WorldWideScience

Sample records for polarising optical microscopy

  1. POLARISATION PRESERVING OPTICAL FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    . This cladding structure provides polarisation preserving properties to the optical fibre. Optical fibres using this technology may have claddings with elements placed non-periodically as well as in a two-dimensional periodic lattice - such as cladding providing Photonic Band Gap (PBG) effects....

  2. Polarisation-sensitive optical elements in azobenzene polyesters and peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Berg, Rolf Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we describe fabrication of polarisation holographic optical elements in azobenzene polyesters. Both liquid crystalline and amorphous side-chain polyesters have been utilised. Diffractive optical elements such as lenses and gratings that are sensitive to the polarisation...... of the incident light have been fabricated with polarisation holography. Computer-generated optical elements and patterns have also been written with a single polarised laser beam. Recording of polarisation defects enabling easy visualisation is also shown to be feasible in azobenzene polyesters....

  3. Sensitivity versus polarisation in multilayer optical thin film design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrem K. Ejigu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a polarised optical filter is more complicated than that of a filter where the polarisation effect does not exist (at a normal angle of incidence. An error in the optical parameters, such as the physical thickness or refractive index of a layer, results in a change in the spectral performance of the multilayer structure. The correlation between error sensitivity and the polarisation effect of light in structures designed at an oblique angle was investigated. To illustrate the correlation, a perpendicular (S and parallel (P polarised beam splitter, at 0.9818 µm central wavelength, designed by genetic algorithm, was used. The beam splitter changes its state of polarisation according to the error in thickness simultaneously induced in each of the layers. The error was calculated by optimising the original design. The observation of the change of the state of polarisation as a result of error sensitivity leads to a different method of designing pure S-polarised or P-polarised optical filters.

  4. OPTICAL FIBRES AND FIBREOPTIC SENSORS: Polarisation reflectometry of anisotropic optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Yurii A.; Kryukov, Igor'I.; Pervadchuk, Vladimir P.; Toroshin, Andrei Yu

    2009-11-01

    Anisotropic, polarisation-maintaining fibres have been studied using a reflectometer and integrated optic polariser. Linearly polarised pulses were launched into the fibre under test at different angles between their plane of polarisation and the main optical axis of the fibre. A special procedure for the correlation analysis of these reflectograms is developed to enhance the reliability of the information about the longitudinal optical uniformity ofanisotropic fibres.

  5. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Plenio, Martin B; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Luy, Burkhard; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13 C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13 C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13 C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis. (paper)

  6. Polarisation in the auroral red line during coordinated EISCAT Svalbard Radar/optical experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barthélémy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The polarisation of the atomic oxygen red line in the Earth's thermosphere is observed in different configurations with respect to the magnetic field line at high latitude during several coordinated Incoherent Scatter radar/optical experiment campaigns. When pointing northward with a line-of-sight nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field, we show that, as expected, the polarisation is due to precipitated electrons with characteristic energies of a few hundreds of electron Volts. When pointing toward the zenith or southward with a line-of-sight more parallel to the magnetic field, we show that the polarisation practically disappears. This confirms experimentally the predictions deduced from the recent discovery of the red line polarisation. We show that the polarisation direction is parallel to the magnetic field line during geomagnetic activity intensification and that these results are in agreement with theoretical work.

  7. A morphological study of the sulfurisation of digenite to covellite using reflected polarised light microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask Møller Frøkiær, Heidi; Warner, Terence E.

    2017-01-01

    A series of copper rods were reacted with sulfur vapour in evacuated glass ampoules at ∼445 °C. Product materials were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction and reflected polarised light microscopy. Copper sulfurised rapidly to digenite, γ-Cu2-xS, under these conditions, whereas the subsequen...... of the covellite structure. Sulfurising a coil of copper wire at ∼445 °C is an effective method for synthesising covellite.......A series of copper rods were reacted with sulfur vapour in evacuated glass ampoules at ∼445 °C. Product materials were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction and reflected polarised light microscopy. Copper sulfurised rapidly to digenite, γ-Cu2-xS, under these conditions, whereas the subsequent...... − besides being a p-type metal − is ionically conducting at 445 °C, although considerably less so than digenite. We infer that the growth of platy covellite crystals and their radial alignment in the primary CuS layer are a consequence of copper ion mobility being restricted to the basal plane...

  8. Polarised two-photon excitation of quantum well excitons for manipulation of optically pumped terahertz lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavcheva, G., E-mail: gsk23@bath.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kavokin, A.V., E-mail: A.Kavokin@soton.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Spin Optics Laboratory, St. Petersburg State University, 1, Ulyanovskaya 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Optical pumping of excited exciton states in a semiconductor quantum well embedded in a microcavity is a tool for realisation of ultra-compact terahertz (THz) lasers based on stimulated optical transition between excited (2p) and ground (1s) exciton state. We show that the probability of two-photon absorption by a 2p-exciton is strongly dependent on the polarisation of both pumping photons. Five-fold variation of the threshold power for terahertz lasing by switching from circular to co-linear pumping is predicted. We identify photon polarisation configurations for achieving maximum THz photon generation quantum efficiency.

  9. Evidence from optical polarisation for a galactic-scale uniform magnetic field in M104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarrott, S.M.; White, C.; Pallister, W.S.; Solinger, A.B.

    1977-01-01

    A map is presented of the linear optical polarisation of the Sombrero Galaxy (M104) that gives clear evidence for the existence of a magnetic field that maintains the same projected direction over an estimated volume of some 10 3 kpc 3 . Detailed knowledge of the polarisation pattern in a nebula is stated to be a powerful tool for further understanding of a nebula. The observations described were made with the 1 m telescope of the Wise Observatory, Israel, during May 1976 using the B waveband of the UBV system, together with a polarimeter and a 4 cm electronographic camera. Measurements were made at 1000 points within the galaxy. The map is superimposed on a photograph of M104, and its main features are described. It is stated that there is little doubt that the observed polarisation pattern was due to the scattering and extinction of light by statistically aligned dust grains. The alignment of the grains is most probably due to magnetic effects, and unless some unexpected mechanism is occurring the grains must be magnetically aligned. The findings are discussed. It is stated that the fact that scattering from aligned grains is occurring makes M104 a likely candidate for the observation of circular polarisation, and such an observation would tend to confirm the interpretation of the linear polarisation. It seems that the observations are concerned with the most extensive homogeneous magnetic field so far observed and it is tempting to speculate that it may be primordial in origin. (U.K.)

  10. Statistical properties of intensity of partially polarised semiconductor laser light backscattered by a single-mode optical fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A E; Potapov, V T; Gorshkov, B G

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of studying statistical properties of the intensity of partially polarised coherent light backscattered by a single mode optical fibre. An expression is derived for the deviation of the backscattered light intensity depending on the scattering region length, the degree of the light source coherence and the degree of scattered light polarisation. It is shown that the backscattered light in a fibre scattered-light interferometer is partially polarised with the polarisation degree P = 1/3 in the case of external perturbations of the interferometer fibre. (scattering of light)

  11. The Ringo2 Optical Polarisation Catalogue of 13 High-Energy Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barres de Almeida, Ulisses; Jermak, Helen; Mundell, Carole; Lindfors, Elina; Nilsson, Kari; Steele, Iain

    2015-08-01

    We present the findings of the Ringo2 3-year survey of 13 blazars (3 FSRQs and 10 BL Lacs) with regular coverage and reasonably fast cadence of one to three observations a week. Ringo2 was installed on the Liverpool Robotic Telescope (LT) on the Canary Island of La Palma between 2009 and 2012 and monitored thirteen high-energy-emitting blazars in the northern sky. The objects selected as well as the observational strategy were tuned to maximise the synergies with high-energy X- to gamma-ray observations. Therefore this sample stands out as a well-sampled, long-term view of high-energy AGN jets in polarised optical light. Over half of the sources exhibited an increase in optical flux during this period and almost a quarter were observed in outburst. We compare the optical data to gamma (Fermi/LAT) and X-ray data during these periods of outburst. In this talk we present the data obtained for all sources over the lifetime of Ringo2 with additional optical data from the KVA telescope and the SkyCamZ wide-field camera (on the LT), we explore the relationship between the change in polarisation angle as a function of time (dEVPA/dMJD), flux and polarisation degree along with cross correlation comparisons of optical and high-energy flux.

  12. Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianquan; Ma, Hongqiang; Liu, Yang

    2017-07-05

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy, a class of optical microscopy techniques at a spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, has revolutionized the way we study biology, as recognized by the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), a widely used SR technique, is based on the principle of single molecule localization. STORM routinely achieves a spatial resolution of 20 to 30 nm, a ten-fold improvement compared to conventional optical microscopy. Among all SR techniques, STORM offers a high spatial resolution with simple optical instrumentation and standard organic fluorescent dyes, but it is also prone to image artifacts and degraded image resolution due to improper sample preparation or imaging conditions. It requires careful optimization of all three aspects-sample preparation, image acquisition, and image reconstruction-to ensure a high-quality STORM image, which will be extensively discussed in this unit. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  14. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  15. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically tunneling current

  16. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  17. Single spin stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Waldherr, Gerald; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate precision addressing of single quantum emitters by combined optical microscopy and spin resonance techniques. To this end we utilize nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond confined within a few ten nanometers as individually resolvable quantum systems. By developing a stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique for NV centers we are able to simultaneously perform sub diffraction-limit imaging and optically detected spin resonance (ODMR)...

  18. Transmission electron and optical microscopy of the domain structure of Ni3B7O13Br ferroic boracite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos-Guzman, A.G.; Trujillo-Torrez, M.; Czank, M.

    2005-01-01

    The study investigated the domain structure of nickel bromine boracite single crystals, by means of polarised-light in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of Ni 3 B 7 O 13 Br were grown by chemical transport reactions in closed quartz ampoules, in the temperature range of 1130 K and were examined by polarising optical microscopy (PLM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PLM was also used in order to study the behaviour of birefringence as a function of temperature. For TEM the single crystals were crushed and mounted on holey carbon films. Comparative electron microscope images were useful for revealing the domain structure of this fully ferroelectric/fully ferroelastic material previously observed between the crossed polars of an optical microscope. X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystal under study was performed at room temperature

  19. Optically sectioned imaging by oblique plane microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Lin, Ziduo; Lyon, Alex R.; MacLeod, Ken T.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Oblique Plane Microscopy (OPM) is a light sheet microscopy technique that combines oblique illumination with correction optics that tilt the focal plane of the collection system. OPM can be used to image conventionally mounted specimens on coverslips or tissue culture dishes and has low out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity. No moving parts are required to achieve an optically sectioned image and so high speed optically sectioned imaging is possible. The first OPM results obtained using a high NA water immersion lens on a commercially available inverted microscope frame are presented, together with a measurement of the achievable optical resolution.

  20. Structure of polypropylene/polyethylene blends assessed by polarised PA-FTIR spectroscopy, polarised FT Raman spectroscopy and confocal Raman microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Pavel; Dybal, Jiří; Ščudla, Jaroslav; Raab, Miroslav; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Eichhorn, K. J.; López-Quintana, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 184, - (2002), s. 107-122 ISSN 1022-1360. [European Symposium on Polymer Spectroscopy /14./. Dresden, 02.09.2001-05.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/97/1071; GA ČR GA203/97/0539; GA AV ČR KSK4050111; GA AV ČR IAA4050904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polypropylene/polyethylene blends * polarized photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopy * confocal Raman microscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2002

  1. Microscopic study of dental hard tissues in primary teeth with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II: Correlation of 3D imaging using X-ray microtomography and polarising microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Graham R; Fearne, Janice M; Sabel, Nina; Norén, Jörgen G

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the histological appearance of dental hard tissues in primary teeth from children with DI using conventional polarised light microscopy and correlate that with 3D imaging using X-ray microtomograpy (XMT) to gain a further understanding of the dentine structure of teeth diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta. Undecalcified sections of primary teeth from patients diagnosed with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II were examined using polarised light microscopy. XMT was employed for 3D-imaging and analysis of the dentine. The polarised light microscopy and XMT revealed tubular structures in the dentine seen as vacuoles coinciding with the path of normal dentinal tubules but not continuous tubules. The size of the tubules was close to that of capillaries. The largest tubular structures had a direction corresponding to where the pulp tissue would have been located during primary dentine formation. The dysfunctional mineralisation of the dentine and obliteration of the pulp evidently leaves blood vessels in the dentine which have in the main been tied off and, in the undecalcified sections, appear as vacuoles. Although from radiographs, the pulp in teeth affected by Dentinogenesis Imperfect type II appears to be completely obliterated, a network of interconnected vessels may remain. The presence of large dentinal tubules and blood vessels, or the remnants of blood vessels, could provide a pathway for bacteria from the oral cavity. This might account for why some of these teeth develop periapical abscesses in spite of apparently having no pulp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving the efficiency of optical coherence tomography by using the non-ideal behaviour of a polarising beam splitter

    KAUST Repository

    Lippok, Norman

    2011-03-30

    We present a new way of improving the efficiency of optical coherence tomography by using the polarisation crosstalk of a polarizing beam splitter to direct most of the available source optical power to the sample. The use of a quarter wave plate in both the reference and the sample arms allows most of the sample power to be directed to the detector while adjusting the reference arm to ensure noise optimised operation. As a result, the sensitivity of such a system can be improved by 6 dB, or alternatively the acquisition time can be improved by a factor of 4 for shot noise limited performance,compared to a traditional OCT configuration using a 50/50 beam splitter. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  3. Polarisation confirmed

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    The polarisation of photons emitted in the decay of a bottom quark into a strange quark, as predicted by the Standard Model, has just been observed for the first time by the LHCb collaboration. More detailed research is still required to determine the value of this polarisation with precision.   In this LHCb event, K, π and γ are emitted from a B+ → K+π-π+γ decay. This was investigated by the LHCb collaboration in order to study the photon (γ) polarisation.   If we imagine that photons are like little spinning tops which spin around an axis aligned with their direction of propagation, we can identify two types of photons. Those that are “right-handed” turn in the same direction as a corkscrew, and those that are “left-handed” turn in the opposite direction. If for a large number of decays of a given type we can observe an imbalance between the production of right-han...

  4. Thermal neutron polarisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satya Murthy, N.S.; Madhava Rao, L.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle for the production of polarised thermal neutrons is discussed and the choice of various crystal monochromators surveyed. Brief mention of broad-spectrum polarisers is made. The application of polarised neutrons to the study of magnetisation density distributions in magnetic crystals, the dynamic concept of polarisation, principle and use of polarisation analysis, the neutron spin-echo technique are discussed. (author)

  5. Single-spin stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Waldherr, Gerald; Neumann, Philipp; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-10-14

    We experimentally demonstrate precision addressing of single-quantum emitters by combined optical microscopy and spin resonance techniques. To this end, we use nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond confined within a few ten nanometers as individually resolvable quantum systems. By developing a stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique for NV centers, we are able to simultaneously perform sub-diffraction-limit imaging and optically detected spin resonance (ODMR) measurements on NV spins. This allows the assignment of spin resonance spectra to individual NV center locations with nanometer-scale resolution and thus further improves spatial discrimination. For example, we resolved formerly indistinguishable emitters by their spectra. Furthermore, ODMR spectra contain metrology information allowing for sub-diffraction-limit sensing of, for instance, magnetic or electric fields with inherently parallel data acquisition. As an example, we have detected nuclear spins with nanometer-scale precision. Finally, we give prospects of how this technique can evolve into a fully parallel quantum sensor for nanometer resolution imaging of delocalized quantum correlations.

  6. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  7. Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Vobornik

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available An average human eye can see details down to 0,07 mm in size. The ability to see smaller details of the matter is correlated with the development of the science and the comprehension of the nature. Today’s science needs eyes for the nano-world. Examples are easily found in biology and medical sciences. There is a great need to determine shape, size, chemical composition, molecular structure and dynamic properties of nano-structures. To do this, microscopes with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution are required. Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM is a new step in the evolution of microscopy. The conventional, lens-based microscopes have their resolution limited by diffraction. SNOM is not subject to this limitation and can offer up to 70 times better resolution.

  8. Scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, Dusan; Vobornik, Slavenka

    2008-02-01

    An average human eye can see details down to 0,07 mm in size. The ability to see smaller details of the matter is correlated with the development of the science and the comprehension of the nature. Today's science needs eyes for the nano-world. Examples are easily found in biology and medical sciences. There is a great need to determine shape, size, chemical composition, molecular structure and dynamic properties of nano-structures. To do this, microscopes with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution are required. Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM) is a new step in the evolution of microscopy. The conventional, lens-based microscopes have their resolution limited by diffraction. SNOM is not subject to this limitation and can offer up to 70 times better resolution.

  9. Comparison of rigorous modelling of different structure profiles on photomasks for quantitative linewidth measurements by means of UV- or DUV-optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Gerd; Bodermann, Bernd; Woehler, Martin

    2007-06-01

    The optical microscopy is an important instrument for dimensional characterisation or calibration of micro- and nanostructures, e.g. chrome structures on photomasks. In comparison to scanning electron microscopy (possible contamination of the sample) and atomic force microscopy (slow, risk of damage) optical microscopy is a fast and non destructive metrology method. The precise quantitative determination of the linewidth from the microscope image is, however, only possible by knowledge of the geometry of the structures and their consideration in the optical modelling. We compared two different rigorous model approaches, the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and the Finite Elements Method (FEM) for modelling of structures with different edge angles, linewidths, line to space ratios and polarisations. The RCWA method can adapt inclined edges profiles only by a staircase approximation leading to increased modelling errors of the RCWA method. Even today's sophisticated rigorous methods still show problems with TM-polarisation. Therefore both rigorous methods are compared in terms of their convergence for TE and TM- polarisation. Beyond that also the influence of typical illumination wavelengths (365 nm, 248 nm and 193 nm) on the microscope images and their contribution to the measuring uncertainty budget will be discussed.

  10. Radiography with polarised neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael L.

    2010-08-20

    In this thesis I present a new technique for the spatially resolved investigation of the magnetic properties of bulk samples. Standard one dimensional neutron depolarisation analysis is combined with neutron radiography to a method we call Neutron Depolarisation Imaging (NDI). The experimental setup which was installed at the neutron radiography beam line ANTARES at FRM II consists of a double crystal monochromator, neutron polariser, spin flipper, polarisation analyser and a position sensitive CCD detector. A comprehensive discussion of the requirements for these components is given and the limitations of the method are shown. The maximum spatial resolution which can be achieved with a neutron radiography setup is determined by the collimation of the neutron beam and the distance between sample and detector. Different types of polarisers have been tested and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A double crystal monochromator and a new type of polariser employing polarising neutron supermirrors based on the principle of an optical periscope were developed and tested during this work. Furthermore, NDI measurements on various samples of the weakly ferromagnetic materials Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al are presented. Neutron depolarisation radiography and tomography measurements were conducted with a spatial resolution as high as 0.3 mm on Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al samples. The feasibility of NDI experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 kbar was shown on a sample of Ni{sub 3}Al using a modified Cu:Be clamp cell. A decrease of the ordering temperature by 2 K under hydrostatic pressure was determined from the NDI measurements and shows the potential of the method for further high pressure experiments. Additionally a method was developed which in principle allows to obtain the intrinsic dependence of the ordering temperature T{sub C} on the ordered moment Ms from NDI measurements on inhomogeneous samples containing regions with

  11. Radiography with polarised neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I present a new technique for the spatially resolved investigation of the magnetic properties of bulk samples. Standard one dimensional neutron depolarisation analysis is combined with neutron radiography to a method we call Neutron Depolarisation Imaging (NDI). The experimental setup which was installed at the neutron radiography beam line ANTARES at FRM II consists of a double crystal monochromator, neutron polariser, spin flipper, polarisation analyser and a position sensitive CCD detector. A comprehensive discussion of the requirements for these components is given and the limitations of the method are shown. The maximum spatial resolution which can be achieved with a neutron radiography setup is determined by the collimation of the neutron beam and the distance between sample and detector. Different types of polarisers have been tested and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A double crystal monochromator and a new type of polariser employing polarising neutron supermirrors based on the principle of an optical periscope were developed and tested during this work. Furthermore, NDI measurements on various samples of the weakly ferromagnetic materials Pd 1-x Ni x and Ni 3 Al are presented. Neutron depolarisation radiography and tomography measurements were conducted with a spatial resolution as high as 0.3 mm on Pd 1-x Ni x and Ni 3 Al samples. The feasibility of NDI experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 kbar was shown on a sample of Ni 3 Al using a modified Cu:Be clamp cell. A decrease of the ordering temperature by 2 K under hydrostatic pressure was determined from the NDI measurements and shows the potential of the method for further high pressure experiments. Additionally a method was developed which in principle allows to obtain the intrinsic dependence of the ordering temperature T C on the ordered moment Ms from NDI measurements on inhomogeneous samples containing regions with different ordering temperatures. This

  12. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  13. Portable fiber-optic taper coupled optical microscopy platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Yu, Yan; Huang, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    The optical fiber taper coupled with CMOS has advantages of high sensitivity, compact structure and low distortion in the imaging platform. So it is widely used in low light, high speed and X-ray imaging systems. In the meanwhile, the peculiarity of the coupled structure can meet the needs of the demand in microscopy imaging. Toward this end, we developed a microscopic imaging platform based on the coupling of cellphone camera module and fiber optic taper for the measurement of the human blood samples and ascaris lumbricoides. The platform, weighing 70 grams, is based on the existing camera module of the smartphone and a fiber-optic array which providing a magnification factor of 6x.The top facet of the taper, on which samples are placed, serves as an irregular sampling grid for contact imaging. The magnified images of the sample, located on the bottom facet of the fiber, are then projected onto the CMOS sensor. This paper introduces the portable medical imaging system based on the optical fiber coupling with CMOS, and theoretically analyzes the feasibility of the system. The image data and process results either can be stored on the memory or transmitted to the remote medical institutions for the telemedicine. We validate the performance of this cell-phone based microscopy platform using human blood samples and test target, achieving comparable results to a standard bench-top microscope.

  14. Full optical model of micro-endoscope with optical coherence microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and visible capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Kiekens, Kelli C.; Syson, Nikolas C.; Romano, Gabriella; Baker, Tressa; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    While Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), Multiphoton Microscopy (MPM), and narrowband imaging are powerful imaging techniques that can be used to detect cancer, each imaging technique has limitations when used by itself. Combining them into an endoscope to work in synergy can help achieve high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis at the point of care. Such complex endoscopes have an elevated risk of failure, and performing proper modelling ensures functionality and minimizes risk. We present full 2D and 3D models of a multimodality optical micro-endoscope to provide real-time detection of carcinomas, called a salpingoscope. The models evaluate the endoscope illumination and light collection capabilities of various modalities. The design features two optical paths with different numerical apertures (NA) through a single lens system with a scanning optical fiber. The dual path is achieved using dichroic coatings embedded in a triplet. A high NA optical path is designed to perform OCM and MPM while a low NA optical path is designed for the visible spectrum to navigate the endoscope to areas of interest and narrowband imaging. Different tests such as the reflectance profile of homogeneous epithelial tissue were performed to adjust the models properly. Light collection models for the different modalities were created and tested for efficiency. While it is challenging to evaluate the efficiency of multimodality endoscopes, the models ensure that the system is design for the expected light collection levels to provide detectable signal to work for the intended imaging.

  15. Through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) with adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Gyunam; Jeong, Junhee; Park, Chris

    2018-03-01

    Through-focus optical microscopy (TSOM) with nanometer-scale lateral and vertical sensitivity levels matching those of scanning electron microscopy has been demonstrated to be useful both for 3D inspections and metrology assessments. In 2014, funded by two private companies (Nextin/Samsung Electronics) and the Korea Evaluation Institute of Industrial Technology (KEIT), a research team from four universities in South Korea set out to investigate core technologies for developing in-line TSOM inspection and metrology tools, with the respective teams focusing on optics implementation, defect inspection, computer simulation and high-speed metrology matching. We initially confirmed the reported validity of the TSOM operation through a computer simulation, after which we implemented the TSOM operation by throughfocus scanning of existing UV (355nm) and IR (800nm) inspection tools. These tools have an identical sampling distance of 150 nm but have different resolving distances (310 and 810 nm, respectively). We initially experienced some improvement in the defect inspection sensitivity level over TSV (through-silicon via) samples with 6.6 μm diameters. However, during the experiment, we noted sensitivity and instability issues when attempting to acquire TSOM images. As TSOM 3D information is indirectly extracted by differentiating a target TSOM image from reference TSOM images, any instability or mismatch in imaging conditions can result in measurement errors. As a remedy to such a situation, we proposed the application of adaptive optics to the TSOM operation and developed a closed-loop system with a tip/tilt mirror and a Shack-Hartmann sensor on an optical bench. We were able to keep the plane position within in RMS 0.4 pixel by actively compensating for any position instability which arose during the TSOM scanning process along the optical axis. Currently, we are also developing another TSOM tool with a deformable mirror instead of a tip/tilt mirror, in which case we

  16. Biological applications of near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, Marco H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, Alain; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) is a true optical microscopic technique allowing fluorescence, absorption, reflection and polarization contrast with the additional advantage of nanometer lateral resolution, unlimited by diffraction and operation at ambient conditions. NSOM based on

  17. Static nuclear polarisation and polarised targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeringa, W.

    1984-12-01

    Recent progress and status of statically polarised nuclear targets are reviewed. Special attention is given to polarised 1 H and 3 He. An important quantity in the determination of the target polarisation is the thermal gradient over the target sample. The dependence of this gradient on heat input, sample geometry, and thermal conductivity of the sample is discussed. Possibilities of performing experiments with proton beams are indicated. (orig.) [de

  18. The Interference of Polarised Light

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    the optics of crystals with C V Raman at the Raman Research. Institute (RRI) in ... trate this contribution by means of specific examples, which ... applied to astronomy. The role ... The study of the effect of polarisation states of the two beams on.

  19. High-speed atomic force microscopy combined with inverted optical microscopy for studying cellular events.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yuki; Sakai, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Aiko; Uekusa, Yoshitsugu; Yagi, Akira; Imaoka, Yuka; Ito, Shuichi; Karaki, Koichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopy (AFM)-optical fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cellular morphologies and events. However, the slow data acquisition rates of the conventional AFM unit of the hybrid system limit the visualization of structural changes during cellular events. Therefore, high-speed AFM units equipped with an optical/fluorescence detection device have been a long-standing wish. Here we describe the implementation of high-speed AFM coupled with an optic...

  20. Social polarisation in Aarhus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Bøggild

    This paper is connected to the phd. project: “Social polarisation in Aarhus” and will discuss the concept of social polarisation and related concepts as poverty, marginalization and social exclusion in developing a research strategy in studying social polarisation in the city....

  1. Subnanometric stabilization of plasmon-enhanced optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Taka-aki; Ichimura, Taro; Kuwahara, Shota; Verma, Prabhat; Kawata, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated subnanometric stabilization of tip-enhanced optical microscopy under ambient condition. Time-dependent thermal drift of a plasmonic metallic tip was optically sensed at subnanometer scale, and was compensated in real-time. In addition, mechanically induced displacement of the tip, which usually occurs when the amount of tip-applied force varies, was also compensated in situ. The stabilization of tip-enhanced optical microscopy enables us to perform long-time and robust measurement without any degradation of optical signal, resulting in true nanometric optical imaging with high reproducibility and high precision. The technique presented is applicable for AFM-based nanoindentation with subnanometric precision. (paper)

  2. Application of super-resolution optical microscopy in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiuhai; Du Jiancong; Huang Qing; Fan Chunhai; Deng Suhui

    2013-01-01

    Background: A noninvasive, real-time far-field optical microscopy is needed to study the dynamic function inside cells and proteins. However, the resolution limit of traditional optical microscope is about 200 nm due to the diffraction limit of light. So, it's hard to directly observe the subcellular structures. Over the past several years of microscopy development, the diffraction limit of fluorescence microscopy has been overcome and its resolution limit is about tens of nanometers. Methods: To overcome the diffraction limit of light, many super-resolution fluoresce microscopes, including stimulated emission of depletion microscopy (STED), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), have been developed. Conclusions: These methods have been applied in cell biology, microbiology and neurobiology, and the technology of super-resolution provides a new insight into the life science. (authors)

  3. Biological applications of novel nonlinear optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Fukui, Kiichi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of newly developed nonlinear optical microscopes namely stimulated parametric emission (SPE) microscope and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope were presented together with their biological applications.

  4. Particles and waves in electron optics and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials, Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contains contributions from leading authorities on the subject matter* Informs and updates all the latest developments in the field of imaging and electron physics* Provides practitioners interested in microscopy, optics, image processing, mathematical morphology, electromagnetic fields, electron, and ion emission with a valuable resource* Features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, and digital image pro...

  5. The use of polarized deuterons beams and the determination of the optical model parameters; Utilisation de faisceaux de deutons polarises et determination des parametres du modele optique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynal, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-06-15

    A general description of beams of polarized particles in nuclear reactions is studied; the various choices necessary to define the polarization parameters are discussed with regard to their consequences. The frequent occurrence of symmetry plane yields a set of relations among these parameters. The range of these parameters is studied in particular for a beam of particles of spin 1 and with a symmetry plane. Nuclear reactions involving two bodies are described in terms of the helicity formalism. With the use of the adopted set of polarization parameters, the polarization of the final state is studied for a given polarization in the initial state. An optical model for deuterons may consist of a scalar term, an L.S potential and tensor potentials built with the distance between the deuteron and the nucleus, its angular momentum or its relative momentum. Calculations have been made with the first two tensor potentials. Many authors have calculated a potential for deuterons starting from the nucleon-nucleus potential. These calculations are redone taking into account both the S and D waves of the deuteron. The various terms of the potential have been calculated with a set of different intrinsic wave functions. The use of a potential not limited to scalar form yields good fits for cross-sections with nuclear radii which are greater than those necessary with a purely central potential. The experimental results obtained at Saclay for the polarization of deuterons elastically scattered by Ca are not compatible with the existence of an important tensor potential; they can be accounted for by an L.S coupling potential independent of the central potential but with very small radii. (author) [French] La description de faisceaux do particules polarisees dans les reactions nucleaires est etudiee de facon generale; les choix necessaires pour definir les parametres de polarisation sont discutes en fonction de leurs consequences. L'existence tres frequente d'un plan de symetrie

  6. Image correction in magneto-optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paturi, P.; Larsen, B.H.; Jacobsen, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    An image-processing procedure that assures correct determination of the magnetic field distribution of magneto-optical images is presented. The method remedies image faults resulting from sources that are proportional to the incident light intensity, such as different types of defects...

  7. Optical Imaging and Microscopy Techniques and Advanced Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Török, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This text on contemporary optical systems is intended for optical researchers and engineers, graduate students and optical microscopists in the biological and biomedical sciences. This second edition contains two completely new chapters. In addition most of the chapters from the first edition have been revised and updated. The book consists of three parts: The first discusses high-aperture optical systems, which form the backbone of optical microscopes. An example is a chapter new in the second edition on the emerging field of high numerical aperture diffractive lenses which seems to have particular promise in improving the correction of lenses. In this part particular attention is paid to optical data storage. The second part is on the use of non-linear optical techniques, including nonlinear optical excitation (total internal reflection fluorescence, second and third harmonic generation and two photon microscopy) and non-linear spectroscopy (CARS). The final part of the book presents miscellaneous technique...

  8. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.; Martins, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate

  9. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A., E-mail: pieter.de-beule@inl.int [Applied Nano-Optics Laboratory, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Martins, Marco [Nano-ICs Group, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  10. In situ SEOP polarised {sup 3}He neutron spin filter for incident beam polarisation and polarisation analysis on neutron scattering instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boag, S., E-mail: s.boag@rl.ac.u [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Babcock, E. [Institut Laue-langevin, 6 rue J. horowitz, BP 156, 38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Juelich Centre for Neutron Science at FRM II, Lichtenbergstrae 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Andersen, K.H.; Becker, M. [Institut Laue-langevin, 6 rue J. horowitz, BP 156, 38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Charlton, T.R. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Chen, W.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Dalgliesh, R.M.; Elmore, S.D.; Frost, C.D. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gentile, T.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Lopez Anton, R. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); ICMA, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Parnell, S.R. [Academic Unit of Radiology, University of Sheffield, S10 2JF (United Kingdom); Petoukhov, A.K. [Institut Laue-langevin, 6 rue J. horowitz, BP 156, 38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Skoda, M.W.A. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Soldner, T. [Institut Laue-langevin, 6 rue J. horowitz, BP 156, 38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the development and characterisation of a new in situ spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) based {sup 3}He neutron spin filter polarisation device. We present results from a recent test of the prototype system developed with the Institut Laue-Langevin. The polariser was installed on the polarised reflectometer CRISP at ISIS in the analyser position. The {sup 3}He was pumped continuously in situ on the beamline. The system also integrated a {sup 3}He adiabatic fast passage spin flipper that allowed reversal of the {sup 3}He and therefore neutron polarisation state, allowing for measurement of all four polarisation cross-sections. The system was run for a number of days reaching a {sup 3}He polarisation of 63%.

  11. Polarisation independent bi-directional four wave mixing for mid span spectral inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Buxens, Alvaro A.; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov

    1999-01-01

    Polarisation independent Four Wave Mixing in a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier used for Mid Span Spectral Inversion (MSSI) is implemented and introduce only 0.9 dB penalty compared to polarisation dependent MSSI. The polarisation dependence in receiver sensitivity is 1 dB.......Polarisation independent Four Wave Mixing in a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier used for Mid Span Spectral Inversion (MSSI) is implemented and introduce only 0.9 dB penalty compared to polarisation dependent MSSI. The polarisation dependence in receiver sensitivity is 1 dB....

  12. Practical guidelines for implementing adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Dean; Pozzi, Paolo; Soloviev, Oleg; Vdovin, Gleb; Verhaegen, Michel

    2018-02-01

    In life sciences, interest in the microscopic imaging of increasingly complex three dimensional samples, such as cell spheroids, zebrafish embryos, and in vivo applications in small animals, is growing quickly. Due to the increasing complexity of samples, more and more life scientists are considering the implementation of adaptive optics in their experimental setups. While several approaches to adaptive optics in microscopy have been reported, it is often difficult and confusing for the microscopist to choose from the array of techniques and equipment. In this poster presentation we offer a small guide to adaptive optics providing general guidelines for successful adaptive optics implementation.

  13. Aberrations and adaptive optics in super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Martin; Andrade, Débora; Burke, Daniel; Patton, Brian; Zurauskas, Mantas

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most powerful tools in the biological investigation of cellular structures and dynamic processes, fluorescence microscopy has undergone extraordinary developments in the past decades. The advent of super-resolution techniques has enabled fluorescence microscopy – or rather nanoscopy – to achieve nanoscale resolution in living specimens and unravelled the interior of cells with unprecedented detail. The methods employed in this expanding field of microscopy, however, are especially prone to the detrimental effects of optical aberrations. In this review, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy techniques based upon single-molecule switching, stimulated emission depletion and structured illumination each suffer from aberrations in different ways that are dependent upon intrinsic technical aspects. We discuss the use of adaptive optics as an effective means to overcome this problem. PMID:26124194

  14. High-speed atomic force microscopy combined with inverted optical microscopy for studying cellular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Sakai, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Aiko; Uekusa, Yoshitsugu; Yagi, Akira; Imaoka, Yuka; Ito, Shuichi; Karaki, Koichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopy (AFM)-optical fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cellular morphologies and events. However, the slow data acquisition rates of the conventional AFM unit of the hybrid system limit the visualization of structural changes during cellular events. Therefore, high-speed AFM units equipped with an optical/fluorescence detection device have been a long-standing wish. Here we describe the implementation of high-speed AFM coupled with an optical fluorescence microscope. This was accomplished by developing a tip-scanning system, instead of a sample-scanning system, which operates on an inverted optical microscope. This novel device enabled the acquisition of high-speed AFM images of morphological changes in individual cells. Using this instrument, we conducted structural studies of living HeLa and 3T3 fibroblast cell surfaces. The improved time resolution allowed us to image dynamic cellular events.

  15. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Shen; Kyu Jang, Sung; Jae Song, Young; Lee, Sungjoo

    2014-01-01

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality

  16. Incorporating Basic Optical Microscopy in the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and versatile approach to incorporating basic optical microscopy in the undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory is described. Attaching a miniature CCD spectrometer to the video port of a standard compound microscope yields a visible microspectrophotometer suitable for student investigations of fundamental spectrometry concepts,…

  17. Assessment of nerve ultrastructure by fibre-optic confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushway, T R; Lanzetta, M; Cox, G; Trickett, R; Owen, E R

    1996-01-01

    Fibre-optic technology combined with confocality produces a microscope capable of optical thin sectioning. In this original study, tibial nerves have been stained in a rat model with a vital dye, 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide, and analysed by fibre-optic confocal microscopy to produce detailed images of nerve ultrastructure. Schwann cells, nodes of Ranvier and longitudinal myelinated sheaths enclosing axons were clearly visible. Single axons appeared as brightly staining longitudinal structures. This allowed easy tracing of multiple signal axons within the nerve tissue. An accurate measurement of internodal lengths was easily accomplished. This technique is comparable to current histological techniques, but does not require biopsy, thin sectioning or tissue fixing. This study offers a standard for further in vivo microscopy, including the possibility of monitoring the progression of nerve regeneration following microsurgical neurorraphy.

  18. Nanometrology using a through-focus scanning optical microscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attota, Ravikiran; Silver, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We present an initial review of a novel through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM pronounced as 'tee-som') imaging method that produces nanometer-dimensional measurement sensitivity using a conventional bright-field optical microscope. In the TSOM method a target is scanned through the focus of an optical microscope, acquiring conventional optical images at different focal positions. The TSOM images are constructed using the through-focus optical images. A TSOM image is unique under given experimental conditions and is sensitive to changes in the dimensions of a target in a distinct way. We use this characteristic for nanoscale-dimensional metrology. This technique can be used to identify the dimension which is changing between two nanosized targets and to determine the dimensions using a library-matching method. This methodology has potential utility for a wide range of target geometries and application areas, including nanometrology, nanomanufacturing, defect analysis, inspection, process control and biotechnology

  19. Nanometric locking of the tight focus for optical microscopy and tip-enhanced microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayazawa, N; Furusawa, K; Kawata, S

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully stabilized the tight focus onto the sample surface of an optical microscope within ±1.0 nm for a virtually unlimited time duration. The time-dependent thermal drift of the tight focus and the mechanical tilt of the sample surface were simultaneously sensed by a non-optical means based on a capacitive sensor and were compensated for in real-time. This non-optical scheme is promising for the suppression of background light sources for optical microscopy. The focus stabilization is crucial for microscopic measurement at an interface, particularly when scanning a large surface area, because there is always a certain amount of mechanical tilt of the sample substrate, which degrades the contrast of the image. When imaging nanoscopic materials such as carbon nanotubes or silicon nanowires, more stringent nanometric stabilization of the focus position relative to such samples is required, otherwise it is often difficult to interpret the results from the observations. Moreover, the smaller the sample volume is, the smaller the signal becomes, resulting in a long exposure time at each position. In this sense, long-term stability of the tight focus is essential for both microscopic large area scanning and nanosized sample scanning (high-resolution/large-area imaging). In addition, the recently developed tip-enhanced microscopy requires long-term stability of the relative position of the tip, sample and focus position. We were able to successfully demonstrate a stability improvement for tip-enhanced microscopy in the same manner. The stabilization of the tight focus enables us to perform long-term and robust measurements without any degradation of optical signal, resulting in the capability of true nanometric optical imaging with good reproducibility and high precision. The technique presented is a simple add-on for any kind of optical microscope. (paper)

  20. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving the efficiency of optical coherence tomography by using the non-ideal behaviour of a polarising beam splitter

    KAUST Repository

    Lippok, Norman; Nielsen, Poul; Vanholsbeeck, Fré dé rique

    2011-01-01

    B, or alternatively the acquisition time can be improved by a factor of 4 for shot noise limited performance,compared to a traditional OCT configuration using a 50/50 beam splitter. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  2. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy by stepwise optical saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yide; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Vigil, Genevieve D.; Khan, Aamir A.; Mason, Devon E.; Boerckel, Joel D.; Roeder, Ryan K.; Howard, Scott S.

    2018-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is an important tool in biomedical research for its ability to discern features smaller than the diffraction limit. However, due to its difficult implementation and high cost, the super-resolution microscopy is not feasible in many applications. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a saturation-based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique that can be easily implemented and requires neither additional hardware nor complex post-processing. The method is based on the principle of stepwise optical saturation (SOS), where M steps of raw fluorescence images are linearly combined to generate an image with a M-fold increase in resolution compared with conventional diffraction-limited images. For example, linearly combining (scaling and subtracting) two images obtained at regular powers extends the resolution by a factor of 1.4 beyond the diffraction limit. The resolution improvement in SOS microscopy is theoretically infinite but practically is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio. We perform simulations and experimentally demonstrate super-resolution microscopy with both one-photon (confocal) and multiphoton excitation fluorescence. We show that with the multiphoton modality, the SOS microscopy can provide super-resolution imaging deep in scattering samples. PMID:29675306

  3. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  4. X-ray diffraction microscopy based on refractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis; Jakobsen, A. C.; Simons, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    A formalism is presented for dark‐field X‐ray microscopy using refractive optics. The new technique can produce three‐dimensional maps of lattice orientation and axial strain within millimetre‐sized sampling volumes and is particularly suited to in situ studies of materials at hard X‐ray energies....... An objective lens in the diffracted beam magnifies the image and acts as a very efficient filter in reciprocal space, enabling the imaging of individual domains of interest with a resolution of 100 nm. Analytical expressions for optical parameters such as numerical aperture, vignetting, and the resolution...

  5. Cytology 3D structure formation based on optical microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Shabalova, I. P.; Djangirova, T. V.; Zaitsev, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The article the article is devoted to optimization of the parameters of imaging of biological preparations in optical microscopy using a multispectral camera in visible range of electromagnetic radiation. A model for the image forming of virtual preparations was proposed. The optimum number of layers was determined for the object scan in depth and holistic perception of its switching according to the results of the experiment.

  6. Cytology 3D structure formation based on optical microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronichev, A N; Polyakov, E V; Zaitsev, S M; Shabalova, I P; Djangirova, T V

    2017-01-01

    The article the article is devoted to optimization of the parameters of imaging of biological preparations in optical microscopy using a multispectral camera in visible range of electromagnetic radiation. A model for the image forming of virtual preparations was proposed. The optimum number of layers was determined for the object scan in depth and holistic perception of its switching according to the results of the experiment. (paper)

  7. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of poled silica waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Arentoft, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy (SHSOM) is performed on electric-field poled silica-based waveguides. Two operation modes of SHSOM are considered. Oblique transmission reflection and normal reflection modes are used to image the spatial distribution of nonlinear susceptibilities...... and limitations of the two operation modes when used for SHSOM studies of poled silica-based waveguides are discussed. The influence of surface defects on the resulting second-harmonic images is also considered. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Optical microscope illumination analysis using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Park, Haesung

    2017-06-15

    Misalignment of the aperture diaphragm present in optical microscopes results in angular illumination asymmetry (ANILAS) at the sample plane. Here we show that through-focus propagation of ANILAS results in a lateral image shift with a focus position. This could lead to substantial errors in quantitative results for optical methods that use through-focus images such as three-dimensional nanoparticle tracking, confocal microscopy, and through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM). A correlation exists between ANILAS and the slant in TSOM images. Hence, the slant in the TSOM image can be used to detect, analyze, and rectify the presence of ANILAS.

  9. Biological applications of near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moers, Marco H. P.; Ruiter, A. G. T.; Jalocha, Alain; van Hulst, Niko F.; Kalle, W. H. J.; Wiegant, J. C. A. G.; Raap, A. K.

    1995-09-01

    Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) is a true optical microscopic technique allowing fluorescence, absorption, reflection and polarization contrast with the additional advantage of nanometer lateral resolution, unlimited by diffraction and operation at ambient conditions. NSOM based on metal coated adiabatically tapered fibers, combined with shear force feedback and operated in illumination mode, has proven to be the most powerful NSOM arrangement, because of its true localization of the optical interaction, its various optical contrast possibilities and its sensitivity down to the single molecular level. In this paper applications of `aperture' NSOM to Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization of human metaphase chromosomes are presented, where the localized fluorescence allows to identify specific DNA sequences. All images are accompanied by the simultaneously acquired force image, enabling direct comparison of the optical contrast with the sample topography on nanometer scale, far beyond the diffraction limit. Thus the unique combination of high resolution, specific optical contrast and ambient operation offers many new direction possibilities in biological studies.

  10. Polarisation effects in fibre lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J.T.; Morkel, P.R.; Reekie, L.; Payne, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    Two orthogonal polarisation eigenmodes have been observed in a single-mode fibre laser. Experimental investigation shows good agreement with theoretical analysis. Both Nd3+ and Er3+-doped single-polarisation single-mode fibre lasers have been demonstrated

  11. Proximal design for a multimodality endoscope with multiphoton microscopy, optical coherence microscopy and visual modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekens, Kelli C.; Talarico, Olivia; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    A multimodality endoscope system has been designed for early detection of ovarian cancer. Multiple illumination and detection systems must be integrated in a compact, stable, transportable configuration to meet the requirements of a clinical setting. The proximal configuration presented here supports visible light navigation with a large field of view and low resolution, high resolution multiphoton microscopy (MPM), and high resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM). All modalities are integrated into a single optical system in the endoscope. The system requires two light sources: a green laser for visible light navigation and a compact fiber based femtosecond laser for MPM and OCM. Using an inline wavelength division multiplexer, the two sources are combined into a single mode fiber. To accomplish OCM, a fiber coupler is used to separate the femtosecond laser into a reference arm and signal arm. The reflected reference arm and the signal from the sample are interfered and wavelength separated by a reflection grating and detected using a linear array. The MPM signal is collimated and goes through a series of filters to separate the 2nd and 3rd harmonics as well as twophoton excitation florescence (2PEF) and 3PEF. Each signal is independently detected on a photo multiplier tube and amplified. The visible light is collected by multiple high numerical aperture fibers at the endoscope tip which are bundled into one SMA adapter at the proximal end and connected to a photodetector. This integrated system design is compact, efficient and meets both optical and mechanical requirements for clinical applications.

  12. Gold nanocone probes for near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeeb, Bastian; Schaefer, Christian; Nill, Peter; Fleischer, Monika; Kern, Dieter P. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy (ANSOM) provides the possibility to collect simultaneously high-resolution topographical and sub-diffraction limited optical information from a surface. When optically excited, the scanning probes act as optical antennae with a strong near-field enhancement near the tip apex. Spatial resolution and optical near-field enhancement depend strongly on the properties and geometry of the scanning probe - in particular on very sharp tip radii. Various possibilities for fabricating good antennae have been pursued. Most commonly, scanning probes consist of electrochemically etched gold wires which are sharp but not well-defined in geometry. We present two different approaches for ultra sharp and well-defined antennae based upon fabricating gold nanocones with a tip radius smaller than 10 nm which can be used in ANSOM. A transfer process is presented that can be used to attach single gold nanocones to non-metallic probes such as sharp glass fiber tips. Alternatively, new processes are presented to fabricate cones directly on pillars of different materials such as silicon or bismuth, which can be applied to cantilever tips for ANSOM scanning applications.

