WorldWideScience

Sample records for polar water column

  1. A microwave satellite water vapour column retrieval for polar winter conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perro, Christopher; Lesins, Glen; Duck, Thomas J.; Cadeddu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    A new microwave satellite water vapour retrieval for the polar winter atmosphere is presented. The retrieval builds on the work of Miao et al. (2001) and Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), employing auxiliary information for atmospheric conditions and numerical optimization. It was tested using simulated and actual measurements from the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) satellite instruments. Ground truth was provided by the G-band vapour radiometer (GVR) at Barrow, Alaska. For water vapour columns less than 6 kg m-2, comparisons between the retrieval and GVR result in a root mean square (RMS) deviation of 0.39 kg m-2 and a systematic bias of 0.08 kg m-2. These results are compared with RMS deviations and biases at Barrow for the retrieval of Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), the AIRS and MIRS satellite data products, and the ERA-Interim, NCEP, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses. When applied to MHS measurements, the new retrieval produces a smaller RMS deviation and bias than for the earlier retrieval and satellite data products. The RMS deviations for the new retrieval were comparable to those for the ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses; however, the MHS retrievals have much finer horizontal resolution (15 km at nadir) and reveal more structure. The new retrieval can be used to obtain pan-Arctic maps of water vapour columns of unprecedented quality. It may also be applied to measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave/Temperature 2 (SSM/T2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit B (AMSU-B), Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS), Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and Chinese MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) instruments.

  2. Water Column Sonar Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The collection and analysis of water column sonar data is a relatively new avenue of research into the marine environment. Primary uses include assessing biological...

  3. Purification of polar compounds from Radix isatidis using conventional C18 column coupled with polar-copolymerized C18 column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Guo, Zhimou; Xiao, Yuansheng; Wang, Chaoran; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Xinmiao

    2010-11-01

    Regarding hydrophilic interaction chromatography and normal phase liquid chromatography, RPLC is another choice used to separate polar compounds with the improvement of polar-modified C18 stationary phase. In this study, a method using conventional C18 column coupled with polar-copolymerized C18 column was successfully developed for the separation and purification of polar compounds from Radix isatidis, which is one of the most commonly used traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). An XTerra MS C18 column was used to fractionate the extract of R. isatidis and a homemade polar-copolymerized C18 column was utilized for the final purification due to its good separation selectivity and high resolution for polar compounds. The established purification system demonstrated good orthogonality for the polar compounds. As a result, ten compounds were purified and three of them were identified as 3-methyl-5-vinyloxazolidin-2-one (compound A), 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (compound B) and 3-methylfuran-2-carboxylic acid (compound G) based on the MS, IR and extensive NMR data, respectively. It was demonstrated to be a feasible and powerful technique for the purification of polar compounds under RPLC mode and more chemical information of TCMs will be obtained to interpret the efficiency of TCMs.

  4. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  5. Ultra-trace-level determination of polar pesticides and their transformation products in surface and estuarine water samples using column liquid chromatography electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, R.J.C.A.; Hogenboom, A.C.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Peerboom, R.A.L.; Cofino, W.P.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    A method is developed for the determination of polar pesticides and their transformation products [atrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, hydroxyatrazine, diuron, 3,4-dichlorophenylmethylurea, 3,4-dichlorophenylurea (DPU), monuron, bentazone, anthranil-isopropylamide, chloridazon,

  6. EX0904 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0904: Water Column Exploration Field...

  7. Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release...of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests ii UNCLAS\\\\Public | CG-926 RDC A. Balsley & Dr. M. Fitzpatrick | Public | June 2017 N...06320 Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Mitigation Prototype Tests iii UNCLAS\\\\Public | CG-926 RDC A. Balsley & Dr. M. Fitzpatrick | Public

  8. Spinal column damage from water ski jumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, J.; Cockshott, W.P.; Shannon, H.S.

    1987-11-01

    We conducted a radiographic survey of 117 competitive water ski jumpers to determine whether this sport can cause spinal column damage and, if so, whether damage is more likely to occur in those who participate during the period of spinal growth and development (age 15 years or younger). We found a high prevalence of two types of abnormality: Scheuermann (adolescent) spondylodystrophy (present in 26% of the skiers) and vertebral body wedging (present in 34%). The prevalence of adolescent spondylodystrophy increased with the number of years of participation in the sport before age 15 years or less. Of those in this age group who had skied for 5 years or more, 57 showed adolescent spondylodystrophy; of those in the same age group who had skied for 9 years or more, 100% were affected. Wedged vertebrae increased as time of participation increased, regardless of the age at which exposure began. We conclude that competitive water ski jumping may damage the spinal column and that consideration should be given to regulating this sport, particularly for children. (orig.)

  9. Spinal column damage from water ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, J; Cockshott, W P; Shannon, H S

    1987-01-01

    We conducted a radiographic survey of 117 competitive water ski jumpers to determine whether this sport can cause spinal column damage and, if so, whether damage is more likely to occur in those who participate during the period of spinal growth and development (age 15 years or younger). We found a high prevalence of two types of abnormality: Scheuermann (adolescent) spondylodystrophy (present in 26% of the skiers) and vertebral body wedging (present in 34%). The prevalence of adolescent spondylodystrophy increased with the number of years of participation in the sport before age 15 years or less. Of those in this age group who had skied for 5 years or more, 57 showed adolescent spondylodystrophy; of those in the same age group who had skied for 9 years or more, 100% were affected. Wedged vertebrae increased as time of participation increased, regardless of the age at which exposure began. We conclude that competitive water ski jumping may damage the spinal column and that consideration should be given to regulating this sport, particularly for children.

  10. Spinal column damage from water ski jumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, J.; Cockshott, W.P.; Shannon, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    We conducted a radiographic survey of 117 competitive water ski jumpers to determine whether this sport can cause spinal column damage and, if so, whether damage is more likely to occur in those who participate during the period of spinal growth and development (age 15 years or younger). We found a high prevalence of two types of abnormality: Scheuermann (adolescent) spondylodystrophy (present in 26% of the skiers) and vertebral body wedging (present in 34%). The prevalence of adolescent spondylodystrophy increased with the number of years of participation in the sport before age 15 years or less. Of those in this age group who had skied for 5 years or more, 57 showed adolescent spondylodystrophy; of those in the same age group who had skied for 9 years or more, 100% were affected. Wedged vertebrae increased as time of participation increased, regardless of the age at which exposure began. We conclude that competitive water ski jumping may damage the spinal column and that consideration should be given to regulating this sport, particularly for children. (orig.)

  11. Bacteriophage in polar inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säwström, Christin; Lisle, John; Anesio, A.M.; Priscu, John C.; Laybourn-Parry, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are found wherever microbial life is present and play a significant role in aquatic ecosystems. They mediate microbial abundance, production, respiration, diversity, genetic transfer, nutrient cycling and particle size distribution. Most studies of bacteriophage ecology have been undertaken at temperate latitudes. Data on bacteriophages in polar inland waters are scant but the indications are that they play an active and dynamic role in these microbially dominated polar ecosystems. This review summarises what is presently known about polar inland bacteriophages, ranging from subglacial Antarctic lakes to glacial ecosystems in the Arctic. The review examines interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts and the abiotic and biotic variables that influence these interactions in polar inland waters. In addition, we consider the proportion of the bacteria in Arctic and Antarctic lake and glacial waters that are lysogenic and visibly infected with viruses. We assess the relevance of bacteriophages in the microbial loop in the extreme environments of Antarctic and Arctic inland waters with an emphasis on carbon cycling.

  12. Solid-phase extraction of polar pesticides from environmental water samples on graphitized carbon and Empore-activated carbon disks and on-line coupling to octadecyl-bonded silica analytical columns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobodník, J.; Oztekizan, O.; Lingeman, H.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1996-01-01

    The suitability of Empore-activated carbon disks (EACD), Envi-Carb graphitized carbon black (GCB) and CPP-50 graphitized carbon for the trace enrichment of polar pesticides from water samples was studied by means of off-line and on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). In the off-line procedure, 0.5-2

  13. Water column methanotrophy controlled by a rapid oceanographic switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinle, L.; Graves, C.A.; Treude, T.; Ferré, B.; Biastoch, A.; Bussmann, I.; Berndt, C.; Krastel, S.; James, R.H.; Behrens, E.; Böning, C.W.; Greinert, J.; Sapart, C.-J.; Scheinert, M.; Sommer, S.; Lehmann, M.F.; Niemann, H.

    2015-01-01

    From the seabed to the water column, where it may be consumed by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. The size and activity of methanotrophic communities, which determine the amount of methane consumed in the water column,are thought to be mainly controlled by nutrient and redoxdynamics3–7. Here, we

  14. Assimilation potential of water column biota: Mesocosm-based evaluations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Ansari, Z.A.; Sadhasivan, A.; Naik, S.; Sawkar, K.

    -toxic. It reveals the findings of mesocosm experiments, conducted to evaluate the assimilation potential of water column biota (bacteria, phytoplankton, and zooplankton). Bulk water quantities from coastal locations, characterized by intense tourist activity, were...

  15. Denitrification in the water column of the central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; De Brabandere, Loreto; Hall, Per O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Removal of fixed nitrogen in the water column of the eastern Gotland Basin, central Baltic Sea, was studied during two cruises in September 2008 and August 2010. The water column was stratified with anoxic sulfidic bottom water meeting oxic nitrate containing water at the oxic–anoxic interface......3 or sulfide concentrations were converted to in situ rates using the measured water column concentrations of NO3 and sulfide and the actual measured relations between NO3 and sulfide concentrations and enitrification rates. In situ denitrification ranged from 0.24 to 15.9 nM N2 h1. Assuming...... area. Even with an active denitrification layer of 3–6 m thickness the pelagic denitrification per unit area clearly exceeded sediment denitrification rates elsewhere in the Baltic Sea. When extrapolated to the entire Baltic Proper (BP) denitrification in the water column was in the range of 132...

  16. Water potential distribution in the testing soil column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Laigen; Zhao Yingjie

    2000-01-01

    The author explains the water potential distribution in the testing soil column under artificial sprinkling condition and confirm that the nuclide migration is carried out under the unsaturated condition. Knowing well the situation of water permeation in the unsaturated zone is one of main research works. The testing material and size of soil column used is very similar to the No.4 soil column for nuclide migration test. Under the same sprinkling condition as simulation test for nuclide migration, the water potential distribution in the soil column was measured. The test result shows that during the test process in upper 40 cm scope of soil column the unsaturated condition is kept from beginning to end

  17. EX1206 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1206: Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Canyons...

  18. EX1305 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1305: Summer Ecosystem Monitoring Survey...

  19. EX0903 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0903: Mapping Field Trial I Mendocino...

  20. EX0905 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0905: Mapping Field Trials II Mendocino...

  1. EX1104 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1104: Mid-Cayman Rise Exploration...

  2. EX1704 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1704: American Samoa and Cook Islands...

  3. EX1601 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1601: Transit and Mission Patch Test...

  4. EX1302 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1302: Ship Shakedown, Patch Test and...

  5. EX1705 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1705: American Samoa, Kingman/Palmyra,...

  6. EX1701 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1701: Kingman/Palmyra, Jarvis (Mapping)...

  7. EX1403 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1403: East Coast Mapping and Exploration...

  8. EX0907 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0907: Mapping Field Trial IV Habitat...

  9. EX1105 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1105: Field Trials of EM302 Multibeam...

  10. EX1608 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1608: FY17 Ship and ROV Shakedown on...

  11. EX0802 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0802: Operation Halloween Shakedown...

  12. EX1602 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1602: Mission System Shakedown/CAPSTONE...

  13. EX1201 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1201: Ship Shakedown and Patch Tests...

  14. EX0901 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0901: Mapping Shakedown Cruise between...

  15. EX1607 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1607: CAPSTONE Wake Island PRI MNM...

  16. EX1303 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1303: New England Seamount Chain...

  17. EX0801 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0801: Mapping Operations Shakedown...

  18. EX1702 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1702: American Samoa Expedition:...

  19. EX1301 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1301: Ship Shakedown and Patch Test...

  20. EX1505 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1505: October 2015 Transit: Honolulu, HI...

  1. EX1005 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1005: Guam to Honolulu, HI Transit...

  2. EX1203 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1203: Florida Escarpment and Straits...

  3. EX1101 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1101: Ship Shakedown and Patch Tests...

  4. EX1604 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1604: CAPSTONE Wake Island PRIMNM...

  5. Metal concentrations in water column, benthic macroinvertebrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concentrations of some metals in the water, benthic macroinvertebrates and the muscle tissue of the Nile tilapia from river Delimi, Nigeria were investigated from January 1998 to June 1998. Samplings were done monthly at 3 different sites. The concentrations of the metals were determined using the atomic absorption ...

  6. Quasi-periodic oscillations from post-shock accretion column of polars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Prasanta; Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2018-02-01

    A set of strongly magnetized accreting white dwarfs (polars) shows quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with frequency about a Hz in their optical luminosity. These Hz-frequency QPOs are thought to be generated by intensity variations of the emitted radiation originating at the post-shock accretion column. Thermal instability in the post-shock region, triggered by efficient cooling process at the base, is believed to be the primary reason behind the temporal variability. Here, we study the structure and the dynamical properties of the post-shock accretion column including the effects of bremsstrahlung and cyclotron radiation. We find that the presence of significant cyclotron emission in optical band reduces the overall variability of the post-shock region. In the case of a larger post-shock region above the stellar surface, the effects of stratification due to stellar gravity become important. An accretion column, influenced by the strong gravity, has a smaller variability as the strength of the thermal instability at the base of the column is reduced. On the other hand, the cool, dense plasma, accumulated just above the stellar surface, may enhance the post-shock variability due to the propagation of magnetic perturbations. These characteristics of the post-shock region are consistent with the observed properties of V834 Cen and in general with cataclysmic variable sources that exhibit QPO frequency of about a Hz.

  7. Chapter 2: Optical Properties of the Water Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, D. A.; Collins, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this chapter, and in chapter 29, the basic inter-relationship between the flux of radiant energy through the water column and the fixation of carbon by the phytoplankton in the ocean through processes of photosynthesis or primary production will be discussed.

  8. Hydrodynamic analysis of oscillating water column wave energy devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Harry B.; Ducasse, Damien; Nielsen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    A 40-chamber I-Beam attenuator-type, oscillating water column, wave energy converter is analyzed numerically based on linearized potential flow theory, and experimentally via model test experiments. The high-order panel method WAMIT by Newman and Lee (WAMIT; a radiation–diffraction panel program...

  9. Water Column Correction for Coral Reef Studies by Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application. PMID:25215941

  10. Water column correction for coral reef studies by remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-09-11

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application.

  11. Ether lipids of planktonic archae in the marine water column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hoefs, M.J.L.; Schouten, S.; King, L.L.; Wakeham, S.G.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    Acyclic and cyclic biphytanes derived from the membrane ether lipids of archaea were found in water column particulate and sedimentary organic matter from several oxic and anoxic marine environments. Compound-specific isotope analyses of the carbon skeletons suggest that planktonic archaea utilize

  12. Denitrification in the water column of the central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; De Brabandere, Loreto; Hall, Per

    2013-01-01

    Removal of fixed nitrogen in the water column of the eastern Gotland Basin, central Baltic Sea, was studied during two cruises in September 2008 and August 2010. The water column was stratified with anoxic sulfidic bottom water meeting oxic nitrate containing water at the oxic–anoxic interface...... was in some situations driven by organic matter alone. Nitrous oxide (N2O) became an increasingly important product of denitrification with increasing sulfide concentration and was >80% of the total N gas formation at 10 μM sulfide. The potential rates of denitrification measured in incubations at elevated......ML source and once the O2 has been depleted denitrification will follow resulting in enormous rates per unit area. Even with an active denitrification layer of 3–6 m thickness the pelagic denitrification per unit area clearly exceeded sediment denitrification rates elsewhere in the Baltic Sea. When...

  13. Determination of octanol-water partition coefficients of polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (N-PAC) by high performance liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg, C.; Nielsen, T.; Hansen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    using a Diol column with an eluent of 35 % MeOH and 65 % water. The results indicate that the Diol column, in reversed phase mode, is able to form hydrogen bonds with a solute. Different LFERs between retention and log K-ow was found for polar and nonpolar compounds. In general log K-ow increased...

  14. The hard X-ray emission spectra from accretion columns in intermediate polars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Insu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray emission from accretion columns in an intermediate polar system, GK Per, using a simple settling solution. The rate of photon emission per logarithmic energy interval can be fitted with a power law, E(exp -gamma), with gamma approximately 2.0, in agreement with observations. This index is only weakly dependent on the mass accretion rate, dot-M, for dot-M in the range of a few times 10(exp 16-18) g/s. The peak energy of the photon spectra (after photoelectric absorption) is expected to be E(sub p) approximately (5 keV) gamma(exp -1/3) (N(sub H)/10(exp 23)/sq cm)(exp 1/3) where N(sub H) is the hydrogen column density along the line of sight. The observed spectra of GK Per and possibly of V1223 Sgr suggest N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This large N(sub H) may be due to partially ionized preshock column material. Alternatively, we also consider absorption by the cool outer parts of an accretion disk. In this case the photoelectric absorption depth in the disk is a sensitive function of inclination. For GK Per the required inclination is approximately 83 deg. For mass accretion rates larger than a critical rate of approximately 10(exp 18) g/s, X-ray emission from the column accretion is significantly affected by radiation drag. Although the mass accretion rate increases dramatically during outbursts, the observed hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray luminosity will not rise proportionately. The slope and peak energy of the outburst spectra are only weakly affected. We conclude that the observed X-ray spectra can be explained by this simple analytic solution and that the production of hard X-rays from the accretion shock at the magnetic poles in the intermediate polars is in general agreement with the observations. However, since the X-ray emission and absorption depend on the mass accretion rate in a complicated manner, observed hard X-ray luminosities (greater than 2 keV) are not a good indicator of the mass

  15. Water column attenuation coefficient estimations in Alqueva reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potes, Miguel; João Costa, Maria; Salgado, Rui; Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Bortoli, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    The vertical structure of the underwater radiative absorption plays an important role in the thermal dynamics of the water surface layer and consequently on the energy budget at the water-lake interface. Thus, a better estimation of the irradiance at different levels is relevant to understand the lake-air interactions. The main purpose of this dataset of measurements is to estimate the spectral attenuation coefficient of the water column. The apparatus exploited in this work are composed of an optical cable linked to a portable FieldSpec UV/VNIR (ASD). This version has hemispherical field-of-view (FOV) of 180° allowing for measurements under all range of solar zenith. In situ water spectral reflectances were also obtained to help in the validation of satellite water leaving reflectances obtained from satellite spectroradiometers. It is intention of the team to develop an algorithm to derive the attenuation coefficient from satellite data in this reservoir.

  16. Planktonic Marine Luminous Bacteria: Species Distribution in the Water Column

    OpenAIRE

    Ruby, E. G.; Greenberg, E. P.; Hastings, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Luminous bacteria were isolated from oceanic water samples taken throughout the upper 1,000 m and ranged in density from 0.4 to 30 colony-forming units per 100 ml. Generally, two peaks in abundance were detected: one in the upper 100 m of the water column, which consisted primarily of Beneckea spp.; and a second between 250 and 1,000 m, which consisted almost entirely of Photobacterium phosphoreum. The population of P. phosphoreum remained relatively stable in abundance at one station that wa...

  17. Cost effectiveness of detritiating water with resin columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    There are technologies in use for cleaning up concentrated tritiated process water. These are not cost effective for tritiated water with low concentrations of tritium. There are currently no cost-effective technologies for cleaning up low-tritium-concentration tritiated water, such as most tritiated groundwater, spent fuel storage basin water, or underground storage tank water. Resin removal of tritium from tritiated water at low concentrations (near the order of magnitude of drinking water standard maximums) is being tested on TA-SO (Los Alamos National Laboratory's Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) waste streams. There are good theoretical and test indications that this may be a technologically effective means of removing tritium from tritiated water. Because of likely engineering design similarity, it is reasonable to anticipate that a resin column system's costs will be similar to some common commercial water treatment systems. Thus, the potential cost effectiveness of a resin treatment system offers hope for treating tritiated water at affordable costs. The TA-50 resin treatment cost projection of $18 per 1,000 gallons is within the same order of magnitude as cost data for typical commercial groundwater cleanup projects. The prospective Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resin treatment system at $18 per 1,000 gallons appears to have a likely cost advantage of at least an order of magnitude over the competing, developmental, water detritiation technologies

  18. SIMULASI GELOMBANG AIR DANGKAL UNTUK PEMBANGKIT ENERGI OSCILLATING WATER COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EKA ANDHIKA KURNIAWAN

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of human causes the increasing of the demand of energy for living. Sea wave energy is one of the alternative energy sources which is renewable and sustainable, no impact on environmental pollution. The goal of this paper is to simulate the level of water wave using shallow water equation for generating energy oscillating water column. The solution of the equation is approximated using LaxFriedrich scheme and will be compared with the analytic solution in standing wave problem. Simulation is used to obtain the results of the energy in the form of electrical power generated by ocean wave. The results of the error of numerical validation is obtained 0.32%. Moreover, the results of the potential energy depend on the height of the surface waves is found 1574.46 Watts the average of water level is 0.881 meters.

  19. Enrichment of heavy water in thermal-diffusion columns connected in series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Ho-Ming; Chen, Liu Yi

    2009-01-01

    The separation equations for enrichment of heavy water from water isotope mixture by thermal diffusion in multiple columns connected in series, have been derived based on one column design developed in previous work. The improvement in separation is achievable by operating in a double-column device, instead of in a single-column device, with the same total column length. It is also found that further improvement in separation is obtainable if a triple-column device is employed, except for operating under small total column length and low flow rate.

  20. 40 CFR 799.6786 - TSCA water solubility: Generator column method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TESTING REQUIREMENTS Product Properties Test Guidelines § 799.6786 TSCA water solubility: Generator column... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true TSCA water solubility: Generator column... suitable units of measurement are g/cm3. Extractor column is used to extract the solute from the saturated...

  1. Planktonic marine luminous bacteria: species distribution in the water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, E G; Greenberg, E P; Hastings, J W

    1980-02-01

    Luminous bacteria were isolated from oceanic water samples taken throughout the upper 1,000 m and ranged in density from 0.4 to 30 colony-forming units per 100 ml. Generally, two peaks in abundance were detected: one in the upper 100 m of the water column, which consisted primarily of Beneckea spp.; and a second between 250 and 1,000 m, which consisted almost entirely of Photobacterium phosphoreum. The population of P. phosphoreum remained relatively stable in abundance at one station that was visited three times over a period of 6 months. However, the abundance of luminous Beneckea spp. isolated from the upper waters fluctuated considerably; they were, as high as 30 colony-forming units per 100 ml in the spring and were not detected in the winter. Water samples from depths of 4,000 to 7,000 m contained less than 0.1 luminous colony-forming unit per 100 ml. The apparent vertical stratification of two taxa of oceanic luminous bacteria may reflect not only differences in physiology, but also depth-related, species-specific symbiotic associations.

  2. Warming of the water column in the southwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoff, Nathaniel L.; Church, John A.

    1992-05-01

    THE response of the deep ocean to long-period temperature variations at the ocean surface is a crucial issue in understanding climate change1. There are, however, very few observations available for studying changes in the thermal structure of ocean interiors. On the basis of measurements made 22 years apart of full-depth temperature sections in the Pacific Ocean between Australia and New Zealand, we show here that there has been a depth-averaged warming of 0.04 °C and 0.03 °C at 43° S and 28° S, respectively, throughout most of the water column below the mixed layer. The sea-level rise caused by expansion between a depth of 300 m and the ocean floor is 2-3 cm, consistent with the observed rate of global sea-level rise2. In the main thermocline there is a coherent cooling and freshening on density surfaces, consistent with surface warming in the Southern Ocean where these waters originate. Similar observations in the North Atlantic3 show comparable changes in the thermal structure and water-mass volumes, but further measurements in other regions are required before firm conclusions can be drawn about the global significance of these changes.