  13. Automated seeding-based nuclei segmentation in nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medyukhina, Anna; Meyer, Tobias; Heuke, Sandro; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy based, e.g., on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) is a fast label-free imaging technique, with a great potential for biomedical applications. However, NLO microscopy as a diagnostic tool is still in its infancy; there is a lack of robust and durable nuclei segmentation methods capable of accurate image processing in cases of variable image contrast, nuclear density, and type of investigated tissue. Nonetheless, such algorithms specifically adapted to NLO microscopy present one prerequisite for the technology to be routinely used, e.g., in pathology or intraoperatively for surgical guidance. In this paper, we compare the applicability of different seeding and boundary detection methods to NLO microscopic images in order to develop an optimal seeding-based approach capable of accurate segmentation of both TPEF and CARS images. Among different methods, the Laplacian of Gaussian filter showed the best accuracy for the seeding of the image, while a modified seeded watershed segmentation was the most accurate in the task of boundary detection. The resulting combination of these methods followed by the verification of the detected nuclei performs high average sensitivity and specificity when applied to various types of NLO microscopy images.

  14. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M.; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM

  15. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  16. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  17. Correlated topographic and spectroscopic imaging by combined atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dehong; Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suh, Y.D.; Lu, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Near-field scanning microscopy is a powerful approach to obtain topographic and spectroscopic characterization simultaneously for imaging biological and nanoscale systems. To achieve optical imaging at high spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, aperture-less metallic scanning tips have been utilized to enhance the laser illumination local electromagnetic field at the apex of the scanning tips. In this paper, we discuss and review our work on combined fluorescence imaging with AFM-metallic tip enhancement, finite element method simulation of the tip enhancement, and their applications on AFM-tip enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) and correlated AFM and FLIM imaging of the living cells

  18. Tunable thin-film optical filters for hyperspectral microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2013-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging was originally developed for use in remote sensing applications. More recently, it has been applied to biological imaging systems, such as fluorescence microscopes. The ability to distinguish molecules based on spectral differences has been especially advantageous for identifying fluorophores in highly autofluorescent tissues. A key component of hyperspectral imaging systems is wavelength filtering. Each filtering technology used for hyperspectral imaging has corresponding advantages and disadvantages. Recently, a new optical filtering technology has been developed that uses multi-layered thin-film optical filters that can be rotated, with respect to incident light, to control the center wavelength of the pass-band. Compared to the majority of tunable filter technologies, these filters have superior optical performance including greater than 90% transmission, steep spectral edges and high out-of-band blocking. Hence, tunable thin-film optical filters present optical characteristics that may make them well-suited for many biological spectral imaging applications. An array of tunable thin-film filters was implemented on an inverted fluorescence microscope (TE 2000, Nikon Instruments) to cover the full visible wavelength range. Images of a previously published model, GFP-expressing endothelial cells in the lung, were acquired using a charge-coupled device camera (Rolera EM-C2, Q-Imaging). This model sample presents fluorescently-labeled cells in a highly autofluorescent environment. Linear unmixing of hyperspectral images indicates that thin-film tunable filters provide equivalent spectral discrimination to our previous acousto-optic tunable filter-based approach, with increased signal-to-noise characteristics. Hence, tunable multi-layered thin film optical filters may provide greatly improved spectral filtering characteristics and therefore enable wider acceptance of hyperspectral widefield microscopy.

  19. Optimal model-based sensorless adaptive optics for epifluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Paolo; Soloviev, Oleg; Wilding, Dean; Vdovin, Gleb; Verhaegen, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We report on a universal sample-independent sensorless adaptive optics method, based on modal optimization of the second moment of the fluorescence emission from a point-like excitation. Our method employs a sample-independent precalibration, performed only once for the particular system, to establish the direct relation between the image quality and the aberration. The method is potentially applicable to any form of microscopy with epifluorescence detection, including the practically important case of incoherent fluorescence emission from a three dimensional object, through minor hardware modifications. We have applied the technique successfully to a widefield epifluorescence microscope and to a multiaperture confocal microscope.

  20. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  1. A robotized six degree of freedom stage for optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramov, M. Z.; Ivanov, I.; Pavlov, V.; Zaharieva, K.

    2013-04-01

    This work represents an investigation of the possibility to use a hexapod system for optical microscopy investigation and measurements. An appropriate hexapod stage has been developed. The stage has been calibrated and used for several different optical microscopy applications. The construction of the stage is based on the classic Stewart platform and thus represents a parallel robot with 6 degree of freedom. Appropriate software is controlling the transformation of the 3 position coordinates of the moving plate and the 3 Euler angles in position velocities and accelerations of the plate motion. An embedded microcontroller is implementing the motion plan and the PID controller regulating the kinematics. By difference to the available in the market hexapods the proposed solution is with lower precision but is significantly cheaper and simple to maintain. The repeatability obtained with current implementation is 0,05 mm and 0,001 rad. A specialized DSP based video processing engine is used for both feedback computation and application specific image processing in real-time. To verify the concept some applications has been developed for specific tasks and has been used for specific measurements.

  2. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of <3%. We also quantified the total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a live mouse. Compared with the conventional amplitude method, the acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed.

  3. Brain plasticity and functionality explored by nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacconi, L.; Allegra, L.; Buffelli, M.; Cesare, P.; D'Angelo, E.; Gandolfi, D.; Grasselli, G.; Lotti, J.; Mapelli, J.; Strata, P.; Pavone, F. S.

    2010-02-01

    In combination with fluorescent protein (XFP) expression techniques, two-photon microscopy has become an indispensable tool to image cortical plasticity in living mice. In parallel to its application in imaging, multi-photon absorption has also been used as a tool for the dissection of single neurites with submicrometric precision without causing any visible collateral damage to the surrounding neuronal structures. In this work, multi-photon nanosurgery is applied to dissect single climbing fibers expressing GFP in the cerebellar cortex. The morphological consequences are then characterized with time lapse 3-dimensional two-photon imaging over a period of minutes to days after the procedure. Preliminary investigations show that the laser induced fiber dissection recalls a regenerative process in the fiber itself over a period of days. These results show the possibility of this innovative technique to investigate regenerative processes in adult brain. In parallel with imaging and manipulation technique, non-linear microscopy offers the opportunity to optically record electrical activity in intact neuronal networks. In this work, we combined the advantages of second-harmonic generation (SHG) with a random access (RA) excitation scheme to realize a new microscope (RASH) capable of optically recording fast membrane potential events occurring in a wide-field of view. The RASH microscope, in combination with bulk loading of tissue with FM4-64 dye, was used to simultaneously record electrical activity from clusters of Purkinje cells in acute cerebellar slices. Complex spikes, both synchronous and asynchronous, were optically recorded simultaneously across a given population of neurons. Spontaneous electrical activity was also monitored simultaneously in pairs of neurons, where action potentials were recorded without averaging across trials. These results show the strength of this technique in describing the temporal dynamics of neuronal assemblies, opening promising

  4. Exploring lipids with nonlinear optical microscopy in multiple biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Garcia, Alba

    Lipids are crucial biomolecules for the well being of humans. Altered lipid metabolism may give rise to a variety of diseases that affect organs from the cardiovascular to the central nervous system. A deeper understanding of lipid metabolic processes would spur medical research towards developing precise diagnostic tools, treatment methods, and preventive strategies for reducing the impact of lipid diseases. Lipid visualization remains a complex task because of the perturbative effect exerted by traditional biochemical assays and most fluorescence markers. Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy enables interrogation of biological samples with minimum disturbance, and is particularly well suited for label-free visualization of lipids, providing chemical specificity without compromising on spatial resolution. Hyperspectral imaging yields large datasets that benefit from tailored multivariate analysis. In this thesis, CRS microscopy was combined with Raman spectroscopy and other label-free nonlinear optical techniques to analyze lipid metabolism in multiple biological systems. We used nonlinear Raman techniques to characterize Meibum secretions in the progression of dry eye disease, where the lipid and protein contributions change in ratio and phase segregation. We employed similar tools to examine lipid droplets in mice livers aboard a spaceflight mission, which lose their retinol content contributing to the onset of nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease. We also focused on atherosclerosis, a disease that revolves around lipid-rich plaques in arterial walls. We examined the lipid content of macrophages, whose variable phenotype gives rise to contrasting healing and inflammatory activities. We also proposed new label-free markers, based on lifetime imaging, for macrophage phenotype, and to detect products of lipid oxidation. Cholesterol was also detected in hepatitis C virus infected cells, and in specific strains of age-related macular degeneration diseased cells by

  5. Adaptive optics stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (AO-STORM) by particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan F; Zhang, Yiwen; Shen, Ping; Kner, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) can achieve resolutions of better than 20nm imaging single fluorescently labeled cells. However, when optical aberrations induced by larger biological samples degrade the point spread function (PSF), the localization accuracy and number of localizations are both reduced, destroying the resolution of STORM. Adaptive optics (AO) can be used to correct the wavefront, restoring the high resolution of STORM. A challenge for AO-STORM microscopy is the development of robust optimization algorithms which can efficiently correct the wavefront from stochastic raw STORM images. Here we present the implementation of a particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach with a Fourier metric for real-time correction of wavefront aberrations during STORM acquisition. We apply our approach to imaging boutons 100 μm deep inside the central nervous system (CNS) of Drosophila melanogaster larvae achieving a resolution of 146 nm.

  6. Quantitative Image Restoration in Bright Field Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Sánchez Miranda, Manuel de Jesús

    2017-11-07

    Bright field (BF) optical microscopy is regarded as a poor method to observe unstained biological samples due to intrinsic low image contrast. We introduce quantitative image restoration in bright field (QRBF), a digital image processing method that restores out-of-focus BF images of unstained cells. Our procedure is based on deconvolution, using a point spread function modeled from theory. By comparing with reference images of bacteria observed in fluorescence, we show that QRBF faithfully recovers shape and enables quantify size of individual cells, even from a single input image. We applied QRBF in a high-throughput image cytometer to assess shape changes in Escherichia coli during hyperosmotic shock, finding size heterogeneity. We demonstrate that QRBF is also applicable to eukaryotic cells (yeast). Altogether, digital restoration emerges as a straightforward alternative to methods designed to generate contrast in BF imaging for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization and improvement of highly inclined optical sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignolini, T.; Curcio, V.; Gardini, L.; Capitanio, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2018-02-01

    Highly Inclined and Laminated Optical sheet (HILO) microscopy is an optical technique that employs a highly inclined laser beam to illuminate the sample with a thin sheet of light that can be scanned through the sample volume1 . HILO is an efficient illumination technique when applied to fluorescence imaging of thick samples owing to the confined illumination volume that allows high contrast imaging while retaining deep scanning capability in a wide-field configuration. The restricted illumination volume is crucial to limit background fluorescence originating from portions of the sample far from the focal plane, especially in applications such as single molecule localization and super-resolution imaging2-4. Despite its widespread use, current literature lacks comprehensive reports of the actual advantages of HILO in these kinds of microscopies. Here, we thoroughly characterize the propagation of a highly inclined beam through fluorescently labeled samples and implement appropriate beam shaping for optimal application to single molecule and super-resolution imaging. We demonstrate that, by reducing the beam size along the refracted axis only, the excitation volume is consequently reduced while maintaining a field of view suitable for single cell imaging. We quantify the enhancement in signal-tobackground ratio with respect to the standard HILO technique and apply our illumination method to dSTORM superresolution imaging of the actin and vimentin cytoskeleton. We define the conditions to achieve localization precisions comparable to state-of-the-art reports, obtain a significant improvement in the image contrast, and enhanced plane selectivity within the sample volume due to the further confinement of the inclined beam.

  8. Investigation of porous asphalt microstructure using optical and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulikakos, L D; Partl, M N

    2010-11-01

    Direct observations of porous asphalt concrete samples in their natural state using optical and electron microscopy techniques led to useful information regarding the microstructure of two mixes and indicated a relationship between microstructure and in situ performance. This paper presents evidence that suboptimal microstructure can lead to premature failure thus making a first step in defining well or suboptimal performing pavements with a bottom-up approach (microstructure). Laboratory and field compaction produce different samples in terms of the microstructure. Laboratory compaction using the gyratory method has produced more microcracks in mineral aggregates after the binder had cooled. Well-performing mixes used polymer-modified binders, had a more homogeneous void structure with fewer elongated voids and better interlocking of the aggregates. Furthermore, well-performing mixes showed better distribution of the mastic and better coverage of the aggregates with bitumen. Low vacuum scanning electron microscopy showed that styrene butadiene styrene polymer modification in binder exists in the form of discontinuous globules and not continuous networks. A reduction in the polymer phase was observed as a result of aging and in-service use. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of optical-fiber nanoprobes for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaidi, N; Chen, Y; Kottler, V; Cambril, E; Mayeux, C; Ronarch, N; Vieu, C

    1998-02-01

    The current scanning near-field optical microscopy has been developed with optical-fiber probes obtained by use of either laser-heated pulling or chemical etching. For high-resolution near-field imaging, the detected signal is rapidly attenuated as the aperture size of the probe decreases. It is thus important to fabricate probes optimized for both spot size and optical transmission. We present a two-step fabrication that allowed us to achieve an improved performance of the optical-fiber probes. Initially, a CO(2) laser-heated pulling was used to produce a parabolic transitional taper ending with a top thin filament. Then, a rapid chemical etching with 50% buffered hydrofluoric acid was used to remove the thin filament and to result in a final conical tip on the top of the parabolic transitional taper. Systematically, we obtained optical-fiber nanoprobes with the apex size as small as 10 nm and the final cone angle varying from 15 degrees to 80 degrees . It was found that the optical transmission efficiency increases rapidly as the taper angle increases from 15 degrees to 50 degrees , but a further increase in the taper angle gives rise to important broadening of the spot size. Finally, the fabricated nanoprobes were used in photon-scanning tunneling microscopy, which allowed observation of etched double lines and grating structures with periods as small as 200 nm.

  10. Polarised infrared cathodoluminescence from platelet defects in natural diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiflawi, I.; Lang, A.R.

    1977-01-01

    It is reported that the large platelet defects occasionally found in natural diamonds emit polarised cathodoluminescence in the near infrared. There is much uncertainty regarding the composition and structure of the platelets. New findings on the optical properties of the platelets are discussed. The discovery that cathodoluminescence from giant platelets can be seen in the near infrared using an image converter was followed up by photographic recording with Kodak high speed infrared films, and it was found that the infrared emission from the platelets is polarised in the platelet plane with a considerably higher polarisation ratio than in the case of their visible emissions. In order to assess the degree of polarisation of the infrared emission a Polaroid Type HR linear polariser was used, which is very effective at the longest wavelengths recorded by the Kodak high speed infrared film. The high degree of polarisation of the platelet infrared emission constitutes a well defined optical characteristic that any model for platelet structure, and for optical processes associated with platelets, must satisfactorily accommodate. (U.K.)

  11. New fluorinated rhodamines for optical microscopy and nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitronova, Gyuzel Yu; Belov, Vladimir N; Bossi, Mariano L; Wurm, Christian A; Meyer, Lars; Medda, Rebecca; Moneron, Gael; Bretschneider, Stefan; Eggeling, Christian; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W

    2010-04-19

    New photostable rhodamine dyes represented by the compounds 1 a-r and 3-5 are proposed as efficient fluorescent markers with unique combination of structural features. Unlike rhodamines with monoalkylated nitrogen atoms, N',N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) derivatives 1 e, 1 i, 1 j, 3-H and 5 were found to undergo sulfonation of the xanthene fragment at the positions 4' and 5'. Two fluorine atoms were introduced into the positions 2' and 7' of the 3',6'-diaminoxanthene fragment in compounds 1 a-d, 1 i-l and 1 m-r. The new rhodamine dyes may be excited with λ=488 or 514 nm light; most of them emit light at λ=512-554 nm (compounds 1 q and 1r at λ=576 and 589 nm in methanol, respectively) and have high fluorescence quantum yields in solution (up to 98 %), relatively long excited-state lifetimes (>3 ns) and are resistant against photobleaching, especially at high laser intensities, as is usually applied in confocal microscopy. Sulfonation of the xanthene fragment with 30 % SO3 in H2SO4 is compatible with the secondary amide bond (rhodamine-CON(Me)CH2CH2COOH) formed with MeNHCH2CH2COOCH3 to providing the sterically unhindered carboxylic group required for further (bio)conjugation reactions. After creating the amino reactive sites, the modified derivatives may be used as fluorescent markers and labels for (bio)molecules in optical microscopy and nanoscopy with very-high light intensities. Further, the new rhodamine dyes are able to pass the plasma membrane of living cells, introducing them as potential labels for recent live-cell-tag approaches. We exemplify the excellent performance of the fluorinated rhodamines in optical microscopy by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy experiments. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Differential Polarization Nonlinear Optical Microscopy with Adaptive Optics Controlled Multiplexed Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginijus Barzda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red, which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures.

  13. A Model of Polarisation Rotations in Blazars from Kink Instabilities in Relativistic Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Nalewajko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple model of polarisation rotation in optically thin relativistic jets of blazars. The model is based on the development of helical (kink mode of current-driven instability. A possible explanation is suggested for the observational connection between polarisation rotations and optical/gamma-ray flares in blazars, if the current-driven modes are triggered by secular increases of the total jet power. The importance of intrinsic depolarisation in limiting the amplitude of coherent polarisation rotations is demonstrated. The polarisation rotation amplitude is thus very sensitive to the viewing angle, which appears to be inconsistent with the observational estimates of viewing angles in blazars showing polarisation rotations. Overall, there are serious obstacles to explaining large-amplitude polarisation rotations in blazars in terms of current-driven kink modes.

  14. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Malaescu, B; Zhang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle–antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e− annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingre...

  15. Large Interstellar Polarisation Survey. II. UV/optical study of cloud-to-cloud variations of dust in the diffuse ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenmorgen, R.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Bagnulo, S.; Cox, N. L. J.; Cami, J.; Peest, C.

    2018-03-01

    It is well known that the dust properties of the diffuse interstellar medium exhibit variations towards different sight-lines on a large scale. We have investigated the variability of the dust characteristics on a small scale, and from cloud-to-cloud. We use low-resolution spectro-polarimetric data obtained in the context of the Large Interstellar Polarisation Survey (LIPS) towards 59 sight-lines in the Southern Hemisphere, and we fit these data using a dust model composed of silicate and carbon particles with sizes from the molecular to the sub-micrometre domain. Large (≥6 nm) silicates of prolate shape account for the observed polarisation. For 32 sight-lines we complement our data set with UVES archive high-resolution spectra, which enable us to establish the presence of single-cloud or multiple-clouds towards individual sight-lines. We find that the majority of these 35 sight-lines intersect two or more clouds, while eight of them are dominated by a single absorbing cloud. We confirm several correlations between extinction and parameters of the Serkowski law with dust parameters, but we also find previously undetected correlations between these parameters that are valid only in single-cloud sight-lines. We find that interstellar polarisation from multiple-clouds is smaller than from single-cloud sight-lines, showing that the presence of a second or more clouds depolarises the incoming radiation. We find large variations of the dust characteristics from cloud-to-cloud. However, when we average a sufficiently large number of clouds in single-cloud or multiple-cloud sight-lines, we always retrieve similar mean dust parameters. The typical dust abundances of the single-cloud cases are [C]/[H] = 92 ppm and [Si]/[H] = 20 ppm.

  16. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy using a MEMS scanning mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Ling, Tao; Wei, Xunbin; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    It has been studied that a potential marker to obtain prognostic information about bladder cancer is tumor neoangiogenesis, which can be quantified by morphometric characteristics such as microvascular density. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can render sensitive three-dimensional (3D) mapping of microvasculature, providing promise to evaluate the neoangiogenesis that is closely related to the diagnosis of bladder cancer. To ensure good image quality, it is desired to acquire bladder PAM images from its inside via the urethra, like conventional cystoscope. Previously, we demonstrated all-optical PAM systems using polymer microring resonators to detect photoacoustic signals and galvanometer mirrors for laser scanning. In this work, we build a miniature PAM system using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, demonstrating a prototype of an endoscopic PAM head capable of high imaging quality of the bladder. The system has high resolutions of 17.5 μm in lateral direction and 19 μm in the axial direction at a distance of 5.4 mm. Images of printed grids and the 3D structure of microvasculature in animal bladders ex vivo by the system are demonstrated.

  17. Observation of self-assembled fluorescent beads by scanning near-field optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Jo, W.; Kim, Min-Gon; Kyu Park, Hyun; Hyun Chung, Bong

    2006-01-01

    Optical response and topography of fluorescent latex beads both on flat self-assembled monolayer and on a micron-patterned surface with poly(dimethylsiloxane) are studied. Scanning near-field optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized together for detecting fluorescence and imaging topography of the patterned latex beads, respectively. As a result, the micro-patterned latex beads where a specific chemical binding occurred show a strong signal, whereas no signals are observed in the case of nonspecific binding. With fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), it is convenient to measure fluorescence signal from the patterned beads allowing us to monitor the small balls of fluorescent latex

  18. Atomic force and scanning near-field optical microscopy study of carbocyanine dye J-aggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokhorov, V.V.; Petrova, M.G.; Kovaleva, Natalia; Demikhov, E.I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2014), s. 700-704 ISSN 1573-4137 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbocyanine dye * elementary fibri * high-resolution atomic force microscopy * J-aggregate * probe microscopy * scanning near-field optical microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2014

  19. Simultaneous characterization of rotational and translational diffusion of optically anisotropic particles by optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Cerbino, Roberto; Haro-Pérez, Catalina

    2016-01-01

    We probe the roto-translational Brownian motion of optically anisotropic particles suspended in water with a simple and straightforward optical microscopy experiment that does not require positional or rotational particle tracking. We acquire a movie of the suspension placed between two polarizing elements and we extract the translational diffusion coefficient D T and the rotational diffusion coefficient D R from the analysis of the temporal correlation properties of the spatial Fourier modes of the intensity fluctuations in the movie. Our method is successfully tested with a dilute suspension of birefringent spherical colloidal particles obtained by polymerizing an emulsion of droplets of liquid crystal in a nematic phase, whose roto-translational dynamics is found to be well described by theory. The simplicity of our approach makes our method a viable alternative to particle tracking and depolarized dynamic light scattering. (paper)

  20. Optimisation-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonello, J.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy is an essential tool for life sciences. Thanks to the development of confocal and multiphoton microscopy, scientists are able to obtain high-resolution 3D views of biological specimens. Nevertheless, spatial variations in the index of refraction within specimens cause aberrations that

  1. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...

  2. Evaluation and Comparison of the Biopathology of Collagen and Inflammation in the Extracellular Matrix of Oral Epithelial Dysplasias and Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia Using Picrosirius Red Stain and Polarising Microscopy: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Soma Susan; Sarojini, Sreenivasan Bargavan; George, Giju Baby; Vinod, Sankar; Mathew, Philips; Babu, Anulekh; Sebastian, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The role of tumour inflammation and the dysplastic epithelial-stromal interactions on the nature of collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of dysplastic epithelium is not fully understood. The present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the inflammation and pathological stromal collagen (loosely packed thin disorganized collagen) present in mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasias with that of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasias. The basement membrane intactness of epithelial dysplasias was also evaluated to determine if dysplastic epithelial mesenchymal interaction has any role in the integrity of stromal collagen in epithelial dysplasia. Oral epithelial dysplasias, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia and normal oral mucosal samples were used for the study. Packing, thickness and orientation of collagen fibres in mild, moderate and severe grades of oral epithelial dysplasias (n = 24), inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (n = 8) and normal oral mucosal samples (n = 8) were analysed based on the polarisation of collagen fibres in picrosirius red polarising stain under polarising microscope. All the grades of epithelial dysplasias showed greenish yellow birefringence confirming the presence of loosely arranged pathological collagen in the presence of moderate inflammation. All the cases of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia showed red polarisation hue and moderate inflammation. A statistically significant difference was found in the packing and orientation of collagen when epithelial dysplasias and inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia were compared (P collagen even in mild epithelial dysplasia suggests that tumourigenic factors are released to connective tissue stroma much earlier than expected. Hence we suggest considering the integrity of extracellular matrix collagen, intactness of basement membrane and inflammation associated with dysplasia along with the anaplasia of epithelial cells in the microscopic assessment of dysplastic epithelium.

  3. Comparison between optical techniques and confocal microscopy for defect detection on thin wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, Philip; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2004-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal microscopy (CM) are not suitable for on-line surface inspection of fine metallic wires. In the recent years, some optical techniques have been developed to be used for those tasks. However, they need a rigorous validation. In this work, we have used confocal microscopy to obtain the topography z(x,y) of wires with longitudinal defects, such as dielines. The topography has been used to predict the light scattered by the wire. These simulations have been compared with experimental results, showing a good agreement

  4. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...... in transmission mode. In both cases the SH signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm in correspondence to the maximum in the photoluminescence spectrum of the QD sample. SH near-field optical images exhibit spatial signal variations on a subwavelength scale that depend on the pump wavelength. We...

  5. Biobeam—Multiplexed wave-optical simulations of light-sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Martin; Bundschuh, Sebastian T.

    2018-01-01

    Sample-induced image-degradation remains an intricate wave-optical problem in light-sheet microscopy. Here we present biobeam, an open-source software package that enables simulation of operational light-sheet microscopes by combining data from 105–106 multiplexed and GPU-accelerated point-spread-function calculations. The wave-optical nature of these simulations leads to the faithful reproduction of spatially varying aberrations, diffraction artifacts, geometric image distortions, adaptive optics, and emergent wave-optical phenomena, and renders image-formation in light-sheet microscopy computationally tractable. PMID:29652879

  6. Near-field scanning optical microscopy using polymethylmethacrylate optical fiber probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibani, H.; Dukenbayev, K.; Mensi, M.; Sekatskii, S.K.; Dietler, G.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first use of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) optical fiber-made probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The sharp tips were prepared by chemical etching of the fibers in ethyl acetate, and the probes were prepared by proper gluing of sharpened fibers onto the tuning fork in the conditions of the double resonance (working frequency of a tuning fork coincides with the resonance frequency of dithering of the free-standing part of the fiber) reported earlier for the case of glass fibers. Quality factors of the probes in the range 2000-6000 were obtained, which enables the realization of an excellent topographical resolution including state-of-art imaging of single DNA molecules. Near-field optical performance of the microscope is illustrated by the Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope images of fluorescent beads with a diameter of 100 nm. The preparation of these plastic fiber probes proved to be easy, needs no hazardous material and/or procedures, and typical lifetime of a probe essentially exceeds that characteristic for the glass fiber probe.

  7. Optical detection of ultrasound using an apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Phillip; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2013-01-01

    Laser ultrasonics techniques are power approaches for non-contact generation and detection of high frequency ultrasound on a local scale. In these techniques, optical diffraction limits the spatial information that can be accessed from a measurement. In order to improve the lateral spatial resolution, we incorporate an apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (aNSOM) into laser ultrasonics setup for local detection of laser generated ultrasound. The aNSOM technique relies on the measurement of a weak backscattered near-field light intensity resulting from the oblique illumination of a nanoscale probe-tip positioned close to a sample surface. We enhance the optical near-field intensity by coupling light to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the shaft of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. The SPPs propagate down the AFM shaft, localize at the tip apex, and are backscattered to the far-field when the separation distance between the probe tip and the sample surface is comparable to the probe-tip radius. The backscattered near-field intensity is dynamically modulated when an ultrasonic wave arrives at the sample surface leading to a transient change in the tip-sample separation distance. We present experimental results detailing measurement of broadband and narrowband laser generated ultrasound in solids with frequencies reaching up to 180 MHz range.

  8. Simultaneous topographical, electrical and optical microscopy of optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Naresh; Zoladek-Lemanczyk, Alina; Guilbert, Anne A. Y.; Su, Weitao; Tuladhar, Sachetan M.; Kirchartz, Thomas; Schroeder, Bob C.; McCulloch, Iain; Nelson, Jenny; Roy, Debdulal; Castro, Fernando A.

    2017-01-01

    resolution by combining plasmonic optical signal enhancement with electrical-mode scanning probe microscopy. We demonstrate that this combined approach offers subsurface sensitivity that can be exploited to provide molecular information with a nanoscale

  9. Near-Field Optical Microscopy of Fractal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coello, Victor; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Using a photon scanning tunnelling microscope combined with a shear-force feedback system, we image both topographical and near-field optical images (at the wavelengths of 633 and 594 nm) of silver colloid fractals. Near-field optical imaging is calibrated with a standing evanescent wave pattern...

  10. Polarisation-sensitive switch: An integrated intensity-independent solution for 1.3 μm based on the polarisation anisotropy of ordered InGaAsP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, S.; Malzer, S.; Doehler, G.H.; Neumann, S.; Prost, W.; Tegude, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Ordered materials provide new possibilities for optical device applications. Through a strong polarisation anisotropy of absorption a high functional polarisation-sensitive switch can be fabricated which in addition is nearly independent on the optical power. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Gluon Polarisation Measurements at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Luís

    2012-01-01

    One of the missing keys in the present understanding of the spin structure of the nucleon is the contribution from the gluons: the so-called gluon polarisation. This quantity can be determined in DIS through the photon-gluon fusion process, in which two analysis methods may be used: (i) identifying open charm events or (ii) selecting events with high $p_{T}$ hadrons. The data used in the present work were collected in the COMPASS experiment, where a 160 GeV/c naturally polarised muon beam, impinging on a polarised nucleon fixed target is used. Preliminary results for the gluon polarisation from high $p_{T}$ and open charm analyses are presented. The gluon polarisation result for high $p_{T}$ hadrons is divided, for the first time, into three statistically independent measurements at LO. The result from open charm analysis is obtained at LO and NLO. In both analyses a new weighted method based on a neural network approach is used.

  12. Near-field optical microscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara, A.; Lopez-Rios, T.; Quemerais, P.

    2005-01-01

    A homemade apertureless near-field optical microscope using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is described. The experimental set-up simultaneously provides optical and topographic images of the sample. Technical details and features of the set-up are presented, together with results demonstrating the sub-wavelength resolution achieved as well as its sensitivity to dielectric contrasts. We show that the use of a STM permits to precisely control very small distances between the tip and the sample which is a great advantage to excite localized optical resonances between the tip and the surface

  13. Quantitative optical microscopy: measurement of cellular biophysical features with a standard optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; McCarty, Owen J T

    2014-04-07

    We describe the use of a standard optical microscope to perform quantitative measurements of mass, volume, and density on cellular specimens through a combination of bright field and differential interference contrast imagery. Two primary approaches are presented: noninterferometric quantitative phase microscopy (NIQPM), to perform measurements of total cell mass and subcellular density distribution, and Hilbert transform differential interference contrast microscopy (HTDIC) to determine volume. NIQPM is based on a simplified model of wave propagation, termed the paraxial approximation, with three underlying assumptions: low numerical aperture (NA) illumination, weak scattering, and weak absorption of light by the specimen. Fortunately, unstained cellular specimens satisfy these assumptions and low NA illumination is easily achieved on commercial microscopes. HTDIC is used to obtain volumetric information from through-focus DIC imagery under high NA illumination conditions. High NA illumination enables enhanced sectioning of the specimen along the optical axis. Hilbert transform processing on the DIC image stacks greatly enhances edge detection algorithms for localization of the specimen borders in three dimensions by separating the gray values of the specimen intensity from those of the background. The primary advantages of NIQPM and HTDIC lay in their technological accessibility using "off-the-shelf" microscopes. There are two basic limitations of these methods: slow z-stack acquisition time on commercial scopes currently abrogates the investigation of phenomena faster than 1 frame/minute, and secondly, diffraction effects restrict the utility of NIQPM and HTDIC to objects from 0.2 up to 10 (NIQPM) and 20 (HTDIC) μm in diameter, respectively. Hence, the specimen and its associated time dynamics of interest must meet certain size and temporal constraints to enable the use of these methods. Excitingly, most fixed cellular specimens are readily investigated with

  14. Analysis of artificial opals by scanning near field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, J.; Lozano, G.; Lamela, J.; Lifante, G.; Dorado, L. A.; Depine, R. A.; Jaque, F.; Míguez, H.

    2011-04-01

    Herein we present a detailed analysis of the optical response of artificial opal films realized employing a near-field scanning optical microscope in collection and transmission modes. Near-field patterns measured at the rear surface when a plane wave impinges on the front face are presented with the finding that optical intensity maps present a clear correlation with the periodic arrangement of the outer surface. Calculations based on the vector Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method reproduce the different profiles experimentally observed as well as the response to the polarization of the incident field. These observations constitute the first experimental confirmation of the collective lattice resonances that give rise to the optical response of these three dimensional periodic structures in the high-energy range.

  15. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity

  16. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M. J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J. E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J. P.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  17. High definition aperture probes for near-field optical microscopy fabricated by focused ion beam milling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Otter, A.M.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1998-01-01

    We have improved the optical characteristics of aluminum-coated fiber probes used in near-field scanning optical microscopy by milling with a focused ion beam. This treatment produces a flat-end face free of aluminum grains, containing a well- defined circularly-symmetric aperture with controllable

  18. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  19. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  20. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  1. Microsphere-aided optical microscopy and its applications for super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-12-01

    The spatial resolution of a standard optical microscope (SOM) is limited by diffraction. In visible spectrum, SOM can provide ∼ 200 nm resolution. To break the diffraction limit several approaches were developed including scanning near field microscopy, metamaterial super-lenses, nanoscale solid immersion lenses, super-oscillatory lenses, confocal fluorescence microscopy, techniques that exploit non-linear response of fluorophores like stimulated emission depletion microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, etc. Recently, photonic nanojet generated by a dielectric microsphere was used to break the diffraction limit. The microsphere-approach is simple, cost-effective and can be implemented under a standard microscope, hence it has gained enormous attention for super-resolution imaging. In this article, we briefly review the microsphere approach and its applications for super-resolution imaging in various optical imaging modalities.

  2. Pupil-segmentation-based adaptive optics for microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Na; Milkie, Daniel E.; Betzig, Eric

    2011-03-01

    Inhomogeneous optical properties of biological samples make it difficult to obtain diffraction-limited resolution in depth. Correcting the sample-induced optical aberrations needs adaptive optics (AO). However, the direct wavefront-sensing approach commonly used in astronomy is not suitable for most biological samples due to their strong scattering of light. We developed an image-based AO approach that is insensitive to sample scattering. By comparing images of the sample taken with different segments of the pupil illuminated, local tilt in the wavefront is measured from image shift. The aberrated wavefront is then obtained either by measuring the local phase directly using interference or with phase reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in astronomical AO. We implemented this pupil-segmentation-based approach in a two-photon fluorescence microscope and demonstrated that diffraction-limited resolution can be recovered from nonbiological and biological samples.

  3. Polarisation control of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varming, Poul; Philipsen, Jacob Lundgreen; Berendt, Martin Ole

    1998-01-01

    The polarisation properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser are investigated. It is shown experimentally that the birefringence of the UV induced phase-shift is the dominating effect controlling the polarisation properties of the laser......The polarisation properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser are investigated. It is shown experimentally that the birefringence of the UV induced phase-shift is the dominating effect controlling the polarisation properties of the laser...

  4. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    are considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  5. An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope. Scanning probe Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1991-01-01

    An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope (EFOM) is presented, which employs frustrated total internal reflection on a highly localized scale by means of a sharp dielectric tip. The coupling of the evanescent field to the sub-micrometer probe as a function of probe-sample distance, angle of incidence

  6. Confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes for high speed measurements and better imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Wanhee; Lee, SeungWoo; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2008-02-01

    Confocal scanning microscopy (CSM) needs a scanning mechanism because only one point information of specimen can be obtained. Therefore the speed of the confocal scanning microscopy is limited by the speed of the scanning tool. To overcome this limitation from scanning tool we propose another scanning mechanism. We make three optical probes in the specimen under confocal condition of each point. Three optical probes are moved by beam scanning mechanism with shared resonant scanning mirror (RM) and galvanometer driven mirror (GM). As each optical probe scan allocated region of the specimen, information from three points is obtained simultaneously and image acquisition time is reduced. Therefore confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is expected to have three times faster speed of the image acquisition than conventional one. And as another use, multiple optical probes to which different light wavelength is applied can scan whole same region respectively. It helps to obtain better contrast image in case of specimens having different optical characteristics for specific light wavelength. In conclusion confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is useful technique for views of image acquisition speed and image quality.

  7. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  8. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E.; Houdellier, F.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  9. Axions and polarisation of quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payez, A.; Cudell, J. R.; Hutsemekers, D.

    2008-01-01

    We present results showing that, thanks to axion-photon mixing in external magnetic fields, it is actually possible to produce an effect similar to the one needed to explain the large-scale coherent orientations of quasar polarisation vectors in visible light that have been observed in some regions of the sky

  10. A minimal optical trapping and imaging microscopy system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available We report the construction and testing of a simple and versatile optical trapping apparatus, suitable for visualizing individual microtubules (∼25 nm in diameter and performing single-molecule studies, using a minimal set of components. This design is based on a conventional, inverted microscope, operating under plain bright field illumination. A single laser beam enables standard optical trapping and the measurement of molecular displacements and forces, whereas digital image processing affords real-time sample visualization with reduced noise and enhanced contrast. We have tested our trapping and imaging instrument by measuring the persistence length of individual double-stranded DNA molecules, and by following the stepping of single kinesin motor proteins along clearly imaged microtubules. The approach presented here provides a straightforward alternative for studies of biomaterials and individual biomolecules.

  11. Near-field scanning optical microscopy based nanostructuring of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimmalgi, A; Hwang, D J; Grigoropoulos, C P

    2007-01-01

    Nanofabrication, at lateral resolutions beyond the capability of conventional optical lithography techniques, is demonstrated here. Femtosecond laser was used in conjunction with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopes (NSOMs) to nanostructure thin metal films. Also, the possibility of using these nanostructured metal films as masks to effectively transfer the pattern to the underlying substrate by wet etching process is shown. Two different optical nearfiled processing schemes were studied for near-field nanostructuring. In the first scheme, local field enhancement in the near-field of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) probe tip irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses was utilized (apertureless NSOM mode) and as a second approach, femtosecond laser beam was spatially confined by cantilevered NSOM fiber tip (apertured NOSM mode). The minimized heat- and shock-affected areas introduced during ultrafast laser based machining process, allows processing of even high conductivity thin metal films with minimized formation of any interfacial compounds between the metal films and the underlying substrate. Potential applications of this method may be in the fields of nanolithography, nanofluidics, nanoscale chemical and gas sensors, high-density data storage, nano-opto-electronics, as well as biotechnology related applications

  12. Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  13. High-temperature phase transitions and domain structures of KLiSO{sub 4}. Studied by polarisation-optics, X-ray topography and liquid-crystal surface decoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherf, Christian; Chung, Su Jin; Hahn, Theo; Klapper, Helmut [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kristallographie; Ivanov, Nicolay R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Shubnikov Inst. of Crystallography

    2017-07-01

    The transitions between the room temperature phase III (space group P6{sub 3}) and the two high-temperature phases II (Pcmn) and I (P6{sub 3}/mmc) of KLiSO{sub 4} and the domain structures generated by them were investigated by high-temperature polarisation optics (birefringence) and room-temperature X-ray topography, optical activity and nematic-liquid-crystal (NLC) surface decoration. The transition from the polar hexagonal phase III into the centrosymmetric orthorhombic phase II at 708 K leads, due to the loss of the trigonal axis and the radial temperature gradient of the optical heating chamber used, to a roughly hexagonal arrangement of three sets of thin orthorhombic {110} lamelleae with angles of 60 (120 ) between them. The associated twin law ''reflection m{110}{sub orth}'' corresponds to the frequent growth twin m{10 anti 10}{sub hex} of phase III. The domains are easily ferroelastically switched. Upon further heating above 949 K into phase I (P6{sub 3}/mmc) all domains vanish. Upon cooling back into phase II the three domain states related by 60 (120 ) reflections m{110}{sub orth} re-appear, however (due to the higher thermal agitation at 949 K) with a completely different domain structure consisting of many small, irregularly arranged {110}{sub orth} domains. Particular attention is paid to the domain structure of the hexagonal room temperature phase III generated during the re-transition from the orthorhombic phase II. Curiously, from the expected three twin laws inversion anti 1, rotation 2 perpendicular to [001]{sub hex} and reflection m{10 anti 10}{sub hex} only the latter, which corresponds to the frequent growth twinning, has been found. Finally a short treatise of the structural relations of the KLiSO{sub 4} high-temperature polymorphs is given.

  14. Scanning near-field optical microscopy and near-field optical probes: properties, fabrication, and control of parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryakhlushin, V F; Veiko, V P; Voznesenskii, N B

    2007-01-01

    A brief review of modern applications of scanning near-field optical (SNO) devices in microscopy, spectroscopy, and lithography is presented in the introduction. The problem of the development of SNO probes, as the most important elements of SNO devices determining their resolution and efficiency, is discussed. Based on the works of the authors, two different methods for fabricating SNO probes by using the adiabatic tapering of an optical fibre are considered: the laser-heated mechanical drawing and chemical etching. A nondestructive optical method for controlling the nanometre aperture of SNO probes is proposed, substantiated, and tested experimentally. The method is based on the reconstruction of a near-field source with the help of a theoretical algorithm of the inverse problem from the experimental far-filed intensity distribution. Some prospects for a further refinement of the construction and technology of SNO probes are discussed. (optical microscopy)

  15. Conjugate adaptive optics with remote focusing in multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Lam, Tuwin; Zhu, Bingzhao; Li, Qinggele; Reinig, Marc R.; Kubby, Joel

    2018-02-01

    The small correction volume for conventional wavefront shaping methods limits their application in biological imaging through scattering media. In this paper, we take advantage of conjugate adaptive optics (CAO) and remote focusing (CAORF) to achieve three-dimensional (3D) scanning through a scattering layer with a single correction. Our results show that the proposed system can provide 10 times wider axial field of view compared with a conventional conjugate AO system when 16,384 segments are used on a spatial light modulator. We demonstrate two-photon imaging with CAORF through mouse skull. The fluorescent microspheres embedded under the scattering layers can be clearly observed after applying the correction.

  16. Growth and optical microscopy observation of the lysozyme crystals

    OpenAIRE

    R.Vlokh; L.Marsel; I.Teslyuk; O.G.Vlokh

    2001-01-01

    The little single lysozyme crystals in the capillary after 15 days of growth process with average size 0.1´0.1´0.16mm3 were obtained. It was shown that lysozyme crystals are optically anisotropical and birefringence along a axis is Dn=(2.2±0.5)´10-3 in visible spectrum region. From the measurements of crystallographic angles follows that on the {001} faces angles equal a=81o, b=99o. On the sexangle faces angles equal e=100o, f=140o and g=120o. On the base of obtained results the lysozyme crys...

  17. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflections optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices is discussed. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics

  18. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics

  19. Second-order nonlinear optical microscopy of spider silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Hien, Khuat Thi Thu; Mizutani, Goro; Rutt, Harvey N.

    2017-06-01

    Asymmetric β-sheet protein structures in spider silk should induce nonlinear optical interaction such as second harmonic generation (SHG) which is experimentally observed for a radial line and dragline spider silk using an imaging femtosecond laser SHG microscope. By comparing different spider silks, we found that the SHG signal correlates with the existence of the protein β-sheets. Measurements of the polarization dependence of SHG from the dragline indicated that the β-sheet has a nonlinear response depending on the direction of the incident electric field. We propose a model of what orientation the β-sheet takes in spider silk.

  20. Interference electron microscopy of one-dimensional electron-optical phase objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazzini, P.F.; Ortolani, L.; Pozzi, G.; Ubaldi, F.

    2006-01-01

    The application of interference electron microscopy to the investigation of electron optical one-dimensional phase objects like reverse biased p-n junctions and ferromagnetic domain walls is considered. In particular the influence of diffraction from the biprism edges on the interference images is analyzed and the range of applicability of the geometric optical equation for the interpretation of the interference fringe shifts assessed by comparing geometric optical images with full wave-optical simulations. Finally, the inclusion of partial spatial coherence effects are discussed

  1. All-optical optoacoustic microscopy based on probe beam deflection technique

    OpenAIRE

    Maswadi, Saher M.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Roth, Caleb C.; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Beier, Hope T.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) microscopy using an all-optical system based on the probe beam deflection technique (PBDT) for detection of laser-induced acoustic signals was investigated as an alternative to conventional piezoelectric transducers. PBDT provides a number of advantages for OA microscopy including (i) efficient coupling of laser excitation energy to the samples being imaged through the probing laser beam, (ii) undistorted coupling of acoustic waves to the detector without the need for separa...

  2. Hybrid Microscopy: Enabling Inexpensive High-Performance Imaging through Combined Physical and Optical Magnifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Chang, Jae-Byum; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Aleman, Julio; Batzaya, Byambaa; Krishnadoss, Vaishali; Ramanujam, Aishwarya Aravamudhan; Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Boyden, Edward S; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-15

    To date, much effort has been expended on making high-performance microscopes through better instrumentation. Recently, it was discovered that physical magnification of specimens was possible, through a technique called expansion microscopy (ExM), raising the question of whether physical magnification, coupled to inexpensive optics, could together match the performance of high-end optical equipment, at a tiny fraction of the price. Here we show that such "hybrid microscopy" methods--combining physical and optical magnifications--can indeed achieve high performance at low cost. By physically magnifying objects, then imaging them on cheap miniature fluorescence microscopes ("mini-microscopes"), it is possible to image at a resolution comparable to that previously attainable only with benchtop microscopes that present costs orders of magnitude higher. We believe that this unprecedented hybrid technology that combines expansion microscopy, based on physical magnification, and mini-microscopy, relying on conventional optics--a process we refer to as Expansion Mini-Microscopy (ExMM)--is a highly promising alternative method for performing cost-effective, high-resolution imaging of biological samples. With further advancement of the technology, we believe that ExMM will find widespread applications for high-resolution imaging particularly in research and healthcare scenarios in undeveloped countries or remote places.

  3. Tunable error-free optical frequency conversion of a 4ps optical short pulse over 25 nm by four-wave mixing in a polarisation-maintaining optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, T.; Kawanishi, S.; Saruwatari, M.

    1994-05-01

    Error-free, tunable optical frequency conversion of a transform-limited 4.0 ps optical pulse signalis demonstrated at 6.3 Gbit/s using four-wave mixing in a polarization-maintaining optical fibre. The process generates 4.0-4.6 ps pulses over a 25nm range with time-bandwidth products of 0.31-0.43 and conversion power penalties of less than 1.5 dB.

  4. Wave front engineering by means of diffractive optical elements for applications in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Dan; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Cabrini, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Prasciolu, Mauro; Businaro, Luca; Kaulich, Burchard; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2006-05-01

    We present a unified view regarding the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for microscopy applications a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and fabrication of DOE through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular we show applications ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that beside focusing perform also other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of spherical micro beads and for direct trapping and manipulation of biological cells with non-spherical shapes. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gaussian mode conversion, which allows to trap and transfer orbital angular momentum of light to micro particles with high refractive index and to trap and manipulate low index particles. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for DOEs implementation. High resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in X-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field X-ray microscopy.

  5. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Imaging slit-coupled surface plasmon polaritons using conventional optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehfuz, R; Chowdhury, F A; Chau, K J

    2012-05-07

    We develop a technique that now enables surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupled by nano-patterned slits in a metal film to be detected using conventional optical microscopy with standard objective lenses. The crux of this method is an ultra-thin polymer layer on the metal surface, whose thickness can be varied over a nanoscale range to enable controllable tuning of the SPP momentum. At an optimal layer thickness for which the SPP momentum matches the momentum of light emerging from the slit, the SPP coupling efficiency is enhanced about six times relative to that without the layer. The enhanced efficiency results in distinctive and bright plasmonic signatures near the slit visible by naked eye under an optical microscope. We demonstrate how this capability can be used for parallel measurement through a simple experiment in which the SPP propagation distance is extracted from a single microscope image of an illuminated array of nano-patterned slits on a metal surface. We also use optical microscopy to image the focal region of a plasmonic lens and obtain results consistent with a previously-reported results using near-field optical microscopy. Measurement of SPPs near a nano-slit using conventional and widely-available optical microscopy is an important step towards making nano-plasmonic device technology highly accessible and easy-to-use.

  7. Phase noise cancellation in polarisation-maintaining fibre links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, B.; Vélez López, M. C.; Thoumany, P.; Pizzocaro, M.; Calonico, D.

    2018-03-01

    The distribution of ultra-narrow linewidth laser radiation is an integral part of many challenging metrological applications. Changes in the optical pathlength induced by environmental disturbances compromise the stability and accuracy of optical fibre networks distributing the laser light and call for active phase noise cancellation. Here we present a laboratory scale optical (at 578 nm) fibre network featuring all polarisation maintaining fibres in a setup with low optical powers available and tracking voltage-controlled oscillators implemented. The stability and accuracy of this system reach performance levels below 1 × 10-19 after 10 000 s of averaging.

  8. An introduction to optical super-resolution microscopy for the adventurous biologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangindertael, J.; Camacho, R.; Sempels, W.; Mizuno, H.; Dedecker, P.; Janssen, K. P. F.

    2018-04-01

    Ever since the inception of light microscopy, the laws of physics have seemingly thwarted every attempt to visualize the processes of life at its most fundamental, sub-cellular, level. The diffraction limit has restricted our view to length scales well above 250 nm and in doing so, severely compromised our ability to gain true insights into many biological systems. Fortunately, continuous advancements in optics, electronics and mathematics have since provided the means to once again make physics work to our advantage. Even though some of the fundamental concepts enabling super-resolution light microscopy have been known for quite some time, practically feasible implementations have long remained elusive. It should therefore not come as a surprise that the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to the scientists who, each in their own way, contributed to transforming super-resolution microscopy from a technological tour de force to a staple of the biologist’s toolkit. By overcoming the diffraction barrier, light microscopy could once again be established as an indispensable tool in an age where the importance of understanding life at the molecular level cannot be overstated. This review strives to provide the aspiring life science researcher with an introduction to optical microscopy, starting from the fundamental concepts governing compound and fluorescent confocal microscopy to the current state-of-the-art of super-resolution microscopy techniques and their applications.

  9. 3D on-chip microscopy of optically cleared tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Shin, Yoonjung; Sung, Kevin; Yang, Sam; Chen, Harrison; Wang, Hongda; Teng, Da; Rivenson, Yair; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2018-02-01

    Traditional pathology relies on tissue biopsy, micro-sectioning, immunohistochemistry and microscopic imaging, which are relatively expensive and labor-intensive, and therefore are less accessible in resource-limited areas. Low-cost tissue clearing techniques, such as the simplified CLARITY method (SCM), are promising to potentially reduce the cost of disease diagnosis by providing 3D imaging and phenotyping of thicker tissue samples with simpler preparation steps. However, the mainstream imaging approach for cleared tissue, fluorescence microscopy, suffers from high-cost, photobleaching and signal fading. As an alternative approach to fluorescence, here we demonstrate 3D imaging of SCMcleared tissue using on-chip holography, which is based on pixel-super-resolution and multi-height phase recovery algorithms to digitally compute the sample's amplitude and phase images at various z-slices/depths through the sample. The tissue clearing procedures and the lens-free imaging system were jointly optimized to find the best illumination wavelength, tissue thickness, staining solution pH, and the number of hologram heights to maximize the imaged tissue volume, minimize the amount of acquired data, while maintaining a high contrast-to-noise ratio for the imaged cells. After this optimization, we achieved 3D imaging of a 200-μm thick cleared mouse brain tissue over a field-of-view of based microscope (20× 0.75NA). Moreover, the lens-free microscope achieves an order-of-magnitude better data efficiency compared to its lens-based counterparts for volumetric imaging of samples. The presented low-cost and high-throughput lens-free tissue imaging technique enabled by CLARITY can be used in various biomedical applications in low-resource-settings.

  10. In situ 3D characterization of historical coatings and wood using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Latour , Gaël; Echard , Jean-Philippe; Didier , Marie; Schanne-Klein , Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We demonstrate multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) microscopies. We first identify the nonlinear optical response of materials commonly encountered in coatings of cultural heritage artifacts by analyzing one- and multi-layered model samples. We observe 2PEF signals from cochineal lake and sandarac and show that pigments and varnish films can be discriminate...

  11. Generalized spectral method for near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Zhang, L. M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Castro Neto, A. H. [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2016-02-07

    Electromagnetic interaction between a sub-wavelength particle (the “probe”) and a material surface (the “sample”) is studied theoretically. The interaction is shown to be governed by a series of resonances corresponding to surface polariton modes localized near the probe. The resonance parameters depend on the dielectric function and geometry of the probe as well as on the surface reflectivity of the material. Calculation of such resonances is carried out for several types of axisymmetric probes: spherical, spheroidal, and pear-shaped. For spheroids, an efficient numerical method is developed, capable of handling cases of large or strongly momentum-dependent surface reflectivity. Application of the method to highly resonant materials, such as aluminum oxide (by itself or covered with graphene), reveals a rich structure of multi-peak spectra and nonmonotonic approach curves, i.e., the probe-sample distance dependence. These features also strongly depend on the probe shape and optical constants of the model. For less resonant materials such as silicon oxide, the dependence is weak, so that the spheroidal model is reliable. The calculations are done within the quasistatic approximation with radiative damping included perturbatively.

  12. Coherent optical adaptive technique improves the spatial resolution of STED microscopy in thick samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Yang, Yanlong; Tan, Yu; Chen, Xun; Li, Yang; Qu, Junle; Ye, Tong

    2018-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) is one of far-field optical microscopy techniques that can provide sub-diffraction spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the STED microscopy is determined by the specially engineered beam profile of the depletion beam and its power. However, the beam profile of the depletion beam may be distorted due to aberrations of optical systems and inhomogeneity of specimens’ optical properties, resulting in a compromised spatial resolution. The situation gets deteriorated when thick samples are imaged. In the worst case, the sever distortion of the depletion beam profile may cause complete loss of the super resolution effect no matter how much depletion power is applied to specimens. Previously several adaptive optics approaches have been explored to compensate aberrations of systems and specimens. However, it is hard to correct the complicated high-order optical aberrations of specimens. In this report, we demonstrate that the complicated distorted wavefront from a thick phantom sample can be measured by using the coherent optical adaptive technique (COAT). The full correction can effectively maintain and improve the spatial resolution in imaging thick samples. PMID:29400356

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single

  14. Single molecule mapping of the optical field distribution of probes for near-field microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    The most difficult task in near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is to make a high quality subwavelength aperture probe, Recently we have developed high definition NSOM probes by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. These probes have a higher brightness, better polarization characteristics,

  15. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the general principles of near-field optical microscopy. I consider the influence of a probe when being used to image localized dipolar excitations and suggest a way of evaluating the perturbation thus introduced. Using the rigorous microscopic (electric) point-dipole description, I...

  16. SEM/EDS and optical microscopy analyses of microplastics in ocean trawl and fish guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Wagner, Jeff; Ghosal, Sutapa; Bedi, Gagandeep; Wall, Stephen

    2017-12-15

    Microplastic particles from Atlantic and Pacific Ocean trawls, lab-fed fish guts and ocean fish guts have been characterized using optical microscopy and SEM/EDS in terms of size, morphology, and chemistry. We assessed whether these measurements could serve as a rapid screening process for subsequent identification of the likely microplastic candidates by micro-spectroscopy. Optical microscopy enabled morphological classification of the types of particles or fibers present in the sample, as well as the quantification of particle size ranges and fiber lengths. SEM/EDS analysis was used to rule out non-plastic particles and screen the prepared samples for potential microplastic, based on their element signatures and surface characteristics. Chlorinated plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) could be easily identified with SEM/EDS due to their unique elemental signatures including chlorine, as could mineral species that are falsely identified as plastics by optical microscopy. Particle morphology determined by optical microscopy and SEM suggests the fish ingested particles contained both degradation fragments from larger plastic pieces and also manufactured microplastics. SEM images of microplastic particle surfaces revealed characteristic cracks consistent with environmental exposure, as well as pigment particles consistent with manufactured materials. Most of the microplastic surfaces in the fish guts and ocean trawls were covered with biofilms, radiolarians, and crustaceans. Many of the fish stomachs contained micro-shell pieces which visually resembled microplastics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation...

  18. DMD-based LED-illumination super-resolution and optical sectioning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Dan; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Wen; Winterhalder, Martin; Zumbusch, Andreas; Qi, Yujiao; Xia, Liang; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong; Zhao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy has incomparable advantages over other high-resolution microscopic technologies, such as electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in the study of biological molecules, pathways and events in live cells and tissues. We present a novel approach of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for fringe projection and a low-coherence LED light for illumination. The lateral resolution of 90 nm and the optical sectioning depth of 120 μm were achieved. The maximum acquisition speed for 3D imaging in the optical sectioning mode was 1.6×10(7) pixels/second, which was mainly limited by the sensitivity and speed of the CCD camera. In contrast to other SIM techniques, the DMD-based LED-illumination SIM is cost-effective, ease of multi-wavelength switchable and speckle-noise-free. The 2D super-resolution and 3D optical sectioning modalities can be easily switched and applied to either fluorescent or non-fluorescent specimens.

  19. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  20. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Marcel A; Ronzitti, Emiliano; Sternberg, Jenna R; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes.

  1. Cathodoluminescence-activated nanoimaging: noninvasive near-field optical microscopy in an electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischak, Connor G; Hetherington, Craig L; Wang, Zhe; Precht, Jake T; Kaz, David M; Schlom, Darrell G; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-05-13

    We demonstrate a new nanoimaging platform in which optical excitations generated by a low-energy electron beam in an ultrathin scintillator are used as a noninvasive, near-field optical scanning probe of an underlying sample. We obtain optical images of Al nanostructures with 46 nm resolution and validate the noninvasiveness of this approach by imaging a conjugated polymer film otherwise incompatible with electron microscopy due to electron-induced damage. The high resolution, speed, and noninvasiveness of this "cathodoluminescence-activated" platform also show promise for super-resolution bioimaging.

  2. Group velocity measurement using spectral interference in near-field scanning optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, John D.; Chaipiboonwong, Tipsuda; Brocklesby, William S.; Charlton, Martin D. B.; Netti, Caterina; Zoorob, Majd E.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2006-01-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy provides a tool for studying the behavior of optical fields inside waveguides. In this experiment the authors measure directly the variation of group velocity between different modes of a planar slab waveguide as the modes propagate along the guide. The measurement is made using the spectral interference between pulses propagating inside the waveguide with different group velocities, collected using a near-field scanning optical microscope at different points down the guide and spectrally resolved. The results are compared to models of group velocities in simple guides

  3. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Isometric multimodal photoacoustic microscopy based on optically transparent micro-ring ultrasonic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Kevin; Chen, Siyu; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is an attractive imaging tool complementary to established optical microscopic modalities by providing additional molecular specificities through imaging optical absorption contrast. While the development of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) offers high lateral resolution, the acoustically-determined axial resolution is limited due to the constraint in ultrasonic detection bandwidth. ORPAM with isometric spatial resolution along both axial and lateral direction is yet to be developed. Although recently developed sophisticated optical illumination and reconstruction methods offer improved axial resolution in ORPAM, the image acquisition procedures are rather complicated, limiting their capabilities for high-speed imaging and being easily integrated with established optical microscopic modalities. Here we report an isometric ORPAM based on an optically transparent micro-ring resonator ultrasonic detector and a commercial inverted microscope platform. Owing to the superior spatial resolution and the ease of integrating our ORPAM with established microscopic modalities, single cell imaging with extrinsic fluorescence staining, intrinsic autofluorescence, and optical absorption can be achieved simultaneously. This technique holds promise to greatly improve the accessibility of PAM to the broader biomedical researchers.

  5. The OSIRIS diffractometer and polarisation analysis spectrometer at ISIS. New developments and 3He spin-filter polarisation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Ken H.; Marero, David Martin y; Barlow, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    OSIRIS combines a long-wavelength powder diffractometer with a polarisation analysis backscattering spectrometer. The diffractometer can access wavelengths up to 70 A with a resolution of better than 1% Δd/d. The very high counting-rate at shorter wavelengths is ideal for in-situ, real-time and parametric experiments. The spectroscopy section incorporates an array of graphite crystals arranged in near-backscattering to give a high counting rate with 25 μeV energy resolution. The incident beam is polarised using a supermirror bender and the scattered beam is polarisation-analysed by a 3 He spin-filter in the process of being constructed. The spin-filter system consists of a fibre laser, a peristaltic pump and a wide-angle banana-shaped quartz cell in a continuous-flow setup. The scattered beam passes twice through the spin-filter cell, thus doubling the optical path length in the cell. The aim is to achieve 70% nuclear polarisation with no variation in time. (author)

  6. Comprehensive study of unexpected microscope condensers formed in sample arrangements commonly used in optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Darshan B; Aldawsari, Mabkhoot Mudith S; Alharbi, Bandar Mohammed H; Sen, Sanchari; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We show that various setups for optical microscopy which are commonly used in biomedical laboratories behave like efficient microscope condensers that are responsible for observed subwavelength resolution. We present a series of experiments and simulations that reveal how inclined illumination from such unexpected condensers occurs when the sample is perpendicularly illuminated by a microscope's built-in white-light source. In addition, we demonstrate an inexpensive add-on optical module that serves as an efficient and lightweight microscope condenser. Using such add-on optical module in combination with a low-numerical-aperture objective lens and Fourier plane imaging microscopy technique, we demonstrate detection of photonic crystals with a period nearly eight times smaller than the Rayleigh resolution limit.

  7. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Neutron scattering from polarised proton domains

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Brandt, B; Kohbrecher, J; Konter, J A; Mango, S; Glattli, H; Leymarie, E; Grillo, I; May, R P; Jouve, H; Stuhrmann, H B; Stuhrmann, H B; Zimmer, O

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent small-angle polarised neutron scattering from domains of polarised protons has been observed at the onset of dynamic nuclear polarisation in a frozen solution of 98% deuterated glycerol-water at 1 K containing a small concentration of paramagnetic centres (EHBA-Cr sup V). Simultaneous NMR measurements show that the observed scattering arises from protons around the Cr sup V -ions which are polarised to approx 10% in a few seconds, much faster than the protons in the bulk. (authors)

  9. Evanescent field characterisation for a d-shaped optical fibre using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.T.; Nugent, K.A.; Roberts, A.; Mulvaney, P.; Lo, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Scanning near field optical microscopy is used to measure the evanescent filed and mode profile of a Ge-doped D-shaped optical fibre. The structure of the fibre is determined by differential etching followed by an investigation of the resultant topography with an atomic force microscope. This information is then used to theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed fields

  10. Spin Polarisabilities and Compton Scattering from χEFT: Bridging QCD and Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    Compton scattering from protons and neutrons probes their two-photon response in electric and magnetic fields of real photons, exploring the symmetries and interaction strengths of the internal degrees of freedom. With the scalar polarisabilities αE 1 and βM 1 now reasonably understood, the focus turns to the so-far poorly explored spin-polarisabilities. They parametrise the stiffness of the nucleon spin in external electro-magnetic fields, analogous to rotations of the polarisation of light by optically active media (bi-refringence/Faraday effect) and are particularly sensitive to the directional dependence of the πNγ interactions dictated by chiral symmetry and its breaking. This contribution addresses the potential of Chiral Effective Field Theory to relate between lattice QCD and ongoing or approved efforts at MAX-lab, HI γS and MAMI. We discuss high-intensity experiments with polarised targets and polarised beams which will allow the extraction of the spin-polarisabilities; χEFT predictions which indicate which observables for polarised protons, deuterons and 3 He are particularly sensitive; convergence, residual theoretical uncertainties and possibilities for improvement; and chiral extrapolations in mπ for lattice computations. Supported in part by UK STFC, US DOE and George Washington University.

  11. Wide-field two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Wang, Lidai; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Maslov, Konstantin; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is an emerging technique that directly images optical absorption in tissue at high spatial resolution. To date, the majority of OR-PAM systems are based on single focused optical excitation and ultrasonic detection, limiting the wide-field imaging speed. While one-dimensional multifocal OR-PAM (1D-MFOR-PAM) has been developed, the potential of microlens and transducer arrays has not been fully realized. Here, we present the development of two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy (2D-MFOR-PACM), using a 2D microlens array and a full-ring ultrasonic transducer array. The 10 × 10 mm2 microlens array generates 1800 optical foci within the focal plane of the 512-element transducer array, and raster scanning the microlens array yields optical-resolution photoacoustic images. The system has improved the in-plane resolution of a full-ring transducer array from ≥100 µm to 29 µm and achieved an imaging time of 36 seconds over a 10 × 10 mm2 field of view. In comparison, the 1D-MFOR-PAM would take more than 4 minutes to image over the same field of view. The imaging capability of the system was demonstrated on phantoms and animals both ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24322226

  12. X-ray optics for scanning fluorescence microscopy and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryon, R.W.; Warburton, W.K.

    1992-05-01

    Scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy is analogous to scanning electron microscopy. Maps of chemical element distribution are produced by scanning with a very small x-ray beam. Goal is to perform such scanning microscopy with resolution in the range of <1 to 10 μm, using standard laboratory x-ray tubes. We are investigating mirror optics in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. K-B optics uses two curved mirrors mounted orthogonally along the optical axis. The first mirror provides vertical focus, the second mirror provides horizontal focus. We have used two types of mirrors: synthetic multilayers and crystals. Multilayer mirrors are used with lower energy radiation such as Cu Kα. At higher energies such as Ag Kα, silicon wafers are used in order to increase the incidence angles and thereby the photon collection efficiency. In order to increase the surface area of multilayers which reflects x-rays at the Bragg angle, we have designed mirrors with the spacing between layers graded along the optic axis in order to compensate for the changing angle of incidence. Likewise, to achieve a large reflecting surface with silicon, the wafers are placed on a specially designed lever arm which is bent into a log spiral by applying force at one end. In this way, the same diffracting angle is maintained over the entire surface of the wafer, providing a large solid angle for photon collection

  13. Inclusion in a Polarised World

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This paper on inclusion was presented to the at the 2005 summer school of DEEEP (Development Education Exchange in Europe Project), Härnösand - Sweden, 5 - 12 June 2005. It addresses the significance of the concept of world civilisation. It assesses how meaning may be attached to the concept of inclusion in an economically polarised world. It develops a critique of the conception of economic inclusion, by means of an exploration of linguistic inclusion and the notion of ‘disability’. ‘...

  14. Imaging subsurface damage of grinded fused silica optics by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neauport, J.; Cormont, P.; Destribats, J.; Legros, P.; Ambard, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report an experimental investigation of fluorescence confocal microscopy as a tool to measure subsurface damage on grinded fused silica optics. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed with an excitation at the wavelength of 405 nm on fixed abrasive diamond grinded fused silica samples. We detail the measured fluorescence spectrums and compare them to those of oil based coolants and grinding slurries. We evidence that oil based coolant used in diamond grinding induces a fluorescence that marks the subsurface damages and eases its observation. Such residual traces might also be involved in the laser damage process. (authors)

  15. Investigation of shape memory of red blood cells using optical tweezers and quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2012-03-01

    RBC has been shown to possess shape memory subsequent to shear-induced shape transformation. However, this property of RBC may not be generalized to all kinds of stresses. Here, we report our observation on the action of radiation pressure forces on RBC's shape memory using optical manipulation and quantitative phase microscopy (OMQPM). QPM, based on Mach-Zehnder interferrometry, allowed measurement of dynamic changes of shape of RBC in optical tweezers at different trapping laser powers. In high power near-infrared optical tweezers (>200mW), the RBC was found to deform significantly due to optical forces. Upon removal of the tweezers, hysteresis in recovering its original resting shape was observed. In very high power tweezers or long-term stretching events, shape memory was almost erased. This irreversibility of the deformation may be due to temperature rise or stress-induced phase transformation of lipids in RBC membrane.

  16. Structured light optical microscopy for three-dimensional reconstruction of technical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettel, Johannes; Reinecke, Holger; Müller, Claas

    2016-04-01

    In microsystems technology quality control of micro structured surfaces with different surface properties is playing an ever more important role. The process of quality control incorporates three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of specularand diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. Due to the demand on high measurement accuracy and data acquisition rates, structured light optical microscopy has become a valuable solution to solve this problem providing high vertical and lateral resolution. However, 3D reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces still remains a challenge to optical measurement principles. In this paper we present a measurement principle based on structured light optical microscopy which enables 3D reconstruction of specular- and diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. It is realized using two light paths of a stereo microscope equipped with different magnification levels. The right optical path of the stereo microscope is used to project structured light onto the object surface. The left optical path is used to capture the structured illuminated object surface with a camera. Structured light patterns are generated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) device in combination with a high power Light Emitting Diode (LED). Structured light patterns are realized as a matrix of discrete light spots to illuminate defined areas on the object surface. The introduced measurement principle is based on multiple and parallel processed point measurements. Analysis of the measured Point Spread Function (PSF) by pattern recognition and model fitting algorithms enables the precise calculation of 3D coordinates. Using exemplary technical surfaces we demonstrate the successful application of our measurement principle.

  17. Doppler optical coherence microscopy and tomography applied to inner ear mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Scott; Freeman, Dennis M. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Ghaffari, Roozbeh [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-12-31

    While it is clear that cochlear traveling waves underlie the extraordinary sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and dynamic range of mammalian hearing, the underlying micromechanical mechanisms remain unresolved. Recent advances in low coherence measurement techniques show promise over traditional laser Doppler vibrometry and video microscopy, which are limited by low reflectivities of cochlear structures and restricted optical access. Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) and Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) both utilize a broadband source to limit constructive interference of scattered light to a small axial depth called a coherence gate. The coherence gate can be swept axially to image and measure sub-nanometer motions of cochlear structures throughout the cochlear partition. The coherence gate of DOCT is generally narrower than the confocal gate of the focusing optics, enabling increased axial resolution (typically 15 μm) within optical sections of the cochlear partition. DOCM, frequently implemented in the time domain, centers the coherence gate on the focal plane, achieving enhanced lateral and axial resolution when the confocal gate is narrower than the coherence gate. We compare these two complementary systems and demonstrate their utility in studying cellular and micromechanical mechanisms involved in mammalian hearing.

  18. Oxidation study by Moessbauer and optic microscopy of steels from boiler tubes used in sugar industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, M.; Perez Alcazar, G.A.; Aguilar, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Optic microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to study the fail and the inner rusted surface of two boiler tubes used in the sugar industry, respectively. The studied tubes, of the type ASTM A 192, were found to have cracks. By optic microscopy it was observed that the failure begins in the inner surface with circumferential cracking. Also, inside and around the surface close to the cracks a rusted layer was detected. Powder from these layers was collected for Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis. By this method the presence of two or three types of Fe oxides such as wuestite, magnetite and hematite, was proved. These results permit to conclude that the failure mechanism was the thermal fatigue due to a hot work in an O 2 -rich vapor atmosphere. The rusted products are stable at high temperatures

  19. On the electromagnetic polarisabilities of the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harun ar Rashid, A.M.

    1982-10-01

    The dynamic electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the nucleon are calculated taking the photon-nucleon resonance vertex-function ambiguity parameters into account. The annihilation channel in the Compton scattering amplitude is also evaluated from the chiral effective Lagrangian. It is found that the electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the proton are of the same order of magnitude. (author)

  20. Segmentation of Drosophila Heart in Optical Coherence Microscopy Images Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Lian; Qin, Xi; He, Yuanhao; Sang, Xialin; Pan, Jinda; Xu, Tao; Men, Jing; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Li, Airong; Ma, Yutao; Zhou, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Convolutional neural networks are powerful tools for image segmentation and classification. Here, we use this method to identify and mark the heart region of Drosophila at different developmental stages in the cross-sectional images acquired by a custom optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system. With our well-trained convolutional neural network model, the heart regions through multiple heartbeat cycles can be marked with an intersection over union (IOU) of ~86%. Various morphological and dyn...

  1. The polarised Λ production in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindran, V.

    1997-01-01

    The Q 2 evolution of polarised parton fragmentation functions is discussed using the Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations. The first moments of both the polarised quark and gluon fragmentation functions are shown to behave in a similar fashion at very high energies. This analysis is applicable to any hard processes involving the production of polarised hadrons. The polarised Λ hyperon production in e + e - annihilation where this can be realised is considered. We present complete α s (Q 2 ) corrections to the asymmetries discussed in the paper of Burkardt and Jaffe which demonstrates the extraction of various polarised fragmentation functions. To this order, these corrections are found to be scheme dependent similar to that of structure functions. (orig.)

  2. The mechanism of borax crystallization using in situ optical microscopy and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suharso, G.; Parkinson, M.; Ogden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The quality of high-purity borax depends both on the concentrations of the impurities and the product appearance, which are mainly determined by the size and morphology of the crystals. Thus, knowledge about crystallization of borax is of direct relevance to the industrial production of borax. In addition, fundamental studies of borax crystallization will provide results of relevance to the crystallization of other economically important materials. An investigation into the fundamental mechanism of crystal growth of borax from aqueous solution was carried out, as a model system. The investigation focussed on the growth mechanism, and the influence of factors such as solution supersaturation, temperature, crystal size and solution flow on the rate of crystal growth. In situ optical microscopy was used to determine growth rates of three different faces of borax crystals at 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg C, at various concentrations. It was found that the growth rate increases with increasing temperature and supersaturation. At low concentration , growth on the (010), (001), and (111) faces occurs via a spiral growth mechanism and at high concentration birth and spread is the principal mechanism operating. The activation energy for the different mechanisms was determined. Examination by ex situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) showed features suggesting that the (100), (010), (001) faces of borax crystals grow by spiral mechanism at low concentration and two dimensional nucleation at high concentration. These experiments support the data obtained from in situ optical microscopy. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  3. Optically sectioned in vivo imaging with speckle illumination HiLo microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Daryl; Ford, Tim N.; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Mertz, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple wide-field imaging technique, called HiLo microscopy, that is capable of producing optically sectioned images in real time, comparable in quality to confocal laser scanning microscopy. The technique is based on the fusion of two raw images, one acquired with speckle illumination and another with standard uniform illumination. The fusion can be numerically adjusted, using a single parameter, to produce optically sectioned images of varying thicknesses with the same raw data. Direct comparison between our HiLo microscope and a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope is made on the basis of sectioning strength and imaging performance. Specifically, we show that HiLo and confocal 3-D imaging of a GFP-labeled mouse brain hippocampus are comparable in quality. Moreover, HiLo microscopy is capable of faster, near video rate imaging over larger fields of view than attainable with standard confocal microscopes. The goal of this paper is to advertise the simplicity, robustness, and versatility of HiLo microscopy, which we highlight with in vivo imaging of common model organisms including planaria, C. elegans, and zebrafish.

  4. Application of carbon nanotubes to topographical resolution enhancement of tapered fiber scanning near field optical microscopy probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, S. T.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2003-05-01

    Scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) probes are typically tapered optical fibers with metallic coatings. The tip diameters are generally in excess of 300 nm and thus provide poor topographical resolution. Here we report on the attachment multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the probes in order to substantially enhance the topographical resolution, without adversely affecting the optical resolution.

  5. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  6. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, Kyle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  7. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans.

  8. All-optical optoacoustic microscopy based on probe beam deflection technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saher M. Maswadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optoacoustic (OA microscopy using an all-optical system based on the probe beam deflection technique (PBDT for detection of laser-induced acoustic signals was investigated as an alternative to conventional piezoelectric transducers. PBDT provides a number of advantages for OA microscopy including (i efficient coupling of laser excitation energy to the samples being imaged through the probing laser beam, (ii undistorted coupling of acoustic waves to the detector without the need for separation of the optical and acoustic paths, (iii high sensitivity and (iv ultrawide bandwidth. Because of the unimpeded optical path in PBDT, diffraction-limited lateral resolution can be readily achieved. The sensitivity of the current PBDT sensor of 22 μV/Pa and its noise equivalent pressure (NEP of 11.4 Pa are comparable with these parameters of the optical micro-ring resonator and commercial piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers. Benefits of the present prototype OA microscope were demonstrated by successfully resolving micron-size details in histological sections of cardiac muscle.

  9. All-optical optoacoustic microscopy based on probe beam deflection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswadi, Saher M; Ibey, Bennett L; Roth, Caleb C; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A; Beier, Hope T; Glickman, Randolph D; Oraevsky, Alexander A

    2016-09-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) microscopy using an all-optical system based on the probe beam deflection technique (PBDT) for detection of laser-induced acoustic signals was investigated as an alternative to conventional piezoelectric transducers. PBDT provides a number of advantages for OA microscopy including (i) efficient coupling of laser excitation energy to the samples being imaged through the probing laser beam, (ii) undistorted coupling of acoustic waves to the detector without the need for separation of the optical and acoustic paths, (iii) high sensitivity and (iv) ultrawide bandwidth. Because of the unimpeded optical path in PBDT, diffraction-limited lateral resolution can be readily achieved. The sensitivity of the current PBDT sensor of 22 μV/Pa and its noise equivalent pressure (NEP) of 11.4 Pa are comparable with these parameters of the optical micro-ring resonator and commercial piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers. Benefits of the present prototype OA microscope were demonstrated by successfully resolving micron-size details in histological sections of cardiac muscle.

  10. Chemically etched fiber tips for near-field optical microscopy: a process for smoother tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambelet, P; Sayah, A; Pfeffer, M; Philipona, C; Marquis-Weible, F

    1998-11-01

    An improved method for producing fiber tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy is presented. The improvement consists of chemically etching quartz optical fibers through their acrylate jacket. This new method is compared with the previous one in which bare fibers were etched. With the new process the meniscus formed by the acid along the fiber does not move during etching, leading to a much smoother surface of the tip cone. Subsequent metallization is thus improved, resulting in better coverage of the tip with an aluminum opaque layer. Our results show that leakage can be avoided along the cone, and light transmission through the tip is spatially limited to an optical aperture of a 100-nm dimension.

  11. Nanohybrids Near-Field Optical Microscopy: From Image Shift to Biosensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayla El-Kork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-Field Optical Microscopy is a valuable tool for the optical and topographic study of objects at a nanometric scale. Nanoparticles constitute important candidates for such type of investigations, as they bear an important weight for medical, biomedical, and biosensing applications. One, however, has to be careful as artifacts can be easily reproduced. In this study, we examined hybrid nanoparticles (or nanohybrids in the near-field, while in solution and attached to gold nanoplots. We found out that they can be used for wavelength modulable near-field biosensors within conditions of artifact free imaging. In detail, we refer to the use of topographic/optical image shift and the imaging of Local Surface Plasmon hot spots to validate the genuineness of the obtained images. In summary, this study demonstrates a new way of using simple easily achievable comparative methods to prove the authenticity of near-field images and presents nanohybrid biosensors as an application.

  12. Propagation of polarised light in bent hi-bi spun fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przhiyalkovsky, Ya V; Morshnev, S K; Starostin, N I; Gubin, V P [V.A.Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino branch, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The evolution of polarisation states (PS's) of broadband light propagating through a bent optical fibre with a helical structure of its refractive index anisotropy (hi-bi spun fibre) has been studied theoretically and experimentally. It has been shown that there exists a coordinate system of PS's in which the differential Jones matrix can be replaced by a diagonal matrix, which allows the polarisation parameters of the output broadband light to be readily calculated with sufficient accuracy. We have derived a formula for evaluating the magneto-optical sensitivity of a bent spun fibre. An approach has been proposed for restoring the degree of polarisation of light in a bent hi-bi spun fibre and, as a consequence, the visibility (contrast) of the interferometer in a current sensor with a sensing element based on the fibre under consideration. (optical fibres)

  13. Reciprocity theory of apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy with point-dipole probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esslinger, Moritz; Vogelgesang, Ralf

    2012-09-25

    Near-field microscopy offers the opportunity to reveal optical contrast at deep subwavelength scales. In scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), the diffraction limit is overcome by a nanoscopic probe in close proximity to the sample. The interaction of the probe with the sample fields necessarily perturbs the bare sample response, and a critical issue is the interpretation of recorded signals. For a few specific SNOM configurations, individual descriptions have been modeled, but a general and intuitive framework is still lacking. Here, we give an exact formulation of the measurable signals in SNOM which is easily applicable to experimental configurations. Our results are in close analogy with the description Tersoff and Hamann have derived for the tunneling currents in scanning tunneling microscopy. For point-like scattering probe tips, such as used in apertureless SNOM, the theory simplifies dramatically to a single scalar relation. We find that the measured signal is directly proportional to the field of the coupled tip-sample system at the position of the tip. For weakly interacting probes, the model thus verifies the empirical findings that the recorded signal is proportional to the unperturbed field of the bare sample. In the more general case, it provides guidance to an intuitive and faithful interpretation of recorded images, facilitating the characterization of tip-related distortions and the evaluation of novel SNOM configurations, both for aperture-based and apertureless SNOM.

  14. On cloud ice induced absorption and polarisation effects in microwave limb sounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave limb sounding in the presence of ice clouds was studied by detailed simulations, where clouds and other atmospheric variables varied in three dimensions and the full polarisation state was considered. Scattering particles were assumed to be horizontally aligned oblate spheroids with a size distribution parameterized in terms of temperature and ice water content. A general finding was that particle absorption is significant for limb sounding, which is in contrast to the down-looking case, where it is usually insignificant. Another general finding was that single scattering can be assumed for cloud optical paths below about 0.1, which is thus an important threshold with respect to the complexity and accuracy of retrieval algorithms. The representation of particle sizes during the retrieval is also discussed. Concerning polarisation, specific findings were as follows: Firstly, no significant degree of circular polarisation was found for the considered particle type. Secondly, for the ±45° polarisation components, differences of up to 4 K in brightness temperature were found, but differences were much smaller when single scattering conditions applied. Thirdly, the vertically polarised component has the smallest cloud extinction. An important goal of the study was to derive recommendations for future limb sounding instruments, particularly concerning their polarisation setup. If ice water content is among the retrieval targets (and not just trace gas mixing ratios, then the simulations show that it should be best to observe any of the ±45° and circularly polarised components. These pairs of orthogonal components also make it easier to combine information measured from different positions and with different polarisations.

  15. Visible light optical coherence microscopy imaging of the mouse cortex with femtoliter volume resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Conrad W.; Chong, Shau Poh; Kho, Aaron M.; Zhu, Jun; Kholiqov, Oybek; Dubra, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2018-02-01

    Most flying-spot Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) systems use a symmetric confocal geometry, where the detection path retraces the illumination path starting from and ending with the spatial mode of a single mode optical fiber. Here, we describe a visible light OCM instrument that breaks this symmetry to improve transverse resolution without sacrificing collection efficiency in scattering tissue. This was achieved by overfilling a 0.3 numerical aperture (NA) water immersion objective on the illumination path, while maintaining a conventional Gaussian mode detection path (1/e2 intensity diameter 0.82 Airy disks), enabling 1.1 μm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) transverse resolution. At the same time, a 0.9 μm FWHM axial resolution in tissue, achieved by a broadband visible light source, enabled femtoliter volume resolution. We characterized this instrument according to paraxial coherent microscopy theory, and then used it to image the meningeal layers, intravascular red blood cell-free layer, and myelinated axons in the mouse neocortex in vivo through the thinned skull. Finally, by introducing a 0.8 NA water immersion objective, we improved the lateral resolution to 0.44 μm FWHM, which provided a volumetric resolution of 0.2 fL, revealing cell bodies in cortical layer I of the mouse brain with OCM for the first time.

  16. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-01-01

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity

  17. Accurate Rapid Lifetime Determination on Time-Gated FLIM Microscopy with Optical Sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, António Miguel

    2018-01-01

    Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful technique to assess the biochemistry of cells and tissues. When applied to living thick samples, it is hampered by the lack of optical sectioning and the need of acquiring many images for an accurate measurement of fluorescence lifetimes. Here, we report on the use of processing techniques to overcome these limitations, minimizing the acquisition time, while providing optical sectioning. We evaluated the application of the HiLo and the rapid lifetime determination (RLD) techniques for accurate measurement of fluorescence lifetimes with optical sectioning. HiLo provides optical sectioning by combining the high-frequency content from a standard image, obtained with uniform illumination, with the low-frequency content of a second image, acquired using structured illumination. Our results show that HiLo produces optical sectioning on thick samples without degrading the accuracy of the measured lifetimes. We also show that instrument response function (IRF) deconvolution can be applied with the RLD technique on HiLo images, improving greatly the accuracy of the measured lifetimes. These results open the possibility of using the RLD technique with pulsed diode laser sources to determine accurately fluorescence lifetimes in the subnanosecond range on thick multilayer samples, providing that offline processing is allowed.

  18. Near-field-optical-microscopy studies of micro-modifications caused by femtosecond laser irradiation in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamela, J.; Jaque, D.; Rodenas, A.; Jaque, F.; Torchia, G.A.; Vazquez, J.R.; Mendez, C.; Roso, L.

    2008-01-01

    Near-field-optical-microscopy has been used to study the micro-modifications caused by femtosecond laser pulses focused at the surface and in the volume of lithium niobate crystals. We have found experimental evidence of the existence, close to femtosecond ablation craters, of periodic modifications in the surface reflectivity. In addition, the potential application of near-field-optical microscopy for the spatial location of permanent modifications caused by femtosecond pulses focused inside lithium niobate crystals has been also demonstrated. (orig.)

  19. Structured Illumination-Based Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy for Hemato- and Cyto-Pathology Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieqiao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy utilizes interfering light and the moiré effect to enhance spatial resolution to about a half of that of conventional light microscopy, i.e. approximately 90 nm. In addition to the enhancement in the x and y directions, it also allows enhancement of resolution in the z- direction by the same factor of two (to approximately 220 nm, making it a powerful tool for 3-D morphology studies of fluorescently labeled cells or thin tissue sections. In this report, we applied this technique to several types of blood cells that are commonly seen in hematopathology. Compared with standard brightfield and ordinary fluorescence microscopy images, the 3-D morphology results clearly reveal the morphological features of different types of normal blood cells. We have also used this technique to evaluate morphologies of abnormal erythrocytes and compare them with those recorded on normal cells. The results give a very intuitive presentation of morphological structures of erythrocytes with great details. This research illustrates the potential of this technique to be used in hematology and cyto-pathology studies aimed at identifying nanometer-sized features that cannot be distinguished otherwise with conventional optical microscopy.

  20. Label-free nonlinear optical microscopy detects early markers for osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofemeier, Arne D.; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Schürmann, Matthias; Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Nolte, Lena; Sudhoff, Holger; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering by stem cell differentiation is a novel treatment option for bone regeneration. Most approaches for the detection of osteogenic differentiation are invasive or destructive and not compatible with live cell analysis. Here, non-destructive and label-free approaches of Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to detect and image osteogenic differentiation of human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs). Combined CARS and SHG microscopy was able to detect markers of osteogenesis within 14 days after osteogenic induction. This process increased during continued differentiation. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy showed significant increases of the PO43- symmetric stretch vibrations at 959 cm-1 assigned to calcium hydroxyapatite between days 14 and 21. Additionally, CARS microscopy was able to image calcium hydroxyapatite deposits within 14 days following osteogenic induction, which was confirmed by Alizarin Red-Staining and RT- PCR. Taken together, the multimodal label-free analysis methods Raman spectroscopy, CARS and SHG microscopy can monitor osteogenic differentiation of adult human stem cells into osteoblasts with high sensitivity and spatial resolution in three dimensions. Our findings suggest a great potential of these optical detection methods for clinical applications including in vivo observation of bone tissue-implant-interfaces or disease diagnosis.

  1. Label-free imaging of acanthamoeba using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tsubasa; Cha, Yu-Rok; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Kano, Hideaki

    2018-02-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a disease in which amoebae named Acanthamoeba invade the cornea of an eye. To diagnose this disease before it becomes serious, it is important to detect the cyst state of Acanthamoeba in the early stage of infection. In the present study, we explored spectroscopic signitures of the cyst state of Acanthamoeba using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy with the channels of multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG), and third harmonic generation (THG). A sharp band at around 1603 cm-1 in the CARS (Im[χ(3)]) spectrum was found at the cyst state of Acanthamoeba, which possibly originates from ergosterol and/or 7-dehydrostigmasterol. It can be used as a maker band of Acanthamoeba for medical treatment. Keyword: Acanthamoeba keratitis, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, CARS, second harmonic generation, SHG, microspectroscopy, multiphoton microscopy

  2. Utilizing nonlinear optical microscopy to investigate the development of early cancer in nude mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lo, Wen; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    In this investigation, we used in vivo nonlinear optical microscopy to image normal and carcinogen DMBA treated skin tissues of nude mice. We acquired two-photon autofluroescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of the skin tissue, and applied the ASI (Autofluorescence versus SHG Index) to the resulting image. This allows us to visualize and quantify the interaction between mouse skin cells and the surrounding connective tissue. We found that as the imaging depth increases, ASI has a different distribution in the normal and the treated skin tissues. Since the DMBA treated skin eventually became squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), our results show that the physiological changes to mouse skin en route to become cancer can be effectively tracked by multiphoton microscopy. We envision this approach to be effective in studying tumor biology and tumor treatment procedures.

  3. 3D automatic quantification applied to optically sectioned images to improve microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE Diaz-Zamboni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available New fluorescence microscopy techniques, such as confocal or digital deconvolution microscopy, allow to easily obtain three-dimensional (3D information from specimens. However, there are few 3D quantification tools that allow extracting information of these volumes. Therefore, the amount of information acquired by these techniques is difficult to manipulate and analyze manually. The present study describes a model-based method, which for the first time shows 3D visualization and quantification of fluorescent apoptotic body signals, from optical serial sections of porcine hepatocyte spheroids correlating them to their morphological structures. The method consists on an algorithm that counts apoptotic bodies in a spheroid structure and extracts information from them, such as their centroids in cartesian and radial coordinates, relative to the spheroid centre, and their integrated intensity. 3D visualization of the extracted information, allowed us to quantify the distribution of apoptotic bodies in three different zones of the spheroid.

  4. Nonlinear optical microscopy for histology of fresh normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of only 1-5%. The acceleration of intraoperative histological examination would be beneficial for better management of pancreatic cancer, suggesting an improved survival. Nonlinear optical methods based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second harmonic generation (SHG of intrinsic optical biomarkers show the ability to visualize the morphology of fresh tissues associated with histology, which is promising for real-time intraoperative evaluation of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate whether the nonlinear optical imaging methods have the ability to characterize pancreatic histology at cellular resolution, we studied different types of pancreatic tissues by using label-free TPEF and SHG. Compared with other routine methods for the preparation of specimens, fresh tissues without processing were found to be most suitable for nonlinear optical imaging of pancreatic tissues. The detailed morphology of the normal rat pancreas was observed and related with the standard histological images. Comparatively speaking, the preliminary images of a small number of chemical-induced pancreatic cancer tissues showed visible neoplastic differences in the morphology of cells and extracellular matrix. The subcutaneous pancreatic tumor xenografts were further observed using the nonlinear optical microscopy, showing that most cells are leucocytes at 5 days after implantation, the tumor cells begin to proliferate at 10 days after implantation, and the extracellular collagen fibers become disordered as the xenografts grow. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, nonlinear optical imaging was used to characterize the morphological details of fresh pancreatic tissues for the first time. We demonstrate that it is possible to provide real-time histological evaluation of pancreatic cancer by the nonlinear optical methods, which present an

  5. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy and microscopy of model random and biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yici

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopy and microscopy applied to biomedical science are emerging as new and rapidly growing areas which offer important insight into basic phenomena. Ultrafast NLO processes provide temporal, spectral and spatial sensitivities complementary or superior to those achieved through conventional linear optical approaches. The goal of this thesis is to explore the potential of two fundamental NLO processes to produce noninvasive histological maps of biological tissues. Within the goal of the thesis, steady state intensity, polarization and angular measurements of second- and third-harmonic generations (SHG, THG) have been performed on model random scattering and animal tissue samples. The nonlinear optical effects have been evaluated using models. Conversion efficiencies of SHG and THG from animal tissue interfaces have been determined, ranging from 10-7 to 10-10. The changes in the multiharmonic signals were found to depend on both local and overall histological structures of biological samples. The spectral signatures of two photon excitation induced fluorescence from intrinsic fluorophores have been acquired and used to characterize the physical state and types of tissues. Two dimensional scanning SHG and TPF tomographic images have been obtained from in vitro animal tissues, normal and diseased human breast tissues, and resolved subsurface layers and histo-chemical distributions. By combining consecutive 2D maps, a 3D image can be produced. The structure and morphology dependence of the SH signal has been utilized to image and evaluate subsurface tumor progression depth. Second harmonic microscopy in model random and biological cells has been studied using a CCD camera to obtain direct images from subcellular structures. Finally, near infrared (NIR) NLO spectroscopy and microscopy based on SHG and TPF have demonstrated high spatial resolution, deeper penetration depth, low level photo-damaging and enhanced morphological sensitivity for

  6. Massively parallel data processing for quantitative total flow imaging with optical coherence microscopy and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Szlag, Daniel; Marchand, Paul J.; Kumar, Ashwin S.; Lasser, Theo

    2017-08-01

    We present an application of massively parallel processing of quantitative flow measurements data acquired using spectral optical coherence microscopy (SOCM). The need for massive signal processing of these particular datasets has been a major hurdle for many applications based on SOCM. In view of this difficulty, we implemented and adapted quantitative total flow estimation algorithms on graphics processing units (GPU) and achieved a 150 fold reduction in processing time when compared to a former CPU implementation. As SOCM constitutes the microscopy counterpart to spectral optical coherence tomography (SOCT), the developed processing procedure can be applied to both imaging modalities. We present the developed DLL library integrated in MATLAB (with an example) and have included the source code for adaptations and future improvements. Catalogue identifier: AFBT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFBT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 913552 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 270876249 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: CUDA/C, MATLAB. Computer: Intel x64 CPU, GPU supporting CUDA technology. Operating system: 64-bit Windows 7 Professional. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, CPU code has been vectorized in MATLAB, CUDA code has been parallelized. RAM: Dependent on users parameters, typically between several gigabytes and several tens of gigabytes Classification: 6.5, 18. Nature of problem: Speed up of data processing in optical coherence microscopy Solution method: Utilization of GPU for massively parallel data processing Additional comments: Compiled DLL library with source code and documentation, example of utilization (MATLAB script with raw data) Running time: 1,8 s for one B-scan (150 × faster in comparison to the CPU

  7. Experimental and theoretical analysis for improved microscope design of optical projection tomographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Ryan L; Seibel, Eric J

    2013-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results of axial displacement of objects relative to a fixed condenser focal plane (FP) in optical projection tomographic microscopy (OPTM). OPTM produces three-dimensional, reconstructed images of single cells from two-dimensional projections. The cell rotates in a microcapillary to acquire projections from different perspectives where the objective FP is scanned through the cell while the condenser FP remains fixed at the center of the microcapillary. This work uses a combination of experimental and theoretical methods to improve the OPTM instrument design.