  3. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  4. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  5. Mathematical simulation of water distillation column for decreasing volume of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Naruse, Yuji

    1981-12-01

    Water distillation is an attractive method for decreasing volume of the tritiated water produced by operation of tritium facilities. The tritiated water is continuously fed to a column and it is separated into two streams. The top stream is discarded to the environment after addition of sufficient amount of uncontaminated water. The bottom stream is further treated for solidification and capsulation. The tridiagonal matrix method proved to provide surprisingly rapid convergences of the calculations. The concentration of deuterium naturally contained in the tritiated water is higher than the tritium concentration, but it was verified that presence of HDO can be ignored in the calculation. (author)

  6. Measurement of capacity coefficient of inclined liquid phase catalytic exchange column for tritiated water processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamai, Hideki; Konishi, Satoshi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Okuno, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) is effective method for enrichment and removal of tritium from tritiated water. Capacity coefficients of operating LPCE column that are essential to evaluate column performance were measured. Experiments were performed with short catalyst packed columns and effect of inclination was studied. Method for evaluation of capacity coefficients was established from measurement of isotope concentration of liquid, vapor, gas phases at the two ends of the column. The capacity coefficients were measured under various superficial gas velocities. Feasibility study of helical columns with roughened inner surface was performed with short inclined columns. The column performance was not strongly affected by the inclination. The result indicates technological feasibility of helical LPCE column, that is expected to have operation stability and reduced height

  7. Ultrasonic testing device having an adjustable water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Neidigk, Stephen O.; Rackow, Kirk A.; Duvall, Randy L.

    2015-09-01

    An ultrasonic testing device having a variable fluid column height is disclosed. An operator is able to adjust the fluid column height in real time during an inspection to to produce optimum ultrasonic focus and separate extraneous, unwanted UT signals from those stemming from the area of interest.

  8. Superheated water as eluent in high-temperature high-performance liquid chromatographic separations of steroids on a polymer-coated zirconia column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, S M; Ye, C Q; Zhang, D D; Branch, B R; Zhang, X J; Okafo, N

    2001-04-13

    High-temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC), with a superheated water mobile phase, has been shown to be a feasible replacement for medium-polarity acetonitrile-water mixtures as an eluent in reversed-phase HPLC. Instrumental parameters of flow-rate, injection volume and mobile phase preheating were shown to have significant effects on the quality of the chromatographic peaks. The selectivity and retention patterns of testosterone and several related compounds were investigated on a porous zirconia, polybutadiene-coated column at temperatures up to 200 degrees C and compared with that of a porous silica, octadecylsilane-coated column and the zirconia column under traditional reversed-phase conditions of an acetonitrile-water mobile phase at 40 degrees C. The selectivity differences observed for testosterone and related compounds show that the separation mechanisms are complementary and unique selectivity is obtained with the zirconia column under HTLC conditions.

  9. Study on the breakwater caisson as oscillating water column facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Shi, Hongda; Liu, Defu; Liu, Zhen

    2010-09-01

    The Oscillating Water Column (OWC) wave energy convertor with the advantage of its simple geometrical construction and excellent stability is widely employed. Recently, perforated breakwaters have been often used as they can effectively reduce the wave reflection from and wave forces acting on the structures. Considering the similarity between the compartment of perforated caisson and the air chamber of OWC wave energy convertor, a new perforated caisson of breakwater is designed in this paper. The ordinary caisson is modified by installing facilities similar to the air chamber of OWC converter, but here they are utilized to dissipate the wave energy inside the caisson. Such an arrangement improves the stability of the caisson and reduces the construction cost by using the compartment of perforated caisson like using an air chamber. This innovation has both academic significance and important engineering value. For a new type of caisson, reliability analysis of the structure is necessary. Linear potential flow theory is applied to calculate the horizontal wave force acting on the caisson. The calculated results are compared with experimental data, showing the feasibility of the method. The Importance Sampling Procedure (ISP) is used to analyse the reliability of this caisson breakwater.

  10. Intertidal water column meiofauna in relation to wave intensity on an exposed beach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Germán Rodríguez

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, various studies have shown that some meiofaunal taxa frequently occur in the water column. Water currents or any process that disturbs the sediments are possible factors that can facilitate the passive entry of meiofauna in the water column. Wave action has been predicted as one of these factors (Armonies, 1994, suggesting a correlation between the number of eroded specimens and wave intensity should exist. As a test of this prediction, replicated samples were taken in the water column, swash sediment and back-swash water in an exposed beach (Island of Sylt, northern Wadden Sea. Wave height and period were measured to characterise the energy regime. Samplings were carried out over a nine day period in August 2000, at diurnal mid-tide time. Wave height and period varied significantly among collections. Densities of nematodes, harpacticoids, nauplii, platyhelminthes, ostracods and bivalve larvae in the water column, swash sediment and back-swash water varied significantly among collections. Nevertheless, no significant correlation was found between water column density and wave characteristics. Density of meiofauna in the water column was not correlated with density in the sediment or in back-swash water. Therefore wave intensity did not explain the variability of meiofaunal densities present in the water column.

  11. 40 CFR 799.6784 - TSCA water solubility: Column elution method; shake flask method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true TSCA water solubility: Column elution... AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Product Properties Test Guidelines § 799.6784 TSCA water solubility: Column elution method; shake flask method. (a) Scope—(1) Applicability. This section is intended to meet...

  12. Zoolankton distribution in neuston and water column along west coast of India from Goa to Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Padmavati, G.; Goswami, S.C.

    Zooplankton distribution and abundance in neuston layer and water column at 4 stansects between Goa to Gujarat during January-February, 1988 were studied. The ambient water temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen at surface layer ranged between...

  13. Simulation of water flows in multiple columns with small outlets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Yong Kweon; Li, Zi Lu; Jeong, Jong Hyun; Lee, Jun Hee

    2006-01-01

    High-pressure die casting such as thixocasting and rheocasting is an effective process in the manufacturing automotive parts. Following the recent trend in the automotive manufacturing technologies, the product design subject to the die casting becomes more and more complex. Simultaneously the injection speed is also designed to be very high to establish a short cycle-time. Thus, the requirement of the die design becomes more demanding than ever before. In some cases the product's shape can have multiple slender manifolds. In such cases, design of the inlet and outlet parts of the die is very important in the whole manufacturing process. The main issues required for the qualified products are to attain gentle and uniform flow of the molten liquid within the passages of the die. To satisfy such issues, the inlet cylinder ('bed cylinder' in this paper) must be as large as possible and simultaneously the outlet opening at the end of each passage must be as small as possible. However these in turn obviously bring additional manufacturing costs caused by re-melting of the bed cylinder and increased power due to the small outlet-openings. The purpose of this paper is to develop effective simulation methods of calculation for fluid flows in multiple columns, which mimic the actual complex design, and to get some useful information which can give some contributions to the die-casting industry. We have used a commercial code CFX in the numerical simulation. The primary parameter involved is the size of the bed cylinder. We will show how the very small opening of the outlet can be treated with the aid of the porous model provided in the code. To check the validity of the numerical results we have also conducted a simple experiment by using water

  14. Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Diak, George R.; Hayden, Cristopher M.; Young, John A.

    1995-01-01

    These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation. The assimilation of satellite-observed moisture and cloud water, together withy three-mode diabatic initialization, significantly alleviates the model precipitation spinup problem, especially in the first 3 h of the forecast. Experimental forecasts indicate that the impact of satellite-observed temperature and water vapor profiles and cloud water alone in the initialization procedure shortens the spinup time for precipitation rates by 1-2 h and for regeneration of the areal coverage by 3 h. The diabatic initialization further reduces the precipitation spinup time (compared to adiabatic initialization) by 1 h.

  15. Total Column Water Vapor Trends from 15 Years of MODIS/NIR above the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    OMAR, D. A.; Sarkissian, A.; Keckhut, P.; Bock, O.; Claud, C.; Irbah, A.

    2016-12-01

    Water vapor is defined as a major climate indicator at many occasions, highly variable spatially and temporarily, water vapor has the most important natural GHG effect, through his high infra-red absorption capacity, and temperature changes sensitivity, water vapor affects the Earth radiative budget and energy transfer, evolved at many atmospheric dynamics including the cloud formation and the aerosols composition. As a consequence to the accelerated transition towards the new climate especially above the arctic, and to investigate the feedback to the arctic amplification and the global warming, we study the water vapor variability and trends on a relatively long term above the arctic region, using the Total Column Water Vapor retrieval from MODIS/NIR spectro-radiometer on board of TERRA satellite. These 15 Years monthly daytime satellite data were compared to GPS integrated water vapor over four selected NDACC polar stations: Sodankyla-Finland, Ny-Alesund -Svalbard, Thule-Greenland, Scoresbysund-Greenland. GPS data are calculated with the temperature and pressure profile of the nearest coastal ERA-Interim station. These data were filtered for nearly coincident time to satellite over pass in order to exclude the timing effects. Errors, relative biases and RMSE at both monthly and seasonally scales will be presented and discussed. Then the MODIS 15 years linear trends and anomalies above the whole Arctic will be shown with a special focus on sea ice extent decline feed-back and hydrologic cycle connections with respect to heat waves. Results show wetter trends on the Mackenzie and mid-Siberia at September, unlike the European arctic summer which is getting drier, while Svalbard is getting wetter almost all the year. Conclusion and perspectives are also presented.

  16. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  17. Sources of water column methylmercury across multiple estuaries in the Northeast U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcom, Prentiss H; Schartup, Amina T; Mason, Robert P; Chen, Celia Y

    2015-12-20

    Estuarine water column methylmercury (MeHg) is an important driver of mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation in pelagic organisms and thus it is necessary to understand the sources and processes affecting environmental levels of MeHg. Increases in water column MeHg concentrations can ultimately be transferred to fish consumed by humans, but despite this, the sources of MeHg to the estuarine water column are still poorly understood. Here we evaluate MeHg sources across 4 estuaries and 10 sampling sites and examine the distributions and partitioning of sediment and water column MeHg across a geographic range (Maine to New Jersey). Our study sites present a gradient in the concentrations of sediment, pore water and water column Hg species. Suspended particle MeHg ranged from below detection to 187 pmol g -1 , dissolved MeHg from 0.01 to 0.68 pM, and sediment MeHg from 0.01 to 109 pmol g -1 . Across multiple estuaries, dissolved MeHg correlated with Hg species in the water column, and sediment MeHg correlated with sediment total Hg (HgT). Water column MeHg did not correlate well with sediment Hg across estuaries, indicating that sediment concentrations were not a good predictor of water MeHg concentrations. This is an unexpected finding since it has been shown that MeHg production from inorganic Hg 2+ within sediment is the primary source of MeHg to coastal waters. Additional sources of MeHg regulate water column MeHg levels in some of the shallow estuaries included in this study.

  18. Tritium isotope separation by water distillation column packed with silica-gel beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Tritium enrichment or depletion by water distillation was investigated using a glass column of 32cm in height packed with silica-gel beads of 3.4mm in average diameter. The total separation factor of the silica-gel distillation column, α H-T , was compared with those of an open column distillation tower and of a column packed with stainless-steel Dixon rings. Depletion of the tritium activity in the distillate was enhanced by isotopic exchange with water absorbed on silica-gel beads that have a higher affinity for HTO than for H 2 O. The value of α H-T -1 of the silica-gel distillation column was about four times larger than that of a column without any packing and about two times larger than that of the Dixon-ring column. The improvement of α H-T by the silica-gel adsorbent indicated that the height of the distillation-adsorption column becomes shorter than that of the height of conventional distillation columns. (author)

  19. Exp6-polar thermodynamics of dense supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2007-12-13

    We introduce a simple polar fluid model for the thermodynamics of dense supercritical water based on a Buckingham (exp-6) core and point dipole representation of the water molecule. The proposed exp6-polar thermodynamics, based on ideas originally applied to dipolar hard spheres, performs very well when tested against molecular dynamics simulations. Comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data available for supercritical water yield excellent agreement for the shock Hugoniot, isotherms and sound speeds, and are also quite good for the self-diffusion constant and relative dielectric constant. We expect the present approach to be also useful for other small polar molecules and their mixtures.

  20. EX1502L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1502L1: Caribbean Exploration (Mapping)...

  1. EX1103L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1103L2: Exploration and Mapping,...

  2. SAFARI 2000 AOT and Column Water Vapor, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The data presented here include the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and column water vapor measurements taken at sites along the Kalahari Transect using a...

  3. EX1404L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1404L3: Northeast Seamounts and Canyons...

  4. EX1504L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L1: CAPSTONE NWHI & Johnston...

  5. EX1402L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1402L2: Gulf of Mexico Mapping and...

  6. EX1502L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1502L3: Caribbean Exploration (ROV)...

  7. EX1103L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1103: Exploration and Mapping, Galapagos...

  8. EX1504L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address Pacific...

  9. EX0909L4 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L4: Mapping Field Trials -...

  10. EX1304L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1304L1: Northeast U.S. Canyons...

  11. EX1004L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1004L3: Exploration Indonesia - Bitung...

  12. EX1004L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1004L2: Exploration Indonesia - Bitung...

  13. EX1004L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1004L1: Exploration Indonesia - Guam to...

  14. EX0909L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L1: Mapping Field Trials - Necker...

  15. EX1202L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1202L1: Gulf of Mexico Exploration...

  16. Organic matter processing by microbial communities throughout the Atlantic water column as revealed by metaproteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergauer, K.; Fernàndez-Guerra, A.; Garcia, J.A.L.; Sprenger, R.R.; Stepanauskas, R.; Pachiadaki, M.G.; Jensen, O.N.; Herndl, G.

    2018-01-01

    The phylogenetic composition of the heterotrophic microbialcommunity is depth stratified in the oceanic water column downto abyssopelagic layers. In the layers below the euphotic zone, it hasbeen suggested that heterotrophic microbes rely largely on solubilizedparticulate organic matter as a carbon

  17. EX1202L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1202L3: Gulf of Mexico Exploration...

  18. EX1202L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1202: Gulf of Mexico Exploration between...

  19. EX0909L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L3: Mapping Field Trials - Hawaiian...

  20. EX1402L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1402L1: Gulf of Mexico Mapping and...

  1. EX1504L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III: Main Hawaiian...

  2. EX1504L4 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address Pacific...

  3. EX1402L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1402L3: Gulf of Mexico Mapping and ROV...

  4. EX1503L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1503L1: Tropical Exploration (Mapping I)...

  5. EX1205L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1205L1: Exploration, Blake Plateau...

  6. EX1605L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1605L3: CAPSTONE CNMI & Mariana...

  7. EX1205L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1205L2: Northeast Canyons and...

  8. EX0909L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L2: Mapping Field Trials - Necker...

  9. EX1605L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1605L1: CAPSTONE CNMI & Mariana...

  10. Recent studies of acoustic wave propagation in shallow water waveguides with variable water column properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiey, M.; Lynch, J. F.

    2012-11-01

    In the past half-century numerous scientific research programs have been conducted which have advanced our understanding of shallow water acoustics far beyond the original and pioneering work by Ewing, Worzel, and Pekeris (1948). In particular, during the last three decades several major initiatives have focused on both observation and modeling of acoustic waves in shallow water region with extremely variable environmental properties. We now realize that the shallow water acoustic wave propagation problem is a complicated study of wave propagation in a 4D partially random media with anisotropic, time and space dependent physical properties. The nonlinear internal wave field, the shelf break front, and coastal eddies are good examples of oceanographic processes that cause this type of variability. A review of our progress, which focuses on the effects of the water column, is presented, as well as an assessment of what future questions will be of interest and importance.

  11. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  12. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Trigonaspis spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2015-01-01

    of crystallites that cover the surfaces of both the tower-shaped flagellar pole coccoliths and the disc-shaped body coccoliths are the keystone features of the genus. Circumstantial evidence exists linking species of Trigonaspis with species of Pappomonas in haploid-diploid life cycles.......A group of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions several decades ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported adding to the morphological and biogeographical databases of some of the species. The holococcolithophorid genus...... Trigonaspis is revisited here with the purpose of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history aspects and biogeography. The genus Trigonaspis as currently circumscribed comprises four taxa – two from each polar region. The triangular plates...

  13. Involvement of cell shape and flagella in the bacterial retention during percolation of contaminated water through soil columns in tropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, Moise; Ewoti, Olive V Noah; Nougang, Mireille; Moungang, Marlyse L; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Krier, Francois; Servais, Pierre; Hornez, Jean-Pierre; Njine, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Microorganisms' retention in soil contributes to the natural purification of groundwater. Bacteria found in groundwater are generally of various shapes. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of cell shape and flagella in bacterial retention during polluted water percolation through two soil columns CA and CB, in the equatorial region in Central Africa. Percolation tests were carried out using different water loads samples which were contaminated by Escherichia coli (straight rods, peritrichous flagella), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (rods bacteria, polar flagella), and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (spherical, free-flagellum). It has been noted that showed that through soil column CA, the mean values of cells retention ratios (T(R)) varied with bacteria species considered, and from one applied water load sample to another. E. coli T(R) and that of S. saprophyticus were not significantly different (P> 0.05) for the two soil columns. V. parahaemolyticus T(R) significantly differed from that of E. coli and S. saprophyticus through soil column CA (Psoil column CB (Psoil columns. S. saprophyticus in most cases was more retained than others. The physical properties of the bacterial cell must be taken into consideration when evaluating the transfer of bacteriological pollutants towards groundwater.

  14. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Wigwamma spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.; Heldal, Mikal

    2013-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose of provi...... appearance of the coccolith armour of the cell...

  15. Carbon cycle. Sunlight controls water column processing of carbon in arctic fresh waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Rose M; Ward, Collin P; Crump, Byron C; Kling, George W

    2014-08-22

    Carbon in thawing permafrost soils may have global impacts on climate change; however, the factors that control its processing and fate are poorly understood. The dominant fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released from soils to inland waters is either complete oxidation to CO2 or partial oxidation and river export to oceans. Although both processes are most often attributed to bacterial respiration, we found that photochemical oxidation exceeds rates of respiration and accounts for 70 to 95% of total DOC processed in the water column of arctic lakes and rivers. At the basin scale, photochemical processing of DOC is about one-third of the total CO2 released from surface waters and is thus an important component of the arctic carbon budget. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. In situ quantitative characterisation of the ocean water column using acoustic multibeam backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, G.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Lucieer, V.; Lurton, X.; Greinert, J.; Dupré, S.; Nau, A.; Heffron, E.; Roche, M.; Ladroit, Y.; Urban, P.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting liquid, solid or gaseous features in the ocean is generating considerable interest in the geoscience community, because of their potentially high economic values (oil & gas, mining), their significance for environmental management (oil/gas leakage, biodiversity mapping, greenhouse gas monitoring) as well as their potential cultural and traditional values (food, freshwater). Enhancing people's capability to quantify and manage the natural capital present in the ocean water goes hand in hand with the development of marine acoustic technology, as marine echosounders provide the most reliable and technologically advanced means to develop quantitative studies of water column backscatter data. This is not developed to its full capability because (i) of the complexity of the physics involved in relation to the constantly changing marine environment, and (ii) the rapid technological evolution of high resolution multibeam echosounder (MBES) water-column imaging systems. The Water Column Imaging Working Group is working on a series of multibeam echosounder (MBES) water column datasets acquired in a variety of environments, using a range of frequencies, and imaging a number of water-column features such as gas seeps, oil leaks, suspended particulate matter, vegetation and freshwater springs. Access to data from different acoustic frequencies and ocean dynamics enables us to discuss and test multifrequency approaches which is the most promising means to develop a quantitative analysis of the physical properties of acoustic scatterers, providing rigorous cross calibration of the acoustic devices. In addition, high redundancy of multibeam data, such as is available for some datasets, will allow us to develop data processing techniques, leading to quantitative estimates of water column gas seeps. Each of the datasets has supporting ground-truthing data (underwater videos and photos, physical oceanography measurements) which provide information on the origin and

  17. Chromatographic selectivity of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic columns for polar aromatic compounds by pressure-driven capillary liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Fuh, Ming-Ren, E-mail: msfuh@scu.edu.tw

    2016-10-05

    In this study, divinylbenzene (DVB) was used as the cross-linker to prepare alkyl methacrylate (AlMA) monoliths for incorporating π-π interactions between the aromatic analytes and AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in capillary LC analysis. Various AlMA/DVB ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The physical properties (such as porosity, permeability, and column efficiency) of the synthesized AlMA-DVB monolithic columns were investigated for characterization. Isocratic elution of phenol derivatives was first employed to evaluate the suitability of the prepared AlMA-DVB columns for small molecule separation. The run-to-run (0.16–1.20%, RSD; n = 3) and column-to-column (0.26–2.95%, RSD; n = 3) repeatabilities on retention times were also examined using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. The π-π interactions between the aromatic ring and the DVB-based stationary phase offered better recognition on polar analytes with aromatic moieties, which resulted in better separation resolution of aromatic analytes on the AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. In order to demonstrate the capability of potential environmental and/or food safety applications, eight phenylurea herbicides with single benzene ring and seven sulfonamide antibiotics with polyaromatic moieties were analyzed using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. - Highlights: • First investigation on chromatographic selectivity of AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. • Good run-to-run/column-to-column repeatability (<3%) on AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. • Efficient separation of phenylurea herbicides and sulfonamides on AlMA-DVB columns.

  18. Boolean Matching Filters Based on Row and Column Weights of Reed–Muller Polarity Coefficient Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chip-Hong Chang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we have shown, by means of the EXOR Ternary Decision Diagram that the number of literals and product terms of the Fixed Polarity Reed–Muller (FPRM expansions can be used to fully classify all Boolean functions in NP equivalent class and NPN equivalent class, respectively. Efficient graph based algorithms to compute the complete weight vectors have been presented. The proof and computation method has led to the derivation of a set of characteristic signatures that has low probability of aliasing when used as the Boolean matching filters in library mapping.

  19. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  20. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    gas transfer coefficient, k, for both a vegetated condition and a control condition (no cylinders). The presence of cylinders in the tank substantially increased the rate of the gas transfer. For the highest wind speed, the gas transfer coefficient was several times higher when cylinders were present compared to when they were not. The gas transfer coefficient for the vegetated condition also proved sensitive to wind speed, increasing markedly with increasing mean wind speeds. Profiles of dissolved oxygen revealed well-mixed conditions in the bulk water column following prolonged air-flow above the water surface, suggesting application of the thin-film model is appropriate. The enhanced gas exchange observed might be explained by increased turbulent kinetic energy within the water column and the anisotropy of the cylinder array, which constrains horizontal motions more than vertical motions. Improved understanding of gas exchange in vegetated water columns may be of particularly use to investigations of carbon fluxes and soil accretion in wetlands. Reference: Nepf, H. (1999), Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation, Water Resour. Res., 35(2), 479-489.

  1. Water column conditions in a coastal lagoon near Jeddah, Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa M. A. Albarakati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Water column conditions in a lagoon near Jeddah are investigated on the basisof changes in potential energy. Three major factors including balance ofsurface heat at the air-sea interface, wind and tidal mixing are considered.A negative potential energy change dv/dt will developstratification, whereas positive dv/dt will tend to mix the watercolumn. The tidal effect is greater in summer with wind mixing showing nogreat variations. The buoyancy effect of the heat balance at the surface isnegative from April to October. This negative buoyancy effect will tend to developstratification but the positive contributions of wind and tide counteract this andthe water column remains mixed except in September and October, when a weakstratification may develop. Generally, the water column remains practically mixedthroughout the year. The change in heat content of the water column from mid-Aprilto mid-September is about 3.3 × 108 J. During this period the netheat input at the air interface is about 2.0 × 108 J, which isabout 40% less than the heat content of the water column, showing that the heat is advected towards the central area from the shallower periphery of the lagoon.

  2. Seasonal Dynamics of Biogeochemical Processes in the Water Column of the Northeastern Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, I. I.; Lein, A. Yu.; Makkaveev, P. N.; Klyuvitkin, A. A.; Kravchishina, M. D.; Ivanov, M. V.; Flint, M. V.