  8. Occlusal overload investigations by noninvasive technology: fluorescence microscopy and en-face optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Negrutiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Demjan, Enikö; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study is the early detection and monitoring of occlusal overload in bruxing patients. En-Face Optical coherence tomography (eF-OCT) and fluorescence microscopy (FM) were used for the imaging of several anterior teeth extracted from patients with light active bruxism. We found a characteristic pattern of enamel cracks, that reached the tooth surface. We concluded that the combination of the en-Face OCT and FM is a promising non-invasive alternative technique for reliable monitoring of occlusal overload.

  9. En face speckle reduction in optical coherence microscopy by frequency compounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnain, Caroline; Wang, Hui; Sakadžić, Sava; Fischl, Bruce; Boas, David A

    2016-05-01

    We report the use of frequency compounding to significantly reduce speckle noise in optical coherence microscopy, more specifically on the en face images. This method relies on the fact that the speckle patterns recorded from different wavelengths simultaneously are independent; hence their summation yields significant reduction in noise, with only a single acquisition. The results of our experiments with microbeads show that the narrow confocal parameter, due to a high numerical aperture objective, restricts the axial resolution loss that would otherwise theoretically broaden linearly with the number of optical frequency bands used. This speckle reduction scheme preserves the lateral resolution since it is performed on individual A-scans. Finally, we apply this technique to images of fixed human brain tissue, showing significant improvements in contrast-to-noise ratio with only moderate loss of axial resolution, in an effort to improve automatic three-dimensional detection of cells and fibers in the cortex.

  10. Plasmonic optical antenna design for performing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharintsev, S S; Fishman, A I; Salakhov, M Kh; Hoffmann, G G

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights optical plasmonic antennas designed with dc-pulsed low-voltage electrochemical etching of a gold wire for implementing tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements. We demonstrate a versatile electrochemical system that allows one to engineer TERS-active metallic gold tips with diverse shapes and sizes in a highly reproducible fashion. The underlying etching mechanism at a voltage-driven meniscus around a gold wire immersed into an electrolyte is discussed in detail. We show that the developed method is suitable to produce not only the simplest geometries such as cones and spheroids, but more complex designs. Attempts have been made to design plasmonic tapered antennas with quasi-uniformly spaced nano-sized bumps on the mesoscopic zone for the extra surface plasmon-light coupling. The capability of the patterned antenna to enhance and localize optical fields is demonstrated with near-field Raman microscopy and spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes bundles. (paper)

  11. The secret world of shrimps: polarisation vision at its best.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kleinlogel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal vision spans a great range of complexity, with systems evolving to detect variations in light intensity, distribution, colour, and polarisation. Polarisation vision systems studied to date detect one to four channels of linear polarisation, combining them in opponent pairs to provide intensity-independent operation. Circular polarisation vision has never been seen, and is widely believed to play no part in animal vision. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Polarisation is fully measured via Stokes' parameters--obtained by combined linear and circular polarisation measurements. Optimal polarisation vision is the ability to see Stokes' parameters: here we show that the crustacean Gonodactylus smithii measures the exact components required. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This vision provides optimal contrast-enhancement and precise determination of polarisation with no confusion states or neutral points--significant advantages. Linear and circular polarisation each give partial information about the polarisation of light--but the combination of the two, as we will show here, results in optimal polarisation vision. We suggest that linear and circular polarisation vision not be regarded as different modalities, since both are necessary for optimal polarisation vision; their combination renders polarisation vision independent of strongly linearly or circularly polarised features in the animal's environment.

  12. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-01-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo . The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque ™ ) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque ™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µ m for Omnipaque ™ and 40 µ m for glycerol ( p   ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque ™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque ™ . However, Omnipaque ™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure. (paper)

  13. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V.; Lademann, Juergen; E Darvin, Maxim

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo. The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque™) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µm for Omnipaque™ and 40 µm for glycerol (p  ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque™. However, Omnipaque™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure.

  14. An integrated optical coherence microscopy imaging and optical stimulation system for optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is the clinical standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling cardiac rhythm, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its applications. Optogenetic pacing of the heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids the shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Drosophila melanogaster, which is a powerful model organism with orthologs of nearly 75% of human disease genes, has not been studied for optogenetic pacing in the heart. Here, we developed a non-invasive integrated optical pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging system to control the heart rhythm of Drosophila at different developmental stages using light. The OCM system is capable of providing high imaging speed (130 frames/s) and ultrahigh imaging resolutions (1.5 μm and 3.9 μm for axial and transverse resolutions, respectively). A light-sensitive pacemaker was developed in Drosophila by specifically expressing the light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in transgenic Drosophila heart. We achieved non-invasive and specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm throughout the fly's life cycle (larva, pupa, and adult) by stimulating the heart with 475 nm pulsed laser light. Heart response to stimulation pulses was monitored non-invasively with OCM. This integrated non-invasive optogenetic control and in vivo imaging technique provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology.

  15. Identification of nodal tissue in the living heart using rapid scanning fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2013-09-01

    Risks associated with pediatric reconstructive heart surgery include injury of the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrioventricular node (AVN), requiring cardiac rhythm management using implantable pacemakers. These injuries are the result of difficulties in identifying nodal tissues intraoperatively. Here we describe an approach based on confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores to quantify tissue microstructure and identify nodal tissue. Using conventional 3-dimensional confocal microscopy we investigated the microstructural arrangement of SAN, AVN, and atrial working myocardium (AWM) in fixed rat heart. AWM exhibited a regular striated arrangement of the extracellular space. In contrast, SAN and AVN had an irregular, reticulated arrangement. AWM, SAN, and AVN tissues were beneath a thin surface layer of tissue that did not obstruct confocal microscopic imaging. Subsequently, we imaged tissues in living rat hearts with real-time fiber-optics confocal microscopy. Fiber-optics confocal microscopy images resembled images acquired with conventional confocal microscopy. We investigated spatial regularity of tissue microstructure from Fourier analysis and second-order image moments. Fourier analysis of fiber-optics confocal microscopy images showed that the spatial regularity of AWM was greater than that of nodal tissues (37.5 ± 5.0% versus 24.3 ± 3.9% for SAN and 23.8 ± 3.7% for AVN; Pfiber-optics confocal microscopy. Application of the approach in pediatric reconstructive heart surgery may reduce risks of injuring nodal tissues.

  16. Three-dimensional DNA image cytometry by optical projection tomographic microscopy for early cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Biancardi, Alberto M; Patten, Florence W; Reeves, Anthony P; Seibel, Eric J

    2014-04-01

    Aneuploidy is typically assessed by flow cytometry (FCM) and image cytometry (ICM). We used optical projection tomographic microscopy (OPTM) for assessing cellular DNA content using absorption and fluorescence stains. OPTM combines some of the attributes of both FCM and ICM and generates isometric high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) images of single cells. Although the depth of field of the microscope objective was in the submicron range, it was extended by scanning the objective's focal plane. The extended depth of field image is similar to a projection in a conventional x-ray computed tomography. These projections were later reconstructed using computed tomography methods to form a 3-D image. We also present an automated method for 3-D nuclear segmentation. Nuclei of chicken, trout, and triploid trout erythrocyte were used to calibrate OPTM. Ratios of integrated optical densities extracted from 50 images of each standard were compared to ratios of DNA indices from FCM. A comparison of mean square errors with thionin, hematoxylin, Feulgen, and SYTOX green was done. Feulgen technique was preferred as it showed highest stoichiometry, least variance, and preserved nuclear morphology in 3-D. The addition of this quantitative biomarker could further strengthen existing classifiers and improve early diagnosis of cancer using 3-D microscopy.

  17. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy and Anterior Segment Optic Coherence Tomography Findings in Ocular Ochronosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Demirkilinc Biler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report clinical and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM findings of two patients with ocular ochronosis secondary due to alkaptonuria. Materials and Methods. Complete ophthalmologic examinations, including IVCM (HRT II/Rostock Cornea Module, Heidelberg, Germany, anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT (Topcon 3D spectral-domain OCT 2000, Topcon Medical Systems, Paramus, NJ, USA, corneal topography (Pentacam, OCULUS Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany, and anterior segment photography, were performed. Results. Biomicroscopic examination showed bilateral darkly pigmented lesions of the nasal and temporal conjunctiva and episclera in both patients. In vivo confocal microscopy of the lesions revealed prominent degenerative changes, including vacuoles and fragmentation of collagen fibers in the affected conjunctival lamina propria and episclera. Hyperreflective pigment granules in different shapes were demonstrated in the substantia propria beneath the basement membrane. AS-OCT of Case 1 demonstrated hyporeflective areas. Fundus examination was within normal limits in both patients, except tilted optic discs with peripapillary atrophy in one of the patients. Corneal topography, thickness, and macular OCT were normal bilaterally in both cases. Conclusion. The degenerative and anatomic changes due to ochronotic pigment deposition in alkaptonuria can be demonstrated in detail with IVCM and AS-OCT. Confocal microscopic analysis in ocular ochronosis may serve as a useful adjunct in diagnosis and monitoring of the disease progression.

  18. Imaging arterial cells, atherosclerosis, and restenosis by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Wei; Simianu, Vlad; Locker, Matthew J.; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-02-01

    By integrating sum-frequency generation (SFG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope platform, multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging of arteries and atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated. CARS signals arising from CH II-rich membranes allowed visualization of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in a carotid artery. Additionally, CARS microscopy allowed vibrational imaging of elastin and collagen fibrils which are rich in CH II bonds in their cross-linking residues. The extracellular matrix organization was further confirmed by TPEF signals arising from elastin's autofluorescence and SFG signals arising from collagen fibrils' non-centrosymmetric structure. The system is capable of identifying different atherosclerotic lesion stages with sub-cellular resolution. The stages of atherosclerosis, such as macrophage infiltration, lipid-laden foam cell accumulation, extracellular lipid distribution, fibrous tissue deposition, plaque establishment, and formation of other complicated lesions could be viewed by our multimodal CARS microscope. Collagen percentages in the region adjacent to coronary artery stents were resolved. High correlation between NLO and histology imaging evidenced the validity of the NLO imaging. The capability of imaging significant components of an arterial wall and distinctive stages of atherosclerosis in a label-free manner suggests the potential application of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to monitor the onset and progression of arterial diseases.

  19. Correlation of ''twins'' observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in YBa2Cu3O7/sub -//sub x/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, H.A.; Singh, A.K.; Pande, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    By using transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy on the same specimens, the patterns of light- and dark-contrast lines seen in reflected polarized light were shown to be an interference pattern due to the variable spacing of suboptical microtwins. These microtwins are mostly [110] reflection twins. The [110] twinning was observed to be cyclic and occasionally pseudotetragonal because of the progressive cycling of contact twin domains. Within a domain, and occasionally in a whole grain, the [110] reflection twins occurred as polysynthetic lamellae. The morphology of the domain structure can be explained from the theory of martensitic transformation

  20. Multiplexed optical data storage and vectorial ray tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foreman M.R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available With the motivation of creating a terabyte-sized optical disk, a novel imaging technique is implemented. This technique merges two existing technologies: confocal microscopy and Mueller matrix imaging. Mueller matrix images from a high numerical space are obtained. The acquisition of these images makes the exploration of polarisation properties in a sample possible. The particular case of optical data storage is used as an example in this presentation. Since we encode information into asymmetric datapits (see Figure 1, the study of the polarisation of the scattered light can then be used to recover the orientation of the pit. It is thus possible to multiplex information by changing the angle of the mark. The storage capacity in the system is hence limited by the number of distinct angles that the optical system can resolve. This presentation thus answers the question; what is the current storage capacity of a polarisation sensitive optical disk? After a brief introduction to polarisation, the decoding method and experimental results are presented so as to provide an answer to this question. With the aim of understanding high NA focusing, an introduction to vectorial ray tracing is then given.

  1. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease.

  2. Nonlinear adaptive optics: aberration correction in three photon fluorescence microscopy for mouse brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P.; Wang, Tianyu; Wang, Mengran; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Xu, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a well-established technique for deep-tissue imaging with subcellular resolution. Three-photon microscopy (3PM) when combined with long wavelength excitation was shown to allow deeper imaging than two-photon microscopy (2PM) in biological tissues, such as mouse brain, because out-of-focus background light can be further reduced due to the higher order nonlinear excitation. As was demonstrated in 2PM systems, imaging depth and resolution can be improved by aberration correction using adaptive optics (AO) techniques which are based on shaping the scanning beam using a spatial light modulator (SLM). In this way, it is possible to compensate for tissue low order aberration and to some extent, to compensate for tissue scattering. Here, we present a 3PM AO microscopy system for brain imaging. Soliton self-frequency shift is used to create a femtosecond source at 1675 nm and a microelectromechanical (MEMS) SLM serves as the wavefront shaping device. We perturb the 1020 segment SLM using a modified nonlinear version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. The nonlinearity of the fluorescence signal used for feedback ensures that the signal is increasing when the spot size decreases, allowing compensation of phase errors in an iterative optimization process without direct phase measurement. We compare the performance for different orders of nonlinear feedback, showing an exponential growth in signal improvement as the nonlinear order increases. We demonstrate the impact of the method by applying the 3PM AO system for in-vivo mouse brain imaging, showing improvement in signal at 1-mm depth inside the brain.

  3. Nucleon Polarisabilities and Effective Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.

    2017-09-01

    Low-energy Compton scattering probes the nucleon's two-photon response to electric and magnetic fields at fixed photon frequency and multipolarity. It tests the symmetries and strengths of the interactions between constituents, and with photons. For convenience, this energy-dependent information is often compressed into the two scalar dipole polarisabilities αE 1 and βM 1 at zero photon energy. These are fundamental quantities, and important for the proton charge radius puzzle and the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen. Combined with emerging lattice QCD computations, they provide stringent tests for our understanding of hadron structure. Extractions of the proton and neutron polarisabilities from all published elastic data below 300 MeV in Chiral Effective Field Theory with explicit Δ (1232) are now available. This talk emphasises χEFT as natural bridge between lattice QCD and ongoing or approved efforts at HI γS, MAMI and MAX-lab. Chiral lattice extrapolations from mπ > 200 MeV to the physical point compare well to lattice computations. Combining χEFT with high-intensity experiments with polarised targets and polarised beams will extract not only scalar polarisabilities, but in particular the four so-far poorly explored spin-polarisabilities. These parametrise the stiffness of the spin in external electro-magnetic fields (nucleonic bi-refringence/Faraday effect). New chiral predictions for proton, deuteron and 3He observables show intriguing sensitivities on spin and neutron polarisabilities. Data consistency and a model-independent quantification of residual theory uncertainties by Bayesian analysis are also discussed. Proton-neutron differences explore the interplay between chiral symmetry breaking and short-distance Physics. Finally, I address their impact on the neutron-proton mass difference, big-bang nucleosynthesis, and their relevance for anthropic arguments. Supported in part by DOE DE-SC0015393 and George Washington University.

  4. Scanning near-field optical microscopy of quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skacel, Matthias; Fiore, Andrea [COBRA Research Institute, Technical University Eindhoven, Den Dolech 2, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Prancardi, Marco; Gerardino, Annamaria [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnology, CNR, via del Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Alloing, Blandine; Li Lianhe, E-mail: m.s.skacel@tue.n [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electronics, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-09-01

    Nanophotonic devices are of major interest for research and future quantum communication applications. Due to their nanometer feature size the resolution limit of far-field microscopy poses a limitation on the characterization of their optical properties. A method to overcome the resolution limit is the Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope (SNOM). By approaching a fiber tip into the close vicinity of the sample the optical emission in the near-field regime is collected. This way of collecting the light is not affected by the diffraction limit. We employ a low temperature SNOM to investigate the photoluminescence of InAs QDs emitting at 1300nm wavelength embedded in photonic crystal cavities. At each location of an image scan the tip is stopped and a spectrum is acquired. We then plot maps of the photoluminescence for each wavelength. With this instrument it is now possible to directly observe the coupling of QDs to photonic crystal cavities both spectrally and spatially. We show first results of photoluminescence mapping of InAs QDs in photonic crystal cavities.

  5. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  6. Characterizing the surface forces between two individual nanowires using optical microscopy based nanomanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongtao; Mead, James L.; Wang, Shiliang; Fatikow, Sergej; Huang, Han

    2018-06-01

    The adhesion and friction between two Al2O3 nanowires (NWs) was characterized by the use of optical microscopy based nanomanipulation, with which peeling, shearing and sliding was performed. The elastically deformed shape of the NWs during peeling and shearing was used to calculate the adhesion and frictional forces; force sensing was not required. The obtained adhesion stress between two Al2O3 NWs varied from 0.14 to 0.25 MPa, lower than that observed for carbon nanotube junctions, and was attributed to van der Waals attraction. Stick-slip was observed during the shearing and sliding of two NWs, and was the consequence of discrete contact between surface asperities. The obtained static and kinetic frictional stresses varied from 0.7 to 1.3 MPa and 0.4 to 0.8 MPa, respectively; significantly greater than the obtained adhesion stress.

  7. The lymphatic mechanisms of brain cleaning: application of optical coherence tomography and fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkovskaya-Semyachkina, O.; Abdurashitov, A.; Fedosov, I.; Namykin, A.; Pavlov, A.; Shirokov, A.; Shushunova, N.; Sindeeva, O.; Khorovodov, A.; Ulanova, M.; Sagatova, V.; Agranovich, I.; Bodrova, A.; Kurths, J.

    2018-04-01

    Here we studied the role of cerebral lymphatic system in the brain clearing using intraparenchymal injection of Evans Blue and gold nanorods assessed by optical coherent tomography and fluorescence microscopy. Our data clearly show that the cerebral lymphatic system plays an important role in the brain cleaning via meningeal lymphatic vessels but not cerebral veins. Meningeal lymphatic vessels transport fluid from the brain into the deep cervical node, which is the first anatomical "station" for lymph outflow from the brain. The lymphatic processes underlying brain clearing are more slowly vs. peripheral lymphatics. These results shed light on the lymphatic mechanisms responsible for brain clearing as well as interaction between the intra- and extracranial lymphatic compartment.

  8. Tunable optical setup with high flexibility for spectrally resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, G; Akimov, D; Bartelt, H; Dietzek, B; Popp, J; Schlücker, S

    2011-01-01

    A simplified setup for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is introduced, which allows for recording CARS images with 30 cm -1 excitation bandwidth for probing Raman bands between 500 and 900 cm -1 with minimal requirements for alignment. The experimental arrangement is based on electronic switching between CARS images recorded at different Raman resonances by combining a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as broadband light source and an acousto-optical programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF) as tunable wavelength filter. Such spatial light modulator enables selection of a narrow-band spectrum to yield high vibrational contrast and hence chemical contrast in the resultant CARS images. Furthermore, an experimental approach to reconstruct spectral information from CARS image contrast is introduced

  9. Label-free imaging of developing vasculature in zebrafish with phase variance optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Fingler, Jeff; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2016-03-01

    A phase variance optical coherence microscope (pvOCM) has been created to visualize blood flow in the vasculature of zebrafish embryos, without using exogenous labels. The pvOCM imaging system has axial and lateral resolutions of 2 μm in tissue, and imaging depth of more than 100 μm. Imaging of 2-5 days post-fertilization zebrafish embryos identified the detailed structures of somites, spinal cord, gut and notochord based on intensity contrast. Visualization of the blood flow in the aorta, veins and intersegmental vessels was achieved with phase variance contrast. The pvOCM vasculature images were confirmed with corresponding fluorescence microscopy of a zebrafish transgene that labels the vasculature with green fluorescent protein. The pvOCM images also revealed functional information of the blood flow activities that is crucial for the study of vascular development.

  10. Fabrication of a novel nano-probe slide for near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Sang-Youp; Jeang, Eun-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Park, Seung-Han; Cho, Kyu-Man

    2004-01-01

    A novel probe structure, which can act as a planar nano-probe slide for near-field microscopy, was proposed and fabricated. Sub-wavelength apertures on a Si substrate are successfully produced by means of standard photolithography techniques with properly selected masks. In particular, the anisotropic etching characteristics of Si substrate and the hardness of the Si 3 N 4 film are utilized. Probe-to-probe scanning of the fabricated near-field nano-probe slide shows sub-wavelength confinement of light and comparable throughput to the conventional optical fiber probe. We also show that the nano-probe slide can serve as a supporting base and a sub-wavelength aperture to obtain the near-field photoluminescence spectra of a limited number of CdSe nanocrystals.

  11. Study of Transitions between Wetting States on Microcavity Arrays by Optical Transmission Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Smistrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a simple and fast optical method based on transmission microscopy to study the stochastic wetting transitions on micro- and nanostructured polymer surfaces immersed in water. We analyze the influence of immersion time and the liquid pressure on the degree of water......-Laplace equation for the water menisci in the cavities and the diffusion of dissolved gas molecules in the water. In addition, the wetting transitions had a stochastic nature, which resulted from the short diffusion distance for dissolved gas molecules in the water between neighboring cavities. Furthermore, we...... compared the contact angle properties of two polymeric materials (COC and PP) with moderate hydrophobicity. We attributed the difference in the water repellency of the two materials to a difference in the wetting of their nanostructures. Our experimental observations thus indicate that both the diffusion...

  12. Microsphere imaging with confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hyung Su; An, Kyung Won; Lee, Jai Hyung

    2002-01-01

    We have acquired images of polystyrene and fused-silica microsphere by using conventional optical microscopy, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, and performed comparative analysis of these images. Different from conventional optical microscopy, confocal and two-photon microscopy had good optical sectioning capability. In addition, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy had better lateral resolution than conventional optical microscopy. These results are attributed to confocality and nonlinearity of confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy, respectively.

  13. Simultaneous topographical, electrical and optical microscopy of optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Naresh

    2017-01-12

    Novel optoelectronic devices rely on complex nanomaterial systems where the nanoscale morphology and local chemical composition are critical to performance. However, the lack of analytical techniques that can directly probe these structure-property relationships at the nanoscale presents a major obstacle to device development. In this work, we present a novel method for non-destructive, simultaneous mapping of the morphology, chemical composition and photoelectrical properties with <20 nm spatial resolution by combining plasmonic optical signal enhancement with electrical-mode scanning probe microscopy. We demonstrate that this combined approach offers subsurface sensitivity that can be exploited to provide molecular information with a nanoscale resolution in all three spatial dimensions. By applying the technique to an organic solar cell device, we show that the inferred surface and subsurface composition distribution correlates strongly with the local photocurrent generation and explains macroscopic device performance. For instance, the direct measurement of fullerene phase purity can distinguish between high purity aggregates that lead to poor performance and lower purity aggregates (fullerene intercalated with polymer) that result in strong photocurrent generation and collection. We show that the reliable determination of the structure-property relationship at the nanoscale can remove ambiguity from macroscopic device data and support the identification of the best routes for device optimisation. The multi-parameter measurement approach demonstrated herein is expected to play a significant role in guiding the rational design of nanomaterial-based optoelectronic devices, by opening a new realm of possibilities for advanced investigation via the combination of nanoscale optical spectroscopy with a whole range of scanning probe microscopy modes.

  14. The necessity of microscopy to characterize the optical properties of size-selected, nonspherical aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veghte, Daniel P; Freedman, Miriam A

    2012-11-06

    It is currently unknown whether mineral dust causes a net warming or cooling effect on the climate system. This uncertainty stems from the varied and evolving shape and composition of mineral dust, which leads to diverse interactions of dust with solar and terrestrial radiation. To investigate these interactions, we have used a cavity ring-down spectrometer to study the optical properties of size-selected calcium carbonate particles, a reactive component of mineral dust. The size selection of nonspherical particles like mineral dust can differ from spherical particles in the polydispersity of the population selected. To calculate the expected extinction cross sections, we use Mie scattering theory for monodisperse spherical particles and for spherical particles with the polydispersity observed in transmission electron microscopy images. Our results for calcium carbonate are compared to the well-studied system of ammonium sulfate. While ammonium sulfate extinction cross sections agree with Mie scattering theory for monodisperse spherical particles, the results for calcium carbonate deviate at large and small particle sizes. We find good agreement for both systems, however, between the calculations performed using the particle images and the cavity ring-down data, indicating that both ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate can be treated as polydisperse spherical particles. Our results indicate that having an independent measure of polydispersity is essential for understanding the optical properties of nonspherical particles measured with cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Our combined spectroscopy and microscopy techniques demonstrate a novel method by which cavity ring-down spectroscopy can be extended for the study of more complex aerosol particles.

  15. Portable optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy for volumetric imaging of multiscale organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tian; Guo, Heng; Yao, Lei; Xie, Huikai; Jiang, Huabei; Xi, Lei

    2018-04-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) provides a fundamentally new tool for a broad range of studies of biological structures and functions. However, the use of PAM has been largely limited to small vertebrates due to the large size/weight and the inconvenience of the equipment. Here, we describe a portable optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (pORPAM) system for 3-dimensional (3D) imaging of small-to-large rodents and humans with a high spatiotemporal resolution and a large field of view. We show extensive applications of pORPAM to multiscale animals including mice and rabbits. In addition, we image the 3D vascular networks of human lips, and demonstrate the feasibility of pORPAM to observe the recovery process of oral ulcer and cancer-associated capillary loops in human oral cavities. This technology is promising for broad biomedical studies from fundamental biology to clinical diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Three-dimensional simultaneous optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy for investigation of lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Meissner, Sven; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Koch, Edmund

    2012-07-01

    Although several strategies exist for a minimal-invasive treatment of patients with lung failure, the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome still reaches 30% at minimum. This striking number indicates the necessity of understanding lung dynamics on an alveolar level. To investigate the dynamical behavior on a microscale, we used three-dimensional geometrical and functional imaging to observe tissue parameters including alveolar size and length of embedded elastic fibers during ventilation. We established a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy system that is able to monitor the distension of alveolar tissue and elastin fibers simultaneously within three dimensions. The OCT system can laterally resolve a 4.9 μm line pair feature and has an approximately 11 μm full-width-half-maximum axial resolution in air. confocal fluorescence microscopy visualizes molecular properties of the tissue with a resolution of 0.75 μm (laterally), and 5.9 μm (axially) via fluorescence detection of the dye sulforhodamine B specifically binding to elastin. For system evaluation, we used a mouse model in situ to perform lung distension by application of different constant pressure values within the physiological regime. Our method enables the investigation of alveolar dynamics by helping to reveal basic processes emerging during artificial ventilation and breathing.

  17. Local Delivery of Fluorescent Dye For Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy of the Living Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eHuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release versus foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  18. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  19. Electronically tunable femtosecond all-fiber optical parametric oscillator for multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Tim; Brinkmann, Maximilian; Fallnich, Carsten

    2018-02-01

    We present a femtosecond fiber-based optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) for multiphoton microscopy with wavelength tuning by electronic repetition rate tuning in combination with a dispersive filter in the FOPO cavity. The all-spliced, all-fiber FOPO cavity is based on polarization-maintaining fibers and a broadband output coupler, allowing to get access to the resonant signal pulses as well as the idler pulses simultaneously. The system was pumped by a gain-switched fiber-coupled laser diode emitting pulses at a central wavelength of 1030 nm and an electronically tunable repetition frequency of about 2 MHz. The pump pulses were amplified in an Ytterbium fiber amplifier system with a pulse duration after amplification of 13 ps. Tuning of the idler (1140 nm - 1300 nm) and signal wavelengths (850 nm - 940 nm) was achieved by changing the repetition frequency of the pump laser by about 4 kHz. The generated signal pulses reached a pulse energy of up to 9.2 nJ at 920 nm and were spectrally broadened to about 6 nm in the FOPO by a combination of self-phase and cross-phase modulation. We showed external compression of the idler pulses at 920 nm to about 430 fs and appleid them to two-photon excitation microscopy with green fluorescent dyes. The presented system constitutes an important step towards a fully fiber-integrated all-electronically tunable and, thereby, programmable light source and already embodies a versatile and flexible light source for applications, e.g., for smart microscopy.

  20. Measurement of W Polarisation at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    The three different helicity states of W bosons produced in the reaction e+ e- -> W+ W- -> l nu q q~ at LEP are studied using leptonic and hadronic W decays. Data at centre-of-mass energies \\sqrt s = 183-209 GeV are used to measure the polarisation of W bosons, and its dependence on the W boson production angle. The fraction of longitudinally polarised W bosons is measured to be 0.218 \\pm 0.027 \\pm 0.016 where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  1. Towards high resolution polarisation analysis using double polarisation and ellipsoidal analysers

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Y-Marero, D

    2002-01-01

    Classical polarisation analysis methods lack the combination of high resolution and high count rate necessary to cope with the demand of modern condensed-matter experiments. In this work, we present a method to achieve high resolution polarisation analysis based on a double polarisation system. Coupling this method with an ellipsoidal wavelength analyser, a high count rate can be achieved whilst delivering a resolution of around 10 mu eV. This method is ideally suited to pulsed sources, although it can be adapted to continuous sources as well. (orig.)

  2. Improving the visualization of electron-microscopy data through optical flow interpolation

    KAUST Repository

    Carata, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    Technical developments in neurobiology have reached a point where the acquisition of high resolution images representing individual neurons and synapses becomes possible. For this, the brain tissue samples are sliced using a diamond knife and imaged with electron-microscopy (EM). However, the technique achieves a low resolution in the cutting direction, due to limitations of the mechanical process, making a direct visualization of a dataset difficult. We aim to increase the depth resolution of the volume by adding new image slices interpolated from the existing ones, without requiring modifications to the EM image-capturing method. As classical interpolation methods do not provide satisfactory results on this type of data, the current paper proposes a re-framing of the problem in terms of motion volumes, considering the depth axis as a temporal axis. An optical flow method is adapted to estimate the motion vectors of pixels in the EM images, and this information is used to compute and insert multiple new images at certain depths in the volume. We evaluate the visualization results in comparison with interpolation methods currently used on EM data, transforming the highly anisotropic original dataset into a dataset with a larger depth resolution. The interpolation based on optical flow better reveals neurite structures with realistic undistorted shapes, and helps to easier map neuronal connections. © 2011 ACM.

  3. In situ 3D characterization of historical coatings and wood using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-10-22

    We demonstrate multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) microscopies. We first identify the nonlinear optical response of materials commonly encountered in coatings of cultural heritage artifacts by analyzing one- and multi-layered model samples. We observe 2PEF signals from cochineal lake and sandarac and show that pigments and varnish films can be discriminated by exploiting their different emission spectral ranges as in luminescence linear spectroscopy. We then demonstrate SHG imaging of a filler, plaster, composed of bassanite particles which exhibit a non centrosymmetric crystal structure. We also show that SHG/2PEF imaging enables the visualization of wood microstructure through typically 60 µm-thick coatings by revealing crystalline cellulose (SHG signal) and lignin (2PEF signal) in the wood cell walls. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as a promising non-destructive and contactless tool for in situ 3D investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale.

  4. Refractometry of melanocyte cell nuclei using optical scatter images recorded by digital Fourier microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Nieminen, Timo A; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2009-01-01

    The cell nucleus is the dominant optical scatterer in the cell. Neoplastic cells are characterized by cell nucleus polymorphism and polychromism-i.e., the nuclei exhibits an increase in the distribution of both size and refractive index. The relative size parameter, and its distribution, is proportional to the product of the nucleus size and its relative refractive index and is a useful discriminant between normal and abnormal (cancerous) cells. We demonstrate a recently introduced holographic technique, digital Fourier microscopy (DFM), to provide a sensitive measure of this relative size parameter. Fourier holograms were recorded and optical scatter of individual scatterers were extracted and modeled with Mie theory to determine the relative size parameter. The relative size parameter of individual melanocyte cell nuclei were found to be 16.5+/-0.2, which gives a cell nucleus refractive index of 1.38+/-0.01 and is in good agreement with previously reported data. The relative size parameters of individual malignant melanocyte cell nuclei are expected to be greater than 16.5.

  5. In vivo oral imaging with integrated portable photoacoustic microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Qi, Weizhi; Jin, Tian; Guo, Heng; Xi, Lei

    2017-12-01

    Oral diseases, especially oral cancers, are becoming serious health problems in humans. To image vasculatures and structures simultaneously in the human oral cavity which are tightly associated with various oral diseases, we develop a dual-modality portable optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. This system utilizes a new rotary scanning mechanism and a compact design of the imaging head, making it portable and free of translation of the imaging interface or samples. Through the phantom experiments, both modalities yield high lateral resolutions of 8.1 μm (ORPAM) and 8.56 μm (OCT), respectively. The axial resolutions are measured to be 116.5 μm for ORPAM and 6.1 μm for OCT. In vivo imaging of a mouse ear was carried out to evaluate the performance of the system in biological tissues. In addition, in vivo oral imaging of a healthy human lip and monitoring recovery progress of a lip ulcer demonstrate the clinical potential of this system.

  6. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress

  7. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Claude Boccara, A.; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  8. Fluorescent nanoscale detection of biotin-streptavidin interaction using near-field scanning optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Gokarna, Anisha; Hulme, John P; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2008-01-01

    We describe a nanoscale strategy for detecting biotin-streptavidin binding using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) that exploits the fluorescence properties of single polydiacetylene (PDA) liposomes. NSOM is more useful to observe nanomaterials having optical properties with the help of topological information. We synthesized amine-terminated 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) monomer (PCDA-NH 2 ) and used this derivatized monomer to prepare PCDA liposomes. PCDA-NH 2 liposomes were immobilized on an aldehyde-functionalized glass surface followed by photopolymerization by using a 254 nm light source. To measure the biotin-streptavidin binding, we conjugated photoactivatable biotin to immobilized PCDA-NH 2 liposomes by UV irradiation (365 nm) and subsequently allowed them to interact with streptavidin. We analyzed the fluorescence using a fluorescence scanner and observed single liposomes using NSOM. The average height and NSOM signal observed in a single liposome after binding were ∼31.3 to 8.5 ± 0.5 nm and 0.37 to 0.16 ± 0.6 kHz, respectively. This approach, which has the advantage of not requiring a fluorescent label, could prove highly beneficial for single molecule detection technology

  9. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Boccara, A Claude; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  10. Acute changes associated with electrode insertion measured with optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Lozzi, Andrea; Boretsky, Adam; Agrawal, Anant; Welle, Cristin G.

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in functional neural imaging, penetrating microelectrodes provide the most direct interface for the extraction of neural signals from the nervous system and are a critical component of many high degree-of-freedom braincomputer interface devices. Electrode insertion is a traumatic event that elicits a complex neuroinflammatory response. In this investigation we applied optical coherence microscopy (OCM), particularly optical coherence angiography (OCA), to characterize the immediate tissue response during microelectrode insertion. Microelectrodes of varying dimension and footprint (one-, two-, and four-shank) were inserted into mouse motor cortex beneath a window after craniotomy surgery. The microelectrodes were inserted in 3-4 steps at 15-20°, with approximately 250 μm linear insertion distance for each step. Before insertion and between each step, OCM datasets were collected, including for quantitative capillary velocimetry. A cohort of control animals without microelectrode insertion was also imaged over a similar time period (2-3 hours). Mechanical tissue deformation was observed in all the experimental animals. The quantitative angiography results varied across animals, and were not correlated with device dimensions. In some cases, localized flow drop-out was observed in a small region surrounding the electrode, while in other instances a global disruption in flow occurred, perhaps as a result of large vessel compression caused by mechanical pressure. OCM is a tool that can be used in various neurophotonics applications, including quantification of the neuroinflammatory response to penetrating electrode insertion.

  11. Microfluidic Imaging Flow Cytometry by Asymmetric-detection Time-stretch Optical Microscopy (ATOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson H L; Lai, Queenie T K; Chung, Bob M F; Lee, Kelvin C M; Mok, Aaron T Y; Yip, G K; Shum, Anderson H C; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-06-28

    Scaling the number of measurable parameters, which allows for multidimensional data analysis and thus higher-confidence statistical results, has been the main trend in the advanced development of flow cytometry. Notably, adding high-resolution imaging capabilities allows for the complex morphological analysis of cellular/sub-cellular structures. This is not possible with standard flow cytometers. However, it is valuable for advancing our knowledge of cellular functions and can benefit life science research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. Incorporating imaging capabilities into flow cytometry compromises the assay throughput, primarily due to the limitations on speed and sensitivity in the camera technologies. To overcome this speed or throughput challenge facing imaging flow cytometry while preserving the image quality, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) has been demonstrated to enable high-contrast, single-cell imaging with sub-cellular resolution, at an imaging throughput as high as 100,000 cells/s. Based on the imaging concept of conventional time-stretch imaging, which relies on all-optical image encoding and retrieval through the use of ultrafast broadband laser pulses, ATOM further advances imaging performance by enhancing the image contrast of unlabeled/unstained cells. This is achieved by accessing the phase-gradient information of the cells, which is spectrally encoded into single-shot broadband pulses. Hence, ATOM is particularly advantageous in high-throughput measurements of single-cell morphology and texture - information indicative of cell types, states, and even functions. Ultimately, this could become a powerful imaging flow cytometry platform for the biophysical phenotyping of cells, complementing the current state-of-the-art biochemical-marker-based cellular assay. This work describes a protocol to establish the key modules of an ATOM system (from optical frontend to data processing and visualization

  12. Characterization of power induced heating and damage in fiber optic probes for near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Erickson, Elizabeth S.; Mooren, Olivia L.; Dunn, Robert C.

    2007-05-01

    Tip-induced sample heating in near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is studied for fiber optic probes fabricated using the chemical etching technique. To characterize sample heating from etched NSOM probes, the spectra of a thermochromic polymer sample are measured as a function of probe output power, as was previously reported for pulled NSOM probes. The results reveal that sample heating increases rapidly to ˜55-60°C as output powers reach ˜50nW. At higher output powers, the sample heating remains approximately constant up to the maximum power studied of ˜450nW. The sample heating profiles measured for etched NSOM probes are consistent with those previously measured for NSOM probes fabricated using the pulling method. At high powers, both pulled and etched NSOM probes fail as the aluminum coating is damaged. For probes fabricated in our laboratory we find failure occurring at input powers of 3.4±1.7 and 20.7±6.9mW for pulled and etched probes, respectively. The larger half-cone angle for etched probes (˜15° for etched and ˜6° for pulled probes) enables more light delivery and also apparently leads to a different failure mechanism. For pulled NSOM probes, high resolution images of NSOM probes as power is increased reveal the development of stress fractures in the coating at a taper diameter of ˜6μm. These stress fractures, arising from the differential heating expansion of the dielectric and the metal coating, eventually lead to coating removal and probe failure. For etched tips, the absence of clear stress fractures and the pooled morphology of the damaged aluminum coating following failure suggest that thermal damage may cause coating failure, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out.

  13. Noninvasive label-free monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in human skin using nonlinear optical microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past decade, nonlinear optical microscopy has seen a dramatic rise in its use in research settings due to its noninvasiveness, enhanced penetration depth, intrinsic optical sectioning, and the ability to probe chemical compounds with molecular specificity without exogenous contrast agents. Nonlinear optical techniques including two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), second harmonic generation (SHG), coherent anti-Stokes and stimulated Raman scattering (CARS and SRS, respectively), as well as transient and sum frequency absorption (TA and SFA, respectively), have been widely used to explore the physiology and microanatomy of skin. Recently, these modalities have shed light on dermal processes that could not have otherwise been observed, including the spatiotemporal monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. However, a challenge quickly arises when studying such chemicals in a dermatological context: many exogenous compounds have optical signatures that can interfere with the signals that would otherwise be acquired from intact skin. For example, oily solvents exhibit strong signals when probing CH2 vibrations with CARS/SRS; chemical sun filters appear bright in 2PEF microscopy; and darkly colored compounds readily absorb light across a broad spectrum, producing strong TA/SFA signals. Thus, this discussion will first focus on the molecular contrast in skin that can be probed using the aforementioned nonlinear optical techniques. This will be followed by an overview of strategies that take advantage of the exogenous compounds' optical signatures to probe spatiotemporal dynamics while preserving endogenous information from skin.

  14. Development of an thin, internal superconducting polarisation magnet for the polarised target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altfelde, Timo; Bornstein, Marcel; Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Miebach, Roland; Reeve, Scott; Runkel, Stefan; Sommer, Marco; Streit, Benjamin [Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve the figure of merit of double-polarisation experiments at CB-ELSA in Bonn, the Polarised Target is working on a new dilution refrigerator. For maximum polarisation of nucleons low temperatures and a high homogeneous magnetic field within the target area is needed. A thin, superconducting magnet is in development, which will create a continuous longitudinal magnetic field of 2.5 T and which will be used within the new refrigerator. The solenoidal geometry of this magnet uses two additional correction coils, placed at a well defined calculated position, for reaching the homogeneity criteria of 10{sup -4} needed for the dynamic nuclear polarisation process. Practically, the superconducting wires as well as the correction coils have to be placed with maximum precision: Small fluctuations of the distance between the current loops can diminish the requested homogeneity.

  15. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sednev, Maksim V; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-01-01

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe’s diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiments, bright and photoresistant dyes with small Stokes shifts of 20–40 nm were used. The rapid progress in STED microscopy showed that organic fluorophores possessing large Stokes shifts are indispensable in multi-color super-resolution techniques. The ultimate result of the imaging relies on the optimal combination of a dye, the bio-conjugation procedure and the performance of the optical microscope. Modern bioconjugation methods, basics of STED microscopy, as well as structures and spectral properties of the presently available fluorescent markers are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the spectral properties of the commercial dyes are tabulated and correlated with the available depletion wavelengths found in STED microscopes produced by LEICA Microsytems, Abberior Instruments and Picoquant GmbH. (topical review)

  16. Dimensional metrology of lab-on-a-chip internal structures: a comparison of optical coherence tomography with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, D R; Halter, M; Hwang, J

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of internal structures in a polymeric microfluidic device, especially of a final product, will require a different set of optical metrology tools than those traditionally used for microelectronic devices. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is a promising technique to characterize the internal structures of poly(methyl methacrylate) devices where the subsurface structures often cannot be imaged by conventional wide field optical microscopy. The structural details of channels in the devices were imaged with OCT and analyzed with an in-house written ImageJ macro in an effort to identify the structural details of the channel. The dimensional values obtained with OCT were compared with laser-scanning confocal microscopy images of channels filled with a fluorophore solution. Attempts were also made using confocal reflectance and interferometry microscopy to measure the channel dimensions, but artefacts present in the images precluded quantitative analysis. OCT provided the most accurate estimates for the channel height based on an analysis of optical micrographs obtained after destructively slicing the channel with a microtome. OCT may be a promising technique for the future of three-dimensional metrology of critical internal structures in lab-on-a-chip devices because scans can be performed rapidly and noninvasively prior to their use. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-15

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  18. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  19. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  20. Unbiased Polarised Parton Distribution Functions and their Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the determination of spin-dependent, or polarised, Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) from all relevant inclusive polarised DIS data. The analysis is performed within the NNPDF approach, which provides a faithful and statistically sound representation of PDFs and their uncertainties. We describe how the NNPDF methodology has been extended to the polarised case, and compare our results with other recent polarised parton sets. We show that polarised PDF uncertainties can be sizeably underestimated in standard determinations, most notably for the gluon.

  1. Polarisation of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vryonidou Eleni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present results for the polarisation of gauge bosons produced at the LHC. Polarisation effects for W bosons manifest themselves in the angular distributions of the lepton and in the distributions of lepton transverse momentum and missing transverse energy. The polarisation is discussed for a range of different processes producing W bosons such as W+jets and W from top production. The relative contributions of the different polarisation states vary from process to process, reflecting the dynamics of the underlying hardscattering process. We also calculate the polarisation of the Z boson produced in association with QCD jets at the LHC.

  2. Towards non-invasive 3D hepatotoxicity assays with optical coherence phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Treskes, Philipp; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue-engineered models are increasingly recognised as more physiologically-relevant than standard 2D cell culture for pre-clinical drug toxicity testing. However, many types of conventional toxicity assays are incompatible with dense 3D tissues. This study investigated the use of optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) as a novel approach to assess cell death in 3D tissue culture. For 3D micro-spheroid formation Human hepatic C3A cells were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid gels and cultured in 100μl MEME/10%FBS in 96-well plates. After spheroid formation the 3D liver constructs were exposed to acetaminophen on culture day 8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in 3D cultures was evaluated using standard biochemical assays. An inverted OCPM in common path configuration was developed with a Callisto OCT engine (Thorlabs), centred at 930nm and a custom scanning head. Intensity data were used to perform in-depth microstructural imaging. In addition, phase fluctuations were measured by collecting several successive B scans at the same location, and statistics on the first time derivative of the phase, i.e. time fluctuations, were analysed over the acquisition time interval to retrieve overall cell viability. OCPM intensity (cell cluster size) and phase fluctuation statistics were directly compared with biochemical assays. In this study, we investigated optical coherence phase tomography to assess cell death in a 3d liver model after exposure to a prototypical hepatotoxin, acetaminophen. We showed that OCPM has the potential to assess noninvasively and label-free drug toxicity in 3D tissue models.

  3. Advanced magneto-optical microscopy: Imaging from picoseconds to centimeters - imaging spin waves and temperature distributions (invited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necdet Onur Urs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the observation of magnetic domains and domain walls by wide-field optical microscopy based on the magneto-optical Kerr, Faraday, Voigt, and Gradient effect are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the existence of higher order magneto-optical effects for advanced magnetic imaging. Fundamental concepts and advances in methodology are discussed that allow for imaging of magnetic domains on various length and time scales. Time-resolved imaging of electric field induced domain wall rotation is shown. Visualization of magnetization dynamics down to picosecond temporal resolution for the imaging of spin-waves and magneto-optical multi-effect domain imaging techniques for obtaining vectorial information are demonstrated. Beyond conventional domain imaging, the use of a magneto-optical indicator technique for local temperature sensing is shown.

  4. A Multi-Gradient Generator in a Single Microfluidic Device for Optical Microscopy and Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrossian, Manuel; Nadeau, Jay; Lindensmith, Chris

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this work was to create a single microfluidic device capable of establishing multiple types of gradients in a quantifiable manner. Many microbial species are known to exhibit directed motility in the presence of stimuli. This phenomenon, known as taxis, can be used as a bio-signature and a means of identifying microorganisms. Directed microbial motility has been seen as a response to the presence of certain chemicals, light, heat, magnetic fields, and other stimuli. Microbial movement along the gradient vector, that cannot be explained by passive hydrodynamics or Brownian motion, can shed light on whether the sample contains living microbes or not. The ability to create multiple types of gradients in a single microfluidic device allows for high throughput testing of heterogeneous samples to detect taxis. There has been increased interest in the search for life within our solar system where liquid water is known to exist. Induced directional motility can serve as a viable method for detecting living organisms that actively respond to their environment. The device developed here includes a chemical, photonic, thermal, and magnetic gradient generator, while maintaining high optical quality in order to be used for microscopy as well as quantitative phase imaging This work was funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, who the authors wish to thank for their generosity.

  5. True Tapping Mode Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy with Bent Glass Fiber Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A; Yasinskii, V M; Filimonenko, D S; Rostova, E; Dietler, G; Sekatskii, S K

    2018-01-01

    In scanning near-field optical microscopy, the most popular probes are made of sharpened glass fiber attached to a quartz tuning fork (TF) and exploiting the shear force-based feedback. The use of tapping mode feedback could be preferable. Such an approach can be realized, for example, using bent fiber probes. Detailed analysis of fiber vibration modes shows that realization of truly tapping mode of the probe dithering requires an extreme caution. In case of using the second resonance mode, probes vibrate mostly in shear force mode unless the bending radius is rather small (ca. 0.3 mm) and the probe's tip is short. Otherwise, the shear force character of the dithering persists. Probes having these characteristics were prepared by irradiation of a tapered etched glass fiber with a CW CO 2 laser. These probes were attached to the TF in double resonance conditions which enables achieving significant quality factor (4000-6000) of the TF + probe system (Cherkun et al., 2006). We also show that, to achieve a truly tapping character, dithering, short, and not exceeding 3 mm lengths of a freestanding part of bent fiber probe beam should also be used in the case of nonresonant excitation.

  6. Towards automated segmentation of cells and cell nuclei in nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medyukhina, Anna; Meyer, Tobias; Schmitt, Michael; Romeike, Bernd F M; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging techniques based e.g. on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) show great potential for biomedical imaging. In order to facilitate the diagnostic process based on NLO imaging, there is need for an automated calculation of quantitative values such as cell density, nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio, average nuclear size. Extraction of these parameters is helpful for the histological assessment in general and specifically e.g. for the determination of tumor grades. This requires an accurate image segmentation and detection of locations and boundaries of cells and nuclei. Here we present an image processing approach for the detection of nuclei and cells in co-registered TPEF and CARS images. The algorithm developed utilizes the gray-scale information for the detection of the nuclei locations and the gradient information for the delineation of the nuclear and cellular boundaries. The approach reported is capable for an automated segmentation of cells and nuclei in multimodal TPEF-CARS images of human brain tumor samples. The results are important for the development of NLO microscopy into a clinically relevant diagnostic tool. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. LIBS, Raman spectroscopy, and optical microscopy analyses of superficial encrustations on ancient tesserae in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkowska, Anna; Chmielewski, Krzysztof; Skrzyczanowski, Wojciech; Mularczyk-Oliwa, Monika; Ostrowski, Roman; Strzelec, Marek

    2017-07-01

    The aim of research was determination of composition and nature of superficial deposits, cumulated at the selected mosaic's tesserae from Lebanon. Selected were three series of objects from different locations, namely from the seaside and mountain archaeological sites as well as from the mosaics exposed in the city center. Analyzed were stone and ceramic tesserae. The selection of objects was dictated by wide diversification of factors influencing the state of preservation and composition of deposits in given location. Investigations were performed including LIBS, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and optical 3D microscopy. The experimental results included composition and kind of deposit at the tesserae surfaces, and composition of tesserae itself. Compounds in the superficial deposits were identified. Confirmed was occurrence of different encrustations in dependence on geographic localization of a given sample. The interpretation of results was supported by multivariate statistical techniques, especially by the factor analysis. Performed analyses constitute the pioneer realization in terms of determination of deposits composition at the surface of mosaics from the Lebanon territory.

  8. Fully time-resolved near-field scanning optical microscopy fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Eun-Soo; Vanden Bout, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has been coupled with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to record complete fluorescence lifetime decays at each pixel in an NSOM image. The resulting three-dimensional data sets can be binned in the time dimension to create images of photons at particular time delays or images of the fluorescence lifetime. Alternatively, regions of interest identified in the topography and fluorescence images can be used to bin the data in the spatial dimensions resulting in high signal to noise fluorescence decays of particular regions of the sample. The technique has been demonstrated on films of poly(vinylalcohol), doped with the fluorescent dye, cascade blue (CB). The CB segregates into small circular regions of high concentration within the films during the drying process. The lifetime imaging shows that the spots have slightly faster excited state decays due to quenching of the luminescence as a result of the higher concentration. The technique is also used to image the fluorescence lifetime of an annealed film of poly(dihexylfluorene). The samples show high contrast in the total intensity fluorescence image, but the lifetime image reveals the sample to be extremely uniform

  9. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borglin, Johan [Biomedical Photonics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Guldbrand, Stina [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Evenbratt, Hanne [Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemigården 4, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B., E-mail: marica.ericson@chem.gu.se [Biomedical Photonics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Grönbeck, Henrik [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 9, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-12-07

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region.

  10. Rigorous numerical modeling of scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinzhong; Lo, Chiu Fan Bowen; Zheng, William; Hu, Hai; Dai, Qing; Liu, Mengkun

    2017-11-01

    Over the last decade, scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy have been widely used in nano-photonics and material research due to their fine spatial resolution and broad spectral range. A number of simplified analytical models have been proposed to quantitatively understand the tip-scattered near-field signal. However, a rigorous interpretation of the experimental results is still lacking at this stage. Numerical modelings, on the other hand, are mostly done by simulating the local electric field slightly above the sample surface, which only qualitatively represents the near-field signal rendered by the tip-sample interaction. In this work, we performed a more comprehensive numerical simulation which is based on realistic experimental parameters and signal extraction procedures. By directly comparing to the experiments as well as other simulation efforts, our methods offer a more accurate quantitative description of the near-field signal, paving the way for future studies of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  11. Nonlinear optical response of the collagen triple helix and second harmonic microscopy of collagen liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniset-Besseau, A.; De Sa Peixoto, P.; Duboisset, J.; Loison, C.; Hache, F.; Benichou, E.; Brevet, P.-F.; Mosser, G.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen is characterized by triple helical domains and plays a central role in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks, basement membranes, as well as other structures of the connective tissue. Remarkably, fibrillar collagen exhibits efficient Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and SHG microscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to score fibrotic pathologies. However, the nonlinear optical response of fibrillar collagen is not fully characterized yet and quantitative data are required to further process SHG images. We therefore performed Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) experiments and measured a second order hyperpolarisability of 1.25 10-27 esu for rat-tail type I collagen. This value is surprisingly large considering that collagen presents no strong harmonophore in its amino-acid sequence. In order to get insight into the physical origin of this nonlinear process, we performed HRS measurements after denaturation of the collagen triple helix and for a collagen-like short model peptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)10]3. It showed that the collagen large nonlinear response originates in the tight alignment of a large number of weakly efficient harmonophores, presumably the peptide bonds, resulting in a coherent amplification of the nonlinear signal along the triple helix. To illustrate this mechanism, we successfully recorded SHG images in collagen liquid solutions by achieving liquid crystalline ordering of the collagen triple helices.

  12. True Tapping Mode Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy with Bent Glass Fiber Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Smirnov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In scanning near-field optical microscopy, the most popular probes are made of sharpened glass fiber attached to a quartz tuning fork (TF and exploiting the shear force-based feedback. The use of tapping mode feedback could be preferable. Such an approach can be realized, for example, using bent fiber probes. Detailed analysis of fiber vibration modes shows that realization of truly tapping mode of the probe dithering requires an extreme caution. In case of using the second resonance mode, probes vibrate mostly in shear force mode unless the bending radius is rather small (ca. 0.3 mm and the probe’s tip is short. Otherwise, the shear force character of the dithering persists. Probes having these characteristics were prepared by irradiation of a tapered etched glass fiber with a CW CO2 laser. These probes were attached to the TF in double resonance conditions which enables achieving significant quality factor (4000–6000 of the TF + probe system (Cherkun et al., 2006. We also show that, to achieve a truly tapping character, dithering, short, and not exceeding 3 mm lengths of a freestanding part of bent fiber probe beam should also be used in the case of nonresonant excitation.

  13. Validating Intravascular Imaging with Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Pier-Luc; Bertrand, Marie-Jeanne; Abran, Maxime; Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Stähli, Barbara E; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Geoffroy, Pascale; Mecteau, Mélanie; Busseuil, David; Ni, Feng; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Rhéaume, Éric; L'Allier, Philippe; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by the formation of a plaque in the arterial wall. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images allowing delineation of atherosclerotic plaques. When combined with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF), the plaque can also be studied at a molecular level with a large variety of biomarkers. In this work, we present a system enabling automated volumetric histology imaging of excised aortas that can spatially correlate results with combined IVUS/NIRF imaging of lipid-rich atheroma in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Pullbacks in the rabbit aortas were performed with a dual modality IVUS/NIRF catheter developed by our group. Ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) histology was performed combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy, providing high-resolution anatomical and molecular information, respectively, to validate in vivo findings. The microscope was combined with a serial slicer allowing for the imaging of the whole vessel automatically. Colocalization of in vivo and ex vivo results is demonstrated. Slices can then be recovered to be tested in conventional histology.

  14. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borglin, Johan; Guldbrand, Stina; Evenbratt, Hanne; Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B.; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region

  15. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  17. W Boson Polarisation at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Elements of the spin density matrix for W bosons in e+e- -> W+W- -> qqln events are measured from data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP. This information is used calculate polarised differential cross-sections and to search for CP-violating effects. Results are presented for W bosons produced in e+e- collisions with centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The average fraction of W bosons that are longitudinally polarised is found to be (23.9 +- 2.1 +- 1.1)% compared to a Standard Model prediction of (23.9 +- 0.1)%. All results are consistent with CP conservation.

  18. Measurement of the Tau Polarisation at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Boix, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Ward, J.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Halley, A.W.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Giehl, I.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeintiz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Nikolic, Irina; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Foa, L.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2001-01-01

    The polarisation of $\\tau$'s produced in Z decay is measured using 160 pb$^{-1}$ of data accumulated at LEP by the ALEPH detector between 1990 and 1995. The variation of the polarisation with polar angle yields the two parameters ${\\cal A}_e = 0.1504 \\pm 0.0068 $ and ${\\cal A}_{\\tau} = 0.1451 \\pm 0.0059$ which are consistent with the hypothesis of $e$-$\\tau$ universality. Assuming universality, the value ${\\cal A}_{e\\mbox{-}\\tau} = 0.1474 \\pm 0.0045$ is obtained from which the effective weak mixing angle $\\sin^2 {\\theta_{\\mathrm{W}}^{\\mathrm{eff}}} =0.23147 \\pm 0.00057 $ is derived.

  19. Combined reflectance confocal microscopy-optical coherence tomography for delineation of basal cell carcinoma margins: an ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Nicusor; Peterson, Gary; Chang, Ernest W.; Maguluri, Gopi; Fox, William; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) approach, integrated within a single optical layout, for diagnosis of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and delineation of margins. While RCM imaging detects BCC presence (diagnoses) and its lateral spreading (margins) with measured resolution of ˜1 μm, OCT imaging delineates BCC depth spreading (margins) with resolution of ˜7 μm. When delineating margins in 20 specimens of superficial and nodular BCCs, depth could be reliably determined down to ˜600 μm, and agreement with histology was within about ±50 μm.

  20. Wide-field optical detection of nanoparticles using on-chip microscopy and self-assembled nanolenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudanyali, Onur; McLeod, Euan; Luo, Wei; Greenbaum, Alon; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Hennequin, Yves; Allier, Cédric P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-03-01

    The direct observation of nanoscale objects is a challenging task for optical microscopy because the scattering from an individual nanoparticle is typically weak at optical wavelengths. Electron microscopy therefore remains one of the gold standard visualization methods for nanoparticles, despite its high cost, limited throughput and restricted field-of-view. Here, we describe a high-throughput, on-chip detection scheme that uses biocompatible wetting films to self-assemble aspheric liquid nanolenses around individual nanoparticles to enhance the contrast between the scattered and background light. We model the effect of the nanolens as a spatial phase mask centred on the particle and show that the holographic diffraction pattern of this effective phase mask allows detection of sub-100 nm particles across a large field-of-view of >20 mm2. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we report on-chip detection of individual polystyrene nanoparticles, adenoviruses and influenza A (H1N1) viral particles.

  1. Sub-40 fs, 1060-nm Yb-fiber laser enhances penetration depth in nonlinear optical microscopy of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Mihaela; Saytashev, Ilyas; Hou, Jue; Dantus, Marcos; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2015-12-01

    Advancing the practical utility of nonlinear optical microscopy requires continued improvement in imaging depth and contrast. We evaluated second-harmonic generation (SHG) and third-harmonic generation images from ex vivo human skin and showed that a sub-40 fs, 1060-nm Yb-fiber laser can enhance SHG penetration depth by up to 80% compared to a >100 fs, 800 nm Ti:sapphire source. These results demonstrate the potential of fiber-based laser systems to address a key performance limitation related to nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technology while providing a low-barrier-to-access alternative to Ti:sapphire sources that could help accelerate the movement of NLOM into clinical practice.

  2. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-01-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  3. Oxidation study by Mössbauer and optic microscopy of steels from boiler tubes used in sugar industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, M.; Pérez Alcázar, G. A.; Aguilar, Y.

    1998-08-01

    Optic microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to study the fail and the inner rusted surface of two boiler tubes used in the sugar industry, respectively. The studied tubes, of the type ASTM A 192, were found to have cracks. By optic microscopy it was observed that the failure begins in the inner surface with circumferential cracking. Also, inside and around the surface close to the cracks a rusted layer was detected. Powder from these layers was collected for Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis. By this method the presence of two or three types of Fe oxides such as wüstite, magnetite and hematite, was proved. These results permit to conclude that the failure mechanism was the thermal fatigue due to a hot work in an O2 -rich vapor atmosphere. The rusted products are stable at high temperatures.

  4. Development of a thin, internal superconducting polarisation magnet for the polarised target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, Marcel; Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Reeve, Scott; Runkel, Stefan [Physikalisches Institut, Bonn Univ. (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In order to improve the figure of merit of double-polarisation experiments at CB-ELSA in Bonn, the Polarised Target is working on a new dilution refrigerator. For maximum polarisation of nucleons low temperatures and a high homogeneous magnetic field within the target area is needed. A thin, superconducting magnet is in development, which will create a continuous longitudinal magnetic field of 2.5 T and which will be used within the new refrigerator. The solenoidal geometry of this magnet uses two additional correction coils, placed at a well defined calculated position, for reaching the homogeneity criteria of 10{sup -4} needed for the dynamic nuclear process. Practically, the superconducting wires as well as the correction coils have to be placed with maximum precision: Small fluctuations of the distance between the current loops can diminish the requested homogeneity. A second build prototype passes first tests and looks promising to fulfil the particular requirements.

  5. How to polarise all neutrons in one beam: a high performance polariser and neutron transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Bentley, P. M.; Pappas, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarised neutron beams are used in disciplines as diverse as magnetism,soft matter or biology. However, most of these applications often suffer from low flux also because the existing neutron polarising methods imply the filtering of one of the spin states, with a transmission of 50% at maximum. With the purpose of using all neutrons that are usually discarded, we propose a system that splits them according to their polarisation, flips them to match the spin direction, and then focuses them at the sample. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that this is achievable over a wide wavelength range and with an outstanding performance at the price of a more divergent neutron beam at the sample position.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of a nanometer-sized optical fiber electrode based on selective chemical etching for scanning electrochemical/optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kenichi; Ohkawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Sho; Ueda, Akio; Niwa, Osamu; Suzuki, Koji

    2006-03-15

    We have already reported a method for fabricating ultramicroelectrodes (Suzuki, K. JP Patent, 2004-45394, 2004). This method is based on the selective chemical etching of optical fibers. In this work, we undertake a detailed investigation involving a combination of etched optical fibers with various types of tapered tip (protruding-shape, double- (or pencil-) shape and triple-tapered electrode) and insulation with electrophoretic paint. Our goal is to establish a method for fabricating nanometer-sized optical fiber electrodes with high reproducibility. As a result, we realized pencil-shaped and triple-tapered electrodes that had radii in the nanometer range with high reproducibility. These nanometer-sized electrodes showed well-defined sigmoidal curves and stable diffusion-limited responses with cyclic voltammetry. The pencil-shaped optical fiber, which has a conical tip with a cone angle of 20 degrees , was effective for controlling the electrode radius. The pencil-shaped electrodes had higher reproducibility and smaller electrode radii (r(app) etched optical fiber electrodes. By using a pencil-shaped electrode with a 105-nm radius as a probe, we obtained simultaneous electrochemical and optical images of an implantable interdigitated array electrode. We achieved nanometer-scale resolution with a combination of scanning electrochemical microscopy SECM and optical microscopy. The resolution of the electrochemical and optical images indicated sizes of 300 and 930 nm, respectively. The neurites of living PC12 cells were also successfully imaged on a 1.6-microm scale by using the negative feedback mode of an SECM.

  7. Investigating pitting in X65 carbon steel using potentiostatic polarisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Sikiru; Hua, Yong; Barker, R.; Neville, A.

    2017-11-01

    Although pitting corrosion in passive materials is generally well understood, the growth of surface pits in actively-corroding materials has received much less attention to date and remains poorly understood. One of the key challenges which exists is repeatedly and reliably generating surface pits in a practical time-frame in the absence of deformation and/or residual stress so that studies on pit propagation and healing can be performed. Another pertinent issue is how to evaluate pitting while addressing general corrosion in low carbon steel. In this work, potentiostatic polarisation was employed to induce corrosion pits (free from deformation or residual stress) on actively corroding X65 carbon steel. The influence of applied potential (50 mV, 100 mV and 150 mV vs open circuit potential) was investigated over 24 h in a CO2-saturated, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at 30 °C and pH 3.8. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilised to examine pits, while surface profilometry was conducted to measure pit depth as a function of applied potential over the range considered. Analyses of light pitting (up to 120 μm) revealed that pit depth increased linearly with increase in applied potential. This paper relates total pit volume (measured using white light interferometry) to dissipated charge or total mass loss (using the current response for potentiostatic polarisation in conjunction with Faraday's law). By controlling the potential of the surface (anodic) the extent of pitting and general corrosion could be controlled. This allowed pits to be evaluated for their ability to continue to propagate after the potentiostatic technique was employed. Linear growth from a depth of 70 μm at pH 3.8, 80 °C was demonstrated. The technique offers promise for the study of inhibition of pitting.

  8. Towards phonon photonics: scattering-type near-field optical microscopy reveals phonon-enhanced near-field interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    Diffraction limits the spatial resolution in classical microscopy or the dimensions of optical circuits to about half the illumination wavelength. Scanning near-field microscopy can overcome this limitation by exploiting the evanescent near fields existing close to any illuminated object. We use a scattering-type near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM) that uses the illuminated metal tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to act as scattering near-field probe. The presented images are direct evidence that the s-SNOM enables optical imaging at a spatial resolution on a 10 nm scale, independent of the wavelength used (λ=633 nm and 10 μm). Operating the microscope at specific mid-infrared frequencies we found a tip-induced phonon-polariton resonance on flat polar crystals such as SiC and Si 3 N 4 . Being a spectral fingerprint of any polar material such phonon-enhanced near-field interaction has enormous applicability in nondestructive, material-specific infrared microscopy at nanoscale resolution. The potential of s-SNOM to study eigenfields of surface polaritons in nanostructures opens the door to the development of phonon photonics--a proposed infrared nanotechnology that uses localized or propagating surface phonon polaritons for probing, manipulating and guiding infrared light in nanoscale devices, analogous to plasmon photonics

  9. Observer Performance in the Use of Digital and Optical Microscopy for the Interpretation of Tissue-Based Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios A. Gavrielides

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We conducted a validation study of digital pathology for the quantitative assessment of tissue-based biomarkers with immunohistochemistry. Objective.\tTo examine observer agreement as a function of viewing modality (digital versus optical microscopy, whole slide versus tissue microarray (TMA review, biomarker type (HER2 incorporating membranous staining and Ki-67 with nuclear staining, and data type (continuous and categorical. Methods.\tEight pathologists reviewed 50 breast cancer whole slides (25 stained with HER2 and 25 with Ki-67 and 2 TMAs (1 stained with HER2, 1 with Ki-67, each containing 97 cores, using digital and optical microscopy. Results. Results showed relatively high overall interobserver and intermodality agreement, with different patterns specific to biomarker type. For HER2, there was better interobserver agreement for optical compared to digital microscopy for whole slides as well as better interobserver and intermodality agreement for TMAs. For Ki-67, those patterns were not observed. Conclusions. The differences in agreement patterns when examining different biomarkers and different scoring methods and reviewing whole slides compared to TMA stress the need for validation studies focused on specific pathology tasks to eliminate sources of variability that might dilute findings. The statistical uncertainty observed in our analyses calls for adequate sampling for each individual task rather than pooling cases.

  10. Investigation of optical nanostructures for photovoltaics with near-field scanning microscopy; Untersuchung optischer Nanostrukturen fuer die Photovoltaik mit Nahfeldmikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Thomas

    2011-09-26

    Textured and rough surfaces are known to increase light trapping in solar cells significantly. The development and optimization of these nano-structures is essential to improve the energy conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. In the past, first research approaches covered classical and macroscopic investigations, e.g. determining the haze or angularly resolved scattering. These methods do not provide precise explanation for the optical improvement of the devices, because layer thicknesses and structure sizes in thin-film solar cells are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. The impact of local nano-structures and their contribution to the local absorption enhancement is not resolved by macroscopic measurements. In this thesis, near-field scanning optical microscopy is introduced as first near-field investigations of nano-structures for photovoltaics. This provides an insight into local optical effects for relevant surfaces of photovoltaic devices. Investigating the distribution of the electric fields in layer stacks is crucial to understand the absorption in solar cells. Evanescent fields, which occur due to total internal reflection at the interfaces, are measurable by near-field scanning optical microscopy and yield important information about local light trapping. Within the framework of this thesis, correlations between local surface structures and optical near-field effects are shown. In this case structure features of randomly textured surfaces, which optimize local light trapping, are identified. It paves the way to connect microscopic optical effects on the surface with the macroscopic performance of thin-film solar cells. Moreover, the measurement yields a 3D illustration of the electric field distribution over the sample surface. It is an important criterion to prove the results of rigorous diffraction theory. An excellent agreement between experiment and simulation is found. The simulations provide an insight into the material, which is

  11. Optical Saturation as a Versatile Tool to Enhance Resolution in Confocal Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíčková, Jana; Benda, Aleš; Enderlein, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 9 (2009), s. 2623-2629 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : fluorescence microscopy * reconstruction microscopy * cassettes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2009

  12. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.

    2001-01-01

    By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical mic...

  13. Linearly polarised photons at the BGO-OD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bella, Andreas [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment, located at the ELSA accelerator of the University of Bonn, aims at the study of photoproduction reactions off the nucleon. A real, energy-tagged photon beam is produced via bremsstrahlung by irradiating a thin radiator with the electron beam provided by ELSA. Linear polarisation is obtained by coherent bremsstrahlung. This requires a crystal radiator; in our case a 570 μm thick diamond is used. The production mechanism of a linearly polarised photon beam via coherent bremsstrahlung, the determination of the degree of polarisation and first results obtained with a linearly polarised photon beam are shown in this talk.

  14. In vivo multiphoton-microscopy of picosecond-laser-induced optical breakdown in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Mihaela; Lentsch, Griffin; Korta, Dorota Z; König, Karsten; Kelly, Kristen M; Tromberg, Bruce J; Zachary, Christopher B

    2017-08-01

    Improvements in skin appearance resulting from treatment with fractionated picosecond-lasers have been noted, but optimizing the treatment efficacy depends on a thorough understanding of the specific skin response. The development of non-invasive laser imaging techniques in conjunction with laser therapy can potentially provide feedback for guidance and optimizing clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the capability of multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a high-resolution, label-free imaging technique, to characterize in vivo the skin response to a fractionated non-ablative picosecond-laser treatment. Two areas on the arm of a volunteer were treated with a fractionated picosecond laser at the Dermatology Clinic, UC Irvine. The skin response to treatment was imaged in vivo with a clinical MPM-based tomograph at 3 hours and 24 hours after treatment and seven additional time points over a 4-week period. MPM revealed micro-injuries present in the epidermis. Pigmented cells were particularly damaged in the process, suggesting that melanin is likely the main absorber for laser induced optical breakdown. Damaged individual cells were distinguished as early as 3 hours post pico-laser treatment with the 532 nm wavelength, and 24 hours post-treatment with both 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths. At later time points, clusters of cellular necrotic debris were imaged across the treated epidermis. After 24 hours of treatment, inflammatory cells were imaged in the proximity of epidermal micro-injuries. The epidermal injuries were exfoliated over a 4-week period. This observational and descriptive pilot study demonstrates that in vivo MPM imaging can be used non-invasively to provide label-free contrast for describing changes in human skin following a fractionated non-ablative laser treatment. The results presented in this study represent the groundwork for future longitudinal investigations on an expanded number of subjects to understand the response to treatment

  15. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pichler, Bernd; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10 6 -3 x 10 8 labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10 6 cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells. (orig.)

  16. Feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy in ultra-structural imaging of human colon tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Seo [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo June; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Hyuk; Bom, Hee Seung; Lee, Byeong Il [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    We demonstrated the imaging feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) in pathological diagnosis of human colon tissues. FF-OCM images with high transverse resolution were obtained at different depths of the samples without any dye staining or physical slicing, and detailed microstructures of human colon tissues were visualized. Morphological differences in normal tissues, cancer tissues, and tissues under transition were observed and matched with results seen in conventional optical microscope images. The optical biopsy based on FF-OCM could overcome the limitations on the number of physical cuttings of tissues and could perform high-throughput mass diagnosis of diseased tissues. The proved utility of FF-OCM as a comprehensive and efficient imaging modality of human tissues showed it to be a good alternative to conventional biopsy.

  17. Feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy in ultra-structural imaging of human colon tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Seo; Choi, Woo June; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Bom, Hee Seung; Lee, Byeong Il

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated the imaging feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) in pathological diagnosis of human colon tissues. FF-OCM images with high transverse resolution were obtained at different depths of the samples without any dye staining or physical slicing, and detailed microstructures of human colon tissues were visualized. Morphological differences in normal tissues, cancer tissues, and tissues under transition were observed and matched with results seen in conventional optical microscope images. The optical biopsy based on FF-OCM could overcome the limitations on the number of physical cuttings of tissues and could perform high-throughput mass diagnosis of diseased tissues. The proved utility of FF-OCM as a comprehensive and efficient imaging modality of human tissues showed it to be a good alternative to conventional biopsy.

  18. A spatio-temporally compensated acousto-optic scanner for two-photon microscopy providing large field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Y; Léger, J-F; Lapole, R; Honnorat, N; Candela, Y; Dieudonné, S; Bourdieu, L

    2008-07-07

    Acousto-optic deflectors (AOD) are promising ultrafast scanners for non-linear microscopy. Their use has been limited until now by their small scanning range and by the spatial and temporal dispersions of the laser beam going through the deflectors. We show that the use of AOD of large aperture (13mm) compared to standard deflectors allows accessing much larger field of view while minimizing spatio-temporal distortions. An acousto-optic modulator (AOM) placed at distance of the AOD is used to compensate spatial and temporal dispersions. Fine tuning of the AOM-AOD setup using a frequency-resolved optical gating (GRENOUILLE) allows elimination of pulse front tilt whereas spatial chirp is minimized thanks to the large aperture AOD.

  19. Increase in data capacity utilising dimensions of wavelength, space, time, polarisation and multilevel modulation using a single laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Hu, Hao; Ye, Feihong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the capacity of optical networks while have the objective of lowering the total consumed energy per bit is challenging. By exploiting several dimensions, i.e. wavelength, space, time, polarisation and multilevel modulation simultaneously, a single laser can offer formidable capacity pe...... performance with potentially reduced energy consumption per bit. Up to 43 Tbit/s has been demonstrated....

  20. Super-resolution optical microscopy for studying membrane structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc

    2017-07-12

    Investigation of cell membrane structure and dynamics requires high spatial and temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of conventional light microscopy is limited due to the diffraction of light. However, recent developments in microscopy enabled us to access the nano-scale regime spatially, thus to elucidate the nanoscopic structures in the cellular membranes. In this review, we will explain the resolution limit, address the working principles of the most commonly used super-resolution microscopy techniques and summarise their recent applications in the biomembrane field.

  1. Propagation of TE and TM polarised light through smoothed sixty degree bends in planar photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Borel, Peter Ingo; Thorhauge, Morten

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, bends in planar PCWs are investigated by introducing two smoothed 60° bends each having one hole. The PCWs are defined by leaving out single rows of holes. In and out coupling of light to the PCWs is obtained utilising tapered ridge waveguides. Transmission spectra are recorded for...... for both the TE and TM polarisation with an optical spectrum analyser by using two LED sources centred at 1330 nm and 1550 nm. The 3D FDTD simulations successfully explain the observed bend losses both for the TE and TM polarisations....

  2. Chemical segregation and self polarisation in ferroelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard E. Watts

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical partitioning or segregation is commonly encountered in solid-state syntheses. It is driven by compositional, thermal and electric field gradients. These phenomena can be quite extreme in thin films and lead to notable effects on the electrical properties of ferroelectrics. The segregation in ferroelectric thin films will be illustrated and the mechanisms explained in terms of diffusion processes driven by a potential gradient of the oxygen. The hypothesis can also explain self polarisation and imprint in ferroelectric hysteresis.

  3. PANTHER - Polarisation Analysis with Thermal neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, P.P.; Fennell, T.; Schober, H.; Orecchini, A.; Rols, S.; Andersen, K.H.; Stewart, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    PANTHER will build on the success of IN4, the world's most intense time-of-flight spectrometer. A large position-sensitive detector (PSD) will improve data collection rates significantly, the background will be greatly reduced, and it will incorporate features indispensable for magnetic studies (small angles, polarisation analysis, high magnetic field devices). The new instrument will enable rapid surveys of (Q,ω) space, as well as more detailed studies in fields ranging from magnetism to the structural excitations - phonon densities of states, dispersion of collective modes and molecular vibrations - that govern the behaviour of many important physical and chemical systems. (authors)

  4. Improvement in spatial frequency characteristics of magneto-optical Kerr microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Takeshi

    2017-10-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional magneto-optical Kerr microscope, compared with those of conventional optical microscopes, inevitably deteriorates owing to oblique illumination. An approach to obtaining the maximum spatial resolution using multiple images with different illumination directions is demonstrated here. The method was implemented by rotating the illumination path around the optical axis using a motorized stage. The Fourier transform image of the observed magnetic domain indicates that the spatial frequency component that is lost in the conventional method is restored.

  5. Revealing t-tubules in striated muscle with new optical super-resolution microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru D. Jayasinghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The t-tubular system plays a central role in the synchronisation of calcium signalling and excitation-contraction coupling in most striated muscle cells. Light microscopy has been used for imaging t-tubules for well over 100 years and together with electron microscopy (EM, has revealed the three-dimensional complexities of the t-system topology within cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres from a range of species. The emerging super-resolution single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM techniques are offering a near 10-fold improvement over the resolution of conventional fluorescence light microscopy methods, with the ability to spectrally resolve nanometre scale distributions of multiple molecular targets. In conjunction with the next generation of electron microscopy, SMLM has allowed the visualisation and quantification of intricate t-tubule morphologies within large areas of muscle cells at an unprecedented level of detail. In this paper, we review recent advancements in the t-tubule structural biology with the utility of various microscopy techniques. We outline the technical considerations in adapting SMLM to study t-tubules and its potential to further our understanding of the molecular processes that underlie the sub-micron scale structural alterations observed in a range of muscle pathologies.

  6. Polarization contrast in reflection near-field optical microscopy with uncoated fibre tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using cross-hatched, patterned semiconductor surfaces and round 20-nm-thick gold pads on semiconductor wafers, we investigate the imaging characteristics of a reflection near-field optical microscope with an uncoated fibre tip for different polarization configurations and light wavelengths....... Is is shown that cross-polarized detection allows one to effectively suppress far-field components in the detected signal and to realise imaging of optical contrast on the sub-wavelength scale. The sensitivity window of our microscope, i.e. the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...

  7. Polarised Photon Beams for the BGO-OD Experiment at ELSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, T.; Bella, A.; Alef, S.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bielefeldt, P.; Boese, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.

    The new BGO-OD experiment at the electron accelerator ELSA, of the University of Bonn, is designed to study the reaction dynamics of nucleon excitations in meson photoproduction. It consists of a central BGO calorimeter with a magnetic spectrometer in forward direction. The physics programme includes the measurement of polarisation observables using linearly and circularly polarised photon beams. Linear polarisation is obtained by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal, and circular polarisation is obtained via bremsstrahlung from longitudinally polarised electrons. The degree of linear polarisation is determined from the bremsstrahlung spectrum itself. To determine the polarisation of the circularly polarised photon beam, the polarisation of the electron beam is measured by a Møller polarimeter. As a preliminary consistency check, the (linear) polarisation observable, Σ, was compared to world data for π0 and η photoproduction. To determine the degree of circular polarisation, a Møller polarimeter was setup and first measurements of the electron beam polarisation performed.

  8. Cross-polarised and parallel-polarised light: Viewing and photography for examination and documentation of biological materials in medicine and forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Katharine L

    2018-01-01

    Cross-polarisation, with regard to visible light, is a process wherein two polarisers with perpendicular orientation to one another are used on the incident and reflected lights. Under cross-polarised light birefringent structures which are otherwise invisible become apparent. Cross-polarised light eliminates glare and specular highlights, allowing for an unobstructed view of subsurface pathology. Parallel-polarisation occurs when the polarisers are rotated to the same orientation. When cross- or parallel-polarisation is applied to photography, images can be generated which aid in visualisation of surface and subsurface elements. Improved access to equipment and education has the potential to benefit practitioners, researchers, investigators and patients.

  9. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  10. Photonic Torque Microscopy of the Nonconservative Force Field for Optically Trapped Silicon Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Irrera, A.; Maggazu, A.; Artoni, P.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Hanna, S.; Jones, P.H.; Priolo, F.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Marago, O.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2016), s. 4181-4188 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * silicon nanowires * nonequilibrium dynamics * Brownian motion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  11. Spin polarisation with electron Bessel beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schattschneider, P., E-mail: schattschneider@ifp.tuwien.ac.at [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Wien, A-1040 Wien (Austria); USTEM, Technische Universität Wien, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Grillo, V. [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM, Parco delle Scienze 37a, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Aubry, D. [Centrale Supelec, MSSMast CNRS 8579, F-92295 Châtenay-Malabry (France)

    2017-05-15

    The theoretical possibility to use an electron microscope as a spin polarizer is studied. It turns out that a Bessel beam passing a standard magnetic objective lens is intrinsically spin polarized when post-selected on-axis. In the limit of infinitely small detectors, the spin polarisation tends to 100 %. Increasing the detector size, the polarisation decreases rapidly, dropping below 10{sup −4} for standard settings of medium voltage microscopes. For extremely low voltages, the Figure of Merit increases by two orders of magnitude, approaching that of existing Mott detectors. Our findings may lead to new desings of spin filters, an attractive option in view of its inherent combination with the electron microscope, especially at low voltage. - Highlights: • TEM round magnetic lenses can act as spin polarizers when a Bessel beam is sent through. • This is found on theoretical grounds and demonstrated numerically for a few cases. • The effect is small, but can reach a Figure of Merit similar to existing Mott detectors. • This opens the possibility to construct nanometer-sized spin filters or detectors.

  12. Usage of polarisation features of landmines for improved automatic detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, W. de; Cremer, F.; Schutte, K.; Storm, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the landmine detection performance of an infrared and a visual light camera both equipped with a polarisation filter are compared with the detection performance of these cameras without polarisation filters. Sequences of images have been recorded with in front of these cameras a

  13. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  14. Anatomical and physiological evidence for polarisation vision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Birgit; Cronin, Thomas W; Ribi, Willi A; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2007-06-01

    The presence of a specialised dorsal rim area with an ability to detect the e-vector orientation of polarised light is shown for the first time in a nocturnal hymenopteran. The dorsal rim area of the halictid bee Megalopta genalis features a number of characteristic anatomical specialisations including an increased rhabdom diameter and a lack of primary screening pigments. Optically, these specialisations result in wide spatial receptive fields (Deltarho = 14 degrees ), a common adaptation found in the dorsal rim areas of insects used to filter out interfering effects (i.e. clouds) from the sky. In this specialised eye region all nine photoreceptors contribute their microvilli to the entire length of the ommatidia. These orthogonally directed microvilli are anatomically arranged in an almost linear, anterior-posterior orientation. Intracellular recordings within the dorsal rim area show very high polarisation sensitivity and a sensitivity peak within the ultraviolet part of the spectrum.

  15. Polarised Multiangular Reflectance Measurements Using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Peltoniemi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The design, operation, and properties of the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO are presented. FIGIFIGO is a portable instrument for the measurement of surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF for samples with diameters of 10 – 50 cm. A set of polarising optics enable the measurement of linearly polarised BRF over the full solar spectrum (350 – 2,500 nm. FIGIFIGO is designed mainly for field operation using sunlight, but operation in a laboratory environment is also possible. The acquired BRF have an accuracy of 1 – 5% depending on wavelength, sample properties, and measurement conditions. The angles are registered at accuracies better than 2°. During 2004 – 2008, FIGIFIGO has been used in the measurement of over 150 samples, all around northern Europe. The samples concentrate mostly on boreal forest understorey, snow, urban surfaces, and reflectance calibration surfaces.

  16. Dual-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy for cells with gold nanoparticle bioconjugates in three-dimensional cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Yi; Liu, Wei-Wen; Chen, Shu-Ching; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models bridge the gap between typical two-dimensional cultures and in vivo conditions. However, conventional optical imaging methods such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy cannot accurately depict cellular processing in 3D models due to limited penetration of photons. We developed a dualwavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), which provides sufficient penetration depth and spatial resolution, for studying CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) trafficking in an in vitro 3D tumor microenvironment. CTLs play a cardinal role in host defense against tumor. Efficient trafficking of CTLs to the tumor microenvironment is a critical step for cancer immunotherapy. For the proposed system, gold nanospheres and indocyanine green (ICG) have been remarkable choices for contrast agents for photoacoustic signals due to their excellent biocompatibility and high optical absorption. With distinct absorption spectrums, targeted cells with gold nanospheres and ICG respectively can be identified by switching 523-nm and 800-nm laser irradiation. Moreover, we use an x-y galvanometer scanner to obtain high scanning rate. In the developed system, lateral and axial resolutions were designed at 1.6 μm and 5 μm, respectively. We successfully showed that dual-spectral OR-PAM can map either the distribution of CTLs with gold nanospheres at a visible wavelength of 523 nm or the 3D structure of tumor spheres with ICG in an in vitro 3D microenvironment. Our OR-PAM can provide better biological relevant information in cellular interaction and is potential for preclinical screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  17. Proceedings of the second workshop on polarised target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, G.R.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Cox, S.F.J.; Cragg, D.A.

    1980-10-01

    The proceedings are reported of a second international workshop which was convened to consider the use of polarised targets in nuclear research and in particular the experimental difficulties imposed by the limitations of target materials with respect to their relatively low hydrogen content and susceptibility to radiation damage. Papers presented were entitled: (1) Introduction and general review. (2) Theory of dynamic nuclear polarisation. (3) Radiation induced paramagnetic centres in organic and inorganic materials. (4) Dynamic nuclear polarisation with radiation induced free radicals. (5) Radiation damage of chemically doped materials. (6) Chemical doping. (7) Techniques and instrumentation. (8) The use of polarised nuclei in physics with neutrons. (9) The use of polarised targets in high energy physics. (U.K.)

  18. Sub?40?fs, 1060?nm Yb?fiber laser enhances penetration depth in nonlinear optical microscopy of human skin

    OpenAIRE

    Balu, Mihaela; Saytashev, Ilyas; Hou, Jue; Dantus, Marcos; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Authors. Advancing the practical utility of nonlinear optical microscopy requires continued improvement in imaging depth and contrast. We evaluated second-harmonic generation (SHG) and third-harmonic generation images from ex vivo human skin and showed that a sub-40 fs, 1060-nm Yb-fiber laser can enhance SHG penetration depth by up to 80% compared to a > 100 fs, 800 nm Ti:sapphire source. These results demonstrate the potential of fiber-based laser systems to address a key perform...

  19. Atomic force microscopy for the determination of refractive index profiles of optical fibres and waveguides: a quantitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.T.; Mulvaney, P.; Roberts, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The use of preferential etching and atomic force microscopy to measure refractive index profiles of optical fibres is investigated. Both the etch rate and the position of lateral features are shown to be independent of etch time. An elliptical core fibre has been studied and the resultant profile found to be in qualitative agreement with the preform index profile. It is shown, however, that the ellipticity of the core has changed during the drawing process. The method has been extended to fluorine and germanium doped planar waveguides and the results correlated with the fabrication process

  20. Extending the methodology of X-ray crystallography to allow X-ray microscopy without X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jianwei; Kirz, Janos; Sayre, David; Charalambous, Pambos

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that the soft X-ray diffraction pattern from a micron-size noncrystalline specimen can be recorded and inverted to form a high-resolution image. The phase problem is overcome by oversampling the diffraction pattern. The image is obtained using an iterative algorithm. The technique provides a method for X-ray microscopy requiring no high-resolution X-ray optical elements or detectors. In the present work, a resolution of approximately 60 nm was obtained, but we believe that considerably higher resolution can be achieved

  1. Light depolarization induced by metallic tips in apertureless near-field optical microscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gucciardi, P G [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, sezione Messina, Salita Sperone, Contrada Papardo, I-98158 Faro Superiore, Messina (Italy); Lopes, M; Deturche, R; Julien, C; Barchiesi, D; Chapelle, M Lamy de la [Institut Charles Delaunay-CNRS FRE 2848, Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP2060, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2008-05-28

    We have investigated the depolarization effects of light scattered by sharp tips used for apertureless near-field optical microscopy. Dielectric and metal coated tips have been investigated and depolarization factors between 5 and 30% have been measured, changing as a function of the incident light polarization and of the tip shape. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations performed by the finite element method, giving a near-field depolarization factor close to 10%. The effect of depolarization has been investigated in polarized tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) experiments; the depolarization gives rise to forbidden Raman modes in Si crystals.

  2. Three-ring filters increase the effective NA up to 1.46 in optical sectioning fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Corral, M; Ibanez-Lopez, C; Caballero, M T; Munoz-Escriva, L; Saavedra, G

    2003-01-01

    Single-photon fluorescence confocal microscopy techniques can be combined with the use of specific binary filters in order to increase their optical sectioning capability. We present a novel class of axially super-resolving binary pupil filters specially designed to reach this aim. These filters let us to obtain a relevant compression of the z-response together with the reduction of the photo-bleaching effect typically inherent to apodization techniques. The fact of joining both the three-ring filters we propose in the illumination path, and the confocal detection gives rise to an important effective increase of lenses of effective numerical aperture

  3. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skapin, A. Sever; Ropret, P.; Bukovec, P.

    2007-01-01

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods

  4. Near-field scanning optical microscopy cross-sectional measurements of crystalline GaAs solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herndon, M. K.; Bradford, W. C.; Collins, R. T.; Hawkins, B. E.; Kuech, T. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) was used to study cleaved edges of GaAs solar cell devices. Using visible light for excitation, the NSOM acquired spatially resolved traces of the photocurrent response across the various layers in the device. For excitation energies well above the band gap, carrier recombination at the cleaved surface had a strong influence on the photocurrent signal. Decreasing the excitation energy, which increased the optical penetration depth, allowed the effects of surface recombination to be separated from collection by the pn junction. Using this approach, the NSOM measurements directly observed the effects of a buried minority carrier reflector/passivation layer. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  5. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional...... laser (AFXL)-induced channels and dynamics in their spatiotemporal closure using in vivo OCT and RCM techniques. Study design/Materials and Methods The inner forearm of healthy subjects (n = 6) was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser using 5 and 25% densities, 120 μm beam diameter, 5, 15, and 25 m......J/microbeam. Treatment sites were scanned with OCT to evaluate closure of AFXL-channels and RCM to evaluate subsequent re-epithelialization. Results OCT and RCM identified laser channels in epidermis and upper dermis as black, ablated tissue defects surrounded by characteristic hyper-and hyporeflective zones. OCT imaged...

  6. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    OpenAIRE

    van Graft, M.; van Graft, Marja; Oosterhuis, B.; Oosterhuis, Bernard; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical fiber. After passage through appropriate filters the light is measured using a photomultiplier tube. The optical fiber is mounted in one of the microscope outlets. Signals derived from the photomultipl...

  7. Modeling optical behavior of birefringent biological tissues for evaluation of quantitative polarized light microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.; Kranenbarg, S.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) is a popular tool for the investigation of birefringent architectures in biological tissues. Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, is such a birefringent material. Interpretation of results of qPLM in terms of collagen network architecture and

  8. Improving the visualization of electron-microscopy data through optical flow interpolation

    KAUST Repository

    Carata, Lucian; Shao, Dan; Hadwiger, Markus; Grö eller, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    with electron-microscopy (EM). However, the technique achieves a low resolution in the cutting direction, due to limitations of the mechanical process, making a direct visualization of a dataset difficult. We aim to increase the depth resolution of the volume

  9. BigNeuron: Large-Scale 3D Neuron Reconstruction from Optical Microscopy Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Peng (Hanchuan); M. Hawrylycz (Michael); J. Roskams (Jane); S. Hill (Sean); N. Spruston (Nelson); E. Meijering (Erik); G.A. Ascoli (Giorgio A.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding the structure of single neurons is critical for understanding how they function within neural circuits. BigNeuron is a new community effort that combines modern bioimaging informatics, recent leaps in labeling and microscopy, and the widely recognized need for openness and

  10. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in live cells using transient absorption microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Lu, Feng; Streets, Aaron M; Fei, Peng; Quan, Junmin; Huang, Yanyi

    2013-06-07

    We directly observe non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in living cells using transient absorption microscopy. This label-free technology provides a novel modality to study the dynamic behavior of nanodiamonds inside the cells with intrinsic three-dimensional imaging capability. We apply this method to capture the cellular uptake of nanodiamonds under various conditions, confirming the endocytosis mechanism.