    2018-01-01

    Integrated studies on the hydrochemistry and water column rates of microbial processes in the eastern sector of the Black Sea along a standard 100-miles transect off Gelendzhik from the coast to the central part of the sea at water depths of 100-2170 m show that a series of warm winters and the absence of intense convective winter mixing resulted in a relatively low content of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), and nutrients in the water column in March 2009. The relatively high SPM concentrations and the presence of isotopically light POC at the offshore station are indicative of the supply of terrigenous material from land and low contributions of phytoplanktonic organic matter to the composition of SPM. This may explain the low rates of biogeochemical processes in the water column near the coast. The surface layer at deep-water stations is dominated by isotopically heavy phytoplanktonic organic matter. This suggests that the supply of terrigenous material from land was insufficient in offshore deep-water areas. Therefore, warm winters and insufficient nutrient supply do not prevent photosynthesis in the photic layer of the deep-water zone, which generates organic substrates for heterotrophic aquatic communities. The results of isotopic analysis of POC, measurements of the rates biogeochemical processes, and the hydrochemical characteristics of the water column can be used to determine the nature and seasonal variability of the POC composition.

  3. Use of serially coupled capillary columns with different polarity of stationary phases for the separation of the natural complex volatile mixture of the marine red alga Corallina elongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembitsky, V M; Srebnik, M

    2002-09-01

    Separation of a complex of natural volatile compounds using serially coupled capillary columns with different polarity of stationary phases by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry from the medicinal marine red alga Corallina elongata is reported. Nearly 200 hydrocarbons, halogen compounds, fatty acids, and other metabolites were found. Using this gas chromatography procedure we demonstrate the successful separation of different volatile organic compounds.

  4. Water vapor retrieval from near-IR measurements of polarized scanning atmospheric corrector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Lili; Ning, Yuanming; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Xingfeng; Ma, Yan; Li, Zhengqiang; Cui, Wenyu

    2018-02-01

    Water vapor and aerosol are two key atmospheric factors effecting the remote sensing image quality. As water vapor is responsible for most of the solar radiation absorption occurring in the cloudless atmosphere, accurate measurement of water content is important to not only atmospheric correction of remote sensing images, but also many other applications such as the study of energy balance and global climate change, land surface temperature retrieval in thermal remote sensing. A multi-spectral, single-angular, polarized radiometer called Polarized Scanning Atmospheric Corrector (PSAC) were developed in China, which are designed to mount on the same satellite platform with the principle payload and provide essential parameters for principle payload image atmospheric correction. PSAC detect water vapor content via measuring atmosphere reflectance at water vapor absorbing channels (i.e. 0.91 μm) and nearby atmospheric window channel (i.e. 0.865μm). A near-IR channel ratio method was implemented to retrieve column water vapor (CWV) amount from PSAC measurements. Field experiments were performed at Yantai, in Shandong province of China, PSAC aircraft observations were acquired. The comparison between PSAC retrievals and ground-based Sun-sky radiometer measurements of CWV during the experimental flights illustrates that this method retrieves CWV with relative deviations ranging from 4% 13%. This method retrieve CWV more accurate over land than over ocean, as the water reflectance is low.

  5. Removal of Chloroform (CHCl3 from Tehran Drinking Water by GAC and Air Stripping Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M T Samadi, S Nasseri, A Mesdaghinia, M R Alizadefard

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The harmful substances, defined as trihalomethanes (THMs, were found to be formed during the disinfection of drinking water when chlorine was used as the disinfectant. In this research, the effectiveness of granular activated carbon (GAC and air stripping (AS packed column for the removal of chloroform (CHCl3 (as THMs basic indicator compound in many resources in range of 50 to300µg/L, from drinking water was studied. Pilots of GAC and air stripping columns were designed and set up. The study was carried out for the two cases of deionized and chlorinated Tehran tap water. Also the effects of flow rate, chloroform and TDS concentrations were considered in both treatment systems. Gas chromatography (GC with electron capture detector (ECD was used for determination of chloroform concentration in inlet and outlet samples. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS and non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis method. Results showed a positive correlation between the flow rate and chloroform concentration, and removal efficiencies. The average of variations of removal efficiencies for AS and GAC columns with deionized water samples were, 89.9%, 71.2% and for chlorinated Tehran tap water were 91.2% and 76.4%, respectively. The removal of feed residual chlorine in these columns with 0.5, 0.8 ppm was 100%, respectively and re-chlorination for finishing water was recommended. Results showed AS to be considered more effective in chloroform removal for conventional water treatment plants as a finishing process.

  6. Examination of the isotopic exchange columns used in heavy water fabrication by nondestructive metallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascu, Romulus; Romanu, Radu; Cotarcea, Constantin; Marinescu, Bebe

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of an investigation using nondestructive metallography of the isotopic exchange columns used for heavy water fabrication in ROMAG PROD plant at Drobeta Turnu Severin. The nondestructive metallography is based on the examination of the surface moulds. Thus the corroded areas on the inner walls of the isotopic exchange columns are investigated with metallographic replicas to observe microstructures in steel G 52/28 and reveal possible microcracks. Finally, metallographic structures of the investigated areas were determined but structural modifications with respect to the control ones were not observed. Only, in the tray 30 in the C 1106 column microcracks were evidenced in the characteristic areas at the welded joins were the tray attached to the column. So a new intervention was needed

  7. Distribution of radioiodine in soil column experiments with simulations of varying ground water levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachse, R.; Paetzold, G.

    1993-01-01

    Results of long-term experiments with 129 I-labelling under field conditions show faster migration of iodine in deeper soil layers for an orthi-eutric fluvisol adjacent to a river as compared to an orthi-humic gleysol without river vicinity. This observation suggests a possible influence of ground water level variations on radioiodine sorption to soil constituents. To verify these findings, experiments with undisturbed soil columns are carried out with controlled moisture regimes. The soil columns are labelled with 125 I and exposed to simulated rainfall or to extreme variations in ground water levels caused by daily pumping cycles. Both watering conditions affect the migration of radioiodine into deeper soil layers. After an experimental period of 25 days it could be detected down to 10 cm below the soil surface. The highest concentrations are found in the 0-2 cm layer. However, in case of the rainfall simulation the radioiodine concentrations in this layer are remarkably higher as compared to those of the experiments with ground water variations. Only the rainfall exposed soil columns show differences between the two soils with respect to tracer depth profiles. An especially fast migration of radioiodine occurs, when the tracer is applied on a water saturated soil column and the soil water is soaked from the bottom immediately after the application. (orig.) [de

  8. Recycling of drinking water treatment residue as an additional medium in columns for effective P removal from eutrophic surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhui; Wu, Yu; Bai, Leilei; Zhao, Yaqian; Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Liu, Xin

    2018-04-03

    This study assesses the feasibility of recycling drinking water treatment residue (DWTR) to treat eutrophic surface water in a one-year continuous flow column test. Heat-treated DWTR was used as an additional medium (2%-4%) in columns in case excessive organic matter and N were released from the DWTR to surface water. The results indicated that with minimal undesirable effects on other water properties, DWTR addition substantially enhanced P removal, rendering P concentrations in treated water oligotrophic and treated water unsuitable for Microcystis aeruginosa breeding. Long-term stable P removal by DWTR-column treatment was mainly attributed to the relatively low P levels in raw water (<0.108 mg L -1 ) and high P adsorption capability of DWTR, as confirmed by increases in amorphous Al/Fe in DWTR after the tests and low adsorption of P in the mobile forms. The major components of DWTR showed minimal changes, and potential metal pollution from DWTR was not a factor to consider during recycling. DWTR also enriched functional bacterial genera that benefitted biogeochemical cycles and multiple pollution control (e.g., Dechloromonas, Geobacter, Leucobacter, Nitrospira, Rhodoplanes, and Sulfuritalea); an apparent decrease in Mycobacterium with potential pathogenicity was observed in DWTR-columns. Regardless, limited denitrification of DWTR-columns was observed as a result of low bioavailability of C in surface water. This finding indicates that DWTR can be used with other methods to ensure denitrification for enhanced treatment effects. Overall, the use of DWTR as an additional medium in column systems can potentially treat eutrophic surface water. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prolongation of the deployment and monitoring of a multiple oscillating water column wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Chudley, J.; Dai, Y.M.

    2003-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project to prolong the sea trials of a multiple oscillating water column wave energy converter (MOWC) device for another 12 months to obtain further data. The objectives of the project include the evaluation of the ability of the MOWC to generate reliable energy to produce electricity, the estimation of the conversion efficiency, and the identification of improvements to increase the conversion efficiency, Details are given of the analysis of the sea trials data, and the performance of the broadband oscillating water column prototype.

  10. Pathways of Methylmercury Transfer to the Water Column Across Multiple Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartup, A. T.; Balcom, P. H.; Mason, R. P.; Chen, C.

    2014-12-01

    Estuarine water column methylmercury (MeHg) is an important driver of bioaccumulation in pelagic organisms so it is important to understand the sources and cycling of MeHg. As MeHg biomagnifies in food webs, increased water column concentrations can be transferred to fish consumed by humans. Few studies have taken a multi-estuary approach to look at MeHg cycling in the water column of these important MeHg producing areas. We examined the distributions and partitioning of sediment and water column MeHg across a geographic range of estuaries. In 2008 we sampled 10 shallow-water estuarine sites from Maine to New Jersey, sampled 11 sites in 4 estuaries in 2009, and sampled at 3 estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) sites in 1 estuary in 2012. Sediment measurements included both solid phase and pore water MeHg and total mercury (HgT). Water column parameters included dissolved and particulate MeHg and HgT, total suspended solids, nutrients, and dissolved organic carbon. Average suspended particle MeHg was highest at Wells (ME; 6 to 11.5 pmol/g; 4.5 to 7% of HgT) and lowest at Portsmouth (NH) and in Long Island Sound (CT-NY; 0.2 to 5.5 pmol/g; 0.25 to 3.75% of HgT). Average water column dissolved MeHg was highest in the Delaware River ETM (0.5 to 0.7 pM; 16 to 24% of HgT) and lowest at Portsmouth (0.06 to 0.12 pM; 1 to 2% of HgT). Significant positive correlations were found between MeHg and HgT across multiple estuaries in both sediment and the water column in 2008 and 2009. In contrast, water column dissolved and suspended particle MeHg do not correlate well with sediment MeHg or HgT, pore water MeHg or methylation rates in sediment across estuaries, indicating that sediment is often not a good predictor of water MeHg levels. However, ratios of average dissolved:pore water MeHg and suspended particle:sediment MeHg are close to 1 in the Delaware River ETM, suggesting that sediment supplies MeHg to the water column in this turbulent region, but average pore water MeHg was

  11. Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Concept Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    381-388. Wiltshire, G.A. and Corcoran, L. (1991). Response to the Presidente Rivera Major Oil Spill, Delaware River, 1991 International Oil Spill... Presidente Rivera spill in the Delaware River, fish nets were able to recover eight tons of oil before they became fouled (NOAA, 1992). In addition to...Tarballs / mats that drifted below the water surface. None 1989 T/V Presidente Rivera (Wiltshire and Cocoran, 1991) Delaware River, NJ Large masses in

  12. Evaluating Rotavirus and Norovirus transport processes in standardised and natural soil-water columns experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Pablo; Schijven, Jack; Victoria, Matias; Alvareda, Elena; López Tort, Fernando; Ramos, Julián; Lizasoain, Andrés; Sapriza, Gonzalo; Castells, Matias; Colina, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    In Uruguay, as in many developed and developing countries, rotavirus and norovirus are major causes of diarrhea and others symptoms of acute gastroenteritis. In some areas of Uruguay, groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption. In the rural area of the Salto district, virus contamination has been detected in several groundwater wells. Because sewer coverage is low, the most probable sources of contamination are nearby septic systems. This work aims to evaluate the transport of rotavirus and norovirus from clinic samples in two sets of column experiments under saturated conditions: 6.7-cm columns with quartz sand (ionic strength 1mM, pH 7.0) and with sand from the Salto aquifer (Uruguay) (9,2% coarse sand, 47,8% medium sand, 40,5% fine sand, magnesium/calcium bicarbonate water, Ionic strength 15.1 mM, pH 7.2). Both viruses were seeded for 2 pore volumes onto the columns. Samples were collected at the column outlet and viruses were enumerated by Q-PRCR. Breakthrough curves were constructed and fitted to a two-site kinetic attachment/detachment model, including blocking using Hydrus-1D. In the quartz sand column, both rotavirus and norovirus were removed two orders in magnitude. In the Salto sand column, rotavirus was removed 2 log10 as well, but norovirus was removed 4 log10. The fitting of the breakthrough curves indicated that blocking played a role for rotavirus in the Salto sand column. These results are consistent with the field observation where only rotavirus was detected in the Salto aquifer, while similar concentrations in Salto sewer effluent were measured for both viruses. This work, besides reporting actual parameters values for human virus transport modelling, shows the significant differences in transport that human viruses can have in standardised and natural soil-water systems.

  13. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments NAC/SETAC 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  14. Petroleum hydrocarbons in the water column of Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, J.M.; Boehm, P.D.; Haas, L.; Kinney, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Within a few days after the Exxon Valdez crude oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, a monitoring study was initiated to determine the distribution, concentrations, and changes over time of petroleum hydrocarbons in the water column throughout the Sound. Additional measurements were made of the concentrations and compositions of petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sheens of weathered crude oil occasionally observed in the Sound. This paper reports that measured concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the water column of prince William Sound have been consistently low since measurements began in late March 1989. For a brief period in April, in regions of the Sound where the oil spread, there was a measurable increase in the upper water column in the average concentrations of the potentially toxic fractions of oil, the volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The average measured concentration of VOAs in the water column reached a peak of about 2 μg/L in early April. By late April, average VOA concentrations had returned to levels comparable to those in water samples from unoiled reference areas

  15. Erratum to ;Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-07-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen, light, and temperature. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with temperature, light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that surface (20 m) rates were regulated by temperature, light, and [H+] (i.e. pH). In addition, surface (20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  16. Preparation and evaluation of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic columns for separating polar small molecules by capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wu, Yu-Ru; Lin, Tzuen-Yeuan; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2015-04-29

    In this study, methacrylic acid (MAA) was incorporated with alkyl methacrylates to increase the hydrophilicity of the synthesized ethylene dimethacrylate-based (EDMA-based) monoliths for separating polar small molecules by capillary LC analysis. Different alkyl methacrylate-MAA ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% alkyl methacrylate-MAA-EDMA monoliths in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The porosity, permeability, and column efficiency of the synthesized MAA-incorporated monolithic columns were characterized. A mixture of phenol derivatives is employed to evaluate the applicability of using the prepared monolithic columns for separating small molecules. Fast separation of six phenol derivatives was achieved in 5 min with gradient elution using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. In addition, the effect of acetonitrile content in mobile phase on retention factor and plate height as well as the plate height-flow velocity curves were also investigated to further examine the performance of the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. Moreover, the applicability of prepared polymer-based monolithic column for potential food safety applications was also demonstrated by analyzing five aflatoxins and three phenicol antibiotics using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Water Ice Albedo Variations on the Martian Northern Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2003-01-01

    The Viking Orbiters determined that the surface of Mars northern residual cap is water ice. Many researchers have related observed atmospheric water vapor abundances to seasonal exchange between reservoirs such as the polar caps, but the extent to which the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere remains uncertain. Early studies of the ice coverage and albedo of the northern residual Martian polar cap using Mariner 9 and Viking images reported that there were substantial internannual differences in ice deposition on the polar cap, a result which suggested a highly variable Martian climate. However, some of the data used in these studies were obtained at differing values of heliocentric solar longitude (L(sub s)). Reevaluation of this dataset indicated that the residual cap undergoes seasonal brightening throughout the summer, and indicated that this process repeats from year to year. In this study we continue to compare Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter imaging observations and thermal data of the north residual polar cap to data acquired with Mars Global Surveyor s Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) instrument. In the current study, our goal is to examine all released data from MGS MOC in the northern summer season, along with applicable TES data in order to better understand the albedo variations in the northern summer and their implications on water transport. To date, work has focused primarily on the MOC dataset. In 1999, data acquisition of the northern polar regions began at L(sub s) = 107, although there was little north polar data acquired from L(sub s)= 107 to L(sub s) = 109. We examined a total of 409 images from L(sub s) = 107 to L(sub s)=148. We have also examined data from 2000 from L(sub s)= 93 to L(sub s)= 110; additional progress is ongoing. Here we present a progress report of our observations, and continue to determine their implications for the Martian water cycle.

  18. Fatty acid composition of commercial vegetable oils from the French market analysed using a long highly polar column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vingering Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing concern for consumed fat by western populations has raised the question of the level and the quality of fat intake, especially the composition of fatty acids (FA and their impact on human health. As a consequence, consumers and nutritionists have requested updated publications on FA composition of food containing fat. In the present study, fourteen different kinds of edible oils (rapeseed, olive, hazelnut, argan, groundnut, grape seed, sesame, sunflower, walnut and organic walnut, avocado, wheat germ, and two combined oils were analysed for FA determination using a BPX-70 60 m highly polar GC column. Oils were classified according to the classification of Dubois et al. (2007, 2008. Monounsaturated FA (MUFA group oils, including rapeseed, olive, hazelnut, and avocado oils, contained mainly oleic acid (OA. Groundnut and argan oils, also rich in MUFA, showed in addition high linoleic acid (LA contents. In the polyunsaturated (PUFA group, grape seed oil presented the highest LA content while sunflower, sesame, and wheat germ oils showed noticeable MUFA amounts in addition to high PUFA contents. Walnut oils, also rich in LA, showed the highest linolenic acid (ALA content. The n-6/n-3 ratio of each oil was calculated. Trans-FA (TFA was also detected and quantified. Results were compared with the data published during the past decade, and the slight discrepancies were attributed to differences in origin and variety of seed-cultivars, and in seed and oil processes.

  19. Evaluating the performance of Lyzenga's water column correction in case-1 coral reef water using a simulated Wolrdview-2 imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Mandini Manessa, Masita; Haidar, Muhammad; Budhiman, Syarif; Winarso, Gatot; Kanno, Ariyo; Sagawa, Tatsuyuki; Sekine, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    This study identified the performance of Lyzenga water column correction under controlled condition of noise, water quality, and bottom type diversity. We build a simulated multispectral imagery, represent the subsurface reflectance of coral reef environment that receives by Worldview-2 satellite. The evaluation was performed to two different subsurface reflectance: Lee et al.’s and Maritonia et al.’s radiative transfer model. As a result, in the case of simple Maritonia et al.’s reflectance model, it shows that the effect of the water column is removable. However, if the actual just above surface reflectance is as more complex as Lee et al.’s model, then the Lyzenga's water column method could reduce the effect of water attenuation but not removed. In fact, based on the mathematical presentation of Lyzenga's model on simulation reflectance formula the effect of depth and water attenuation are in multiplication function. Thus, even after the correction, the water column attenuation effect stillremain.

  20. Permeation of nanopores by water the effects of channel polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, R; Hansen, J P

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to characterize the permeation by water of cylindrical nanopores, modelling ion channels, as a function of channel radius R and dielectric permittivity epsilon. Intermittent permeation is found in a narrow range around the threshold values of R and epsilon. While channel permeation is highly sensitive to channel polarization effects, no effect on structural properties of the confined water is found on varying epsilon.

  1. 40 CFR 799.6756 - TSCA partition coefficient (n-octanol/water), generator column method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Medicinal Chemistry Project, Pomona College, Claremont, CA. (10) Hawker, D.W. and Connell, D.W. Octanol... aromatic hydrocarbons by a coupled column liquid chromatographic technique,” Analytical Chemistry, 50:175... Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Water,” Analytical Chemistry 50:997-1000 (1978). (13) Miller, M.M. et al. Aqueous...

  2. The hyperturbid state of the water column in estuaries and rivers: the importance of hindered settling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Yoeri M.; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Winterwerp, Johan C.

    2018-03-01

    Over the last few decades, some estuaries have undergone a transition to a hyperturbid state, characterised by suspended sediment concentrations of several grammes per litre averaged over the water column. To improve our understanding of this transition and of naturally hyperturbid estuaries, we systematically identify the processes allowing for high suspended sediment concentrations using a water column (1DV) model. Under a range of realistic forcing conditions, the state of the water column can be characterised by one of two equilibrium states. The first is an erosion-limited state, in which there still is sediment available for erosion at the bed. We find that this state only occurs with relatively low concentrations. The second is a supply-limited state, in which all erodable sediment is in suspension. The concentration in this state depends entirely on the amount of sediment in the system and can potentially be very high. We identify the conditions under which the state of the water column can jump from a low to a high concentration and identify hysteresis in the transition between the two states. The mechanism responsible for this hysteresis is hindered settling. It thus follows that hyperturbidity is only possible in a supply-limited state. From this observation we derive a necessary condition for an estuarine system to make the transition from low turbidity to hyperturbidity in a 1DV context. This is an important step towards understanding why some estuaries are hyperturbid and assessing the risk that particular estuaries may become hyperturbid in the future.

  3. Numerical Simulation of a Dual-Chamber Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezhi Ning

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a dual-chamber Oscillating Water Column (OWC Wave Energy Converter (WEC is considered in the present study. The device has two sub-chambers with a shared orifice. A two-dimensional (2D fully nonlinear numerical wave flume based on the potential-flow theory and the time-domain higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM is applied for the simulation. The incident waves are generated by using the immerged sources and the air-fluid coupling influence is considered with a simplified pneumatic model. In the present study, the variation of the surface elevation and the water column volume in the two sub-chambers are investigated. The effects of the chamber geometry (i.e., the draft and breadth of two chambers on the surface elevation and the air pressure in the chamber are investigated, respectively. It is demonstrated that the surface elevations in the two sub-chambers are strongly dependent on the wave conditions. The larger the wavelength, the more synchronous motion of the two water columns in the two sub-chambers, thus, the lager the variation of the water column volume.

  4. The structure of the pelagic food web in relation to water column structure in the Skagerrak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Kaas, H.; Kruse, B.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution, composition and activity of phytoplankton, and accompanying changes in specific activities of bacterioplankton and copepods, were related to variations in the vertical structure of the water column along a transect through the Skagerrak in May 1987. The Skagerrak is characterized...

  5. Evaluating the precision of passive sampling methods using PRCs in the water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess these models, four different thicknesses of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers were co-deployed for 28 days in the water column at three sites in New Bedford Harbor, MA, USA. Each sampler was pre-loaded with six PCB performance reference compounds (PRCs) t...

  6. Dynamics of thraustochytrid protists in the water column of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Ramaiah, N.; Raghukumar, C.

    and bacteria in the water column, up to 2000 m in the central Arabian Sea are investigated. Four seasons, namely the end of the southwest summer monsoon (September/October 1993), the summer pre-monsoon (April/May 1994), the end of the northeast winter monsoon...

  7. Cotransport of Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite particles through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2011-02-01

    This study is focused on Pseudomonas putida bacteria transport in porous media in the presence of suspended kaolinite clay particles. Experiments were performed with bacteria and kaolinite particles separately to determine their individual transport characteristics in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads. The results indicated that the mass recovery of bacteria and clay particles decreased as the pore water velocity decreased. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the attachment of Pseudomonas putida onto kaolinite particles. The attachment process was adequately described by a Langmuir isotherm. Finally, bacteria and kaolinite particles were injected simultaneously into a packed column in order to investigate their cotransport behavior. The experimental data suggested that the presence of clay particles significantly inhibited the transport of bacteria in water-saturated porous media. The observed reduction of Pseudomonas putida recovery in the column outflow was attributed to bacteria attachment onto kaolinite particles, which were retained onto the solid matrix of the column. A mathematical model was developed to describe the transport of bacteria in the presence of suspended clay particles in one-dimensional water-saturated porous media. Model simulations were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Preparation and evaluation of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic columns for separating polar small molecules by capillary liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wu, Yu-Ru; Lin, Tzuen-Yeuan; Fuh, Ming-Ren, E-mail: msfuh@scu.edu.tw

    2015-04-29

    Highlights: • Methacrylic acid (MAA) was used to increase hydrophilicity of polymeric monoliths. • Fast separation of phenol derivatives was achieved in 5 min using MAA-incorporated column. • Separations of aflatoxins and phenicol antibiotics were achieved using MAA-incorporated column. - Abstract: In this study, methacrylic acid (MAA) was incorporated with alkyl methacrylates to increase the hydrophilicity of the synthesized ethylene dimethacrylate-based (EDMA-based) monoliths for separating polar small molecules by capillary LC analysis. Different alkyl methacrylate–MAA ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% alkyl methacrylate–MAA–EDMA monoliths in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The porosity, permeability, and column efficiency of the synthesized MAA-incorporated monolithic columns were characterized. A mixture of phenol derivatives is employed to evaluate the applicability of using the prepared monolithic columns for separating small molecules. Fast separation of six phenol derivatives was achieved in 5 min with gradient elution using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. In addition, the effect of acetonitrile content in mobile phase on retention factor and plate height as well as the plate height-flow velocity curves were also investigated to further examine the performance of the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. Moreover, the applicability of prepared polymer-based monolithic column for potential food safety applications was also demonstrated by analyzing five aflatoxins and three phenicol antibiotics using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column.