  11. Establishing the suitability of quantitative optical CT microscopy of PRESAGE® radiochromic dosimeters for the verification of synchrotron microbeam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Simon J.; Rahman, A. T. Abdul; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Brochard, Thierry; Adamovics, John; Nisbet, Andrew; Bradley, David

    2013-09-01

    Previous research on optical computed tomography (CT) microscopy in the context of the synchrotron microbeam has shown the potential of the technique and demonstrated high quality images, but has left two questions unanswered: (i) are the images suitably quantitative for 3D dosimetry? and (ii) what is the impact on the spatial resolution of the system of the limited depth-of-field of the microscope optics? Cuvette and imaging studies are reported here that address these issues. Two sets of cuvettes containing the radiochromic plastic PRESAGE® were irradiated at the ID17 biomedical beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation facility over the ranges 0-20 and 0-35 Gy and a third set of cuvettes was irradiated over the range 0-20 Gy using a standard medical linac. In parallel, three cylindrical PRESAGE® samples of diameter 9.7 mm were irradiated with test patterns that allowed the quantitative capabilities of the optical CT microscope to be verified, and independent measurements of the imaging modulation transfer function (MTF) to be made via two different methods. Both spectrophotometric analysis and imaging gave a linear dose response, with gradients ranging from 0.036-0.041 cm-1 Gy-1 in the three sets of cuvettes and 0.037 (optical CT units) Gy-1 for the imaging. High-quality, quantitative imaging results were obtained throughout the 3D volume, as illustrated by depth-dose profiles. These profiles are shown to be monoexponential, and the linear attention coefficient of PRESAGE® for the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam is measured to be (0.185 ± 0.02) cm-1 in excellent agreement with expectations. Low-level (<5%) residual image artefacts are discussed in detail. It was possible to resolve easily slit patterns of width 37 µm (which are smaller than many of the microbeams used on ID-17), but some uncertainty remains as to whether the low values of MTF for the higher spatial frequencies are scanner related or a result of genuine (but non-ideal) dose

  12. A SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-PROBE DETECTION LABEL-FREE OPTICAL-RESOLUTION PHOTOACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE BASED ON MICROCAVITY TRANSDUCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGBO WU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous multi-probe detection for an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM system. OR-PAM has elicited the attention of biomedical imaging researchers because of its optical absorption contrast and high spatial resolution with great imaging depth. OR-PAM allows label-free and noninvasive imaging by maximizing the optical absorption of endogenous biomolecules. However, given the inadequate absorption of some biomolecules, detection sensitivity at the same incident intensity requires improvement. In this study, a modulated continuous wave with power density less than 3 mW/cm2 (1/4 of the ANSI safety limit excited the weak photoacoustic (PA signals of biological cells. A microcavity transducer is developed based on the bulk modulus of gas five orders of magnitude lower than that of solid; air pressure variation is inversely proportional to cavity volume at the same temperature increase. Considering that a PA wave expands in various directions, detecting PA signals from different positions and adding them together can increase detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we employ four detectors to acquire tiny PA signals simultaneously. Experimental results show that the developed OR-PAM system allows the label-free imaging of cells with weak optical absorption.

  13. Design of angle-resolved illumination optics using nonimaging bi-telecentricity for 193 nm scatterfield microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Martin Y; Barnes, Bryan M; Silver, Richard M

    2018-03-01

    Accurate optics-based dimensional measurements of features sized well-below the diffraction limit require a thorough understanding of the illumination within the optical column and of the three-dimensional scattered fields that contain the information required for quantitative metrology. Scatterfield microscopy can pair simulations with angle-resolved tool characterization to improve agreement between the experiment and calculated libraries, yielding sub-nanometer parametric uncertainties. Optimized angle-resolved illumination requires bi-telecentric optics in which a telecentric sample plane defined by a Köhler illumination configuration and a telecentric conjugate back focal plane (CBFP) of the objective lens; scanning an aperture or an aperture source at the CBFP allows control of the illumination beam angle at the sample plane with minimal distortion. A bi-telecentric illumination optics have been designed enabling angle-resolved illumination for both aperture and source scanning modes while yielding low distortion and chief ray parallelism. The optimized design features a maximum chief ray angle at the CBFP of 0.002° and maximum wavefront deviations of less than 0.06 λ for angle-resolved illumination beams at the sample plane, holding promise for high quality angle-resolved illumination for improved measurements of deep-subwavelength structures using deep-ultraviolet light.

  14. Image-based overlay and alignment metrology through optically opaque media with sub-surface probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Maarten H.; Mohtashami, Abbas; Piras, Daniele; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2018-03-01

    Nondestructive subsurface nanoimaging through optically opaque media is considered to be extremely challenging and is essential for several semiconductor metrology applications including overlay and alignment and buried void and defect characterization. The current key challenge in overlay and alignment is the measurement of targets that are covered by optically opaque layers. Moreover, with the device dimensions moving to the smaller nodes and the issue of the so-called loading effect causing offsets between between targets and product features, it is increasingly desirable to perform alignment and overlay on product features or so-called on-cell overlay, which requires higher lateral resolution than optical methods can provide. Our recently developed technique known as SubSurface Ultrasonic Resonance Force Microscopy (SSURFM) has shown the capability for high-resolution imaging of structures below a surface based on (visco-)elasticity of the constituent materials and as such is a promising technique to perform overlay and alignment with high resolution in upcoming production nodes. In this paper, we describe the developed SSURFM technique and the experimental results on imaging buried features through various layers and the ability to detect objects with resolution below 10 nm. In summary, the experimental results show that the SSURFM is a potential solution for on-cell overlay and alignment as well as detecting buried defects or voids and generally metrology through optically opaque layers.

  15. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J; Tang, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications.

  16. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ~9 fold higher density of fiber optic cables on its top facet compared to the bottom one and is illuminated by an incoherent light source, e.g., a simple light-emitting-diode (LED). The transmitted light pattern through the object is then sampled by this array of fiber optic cables, delivering a transmission image of the sample onto the other side of the taper, with ~3× magnification in each direction. This magnified image of the object, located at the bottom facet of the fiber array, is then projected onto the CMOS image sensor of the cellphone using two lenses. While keeping the sample and the cellphone camera at a fixed position, the fiber-optic array is then manually rotated with discrete angular increments of e.g., 1-2 degrees. At each angular position of the fiber-optic array, contact images are captured using the cellphone camera, creating a sequence of transmission images for the same sample. These multi-frame images are digitally fused together based on a shift-and-add algorithm through a custom-developed Android application running on the smart-phone, providing the final microscopic image of the sample, visualized through the screen of the phone. This final computation step improves the resolution and also removes spatial artefacts that arise due to non-uniform sampling of the transmission intensity at the fiber optic array surface. We validated the performance of this cellphone based Contact Scope by imaging resolution test charts and blood smears.

  17. Heavy-ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Yang, T.C.H.; Richards, T.; Tobias, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter briefly describes the techniques of optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, soft x-ray microscopy and compares these latter techniques with heavy-ion microscopy. The resolution obtained with these various types of microscopy are compared and the influence of the etching procedure on total resolution is discussed. Several micrographs of mammalian cells are included

  18. Social Polarisation and the Danish Welfare State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Bøggild; Rasmussen, Tove Valborg

    look at Aarhus in the light of these theories and studies of other cities. We present some preliminary results of a study based on public registered data covering income, capital, occupation, social services, types of dwellings, localisation etc. in the municipality of Aarhus. On the one hand we paint...... a preliminary picture of Aarhus looking at the distribution of poverty and wealth showing some indicators towards inequality. Furthermore we discuss central theories, concepts and measured indicators......Globalisation and the information society tend - according to leading theories - to increase social polarisation and create dual cities. Studies have shown that the tendencies are more complicated in several of the European cities and the welfare state seems to have an impact on the development. We...

  19. Measurement of $\\tau$ polarisation at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Using the data collected with the L3 detector at LEP between 1990 and 1995, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 149 pb$^{-1}$, the $\\tau$ longitudinal polarisation has been measured as a function of the production polar angle using the $\\tau$ decays \\thad\\ ($\\rm h = \\pi, \\rho, \\aone$) and \\tlep\\ ($\\rm \\ell = e, \\mu$). From this measurement the quantities æl~and \\at, which depend on the couplings of the electron and the $\\tau$ to the Z, are determined to be $\\ael = 0.1678 \\pm 0.0127 \\pm 0.0030 $ and $\\at = 0.1476 \\pm 0.0088 \\pm 0.0062$, consistent with the hypothesis of e--$\\tau$ universality. Under this assumption a value of $\\al = 0.1540 \\pm 0.0074 \\pm 0.0044 $ is obtained, yielding the value of the effective weak mixing angle $\\swsqb = 0.2306 \\pm 0.0011$.

  20. Polarisation resonance in X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Paterson, D.; Matheson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The study of crystal structures by means of dynamic X-ray diffraction has placed a challenge to theoreticians to revise the X-ray diffraction theory based on Maxwell's equation. In this paper the feasibility of using 'polarisation resonance' as a tool in the determination of absolute configuration for asymmetric structures is investigated. Two (left- and right-handed), σ + and σ- , circular polarization states for 3-beam conditions are considered. Moreover, extending interaction into the 3 rd. dimension (normal to the beam) opens the possibility of absolute configuration determination of asymmetric structures in 3 dimensions. The computational scheme used is shown in terms of scattering diagrams. 7 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  1. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M.P.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of the laser induced crater and ablation features by in situ homemade optical microscope. • Performance comparison between confocal microscope for material characterization and homemade optical microscope. • Coupled system of laser ablation setup with a low cost optical microscope. - Abstract: A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  2. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M.P.; Nicolas, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evolution of the laser induced crater and ablation features by in situ homemade optical microscope. • Performance comparison between confocal microscope for material characterization and homemade optical microscope. • Coupled system of laser ablation setup with a low cost optical microscope. - Abstract: A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  3. Combined multi-plane phase retrieval and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging for 4D cell microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, A.; Grußmayer, K. S.; Bostan, E.; Lukes, T.; Bouwens, A.; Sharipov, A.; Geissbuehler, S.; Mahul-Mellier, A.-L.; Lashuel, H. A.; Leutenegger, M.; Lasser, T.

    2018-03-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy provides unprecedented insight into cellular and subcellular structures. However, going `beyond the diffraction barrier' comes at a price, since most far-field super-resolution imaging techniques trade temporal for spatial super-resolution. We propose the combination of a novel label-free white light quantitative phase imaging with fluorescence to provide high-speed imaging and spatial super-resolution. The non-iterative phase retrieval relies on the acquisition of single images at each z-location and thus enables straightforward 3D phase imaging using a classical microscope. We realized multi-plane imaging using a customized prism for the simultaneous acquisition of eight planes. This allowed us to not only image live cells in 3D at up to 200 Hz, but also to integrate fluorescence super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging within the same optical instrument. The 4D microscope platform unifies the sensitivity and high temporal resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-02

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions.

  5. Optical coherent tomography and fluorescent microscopy for the study of meningeal lymphatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Abdurashitov, A.; Namykin, A.; Fedosov, I.; Pavlov, A.; Karavaev, A.; Sindeeva, O.; Shirokov, A.; Ulanova, M.; Shushunova, N.; Khorovodov, A.; Agranovich, I.; Bodrova, A.; Sagatova, M.; Shareef, Ali Esmat; Saranceva, E.; Dvoryatkina, M.; Tuchin, V.

    2018-04-01

    The development of novel technologies for the imaging of meningeal lymphatic vessels is one of the amazing trends of biophotonics thanks to discovery of brain lymphatics over several years ago. However, there is the limited technologies exist for the study of lymphatics in vivo because lymphatic vessels are transparent with a low speed flow of lymph. Here we demonstrate the successful application of fluorescent microscopy for the imaging of lymphatic system in the mouse brain in vivo.

  6. BigNeuron: Large-scale 3D Neuron Reconstruction from Optical Microscopy Images

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael; Roskams, Jane; Hill, Sean; Spruston, Nelson; Meijering, Erik; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding the structure of single neurons is critical for understanding how they function within neural circuits. BigNeuron is a new community effort that combines modern bioimaging informatics, recent leaps in labeling and microscopy, and the widely recognized need for openness and standardization to provide a community resource for automated reconstruction of dendritic and axonal morphology of single neurons. Understanding the structure of single neurons is critical for unde...

  7. How Hedstrom files fail during clinical use? A retrieval study based on SEM, optical microscopy and micro-XCT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinelis, Spiros; Al Jabbari, Youssef S

    2018-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the failure mechanism of clinically failed Hedstrom (H)-files. Discarded H-files (n=160) from #8 to #40 ISO sizes were collected from different dental clinics. Retrieved files were classified according to their macroscopic appearance and they were investigated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography (mXCT). Then the files were embedded in resin along their longitudinal axis and after metallographic grinding and polishing, studied under an incident light microscope. The macroscopic evaluation showed that small ISO sizes (#08-#15) failed by extensive plastic deformation, while larger sizes (≥#20) tended to fracture. Light microscopy and mXCT results coincided showing that unused and plastically deformed files were free of internal defects, while fractured files demonstrate the presence of intense cracking in the flute region. SEM analysis revealed the presence of striations attributed to the fatigue mechanism. Secondary cracks were also identified by optical microscopy and their distribution was correlated to fatigue under bending loading. Experimental results demonstrated that while overloading of cutting instruments is the predominating failure mechanism of small file sizes (#08-#15), fatigue should be considered the fracture mechanism for larger sizes (≥#20).

  8. FDTD simulated observation of a gold nanorod by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Keiji; Maruoka, Teruto; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yuichi; Imura, Kohei; Saiki, Toshiharu; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    The optical properties of a gold nanorod were investigated by Imura et. al. using an apertured-type scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM). The observed transmission image showed an oscillating pattern along the long axis of the nanorod. We obtain the image using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Our model includes a nanorod on a glass substrate, a SNOM, and current as a light source. We develop a simple method for including the Drude-Lorentz dispersion relation of Vial et. al. for gold in the FDTD. The oscillating pattern is explained by the total current in the nanorod, tip of the SNOM, and light source. (author)

  9. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Polarisation analysis on the LET time-of-flight spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, G. J.; Košata, J.; Devonport, M.; Galsworthy, P.; Bewley, R. I.; Voneshen, D. J.; Dalgliesh, R.; Stewart, J. R.

    2017-06-01

    We present a design for implementing uniaxial polarisation analysis on the LET cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer, installed on the second target station at ISIS. The polarised neutron beam is to be produced by a transmission-based supermirror polariser with the polarising mirrors arranged in a “double-V” formation. This will be followed by a Mezei-type precession coil spin flipper, selected for its small spatial requirements, as well as a permanent magnet guide field to transport the beam polarisation to the sample position. The sample area will contain a set of holding field coils, whose purpose is to produce a highly homogenous magnetic field for the wide-angle 3He analyser cell. To facilitate fast cell changes and reduce the risk of cell failure, we intend to separate the cell and cryostat from the vacuum of the sample tank by installing both in a vessel at atmospheric pressure. When the instrument upgrade is complete, the performance of LET is expected to be commensurate with existing and planned polarised cold neutron spectrometers at other sources. Finally, we discuss the implications of performing uniaxial polarisation analysis only, and identify quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) on ionic conducting materials as an interesting area to apply the technique.

  11. In vivo monitoring of seeds and plant-tissue water absorption using optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikova, Veronika V.; Kutis, Irina S.; Kutis, Sergey D.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.

    2004-07-01

    First experimental results on OCT imaging of internal structure of plant tissues and in situ OCT monitoring of plant tissue regeneration at different water supply are reported. Experiments for evaluating OCT capabilities were performed on Tradescantia. The investigation of seeds swelling was performed on wheat seeds (Triticum L.), barley seeds (Hordeum L.), long-fibred flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) and cucumber seeds (Cucumis sativus L.). These OCT images correlate with standard microscopy data from the same tissue regions. Seeds were exposed to a low-intensity physical factor-the pulsed gradient magnetic field (GMF) with pulse duration 0.1 s and maximum amplitude 5 mT (4 successive pulses during 0.4 s). OCT and OCM enable effective monitoring of fast reactions in plants and seeds at different water supply.

  12. Single molecule detection on the cell membrane with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, B.I.

    2004-01-01

    In this research we have developed a dedicated near- field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) for molecular biology and applied it to study the spatial organization of (fluorescently labeled) proteins at the cell surface. For the first time, protein clusters and individual molecules are resolved at

  13. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Graft, M.; van Graft, Marja; Oosterhuis, B.; Oosterhuis, Bernard; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical

  14. Single top polarisation as a window to new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A., E-mail: jaas@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Degrande, C. [CERN, Theory Department, Geneva 23 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Khatibi, S. [School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-10

    We discuss the effect of heavy new physics, parameterised in terms of four-fermion operators, in the polarisation of single top (anti-)quarks in the t-channel process at the LHC. It is found that for operators involving a right-handed top quark field the relative effect on the longitudinal polarisation is twice larger than the relative effect on the total cross section. This enhanced dependence on possible four-fermion contributions makes the polarisation measurements specially interesting, in particular at high momenta.

  15. Wettability and surface free energy of polarised ceramic biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Miho; Hori, Naoko; Namba, Saki; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Toyama, Takeshi; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The surface modification of ceramic biomaterials used for medical devices is expected to improve osteoconductivity through control of the interfaces between the materials and living tissues. Polarisation treatment induced surface charges on hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite and yttria-stabilized zirconia regardless of the differences in the carrier ions participating in the polarisation. Characterization of the surfaces revealed that the wettability of the polarised ceramic biomaterials was improved through the increase in the surface free energies compared with conventional ceramic surfaces. (note)

  16. Super-resolution imaging of subcortical white matter using stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainsworth, A. H.; Lee, S.; Patel, A.; Poon, W. W.; Knight, A. E.

    2018-01-01

    Aims The spatial resolution of light microscopy is limited by the wavelength of visible light (the ‘diffraction limit’, approximately 250 nm). Resolution of sub-cellular structures, smaller than this limit, is possible with super resolution methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). We aimed to resolve subcellular structures (axons, myelin sheaths and astrocytic processes) within intact white matter, using STORM and SOFI. Methods Standard cryostat-cut sections of subcortical white matter from donated human brain tissue and from adult rat and mouse brain were labelled, using standard immunohistochemical markers (neurofilament-H, myelin-associated glycoprotein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP). Image sequences were processed for STORM (effective pixel size 8–32 nm) and for SOFI (effective pixel size 80 nm). Results In human, rat and mouse, subcortical white matter high-quality images for axonal neurofilaments, myelin sheaths and filamentous astrocytic processes were obtained. In quantitative measurements, STORM consistently underestimated width of axons and astrocyte processes (compared with electron microscopy measurements). SOFI provided more accurate width measurements, though with somewhat lower spatial resolution than STORM. Conclusions Super resolution imaging of intact cryo-cut human brain tissue is feasible. For quantitation, STORM can under-estimate diameters of thin fluorescent objects. SOFI is more robust. The greatest limitation for super-resolution imaging in brain sections is imposed by sample preparation. We anticipate that improved strategies to reduce autofluorescence and to enhance fluorophore performance will enable rapid expansion of this approach. PMID:28696566

  17. Super-resolution imaging of subcortical white matter using stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainsworth, A H; Lee, S; Foot, P; Patel, A; Poon, W W; Knight, A E

    2017-07-11

    The spatial resolution of light microscopy is limited by the wavelength of visible light (the 'diffraction limit', approximately 250 nm). Resolution of sub-cellular structures, smaller than this limit, is possible with super resolution methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). We aimed to resolve subcellular structures (axons, myelin sheaths and astrocytic processes) within intact white matter, using STORM and SOFI. Standard cryostat-cut sections of subcortical white matter from donated human brain tissue and from adult rat and mouse brain were labelled, using standard immunohistochemical markers (neurofilament-H, myelin-associated glycoprotein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP). Image sequences were processed for STORM (effective pixel size 8-32 nm) and for SOFI (effective pixel size 80 nm). In human, rat and mouse, subcortical white matter high-quality images for axonal neurofilaments, myelin sheaths and filamentous astrocytic processes were obtained. In quantitative measurements, STORM consistently underestimated width of axons and astrocyte processes (compared with electron microscopy measurements). SOFI provided more accurate width measurements, though with somewhat lower spatial resolution than STORM. Super resolution imaging of intact cryo-cut human brain tissue is feasible. For quantitation, STORM can under-estimate diameters of thin fluorescent objects. SOFI is more robust. The greatest limitation for super-resolution imaging in brain sections is imposed by sample preparation. We anticipate that improved strategies to reduce autofluorescence and to enhance fluorophore performance will enable rapid expansion of this approach. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  18. Tissue imaging using full field optical coherence microscopy with short multimode fiber probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Eto, Kai; Goto, Tetsuhiro; Kurotani, Reiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2018-03-01

    In achieving minimally invasive accessibility to deeply located regions the size of the imaging probes is important. We demonstrated full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCM) using an ultrathin forward-imaging short multimode fiber (SMMF) probe of 50 μm core diameter, 125 μm diameter, and 7.4 mm length for optical communications. The axial resolution was measured to be 2.14 μm and the lateral resolution was also evaluated to be below 4.38 μm using a test pattern (TP). The spatial mode and polarization characteristics of SMMF were evaluated. Inserting SMMF to in vivo rat brain, 3D images were measured and 2D information of nerve fibers was obtained. The feasibility of an SMMF as an ultrathin forward-imaging probe in FF-OCM has been demonstrated.

  19. Toward endoscopes with no distal optics: video-rate scanning microscopy through a fiber bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Bouwmans, Géraud; Monneret, Serge; Rigneault, Hervé

    2013-03-01

    We report a step toward scanning endomicroscopy without distal optics. The focusing of the beam at the distal end of a fiber bundle is achieved by imposing a parabolic phase profile across the exit face with the aid of a spatial light modulator. We achieve video-rate images by galvanometric scanning of the phase tilt at the proximal end. The approach is made possible by the bundle, designed to have very low coupling between cores.

  20. Optimization of s-Polarization Sensitivity in Apertureless Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuika Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a general belief in apertureless near-field microscopy that the so-called p-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized parallel to the axis of the probe, is advantageous to its counterpart, the s-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized perpendicular to the probe axis. While this is true for most samples under common near-field experimental conditions, there are samples which respond better to the s-polarization configuration due to their orientations. Indeed, there have been several reports that have discussed such samples. This leads us to an important requirement that the near-field experimental setup should be equipped with proper sensitivity for measurements with s-polarization configuration. This requires not only creation of effective s-polarized illumination at the near-field probe, but also proper enhancement of s-polarized light by the probe. In this paper, we have examined the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity of near-field probes by measuring and evaluating the near-field Rayleigh scattering images constructed by a variety of probes. We found that the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity strongly depends on the sharpness of the apex of near-field probes. We have discussed the efficient value of probe sharpness by considering a balance between the enhancement and the spatial resolution, both of which are essential requirements of apertureless near-field microscopy.

  1. Characterization of human arterial tissue affected by atherosclerosis using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baria, Enrico; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rotellini, Matteo; Nesi, Gabriella; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread cardiovascular disease caused by the deposition of lipids (such as cholesterol and triglycerides) on the inner arterial wall. The rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, resulting in a thrombus, is one of the leading causes of death in the Western World. Preventive assessment of plaque vulnerability is therefore extremely important and can be performed by studying collagen organization and lipid composition in atherosclerotic arterial tissues. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Instead, a label-free and non-invasive alternative is provided by nonlinear microscopy. In this study, we combined SHG and FLIM microscopy in order to characterize collagen organization and lipids in human carotid ex vivo tissues affected by atherosclerosis. SHG and TPF images, acquired from different regions within atherosclerotic plaques, were processed through image pattern analysis methods (FFT, GLCM). The resulting information on collagen and cholesterol distribution and anisotropy, combined with collagen and lipids fluorescence lifetime measured from FLIM images, allowed characterization of carotid samples and discrimination of different tissue regions. The presented method can be applied for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. Moreover, it lays the foundation for a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to be used in clinical setting.

  2. Color electron microprobe cathodoluminescence of Bishunpur meteorite compared with the traditional optical microscopy method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Araujo Tosi

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathodoluminescence (CL imaging is an outstanding method for sub classification of Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites (UOC - petrological type 3. CL can be obtained by several electron beam apparatuses. The traditional method uses an electron gun coupled to an optical microscope (OM. Although many scanning electron microscopes (SEM and electron microprobes (EPMA have been equipped with a cathodoluminescence, this technique was not fully explored. Images obtained by the two methods differ due to a different kind of signal acquisition. While in the CL-OM optical photography true colors are obtained, in the CL-EPMA the results are grayscale monochromatic electronic signals. L-RGB filters were used in the CL-EPMA analysis in order to obtain color data. The aim of this work is to compare cathodoluminescence data obtained from both techniques, optical microscope and electron microprobe, on the Bishunpur meteorite classified as LL 3.1 chondrite. The present study allows concluding that 20 KeV and 7 nA is the best analytical condition at EPMA in order to test the equivalence between CL-EPMA and CL-OM colour results. Moreover, the color index revealed to be a method for aiding the study of the thermal metamorphism, but it is not definitive for the meteorite classification.

  3. Polarised neutron diffraction studies on weak ferromagnetism - a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishna, P.

    1982-10-01

    The physical basis of the phenomenon of weak ferromagnetism in certain antiferromagnetic insulators is briefly discussed. A survey of the contributions of polarised neutron diffraction towards the elucidation of different aspects of this field is presented

  4. Performance of a frozen spin polarised proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, F.M.

    1977-12-01

    The operational performance of a frozen spin polarised proton target specifically designed to give an unusually large angular access to the target has been examined. It is concluded that the mean absolute proton polarisation was held at about 64 +- 2% throughout the majority of HEP data recording. An excessive heat input to the target caused by inadequate cooling of the coaxial cable coupling to the nmr coil in the cavity seriously reduced the dwell-time of the target for HEP data collection. However, the short cooldown time of the target and minimal depolarisation associated with recycling of the target between polarising and HEP data collection positions resulted in only a small overall reduction in mean target polarisation and operational efficiency. (author)

  5. Polarisabilities and shielding factors for He, Ne and Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachran, R.P.; Ryman, A.G.; Stauffer, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    Multipole polarisabilities and shielding factors for helium, neon and argon have been calculated accurately in the coupled Hartree-Fock approximation. A shell by shell analysis is given for the first four multipoles. (author)

  6. 3D imaging of optically cleared tissue using a simplified CLARITY method and on-chip microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yibo; Shin, Yoonjung; Sung, Kevin; Yang, Sam; Chen, Harrison; Wang, Hongda; Teng, Da; Rivenson, Yair; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput sectioning and optical imaging of tissue samples using traditional immunohistochemical techniques can be costly and inaccessible in resource-limited areas. We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) imaging and phenotyping in optically transparent tissue using lens-free holographic on-chip microscopy as a low-cost, simple, and high-throughput alternative to conventional approaches. The tissue sample is passively cleared using a simplified CLARITY method and stained using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine to target cells of interest, enabling bright-field optical imaging and 3D sectioning of thick samples. The lens-free computational microscope uses pixel super-resolution and multi-height phase recovery algorithms to digitally refocus throughout the cleared tissue and obtain a 3D stack of complex-valued images of the sample, containing both phase and amplitude information. We optimized the tissue-clearing and imaging system by finding the optimal illumination wavelength, tissue thickness, sample preparation parameters, and the number of heights of the lens-free image acquisition and implemented a sparsity-based denoising algorithm to maximize the imaging volume and minimize the amount of the acquired data while also preserving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. As a proof of concept, we achieved 3D imaging of neurons in a 200-μm-thick cleared mouse brain tissue over a wide field of view of 20.5 mm2. The lens-free microscope also achieved more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in raw data compared to a conventional scanning optical microscope imaging the same sample volume. Being low cost, simple, high-throughput, and data-efficient, we believe that this CLARITY-enabled computational tissue imaging technique could find numerous applications in biomedical diagnosis and research in low-resource settings.

  7. 3D imaging of optically cleared tissue using a simplified CLARITY method and on-chip microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yibo

    2017-08-12

    High-throughput sectioning and optical imaging of tissue samples using traditional immunohistochemical techniques can be costly and inaccessible in resource-limited areas. We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) imaging and phenotyping in optically transparent tissue using lens-free holographic on-chip microscopy as a low-cost, simple, and high-throughput alternative to conventional approaches. The tissue sample is passively cleared using a simplified CLARITY method and stained using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine to target cells of interest, enabling bright-field optical imaging and 3D sectioning of thick samples. The lens-free computational microscope uses pixel super-resolution and multi-height phase recovery algorithms to digitally refocus throughout the cleared tissue and obtain a 3D stack of complex-valued images of the sample, containing both phase and amplitude information. We optimized the tissue-clearing and imaging system by finding the optimal illumination wavelength, tissue thickness, sample preparation parameters, and the number of heights of the lens-free image acquisition and implemented a sparsity-based denoising algorithm to maximize the imaging volume and minimize the amount of the acquired data while also preserving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. As a proof of concept, we achieved 3D imaging of neurons in a 200-μm-thick cleared mouse brain tissue over a wide field of view of 20.5 mm2. The lens-free microscope also achieved more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in raw data compared to a conventional scanning optical microscope imaging the same sample volume. Being low cost, simple, high-throughput, and data-efficient, we believe that this CLARITY-enabled computational tissue imaging technique could find numerous applications in biomedical diagnosis and research in low-resource settings.

  8. Following Intracellular Cholesterol Transport by Linear and Non-Linear Optical Microscopy of Intrinsically Fluorescent Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wustner, D.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of intracellular cholesterol transport is important for understanding the molecular basis of several metabolic and neuronal diseases, like atheroclerosis or lysosomal storage disorders. Progress in this field depends crucially on the development of new technical approaches to follow...... is on recent developments in imaging technology to follow the intracellular fate of intrinsically fluorescent sterols as faithful cholesterol markers. In particular, UV-sensitive wide field and multiphoton microscopy of the sterol dehydroergosterol, DHE, is explained and new methods of quantitative image...... analysis like pixel-wise bleach rate fitting and multiphoton image correlation spectroscopy are introduced. Several applications of the new technology including observation of vectorial sterol trafficking in polarized human hepatoma cells for investigation of reverse cholesterol transport are presented....

  9. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hao, E-mail: hc000211@ohio.edu [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics & Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rosenmann, Daniel [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai [Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics & Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rose, Volker, E-mail: vrose@anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  10. Nanospectrofluorometry inside single living cell by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, F. H.; Shang, G. Y.; Troyon, M.; Spajer, M.; Morjani, H.; Angiboust, J. F.; Manfait, M.

    2001-10-01

    Near-field fluorescence spectra with subdiffraction limit spatial resolution have been taken in the proximity of mitochondrial membrane inside breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) treated with the fluorescent dye (JC-1) by using a scanning near-field optical microscope coupled with a confocal laser microspectrofluorometer. The probe-sample distance control is based on a piezoelectric bimorph shear force sensor having a static spring constant k=5 μN/nm and a quality factor Q=40 in a physiological medium of viscosity η=1.0 cp. The sensitivity of the force sensor has been tested by imaging a MCF7 cell surface.

  11. Note: Tormenta: An open source Python-powered control software for camera based optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabas, Federico M; Masullo, Luciano A; Stefani, Fernando D

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, PC control and synchronization of scientific instruments was only possible through closed-source expensive frameworks like National Instruments' LabVIEW. Nowadays, efficient cost-free alternatives are available in the context of a continuously growing community of open-source software developers. Here, we report on Tormenta, a modular open-source software for the control of camera-based optical microscopes. Tormenta is built on Python, works on multiple operating systems, and includes some key features for fluorescence nanoscopy based on single molecule localization.

  12. Diffuse optical microscopy for quantification of depth-dependent epithelial backscattering in the cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Lam, Sylvia; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Miller, Dianne M.; McAlpine, Jessica N.; Lee, Marette; Kienle, Alwin; MacAulay, Calum

    2016-06-01

    A fiber optic imaging approach is presented using structured illumination for quantification of almost pure epithelial backscattering. We employ multiple spatially modulated projection patterns and camera-based reflectance capture to image depth-dependent epithelial scattering. The potential diagnostic value of our approach is investigated on cervical ex vivo tissue specimens. Our study indicates a strong backscattering increase in the upper part of the cervical epithelium caused by dysplastic microstructural changes. Quantization of relative depth-dependent backscattering is confirmed as a potentially useful diagnostic feature for detection of precancerous lesions in cervical squamous epithelium.

  13. Polarisation modulated crosscorrelation spectroscopy on a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cywinski, R.; Williams, W.G.

    1984-07-01

    A crosscorrelation technique is introduced by which a total scattering polarisation analysis spectrometer on a pulsed neutron source can be modified to give full neutron polarisation and energy analysis without changing the physical configuration of the instrument. Its implementation on the proposed POLARIS spectrometer at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source is described, and the expected dynamic (Q, ω) range and resolution evaluated. (author)

  14. Measurement of the Tau Lepton Polarisation at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, Sandra F.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, Pierre; Apel, W-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, Antonio; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, Eli; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, Mikael; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, Michal; Bonesini, Maurizio; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, Olga; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, Marko; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, Tiziano; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, Paolo; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, Roberto; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, Fabio; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Dedovich, D.; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Alessandro; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, Barbara; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, Tord; Ellert, Mattias; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, Maria Catarina; Fanourakis, George K.; Feindt, Michael; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, Miriam; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Philippe; Gazis, Evangelos; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, Vincent; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S-O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, Goran; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E.K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, Gabrijel; Kerzel, U.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, Peter; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, Jacques; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, Pierre; Lyons, Louis; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, Athanasios; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, Francisco; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R.Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, Winfried A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim Filho, Luiz Martins; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, Henryk; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, Andrea; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedra, Jonatan; Pieri, L.; Pierre, Francois; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, Peter; Richard, F.; Ridky, Jan; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann, Vanina; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, Martin; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, Petr; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, Clara; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, Giovanni; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, Patrice; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement of the average polarisation P_tau of tau leptons produced in e+e- annihilation at energies significantly above the Z resonance is presented. The polarisation is determined from the kinematic spectra of tau hadronic decays. The measured value P_tau = -0.164 +/- 0.125 is consistent with the Standard Model prediction for the mean LEP energy of 197 GeV.

  15. Multimodal reconstruction of microvascular-flow distributions using combined two-photon microscopy and Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Louis; Sakadžić, Sava; Lesage, Fréderic; Mandeville, Emiri T; Fang, Qianqian; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Boas, David A

    2015-01-01

    Computing microvascular cerebral blood flow ([Formula: see text]) in real cortical angiograms is challenging. Here, we investigated whether the use of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) flow measurements in individual vessel segments can help in reconstructing [Formula: see text] across the entire vasculature of a truncated cortical angiogram. A [Formula: see text] computational framework integrating DOCT measurements is presented. Simulations performed on a synthetic angiogram showed that the addition of DOCT measurements, especially close to large inflowing or outflowing vessels, reduces the impact of pressure boundary conditions and estimated vessel resistances resulting in a more accurate reconstruction of [Formula: see text]. Our technique was then applied to reconstruct microvascular flow distributions in the mouse cortex down to [Formula: see text] by combining two-photon laser scanning microscopy angiography with DOCT.

  16. Mapping the Landscape of Domain-Wall Pinning in Ferromagnetic Films Using Differential Magneto-Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Robert; Berezovsky, Jesse

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of domain walls in a ferromagnetic film is largely determined by domain-wall pinning at defects in the material. In this article, we map the effective potential landscape for domain-wall pinning in permalloy films by raster scanning a single ferromagnetic vortex and monitoring the hysteretic vortex displacement vs applied magnetic field. The measurement is carried out using a differential magneto-optical microscopy technique which yields spatial sensitivity of approximately 10 nm. We present a simple algorithm for extracting an effective pinning potential from the measurement of vortex displacement vs applied field. The resulting maps of the pinning potential reveal distinct types of pinning sites, which we attribute to quasi-zero-, one-, and two-dimensional defects in the permalloy film.

  17. Deep-sea spherules from Pacific clay - Mass distribution and influx rate. [extraterrestrial origins from optical and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, M. T.; Davis, P. A., Jr.; Nishiizumi, K.; Millard, H. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    From 411 kg of Pacific clay, 22 mg of stony spherules and 50 mg of iron spherules larger than 150 microns were concentrated. The extraterrestrial origin of these particles was evaluated with the aid of optical and electron microscopy and atomic absorption elemental analysis. An expression for the integral number of stony particles from this sediment in the mass range 20-300 micrograms was derived. The world-wide influx rate of stony particles in the mass range which survive atmospheric heating and ocean sediment storage is calculated to be 90 tons/yr. The relative contributions of ablation debris vs fused interplanetary dust to the influx of stony spherules is discussed, but no conclusions could be made.

  18. Characterization of Byzantine pottery from Oltina (Constanţa County), Romania, using PIXE and Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugoi, Roxana; Talmaţchi, Cristina; Haitǎ, Constantin; Ceccato, Daniele

    2018-02-01

    An assemblage of 58 ceramic shards discovered in archaeological excavations at Oltina, Romania, dated to the 10th-11th century CE, was subjected to archaeometric investigations in order to reveal the raw materials and manufacturing techniques employed by the potters from the Lower Danube zone during the Byzantine ruling. The initial grouping of the shards according to stylistic criteria was refined by the subsequent petrographic study. Optical Microscopy (OM) detailed the general mineralogy and the pottery fabric, i.e. the textural characteristics, porosity and microstructure, surface treatments and firing. The PIXE analyses of potteries performed at AN2000 accelerator of LNL, INFN, Italy led to the identification of the chemical composition of the ceramic shards. The Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of the PIXE data evidenced several categories of shards with distinct compositional signatures, the main division being the one separating the ceramic fragments made of kaolinitic clays from the rest of the Oltina potteries.

  19. Atomic force microscopy deep trench and sidewall imaging with an optical fiber probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Hui, E-mail: xiehui@hit.edu.cn; Hussain, Danish; Yang, Feng [The State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Harbin Institute of Technology, 2 Yikuang, 150080 Harbin (China); Sun, Lining [The State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Harbin Institute of Technology, 2 Yikuang, 150080 Harbin (China); Robotics and Microsystems Center, Soochow University, 215021 Suzhou (China)

    2014-12-15

    We report a method to measure critical dimensions of micro- and nanostructures using the atomic force microscope (AFM) with an optical fiber probe (OFP). This method is capable of scanning narrow and deep trenches due to the long and thin OFP tip, as well as imaging of steep sidewalls with unique profiling possibilities by laterally tilting the OFP without any modifications of the optical lever. A switch control scheme is developed to measure the sidewall angle by flexibly transferring feedback control between the Z- and Y-axis, for a serial scan of the horizontal surface (raster scan on XY-plane) and sidewall (raster scan on the YZ-plane), respectively. In experiments, a deep trench with tapered walls (243.5 μm deep) and a microhole (about 14.9 μm deep) have been imaged with the orthogonally aligned OFP, as well as a silicon sidewall (fabricated by deep reactive ion etching) has been characterized with the tilted OFP. Moreover, the sidewall angle of TGZ3 (AFM calibration grating) was accurately measured using the switchable scan method.

  20. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off longitudinally polarised protons at HERMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, David Francis

    2010-03-01

    This thesis details the simultaneous extraction of three polarisation-dependent asymmetries in the distribution of real photons from the ep→epγ interaction and its indistinguishable deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes at the HERMES fixed-target experiment at Desy. The data analysed were taken using a longitudinally polarised 27.57 GeV positron beam incident on a longitudinally polarised hydrogen gas target. The extracted asymmetries include two single-spin asymmetries A UL and A LU which depend on the polarisation of the target and beam respectively, averaged over all other polarisation states. The double-spin asymmetry A LL dependent on the product of the beam and target polarisations is extracted for the first time. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted relate to combinations of Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs), predominantly H and H. The extracted amplitudes are presented across the HERMES kinematic range alongside theoretical predictions from a GPD model based on double distributions. Large sin φ and cos(0φ) amplitudes are observed for A UL and A LL respectively, with an unexpectedly large sin(2φ) amplitude for A UL . The results for the A UL and A LL asymmetries are broadly compatible with theory predictions, and the extracted A LU amplitudes are compatible with HERMES results extracted from a significantly larger data set. It is foreseen that these results will form input to future global data-based GPD models which aim to provide a better understanding of GPDs. (orig.)

  1. The sunstone and polarised skylight: ancient Viking navigational tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Guy; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Le Floch, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Although the polarisation of the light was discovered at the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Vikings could have used the polarised light around the tenth century in their navigation to America, using a 'sunstone' evoked in the Icelandic Sagas. Indeed, the birefringence of the Iceland spar (calcite), a common crystal in Scandinavia, permits a simple observation of the axis of polarisation of the skylight at the zenith. From this, it is possible to guess the azimuth of a hidden Sun below the horizon, for instance. The high sensitivity of the differential method provided by the ordinary and extraordinary beams of calcite at its so-called isotropy point is about two orders higher than that of the best dichroic polariser and permits to reach an accuracy of ±1° for the Sun azimuth (at sunrise and sunset). Unfortunately, due to the relative fragility of calcite, only the so-called Alderney crystal was discovered on board a 16th ancient ship. Curiously, beyond its use as a sunstone by the Vikings, during these last millennia calcite has led to the discovery of the polarisation of the light itself by Malus and is currently being used to detect the atmospheres of exoplanets. Moreover, the differential method for the light polarisation detection is widely used in the animal world.

  2. Polarised nuclei for neutron science: recent applications and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaettli, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Neutron scattering on nuclei is spin dependent, particularly strongly for 1 H. The means to achieve large nuclear polarisations and its use for structure analysis or as spin-handling device are reviewed. High resolution (diffraction) as well as low resolution (SANS) measurements can benefit from polarised nuclei by changing selectively the form factors of Bragg reflections or the contrasts (the scattering length density profiles) in SANS. The internal structure of ribosomes and the conformation of polymers in solution have been investigated by this method. A numerical simulation is presented to show the influence of steady-state polarisation of protons on the scattering from a protein-ARN model complex. In addition, a more recent technique, time-resolved SANS is described. It makes use of spatial polarisation gradients created around paramagnetic centres at the onset of nuclear polarisation. Such polarisation domains can enhance considerably the scattering amplitude of free radicals and thus contribute to determine their positions inside a complex protein. Examples of possible future experiments are proposed which combine simultaneously the selectivity of solid-state NMR techniques and neutron scattering

  3. The gluon contribution to polarised nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.G.; Roberts, R.G.

    1990-08-01

    As with all parton distributions in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) the separation of polarised nucleon structure functions into gluon and quark contributions must be specified. We consider a definition of the gluon contribution to polarised nucleon structure functions based on exclusive processes which is explicitly gauge invariant, has no regularisation ambiguities, is insensitive to infrared singularities and can be related to other polarised scattering processes. We discuss the relationship of this gluon definition to others that have recently been used and to the estimates that have been made of the gluon contribution using current algebra and other methods. A quantitative analysis of the structure function g 1 (x,Q 2 ) for polarised deep inelastic scattering is carried out, with the aim of examining the importance of the gluon contribution. Using the positivity of parton distributions the magnitude of Δg(x,Q 2 ) is constrained by a realistic estimate of the unpolarised glue. With the appropriate choice of the hard scattering cross-section, Δσ γg , we find that even with a maximally polarised glue (for x > 0.1), some polarised strange quark contribution is still needed by the data of the EMC. (author)

  4. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, X; Cawley, J.; Rainforth, W.M.; Chen, L.

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 μm). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 μm), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). GDOES proved to be an excellent tool for the quantification of oxidation and element distribution as a function of depth, particularly when combined with SEM and TEM to identify oxide type and morphology

  5. Deleterious phases precipitation on superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750: characterization by light optical and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Pardal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious phases precipitation in superduplex stainless steels is the main concern in fabrication by welding and hot forming of this class of material. Sigma, chi and secondary austenite phases are considered deleterious phases because they produce negative effects on corrosion resistance. Besides, sigma and chi phases also promote strong decrease of toughness. In the present work, the precipitations of sigma, chi and secondary austenite under aging in the 800-950 °C interval were studied in two UNS S32750 steels with different grain sizes. The deleterious phases could be quantified by light optical microscopy, with no distinction between them. Scanning electron microscopy was used to distinguish the individual phases in various aging conditions. The results elucidate the influence of the aging temperature and grain size on the kinetics precipitation and morphology of deleterious phases. The kinetics of deleterious phases is higher in the fine grained material in the initial stage of aging, but the maximum amount of deleterious phases is higher in the coarse grained steel.

  6. Hybrid of two-photon microscopy and optical multimodality imaging for multi-scale imaging of small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianmeng; Hui, Hui; Ma, He; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Non-invasive imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical multimodality imaging methods, are commonly used for diagnosing and supervising the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These in vivo imaging methods can provide morphology changes information of IBD in macro-scale. However, it is difficult to investigate the intestinal wall in molecular and cellular level. State-of-art light-sheet and two-photon microscopy have the ability to acquire the changes for IBD in micro-scale. The aim of this work is to evaluate the size of the enterocoel and the thickness of colon wall using both MRI for in vivo imaging, and light-sheet and two-photon microscope for in vitro imaging. C57BL/6 mice were received 3.5% Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in the drinking water for 5 days to build IBD model. Mice were imaged with MRI on days 0, 6 to observe colitis progression. After MRI imaging, the mice were sacrificed to take colons for tissue clearing. Then, light-sheet and two-photon microscopies are used for in vitro imaging of the cleared samples. The experimental group showed symptoms of bloody stools, sluggishness and weight loss. It showed that the colon wall was thicker while the enterocoel was narrower compare to control group. The more details are observed using light-sheet and two-photon microscope. It is demonstrated that hybrid of MRI in macro-scale and light-sheet and two-photon microscopy in micro-scale imaging is feasible for colon inflammation diagnosing and supervising.

  7. Polarised Black Holes in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S.; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-05-03

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global $AdS_{4}$ with conformal boundary $S^{2}\\times\\mathbb{R}_{t}$. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic $AdS$ behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an $AdS$ soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the $AdS$ geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both $AdS$ soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawkin...

  8. Measurement of the SMC muon beam polarisation using the asymmetry in the elastic scattering off polarised electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Adeva, B; Akdogan, T; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Clocchiatti, M; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gatignon, L; Gaussiran, T; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Golutvin, I A; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiryushin, Yu T; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nagaitsev, A P; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Schüler, K P; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sergeev, S; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zamiatin, N I; Zhao, J

    2000-01-01

    A muon beam polarimeter was built for the SMC experiment at the CERN SPS, for beam energies of 100 and 190 GeV. The beam polarisation is determined from the asymmetry in the elastic scattering off the polarised electrons of a ferromagnetic target whose magnetisation is periodically reversed. At muon energies of 100 and 190~GeV the measured polarisation is $P_{\\mu}=-0.80 \\pm 0.03 (stat.)\\pm 0.02 (syst.)$ and $P_{\\mu}=-0.797 \\pm 0.011 (stat.)\\pm 0.012 (syst.)$, respectively. These results agree with measurements of the beam polarisation using a shape analysis of the decay positron energy spectrum.

  9. Structural aspects of displacive transformations: what can optical microscopy contribute? Dehydration of Sm2(C2O43·10H2O as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Matvienko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For martensitic transformations the macroscopic crystal strain is directly related to the corresponding structural rearrangement at the microscopic level. In situ optical microscopy observations of the interface migration and the change in crystal shape during a displacive single crystal to single crystal transformation can contribute significantly to understanding the mechanism of the process at the atomic scale. This is illustrated for the dehydration of samarium oxalate decahydrate in a study combining optical microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  10. Optical diffraction tomography microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of ±37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ∼0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  11. Super-resolution optical microscopy resolves network morphology of smart colloidal microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Stephan; Wrede, Oliver; Huser, Thomas; Hellweg, Thomas

    2018-02-14

    We present a new method to resolve the network morphology of colloidal particles in an aqueous environment via super-resolution microscopy. By localization of freely diffusing fluorophores inside the particle network we can resolve the three dimensional structure of one species of colloidal particles (thermoresponsive microgels) without altering their chemical composition through copolymerization with fluorescent monomers. Our approach utilizes the interaction of the fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G with the polymer network to achieve an indirect labeling. We calculate the 3D structure from the 2D images and compare the structure to previously published models for the microgel morphology, e.g. the fuzzy sphere model. To describe the differences in the data an extension of this model is suggested. Our method enables the tailor-made fabrication of colloidal particles which are used in various applications, such as paints or cosmetics, and are promising candidates for drug delivery, smart surface coatings, and nanocatalysis. With the precise knowledge of the particle morphology an understanding of the underlying structure-property relationships for various colloidal systems is possible.

  12. 4D super-resolution microscopy with conventional fluorophores and single wavelength excitation in optically thick cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Baddeley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical super-resolution imaging of fluorescently stained biological samples is rapidly becoming an important tool to investigate protein distribution at the molecular scale. It is therefore important to develop practical super-resolution methods that allow capturing the full three-dimensional nature of biological systems and also can visualize multiple protein species in the same sample. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that the use of a combination of conventional near-infrared dyes, such as Alexa 647, Alexa 680 and Alexa 750, all excited with a 671 nm diode laser, enables 3D multi-colour super-resolution imaging of complex biological samples. Optically thick samples, including human tissue sections, cardiac rat myocytes and densely grown neuronal cultures were imaged with lateral resolutions of ∼15 nm (std. dev. while reducing marker cross-talk to <1%. Using astigmatism an axial resolution of ∼65 nm (std. dev. was routinely achieved. The number of marker species that can be distinguished depends on the mean photon number of single molecule events. With the typical photon yields from Alexa 680 of ∼2000 up to 5 markers may in principle be resolved with <2% crosstalk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach is based entirely on the use of conventional, commercially available markers and requires only a single laser. It provides a very straightforward way to investigate biological samples at the nanometre scale and should help establish practical 4D super-resolution microscopy as a routine research tool in many laboratories.

  13. Microscopy system of atomic force based on a digital optical reading unit and a buzzer-scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabirian, R.; Loza M, D.; Wang, W. M.; Hwu, E. T.

    2015-01-01

    An astigmatic detection system (Ads) based on a compact disk/digital-versatile-disk (Cd-DVD) astigmatic optical pickup unit is presented. It can achieve a resolution better than 0.3 nm in detection of the vertical displacement and is able to detect the two-dimensional angular tilt of the object surface. Furthermore, a novel scanner design actuated by piezoelectric disk buzzers is presented. The scanner is composed of a quad-rod actuation structure and several piezoelectric disks. It can be driven directly with low-voltage and low-current sources, such as analogue outputs of a data acquisition card and enables a sufficient scanning range of up to μm. In addition, an economic, high-performance streamlined atomic force microscopy (AFM) was constructed, using the buzzer-scanner to move the sample relative to the probe, and using a Cd/DVD optical pickup unit to detect the mechanical resonance of a micro fabricated cantilever. The performance of the AFM is evaluated. The high sensitivity and high bandwidth of the detection system makes the equipment suitable for characterizing nano scale elements. An AFM using our detection system for detecting the deflection of micro fabricated cantilevers can resolve individual atomic steps on graphite surfaces. (Author)

  14. Developing a New Biophysical Tool to Combine Magneto-Optical Tweezers with Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokun Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, in conjunction with advanced imaging techniques such as Blinking assisted Localisation Microscopy (BaLM, achieves localisation precision of single fluorescent dye molecules bound to DNA of ~30 nm along the contour of the molecule; our work here describes developments in producing a system which combines tweezing and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument also features an acousto-optic deflector that temporally divides the laser beam to form multiple traps for high throughput statistics collection. Our motivation for developing the new tool is to enable direct observation of detailed molecular topological transformation and protein binding event localisation in a stretching/twisting mechanical assay that previously could hitherto only be deduced indirectly from the end-to-end length variation of DNA. Our approach is simple and robust enough for reproduction in the lab without the requirement of precise hardware engineering, yet is capable of unveiling the elastic and dynamic properties of filamentous molecules that have been hidden using traditional tools.

  15. Differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography microscopy based on a single-optical-element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Both digital in-line holography (DIH) and zone plate-based microscopy have received considerable interest as powerful imaging tools. However, the former suffers from a twin-image noise problem. The latter suffers from low efficiency and difficulty in fabrication. Here, we present an effective and efficient phase-contrast imaging approach, named differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography (DIC-DIH), by using a single optical element to split the incident light into a plane wave and a converging spherical wave and generate a two-dimensional (2D) DIC effect simultaneously. Specifically, to improve image contrast, we present a new single optical element, termed 2D DIC compound photon sieves, by combining two overlaid binary gratings and a compound photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem and improve image contrast with high efficiency. Additionally, we present an example of the phase-contrast imaging nonuniform thick photoresist development process.

  16. Developing and Incorporating Instructional Videos and Quizzes as a Blended and Online Learning Component in an Undergraduate Optical Microscopy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, S.; Gualda, G. A. R.; Claiborne, L. L.; Brame, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optical mineralogy is not an easy skill to master as an undergraduate, but it is crucial for understanding what the Earth is made out of. It is a supplementary and specific skillset typically taught in a microscope lab supporting lessons on crystallography, chemistry and mineral analysis in the classroom. Mastering the basic skills is required for advancement in courses that utilize thin sections in teaching igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. This project asks: Will exposing undergraduate Earth and environmental studies students to optical microscopy figures in videos prior to lab assist in the acquisition of skills required to describe and distinguish Earth materials? This project is conducted in conjunction with the Blended and Online Learning Design (BOLD) Fellowship offered through the Center for Teaching (CFT) at Vanderbilt University. Eight videos and accompanying pre-lab questions were hosted online weekly in a semester-long, undergraduate Earth materials course. The focus of the design of the videos and supporting questions is specifically on microscopy skills rather than on optics concepts, which is taught post-video. The videos were made available prior to a weekly lab with the intent of familiarizing the student with the types of images and information he/she should obtain with the microscope. Multiple choice, formative-style questions accompany the videos in an online-hosted assignment. These questions are graded on basis of completion and are intended to aid in student metacognition. Subjects include students in the Vanderbilt University Earth Materials course and students from the Hanover College Mineralogy course. The effectiveness of the videos is assessed in two parts: (1) Comparing the homework and lab final grades of the students this year with those of the students last year (2) Analysis of a weekly questionnaire. The answers after each week will be compiled and compared. Collecting data from Vanderbilt University students and Hanover

  17. Examination of diagnostic features in multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography images of ovarian tumorigenesis in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jennifer M.

    Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease owing to the non-specific symptoms and suspected rapid progression, leading to frequent late stage detection and poor prognosis. Medical imaging methods such as CT, MRI and ultrasound as well as serum testing for cancer markers have had extremely poor performance for early disease detection. Due to the poor performance of available screening methods, and the impracticality and ineffectiveness of taking tissue biopsies from the ovary, women at high risk for developing ovarian cancer are often advised to undergo prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. This surgery results in many side effects and is most often unnecessary since only a fraction of high risk women go on to develop ovarian cancer. Better understanding of the early development of ovarian cancer and characterization of morphological changes associated with early disease could lead to the development of an effective screening test for women at high risk. Optical imaging methods including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are excellent tools for studying disease progression owing to the high resolution and depth sectioning capabilities. Further, these techniques are excellent for optical biopsy because they can image in situ non-destructively. In the studies described in this dissertation OCT and MPM are used to identify cellular and tissue morphological changes associated with early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. This work is organized into three specific aims. The first aim is to use the images from the MPM phenomenon of second harmonic generation to quantitatively examine the morphological differences in collagen structure in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The second aim is to examine the differences in endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The third and final aim is to identify changes in ovarian microstructure resulting from early

  18. Development of an optical microscopy system for automated bubble cloud analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Daniel J; Brittle, Stuart A; Toolan, Daniel T W

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the number of uses of bubbles has begun to increase dramatically, with medicine, biofuel production, and wastewater treatment just some of the industries taking advantage of bubble properties, such as high mass transfer. As a result, more and more focus is being placed on the understanding and control of bubble formation processes and there are currently numerous techniques utilized to facilitate this understanding. Acoustic bubble sizing (ABS) and laser scattering techniques are able to provide information regarding bubble size and size distribution with minimal data processing, a major advantage over current optical-based direct imaging approaches. This paper demonstrates how direct bubble-imaging methods can be improved upon to yield high levels of automation and thus data comparable to ABS and laser scattering. We also discuss the added benefits of the direct imaging approaches and how it is possible to obtain considerable additional information above and beyond that which ABS and laser scattering can supply. This work could easily be exploited by both industrial-scale operations and small-scale laboratory studies, as this straightforward and cost-effective approach is highly transferrable and intuitive to use.

  19. CARS microscopy for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzumanyan Grigory; Voskanyan Karine

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy grows in its importance with the development of modern nanotechnology, biotechnology, methods of diagnostics and treatment of most dangerous diseases for mankind. There are several important goals of optical microscopy for biomedical studies among which the next three may be distinguished: fast imaging with high lateral spatial resolution, 3-D sectioning capability and high contrast for chemical selectivity. To meet these specific requirements, various types of both linear and nonlinear optical microscopy were elaborated. (authors)

  20. Optical and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy of luminescent 2-styrylpyridine derivative compounds with Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Gutierrez, E.; Percino, M.J.; Chapela, V.M.; Maldonado, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The present work addresses the optical and morphological properties of organic films based on low molecular weight dyes styrylpyridine derivatives 2-styrylpyridine (A), 4-chlorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (B) and 4-fluorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (C), embedded in a polymeric matrix poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK). The films were prepared by a spin-coating technique from solutions with dye:PVK ratios of 0.25:1, 0.5:1 and 1:1. Solvents were chloroform and toluene. The molar absorption coefficient (ε) spectra for a dye:PVK mixture in solution were a combination of the absorptions of both components separately, but for the deposited films, the shape of the spectrum showed that the poly(N-vinylcarbazole) absorption dominated. However, when the same films were dissolved again in CHCl 3 , their spectra showed an absorption shape similar to that of the solution mixture before the deposition. Solution viscosity measurements were carried out with an Ubbelohde glass capillary viscometer to corroborate the results that showed a better mixture of the dye with the host in chloroform. The morphology of the prepared films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy and exhibited a solvent effect, with a pinhole-free, smooth surface when toluene was used and a wavy surface with chloroform. The ratio dye:matrix was the principal parameter for obtaining optical quality films; for 0.25:1 and 0.5:1 ratios, the films were of good quality, but for 1:1, the dye was expelled from the PVK and a crystallization was present over the surface of the films. Film thickness was also measured and films deposited from toluene solutions gave an average thickness of 54 nm while films from chloroform solutions had an average thickness greater than 160 nm that increased depending on chromophore concentration.

  1. Optical and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy of luminescent 2-styrylpyridine derivative compounds with Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Gutierrez, E., E-mail: cuper_enrique@msn.com [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Complejo de Ciencias, ICUAP, Edif. 103-F, 22 Sur y San Claudio, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Percino, M.J.; Chapela, V.M. [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Complejo de Ciencias, ICUAP, Edif. 103-F, 22 Sur y San Claudio, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Maldonado, J.L. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A.C. (CIO), Lomas del Bosque 115, Col. Lomas del Campestre, C.P. 37150, Leon Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    The present work addresses the optical and morphological properties of organic films based on low molecular weight dyes styrylpyridine derivatives 2-styrylpyridine (A), 4-chlorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (B) and 4-fluorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (C), embedded in a polymeric matrix poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK). The films were prepared by a spin-coating technique from solutions with dye:PVK ratios of 0.25:1, 0.5:1 and 1:1. Solvents were chloroform and toluene. The molar absorption coefficient ({epsilon}) spectra for a dye:PVK mixture in solution were a combination of the absorptions of both components separately, but for the deposited films, the shape of the spectrum showed that the poly(N-vinylcarbazole) absorption dominated. However, when the same films were dissolved again in CHCl{sub 3}, their spectra showed an absorption shape similar to that of the solution mixture before the deposition. Solution viscosity measurements were carried out with an Ubbelohde glass capillary viscometer to corroborate the results that showed a better mixture of the dye with the host in chloroform. The morphology of the prepared films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy and exhibited a solvent effect, with a pinhole-free, smooth surface when toluene was used and a wavy surface with chloroform. The ratio dye:matrix was the principal parameter for obtaining optical quality films; for 0.25:1 and 0.5:1 ratios, the films were of good quality, but for 1:1, the dye was expelled from the PVK and a crystallization was present over the surface of the films. Film thickness was also measured and films deposited from toluene solutions gave an average thickness of 54 nm while films from chloroform solutions had an average thickness greater than 160 nm that increased depending on chromophore concentration.

  2. Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy with integrated dual-axis MEMS scanner for fast 3D imaging and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cogliati, Andrea; Hayes, Adam; Santhanam, Anand P.; Tankam, Patrice; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2015-10-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for characterization of microscopic structures in industrial and clinical applications. A custom micro-electromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner system was developed to achieve 55 kHz A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) instrument with a novel multilevel GPU architecture for high-speed imaging. GD-OCM yields high-definition volumetric imaging with dynamic depth of focusing through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, which has no moving parts and is suitable for use in a manufacturing setting or in a medical environment. A dual-axis MEMS mirror was chosen to replace two single-axis galvanometer mirrors; as a result, the astigmatism caused by the mismatch between the optical pupil and the scanning location was eliminated and a 12x reduction in volume of the scanning system was achieved. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm was demonstrated throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. The MEMS-based scanner resulted in improved image quality, increased robustness and lighter weight of the system - all factors that are critical for on-field deployment. A custom integrated feedback system consisting of a laser diode and a position-sensing detector was developed to investigate the impact of the resonant frequency of the MEMS and the driving signal of the scanner on the movement of the mirror. Results on the metrology of manufactured materials and characterization of tissue samples with GD-OCM are presented.

  3. Polarised IR-microscope spectra of guanidinium hydrogensulphate single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, M; Baran, J

    2006-07-01

    Polarised IR-microscope spectra of C(NH(2))(3)*HSO(4) small single crystal samples were measured at room temperature. The spectra are discussed on the basis of oriented gas model approximation and group theory. The stretching nuOH vibration of the hydrogen bond with the Ocdots, three dots, centeredO distance of 2.603A gives characteristic broad AB-type absorption in the IR spectra. The changes of intensity of the AB bands in function of polariser angle are described. Detailed assignments for bands derived from stretching and bending modes of sulphate anions and guanidinium cations were performed. The observed intensities of these bands in polarised infrared spectra were correlated with theoretical calculation of directional cosines of selected transition dipole moments for investigated crystal. The vibrational studies seem to be helpful in understanding of physical and chemical properties of described compound and also in design of new complexes with exactly defined behaviors.

  4. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  5. Handheld optical coherence tomography-reflectance confocal microscopy probe for detection of basal cell carcinoma and delineation of margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Nicusor; Yélamos, Oriol; Chen, Chih-Shan J.; Maguluri, Gopi; Cordova, Miguel A.; Sahu, Aditi; Park, Jesung; Fox, William; Alessi-Fox, Christi; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-07-01

    We present a hand-held implementation and preliminary evaluation of a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) probe for detecting and delineating the margins of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in human skin in vivo. A standard OCT approach (spectrometer-based) with a central wavelength of 1310 nm and 0.11 numerical aperture (NA) was combined with a standard RCM approach (830-nm wavelength and 0.9 NA) into a common path hand-held probe. Cross-sectional OCT images and enface RCM images are simultaneously displayed, allowing for three-dimensional microscopic assessment of tumor morphology in real time. Depending on the subtype and depth of the BCC tumor and surrounding skin conditions, OCT and RCM imaging are able to complement each other, the strengths of each helping overcome the limitations of the other. Four representative cases are summarized, out of the 15 investigated in a preliminary pilot study, demonstrating how OCT and RCM imaging may be synergistically combined to more accurately detect BCCs and more completely delineate margins. Our preliminary results highlight the potential benefits of combining the two technologies within a single probe to potentially guide diagnosis as well as treatment of BCCs.

  6. Comprehensive optical and data management infrastructure for high-throughput light-sheet microscopy of whole mouse brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllenbroich, M Caroline; Silvestri, Ludovico; Onofri, Leonardo; Costantini, Irene; Hoff, Marcel Van't; Sacconi, Leonardo; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive mapping and quantification of neuronal projections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput imaging of large volumes with microscopic resolution. To this end, we have developed a confocal light-sheet microscope that has been optimized for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of structurally intact clarified whole-mount mouse brains. We describe the optical and electromechanical arrangement of the microscope and give details on the organization of the microscope management software. The software orchestrates all components of the microscope, coordinates critical timing and synchronization, and has been written in a versatile and modular structure using the LabVIEW language. It can easily be adapted and integrated to other microscope systems and has been made freely available to the light-sheet community. The tremendous amount of data routinely generated by light-sheet microscopy further requires novel strategies for data handling and storage. To complete the full imaging pipeline of our high-throughput microscope, we further elaborate on big data management from streaming of raw images up to stitching of 3-D datasets. The mesoscale neuroanatomy imaged at micron-scale resolution in those datasets allows characterization and quantification of neuronal projections in unsectioned mouse brains.

  7. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off longitudinally polarised protons at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, David Francis

    2010-06-15

    This thesis details the simultaneous extraction of three polarisation-dependent asymmetries in the distribution of real photons from the ep{yields}ep{gamma} interaction and its indistinguishable deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes at the HERMES fixed-target experiment at Desy. The data analysed were taken using a longitudinally polarised 27.57 GeV positron beam incident on a longitudinally polarised hydrogen gas target. The extracted asymmetries include two single-spin asymmetries A{sub UL} and A{sub LU} which depend on the polarisation of the target and beam respectively, averaged over all other polarisation states. The double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} dependent on the product of the beam and target polarisations is extracted for the first time. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted relate to combinations of Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs), predominantly H and H. The extracted amplitudes are presented across the HERMES kinematic range alongside theoretical predictions from a GPD model based on double distributions. Large sin {phi} and cos(0{phi}) amplitudes are observed for A{sub UL} and A{sub LL} respectively, with an unexpectedly large sin(2{phi}) amplitude for A{sub UL}. The results for the A{sub UL} and A{sub LL} asymmetries are broadly compatible with theory predictions, and the extracted A{sub LU} amplitudes are compatible with HERMES results extracted from a significantly larger data set. It is foreseen that these results will form input to future global data-based GPD models which aim to provide a better understanding of GPDs. (orig.)

  8. Linearly polarised photons at the BGO-OD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bella, Andreas [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment, located at the ELSA accelerator of the University of Bonn studies photoproduction reactions off the nucleon. A real, energy-tagged photon beam is produced via bremsstrahlung by exposing a thin radiator to the electron beam provided by ELSA. Linear polarisation is obtained by coherent bremsstrahlung. To do this we use a 570 μm thick diamond radiator. The degree of polarisation is obtained from the bremsstrahlung spectrum. A consistency check is performed by extracting the already well measured beam asymmetry Σ in π{sup 0} photoproduction off the proton.

  9. Polarisation Spectral Synthesis For Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Mattia

    2017-02-01

    Despite their relevance across a broad range of astrophysical research topics, Type Ia supernova explosions are still poorly understood and answers to the questions of when, why and how these events are triggered remain unclear. In this respect, polarisation offers a unique opportunity to discriminate between the variety of possible scenarios. The observational evidence that Type Ia supernovae are associated with rather low polarisation signals (smaller than a few per cent) places strong constraints for models and calls for modest asphericities in the progenitor system and/or explosion mechanism.The goal of this thesis is to assess the validity of contemporary Type Ia supernova explosion models by testing whether their predicted polarisation signatures can account for the small signals usually observed. To this end, we have implemented and tested an innovative Monte Carlo scheme in the radiative transfer code artis. Compared to previous Monte Carlo approaches, this technique produces synthetic observables (light curves, flux and polarisation spectra) with a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise and therefore in the required computing time. This improvement is particularly crucial for our study as we aim to extract very weak polarisation signals, comparable to those detected in Type Ia supernovae. We have also demonstrated the applicability of this method to other classes of supernovae via a preliminary study of the first spectropolarimetry observations of superluminous supernovae.Using this scheme, we have calculated synthetic spectropolarimetry for three multi-dimensional explosion models recently proposed as promising candidates to explain Type Ia supernovae. Our findings highlight the power of spectropolarimetry in testing and discriminating between different scenarios. While all the three models predict light curves and flux spectra that are similar to each others and reproduce those observed in Type Ia supernovae comparably well, polarisation does

  10. The Gender Dimension of Technical Change and Job Polarisation

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne Lindley

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have shown that technical change has led to job polarisation. A relatively unexplored aspect of this is whether there has been a gender bias. This paper is the first to show gender bias in technology driven skill polarisation. Between 1997 and 2006 the demand for women shows hollowing out across high, medium and low education groups, as a consequence of technical change. This was not the case for men. Decomposing the fall in the gender pay gap shows further evidence for gender bi...

  11. The effect of cathodic polarisation on monosaccharides of Amphora coffeaeformis, a marine fouling diatom

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Evans, L.V.; Edyvean, R.G.J.

    The composition of monosaccharides and their variation in concentration in Amphora coffeaeformis cells on non-polarised and cathodically polarised 304 stainless steel were examined when cells were grown under continous illumination at 18~'C for 8 d...

  12. Spatial and spectral image distortions caused by diffraction of an ordinary polarised light beam by an ultrasonic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machikhin, A S; Pozhar, V E [Scientific and Technological Centre of Unique Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-28

    We consider the problem of determining the spatial and spectral image distortions arising from anisotropic diffraction by ultrasonic waves in crystals with ordinary polarised light (o → e). By neglecting the small-birefringence approximation, we obtain analytical solutions that describe the dependence of the diffraction angles and wave mismatch on the acousto-optic (AO) interaction geometry and crystal parameters. The formulas derived allow one to calculate and analyse the magnitude of diffraction-induced spatial and spectral image distortions and to identify the main types of distortions: chromatic compression and trapezoidal deformation. A comparison of the values of these distortions in the diffraction of ordinary and extraordinary polarised light shows that they are almost equal in magnitude and opposite in signs, so that consistent diffraction (o → e → o or e → o → e) in two identical AO cells rotated through 180° in the plane of diffraction can compensate for these distortions. (diffraction of radiation)

  13. Polarisation-preserving photon frequency conversion from a trapped-ion-compatible wavelength to the telecom C-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyanskiy, V.; Meraner, M.; Schupp, J.; Lanyon, B. P.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate polarisation-preserving frequency conversion of single-photon-level light at 854 nm, resonant with a trapped-ion transition and qubit, to the 1550-nm telecom C band. A total photon in / fiber-coupled photon out efficiency of ˜30% is achieved, for a free-running photon noise rate of ˜60 Hz. This performance would enable telecom conversion of 854 nm polarisation qubits, produced in existing trapped-ion systems, with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 1. In combination with near-future trapped-ion systems, our converter would enable the observation of entanglement between an ion and a photon that has travelled more than 100 km in optical fiber: three orders of magnitude further than the state-of-the-art.

  14. Polarisation of the spontaneous emission from nonpolar and semipolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg (IMTEK) (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF) (Germany); Ploch, Simon; Wernicke, Tim [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Knauer, Arne; Hoffmann, Veit; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institute (FBH) (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institute (FBH) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Spontaneously emitted light stemming from semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells is polarized. This property is a consequence of the broken in-plane symmetry of non c-plane wurtzite quantum wells. We studied the polarized photoluminescence of semipolar and nonpolar InGaN/InGaN multi quantum wells grown on low defect density GaN substrates with a setup for confocal microscopy. For excitation of charge carriers we use a 375 nm diode laser. The photoluminescence is collected with an objective of small NA, to avoid polarisation scrambling, and analyzed with a broadband polarizer and a spectrometer. The experimental results are compared to k.p band structure calculations for semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells. These simulations provide the polarisation degree of the confined states of the valence band and their energetic splitting. Next, from the thermal occupation the polarized spectra are calculated. The comparison with experimental results allows the determination of the valence subband splitting. Our experiments show a splitting of the two topmost valence subbands in nonpolar direction which is larger than predicted.

  15. Optimising polarised neutron scattering measurements--XYZ and polarimetry analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cussen, L.D.; Goossens, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The analytic optimisation of neutron scattering measurements made using XYZ polarisation analysis and neutron polarimetry techniques is discussed. Expressions for the 'quality factor' and the optimum division of counting time for the XYZ technique are presented. For neutron polarimetry the optimisation is identified as analogous to that for measuring the flipping ratio and reference is made to the results already in the literature

  16. Optimising polarised neutron scattering measurements--XYZ and polarimetry analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cussen, L D

    2002-01-01

    The analytic optimisation of neutron scattering measurements made using XYZ polarisation analysis and neutron polarimetry techniques is discussed. Expressions for the 'quality factor' and the optimum division of counting time for the XYZ technique are presented. For neutron polarimetry the optimisation is identified as analogous to that for measuring the flipping ratio and reference is made to the results already in the literature.

  17. Flux and polarisation spectra of water clouds on exoplanets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karalidi, T.; Stam, D.M.; Hovenier, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Context. A crucial factor for a planet’s habitability is its climate. Clouds play an important role in planetary climates. Detecting and characterising clouds on an exoplanet is therefore crucial when addressing this planet’s habitability. Aims. We present calculated flux and polarisation spectra of

  18. The commensurate spin excitation in chromium: A polarised neutron investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.; Stirling, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A polarised neutron experiment with neutron energy analysis has been performed with a single-Q sample of chromium in a large magnetic field. The 4-meV ''commensurate'' mode is found to involve spin fluctuations parallel to the ordered chromium moments. 8 refs., 3 figs

  19. Polarised Drell-Yan measurements at $\\mathrm{COMPASS}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chiosso, Michela

    2015-01-01

    Much of the information that exists today about Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution Functions (TMDs) comes from SIDIS measurements with unpolarised and polarised beams and targets where they appear convoluted with fragmentation functions (FFs). Drell-Yan (DY) measurements are complementary to those by SIDIS experiments, as they allow to measure convolutions of only Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) without involving FFs. Moreover, given the T-odd character of both Sivers and Boer-Mulders functions, the sign of these TMDs is expected to be reversed when observed from SIDIS or from DY. Measurements of SIDIS were performed by Compass in the period 2002 to 2007 and in 2010, using a naturally polarised μ+ beam and a solid state target polarised either longitudinally or transversely with respect to the beam direction. Now the COMPASS Experiment has the unique opportunity to access TMDs from single-polarised Drell-Yan processes as well, in the same kinematical domain of the SIDIS data and with the ...

  20. Efforts towards a dynamically polarised HD-target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, E.; Goertz, St.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular hydrogen isotopes contain no unpolarisable background. From this point of view they appear to be the material of choice for a polarised bulk target in scattering experiments. The fast nuclear relaxation of H 2 and D 2 is one reason that these substances are not highly polarisable. This fact brings hydrogendeuteride (HD) into focus. In Bochum a device to freeze out gases into the consisting 4 He-cryostat has been built up. The principle of the Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation requires a sufficient amount of paramagnetic electrons. These have been produced by cracking HD molecules at 1 K using a 90 Sr β-source with an activity of 3.7 GBq. Six days of effective irradiation resulted in a density of paramagnetic centres in the order of 10 18 spins/cm 3 . This could be estimated from bolometric electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Dynamic polarisation could not be achieved. This is accounted to isotopic impurities in the used HD, which accelerate the nuclear relaxation. The constant of ortho-para conversion in H 2 could be confirmed to be 1.9%/h

  1. The Polarised Valence Quark Distribution from semi-inclusive DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Arbuzov, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, A.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nikolaev, K.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Reggiani, D.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schonmeier, P.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The semi-inclusive difference asymmetry A^{h+ - h-} for hadrons of opposite charge has been measured by the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The data were collected in the years 2002-2004 using a 160 GeV polarised muon beam scattered off a large polarised 6-LiD target and cover the range 0.006 < x < 0.7 and 1 < Q^2 < 100 (GeV/c)^2. In leading order QCD (LO) the asymmetry A_d^{h+ - h-} measures the valence quark polarisation and provides an evaluation of the first moment of Delta u_v + Delta d_v which is found to be equal to 0.40 +- 0.07 (stat.) +- 0.05 (syst.) over the measured range of x at Q^2 = 10 (GeV/c)^2. When combined with the first moment of g_1^d previously measured on the same data, this result favours a non-symmetric polarisation of light quarks Delta u-bar = -Delta d-bar at a confidence level of two standard deviations, in contrast to the often assumed symmetric scenario Delta u-bar = Delta d-bar = Delta s-bar = Delta s.

  2. A Circadian Clock Gene, Cry, Affects Heart Morphogenesis and Function in Drosophila as Revealed by Optical Coherence Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesh Alex

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are endogenous, entrainable oscillations of physical, mental and behavioural processes in response to local environmental cues such as daylight, which are present in the living beings, including humans. Circadian rhythms have been related to cardiovascular function and pathology. However, the role that circadian clock genes play in heart development and function in a whole animal in vivo are poorly understood. The Drosophila cryptochrome (dCry is a circadian clock gene that encodes a major component of the circadian clock negative feedback loop. Compared to the embryonic stage, the relative expression levels of dCry showed a significant increase (>100-fold in Drosophila during the pupa and adult stages. In this study, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM system to perform non-invasive and longitudinal analysis of functional and morphological changes in the Drosophila heart throughout its post-embryonic lifecycle for the first time. The Drosophila heart exhibited major morphological and functional alterations during its development. Notably, heart rate (HR and cardiac activity period (CAP of Drosophila showed significant variations during the pupa stage, when heart remodeling took place. From the M-mode (2D + time OCM images, cardiac structural and functional parameters of Drosophila at different developmental stages were quantitatively determined. In order to study the functional role of dCry on Drosophila heart development, we silenced dCry by RNAi in the Drosophila heart and mesoderm, and quantitatively measured heart morphology and function in those flies throughout its development. Silencing of dCry resulted in slower HR, reduced CAP, smaller heart chamber size, pupal lethality and disrupted posterior segmentation that was related to increased expression of a posterior compartment protein, wingless. Collectively, our studies provided novel evidence that the circadian clock gene, dCry, plays

  3. A Circadian Clock Gene, Cry, Affects Heart Morphogenesis and Function in Drosophila as Revealed by Optical Coherence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianxu; Tate, Rebecca E.; McKee, Mary L.; Capen, Diane E.; Zhang, Zhan; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous, entrainable oscillations of physical, mental and behavioural processes in response to local environmental cues such as daylight, which are present in the living beings, including humans. Circadian rhythms have been related to cardiovascular function and pathology. However, the role that circadian clock genes play in heart development and function in a whole animal in vivo are poorly understood. The Drosophila cryptochrome (dCry) is a circadian clock gene that encodes a major component of the circadian clock negative feedback loop. Compared to the embryonic stage, the relative expression levels of dCry showed a significant increase (>100-fold) in Drosophila during the pupa and adult stages. In this study, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system to perform non-invasive and longitudinal analysis of functional and morphological changes in the Drosophila heart throughout its post-embryonic lifecycle for the first time. The Drosophila heart exhibited major morphological and functional alterations during its development. Notably, heart rate (HR) and cardiac activity period (CAP) of Drosophila showed significant variations during the pupa stage, when heart remodeling took place. From the M-mode (2D + time) OCM images, cardiac structural and functional parameters of Drosophila at different developmental stages were quantitatively determined. In order to study the functional role of dCry on Drosophila heart development, we silenced dCry by RNAi in the Drosophila heart and mesoderm, and quantitatively measured heart morphology and function in those flies throughout its development. Silencing of dCry resulted in slower HR, reduced CAP, smaller heart chamber size, pupal lethality and disrupted posterior segmentation that was related to increased expression of a posterior compartment protein, wingless. Collectively, our studies provided novel evidence that the circadian clock gene, dCry, plays an essential

  4. Differential dynamic optical microscopy for the characterization of soft matter: liquid crystal dynamics, volume phase transition of hydrogels, and phase transition of binary mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Beom-Jin; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Smith, Michael H.; Lyon, L. Andrew

    2011-03-01

    The structure and dynamics of soft matter were studied by differential dynamic optical microscopy. One can retrieve q-space information through image processing and Fourier analysis, even when the feature sizes in real space image are too small to be resolved or even visible in an optical microscope. The temporal sequence of real space images were Fourier transformed, and analyzed for the temporal and spatial fluctuations of power spectrum. Here, we present the results on liquid crystal dynamics and their elastic properties, volume phase transition of hydrogels when their dimensions are sub-micron, and critical opalescence of binary mixtures (water/2,6-lutidine).

  5. Pure chiral optical fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poladian, L; Straton, M; Docherty, A; Argyros, A

    2011-01-17

    We investigate the properties of optical fibres made from chiral materials, in which a contrast in optical activity forms the waveguide, rather than a contrast in the refractive index; we refer to such structures as pure chiral fibres. We present a mathematical formulation for solving the modes of circularly symmetric examples of such fibres and examine the guidance and polarisation properties of pure chiral step-index, Bragg and photonic crystal fibre designs. Their behaviour is shown to differ for left- and right-hand circular polarisation, allowing circular polarisations to be isolated and/or guided by different mechanisms, as well as differing from equivalent non-chiral fibres. The strength of optical activity required in each case is quantified.

  6. Real-time observation of growth and orientation of Sm-Ba-Cu-O phases on a Sm-211 whisker substrate by high-temperature optical microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sun, J.L.; Huang, Y.B.; Cheng, L.; Yao, X.; Lai, Y.J.; Jirsa, Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2009), 898-902 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0722 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : high-temperature optical microscopy * growth and orientation of Sm-Ba-Cu-O phases * Sm-211 whisker substrate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.162, year: 2009

  7. Cross-polarisation discrimination-induced interference in dual-polarised high-capacity satellite communication systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkareem Sarki Karasuwa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The design of spectrally-efficient, high-throughput satellite (HTS systems with capacity approaching one terabit per second requires operating at Ka-band frequencies and above, where there are several gigahertz of allocated radio spectrum, using multiple spot beams with dual orthogonal polarisation mode. At these high frequencies, rain attenuation poses a major obstacle to the design of high-availability satellite links which are needed for the realisation of ubiquitous broadband multimedia communication services including high-speed Internet access at rural and remote locations. Furthermore, depolarisation-induced interference in such systems could have a performance-limiting impact if a co-channel cross-polar signal combines with system noise to drive the carrier-to-noise-plus-interference ratio (CNIR below an acceptable threshold. This paper employs real measurement data to investigate the impact of depolarisation-induced interference on dual-polarised HTS systems for temperate and tropical climatic regions. Scenarios that cause significant system performance degradation are analysed, including the effects of signal frequency, antenna size, and regional rainfall rate. The impact of depolarisation on system performance is quantified by the reductions in the CNIR and link availability of a dual-polarised system when compared with those of a similarly-dimensioned single-polarised system.

  8. Method for determination of the polarisation nonreciprocity in a fibre ring interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronova, Irina A; Gelikonov, V M; Gelikonov, G V

    2000-01-01

    A method is proposed for observation of the polarisation nonreciprocity of fibre ring interferometers (FRIs) by placing a rotating polariser at the output of an interferometer ahead of a photodetector. It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that the absence of a signal for any position of the transmission axis of the polariser at the FRI output is a criterion of the absence of the polarisation nonreciprocity. It is suggested that the coaxial alignment of the anisotropic FRI components be monitored during assembly to ensure the polarisation nonreciprocity on the basis of the absence of a signal at the output of a rotating polariser. It is also shown that, when the conditions for the polarisation nonreciprocity are fulfilled, the signal from the output of a beam splitter located flush against the fibre loop output carries information about the phase characteristics of the beam splitter. (laser gyroscopes)

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Madaan, Nitesh; Bagley, Jacob; Diwan, Anubhav [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Liu, Yiqun [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Davis, Robert C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lunt, Barry M. [Department of Information Technology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Smith, Stacey J., E-mail: ssmith@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The

  10. Metastability in spin polarised Fermi gases and quasiparticle decays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadeghzadeh, Kayvan; Bruun, Georg; Lobo, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the metastability associated with the first order transition from normal to superfluid phases in the phase diagram of two-component polarised Fermi gases.We begin by detailing the dominant decay processes of single quasiparticles.Having determined the momentum thresholds of each...... the interaction strength at which a polarised phase of molecules becomes the groundstate, to the one at which the single quasiparticle groundstate changes character from polaronic to molecular. Our argument in terms of a Fermi sea of polarons naturally suggests their use as an experimental probe. We propose...... experiments to observe the threshold of the predicted region of metastability, the interaction strength at which the quasiparticle groundstate changes character, and the decay rate of polarons....

  11. Constraining new resonant physics with top spin polarisation information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Christoph; Nordstroem, Karl [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ferrando, James [DESY Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We provide a comprehensive analysis of the power of including top quark-polarisation information to kinematically challenging top pair resonance searches, for which ATLAS and CMS start losing sensitivity. Following the general modelling and analysis strategies pursued by the experiments, we analyse the semi-leptonic and the di-lepton channels and show that including polarisation information can lead to large improvements in the limit setting procedures with large data sets. This will allow us to set stronger limits for parameter choices where sensitivity from the invariant mass of the top pair is not sufficient. This highlights the importance of spin observables as part of a more comprehensive set of observables to gain sensitivity to BSM resonance searches. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of the tau polarisation at the Z resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fenandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassaed, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1993-09-01

    Using 18.8 pb-1 of data collected in 1990 and 1991, ALEPH has measured the tau polarisation in the decay modes τ→ ev bar v, τ→μ v bar v, τ→πν, τ→ρν and τ→ a 1ν, using both the individual tau decay kinematics and the event acollinearity. The measurement of the tau polarisation as a function of the production polar angle yields the two parameters A τ and A e , where A l =2 g {/v l } g {/A l }/( g {/v l })2+( g {/A l })2] The results A τ=0.143±0.023 and A e =0.120±0.026 are consistent with the hypothesis of electron-tau universality. Assuming universality yields a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle sin2θ{/w eff}=0.2332±0.0022.

  13. Centriole polarisation to the immunological synapse directs secretion from cytolytic cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arico Maurizo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytolytic cells of the immune system destroy pathogen-infected cells by polarised exocytosis of secretory lysosomes containing the pore-forming protein perforin. Precise delivery of this lethal hit is essential to ensuring that only the target cell is destroyed. In cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, this is accomplished by an unusual movement of the centrosome to contact the plasma membrane at the centre of the immunological synapse formed between killer and target cells. Secretory lysosomes are directed towards the centrosome along microtubules and delivered precisely to the point of target cell recognition within the immunological synapse, identified by the centrosome. We asked whether this mechanism of directing secretory lysosome release is unique to CTL or whether natural killer (NK and invariant NKT (iNKT cytolytic cells of the innate immune system use a similar mechanism to focus perforin-bearing lysosome release. Results NK cells were conjugated with B-cell targets lacking major histocompatibility complex class I 721.221 cells, and iNKT cells were conjugated with glycolipid-pulsed CD1-bearing targets, then prepared for thin-section electron microscopy. High-resolution electron micrographs of the immunological synapse formed between NK and iNKT cytolytic cells with their targets revealed that in both NK and iNKT cells, the centrioles could be found associated (or 'docked' with the plasma membrane within the immunological synapse. Secretory clefts were visible within the synapses formed by both NK and iNKT cells, and secretory lysosomes were polarised along microtubules leading towards the docked centrosome. The Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes were also polarised towards the centrosome at the plasma membrane within the synapse. Conclusions These results reveal that, like CTLs of the adaptive immune system, the centrosomes of NK and iNKT cells (cytolytic cells of the innate immune system direct secretory lysosomes to

  14. Centriole polarisation to the immunological synapse directs secretion from cytolytic cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Jane C; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Pende, Daniela; Arico, Maurizo; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2011-06-28

    Cytolytic cells of the immune system destroy pathogen-infected cells by polarised exocytosis of secretory lysosomes containing the pore-forming protein perforin. Precise delivery of this lethal hit is essential to ensuring that only the target cell is destroyed. In cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), this is accomplished by an unusual movement of the centrosome to contact the plasma membrane at the centre of the immunological synapse formed between killer and target cells. Secretory lysosomes are directed towards the centrosome along microtubules and delivered precisely to the point of target cell recognition within the immunological synapse, identified by the centrosome. We asked whether this mechanism of directing secretory lysosome release is unique to CTL or whether natural killer (NK) and invariant NKT (iNKT) cytolytic cells of the innate immune system use a similar mechanism to focus perforin-bearing lysosome release. NK cells were conjugated with B-cell targets lacking major histocompatibility complex class I 721.221 cells, and iNKT cells were conjugated with glycolipid-pulsed CD1-bearing targets, then prepared for thin-section electron microscopy. High-resolution electron micrographs of the immunological synapse formed between NK and iNKT cytolytic cells with their targets revealed that in both NK and iNKT cells, the centrioles could be found associated (or 'docked') with the plasma membrane within the immunological synapse. Secretory clefts were visible within the synapses formed by both NK and iNKT cells, and secretory lysosomes were polarised along microtubules leading towards the docked centrosome. The Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes were also polarised towards the centrosome at the plasma membrane within the synapse. These results reveal that, like CTLs of the adaptive immune system, the centrosomes of NK and iNKT cells (cytolytic cells of the innate immune system) direct secretory lysosomes to the immunological synapse. Morphologically, the

  15. Near-field and far-field modeling of scattered surface waves. Application to the apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, J.; Parent, G.; Fumeron, S.; Jeandel, G.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of surface waves through scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is a promising technique for thermal measurements at very small scales. Recent studies have shown that electromagnetic waves, in the vicinity of a scattering structure such as an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip, can be scattered from near to far-field and thus detected. In the present work, a model based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and the near-field to far-field (NFTFF) transformation for electromagnetic waves propagation is presented. This model has been validated by studying the electromagnetic field of a dipole in vacuum and close to a dielectric substrate. Then simulations for a tetrahedral tip close to an interface are presented and discussed.

  16. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  17. Scanning microscopy of magnetic domains using the Fe 3p core level transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, J.; Rozhko, I.; Voss, J.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.; Wedemeier, V.

    1999-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum ultraviolet analog to visible-light magneto-optical imaging of magnetic structures using the resonantly enhanced transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect at core level thresholds with incident p-polarized radiation. The advantages are element specificity and a variable information depth. We used the scanning x-ray microscope at HASYLAB capable of obtaining about 1 μm resolution by means of its focusing ellipsoidal ring mirror. The p-polarized component of the reflected light was selected using multilayer reflection at an additional plane mirror downstream to the sample. Micrographs of the optical reflectivity were taken in the vicinity of the Fe 3p core level threshold at 53.7 and 56.5 eV photon energy where the magneto-optical effect is of opposite sign. Magnetic domains are visible in the difference of both recorded images.

  18. Ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in exosporium of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A revealed by electron microscopy using optical diffraction and filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, K; Kawata, T; Takumi, K; Kinouchi, T

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in the exosporium from spores of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A strain 190L was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained exosporium fragments using optical diffraction and filtration. The exosporium was composed of three or more lamellae showing and equilateral, hexagonal periodicity. Images of the single exosporium layer from which the noise had been filtered optically revealed that the hexagonally arranged, morphological unit of the exosporium was composed of three globular subunits about 2.1 nm in diameter which were arranged at the vertices of an equilateral triangle with sides of about 2.4 nm. The morphological units were arranged with a spacing of about 4.5 nm. the adjacent globular subunits appeared to be interconnected by delicate linkers.

  19. Scanning second-harmonic optical microscopy of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy provides a suitable technique for local probing of small ensembles of (or even individual) QD's, and when combined with the detection of second-harmonic (SH) generation the technique becomes suitable to reveal tiny changes of symmetry originating either in the material structures or in...

  20. Optical versus Virtual: Teaching Assistant Perceptions of the Use of Virtual Microscopy in an Undergraduate Human Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Larissa; Dunham, Stacey; Braun, Mark W.; O'Loughlin, Valerie Dean

    2012-01-01

    Many studies that evaluate the introduction of technology in the classroom focus on student performance and student evaluations. This study focuses on instructor evaluation of the introduction of virtual microscopy into an undergraduate anatomy class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with graduate teaching assistants (TA) and analyzed…

  1. Microscopy and Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, George; Difilippantonio, Michael; Ried, Thomas; Bieber, Frederick R

    2017-07-11

    This unit provides an overview of light microscopy, including objectives, light sources, filters, film, and color photography for fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We believe there are excellent opportunities for cytogeneticists, pathologists, and other biomedical readers, to take advantage of specimen optical clearing techniques and expansion microscopy-we briefly point to these new opportunities. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the “true” chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  3. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Philippe; Magnaldo, Alastair; Godard, Jérémy; Schaer, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the "true" chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  4. Imaging chemical interfaces perpendicular to the optical axis with focus-engineered coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamachari, Vishnu Vardhan; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2007-01-01

    In vibrational microscopy, it is often necessary to distinguish between chemically distinct microscopic objects and to highlight the 'chemical interfaces' present in the sample under investigation. Here we apply the concept of focus engineering to enhance the sensitivity of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to these interfaces. Based on detailed numerical simulations, we show that using a focused Stokes field with a sharp phase jump along the longitudinal direction leads to the suppression of the signal from bulk regions and improves the signal contrast from vibrational resonant interfaces oriented perpendicular to the axis of beam propagation. We also demonstrate that the CARS spectral response from chemical interfaces exhibits a clean, Raman-like band-shape with such a phase-shaped excitation. This phenomenon of interface highlighting is a consequence of the coherent nature of CARS signal generation and it involves a complex interplay of the spectral phase of the sample and the spatial phase of the excitation fields

  5. Polarization of Bremsstrahlung; Polarisation du rayonnement de freinage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    The numerical results for the polarization of Bremsstrahlung are presented. The multiple scattering of electrons in the target is taken into account. The angular-and photon energy dependences are seen on the curves for an incident 25 MeV electron energy. (Author) [French] Le taux de polarisation d'un spectre de rayonnement de freinage est calcule pour une cible d'epaisseur finie en tenant compte de la diffusion multiple des electrons dans la cible. Les courbes sont tracees pour les electrons incidents d'energie 25 MeV, pour differentes energies de photons, et a differents angles. (auteur)

  6. Top Polarisation in H-t and Wt production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, R.M.; Hartgring, L.; Niessen, I.; White, C.D.