  9. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... § 52.01-110 Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges (modifies PG-60). 52.01-110 Section 52.01-110 Shipping COAST...

  10. Comparison of labeled tracer methods to measure methane oxidation rates in the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Susan; Heintz, Monica; Blees, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The ocean is generally considered a minor source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Macro-seepage from geological sources at the seafloor is suggested to contribute the most from all of the oceanic sources, about 25 Tg CH4/yr to the atmospheric CH4 budget (4% of total sources), whereas the open ocean contributes only 0.4 Tg CH4/yr (0.07% of total sources). However, most source estimates lack certainty due to a limited knowledge of the fate of CH4 in the water column. CH4 in the water column is mainly influenced by turbulent mixing, a process that spreads and dilutes CH4, and microbial oxidation, the only process that limits the fraction of CH4 in the water column and thus the fraction of CH4 escaping into the atmosphere. Unfortunately, measurements of the rate of microbial oxidation are still rare. Only a few attempts have been made to quantify CH4 oxidation in the water column. CH4 oxidation rates were either measured indirectly by correlation with tracers such as 3He, 222Rn, CFC11 or directly by using 14CH4 or C3H4-labeling/incubation techniques. A comparison of the two labeling/incubation techniques will be presented. The ease of use, time series experiments, kinetic experiments, and the effect of incubation temperature will be discussed and water column profiles compared. Our results indicate similar depth-profiles of turnover times using the two different labeled tracers. However, the data sets are offset. More rapid turnover times were measured using C3H4 and slower turnover of CH4 was found using 14CH4.

  11. Bacterial production in the water column of small streams highly depends on terrestrial dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeber, Daniel; Poulsen, Jane R.; Rasmussen, Jes J.; Kronvang, Brian; Zak, Dominik; Kamjunke, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    In the recent years it has become clear that the largest part of the terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool is removed on the way from the land to the ocean. Yet it is still unclear, where in the freshwater systems terrestrial DOC is actually taken up, and for streams DOC uptake was assumed to happen mostly at the stream bottom (benthic zone). However, a recent monitoring study implies that water column but not benthic bacteria are strongly affected by the amount and composition of DOM entering streams from the terrestrial zone. We conducted an experiment to compare the reaction of the bacterial production and heterotrophic uptake in the water column and the benthic zone to a standardized source of terrestrial DOC (leaf leachate from Beech litter). In detail, we sampled gravel and water from eight streams with a gradient in stream size and land use. For each stream four different treatments were incubated at 16°C for three days and each stream: filtered stream water with gravel stones (representing benthic zone bacteria) or unfiltered stream water (representing water column bacteria), both either with (n = 5) or, without (n = 3) leaf leachate. We found that the bacterial uptake of leaf litter DOC was higher for the benthic zone likely due to the higher bacterial production compared to the water column. In contrast, the bacterial production per amount of leaf leachate DOC taken up was significantly higher for the bacteria in the water column than for those in the benthic zone. This clearly indicates a higher growth efficiency with the leaf leachate DOC for the bacteria in the water column than in the benthic zone. We found a high variability for the growth efficiency in the water column, which was best explained by a negative correlation of the DOC demand with stream width (R² = 0.86, linear correlation of log-transformed data). This was not the case for the benthic zone bacteria (R² = 0.02). This implies that water column bacteria in very small streams

  12. A new type separation column for the water-hydrogen isotope catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic water/hydrogen isotope exchange process is by right considered the most attractive for the solution a number of urgent problems of hydrogen isotope separation. A new type exchange reaction column is described and studied in details by computer simulation and with the help of McCabe-Thiele diagrams. It is shown that the new column in comparison with a traditional one needs less catalyst quantity and a smaller diameter for the solving of the same separation tasks. Generalized calculation data are presented in graphical form

  13. Multiangular hyperspectral investigation of polarized light in case 2 waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonizzo, A.; Zhou, J.; Gilerson, A.; Chowdhary, J.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2009-09-01

    The focus of this work is on the dependence of in situ hyperspectral and multiangular polarized data on the size distribution and refractive index of the suspended particles. Underwater polarization measurements were obtained using a polarimeter developed at the Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York, NY. The degree of polarization (DOP) of the underwater light field in coastal environments was measured and the water-leaving polarized radiance was derived. In-water optical properties were also measured with an ac-9 (WET Labs). Absorption and attenuation spectra are then used to derive information on the dissolved and suspend components in the water medium which are used in a vector radiative transfer code which provides the upwelling radiance. The model was run for various values of the refractive index of mineral particles until the modeled DOP matched the measured one. The relationship between the intensity of the maximum of the DOP and both the refractive index of the mineral particles and the shapes of their size distributions is analyzed in detail.

  14. Variations in Microbial Community Structure through the Stratified Water Column in the Tyrrhenian Sea (Central Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Smedile

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The central Mediterranean Sea is among the most oligotrophic habitats in the marine environment. In this study, we investigated the abundance, diversity and activity of prokaryoplankton in the water column (25–3000-m depth at Station Vector (Tyrrhenian Sea, 39°32.050′ N; 13°22.280′ E. This specific water column consists of three different water masses (Modified Atlantic Water (MAW, Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW and Tyrrhenian Deep Water (TDW, possessing a typical stratification of the Central Mediterranean basin. CARD-FISH showed that the metabolically-active fraction of bacterial populations exceeded the archaeal fraction along the whole water column, except at the deepest water masses. 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA clone libraries obtained from each type of water mass were used to analyse the prokaryoplankton community structure and to distinguish between active and “less active” microbial fractions. Our results showed that the rRNA-derived bacterial libraries seemed to be more depth specific compared to 16S rDNA-derived counterparts. Major differences were detected between the active fractions of bacterioplankton thriving in photic (25 m, MAW and aphotic layers (500–3000 m, LIW and TDW respectively, whereas no statistically-significant differences were detected within the deep, aphotic layers (500–3000 m, LIW and TDW. Archaeal communities possessed more depth-specific distribution patterns with both total and active fractions showing depth stratification. Cyanobacteria and Marine Group II MAGII of Euryarchaea dominated the MAW prokaryoplankton. A notable fraction of Geitlerinema-related cyanobacteria was detected among the metabolically-active bacterial population recovered from the mesopelagic (500 m, LIW aphotic layer, which is indicative of their mixotrophic behaviour. Heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria and members of Marine Group 1.1a and the PSL12-related ALOHA group of Thaumarchaeota were both abundant in the aphotic layers

  15. Carbon dioxide degassing in fresh and saline water I: Degassing performance of a cascade column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran, Damian

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to measure carbon dioxide degassing in a cascade column operating with both fresh (0‰) and saline water (35‰ NaCl) at 15 °C. The cascade column contained bio-block type packing material, was 1.7 m long in each dimension, and was tested both with and without countercurrent air...... exchange. The CO2 concentration of the influent and effluent water was measured using submersible infrared CO2 probes over an influent range of 10-60 mg L−1 CO2. Carbon dioxide degassing was quantified in terms of the mass transfer coefficient (kLa, log concentration driving force divided by packing height...... to differences in the ionization fractions of inorganic carbon species in the effluent water. The results indicate that CO2 removal will be more problematic for saline or seawater recirculating systems compared to freshwater systems....

  16. A Robust Retrieval of Water Vapor Column In Dry Arctic Conditions Using the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedron, P.; Michalsky, J.; Schmid, B.; Slater, D.; Berndt, J.; Harrison, L.; Racette, P.; Westwater, E.; Han, Y.

    2001-01-01

    A method to retrieve water vapor column using the 940-nm water vapor absorption band in dry Arctic conditions is presented. The retrievals with this method are stable with respect to uncertainties in instrument radiometric calibration, air pressure, solar source function, and aerosols. The water vapor column was retrieved with this method using spectra obtained with the rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) that was deployed during an intensive observation period near Barrow, Alaska, in March 1999. A line-by-line radiative transfer model was used to compute water vapor transmittance. The retrievals with this method are compared with retrievals obtained from three independent measurements with microwave radiometers. All four measurements show the same pattern of temporal variations. The RSS results agree most closely with retrievals obtained with the millimeter-wave imaging radiometer (MIR) at its 183 GHz +/- 7 double-side band channel. Their correlation over a period of 7 days when water vapor column varied between 0.75 mm and 3.6 mm (according to RSS) is 0.968 with MIR readings 0.12 mm higher on average.

  17. Analisa Kinerja Pneumatic Wave Energy Converter (WEC Dengan Menggunakan Oscillating Water Column(OWC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Ary Sona

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sistem konversi energi gelombang laut merupakan sistem yang menangkap energi gelombang laut untuk dikonversi menjadi energi lain seperti energi listrik. Salah satu jenis wave energy converter (WEC yang banyak digunakan diantaranya yaitu Oscillating Water Columnatau OWC. Prinsip kerja sistem WEC ini ialah mengubah pergerakan naik turunnya gelombang pada silinder kolom udara untuk menghasilkan udara bertekanan yang selanjutnya digunakan untuk menggerakkan turbin dan generator listrik. Penelitian ini ditujukan untuk dapat mengetahui kinerja dari Oscillating Water Column (OWC dalam menangkap energi gelombang laut. Untuk dapat melakukan penelitian ini diperlukan beberapa perlatan yaitu pembuatan konfigurasi peralatan pembuat dan penangkapan gelombang yang terdiri dari pelampung dan silinder Oscillating Water Column (OWC. Percobaan ini dilakukan dengan cara memvariasikan panjang dan tinggi gelombang pada flow water channel dengan mengatur bukaan pada pneumatic speed control. Dari hasil percobaan diperoleh bahwa kinerja paling efektif diperoleh pada panjang gelombang 0.9 m dan tinggi gelombang 0.23m. Pada karakteristik gelombang tersebut diperoleh tekanan, kecepatan dan volume pada silinder Oscillating Water Column (OWC sebesar  1.11 bar, 39.39 m/s dan 0.0057 m3. Dari hasil percobaan juga diperoleh waktu pengisian Pressure Vessel selama 100 menit dengan tekanan 3 Psi.

  18. JGOFS IV. Subproject: natural radionuclides as tracers for particle dynamics in the water column. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, J.C.; Fietzke, J.; Mangini, A.; Stoffers, P.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the German JOINT GLOBAL OCEAN FLUX STUDY (JGOFS) the aim of the project was to investigate the particle dynamics in the water column, especially to estimate the trapping efficiencies of sediment traps deployed in the eastern North Atlantic (L1: 33 N 21 W; L2: 47 N 19.5 W; L3: 54,4 N 21,1 W; ESTOC: 29,07 N 15,25 W; OMEX: 49 N 12,5 W). This investigation was based on measurements of the distribution of natural radionuclides in the water column and in sediment traps. In the upper water column (≤1000 m) the 230 Th concentrations are similar at all locations investigated and a reversible scavenging model was able to describe the 230 Th distribution. In the deep water-column at L2 and L3 the 230 Th concentrations were significantly lower than predicted from the reversible scavenging model. The 230 Th concentrations here could be described by a scavenging-mixing model which assumes an advection of 230 Th depleted water masses and a rapid ventilation between 3 and 25 years. Based on two models, a mass balance for 230 Th and 231 Pa and a constant removal model, sediment trap efficiencies were calculated to be between 9% and 143%. The lowest efficiencies (9%-36%) were determined in the 500 m and 1000 m traps and no direct relation between water currents velocities and trapping biases were observed. The correction for trapping biases were found to be important for the understanding of the regional differences in the particle flux in the eastern north Atlantic. (orig.) [de

  19. The Impact of magnetic water treatment on salt distribution in a large unsaturated soil column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zlotopolski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of saline water for crop production leads to soil salinization. Magnetically-treated water (MTW has been used for many years and has shown promise in leaching some ions from soil. At the same time, results have been inconsistent and somewhat controversial. In this study, we used large unsaturated columns (diameter 15 cm and length 90 cm to determine: 1 salt distributions at depths of up to 90 cm after adding magnetically-treated, saline water to soil; 2 whether MTW could reduce the rate of accumulation of salts (measured by EC in soil, and; 3 whether MTW could increase the leaching effect of soluble salts below root zones compared to control. The soil tested had a lower salt content compared to the water, a real-world scenario often faced when farmers elect to switch from higher-cost municipal water sources to ground water sources that have a higher saline content. Results indicated that the rate of salt accumulation was greater in the control group at the 30–60 cm depth. At the same time, the salt content at the 90 cm depth was greater in the MTW column. The results have shown that MTW changes the distribution of salts between soil layers reducing their content in the upper layers which are more important for agriculture. Keywords: Magnetic water treatment, Agriculture, Soil, Irrigation water

  20. Trends of total water vapor column above the Arctic from satellites observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alraddawi, Dunya; Sarkissian, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Bock, Olivier; Claud, Chantal; Irbah, Abdenour

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric water vapor (H2O) is the most important natural (as opposed to man-made) greenhouse gas, accounting for about two-thirds of the natural greenhouse effect. Despite this importance, its role in climate and its reaction to climate change are still difficult to assess. Many details of the hydrological cycle are poorly understood, such as the process of cloud formation and the transport and release of latent heat contained in the water vapor. In contrast to other important greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, water vapor has a much higher temporal and spatial variability. Total precipitable water (TPW) or the total column of water vapor (TCWV) is the amount of liquid water that would result if all the water vapor in the atmospheric column of unit area were condensed. TCWV distribution contains valuable information on the vigor of the hydrological processes and moisture transport in the atmosphere. Measurement of TPW can be obtained based on atmospheric water vapor absorption or emission of radiation in the spectral range from UV to MW. TRENDS were found over the terrestrial Arctic by means of TCWV retrievals (using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) near-infrared (2001-2015) records). More detailed approach was made for comparisons with ground based instruments over Sodankyla - Finland (TCWV from: SCIAMACHY 2003-2011, GOME-2A 2007-2011, SAOZ 2003-2011, GPS 2003-2011, MODIS 2003-2011)

  1. Modelling soil water content variations under drought stress on soil column cropped with winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csorba Szilveszter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models are effective tools for evaluating the impact of predicted climate change on agricultural production, but it is difficult to test their applicability to future weather conditions. We applied the SWAP model to assess its applicability to climate conditions, differing from those, for which the model was developed. We used a database obtained from a winter wheat drought stress experiment. Winter wheat was grown in six soil columns, three having optimal water supply (NS, while three were kept under drought-stressed conditions (S. The SWAP model was successfully calibrated against measured values of potential evapotranspiration (PET, potential evaporation (PE and total amount of water (TSW in the soil columns. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (N-S for TWS for the stressed columns was 0.92. For the NS treatment, we applied temporally variable soil hydraulic properties because of soil consolidation caused by regular irrigation. This approach improved the N-S values for the wetting-drying cycle from -1.77 to 0.54. We concluded that the model could be used for assessing the effects of climate change on soil water regime. Our results indicate that soil water balance studies should put more focus on the time variability of structuredependent soil properties.

  2. Organic polar pollutants in surface waters of inland seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlikowska, Anna; Fisch, Kathrin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2015-12-30

    Available data about contamination by polar substances are mostly reported for rivers and near-shore waters and only limited studies exists about their occurrence in marine waters. We present concentrations and distribution of several polar pesticides and UV-filters in surface waters of three inland seas, the Baltic, Black and Mediterranean Sea. Many of the investigated compounds were below detection limits, however, those found in off-shore waters raise a concern about their persistence and possible adverse effect on the ecosystem. Despite a longstanding EU-wide ban we were able to detect atrazine in the Mediterranean and the Baltic Sea. Concentrations in the Black Sea were substantially higher. Runoff from agricultural and urban areas was the main transport route to marine ecosystems for investigated compounds, though irgarol in Mediterranean waters was attributed to intense maritime traffic. 2-Phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid was the only UV-filter detected in marine waters, while benzophenone-4 was observed in the estuaries. Occurrence of UV-filters was seasonal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crancon, P.; Pili, E.; Charlet, L.

    2010-01-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podsolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the ≤ 50 μm mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean pore-water velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both 238 U initially present in the soil column and 233 U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source. (authors)

  4. Remote sensing of tropospheric total column water vapor: Intercomparison of POLDER, AMSR-E and MODIS retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedi, J.; Mcharek, L.; Dubuisson, P.; Parol, F.; Thieuleux, F.

    2013-05-01

    Since December 2004, the CNES Parasol (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Science coupled with Observations from a Lidar) mission has been flying in the A-train with Aqua (NASA) providing more than 5 years of temporally and spatially coincident observations from POLDER, MODIS and AMSRE which enable total column water vapor amount retrievals. We are providing here a temporal and statistical analysis of water vapor near-infrared retrievals from POLDER against MODIS and AMSR-E products derived from nearinfrared, thermal infrared and microwave observations over ocean. A temporal analysis of POLDER official product is conducted in view of AMSR-E and MODIS coincident retrievals over ocean. In a second step, an alternative approach based on the use of simple multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network (NN) is developed to improve the mathematical parameterization used to retrieve water vapor amount from near-infrared observation. The retrievals are further improved when an estimate of the 910 nm surface reflectance is obtained through interpolation between PARASOL 865 nm and 1020 nm channels. This last improvement now allows for a unified land/ocean retrieval algorithm for PARASOL/POLDER.

  5. An Improved Quadrilateral Fitting Algorithm for the Water Column Contribution in Airborne Bathymetric Lidar Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Ding

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an improved method based on a mixture of Gaussian and quadrilateral functions is presented to process airborne bathymetric LiDAR waveforms. In the presented method, the LiDAR waveform is fitted to a combination of three functions: one Gaussian function for the water surface contribution, another Gaussian function for the water bottom contribution, and a new quadrilateral function to fit the water column contribution. The proposed method was tested on a simulated dataset and a real dataset, with the focus being mainly on the performance of retrieving bottom response and water depths. We also investigated the influence of the parameter settings on the accuracy of the bathymetry estimates. The results demonstrate that the improved quadrilateral fitting algorithm shows a superior performance in terms of low RMSE and a high detection rate in the water depth and magnitude retrieval. What’s more, compared with the use of a triangular function or the existing quadrilateral function to fit the water column contribution, the presented method retrieved the least noise and the least number of unidentified waveforms, showed the best performance in fitting the return waveforms, and had consistent fitting goodness for all different water depths.

  6. An Improved Quadrilateral Fitting Algorithm for the Water Column Contribution in Airborne Bathymetric Lidar Waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Li, Qingquan; Zhu, Jiasong; Wang, Chisheng; Guan, Minglei; Chen, Zhipeng; Yang, Chao; Cui, Yang; Liao, Jianghai

    2018-02-11

    In this paper, an improved method based on a mixture of Gaussian and quadrilateral functions is presented to process airborne bathymetric LiDAR waveforms. In the presented method, the LiDAR waveform is fitted to a combination of three functions: one Gaussian function for the water surface contribution, another Gaussian function for the water bottom contribution, and a new quadrilateral function to fit the water column contribution. The proposed method was tested on a simulated dataset and a real dataset, with the focus being mainly on the performance of retrieving bottom response and water depths. We also investigated the influence of the parameter settings on the accuracy of the bathymetry estimates. The results demonstrate that the improved quadrilateral fitting algorithm shows a superior performance in terms of low RMSE and a high detection rate in the water depth and magnitude retrieval. What's more, compared with the use of a triangular function or the existing quadrilateral function to fit the water column contribution, the presented method retrieved the least noise and the least number of unidentified waveforms, showed the best performance in fitting the return waveforms, and had consistent fitting goodness for all different water depths.

  7. Environmental Characterization of Mine Countermeasure Test Ranges: Hydrography and Water Column Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    OBJECTIVES We proposed to characterize the physical, biological and optical fields present during deployments of the Streak Tube Imaging Lidar ...Environmental Characterization of Mine Countermeasure Test Ranges: Hydrography and Water Column Optics David A. Phinney Bigelow Laboratory for...email: csyentsch@aol.com Grant Number: N00014-01-1-0040 LONG-TERM GOALS We wish to observe the hydrographic factors that regulate optical

  8. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8–2.4 nM⋅h−1 at 6 m, which could explain 33–44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux. PMID:22089233

  9. The analysis of scaling mechanism for water-injection pipe columns in the Daqing Oilfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin Jing

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although water-injection in mature reservoirs is a promising low-cost method of enhanced oil recovery (EOR, in the process of development in the oilfield, scale has been produced in water-injection pipe columns. The ability to prevent and control the deposition of scale is critical to the efficient recovery of crude oil from hard environments, as part of the broader discipline of “flow assurance” in the petroleum industry. To this end laboratory-scale deposition tests have been useful to understand scale deposition mechanism. The process, mechanism and the main type of the scale in water-injection pipe columns of the fifth plant of the Daqing Oilfield were analyzed. The effect of temperature on the possibility of carbonate calcium formation on oil recovery was investigated experimentally. One of the scale samples was characterized by electron spectroscopy and the results of the element analysis were investigated. Moreover, the precautionary and control measures of scaling in oilfield pipe column systems are proposed.

  10. Natural Isotopic Fractionation of 238U/235U in the Water Column of the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, S. J.; Brennecka, G.; Anbar, A. D.; Colman, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    The natural fractionation of long-lived uranium isotopes (238U, 235U) is being explored as a paleoredox proxy. While uranium behaves conservatively in oxic seawater, it is readily removed to sediments under reducing conditions. Measurements of δ238/235U in black shales and marine sediments deposited under sulfidic conditions suggest that uranium removed in such environments is isotopically heavy. However, this fractionation process has not been directly demonstrated in a present-day marine environment, nor is the specific mechanism of fractionation known. The euxinic water column of the Black Sea provides an ideal laboratory for studying uranium isotope fractionation. Uranium in Black Sea sediments is 0.35-0.84‰ heavy in δ238/235U relative to open ocean seawater (Weyer et al. 2008). We therefore expect that dissolved uranium in the Black Sea water column should be correspondingly light. Furthermore, direct measurements of δ238/235U versus depth could be used in combination with sediment δ238/235U to infer the dominant locations of U removal and constrain specific mechanisms of fractionation. Here we present the first δ238/235U depth profile from the water column of the Black Sea. The measurements were made on a Neptune MC-ICP-MS, using a 236U-233U double spike to correct for instrumental mass bias, following preconcentration and purification with UTEVA resin. With this method, we are able to measure δ238/235U with a 2σ precision of 0.07‰ on 100 ng samples. Our results show that δ238/235U decreases monotonically with depth (Fig. 1). At the surface, δ238/235U values are similar to those in the open ocean. At 2000m, δ238/235U is 0.28‰ lighter than open ocean seawater, while uranium concentrations are depleted by ~44% relative to conservative mixing. As expected, δ238/235U in the water column is always lighter than the underlying sediments, confirming that 238U is preferentially removed to marine sediments under sulfidic conditions. Fig 1. (left) Depth

  11. Marine Group II Dominates Planktonic Archaea in Water Column of the Northeastern South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haodong Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, nutrients, and salinity are among the important factors constraining the distribution and abundance of microorganisms in the ocean. Marine Group II (MGII belonging to Euryarchaeota commonly dominates the planktonic archaeal community in shallow water and Marine Group I (MGI, now is called Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in global oceans. Results of quantitative PCR (qPCR and 454 sequencing in our study, however, showed the dominance of MGII in planktonic archaea throughout the water column of the northeastern South China Sea (SCS that is characterized by strong water mixing. The abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA representing the main group of Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in the northeastern SCS was significantly lower than in other oceanic regions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the top operational taxonomic units (OTUs of the MGII occurring predominantly below 200 m depth may be unique in the northeastern SCS based on the observation that they are distantly related to known sequences (identity ranging from 90–94%. The abundance of MGII was also significantly correlated with total bacteria in the whole column, which may indicate that MGII and bacteria may have similar physiological or biochemical properties or responses to environmental variation. This study provides valuable information about the dominance of MGII over AOA in both shallow and deep water in the northeastern SCS and highlights the need for comprehensive studies integrating physical, chemical, and microbial oceanography.