    2012-01-01

    We consider laboratory frame observables (like the azimuthal angle between the top quark and its decay lepton or the polar angle between the top quark and leptonic directions) obtained from leptonic decay products of top quarks produced in association with a charged Higgs or W boson. These are robust against QCD corrections to top quark decay, and can be used to pin down the parameter space of a charged Higgs boson, or reduce backgrounds in H - t and (Standard Model) Wt production. Polarisation information can efficiently be used to distinguish single top quark production processes from their backgrounds, as well as to pin down the parameters of a charged Higgs boson model

  7. Orientation, alignment and polarisation in electron-helium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijers, J.P.M.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis electron-photon coincidence experiments to study the excitation of helium by electron impact are updated. This is achieved by cross firing a well collimated and mono-energetic electron beam with a thermal helium beam and measuring the angular and/or polarisation distribution of the decay photons in coincidence with the inelastically scattered electrons. In this way target parameters are determined for the 2 1 P, 3 1 P, 3 1 D and 3 3 P states of helium. (Auth.)

  8. Depolarisation effects in resonance absorption neutron polarising filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayers, J.

    1982-06-01

    The depolarisation of a neutron beam passing through a system of magnetically misaligned single domain particles is examined and simulated using a Monte-Carlo programme. The results of the simulations are in excellent agreement with those of analytic calculations within the regimes where such calculations are applicable. The simulations have been used in the estimation of the polarising efficiency and transmittance of a resonance absorption filter containing partially aligned particles of SmCo 5 . It is shown that the application of strong magnetic fields (approximately equal to 2T) should significantly improve the filter performance. A method of measuring this improvement is suggested. (author)

  9. Alpha-recoil tracks in natural dark mica: Dating geological samples by optical and scanning force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasmacher, U.A.; Lang, M.; Klemme, S.; Moine, B.; Barbero, L.; Neumann, R.; Wagner, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-recoil tracks (ART) are lattice defects caused by the α-decay of 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th, and daughter products. Visualization of etched ARTs in dark mica by phase-contrast microscopy allows dating of Quaternary geological as well as archaeological materials. Visualization of etched ARTs by Nomarski-differential-interference-contrast microscopy (NDICM) and scanning force microscopy (SFM) enables the access to areal densities (ρ a ) of ART etch pits beyond 10 4 mm -2 and thus the extension of the new ART-dating technique to an age range >1 Ma. The successful application of SFM as a new tool in geochronology could open the way to a field to be characterized as nanogeochronology. In order to visualize ARTs by NDICM and SFM, dark mica was etched with 4% HF at 21 deg. C for 5-107 min. A linear relationship between ρ a and etching time (t e ) was observed for phlogopites from the Kerguelen Islands (French territory, Indian Ocean), and the Kovdor magmatic complex (Russia). The volume density (ρ v ) of ART is a function of etching speed (v eff ) and slope of the ρ a -growth curve. The ART-age equation allows the calculation of an individual ρ v -growth curve for the phlogopite analysed by us using the uranium and thorium content. The ART-ages were determined by combining the experimentally obtained volume density with the individual ρ v -growth curve

  10. Simple approach to three-color two-photon microscopy by a fiber-optic wavelength convertor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuen-Che; Huang, Lynn L H; Liang, Jhih-Hao; Chan, Ming-Che

    2016-11-01

    A simple approach to multi-color two-photon microscopy of the red, green, and blue fluorescent indicators was reported based on an ultra-compact 1.03-μm femtosecond laser and a nonlinear fiber. Inside the nonlinear fiber, the 1.03-μm laser pulses were simultaneously blue-shifted to 0.6~0.8 μm and red-shifted to 1.2~1.4 μm region by the Cherenkov radiation and fiber Raman gain effects. The wavelength-shifted 0.6~0.8 μm and 1.2~1.4 μm radiations were co-propagated with the residual non-converted 1.03-μm pulses inside the same nonlinear fiber to form a fiber-output three-color femtosecond source. The application of the multi-wavelength sources on multi-color two-photon fluorescence microscopy were also demonstrated. Overall, due to simple system configuration, convenient wavelength conversion, easy wavelength tunability within the entire 0.7~1.35 μm bio-penetration window and less requirement for high power and bulky light sources, the simple approach to multi-color two-photon microscopy could be widely applicable as an easily implemented and excellent research tool for future biomedical and possibly even clinical applications.

  11. Characterization and fabrication of fully metal-coated scanning near-field optical microscopy SiO2 tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschimann, L; Akiyama, T; Staufer, U; De Rooij, N F; Thiery, L; Eckert, R; Heinzelmann, H

    2003-03-01

    The fabrication of silicon cantilever-based scanning near-field optical microscope probes with fully aluminium-coated quartz tips was optimized to increase production yield. Different cantilever designs for dynamic- and contact-mode force feedback were implemented. Light transmission through the tips was investigated experimentally in terms of the metal coating and the tip cone-angle. We found that transmittance varies with the skin depth of the metal coating and is inverse to the cone angle, meaning that slender tips showed higher transmission. Near-field optical images of individual fluorescing molecules showed a resolution thermocouple showed no evidence of mechanical defect or orifice formation by thermal effects.

  12. Direct characterization of ultraviolet-light-induced refractive index structures by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Madsen, S.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We have applied a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope to directly probe ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced refractive index structures in planar glass samples. This technique permits direct comparison between topography and refractive index changes (10(-5)-10(-3)) with submicrometer...

  13. Dictionary of Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Julian

    2005-10-01

    The past decade has seen huge advances in the application of microscopy in all areas of science. This welcome development in microscopy has been paralleled by an expansion of the vocabulary of technical terms used in microscopy: terms have been coined for new instruments and techniques and, as microscopes reach even higher resolution, the use of terms that relate to the optical and physical principles underpinning microscopy is now commonplace. The Dictionary of Microscopy was compiled to meet this challenge and provides concise definitions of over 2,500 terms used in the fields of light microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, x-ray microscopy and related techniques. Written by Dr Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy and Analysis, the dictionary is intended to provide easy navigation through the microscopy terminology and to be a first point of reference for definitions of new and established terms. The Dictionary of Microscopy is an essential, accessible resource for: students who are new to the field and are learning about microscopes equipment purchasers who want an explanation of the terms used in manufacturers' literature scientists who are considering using a new microscopical technique experienced microscopists as an aide mémoire or quick source of reference librarians, the press and marketing personnel who require definitions for technical reports.

  14. Three-dimensional motion-picture imaging of dynamic object by parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using an inverted magnification optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takahito; Shinomura, Masato; Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Matoba, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    We constructed a parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy (PPSDHM) system using an inverted magnification optical system, and succeeded in three-dimensional (3D) motion-picture imaging for 3D displacement of a microscopic object. In the PPSDHM system, the inverted and afocal magnification optical system consisted of a microscope objective (16.56 mm focal length and 0.25 numerical aperture) and a convex lens (300 mm focal length and 82 mm aperture diameter). A polarization-imaging camera was used to record multiple phase-shifted holograms with a single-shot exposure. We recorded an alum crystal, sinking down in aqueous solution of alum, by the constructed PPSDHM system at 60 frames/s for about 20 s and reconstructed high-quality 3D motion-picture image of the crystal. Then, we calculated amounts of displacement of the crystal from the amounts in the focus plane and the magnifications of the magnification optical system, and obtained the 3D trajectory of the crystal by that amounts.

  15. Characterization of CuCl quantum dots grown in NaCl single crystals via optical measurements, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Kensuke; Akatsu, Tatsuro; Itoh, Ken

    2018-05-01

    We evaluated the crystal size, shape, and alignment of the lattice planes of CuCl quantum dots (QDs) embedded in NaCl single crystals by optical measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We obtained, for the first time, an XRD pattern and TEM images for CuCl QDs in NaCl crystals. The XRD pattern showed that the lattice planes of the CuCl QDs were parallel to those of the NaCl crystals. In addition, the size of the QDs was estimated from the diffraction width. It was apparent from the TEM images that almost all CuCl QDs were polygonal, although some cubic QDs were present. The mean size and size distribution of the QDs were also obtained. The dot size obtained from optical measurements, XRD, and TEM image were almost consistent. Our new findings can help to reveal the growth mechanism of semiconductor QDs embedded in a crystallite matrix. In addition, this work will play an important role in progressing the study of optical phenomena originating from assembled semiconductor QDs.

  16. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  17. Constraining ALPs with linear and circular polarisation measurements of quasar light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payez, Alexandre

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the constraints derived on the mixing of photons with light pseudoscalars using the distributions of good-quality linear and circular polarisation measurements of light from the least polarised classes of quasars. We also provide the dependence of our limit on the average electron density in the local supercluster for nearly massless particles.

  18. Constraining ALPs with linear and circular polarisation measurements of quasar light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payez, Alexandre [Liege Univ. (Belgium). IFPA Group; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We discuss the constraints derived on the mixing of photons with light pseudoscalars using the distributions of good-quality linear and circular polarisation measurements of light from the least polarised classes of quasars. We also provide the dependence of our limit on the average electron density in the local supercluster for nearly massless particles.

  19. Polarisation analysis of elastic neutron scattering using a filter spectrometer on a pulsed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayers, J.; Williams, W.G.

    1981-05-01

    The experimental and theoretical aspects of the polarisation analysis technique in elastic neutron scattering are described. An outline design is presented for a filter polarisation analysis spectrometer on the Rutherford Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source and estimates made of its expected count rates and resolution. (author)

  20. Tunable polarisation-maintaining filter based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Weirich, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A tunable and polarisation-maintaining all-in-fibre filter based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre is demonstrated. Its polarisation extinction ratio reaches 14 dB at 1550 nm wavelength. Its spectral tunability range spans over 250 nm in the temperature range 30–70°C. The measured...

  1. Time-resolved proton polarisation (TPP) images tyrosyl radical sites in bovine liver catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Oliver; Jouve, Hélène M.; Stuhrmann, Heinrich B.

    2017-05-01

    A differentiation between dynamic polarised protons close to tyrosyl radical sites in catalase and those of the bulk is achieved by time-resolved polarised neutron scattering. Three radical sites, all of them being close to the molecular centre and the heme, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369 the radial site of which had previously been proven by EPR.

  2. Polarisation Control of DFB Fibre Laser Using UV-Induced Birefringent Phase-Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Jacob Lundgreen; Lauridsen, Vibeke Claudia; Berendt, Martin Ole

    1998-01-01

    The polarisation properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser are investigated experimentally. A birefringent phase-shift is induced by side illumination of the centre part of the lasing structure with ultraviolet (UV) light and it is experimentally shown that the birefringence...... of the phase-shift is the dominating effect controlling the polarisation properties of the laser....

  3. Analysis of waveguide architectures of InGaN/GaN diode lasers by nearfield optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Sebastian; Tomm, Jens W.; Kühn, Sergei; Hoffmann, Veit; Wenzel, Hans

    2017-02-01

    Waveguide (WG) architectures of 420-nm emitting InAlGaN/GaN diode lasers are analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy using a nearfield scanning optical microscope (NSOM) for excitation and detection. The measurements with a spatial resolution of 100 nm are implemented by scanning the fiber tip along the unprepared front facets of standard devices. PL is collected by the fiber tip, whereas PCs are extracted from the contacts that are anyway present for power supply. The mechanisms of signal generation are addressed in detail. The components of the `optical active region', multiple quantum wells (MQW), WGs, and cladding layers are separately inspected. Even separate analysis of p- and n-sections of the WG become possible. Defect levels are detected in the p-part of the WG. Their presence is consistent with the doping by Mg. An increased efficiency of carrier capture into InGaN/GaN WGs compared to GaN WGs is observed. Thus, beyond the improved optical confinement, the electrical confinement is improved, as well. NSOM PL and PC at GaN based devices do not reach the clarity and spatial resolution for WG mode analysis as seen before for GaAs based devices. This is due to higher modal absorption and higher WG losses. NSOM based optical analysis turns out to be an efficient tool for analysis of single layers grown into InAlGaN/GaN diode laser structures, even if this analysis is done at a packaged ready-to-work device.

  4. Waveguide analysis of heat-drawn and chemically etched probe tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moar, Peter N; Love, John D; Ladouceur, François; Cahill, Laurence W

    2006-09-01

    We analyze two basic aspects of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe's operation: (i) spot-size evolution of the electric field along the probe with and without a metal layer, and (ii) a modal analysis of the SNOM probe, particularly in close proximity to the aperture. A slab waveguide model is utilized to minimize the analytical complexity, yet provides useful quantitative results--including losses associated with the metal coating--which can then be used as design rules.

  5. High Extinction Ratio In-Fibre Polarisers by Exploiting Tilted Fibre Bragg Grating Structures for Single-Polarisation High-Power Fibre Lasers and Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    maintaining (PM) fibre, utilising polarisation hole-burning ( PHB ) effect to reduce homogeneous linewidth of the EDFL. In our work, we demonstrate a stable...loss filter which will induce some loss to the cavity around its paired attenuation band region, thus imposing PHB effect to the gain medium. The...polarisation-hole-burning ( PHB ) effect to realise multi-wavelength switchable function in proposed fibre ring laser system. In the proposed fibre ring laser

  6. An optical investigation of dentinal discoloration due to commonly endodontic sealers, using the transmitted light polarizing microscopy and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Ioana; Ionescu, Ecaterina; Dimitriu, Bogdan Alexandru; Bartok, Ruxandra Ioana; Moldoveanu, Georgiana Florentina; Gheorghiu, Irina Maria; Suciu, Ileana; Ciocîrdel, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the degree of tooth crown staining by commonly used endodontic sealers. Crown discolorations by tooth canal sealers [AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey Gmbh, Konstanz, Germany); Endofill (Produits Dentaires SA, Vevey, Switzerland); Apexit (Dentsply DeTrey Gmbh, Konstanz, Germany); and MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil)] were tested on extracted human premolars. The samples were divided into five groups of five samples each, after root canal sealing. Five teeth were used as control groups. The spectrophotometric method was performed in order to quantify in terms of color change of the coronal part (it was also recorded a track on how the color changes over time). For the microscopic study of the extracted dental specimens subjected to this study, polarized transmitted light microscopy was used. This method involves the development of special microscopic preparations, called "thin sections". In our case, the thin section was performed on 20 prepared and obturated recently extracted teeth. The degree of discoloration was determined after one week and three months using spectrophotometry and polarized light microscopy. All sealers usually cause some degree of discoloration on the cervical aspect of the crowns that increases in time. AH Plus and Endofill caused the greatest discoloration, followed by Apexit and MTA Fillapex.

  7. Epi-detected quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopy for label-free imaging of the tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Stephen Hsu, Chin-Ying [Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore 119083 (Singapore)

    2015-01-19

    We present an epi-detected quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopic imaging technique (i.e., coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third-harmonic generation (THG), and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF)) based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of the tooth. We demonstrate that high contrast ps-CARS images covering both the fingerprint (500–1800 cm{sup −1}) and high-wavenumber (2500–3800 cm{sup −1}) regions can be acquired to uncover the distributions of mineral and organic biomaterials in the tooth, while high quality TPEF, SHG, and THG images of the tooth can also be acquired under ps laser excitation without damaging the samples. The quadruple-modal nonlinear microscopic images (CARS/SHG/THG/TPEF) acquired provide better understanding of morphological structures and biochemical/biomolecular distributions in the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction of the tooth without labeling, facilitating optical diagnosis and characterization of the tooth in dentistry.

  8. The impact of chemical structure and molecular packing on the electronic polarisation of fullerene arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Sheridan; Chia, Cleaven; Teo, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2017-07-19

    Electronic polarisation contributes to the electronic landscape as seen by separating charges in organic materials. The nature of electronic polarisation depends on the polarisability, density, and arrangement of polarisable molecules. In this paper, we introduce a microscopic, coarse-grained model in which we treat each molecule as a polarisable site, and use an array of such polarisable dipoles to calculate the electric field and associated energy of any arrangement of charges in the medium. The model incorporates chemical structure via the molecular polarisability and molecular packing patterns via the structure of the array. We use this model to calculate energies of charge pairs undergoing separation in finite fullerene lattices of different chemical and crystal structures. The effective dielectric constants that we estimate from this approach are in good quantitative agreement with those measured experimentally in C 60 and phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) films, but we find significant differences in dielectric constant depending on packing and on direction of separation, which we rationalise in terms of density of polarisable fullerene cages in regions of high field. In general, we find lattices containing molecules of more isotropic polarisability tensors exhibit higher dielectric constants. By exploring several model systems we conclude that differences in molecular polarisability (and therefore, chemical structure) appear to be less important than differences in molecular packing and separation direction in determining the energetic landscape for charge separation. We note that the results are relevant for finite lattices, but not necessarily for infinite systems. We propose that the model could be used to design molecular systems for effective electronic screening.

  9. Mapping exciton quenching in photovoltaic-applicable polymer blends using time-resolved scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadby, A.; Khalil, G.; Fox, A. M.; Lidzey, D. G.

    2008-05-01

    We have used time-resolved scanning near-field microscopy to image the fluorescence decay lifetime across a phase-separated blend of the photovoltaic-applicable polymers poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-alt-bis- N ,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N ,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB). We show that the efficiency of local fluorescence quenching is composition dependent, with excitons on F8BT molecules being more effectively quenched when F8BT is trapped at a low concentration in a PFB-rich phase. Despite such presumed differences in charge-carrier generation efficiency, our results demonstrate that charge extraction from F8BT:PFB devices is the most dominant mechanism limiting their operational efficiency.

  10. Optical versus virtual: teaching assistant perceptions of the use of virtual microscopy in an undergraduate human anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Larissa; Dunham, Stacey; Braun, Mark W; O'Loughlin, Valerie Dean

    2012-01-01

    Many studies that evaluate the introduction of technology in the classroom focus on student performance and student evaluations. This study focuses on instructor evaluation of the introduction of virtual microscopy into an undergraduate anatomy class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with graduate teaching assistants (TA) and analyzed through qualitative methods. This analysis showed that the teaching assistants found the virtual microscope to be an advantageous change in the classroom. They cite the ease of use of the virtual microscope, access to histology outside of designated laboratory time, and increasing student collaboration in class as the primary advantages. The teaching assistants also discuss principal areas where the use of the virtual microscope can be improved from a pedagogical standpoint, including requiring students to spend more time working on histology in class. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  11. An inverse method for determining the interaction force between the probe and sample using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Win-Jin; Fang, Te-Hua

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a means for calculating the interaction force during the scanning process using a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe. The determination of the interaction force in the scanning system is regarded as an inverse vibration problem. The conjugate gradient method is applied to treat the inverse problem using available displacement measurements. The results show that the conjugate gradient method is less sensitive to measurement errors and prior information on the functional form of quality was not required. Furthermore, the initial guesses for the interaction force can be arbitrarily chosen for the iteration process

  12. Chain end distribution of block copolymer in two-dimensional microphase-separated structure studied by scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Ryojun; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2009-10-01

    The chain end distribution of a block copolymer in a two-dimensional microphase-separated structure was studied by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). In the monolayer of poly(octadecyl methacrylate)-block-poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PODMA-b-PiBMA), the free end of the PiBMA subchain was directly observed by SNOM, and the spatial distributions of the whole block and the chain end are examined and compared with the convolution of the point spread function of the microscope and distribution function of the model structures. It was found that the chain end distribution of the block copolymer confined in two dimensions has a peak near the domain center, being concentrated in the narrower region, as compared with three-dimensional systems.

  13. Growth and decay dynamics of a stable microbubble produced at the end of a near-field scanning optical microscopy fiber probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.S.; Hnatovsky, C.

    2004-01-01

    Low power cw laser radiation coupled into a near-field scanning optical microscopy fiber probe has been used to generate a stable microbubble in water. A probe tip which was selectively chemically etched and metallized served as a microheater for the generation of the stable bubble. Bubble diameters in the range of 40-400 μm and lifetimes of over an hour have been obtained. The microbubble exhibited a linear growth phase over a period of a few seconds before reaching a maximum diameter which depended on the laser power. When the laser beam was blocked the microbubble decayed with a rate which was inversely proportional to the bubble diameter. The bubble lifetime depended on the square of the initial bubble diameter. Instabilities which transform a large stable bubble into a microjet stream of micron sized bubbles as the laser power was increased is also described

  14. New microscopy for nanoimaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kinjo, Y; Watanabe, M

    2002-01-01

    Two types of new microscopy, namely, X-ray contact microscopy (XRCM) in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray projection microscopy (XRPM) using synchrotron radiation and zone plate optics were used to image the fine structures of human chromosomes. In the XRCM plus AFM system, location of X-ray images on a photoresist has become far easier than that with our previous method using transmission electron microscopy coupled with the replica method. In addition, the images obtained suggested that the conformation of chromatin fiber differs from the current textbook model regarding the architecture of a eukaryotic chromosome. X-ray images with high contrast of the specimens could be obtained with XRPM. The resolution of each microscopy was about 30 and 200-300 nm for XRCM plus AFM and XRPM, respectively. (author)

  15. Non-invasive red light optogenetic pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging for drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Jing; Li, Airong; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac pacing could be a powerful tool for investigating mammalian cardiac electrical conduction systems as well as for treatment of certain cardiac pathologies. However, traditional electrical pacing using pacemaker requires an invasive surgical procedure. Electrical currents from the implanted electrodes can also cause damage to heart tissue, further restricting its utility. Optogenetic pacing has been developed as a promising, non-invasive alternative to electrical stimulation for controlling animal heart rhythms. It induces heart contractions by shining pulsed light on transgene-generated microbial opsins, which in turn activate the light gated ion channels in animal hearts. However, commonly used opsins in optogenetic pacing, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), require short light wavelength stimulation (475 nm), which is strongly absorbed and scattered by tissue. Here, we performed optogenetic pacing by expression of recently engineered red-shifted microbial opsins, ReaChR and CsChrimson, in a well-established animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, using the 617 nm stimulation light pulses. The OCM technique enables non-invasive optical imaging of animal hearts with high speed and ultrahigh axial and transverse resolutions. We integrated a customized OCM system with the optical stimulation system to monitor the optogenetic pacing noninvasively. The use of red-sifted opsins enabled deeper penetration of simulating light at lower power, which is promising for applications of optogenetic pacing in mammalian cardiac pathology studies or clinical treatments in the future.

  16. Optical-sectioning microscopy of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in human gliomas: standardization and quantitative comparison with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Linpeng; Chen, Ye; Yin, Chengbo; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2017-04-01

    Systemic delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid leads to enhanced fluorescence image contrast in many tumors due to the increased accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a fluorescent porphyrin that is associated with tumor burden and proliferation. The value of PpIX-guided resection of malignant gliomas has been demonstrated in prospective randomized clinical studies in which a twofold greater extent of resection and improved progression-free survival have been observed. In low-grade gliomas and at the diffuse infiltrative margins of all gliomas, PpIX fluorescence is often too weak to be detected with current low-resolution surgical microscopes that are used in operating rooms. However, it has been demonstrated that high-resolution optical-sectioning microscopes are capable of detecting the sparse and punctate accumulations of PpIX that are undetectable via conventional low-power surgical fluorescence microscopes. To standardize the performance of high-resolution optical-sectioning devices for future clinical use, we have developed an imaging phantom and methods to ensure that the imaging of PpIX-expressing brain tissues can be performed reproducibly. Ex vivo imaging studies with a dual-axis confocal microscope demonstrate that these methods enable the acquisition of images from unsectioned human brain tissues that quantitatively and consistently correlate with images of histologically processed tissue sections.

  17. Application of Optical Coherence Tomography Freeze-Drying Microscopy for Designing Lyophilization Process and Its Impact on Process Efficiency and Product Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Srinivasan, Charudharshini; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Awotwe-Otoo, David; Cruz, Celia N; Muhammad, Ashraf

    2018-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography freeze-drying microscopy (OCT-FDM) is a novel technique that allows the three-dimensional imaging of a drug product during the entire lyophilization process. OCT-FDM consists of a single-vial freeze dryer (SVFD) affixed with an optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system. Unlike the conventional techniques, such as modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) and light transmission freeze-drying microscopy, used for predicting the product collapse temperature (Tc), the OCT-FDM approach seeks to mimic the actual product and process conditions during the lyophilization process. However, there is limited understanding on the application of this emerging technique to the design of the lyophilization process. In this study, we investigated the suitability of OCT-FDM technique in designing a lyophilization process. Moreover, we compared the product quality attributes of the resulting lyophilized product manufactured using Tc, a critical process control parameter, as determined by OCT-FDM versus as estimated by mDSC. OCT-FDM analysis revealed the absence of collapse even for the low protein concentration (5 mg/ml) and low solid content formulation (1%w/v) studied. This was confirmed by lab scale lyophilization. In addition, lyophilization cycles designed using Tc values obtained from OCT-FDM were more efficient with higher sublimation rate and mass flux than the conventional cycles, since drying was conducted at higher shelf temperature. Finally, the quality attributes of the products lyophilized using Tc determined by OCT-FDM and mDSC were similar, and product shrinkage and cracks were observed in all the batches of freeze-dried products irrespective of the technique employed in predicting Tc.

  18. In-vivo nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) of epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) reveals quantitative measures of neoplasia in hamster oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Ortiz, Daniel; Qiu, Suimin; Resto, Vicente; McCammon, Susan; Vargas, Gracie

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) plays an integral role in epithelial neoplasia, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This interface undergoes significant alterations due to hyperproliferating epithelium that supports the transformation of normal epithelium to precancers and cancer. We present a method based on nonlinear optical microscopy to directly assess the ECTI and quantify dysplastic alterations using a hamster model for oral carcinogenesis. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic normal mucosa were imaged in-vivo by both multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy (MPAM) and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) to obtain cross-sectional reconstructions of the oral epithelium and lamina propria. Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histopathological grading and measurement of ECTI parameters. An ECTI shape parameter was calculated based on deviation from the linear geometry (ΔLinearity) seen in normal mucosa was measured using MPAM-SHGM and histology. The ECTI was readily visible in MPAM-SHGM and quantitative shape analysis showed ECTI deformation in dysplasia but not in normal mucosa. ΔLinearity was significantly (p tissue with 87.9% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity, while calculations from histology provided 96.4% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity. Among other quantifiable architectural changes, a progressive statistically significant increase in epithelial thickness was seen with increasing grade of dysplasia. MPAM-SHGM provides new noninvasive ways for direct characterization of ECTI which may be used in preclinical studies to investigate the role of this interface in early transformation. Further development of the method may also lead to new diagnostic approaches to differentiate non-neoplastic tissue from precancers and neoplasia, possibly with other cellular and layer based indicators of abnormality.

  19. Polarisation and precise calibration of the LEP beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    We report in this article on two issues of precision accelerator physics, performed at the LEP collider, that challenged international collaborations. The first result is an increase of the polarisation degree from an almost vanishing natural level to 50%, opening the way to energy calibration by resonant depolarisation. The second result is a systematic and precise determination of the collider centre-of- mass energy correcting for subtle effects such as the azimuthal variation of the beam energy, the magnet temperature, the effects of parasitic earth currents and terrestrial tides. It resulted in an extremely accurate test of the standard model and set significant constraints on the top quark and Higgs masses. (16 refs).

  20. Vacuum polarisation in some static nonuniform magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calucci, G. [Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica Teorica]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    Vacuum polarisation in QED in presence of some configurations of external magnetic fields is investigated. The configuration considered correspond to fields is investigated. The configuration considered correspond to fields lying in a plane and without sources. The motion of a Dirac electron in this field configuration is studied and arguments are found to conclude that the lowest level gives the most important contribution. The result is that the main effect is not very different from the uniform case, the possibilities of calculating the corrections due to the uniformity is explicitly shown. A typical effect of nonuniformity of the field shows out in the refractivity of the field shows out in the refractivity of the vacuum.

  1. Measurement of the charged-pion polarisability at COMPASS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    For more than a decade, COMPASS has been tackling the measurement of the electromagnetic polarizability of the charged pion, which describes the stiffness of the pion against deformation in electromagnetic fields. Previous experiments date back to the 1980's in Serpukhov (Russia), where the Primakoff method for realizing interactions of charged pions with quasi-real photons was first employed. Later also other techniques in photon-nucleon and photon-photon collisions were carried out at different machines. The COMPASS measurement demonstrates that the charged-pion polarizability is significantly smaller than the previous results, roughly by a factor two, with the smallest uncertainties realized so far. The pion polarisability is of fundamental interest in the low-energy sector of quantum chromodynamics. It is directly linked to the quark-gluon substructure and dynamics of the pion, the lightest bound system of strong interaction.

  2. Towards the NNLO evolution of polarised parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, A.; Vermaseren, J.A.M.

    2008-07-01

    We report on the first calculation of the structure function g 1 in polarised deep-inelastic scattering to the third order in massless perturbative QCD. The calculation follows the dispersive approach already used for the corresponding unpolarised cases of F 2,L , but additionally involves higher tensor integrals and the Dirac matrix γ 5 in D ≠ 4 dimensions. Our results confirm all known two-loop expressions including the coefficient functions of Zijlstra and van Neerven not independently verified before. At three loops we extract the helicity-difference next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) quark-quark and gluon-quark splitting functions ΔP qq and ΔP qg . The results exhibit interesting features concerning sum rules and the momentum-fraction limits x → 1 and x → 0. (orig.)

  3. Vacuum polarisation in some static nonuniform magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calucci, G.

    1995-11-01

    Vacuum polarisation in QED in presence of some configurations of external magnetic fields is investigated. The configuration considered correspond to fields is investigated. The configuration considered correspond to fields lying in a plane and without sources. The motion of a Dirac electron in this field configuration is studied and arguments are found to conclude that the lowest level gives the most important contribution. The result is that the main effect is not very different from the uniform case, the possibilities of calculating the corrections due to the uniformity is explicitly shown. A typical effect of nonuniformity of the field shows out in the refractivity of the field shows out in the refractivity of the vacuum

  4. Towards the NNLO evolution of polarised parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Moch, S.; Rogal, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Vermaseren, J.A.M. [Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica (NIKHEF), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-07-15

    We report on the first calculation of the structure function g{sub 1} in polarised deep-inelastic scattering to the third order in massless perturbative QCD. The calculation follows the dispersive approach already used for the corresponding unpolarised cases of F{sub 2,L}, but additionally involves higher tensor integrals and the Dirac matrix {gamma}{sub 5} in D {ne} 4 dimensions. Our results confirm all known two-loop expressions including the coefficient functions of Zijlstra and van Neerven not independently verified before. At three loops we extract the helicity-difference next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) quark-quark and gluon-quark splitting functions {delta}P{sub qq} and {delta}P{sub qg}. The results exhibit interesting features concerning sum rules and the momentum-fraction limits x {yields} 1 and x {yields} 0. (orig.)

  5. Exclusive $\\rho^0$ muoproduction on transversely polarised protons and deuterons

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C.; Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Antonov, A.A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthorl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Hoppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Morreale, A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Negrini, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Wang, L.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The transverse target spin azimuthal asymmetry A_UT in hard exclusive production of rho^0 mesons was measured at COMPASS by scattering 160 GeV/c muons off transversely polarised protons and deuterons. The measured asymmetry is sensitive to the nucleon helicity-flip generalised parton distributions E^q, which are related to the orbital angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. The Q^2, x_B and p_t^2 dependence of A_UT is presented in a wide kinematic range. Results for deuterons are obtained for the first time. The measured asymmetry is small in the whole kinematic range for both protons and deuterons, which is consistent with the theoretical interpretation that contributions from GPDs E^u and E^d approximately cancel.

  6. Large-Angle CMB Suppression and Polarisation Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Copi, C.J.; Schwarz, D.J.; Starkman, G.D.

    2013-01-01

    The anomalous lack of large angle temperature correlations has been a surprising feature of the CMB since first observed by COBE-DMR and subsequently confirmed and strengthened by WMAP. This anomaly may point to the need for modifications of the standard model of cosmology or may show that our Universe is a rare statistical fluctuation within that model. Further observations of the temperature auto-correlation function will not elucidate the issue; sufficiently high precision statistical observations already exist. Instead, alternative probes are required. In this work we explore the expectations for forthcoming polarisation observations. We define a prescription to test the hypothesis that the large-angle CMB temperature perturbations in our Universe represent a rare statistical fluctuation within the standard cosmological model. These tests are based on the temperature-Q Stokes parameter correlation. Unfortunately these tests cannot be expected to be definitive. However, we do show that if this TQ-correlati...

  7. 3D wide field-of-view Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy advancing real-time in-vivo imaging and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cogliati, Andrea; Hayes, Adam; Tankam, Patrice; Santhanam, Anand; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2017-02-01

    Real-time volumetric high-definition wide-field-of-view in-vivo cellular imaging requires micron-scale resolution in 3D. Compactness of the handheld device and distortion-free images with cellular resolution are also critically required for onsite use in clinical applications. By integrating a custom liquid lens-based microscope and a dual-axis MEMS scanner in a compact handheld probe, Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) breaks the lateral resolution limit of optical coherence tomography through depth, overcoming the tradeoff between numerical aperture and depth of focus, enabling advances in biotechnology. Furthermore, distortion-free imaging with no post-processing is achieved with a compact, lightweight handheld MEMS scanner that obtained a 12-fold reduction in volume and 17-fold reduction in weight over a previous dual-mirror galvanometer-based scanner. Approaching the holy grail of medical imaging - noninvasive real-time imaging with histologic resolution - GD-OCM demonstrates invariant resolution of 2 μm throughout a volume of 1 x 1 x 0.6 mm3, acquired and visualized in less than 2 minutes with parallel processing on graphics processing units. Results on the metrology of manufactured materials and imaging of human tissue with GD-OCM are presented.

  8. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for no-adherent cells subjected to point-like stimuli by digital holographic microscopy and holographic optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Guiding, controlling and studying cellular functions are challenging themes in the biomedical field, as they are fundamental prerequisites for new therapeutic strategies from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. In recent years, multidisciplinary studies in nanotechnology offer new tools to investigate important biophysical phenomena in response to the local physical characteristics of the extracellular environment, some examples are the mechanisms of cell adhesion, migration, communication and differentiation. Indeed for reproducing the features of the extracellular matrix in vitro, it is essential to develop active devices that evoke as much as possible the natural cellular environment. Our investigation is in the framework of studying and clarifying the biophysical mechanisms of the interaction between cells and the microenvironment in which they exist. We implement an optical tweezers setup to investigate cell material interaction and we use Digital Holography as non-invasive imaging technique in microscopy. We exploit Holographic Optical Tweezers arrangement in order to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads to induce mechanical deformation in suspended cells. A lot of papers in literature examine the dynamics of the cytoskeleton when cells adhere on substrates and nowadays well established cell models are based on such research activities. Actually, the natural cell environment is made of a complex extracellular matrix and the single cell behavior is due to intricate interactions with the environment and are strongly correlated to the cell-cell interactions. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence.

  9. Provenance study through analysis of microstructural characteristics using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy for Goryeo celadon excavated from the seabed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-su, Han

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims at identifying the provenance of Goryeo celadons by understanding its microstructural characteristics, such as particles, blisters, forms and amount of pores, and the presence of crystal formation, bodies, and glazes and its boundary, using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis of the reproduced samples shows that the glazed layer of the sherd fired at higher temperatures has lower viscosity and therefore it encourages the blisters to be combined together and the layer to become more transparent. In addition, the result showed that the vitrification and melting process of clay minerals such as feldspars and quartzs on the bodies was accelerated for those samples. To factor such characteristics of the microstructure and apply it to the sherds, the samples could be divided into six categories based on status, such as small particles with many small pores or mainly large and small circular pores in the bodies, only a limited number of varied sized blisters in the glazes, and a few blisters and needle-shaped crystals on the boundary surface. In conclusion, the analysis of the microstructural characteristics using an optical microscope and SEM have proven to be useful as a categorizing reference factor in a provenance study on Goryeo celadons.

  10. Optically Sectioned Imaging of Microvasculature of In-Vivo and Ex-Vivo Thick Tissue Models with Speckle-illumination HiLo Microscopy and HiLo Image Processing Implementation in MATLAB Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Ricky Wai

    The work described in this thesis covers the conversion of HiLo image processing into MATLAB architecture and the use of speckle-illumination HiLo microscopy for use of ex-vivo and in-vivo imaging of thick tissue models. HiLo microscopy is a wide-field fluorescence imaging technique and has been demonstrated to produce optically sectioned images comparable to confocal in thin samples. The imaging technique was developed by Jerome Mertz and the Boston University Biomicroscopy Lab and has been implemented in our lab as a stand-alone optical setup and a modification to a conventional fluorescence microscope. Speckle-illumination HiLo microscopy combines two images taken under speckle-illumination and standard uniform-illumination to generate an optically sectioned image that reject out-of-focus fluorescence. The evaluated speckle contrast in the images is used as a weighting function where elements that move out-of-focus have a speckle contrast that decays to zero. The experiments shown here demonstrate the capability of our HiLo microscopes to produce optically-sectioned images of the microvasculature of ex-vivo and in-vivo thick tissue models. The HiLo microscope were used to image the microvasculature of ex-vivo mouse heart sections prepared for optical histology and the microvasculature of in-vivo rodent dorsal window chamber models. Studies in label-free surface profiling with HiLo microscopy is also presented.

  11. Polarisation of auroral emission lines in the Earth's upper atmosphere : first results and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, H.; Barthelemy, M.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Lilensten, J.; Bommier, V.

    2011-12-01

    Polarisation of light is a key observable to provide information about asymmetry or anisotropy within a radiative source. Following the pioneering and controversial work of Duncan in 1959, the polarisation of auroral emission lines in the Earth's upper atmosphere has been overlooked for a long time, even though the red intense auroral line (6300Å) produced by collisional impacts with electrons precipitating along magnetic field lines is a good candidate to search for polarisation. This problem was investigated again by Lilensten et al (2006) and observations were obtained by Lilensten et al (2008) confirming that the red auroral emission line is polarised. More recent measurements obtained by Barthélemy et al (2011) are presented and discussed. The results are compared to predictions of the theoretical work of Bommier et al (2011) and are in good agreement. Following these encouraging results, a new dedicated spectropolarimeter is currently under construction between BIRA-IASB and IPAG to provide simultaneously the polarisation of the red line and of other interesting auroral emission lines such as N2+ 1NG (4278Å), other N2 bands, etc... Perspectives regarding the theoretical polarisation of some of these lines will be presented. The importance of these polarisation measurements in the framework of atmospheric modeling and geomagnetic activity will be discussed.

  12. Improving Image Matching by Reducing Surface Reflections Using Polarising Filter Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conen, N.; Hastedt, H.; Kahmen, O.; Luhmann, T.

    2018-05-01

    In dense stereo matching applications surface reflections may lead to incorrect measurements and blunders in the resulting point cloud. To overcome the problem of disturbing reflexions polarising filters can be mounted on the camera lens and light source. Reflections in the images can be suppressed by crossing the polarising direction of the filters leading to homogeneous illuminated images and better matching results. However, the filter may influence the camera's orientation parameters as well as the measuring accuracy. To quantify these effects, a calibration and an accuracy analysis is conducted within a spatial test arrangement according to the German guideline VDI/VDE 2634.1 (2002) using a DSLR with and without polarising filter. In a second test, the interior orientation is analysed in more detail. The results do not show significant changes of the measuring accuracy in object space and only very small changes of the interior orientation (Δc ≤ 4 μm) with the polarising filter in use. Since in medical applications many tiny reflections are present and impede robust surface measurements, a prototypic trinocular endoscope is equipped with polarising technique. The interior and relative orientation is determined and analysed. The advantage of the polarising technique for medical image matching is shown in an experiment with a moistened pig kidney. The accuracy and completeness of the resulting point cloud can be improved clearly when using polarising filters. Furthermore, an accuracy analysis using a laser triangulation system is performed and the special reflection properties of metallic surfaces are presented.

  13. An introduction to cross-sections and asymmetries measurable using polarised beams in high-energy e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, P.

    1990-08-01

    The implementation of polarised beams at SLC, and hopefully LEP, is an important development. This will allow access to a range of precision measurements which exploit the parity violating nature of the Z boson. This report gives an introduction to the basic quantities which may be measured with polarised beams. These are the left-right asymmetry (A LR ), forward-backward asymmetries with and without polarisation (A R FB , A L FB , A FB ) and the ''improved'' polarised forward-backward asymmetry (A pol FB ). The final state polarisation measurement is also discussed. (author)

  14. Study of NaCl:Mn2+ nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V.; Kolokoltsev, O.; Navarrete Montesinos, M.; Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H.

    2015-01-01

    NaCl:Mn 2+ nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm 2 and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn 2+ single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C

  15. Resolving dispersion and induction components for polarisable molecular simulations of ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pádua, Agílio A. H.

    2017-05-01

    One important development in interaction potential models, or atomistic force fields, for molecular simulation is the inclusion of explicit polarisation, which represents the induction effects of charged or polar molecules on polarisable electron clouds. Polarisation can be included through fluctuating charges, induced multipoles, or Drude dipoles. This work uses Drude dipoles and is focused on room-temperature ionic liquids, for which fixed-charge models predict too slow dynamics. The aim of this study is to devise a strategy to adapt existing non-polarisable force fields upon addition of polarisation, because induction was already contained to an extent, implicitly, due to parametrisation against empirical data. Therefore, a fraction of the van der Waals interaction energy should be subtracted so that the Lennard-Jones terms only account for dispersion and the Drude dipoles for induction. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory is used to resolve the dispersion and induction terms in dimers and to calculate scaling factors to reduce the Lennard-Jones terms from the non-polarisable model. Simply adding Drude dipoles to an existing fixed-charge model already improves the prediction of transport properties, increasing diffusion coefficients, and lowering the viscosity. Scaling down the Lennard-Jones terms leads to still faster dynamics and densities that match experiment extremely well. The concept developed here improves the overall prediction of density and transport properties and can be adapted to other models and systems. In terms of microscopic structure of the ionic liquids, the inclusion of polarisation and the down-scaling of Lennard-Jones terms affect only slightly the ordering of the first shell of counterions, leading to small decreases in coordination numbers. Remarkably, the effect of polarisation is major beyond first neighbours, significantly weakening spatial correlations, a structural effect that is certainly related to the faster dynamics of

  16. Three-dimensional reconstruction of highly complex microscopic samples using scanning electron microscopy and optical flow estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Baghaie

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM as one of the major research and industrial equipment for imaging of micro-scale samples and surfaces has gained extensive attention from its emerge. However, the acquired micrographs still remain two-dimensional (2D. In the current work a novel and highly accurate approach is proposed to recover the hidden third-dimension by use of multi-view image acquisition of the microscopic samples combined with pre/post-processing steps including sparse feature-based stereo rectification, nonlocal-based optical flow estimation for dense matching and finally depth estimation. Employing the proposed approach, three-dimensional (3D reconstructions of highly complex microscopic samples were achieved to facilitate the interpretation of topology and geometry of surface/shape attributes of the samples. As a byproduct of the proposed approach, high-definition 3D printed models of the samples can be generated as a tangible means of physical understanding. Extensive comparisons with the state-of-the-art reveal the strength and superiority of the proposed method in uncovering the details of the highly complex microscopic samples.

  17. Dynamic proton polarisation on polymers in solution: creating contrast in neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinten, M.G.D. van der

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) as an alternative or additional method to create contrast in neutron small angle scattering has been investigated with emphasis on the study of polymers in solution. The need for high polarisations imposes specific requirements on the sample and its environment. Vitreous beads have been used as samples. Nuclear relaxation times show that they contain dissolved air. Parasitic scattering from the solvent is observed, probably arising from nanometer air bubbles. DNP is shown to be useful, in particular for samples that consist of mixtures of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-rich molecules, where the different molecules can be highlighted by changing the polarisation. ((orig.))

  18. Polarisation and compression of 3He for Magnetic Resonance Imaging purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geurts, D. G.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J.; Poolman, H. R.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Nicolay, K.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is often used in medical science as a diagnostic tool for the human body. Conventional MRI uses the NMR signal from the protons of water molecules in tissue to image the interior of the patient's body. However, for certain areas such as the lungs and airways, the usage of a highly polarised gas yields better results. We are currently constructing an apparatus that uses polarised 3 He gas to produce detailed images of those signal-deficient moyeties. We also plan to study possible uptake of polarised 3 He gas by the circulatory system to image other organs

  19. Direct Measurement of the Gluon Polarisation in the Nucleon via Charmed Meson Production

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Arbuzov, A; Badelek, Barbara Maria; Balestra, F; Ball, J; Barth, J; Baum, Guenter; Bedfer, Y; Bernet, Colin; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Brona, G; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Chapiro, A; Chiosso, M; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; De Masi, R; Dedek, N; Dhara, L; Diaz, V; Dinkelbach, A M; Donskov, S V; Dorofeev, V A; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Falaleev, V; Ferrero, L; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr; Fischer, H; Franco, C; Franz, J; Friedrich, J M; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, Fabrice; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, Benigno; Gorin, A M; Grabmuller, S; Grajek, O A; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Hannappel, J; von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heckmann, J; Hedicke, S; Heinsius, Fritz-Herbert; Hermann, R; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; von Hodenberg, M; Horikawa, S; d'Hose, N; Ilgner, C; Ioukaev, A I; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Jahn, R; Janata, A; Jasinski, P; Joosten, R; Jouravlev, N I; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, Bernhard; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Kolosov, V N; Komissarov, E V; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, Kay; Konstantinov, V F; Korentchenko, A S; Koutchinski, N A; Kral, A; Kravchuk, N P; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, Fabienne; Kurek, Krzysztof; Ladygin, M E; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Ludwig, I; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Marroncle, J; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W.Thomas; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nahle, O; Nassalski, J; Neliba, S; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D P; Nikolaenko, V I; Nikolaev, K; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B; Peshekhonov, D V; Peshekhonov, V D; Piragino, G; Platchkov, Stephane; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Procureur, S; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Reggiani, D; Richter, A; Robinet, F; Rondio, Ewa; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, Igor A; Schiavon, P; Schill, Christian; Schonmeier, P; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stinzing, F; Sugonyaev, V P; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Tchalishev, V V; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Venugopal, G; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Vossen, A; Webb, Robert C; Weitzel, Q; Windmolders, R; Wirth, S; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziegler, R; Zvyagin, A

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the gluon polarisation in the nucleon based on the photon-gluon fusion process tagged by charmed meson production and decay to charged K and pi. The data were collected in polarised muon scattering off a polarised deuteron target by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN during 2002-2004. The result of this LO analysis is _x = -0.47 +- 0.44 (stat) +- 0.15 (syst) at ~= 0.11 and a scale mu^2 ~ 13 (GeV/c)^2.

  20. Linear to Circular Polarisation Conversion using Birefringent Properties of Aligned Crystals for Multi-GeV Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first experimental results on the use of a thick aligned Si crystal acting as a quarter wave plate to induce a degree of circular polarisation in a high energy linearly polarised photon beam. The linearly polarised photon beam is produced from coherent bremsstrahlung radiation by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on an aligned Si crystal, acting as a radiator. The linear polarisation of the photon beam is characterised by measuring the asymmetry in electron-positron pair production in a Ge crystal, for different crystal orientations. The Ge crystal therefore acts as an analyser. The birefringence phenomenon, which converts the linear polarisation to circular polarisation, is observed by letting the linearly polarised photons beam pass through a thick Si quarter wave plate crystal, and then measuring the asymmetry in electron-positron pair production again for a selection of relative angles between the crystallographic planes of the radiator, analyser and quarter wave plate. The systematics...