  12. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9-1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5-1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5-1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions.

  13. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangbao Xia

    Full Text Available Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL, soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC and absolute soil solution concentration (CS decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9-1.2 m and shallow water levels (0.6 m respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5-1.8 m.The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5-1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions.

  14. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9–1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5–1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5–1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions. PMID:26730602

  15. Stable sulfur isotopes in the water column of the Cariaco Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaona; Gilhooly, William P., III; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Farquhar, James; Werne, Josef P.; Varela, Ramon; Scranton, Mary I.

    2010-12-01

    Previous geochemical and microbiological studies in the Cariaco Basin indicate intense elemental cycling and a dynamic microbial loop near the oxic-anoxic interface. We obtained detailed distributions of sulfur isotopes of total dissolved sulfide and sulfate as part of the on-going CARIACO time series project to explore the critical pathways at the level of individual sulfur species. Isotopic patterns of sulfate ( δ34S) and sulfide ( δ34SS) were similar to trends observed in the Black Sea water column: δ34SS and δ34S were constant in the deep anoxic water (varying within 0.6‰ for sulfide and 0.3‰ for sulfate), with sulfide roughly 54‰ depleted in 34S relative to sulfate. Near the oxic-anoxic interface, however, the δ34SS value was ˜3‰ heavier than that in the deep water, which may reflect sulfide oxidation and/or a change in fractionation during in situ sulfide production through sulfate reduction (SR). δ34SS and Δ33SS data near the oxic-anoxic interface did not provide unequivocal evidence to support the important role of sulfur-intermediate disproportionation suggested by previous studies. Repeated observation of minimum δ34S values near the interface suggests 'readdition' of 34S-depleted sulfate during sulfide oxidation. A slight increase in δ34S values with depth extended over the water column may indicate a reservoir effect associated with removal of 34S-depleted sulfur during sulfide production through SR. Our δ34SS and Δ33SS data also do not show a clear role for sulfur-intermediate disproportionation in the deep anoxic water column. We interpret the large difference in δ 34S between sulfate and sulfide as reflecting fractionations during SR in the Cariaco deep waters that are larger than those generally observed in culturing studies.

  16. Separation of rate processes for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water in packed columns 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hartog, J. den; Goodale, J.W.; Rolston, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Wetproofed platinum catalysts in packed columns promote isotopic exchange between counter-current streams of hydrogen saturated with water vapour and liquid water. The net rate of deuterium transfer from isotopically enriched hydrogen has been measured and separated into two rate processes involving the transfer of deuterium from hydrogen to water vapour and from water vapour to liquid. These are compared with independent measurements of the two rate processes to test the two-step successive exchange model for trickle bed reactors. The separated transfer rates are independent of bed height and characterize the deuterium concentrations of each stream along the length of the bed. The dependences of the transfer rates upon hydrogen and liquid flow, hydrogen pressure, platinum loading and the effect of dilution of the hydrophobic catalyst with inert hydrophilic packing are reported. The results indicate a third process may be important in the transfer of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water. (author)

  17. Water Column Exploration Field Trial I (EX0904, EM302) aboard the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in the Gorda Ridge, off the coasts of Oregon and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This cruise is a water column exploration field trial cruise, designed to test and refine operations for conducting water column exploration using NOAA Ship Okeanos...

  18. Distinct Aeromonas Populations in Water Column and Associated with Copepods from Estuarine Environment (Seine, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier Chaix

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas spp. are ubiquitous bacteria primarily recovered from aquatic ecosystems. They are found in fresh water as well as estuarine and marine waters, and in association with numerous autochthonous aquatic organisms in these environments. However, aeromonads are also etiologic agents of fish diseases and are now recognized as emerging pathogens in humans. The estuary is therefore a key environment, harboring autochthonous aeromonads, and aeromonads originating from humans and animals, mainly released by treated WWTP effluent or watershed run-off via tributaries. The present study compares the abundance and the diversity of Aeromonas populations. Over 2 years of monitoring (eight campaigns from February 2013 to November 2015, the occurrence of Aeromonas was investigated within the water column (water and fluid mud and in association with copepods. Moreover, the diversity of Aeromonas populations was ascertained by analyzing gyrB and radA sequences, and the antibiotic-resistance phenotypes were determined using the disk diffusion method. This study shows, for the first time, the presence of Aeromonas spp. in water (1.1 × 102 to 1.2 ± 0.3 × 103 CFU.100 mL-1, fluid mud (2.6 ± 2.6 × 102 to 9.8 ± 0.9 × 103 CFU.g-1 and in association with living copepods (1.9 ± 0.7 × 102 to >1.1 × 104 CFU.g-1 in the Seine estuary. Moreover, the diversity study, conducted on 36 strains isolated from the water column and 47 strains isolated from copepods, indicates distinct populations within these two compartments. Strains distributed in five clusters corresponding to A. bestiarum (n = 6; 5.45%, A. encheleia (n = 1; 0.91%, A. media (n = 22; 20.0%, A. rivipollensis (n = 34; 30.91% and A. salmonicida (n = 47; 42.73%. A. salmonicida is the most abundant species associated with Eurytemora affinis (n = 35; 74.47%. In contrast, A. salmonicida accounts for only 30.56% (n = 11 of isolates in the water column. This study shows the coexistence of distinct populations

  19. The analysis of scaling mechanism for water-injection pipe columns in the Daqing Oilfield

    OpenAIRE

    Guolin Jing; Shan Tang; Xiaoxiao Li; Huaiyuan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Although water-injection in mature reservoirs is a promising low-cost method of enhanced oil recovery (EOR), in the process of development in the oilfield, scale has been produced in water-injection pipe columns. The ability to prevent and control the deposition of scale is critical to the efficient recovery of crude oil from hard environments, as part of the broader discipline of “flow assurance” in the petroleum industry. To this end laboratory-scale deposition tests have been useful to und...

  20. Quantum mechanical force field for water with explicit electronic polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaebeom; Mazack, Michael J M; Zhang, Peng; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

    2013-08-07

    A quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) for water is described. Unlike traditional approaches that use quantum mechanical results and experimental data to parameterize empirical potential energy functions, the present QMFF uses a quantum mechanical framework to represent intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in an entire condensed-phase system. In particular, the internal energy terms used in molecular mechanics are replaced by a quantum mechanical formalism that naturally includes electronic polarization due to intermolecular interactions and its effects on the force constants of the intramolecular force field. As a quantum mechanical force field, both intermolecular interactions and the Hamiltonian describing the individual molecular fragments can be parameterized to strive for accuracy and computational efficiency. In this work, we introduce a polarizable molecular orbital model Hamiltonian for water and for oxygen- and hydrogen-containing compounds, whereas the electrostatic potential responsible for intermolecular interactions in the liquid and in solution is modeled by a three-point charge representation that realistically reproduces the total molecular dipole moment and the local hybridization contributions. The present QMFF for water, which is called the XP3P (explicit polarization with three-point-charge potential) model, is suitable for modeling both gas-phase clusters and liquid water. The paper demonstrates the performance of the XP3P model for water and proton clusters and the properties of the pure liquid from about 900 × 10(6) self-consistent-field calculations on a periodic system consisting of 267 water molecules. The unusual dipole derivative behavior of water, which is incorrectly modeled in molecular mechanics, is naturally reproduced as a result of an electronic structural treatment of chemical bonding by XP3P. We anticipate that the XP3P model will be useful for studying proton transport in solution and solid phases as well as across

  1. Impacts of Saharan dust on downward irradiance and photosynthetically available radiation in the water column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical approach was used to quantify the modification of the underwater light field in amplitude (magnitude effect and spectral distribution (spectral effect by different atmospheric conditions altering the incident light. The approach based on an optical model in connection with radiation measurements in the area off Northwest Africa. Key inputs of the model were parameterized magnitude and spectral effects. Various atmospheric conditions were considered: clear sky, dusty sky without clouds, cloudy sky without dust and skies with different ratios of dust and clouds. Their impacts were investigated concerning the modification of the downward irradiance and photosynthetically available radiation in the water column. The impact on downward irradiance depended on the wavelength, the water depth, the optical water properties, the dust and cloud properties, and the ratio of clouds to dust. The influence of clouds on the amplitude can be much higher than that of dust. Saharan dust reduced the photosynthetically available radiation in the water column. Ocean regions were more influenced than coastal areas. Compensations of the magnitude and spectral effects were observed at special water depths in ocean regions and at atmospheric conditions with definite cloud to dust ratios.

  2. Processes controlling mid-water column oxygen minima over the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxia; Hetland, Robert D.; DiMarco, Steven F.; Fennel, Katja

    2015-04-01

    We investigate distributions of dissolved oxygen over the Texas-Louisiana shelf using spatially highly resolved observations in combination with a regional circulation model with simple oxygen dynamics. The observations were collected using a towed, undulating CTD during the Mechanisms Controlling Hypoxia (MCH) program. Mid-water oxygen minimum layers (dissolved oxygen lower than 3.2 mL L-1) were detected in many transects. These oxygen minimum layers are connected with the bottom boundary layer and follow the pycnocline seaward as a tongue of low oxygen into the mid-water column. T-S diagrams highlighting the low oxygen minima in both observations and simulations imply direct connections between low-oxygen bottom water and the oxygen minimum layer. The dynamics of these oxygen minimum layers in the mid-water column are examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Convergence within the bottom boundary layer relative to density surfaces is calculated, results show that there is a convergence in the bottom boundary layer at the location where the pycnocline intersects the bottom. Buoyancy advection forced by bottom Ekman transport creates this convergent flow, and the corresponding low-oxygen intrusion. Similar intrusions of near-bottom water into the pycnocline are observed in other regions. The presence of hypoxia within the bottom boundary layer in the northern Gulf of Mexico creates a unique situation in which these intrusions are also associated with low dissolved oxygen.

  3. A water column study of methane around gas flares located at the West Spitsbergen continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentz, Torben; Damm, Ellen; von Deimling, Jens Schneider

    2014-01-01

    and ebullition of methane into the water column at more than 250 sites in an area of 665 km2. We conducted a detailed study of a subregion of this area, which covers an active gas ebullition area of 175 km2 characterized by 10 gas flares reaching from the seafloor at ∼245 m up to 50 m water depth to identify...... ebullition flare area revealed that the methane concentration gradient is strongly controlled by the pycnocline. While high methane concentrations of up to 524 nmol L1 were measured below the pycnocline, low methane concentrations of less than 20 nmol L1 were observed in the water column above. Variations...... in the δ13CCH4 values point to a 13C depleted methane source (∼ –60‰ VPDB) being mainly mixed with a background values of the ambient water (∼–37.5‰ VPDB). A gas bubble dissolution model indicates that ∼80% of the methane released from gas bubbles into the ambient water takes place below the pycnocline...

  4. Modeling and Circumventing the Effect of Sediments and Water Column on Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, P.

    2017-12-01

    Teleseismic P-wave receiver functions are routinely used to resolve crust and mantle structure in various geologic settings. Receiver functions are approximations to the Earth's Green's functions and are composed of various scattered phase arrivals, depending on the complexity of the underlying Earth structure. For simple structure, the dominant arrivals (converted and back-scattered P-to-S phases) are well separated in time and can be reliably used in estimating crustal velocity structure. In the presence of sedimentary layers, strong reverberations typically produce high-amplitude oscillations that contaminate the early part of the wave train and receiver functions can be difficult to interpret in terms of underlying structure. The effect of a water column also limits the interpretability of under-water receiver functions due to the additional acoustic wave propagating within the water column that can contaminate structural arrivals. We perform numerical modeling of teleseismic Green's functions and receiver functions using a reflectivity technique for a range of Earth models that include thin sedimentary layers and overlying water column. These modeling results indicate that, as expected, receiver functions are difficult to interpret in the presence of sediments, but the contaminating effect of the water column is dependent on the thickness of the water layer. To circumvent these effects and recover source-side structure, we propose using an approach based on transfer function modeling that bypasses receiver functions altogether and estimates crustal properties directly from the waveforms (Frederiksen and Delayney, 2015). Using this approach, reasonable assumptions about the properties of the sedimentary layer can be included in forward calculations of the Green's functions that are convolved with radial waveforms to predict vertical waveforms. Exploration of model space using Monte Carlo-style search and least-square waveform misfits can be performed to

  5. The effect of lead from sediment bioturbation by Lumbriculus variegatus on Daphnia magna in the water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Emmanuel R; Klerks, Paul L

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the bioavailability and potential toxicity to Daphnia magna of lead released to the water column due to bioturbation by Lumbriculus variegatus. Experiments used microcosms with Pb-spiked sediment, with or without worms in the sediment, and with D. magna present in the water column. The daphniids were allowed free movement or were restricted to flow-through containers, in order to assess the influence of their direct contact with the contaminated sediment. A control group consisted of D. magna in clean moderately hard reconstituted water. At the end of the 12-day experiment, D. magna survival, reproduction, biomass, and Pb-bioaccumulation were determined. Water column turbidity and Pb levels were quantified to assess their influence on the Pb toxicity and bioaccumulation. The bioturbation by L. variegatus increased Pb levels and turbidity in the water column. While this resulted in an increased Pb bioaccumulation by the D. magna, the water column Pb levels and the Pb bioaccumulation were insufficient to bring about toxic effects for the survival, reproduction, and biomass of the daphniids. Contact of D. magna with the sediment resulted in an increase in their Pb bioaccumulation, with water turbidity and Pb data, suggesting that these crustaceans also acted as bioturbators. The increase in Pb bioaccumulation in D. magna as a consequence of bioturbation by L. variegatus demonstrates the potential for bioturbation to enhance contaminant toxicity to organisms in the water column, though this potential appeared relatively low in the case of lead.

  6. The preparation of a poly (pentaerythritol tetraglycidyl ether-co-poly ethylene imine) organic monolithic capillary column and its application in hydrophilic interaction chromatography for polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye; Shu, Yan; Yang, Zihui; Lv, Xumei; Tan, Wangming; Chen, Yingzhuang; Ma, Ming; Chen, Bo

    2017-10-02

    An easy single-step thermal treatment "one-pot" approach for the preparation of poly (pentaerythritol tetraglycidyl ether-co-poly ethylene imine) organic monolithic capillary columns was developed successfully. The column was prepared by the epoxy-amine ring-opening polymerization of pentaerythritol tetraglycidyl ether (PTE) with poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) using acetonitrile (ACN) and polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600) as the porogenic system at 60 °C for 12 h. The obtained monolith was homogeneous and permeable. It achieved the high-efficiency separation of polar molecules including amides, nucleosides, bases, phenols, and benzoic acids in capillary liquid chromatography (cLC). The highest column efficiency reached ca. 101,000 plates/m (for guanine) on monolith poly(PTE-co-PEI) at 0.64 mm/s, and satisfactory chromatographic performance with column efficiencies ranged from 45,500 to 97,000 plates/m was achieved for the four amides. A typical hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) retention mechanism was observed with high organic solvent contents (>60% ACN). Also, the polymer-based monolithic column was successfully applied to separate the tumor markers. Furthermore, the poly(PTE-co-PEI) monolith could be easily modified with 1, 2-epoxydodecane, which reacted with the amino groups presented on the surface of the poly(PTE-co-PEI) monolith. Hydrophobic interactions were observed during the separation of alkylbenzenes and anilines on the post-modified poly(PTE-co-PEI) monolith. Together, these results confirm the feasibility of the epoxy-amine ring-opening polymerization reaction during the fabrication of a monolithic column with high efficiency for cLC applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimates of Leaf Relative Water Content from Optical Polarization Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, R. P.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    2017-12-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plant canopies remains a long term goal of remote sensing research. Existing approaches to remotely sensing canopy water status, such as the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and the Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT), have limitations. The CWSI, based upon remotely sensing canopy radiant temperature in the thermal infrared spectral region, does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWT is based upon the physics of water-light interaction in the 900-2000nm spectral region, not plant physiology. Our goal, development of a remote sensing technique for estimating plant water status based upon measurements in the VIS/NIR spectral region, would potentially provide remote sensing access to plant dehydration physiology - to the cellular photochemistry and structural changes associated with water deficits in leaves. In this research, we used optical, crossed polarization filters to measure the VIS/NIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, for 78 corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) leaves having relative water contents (RWC) between 0.60 and 0.98. Our results show that as RWC decreases R increases while T decreases. Our results tie R and T changes in the VIS/NIR to leaf physiological changes - linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf - and perhaps of a plant canopy - might be possible in the future.

  8. Properties of the Water Column and Bottom Derived from AVIRIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Carder, Kendall L.; Chen, F. Robert; Peacock, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    Using AVIRIS data as an example, we show in this study that the optical properties of the water column and bottom of a large, shallow area can be adequately retrieved using a model-driven optimization technique. The simultaneously derived properties include bottom depth, bottom albedo, and water absorption and backscattering coefficients, which in turn could be used to derive concentrations of chlorophyll, dissolved organic matter, and suspended sediments. The derived bottom depths were compared with a bathymetry chart and a boat survey and were found to agree very well. Also, the derived bottom-albedo image shows clear spatial patterns, with end members consistent with sand and seagrass. The image of absorption and backscattering coefficients indicates that the water is quite horizontally mixed. These results suggest that the model and approach used work very well for the retrieval of sub-surface properties of shallow-water environments even for rather turbid environments like Tampa Bay, Florida.

  9. Thermal Thresholds of Phytoplankton Growth in Polar Waters and Their Consequences for a Warming Polar Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Coello-Camba

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polar areas are experiencing the steepest warming rates on Earth, a trend expected to continue in the future. In these habitats, phytoplankton communities constitute the basis of the food web and their thermal tolerance may dictate how warming affects these delicate environments. Here, we compiled available data on thermal responses of phytoplankton growth in polar waters. We assembled 53 growth-vs.-temperature curves (25 from the Arctic, 28 from the Southern oceans, indicating the limited information available for these ecosystems. Half of the data from Arctic phytoplankton came from natural communities where low ambient concentrations could limit growth rates. Phytoplankton from polar waters grew faster under small temperature increases until reaching an optimum (TOPT, and slowed when temperatures increased beyond this value. This left-skewed curves were characterized by higher activation energies (Ea for phytoplankton growth above than below the TOPT. Combining these thermal responses we obtained a community TOPT of 6.5°C (±0.2 and 5.2°C (±0.1 for Arctic and Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, respectively. These threshold temperatures were already exceeded at 70°N during the first half of August 2013, evidenced by sea surface temperatures (SSTs, satellite data, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov. We forecasted SSTs for the end of the twenty-first century by assuming an overall 3°C increase, equivalent to a low emission scenario. Our forecasts show that SSTs at 70°N are expected to exceed TOPT during summer by 2100, and during the first half of August at 75°N. While recent Arctic spring temperatures average 0.5°C and −0.7°C at 70°N and 75°N, respectively, they could increase to 2.8°C at 70°N and 2.2°C at 75°N as we approach 2100. Such temperature increases could lead to intense phytoplankton blooms, shortened by fast nutrient consumption. As SSTs increase, thermal thresholds for phytoplankton growth would be eventually exceeded

  10. Thermal Thresholds of Phytoplankton Growth in Polar Waters and Their Consequences for a Warming Polar Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, Alexandra

    2017-06-02

    Polar areas are experiencing the steepest warming rates on Earth, a trend expected to continue in the future. In these habitats, phytoplankton communities constitute the basis of the food web and their thermal tolerance may dictate how warming affects these delicate environments. Here, we compiled available data on thermal responses of phytoplankton growth in polar waters. We assembled 53 growth-vs.-temperature curves (25 from the Arctic, 28 from the Southern oceans), indicating the limited information available for these ecosystems. Half of the data from Arctic phytoplankton came from natural communities where low ambient concentrations could limit growth rates. Phytoplankton from polar waters grew faster under small temperature increases until reaching an optimum (TOPT), and slowed when temperatures increased beyond this value. This left-skewed curves were characterized by higher activation energies (Ea) for phytoplankton growth above than below the TOPT. Combining these thermal responses we obtained a community TOPT of 6.5°C (±0.2) and 5.2°C (±0.1) for Arctic and Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, respectively. These threshold temperatures were already exceeded at 70°N during the first half of August 2013, evidenced by sea surface temperatures (SSTs, satellite data, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov). We forecasted SSTs for the end of the twenty-first century by assuming an overall 3°C increase, equivalent to a low emission scenario. Our forecasts show that SSTs at 70°N are expected to exceed TOPT during summer by 2100, and during the first half of August at 75°N. While recent Arctic spring temperatures average 0.5°C and −0.7°C at 70°N and 75°N, respectively, they could increase to 2.8°C at 70°N and 2.2°C at 75°N as we approach 2100. Such temperature increases could lead to intense phytoplankton blooms, shortened by fast nutrient consumption. As SSTs increase, thermal thresholds for phytoplankton growth would be eventually exceeded during bloom

  11. Nitrification and the ammonia-oxidizing communities in the central Baltic Sea water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, Helena; Ward, Bess B.; Dippner, Joachim W.; Hietanen, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    The redoxclines that form between the oxic and anoxic water layers in the central Baltic Sea are sites of intensive nitrogen cycling. To gain better understanding of nitrification, we measured the biogeochemical properties along with potential nitrification rates and analyzed the assemblages of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea using functional gene microarrays. To estimate nitrification in the entire water column, we constructed a regression model for the nitrification rates and applied it to the conditions prevailing in the area in 2008-2012. The highest ammonia oxidation rates were found in a thin layer at the top of the redoxcline and the rates quickly decreased below detection limit when oxygen was exhausted. This is probably because extensive suboxic layers, which are known to harbor pelagic nitrification, are formed only for short periods after inflows in the Baltic Sea. The nitrification rates were some of the highest measured in the water columns, but the thickness of the layer where conditions were favorable for nitrification, was very small and it remained fairly stable between years. However, the depth of the nitrification layer varied substantially between years, particularly in the eastern Gotland Basin (EGB) due to turbulence in the water column. The ammonia oxidizer communities clustered differently between the eastern and western Gotland Basin (WGB) and the composition of ammonia-oxidizing assemblages correlated with the environmental variables. The ammonia oxidizer community composition was more even in the EGB, which may be related to physical instability of the redoxcline that does not allow predominance of a single archetype, whereas in the WGB, where the position of the redoxcline is more constant, the ammonia-oxidizing community was less even. Overall the ammonia-oxidizing communities in the Baltic Sea redoxclines were very evenly distributed compared to other marine environments where microarrays have been applied previously.

  12. Water-Column Stratification Observed along an AUV-Tracked Isotherm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Messié, M.; Ryan, J. P.; Kieft, B.; Stanway, M. J.; Hobson, B.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Raanan, B. Y.; Smith, J. M.; Chavez, F.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of marine physical, chemical and microbiological processes benefit from observing in a Lagrangian frame of reference, i.e. drifting with ambient water. Because these processes can be organized relative to specific density or temperature ranges, maintaining observing platforms within targeted environmental ranges is an important observing strategy. We have developed a novel method to enable a Tethys-class long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) (which has a propeller and a buoyancy engine) to track a target isotherm in buoyancy-controlled drift mode. In this mode, the vehicle shuts off its propeller and autonomously detects the isotherm and stays with it by actively controlling the vehicle's buoyancy. In the June 2015 CANON (Controlled, Agile, and Novel Observing Network) Experiment in Monterey Bay, California, AUV Makai tracked a target isotherm for 13 hours to study the coastal upwelling system. The tracked isotherm started from 33 m depth, shoaled to 10 m, and then deepened to 29 m. The thickness of the tracked isotherm layer (within 0.3°C error from the target temperature) increased over this duration, reflecting weakened stratification around the isotherm. During Makai's isotherm tracking, another long-range AUV, Daphne, acoustically tracked Makai on a circular yo-yo trajectory, measuring water-column profiles in Makai's vicinity. A wave glider also acoustically tracked Makai, providing sea surface measurements on the track. The presented method is a new approach for studying water-column stratification, but requires careful analysis of the temporal and spatial variations mingled in the vehicles' measurements. We will present a synthesis of the water column's stratification in relation to the upwelling conditions, based on the in situ measurements by the mobile platforms, as well as remote sensing and mooring data.

  13. Diagnostic-Photographic Determination of Drag/Lift/Torque Coefficients of High Speed Rigid Body in Water Column

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Peter C; Fan, Chenwu; Gefken, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of rigid body falling through water column with a high speed (such as Mk-84 bomb) needs formulas for drag/lift and torque coefficients, which depend on various physical processes such as supercavitation and bubbles...

  14. Links between viral and prokaryotic communities throughout the water column in the (sub)tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Corte, Daniele; Sintes, Eva; Winter, Christian; Yokokawa, Taichi; Reinthaler, Thomas; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Viral and prokaryotic abundance, production and diversity were determined throughout the water column of the subtropical Atlantic Ocean to assess potential variations in the relation between viruses and prokaryotes. Prokaryotic abundance and heterotrophic activity decreased by one and three orders

  15. An evaluation of physical and biogeochemical processes regulating perennial suboxic conditions in the water column of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.

    that oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Arabian Sea is regulated largely by physical processes in association with biogeochemical cycling of oxygen. This results in perennial suboxic conditions in the water column with no significant seasonal variability...

  16. Lake Mixing Regime Influences Arsenic Transfer from Sediments into the Water Column and Uptake in Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawel, J.; Barrett, P. M.; Hull, E.; Burkart, K.; McLean, J.; Hargrave, O.; Neumann, R.

    2017-12-01

    The former ASARCO copper smelter in Ruston, WA, now a Superfund site, contaminated a large area of the south-central Puget Sound region with arsenic over its almost 100-year history. Arsenic, a priority Superfund contaminant and carcinogen, is a legacy pollutant impacting aquatic ecosystems in urban lakes downwind of the ASARCO emissions stack. We investigated the impact of lake mixing regime on arsenic transfer from sediments into lake water and aquatic biota. We regularly collected water column and plankton samples from four study lakes for two years, and deployed sediment porewater peepers and sediment traps to estimate arsenic flux rates to and from the sediments. In lakes with strong seasonal stratification, high aqueous arsenic concentrations were limited to anoxic hypolimnetic waters while low arsenic concentrations were observed in oxic surface waters. However, in polymictic, shallow lakes, we observed elevated arsenic concentrations throughout the entire oxic water column. Sediment flux estimates support higher rates of arsenic release from sediments and vertical transport. Because high arsenic in oxic waters results in spatial overlap between arsenate, a phosphate analog, and lake biota, we observed enhanced trophic transfer of arsenic in polymictic, shallow study lakes, with higher arsenic accumulation (up to an order of magnitude) in both phytoplankton and zooplankton compared to stratified lakes. Chemical and physical mechanisms for higher steady-state arsenic concentrations will be explored. Our work demonstrates that physical mixing processes coupled with sediment/water redox status exert significant control over bioaccumulation, making shallow, periodically-mixed urban lakes uniquely vulnerable to environmental and human health risks from legacy arsenic contamination.

  17. Chlorophyll fluorescence extraction from water-leaving radiance of algae-containing water through polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Pang, Huifang; Liu, Yongjian; Chen, Yanlong; Jiang, Lingling

    2017-12-01

    When measuring reflectance spectra, it is very important to accurately extract chlorophyll fluorescence from elastic- scattering light in water-leaving radiance. The elastic scattering of light by water particles produces partially polarized light. In contrast, chlorophyll fluorescence in planktonic algae yields completely unpolarized light. These properties can be used to separate fluorescent signals from the water-leaving radiance and thus to determine chlorophyll concentration. The algal species Aureococcus anophagefferens was used to conduct a laboratory polarization experiment. For the tests, we used a field spectroradiometer and a polarizer; measurements were collected using two different observation modes. The chlorophyll fluorescence curve extracted through polarization shows an excellent match with the results obtained using the fluorospectro photometer for both measurement modes, suggesting that polarization-based chlorophyll fluorescence extraction may be feasible. The extracted fluorescence is more reliable at incident zenith angles ranging from 30° to 60°. For algae-containing water, the results improve with increasing chlorophyll concentration. This method could help improve chlorophyll concentration measurement and the remote-sensing detection of resulting harmful algae blooms.

  18. Natural Jordanian zeolite: removal of heavy metal ions from water samples using column and batch methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Hutaf M; Massadeh, Adnan M; Younes, Hammad A

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption behavior of natural Jordanian zeolites with respect to Cd(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Pb(2 + ), and Zn(2 + ) was studied in order to consider its application to purity metal finishing drinking and waste water samples under different conditions such as zeolite particle size, ionic strength and initial metal ion concentration. In the present work, a new method was developed to remove the heavy metal by using a glass column as the one that used in column chromatography and to make a comparative between the batch experiment and column experiment by using natural Jordanian zeolite as adsorbent and some heavy metals as adsorbate. The column method was used using different metal ions concentrations ranged from 5 to 20 mg/L with average particle size of zeolite ranged between 90 and 350 mum, and ionic strength ranged from 0.01 to 0.05. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used for analysis of these heavy metal ions, the results obtained in this study indicated that zeolitic tuff is an efficient ion exchanger for removing heavy metals, in particular the fine particle sizes of zeolite at pH 6, whereas, no clear effect of low ionic strength values is noticed on the removal process. Equilibrium modeling of the removal showed that the adsorption of Cd(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Pb(2 + ), and Zn(2 + ) were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR). The sorption energy E determined in the DKR equation (9.129, 10.000, 10.541, and 11.180 kJ/mol for Zn(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Cd(2 + ) and Pb(2 + ) respectively) which revealed the nature of the ion-exchange mechanism.

  19. Application of the Spectral Structure Parameterization technique: retrieval of total water vapor columns from GOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a recently proposed spectral sampling technique for measurements of atmospheric transmissions called the Spectral Structure Parameterization (SSP in order to retrieve total water vapor columns (WVC from reflectivity spectra measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME. SSP provides a good compromise between efficiency and speed when performing retrievals on highly structured spectra of narrow-band absorbers like water vapor. We show that SSP can be implemented in a radiative transfer scheme which treats both direct-path absorption and absorption by singly-scattered light directly. For the retrieval we exploit a ro-vibrational overtone band of water vapor located in the visible around 590 nm. We compare our results to independent values given by the data assimilation model of ECMWF. In addition, results are compared to those obtained from the more accurate, but more computationally expensive, Optical Absorption Coefficient Spectroscopy (OACS.

  20. A compendium of geochemical information from the Saanich Inlet water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Beltrán, Mónica; Hawley, Alyse K.; Capelle, David; Zaikova, Elena; Walsh, David A.; Mueller, Andreas; Scofield, Melanie; Payne, Chris; Pakhomova, Larysa; Kheirandish, Sam; Finke, Jan; Bhatia, Maya; Shevchuk, Olena; Gies, Esther A.; Fairley, Diane; Michiels, Céline; Suttle, Curtis A.; Whitney, Frank; Crowe, Sean A.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2017-10-01

    Extensive and expanding oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) exist at variable depths in coastal and open ocean waters. As oxygen levels decline, nutrients and energy are increasingly diverted away from higher trophic levels into microbial community metabolism, resulting in fixed nitrogen loss and production of climate active trace gases including nitrous oxide and methane. While ocean deoxygenation has been reported on a global scale, our understanding of OMZ biology and geochemistry is limited by a lack of time-resolved data sets. Here, we present a historical dataset of oxygen concentrations spanning fifty years and nine years of monthly geochemical time series observations in Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada that undergoes recurring changes in water column oxygenation status. This compendium provides a unique geochemical framework for evaluating long-term trends in biogeochemical cycling in OMZ waters.

  1. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, David J; Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G; Christian, James R; Kramer, Dennis I; Pedersen, Tom F; Cullen, Jay T

    2014-05-13

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals.

  2. Green rust formation controls nutrient availability in a ferruginous water column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegeye, Asfaw; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-rich (ferruginous) conditions were a prevalent feature of the ocean throughout much of Earth's history. The nature of elemental cycling in such settings is poorly understood, however, thus hampering reconstruction of paleoenvironmental conditions during key periods in Earth evolution...... a mechanism for reconstructing ancient ocean chemistry. Such reconstructions depend, however, on precise knowledge of the iron minerals formed in the water column. Here, we combine mineralogical and geochemical analyses to demonstrate formation of the mixed-valence iron mineral, green rust, in ferruginous...

  3. Acoustic reflections in the water column of Krishna-Godavari offshore basin, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sinha, S.K.; Dewangan, P.; Sain, K.

    profile from the CTD data is shown in Fig. 3b. C. Impedance, Reflectivity and Synthetic Seismogram As sound wave travels through sea water column, it refracts and reflects from layers of different acoustic impedances. This layer property (i.e. acoustic... impedance, ܣܫ) is calculated by multiplying density with soundspeed, ܣܫ  ൌ  ߩ  ൈ  ܿ. The density and soundspeed in seawater were calculated from the observed temperature and salinity profiles at the CTD location. The amplitude of reflected sound waves...

  4. Water column distribution and carbon isotopic signal of cholesterol, brassicasterol and particulate organic carbon in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-J. Cavagna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of concentrations and δ13C signatures of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC and sterols provides a powerful approach to study ecological and environmental changes in both the modern and ancient ocean. We applied this tool to study the biogeochemical changes in the modern ocean water column during the BONUS-GoodHope survey (February–March 2008 from Cape Basin to the northern part of the Weddell Gyre. Cholesterol and brassicasterol were chosen as ideal biomarkers of the heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon pools, respectively, because of their ubiquitous and relatively refractory nature. We document depth distributions of concentrations (relative to bulk POC and δ13C signatures of cholesterol and brassicasterol combined with CO2 aq. surface concentration variation. While the relationship between CO2 aq. and δ13C of bulk POC and biomarkers have been reported by others for the surface water, our data show that this persists in mesopelagic and deep waters, suggesting that δ13C signatures of certain biomarkers in the water column could be applied as proxies for surface water CO2 aq. We observed a general increase in sterol δ13C signatures with depth, which is likely related to a combination of particle size effects, selective feeding on larger cells by zooplankton, and growth rate related effects. Our data suggest a key role of zooplankton fecal aggregates in carbon export for this part of the Southern Ocean (SO. Additionally, in the southern part of the transect south of the Polar Front (PF, the release of sea-ice algae during the ice demise in the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ is hypothesized to influence the isotopic signature of sterols in the open ocean. Overall, the combined use of δ13C values and concentrations measurements of both bulk organic C and specific sterols throughout the water column offers the promising potential to explore the recent history of plankton and the fate of organic matter in the SO.

  5. Water quality and nitrogen mass loss from anaerobic lagoon columns receiving pretreated influent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szogi, Ariel A; Vanotti, Matias B

    2014-07-01

    Control methods are needed to abate NH losses from swine anaerobic lagoons to reduce the contribution of confined swine operations to air pollution. In a 15-mo meso-scale column study, we evaluated the effect of manure pretreatment on water quality, reduction of N losses, and sludge accumulation in swine lagoons using (i) enhanced solid-liquid separation with polymer (SS) and (ii) solid-liquid separation plus biological N treatment using nitrification-denitrification (SS + NDN). A conventional anaerobic lagoon was included as a control. Concentrations of total Kjeldahl N (TKN), total ammoniacal N (TAN), and NO-N were monitored during the course of the study, and the volumes of column liquid and sludge were used to estimate N mass flows. At the end of the study, TKN and TAN concentrations in the liquid of SS columns were 35 and 37% lower than the control, respectively, and TKN and TAN concentrations in SS + NDN were 97 and 99% lower than the control. The N mass flow analysis revealed that SS reduced total N inflow by 30% and SS + NDN by 82% compared with the control. The SS was ineffective at reducing NH losses compared with the control. Instead, SS + NDN effectively reduced total NH losses by 50%, most of which occurred during the first 6 mo of the study. Although both pretreatments can stop the mass accumulation of total N in sludge, SS + NDN had the advantage of improving water quality and abating NH emissions from treated lagoons. As an additional environmental benefit, SS + NDN effluents could be used for crop irrigation without the risk of NH losses during land application. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Coastal circulation and water column properties off Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Molokai, Hawaii, 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Presto, Katherine; Brown, Eric K.

    2011-01-01

    More than 2.2 million measurements of oceanographic forcing and the resulting water-column properties were made off U.S. National Park Service's Kalaupapa National Historical Park on the north shore of Molokai, Hawaii, between 2008 and 2010 to understand the role of oceanographic processes on the health and sustainability of the area's marine resources. The tides off the Kalaupapa Peninsula are mixed semidiurnal. The wave climate is dominated by two end-members: large northwest Pacific winter swell that directly impacts the study site, and smaller, shorter-period northeast trade-wind waves that have to refract around the peninsula, resulting in a more northerly direction before propagating over the study site. The currents primarily are alongshore and are faster at the surface than close to the seabed; large wave events, however, tend to drive flow in a more cross-shore orientation. The tidal currents flood to the north and ebb to the south. The waters off the peninsula appear to be a mix of cooler, more saline, deeper oceanic waters and shallow, warmer, lower-salinity nearshore waters, with intermittent injections of freshwater, generally during the winters. Overall, the turbidity levels were low, except during large wave events. The low overall turbidity levels and rapid return to pre-event background levels following the cessation of forcing suggest that there is little fine-grained material. Large wave events likely inhibit the settlement of fine-grained sediment at the site. A number of phenomena were observed that indicate the complexity of coastal circulation and water-column properties in the area and may help scientists and resource managers to better understand the implications of the processes on marine ecosystem health.

  7. European Multidisciplinary seafloor and the Observatory of the water column for Development; The setup of an interoperable Generic Sensor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danobeitia, J.; Oscar, G.; Bartolomé, R.; Sorribas, J.; Del Rio, J.; Cadena, J.; Toma, D. M.; Bghiel, I.; Martinez, E.; Bardaji, R.; Piera, J.; Favali, P.; Beranzoli, L.; Rolin, J. F.; Moreau, B.; Andriani, P.; Lykousis, V.; Hernandez Brito, J.; Ruhl, H.; Gillooly, M.; Terrinha, P.; Radulescu, V.; O'Neill, N.; Best, M.; Marinaro, G.

    2016-12-01

    European Multidisciplinary seafloor and the Observatory of the water column for Development (EMSODEV) is a Horizon-2020 UE project whose overall objective is the operationalization of eleven marine observatories and four test sites distributed throughout Europe, from the Arctic to the Atlantic, from the Mediterranean to the Black Sea. The whole infrastructure is managed by the European consortium EMSO-ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) with the participation of 8 European countries and other partner countries. Now, we are implementing a Generic Sensor Module (EGIM) within the EMSO ERIC distributed marine research infrastructure. Our involvement is mainly on developing standard-compliant generic software for Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) on EGIM device. The main goal of this development is to support the sensors data acquisition on a new interoperable EGIM system. The EGIM software structure is made up of one acquisition layer located between the recorded data at EGIM module and the data management services. Therefore, two main interfaces are implemented: first, assuring the EGIM hardware acquisition and second allowing push and pull data from data management layer (Sensor Web Enable standard compliant). All software components used are Open source licensed and has been configured to manage different roles on the whole system (52º North SOS Server, Zabbix Monitoring System). The acquisition data module has been implemented with the aim to join all components for EGIM data acquisition and server fulfilling SOS standards interface. The system is already achieved awaiting for the first laboratory bench test and shallow water test connection to the OBSEA node, offshore Vilanova I la Geltrú (Barcelona, Spain). The EGIM module will record a wide range of ocean parameters in a long-term consistent, accurate and comparable manner from disciplines such as biology, geology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and computer science, from polar to subtropical

  8. Evaluation of highly polar ionic liquid gas chromatographic column for the determination of the fatty acids in milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonte, Pierluigi; Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Kramer, John K G; Mossoba, Magdi M; Sidisky, Len; Tyburczy, Cynthia; Rader, Jeanne I

    2012-04-13

    The SLB-IL111, a new ionic liquid capillary column for gas chromatography available from Supelco Inc., was recently shown to provide enhanced separation of unsaturated geometric and positional isomers of fatty acid (FAs) when it was compared to cyanopropylsiloxane (CPS) columns currently recommended for the analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). A 200 m SLB-IL111 capillary column, operated under a combined temperature and eluent flow gradient, was successfully used to resolve most of the FAs contained in milk fat in a single 80 min chromatographic separation. The selected chromatographic conditions provided a balanced, simultaneous separation of short-chain (from 4:0), long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and most of the unsaturated FA positional/geometric isomers contained in milk fat. Among the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), these conditions separated t11-18:1 and t10-18:1 FAs, the two most abundant trans fatty acids (t-FA) contained in most dairy products. These t-FAs reportedly have different biological activities. The conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers commonly found in dairy products were separated from each other, including t7,c9-18:2 from c9,t11-18:2, which eliminated the need for their complementary silver ion HPLC analysis. The application of the SLB-IL111 column provided a complementary elution profile of FAMEs to those obtained by CPS columns, allowing for a more comprehensive FA analysis of total milk fat. The FAMEs were identified by the use of available reference materials, previously synthesized and characterized reference mixtures, and prior separations of the milk fat FAMEs by silver ion chromatography based on the number/geometry of double bonds. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Theoretical Insight into the Biodegradation of Solitary Oil Microdroplets Moving through a Water Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapellos, George E; Paraskeva, Christakis A; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Doyle, Patrick S

    2018-02-12

    In the aftermath of oil spills in the sea, clouds of droplets drift into the seawater column and are carried away by sea currents. The fate of the drifting droplets is determined by natural attenuation processes, mainly dissolution into the seawater and biodegradation by oil-degrading microbial communities. Specifically, microbes have developed three fundamental strategies for accessing and assimilating oily substrates. Depending on their affinity for the oily phase and ability to proliferate in multicellular structures, microbes might either attach to the oil surface and directly uptake compounds from the oily phase, or grow suspended in the aqueous phase consuming solubilized oil, or form three-dimensional biofilms over the oil-water interface. In this work, a compound particle model that accounts for all three microbial strategies is developed for the biodegradation of solitary oil microdroplets moving through a water column. Under a set of educated hypotheses, the hydrodynamics and solute transport problems are amenable to analytical solutions and a closed-form correlation is established for the overall dissolution rate as a function of the Thiele modulus, the Biot number and other key parameters. Moreover, two coupled ordinary differential equations are formulated for the evolution of the particle size and used to investigate the impact of the dissolution and biodegradation processes on the droplet shrinking rate.

  10. Occurrence of the parasite genus Hematodinium (Alveolata: Syndinea) in the water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kristina M; Tew, Ian F; Atkinson, R Jim A; Roberts, Emily C

    2011-01-01

    Crustaceans worldwide are infected with alveolate parasites of the genus Hematodinium, causing substantial losses to langoustine and crab fisheries. The distinct seasonality in Hematodinium occurrence in their decapod hosts, as well as unsuccessful attempts at transmission, suggest the existence of life stages outside their benthic crustacean hosts. We used a nested polymerase chain reaction method to detect Hematodinium rDNA in the environment and in potential alternative hosts. Environmental samples from the Clyde Sea, Scotland, were screened during the April release of dinospores and during June and August, when infection prevalence is rare in benthic crustaceans. Hematodinium rDNA was amplified in 15% (14/94) of isolated langoustine larvae, and in 12% (13/111) of crab larvae. In addition, Hematodinium rDNA was present in mixed plankton samples devoid of decapod larvae, but including the 2 μm-10 mm fraction of particulate organic matter in the water column, containing phytoplankton and other zooplankton. These results indicate that Hematodinium occurs in the water column and is harboured by planktonic organisms, including larval stages of the crustacean hosts, when infections are at their lowest in adult hosts. © 2011 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  11. Water quality monitoring system for determination of ionic nutrients by ion-exclusion chromatography with spectrophotometric detection on cation- and anion-exchange resin columns using water eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Daisuke; Nakatani, Nobutake; Mori, Masanobu; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-07-01

    A unified ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) system for monitoring anionic and cationic nutrients like NH4+, NO2-, NO3-, phosphate ion, silicate ion and HCO3- was developed and applied to several environmental waters. The IEC system consisted of four IEC methodologies, including the IEC with ultraviolet (UV) form connected with detection at 210 nm for determining NH4+ on anion-exchange separation column in OH anion-exchange UV-conversion column in I- form in tandem, the IEC with UV-detection at 210 nm for determining simultaneously NO3- and NO3- on cation-exchange separation column in H+ form, the IEC with UV-detection at 210 nm for determining HCO3- on cation-exchange separation column in H+ form connected with anion-exchange UV-conversion column in I- form in tandem, and the IEC with visible-detection based on molybdenum-blue reaction for determining simultaneously silicate and phosphate ions on cation-exchange separation column in H+ form. These IEC systems were combined through three manually-driven 6-port column selection valves to select each separation column to determine selectively the ionic nutrients. Using this sequential water quality monitoring system, the analytical performances such as calibration linearity, reproducibility, detection limit and recovery were also tested under the optimized chromatographic conditions. This novel water quality monitoring system has been applied successfully for the determination of the ionic eutrophication components in sub-urban river waters.

  12. Novel Robotic Platforms for the Accurate Sampling and Monitoring of Water Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Roemi; Apalkov, Andrey; Armada, Manuel

    2016-08-29

    The hydrosphere contains large amounts of suspended particulate material, including living and non-living material that can be found in different compositions and concentrations, and that can be composed of particles of different sizes. The study of this particulate material along water columns plays a key role in understanding a great variety of biological, chemical, and physical processes. This paper presents the conceptual design of two patented robotic platforms that have been conceived for carrying out studies of water properties at desired depths with very high accuracy in the vertical positioning. One platform has been specially designed for operating near to a reservoir bottom, while the other is intended to be used near the surface. Several experimental tests have been conducted in order to validate the proposed approaches.

  13. Novel Robotic Platforms for the Accurate Sampling and Monitoring of Water Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemi Fernández

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydrosphere contains large amounts of suspended particulate material, including living and non-living material that can be found in different compositions and concentrations, and that can be composed of particles of different sizes. The study of this particulate material along water columns plays a key role in understanding a great variety of biological, chemical, and physical processes. This paper presents the conceptual design of two patented robotic platforms that have been conceived for carrying out studies of water properties at desired depths with very high accuracy in the vertical positioning. One platform has been specially designed for operating near to a reservoir bottom, while the other is intended to be used near the surface. Several experimental tests have been conducted in order to validate the proposed approaches.

  14. Centennial Variability in Winter Climate and Water Column Oxygenation During Mediterranean Sapropel S1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilbert, T.; Reichart, G.; Mason, P.; de Lange, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Eastern Mediterranean sapropels have been intensively studied as part of the oceanographic response to climate variability on orbital timescales, but the potential of laminated sapropel intervals for more highly resolved climate reconstruction remains underexploited. Even the highest resolution discrete sample series have been shown to alias short term variability in bottom water oxygenation, a key tracer of regional winter climate. Here we present trace elemental profiles of a laminated S1 sapropel, measured by Laser Ablation ICP-MS scanning of resin embedded sediment at <100µm resolution. The profiles reveal persistent centennial scale oscillations in the accumulation of V, Mo and U, interpreted to record variable oxygenation of the Eastern Mediterranean water column during S1. The results question existing theories about the stability of the 'sapropel state' and provide a new archive of centennial-scale winter climate variability in the wider European region.

  15. Monitoring single-channel water permeability in polarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhova, Liudmila; Horner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Pohl, Peter

    2011-11-18

    So far the determination of unitary permeability (p(f)) of water channels that are expressed in polarized cells is subject to large errors because the opening of a single water channel does not noticeably increase the water permeability of a membrane patch above the background. That is, in contrast to the patch clamp technique, where the single ion channel conductance may be derived from a single experiment, two experiments separated in time and/or space are required to obtain the single-channel water permeability p(f) as a function of the incremental water permeability (P(f,c)) and the number (n) of water channels that contributed to P(f,c). Although the unitary conductance of ion channels is measured in the native environment of the channel, p(f) is so far derived from reconstituted channels or channels expressed in oocytes. To determine the p(f) of channels from live epithelial monolayers, we exploit the fact that osmotic volume flow alters the concentration of aqueous reporter dyes adjacent to the epithelia. We measure these changes by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, which allows the calculation of both P(f,c) and osmolyte dilution within the unstirred layer. Shifting the focus of the laser from the aqueous solution to the apical and basolateral membranes allowed the FCS-based determination of n. Here we validate the new technique by determining the p(f) of aquaporin 5 in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell monolayers. Because inhibition and subsequent activity rescue are monitored on the same sample, drug effects on exocytosis or endocytosis can be dissected from those on p(f).

  16. Small zeolite column tests for removal of cesium from high radioactive contaminated water in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijikata, Takatoshi; Uozumi, Koichi; Tukada, Takeshi; Koyama, Tadafumi; Ishikawa, Keiji; Ono, Shoichi; Suzuki, Shunichi; Denton, Mark; Raymont, John

    2011-01-01

    After the earthquake on March 11th 2011, a large amount (more than 0.12 million m 3 ) of highly radioactive contaminated water had pooled in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. As an urgent issue, highly radioactive nuclides should be removed from this contaminated water to reduce radioactivity in the turbine buildings and nuclear reactor buildings. Removal of Cs from this contaminated water is a key issue, because 134 Cs and 137 Cs are highly radioactive γ-emitting nuclides. The zeolite column system was used for Cs and Sr removal from the radioactive water of Three-Mile Island Unit 2, and modified columns were then developed as a Cs removal method for high-level radioactive water in US national laboratories (WRSC, ORNL, PNNL, Hanford, etc.). In order to treat Fukushima's highly contaminated water with a similar system, it was necessary to understand the properties of zeolite to remove Cs from sea salt as well as the applicability of the column system to a high throughput of around 1200 m 3 /d. The kinetic characteristics of the column were another property to be understood before actual operation. Hence, a functional small-scale zeolite column system was installed in CRIEPI for conducting the experiments to understand decontamination behaviors. Each column has a 2- or 3-cm inner diameter and a 12-cm height, and 12 g of zeolite-type media was packed into the column. The column experiments were carried out with Kurion-zeolite, Herschelite, at different feed rates of simulated water with different concentrations of Cs and sea salt. As for the water with 4 ppm Cs and 0 ppm sea salt, only a 10% Cs concentration was observed in the effluent after 20,000 bed volumes were fed at a rate of 33 cm/min, which corresponds to the actual system. On the other hand, a 40% Cs concentration was observed in the effluent after only 50 bed volumes were passed for water with 2 ppm Cs and 3.4 wt.% sea salt at a feed rate of 34 cm/min. As the absorption of Cs is hampered by the

  17. Numerical study of the air-flow in an oscillating water column wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paixao Conde, J.M. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, New University of Lisbon, Monte de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Gato, L.M.C. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-12-15

    The paper presents a numerical study of the air-flow in a typical pneumatic chamber geometry of an oscillating water column (OWC)-type wave energy converter (WEC), equipped with two vertical-axis air turbines, asymmetrically placed on the top of the chamber. Outwards and inwards, steady and periodic, air-flow calculations were performed to investigate the flow distribution at the turbines' inlet sections, as well as the properties of the air-jet impinging on the water free-surface. The original design of the OWC chamber is likely to be harmful for the operation of the turbines due to the possible air-jet-produced water-spray at the water free-surface subsequently ingested by the turbine. A geometry modification of the air chamber, using a horizontal baffle-plate to deflect the air from the turbines, is proposed and proved to be very effective in reducing the risk of water-spray production from the inwards flow. The flow distribution at the turbines' inlet sections for the outwards flow was found to be fairly uniform for the geometries considered, providing good inlet flow conditions for the turbines. Steady flow was found to be an acceptable model to study the air-flow inside the pneumatic chamber of an OWC-WEC. (author)

  18. Evaluation of an ambient air sampling system for tritium (as tritiated water vapor) using silica gel adsorbent columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, G.W.; Cooper, A.T.; Tinker, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    Ambient air samples for tritium analysis (as the tritiated water vapor [HTO] content of atmospheric moisture) are collected for the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) using the solid adsorbent silica gel. The silica gel has a moisture sensitive indicator which allows for visual observation of moisture movement through a column. Despite using an established method, some silica gel columns showed a complete change in the color indicator for summertime samples suggesting that breakthrough had occurred; thus a series of tests was conducted on the sampling system in an environmental chamber. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum practical sampling volume and overall collection efficiency for water vapor collected on silica gel columns. Another purpose was to demonstrate the use of an impinger-based system to load water vapor onto silica gel columns to provide realistic analytical spikes and blanks for the Hanford Site SESP. Breakthrough volumes (V b ) were measured and the chromatographic efficiency (expressed as the number of theoretical plates [N]) was calculated for a range of environmental conditions. Tests involved visual observations of the change in the silica gel's color indicator as a moist air stream was drawn through the column, measurement of the amount of a tritium tracer retained and then recovered from the silica gel, and gravimetric analysis for silica gel columns exposed in the environmental chamber

  19. A rapid Chelex column method for the determination of metal speciation in natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, K.C. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia); Apte, S.C. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: simon.apte@csiro.au; Batley, G.E. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia); Hales, L.T. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia); Rogers, N.J. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2006-02-03

    A simple, rapid Chelex resin column method has been developed for the determination of metal speciation in natural water samples. A water sample (pH 6-8.2) was pumped through a small plug of the Ca-form of Chelex 100 at a flow rate of 48 {+-} 4 mL/min. The flow regime was optimised to give the shortest possible contact time (0.25 s) but at the same time ensured quantitative uptake of inorganic metal standards onto the resin. Labile metal was calculated as the difference between influent and effluent metal concentrations, measured by some form of atomic spectrometry. In tests with six metal-spiked natural freshwater samples (10 {mu}g/L added metal, pH 7.0-8.2), the labile fraction measured ranged from 87 to 98%, 32 to 64%, 12 to 78%, 38 to 91% and 63 to 89% for cadmium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc, respectively. Application of the method to copper-contaminated waters showed that the results provided a conservative estimate of the fraction inhibiting growth of a copper-sensitive bacterium, thus proving to be a useful measure of bioavailability. Tests on a range of model metal complexes showed that the measured labile metal fraction was inversely proportional to log K, and controlled by the kinetics of metal complex dissociation. Iron-containing colloids, present in natural freshwaters were not retained by the column. The method therefore discriminates trace metal species on the basis of both size and kinetics.

  20. Calibration of the Chemcatcher passive sampler for monitoring selected polar and semi-polar pesticides in surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunold, Roman; Schaefer, Ralf Bernhard; Paschke, Albrecht; Schueuermann, Gerrit; Liess, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Passive sampling is a powerful method for continuous pollution monitoring, but calibration experiments are still needed to generate sampling rates in order to estimate water concentrations for polar compounds. We calibrated the Chemcatcher device with an uncovered SDB-XC Empore disk as receiving phase for 12 polar and semi-polar pesticides in aquatic environments in flow-through tank experiments at two water flow velocities (0.135 m/s and 0.4 m/s). In the 14-day period of exposure the uptake of test substances in the sampler remained linear, and all derived sampling rates R s were in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 L/day. By additionally monitoring the release of two preloaded polar pesticides from the SDB-XC disks over time, very high variation in release kinetics was found, which calls into question the applicability of performance reference compounds. Our study expands the applicability of the Chemcatcher for monitoring trace concentrations of pesticides with frequent occurrence in water. - We calibrated the Chemcatcher passive sampler for current-use polar pesticides in surface waters, allowing its application in future monitoring studies

  1. Effects of a fluctuating water table : Column study on redox dynamics and fate of some organic pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinke, A.J.C.; Dury, O.; Zobrist, J.

    1998-01-01

    The development of the redox conditions has been studied in an initially aerobic column filled with quartz sand coated with ferrihydrite and subjected to a fluctuating water table. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of water table fluctuations on the redox dynamics and the fate of

  2. Prediction of E. coli release from streambed to water column during base flow periods using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial water quality in streams is of importance for recreation, irrigation, and other uses. The streambed sediment has been shown to harbor large fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) population that can be released to water column during high-flow events when sediments are resuspended. There have been...

  3. Strengthening and Stabilization of the Weak Water Saturated Soils Using Stone Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinyakov Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers innovative modern materials and structures for strengthening of weak soils. In this paper describes a method of strengthening of weak saturated soils using stone columns. The method of calculating the physical-mechanical characteristics of reinforced soil mass is presented. Two approaches to determining the stress-strain state and timeframe of consolidation of strengthened soil foundation using the finite element technique in two-dimensional formulation are proposed. The first one approach it is a modeling of reinforced soil mass, where each pile is represented as a separate 2D stripe. The second approach is to the simulation of the strengthened mass the equivalent composite block with improved physical-mechanical characteristics. The use of the equivalent composite block can significantly reduce the time spent on the preparation of a design scheme. The results of calculations were compared. They show the allowable divergence of results of calculation by two methods were presented, and the efficiency of the strengthening of weak water saturated soils by stone column is proved.

  4. Modeling reactive transport of reclaimed water through large soil columns with different low-permeability layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haizhu; Mao, Xiaomin; Barry, D. A.; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Pengxiang

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of different proportions of silt-loam/bentonite mixtures overlying a vadose zone in controlling solute leaching to groundwater was quantified. Laboratory experiments were carried out using three large soil columns, each packed with 200-cm-thick riverbed soil covered by a 2-cm-thick bentonite/silt-loam mixture as the low-permeability layer (with bentonite mass accounting for 12, 16 and 19 % of the total mass of the mixture). Reclaimed water containing ammonium (NH4 +), nitrate (NO3 -), organic matter (OM), various types of phosphorus and other inorganic salts was applied as inflow. A one-dimensional mobile-immobile multi-species reactive transport model was used to predict the preferential flow and transport of typical pollutants through the soil columns. The simulated results show that the model is able to predict the solute transport in such conditions. Increasing the amount of bentonite in the low-permeability layer improves the removal of NH4 + and total phosphorous (TP) because of the longer contact time and increased adsorption capacity. The removal of NH4 + and OM is mainly attributed to adsorption and biodegradation. The increase of TP and NO3 - concentration mainly results from discharge and nitrification in riverbed soils, respectively. This study underscores the role of low-permeability layers as barriers in groundwater protection. Neglect of fingers or preferential flow may cause underestimation of pollution risk.

  5. Heterotrophic Protists in Hypersaline Microbial Mats and Deep Hypersaline Basin Water Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan M. Bernhard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although hypersaline environments pose challenges to life because of the low water content (water activity, many such habitats appear to support eukaryotic microbes. This contribution presents brief reviews of our current knowledge on eukaryotes of water-column haloclines and brines from Deep Hypersaline Anoxic Basins (DHABs of the Eastern Mediterranean, as well as shallow-water hypersaline microbial mats in solar salterns of Guerrero Negro, Mexico and benthic microbialite communities from Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia. New data on eukaryotic diversity from Shark Bay microbialites indicates eukaryotes are more diverse than previously reported. Although this comparison shows that eukaryotic communities in hypersaline habitats with varying physicochemical characteristics are unique, several groups are commonly found, including diverse alveolates, strameonopiles, and fungi, as well as radiolaria. Many eukaryote sequences (SSU in both regions also have no close homologues in public databases, suggesting that these environments host unique microbial eukaryote assemblages with the potential to enhance our understanding of the capacity of eukaryotes to adapt to hypersaline conditions.

  6. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, J. D.; Culling, J. R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used “sustainable” heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  7. Hydrodynamics of a Free Floating Vertical Axisymmetric Oscillating Water Column Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Mavrakos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting a general formulation of the hydrodynamic problem of a floating or restrained oscillating water column device. Three types of first-order boundary value problems are investigated in order to calculate the velocity potential of the flow field around the device. The horizontal and vertical exciting wave forces, the rolling moment, the hydrodynamic parameters, the volume flows, and the drift forces are obtained in order to find the loads on the structure. The efficiency rate of the device is calculated in connection with the absorbed power and the capture length of energy absorption. Finally, the resulting wave motion inside and outside the device and the inner air pressure are examined.

  8. Variable speed control in wells turbine-based oscillating water column devices: optimum rotational speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekube, J.; Garrido, A. J.; Garrido, I.

    2018-03-01

    The effects of climate change and global warming reveal the need to find alternative sources of clean energy. In this sense, wave energy power plants, and in particular Oscillating Water Column (OWC) devices, offer a huge potential of energy harnessing. Nevertheless, the conversion systems have not reached a commercially mature stage yet so as to compete with conventional power plants. At this point, the use of new control methods over the existing technology arises as a doable way to improve the efficiency of the system. Due to the non-uniform response that the turbine shows to the rotational speed variation, the speed control of the turbo-generator may offer a feasible solution for efficiency improvement during the energy conversion. In this context, a novel speed control approach for OWC systems is presented in this paper, demonstrating its goodness and affording promising results when particularized to the Mutriku’s wave power plant.

  9. Transformation of 3-chloroallyl alcohol in water-saturated subsoil studied with a column method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, W.H.J.; Leistra, M.; Matser, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of a newly developed column method for pesticide transformation rate measurements in the subsoil was tested using (Z)- and (E)-3-chloroallyl alcohol as model compounds. The subsoil columns were filled in situ. In the column experiment the half-life ranged from 0.5-5.2 d for

  10. Technical Note: Detection of gas bubble leakage via correlation of water column multibeam images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schneider von Deimling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydroacoustic detection of natural gas release from the seafloor has been conducted in the past by using singlebeam echosounders. In contrast, modern multibeam swath mapping systems allow much wider coverage, higher resolution, and offer 3-D spatial correlation. Up to the present, the extremely high data rate hampers water column backscatter investigations and more sophisticated visualization and processing techniques are needed. Here, we present water column backscatter data acquired with a 50 kHz prototype multibeam system over a period of 75 seconds. Display types are of swath-images as well as of a "re-sorted" singlebeam presentation. Thus, individual and/or groups of gas bubbles rising from the 24 m deep seafloor clearly emerge in the acoustic images, making it possible to estimate rise velocities. A sophisticated processing scheme is introduced to identify those rising gas bubbles in the hydroacoustic data. We apply a cross-correlation technique adapted from particle imaging velocimetry (PIV to the acoustic backscatter images. Temporal and spatial drift patterns of the bubbles are assessed and are shown to match very well to measured and theoretical rise patterns. The application of this processing to our field data gives clear results with respect to unambiguous bubble detection and remote bubble rise velocimetry. The method can identify and exclude the main source of misinterpretations, i.e. fish-mediated echoes. Although image-based cross-correlation techniques are well known in the field of fluid mechanics for high resolution and non-inversive current flow field analysis, we present the first application of this technique as an acoustic bubble detector.

  11. OPERATION OF SEAGOING CRUISE SHIPS IN POLAR WATERS OF THE ANTARCTICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam WOLSKI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As maritime tourism has been developing dynamically in recent years, including cruises into polar areas, the author attempts to identify factors essential for the safety of navigation in those sea areas, with a specific focus on the waters of the Antarctica. The presented methods of navigation take account of hazards that are typical in polar waters. All the considerations are based on the guidelines of the Polar Code.

  12. Diurnal Albedo Variations of the Martian North Polar Water Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, R. F.; Bass, D.

    2002-01-01

    Presentation of findings regarding diurnal variations in the north polar water ice cap of Mars as part of a larger study of the interannual and seasonal variations of the Martian north polar water ice cap. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Performance of passive samplers for monitoring estuarine water column concentrations: 2. Emerging contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Monique M; Burgess, Robert M; Suuberg, Eric M; Cantwell, Mark G; Pennell, Kelly G

    2013-10-01

    Measuring dissolved concentrations of emerging contaminants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and triclosan, can be challenging due to their physicochemical properties resulting in low aqueous solubilities and association with particles. Passive sampling methods have been applied to assess dissolved concentrations in water and sediments primarily for legacy contaminants. Although the technology is applicable to some emerging contaminants, the use of passive samplers with emerging contaminants is limited. In the present study, the performance of 3 common passive samplers was evaluated for sampling PBDEs and triclosan. Passive sampling polymers included low-density polyethylene (PE) and polyoxymethylene (POM) sheets, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. Dissolved concentrations were calculated using measured sampler concentrations and laboratory-derived partition coefficients. Dissolved tri-, tetra-, and pentabrominated PBDE congeners were detected at several of the study sites at very low pg/L concentrations using PE and POM. Calculated dissolved water concentrations of triclosan ranged from 1.7 ng/L to 18 ng/L for POM and 8.8 ng/L to 13 ng/L for PE using performance reference compound equilibrium adjustments. Concentrations in SPME were not reported due to lack of detectable chemical in the PDMS polymer deployed. Although both PE and POM were found to effectively accumulate emerging contaminants from the water column, further research is needed to determine their utility as passive sampling devices for emerging contaminants. © 2013 SETAC.

  14. Ion Chromatographic Method with Post-Column Fuchsin Reaction for Measurement of Bromate in Chlorinated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homer C. Genuino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An ion chromatographic method that employs a post-column reaction with fuchsin and spectrophotometric detection was optimized for measuring bromate (BrO3- in water. BrO3- is converted to Br2 by sodium metabisulfite and then reacted with acidic fuchsin to form a red-colored product that strongly absorbs at 530 nm. The reaction of BrO3- and fuchsin reagent is optimum at pH 3.5 and 65 oC. The method has a limit of quantitation of 4.5 µg L-1 and is linear up to 150 µg L-1 BrO3-. Recoveries from spiked samples were high ranging from 95 to 102 % using external standard calibration and 87 to 103 % using standard addition method. Intra-batch and inter-batch reproducibility studies of the method resulted to RSD values ranging from 0.62 to 2.01 % and percent relative error of 0.12 to 2.94 % for BrO3- concentrations of 10 µg L-1 and 50 µg L-1. This method is free of interferences from common inorganic anions at levels typically found in chlorinated tap drinking water without preconcentration. The optimized method can be applied to trace analysis of bromate in chlorinated tap drinking water samples.

  15. Observation of Mountain Lee Waves with MODIS NIR Column Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapustin, A.; Alexander, M. J.; Ott, L.; Molod, A.; Holben, B.; Susskind, J.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Mountain lee waves have been previously observed in data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) "water vapor" 6.7 micrometers channel which has a typical peak sensitivity at 550 hPa in the free troposphere. This paper reports the first observation of mountain waves generated by the Appalachian Mountains in the MODIS total column water vapor (CWV) product derived from near-infrared (NIR) (0.94 micrometers) measurements, which indicate perturbations very close to the surface. The CWV waves are usually observed during spring and late fall or some summer days with low to moderate CWV (below is approx. 2 cm). The observed lee waves display wavelengths from3-4 to 15kmwith an amplitude of variation often comparable to is approx. 50-70% of the total CWV. Since the bulk of atmospheric water vapor is confined to the boundary layer, this indicates that the impact of thesewaves extends deep into the boundary layer, and these may be the lowest level signatures of mountain lee waves presently detected by remote sensing over the land.

  16. High-Accuracy Measurements of Total Column Water Vapor From the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert R.; Crisp, David; Ott, Lesley E.; O'Dell, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the distribution of water vapor in Earth's atmosphere is of critical importance to both weather and climate studies. Here we report on measurements of total column water vapor (TCWV) from hyperspectral observations of near-infrared reflected sunlight over land and ocean surfaces from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2). These measurements are an ancillary product of the retrieval algorithm used to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, with information coming from three highly resolved spectral bands. Comparisons to high-accuracy validation data, including ground-based GPS and microwave radiometer data, demonstrate that OCO-2 TCWV measurements have maximum root-mean-square deviations of 0.9-1.3mm. Our results indicate that OCO-2 is the first space-based sensor to accurately and precisely measure the two most important greenhouse gases, water vapor and carbon dioxide, at high spatial resolution [1.3 x 2.3 km(exp. 2)] and that OCO-2 TCWV measurements may be useful in improving numerical weather predictions and reanalysis products.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic separations of stereoisomers of chiral basic agrochemicals with polysaccharide-based chiral columns and polar organic mobile phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarashvili, Iza; Shvangiradze, Iamze; Chankvetadze, Lali; Sidamonidze, Shota; Takaishvili, Nino; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2015-12-01

    The separation of the stereoisomers of 23 chiral basic agrochemicals was studied on six different polysaccharide-based chiral columns in high-performance liquid chromatography with various polar organic mobile phases. Along with the successful separation of analyte stereoisomers, emphasis was placed on the effect of the chiral selector and mobile phase composition on the elution order of stereoisomers. The interesting phenomenon of reversal of enantiomer/stereoisomer elution order function of the polysaccharide backbone (cellulose or amylose), type of derivative (carbamate or benzoate), nature, and position of the substituent(s) in the phenylcarbamate moiety (methyl or chloro) and the nature of the mobile phase was observed. For several of the analytes containing two chiral centers all four stereoisomers were resolved with at least one chiral selector/mobile phase combination. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Assessment of pathogen levels in stream water column and bed sediment of Merced River Watershed in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaddella, V. K.; Pandey, P.; Biswas, S.; Lewis, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mitigating pathogen levels in surface water is crucial for protecting public health. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), approximately 480,000 km of rivers/streams are contaminated in the U.S., and a major cause of contamination is elevated levels of pathogen/pathogen indicator. Many of past studies showed considerably higher pathogen levels in sediment bed than that of the stream water column in rivers. In order to improve the understanding of pathogen levels in rivers in California, we carried out an extensive pathogen monitoring study in four different watersheds (Bear Creek, Ingalsbe, Maxwell, and Yosemite watersheds) of Merced River. Stream water and streambed sediment samples were collected from 17 locations. Pathogen levels (E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes) were enumerated in streambed sediment and water column. In addition, the impacts of heat stress on pathogen survival were assessed by inoculating pathogens into the water and sediment samples for understanding the pathogen survival in stream water column and streambed sediment. The pathogen enumeration (in water column and sediment bed) results indicated that the E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes levels were non-detectable in the water column and streambed sediment. The results of heat stress (50◦ C for 180 minutes) test indicated a pathogen decay at one order of magnitude (108 cfu/ml to 107 cfu/ml). Nonetheless, higher pathogen levels (1.13 × 107 cfu/ml) after the heat stress study showed potential pathogen survival at higher temperature. Preliminary results of this study would help in understanding the impacts of elevated temperature on pathogen in stream environment. Further studies are required to test the long-term heat-stress impacts on pathogen survival.

  19. The relationship between phytoplankton distribution and water column characteristics in North West European shelf sea waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehling, Johanna; Davidson, Keith; Bolch, Christopher J S; Brand, Tim D; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton underpin the marine food web in shelf seas, with some species having properties that are harmful to human health and coastal aquaculture. Pressures such as climate change and anthropogenic nutrient input are hypothesized to influence phytoplankton community composition and distribution. Yet the primary environmental drivers in shelf seas are poorly understood. To begin to address this in North Western European waters, the phytoplankton community composition was assessed in light of measured physical and chemical drivers during the "Ellett Line" cruise of autumn 2001 across the Scottish Continental shelf and into adjacent open Atlantic waters. Spatial variability existed in both phytoplankton and environmental conditions, with clear differences not only between on and off shelf stations but also between different on shelf locations. Temperature/salinity plots demonstrated different water masses existed in the region. In turn, principal component analysis (PCA), of the measured environmental conditions (temperature, salinity, water density and inorganic nutrient concentrations) clearly discriminated between shelf and oceanic stations on the basis of DIN:DSi ratio that was correlated with both salinity and temperature. Discrimination between shelf stations was also related to this ratio, but also the concentration of DIN and DSi. The phytoplankton community was diatom dominated, with multidimensional scaling (MDS) demonstrating spatial variability in its composition. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was used to investigate the link between environment and the phytoplankton community. This demonstrated a significant relationship between community composition and water mass as indexed by salinity (whole community), and both salinity and DIN:DSi (diatoms alone). Diatoms of the Pseudo-nitzschia seriata group occurred at densities potentially harmful to shellfish aquaculture, with the potential for toxicity being elevated by the likelihood of DSi limitation of

  20. The relationship between phytoplankton distribution and water column characteristics in North West European shelf sea waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Fehling

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton underpin the marine food web in shelf seas, with some species having properties that are harmful to human health and coastal aquaculture. Pressures such as climate change and anthropogenic nutrient input are hypothesized to influence phytoplankton community composition and distribution. Yet the primary environmental drivers in shelf seas are poorly understood. To begin to address this in North Western European waters, the phytoplankton community composition was assessed in light of measured physical and chemical drivers during the "Ellett Line" cruise of autumn 2001 across the Scottish Continental shelf and into adjacent open Atlantic waters. Spatial variability existed in both phytoplankton and environmental conditions, with clear differences not only between on and off shelf stations but also between different on shelf locations. Temperature/salinity plots demonstrated different water masses existed in the region. In turn, principal component analysis (PCA, of the measured environmental conditions (temperature, salinity, water density and inorganic nutrient concentrations clearly discriminated between shelf and oceanic stations on the basis of DIN:DSi ratio that was correlated with both salinity and temperature. Discrimination between shelf stations was also related to this ratio, but also the concentration of DIN and DSi. The phytoplankton community was diatom dominated, with multidimensional scaling (MDS demonstrating spatial variability in its composition. Redundancy analysis (RDA was used to investigate the link between environment and the phytoplankton community. This demonstrated a significant relationship between community composition and water mass as indexed by salinity (whole community, and both salinity and DIN:DSi (diatoms alone. Diatoms of the Pseudo-nitzschia seriata group occurred at densities potentially harmful to shellfish aquaculture, with the potential for toxicity being elevated by the likelihood of DSi

  1. Multi-column adsorption systems with condenser for tritiated water vapor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotoh, Kenji; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    1996-01-01

    Two types of multi-column adsorption system are proposed as the system for removal of tritiated moisture from tritium process gases or/and handling room atmospheres. The types are of recycle use of adsorption columns, and are composed of twin or triplet columns and one condenser which is used for collecting the adsorbed moisture from columns in desorption process. The systems utilize the dry gas from a working column as the purge gas for regenerating a saturated column and appropriate an active column for recovery of the tritiated moisture passing through the condenser. Each column hence needs the additional amount of adsorbent for collecting the moisture from the condenser. In the modeling and design of an adsorption column, it is primary to estimate the necessary amount of a candidate adsorbent for its packed-bed. The performance of the proposed systems is examined here by analyzing the dependence of the necessary amount of adsorbent for their columns on process operational conditions and adsorbent moisture-adsorption characteristics. The result shows that the necessary amount is sensitive to the types of adsorption isotherm, and suggests that these systems should employ adsorbents which exhibit the Langmuir-type isotherms. (author)

  2. 4SM: A Novel Self-Calibrated Algebraic Ratio Method for Satellite-Derived Bathymetry and Water Column Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Yann G; Favoretto, Fabio

    2017-07-21

    All empirical water column correction methods have consistently been reported to require existing depth sounding data for the purpose of calibrating a simple depth retrieval model; they yield poor results over very bright or very dark bottoms. In contrast, we set out to (i) use only the relative radiance data in the image along with published data, and several new assumptions; (ii) in order to specify and operate the simplified radiative transfer equation (RTE); (iii) for the purpose of retrieving both the satellite derived bathymetry (SDB) and the water column corrected spectral reflectance over shallow seabeds. Sea truth regressions show that SDB depths retrieved by the method only need tide correction. Therefore it shall be demonstrated that, under such new assumptions, there is no need for (i) formal atmospheric correction; (ii) conversion of relative radiance into calibrated reflectance; or (iii) existing depth sounding data, to specify the simplified RTE and produce both SDB and spectral water column corrected radiance ready for bottom typing. Moreover, the use of the panchromatic band for that purpose is introduced. Altogether, we named this process the Self-Calibrated Supervised Spectral Shallow-sea Modeler (4SM). This approach requires a trained practitioner, though, to produce its results within hours of downloading the raw image. The ideal raw image should be a "near-nadir" view, exhibit homogeneous atmosphere and water column, include some coverage of optically deep waters and bare land, and lend itself to quality removal of haze, atmospheric adjacency effect, and sun/sky glint.

  3. Effects of water content on reactive transport of Sr in Chernobyl sand columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szenknect, S. [CEA, Tracers Applications Laboratory, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dewiere, L.; Ardois, C. [IRSN, Environment and Emergency Operations Division, Geosphere-related Risk Analysis Department, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Gaudet, J.P. [UMR 5564 (CNRS/IRD/INPG/UJF), LTHE, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: While transport of non-reactive solutes has been studied extensively in unsaturated porous media, much less is known about the factors that control the transport of sorbing solutes in unsaturated conditions. Three laboratory techniques were used to analyze the transport of Sr in the aeolian sand from Chernobyl Pilot Site [1] in both saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. Batch experiments were performed to study the chemical equilibrium state of the soil/solution system. Stirred flow-through reactor (SFTR) experiments were performed to study the kinetics and reversibility of sorption reactions at the surface of solid particles. Column experiments were also performed in saturated and unsaturated steady flow conditions. Experimental data pointed out a non-linear, instantaneous and reversible sorption process of Sr. A suitable cation-exchange model was used to describe the solute/soil reaction. The former model was coupled with transport models to describe behavior of Sr in saturated [2] and unsaturated flow conditions. Transport properties of sand packed columns have been determined with an inert tracer (HTO). BTCs obtained under saturated conditions exhibit a small amount of dispersion compared to those obtained under unsaturated conditions. Classical advection-dispersion model described successfully saturated tritium breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas a mobile-immobile model (MIM) was required to described asymmetrical unsaturated BTCs. The MIM assumes that the porous medium contains a mobile water phase in which convective-dispersive transport occurs, and a immobile water phase with which solutes can exchange with a first order kinetic. In our experiments, transport by advection in the mobile phase is the predominant process whatever the flow conditions and mass transfer rate between the mobile and immobile regions is the predominant process for broadening the BTCs. Since dispersion is blurred by mass transfer resistance, the

  4. Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Forrest M., III; Chambers, Lin H.; Brooks, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year study affirms that the temperature (Tz) indicated by an inexpensive ($20 to $60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky provides an approximate indication of the total column water vapor (precipitable water or PW). PW was measured by a MICROTOPS II sun photometer. The coefficient of correlation (r2) of the PW and Tz was 0.90, and the rms difference was 3.2 mm. A comparison of the Tz data with the PW provided by a GPS site 31 km NNE yielded an r2 of 0.79, and an rms difference of 5.8 mm. An expanded study compared Tz from eight IR thermometers with PW at various times during the day and night from 17 May to 18 October 2010, mainly at the Texas site and 10 days at Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO). The best results of this comparison were provided by two IR thermometers models that yielded an r2 of 0.96 and an rms difference with the PW of 2.7 mm. The results of both the ongoing 2-year study and the 5-month instrument comparison show that IR thermometers can measure PW with an accuracy (rms difference/mean PW) approaching 10%, the accuracy typically ascribed to sun photometers.

  5. High-resolution passive sampling of dissolved methane in the water column of lakes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A. E.; Cadieux, S. B.; White, J. R.; Pratt, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lakes are important participants in the global carbon cycle, releasing methane in a warming climate and contributing to a positive feedback to climate change. In order to yield detailed methane budgets and understand the implications of warming on methane dynamics, high-resolution profiles revealing methane behavior within the water column need to be obtained. Single day sampling using disruptive techniques has the potential to result in biases. In order to obtain high-resolution, undisturbed profiles of methane concentration and isotopic composition, this study evaluates a passive sampling method over a multi-day equilibration period. Selected for this study were two small lakes (Gatos Research Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer. PDB sampling and pump sampling resulted in statistically similar concentrations (R2=0.89), ranging from 0.85 to 135 uM from PDB and 0.74 to 143 uM from pump sampling. In anoxic waters of the lake, where concentrations were high enough to yield robust isotopic results on the LGR MCIA, δ13C were also similar between the two methods, yielding -73‰ from PDB and -74‰ from pump sampling. Further investigation will produce results for a second lake and methane carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition for both lakes. Preliminary results for this passive sampling method are promising. We envision the use of this technique in future studies of dissolved methane and expect that it will provide a more finely resolved vertical profile, allowing for a more complete understanding of lacustrine methane dynamics.

  6. The Relationship Between the Fine-scale Vertical Distributions of Macrozooplankton, Marine Snow, and Turbulences in the Upper Water Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information Send...Why do sinking mucilage aggregates accumulate in the water column. The Science of the Total Environment 165:15- 22. MacIntyre, S., A.L. Alldredge

  7. Generalist hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities in the oil-polluted water column of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chronopoulou, P.M.; Sanni, G.O.; Silas-Olu, D.I.; van der Meer, J.R.; Timmis, K.N.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; McGenity, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of light crude oil on bacterial communities during an experimental oil spill in the North Sea and in mesocosms (simulating a heavy, enclosed oil spill), and to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from the water column. No

  8. Comparison of Granular Activated Carbon, Natural Clinoptilolite Zeolite, and Anthracite Packed Columns in Removing Mercury from Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Samadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of effective methods for the removal of such pollutants as heavy metals (e.g., mercury from surface and ground water resources introduced by municipal and industrial wastewaters seems to be inevitable, especially in the face of the importance of water reuse in combating water shortages, limited availability of water resources, and imminent risks of a water crisis in Iran. A number of methods are already available for the removal of mercury from water resources. However, these techniques must be investigated for their practicability and economy, in addition to their not only effectiveness. In this research, granular activated carbon, natural zeolite, and anthracite packed-columns were investigated as cheap and effective adsorbents for the removal of mercury. Moreover, the effects of changes in pH (6-8, influent mercury concentrations (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 ppm, contact time (0.5, 1, 2, 3 hr were investigated. Mercury concentration in the samples was determined using a ditizon indicator and spectrophotometry at 492 nm. Results showed that decreasing influent mercury concentration from 1 ppm to 0.25 ppm (under constant conditions increased the removal efficiencies of anthracite, granular activated carbon, and zeolite columns from22%, 63%, and 55% to 28%, 72%, and 64%, respectively. Increasing contact time from 0.5 hr to 3 hr caused the removal efficiencies of these columns to increase from 22%, 56%, and 54% to 42%, 86%, and 82%, respectively. Also, increasing pH level led to increased removal efficiencies of the studied columns. It was found that contact time played a more effective role in enhancing mercury removal efficiency in the granular activated carbon column than in the other two columns. The ranges of mercury removal efficiency obtained for the granular activated carbon, natural zeolite, and anthracite columns under various conditions were (51%-92%, (42%-88%, and (16%-52%, respectively. Based on these results, granular

  9. Fate of parabens and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in aquifer materials columns during step experiments with fresh and sea waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ortiz, C. M.; Boluda-Botella, N.; Prats-Rico, D.; Sentana-Gadea, I.

    2018-02-01

    Coastal areas submitted to seawater intrusion and with discharges from urban and industrial wastewaters, municipal landfill leachates, rivers, recreational waters and other sources are sensitive to be polluted with parabens. Understanding the fate of these compounds in environmental studies, it requires previously the knowledge of the reactive processes in controlled conditions. In this research, laboratory columns experiments were carried out with a group of parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben) and their main degradation compound (4-hydroxybenzoic acid) to study mainly the dynamic sorption processes in different aquifer materials (100% sand and heterogeneous: 81% sand, 9% silt and 10% clay) and with fresh and sea waters, the end members of seawater intrusions. To the column hydrodynamic characterization, tracer assays with increase and decrease of salinity were performed, to obtain the mean residence time of each column and other transport parameters which allow us to compare parabens' sorption in different conditions. The results of the adsorption and desorption of parabens in the sand column demonstrated be fast and simultaneous, with a short delay and without influence of the water salinity. Very different results were found in the column experiments with heterogeneous material, where the presence of clay and organic matter increase the time of adsorption/desorption as the length of the alkyl chain paraben increased, according with their hydrophobicity. It should be noted that despite the quick desorption of the major quantities of parabens, the elution of their trace concentrations was very slow (for the seawater, the buthylparaben required a dimensionless time of 800). Planning the restoration of a coastal aquifer with freshwater, and in the conditions of the studied sand column experiment, it will need a dimensionless time of 160. However, it is necessary to take into account that the studied parabens and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid are

  10. Molecular density functional theory of water including density–polarization coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Lévy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived fromfirst-principles that relies on the particle’s density and multipolar polarization density andincludes the density–polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar densityand vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give morephysical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the fulldensity–pola...

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Essential Oil Components and Fatty Acids in Fennel using Gas Chromatography with a Polar Capillary Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdoska-Bogdanov, Menče; Bogdanov, Jane B; Stefova, Marina

    2015-09-01

    Cultivated and wild growing samples of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae) from R. Macedonia were studied for their volatiles and fatty acid composition. The main essential oil components isolated via hydrodistillation were: trans-anethole (>80%), estragole (method for characterization of both the non-polar volatile and non volatile fractions was developed using n-hexane and dichloromethane (3:1, v/v) in a Soxhlet extraction followed by transesterification. The obtained extracts were then characterized and the dominant fatty acid was 18:1 (petroselinic and oleic acid) 75.0-82.8%, followed by 18:2 (linoleic acid) 10.8-16.2% and other fatty acids: palmitic (4.3-6.9%), stearic (1.2-1.7%) and myristic (0-2.9%). The results for the volatile fraction after Soxhlet extraction and transesterification did not significantly differ from results obtained after hydrodistillation, especially for the main components (trans-anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene), implying that the developed method can be used for simultaneous determination of volatiles and fatty acids.

  12. Aerosol optical properties and precipitable water vapor column in the atmosphere of Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyimbwa, Dennis; Frette, Øyvind; Stamnes, Jakob J; Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hamre, Børge

    2015-02-20

    Between February 2012 and April 2014, we measured and analyzed direct solar radiances at a ground-based station in Bergen, Norway. We discovered that the spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor column (PWVC) retrieved from these measurements have a seasonal variation with highest values in summer and lowest values in winter. The highest value of the monthly median AOT at 440 nm of about 0.16 was measured in July and the lowest of about 0.04 was measured in December. The highest value of the monthly median PWVC of about 2.0 cm was measured in July and the lowest of about 0.4 cm was measured in December. We derived Ångström exponents that were used to deduce aerosol particle size distributions. We found that coarse-mode aerosol particles dominated most of the time during the measurement period, but fine-mode aerosol particles dominated during the winter seasons. The derived Ångström exponent values suggested that aerosols containing sea salt could have been dominating at this station during the measurement period.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Oscillating Water Columns Wave-Structure Interaction in Ocean Energy Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor J. Garrido

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oscillating Water Column (OWC-based power take-off systems are one of the potential solutions to the current energy problems arising from the use of nuclear fission and the consumption of fossil fuels. This kind of energy converter turns wave energy into electric power by means of three different stages: firstly wave energy is transformed into pneumatic energy in the OWC chamber, and then a turbine turns it into mechanical energy and finally the turbogenerator module attached to the turbine creates electric power from the rotational mechanical energy. To date, capture chambers have been the least studied part. In this context, this paper presents an analytical model describing the dynamic behavior of the capture chamber, encompassing the wave motion and its interaction with the OWC structure and turbogenerator module. The model is tested for the case of the Mutriku wave power plant by means of experimental results. For this purpose, representative case studies are selected from wave and pressure drop input-output data. The results show an excellent matching rate between the values predicted by the model and the experimental measured data with a small bounded error in all cases, so that the validity of the proposed model is proven.

  14. A Model Predictive Control-Based Power Converter System for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimara Rajapakse

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the predictability and availability at large scale, wave energy conversion (WEC has still not become a mainstream renewable energy technology. One of the main reasons is the large variations in the extracted power which could lead to instabilities in the power grid. In addition, maintaining the speed of the turbine within optimal range under changing wave conditions is another control challenge, especially in oscillating water column (OWC type WEC systems. As a solution to the first issue, this paper proposes the direct connection of a battery bank into the dc-link of the back-to-back power converter system, thereby smoothening the power delivered to the grid. For the second issue, model predictive controllers (MPCs are developed for the rectifier and the inverter of the back-to-back converter system aiming to maintain the turbine speed within its optimum range. In addition, MPC controllers are designed to control the battery current as well, in both charging and discharging conditions. Operations of the proposed battery direct integration scheme and control solutions are verified through computer simulations. Simulation results show that the proposed integrated energy storage and control solutions are capable of delivering smooth power to the grid while maintaining the turbine speed within its optimum range under varying wave conditions.

  15. Water column productivity and temperature predict coral reef regeneration across the Indo-Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegl, B; Glynn, P W; Wieters, E; Purkis, S; d'Angelo, C; Wiedenmann, J

    2015-02-05

    Predicted increases in seawater temperatures accelerate coral reef decline due to mortality by heat-driven coral bleaching. Alteration of the natural nutrient environment of reef corals reduces tolerance of corals to heat and light stress and thus will exacerbate impacts of global warming on reefs. Still, many reefs demonstrate remarkable regeneration from past stress events. This paper investigates the effects of sea surface temperature (SST) and water column productivity on recovery of coral reefs. In 71 Indo-Pacific sites, coral cover changes over the past 1-3 decades correlated negative-exponentially with mean SST, chlorophyll a, and SST rise. At six monitoring sites (Persian/Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, northern and southern Galápagos, Easter Island, Panama), over half of all corals were reefs in the northwest and central Indian Ocean, as well as the central west Pacific, are at highest risk of degradation, and those at high latitudes the least. The model pinpoints regions where coral reefs presently have the best chances for survival. However, reefs best buffered against temperature and nutrient effects are those that current studies suggest to be most at peril from future ocean acidification.

  16. Nonequilibrium modeling of an ammonia-water rectifyng column via fundamental thermodynamic and transport relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Figueiredo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A nonequilibrium heat and mass transfer model is presented for the steady-state operation of a rectifying column, employed in ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems to dehumidify the ammonia vapor leaving the generator. The thermodynamic state relations of the mixture are derived from two equations representing the Gibbs free energy in terms of temperature, pressure and concentration for the liquid and the vapor phases. Two of the transport properties, surface tension and liquid diffusivity required original relations, as presented here in. The resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved by efficient use of the Newton-Raphson code that minimizes the order of the Jacobian matrix without losing any model information or the quadratic order of convergence of the numerical method. Accuracy tests are performed by grid refinement and by comparison with results in the literature. A sensitivity study is presented showing the influence of some alternative methods for estimation of the transport properties on the temperature and concentration profiles.

  17. Century-Long Warming Trends in the Upper Water Column of Lake Tanganyika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M; Hook, Simon; Huttula, Timo; Kotilainen, Pekka; O'Reilly, Catherine M; Peltonen, Anu; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Sarvala, Jouko; Tamatamah, Rashid; Vadeboncoeur, Yvonne; Wehrli, Bernhard; McIntyre, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika, the deepest and most voluminous lake in Africa, has warmed over the last century in response to climate change. Separate analyses of surface warming rates estimated from in situ instruments, satellites, and a paleolimnological temperature proxy (TEX86) disagree, leaving uncertainty about the thermal sensitivity of Lake Tanganyika to climate change. Here, we use a comprehensive database of in situ temperature data from the top 100 meters of the water column that span the lake's seasonal range and lateral extent to demonstrate that long-term temperature trends in Lake Tanganyika depend strongly on depth, season, and latitude. The observed spatiotemporal variation in surface warming rates accounts for small differences between warming rate estimates from in situ instruments and satellite data. However, after accounting for spatiotemporal variation in temperature and warming rates, the TEX86 paleolimnological proxy yields lower surface temperatures (1.46 °C lower on average) and faster warming rates (by a factor of three) than in situ measurements. Based on the ecology of Thaumarchaeota (the microbes whose biomolecules are involved with generating the TEX86 proxy), we offer a reinterpretation of the TEX86 data from Lake Tanganyika as the temperature of the low-oxygen zone, rather than of the lake surface temperature as has been suggested previously. Our analyses provide a thorough accounting of spatiotemporal variation in warming rates, offering strong evidence that thermal and ecological shifts observed in this massive tropical lake over the last century are robust and in step with global climate change.

  18. Potential interactions between heterotrophic archaea and bacteria for degrading particulate organic carbon in marine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Zhang, C.; Tian, J.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is an essential process in marine carbon cycle, which constitutes an integral component of the marine ecosystem and influences climate change. It is still poorly known, however, how microorganisms interact in utilizing organic matter in the ocean. We have performed metagenomic and qPCR analyses of archaea and bacteria in both particle-attached (>3 mm) and free-living (0.2-3 mm) fractions from surface down to 8727 m in the Mariana Trench. The metagenomic results showed large numbers of genes related to the degradation of valine, leucine, isoleucine and lysine, which were similar between free-living and particle-attached fractions from surface to 6000 m depth intervals. However, the relative abundance of these genes decreased in particle-attached fractions and increased in the free-living fractions below 6000 m depth. This is consistent with the ecophysiology of marine group II (MGII) Euryarchaeota, which are suggested to be able to degrade proteins and lipids. Overall, significant correlation (R2 = 0.95) was observed between the abundance of particle-attached MGII and that of particle-attached heterotrophic bacteria in the Mariana Trench water column; whereas, the correlation was significantly reduced (R2 = 0.34) between free-living MGII and free-living bacteria. We hypothesize that particle-attached MGII and heterotrophic bacteria were mutually beneficial in degrading organic matter, which becomes less important between these organisms in the free-living population.

  19. The effects of red soil in removing phosphorus from water column and reducing phosphorus release from sediment in Lake Taihu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lichun; Pan, Gang

    2014-01-01

    A natural red soil and a lanthanum-modified soil (LMS) were tested to compare their phosphorus (P) adsorption capacities and their effectiveness in removing P from the water column and reducing P release from sediment. The equilibrium of P adsorption demonstrated that the maximum P adsorption for the soil was 1.29 and 2.22 mg g(-1) at pH 8.5 and 5.5, respectively, and for the LMS these were increased by 45.6 and 77.6% at pH 8.5 and 5.5, respectively, indicating that the soil was effective in P adsorption and the doping of lanthanum could substantially increase P adsorption. The sediment-water column incubation showed that, due to the P adsorption of the soil and LMS, the total P in the water column decreased by 58.5, 60.6, 68.2 and 77.2% for 180 g m(-2) soil, 900 g m(-2) soil, 180 g m(-2) LMS and 900 g m(-2) LMS treated systems, respectively, in a short time (6 h), and the capping layer substantially reduced the P release from sediment during column incubation, indicating that the soils were effective in reducing internal P load. However, considering the cost of LMS, the natural soil was suggested to be a cost-effective material to control internal P load.

  20. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan K; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected (1)H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  1. Total column water vapor estimation over land using radiometer data from SAC-D/Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epeloa, Javier; Meza, Amalia

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is retrieving atmospheric total column water vapor (CWV) over land surfaces using a microwave radiometer (MWR) onboard the Scientific Argentine Satellite (SAC-D/Aquarius). To research this goal, a statistical algorithm is used for the purpose of filtering the study region according to the climate type. A log-linear relationship between the brightness temperatures of the MWR and CWV obtained from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements was used. In this statistical algorithm, the retrieved CWV is derived from the Argentinian radiometer's brightness temperature which works at 23.8 GHz and 36.5 GHz, and taking into account CWVs observed from GNSS stations belonging to a region sharing the same climate type. We support this idea, having found a systematic effect when applying the algorithm; it was generated for one region using the previously mentioned criteria, however, it should be applied to additional regions, especially those with other climate types. The region we analyzed is in the Southeastern United States of America, where the climate type is Cfa (Köppen - Geiger classification); this climate type includes moist subtropical mid-latitude climates, with hot, muggy summers and frequent thunderstorms. However, MWR only contains measurements taken from over ocean surfaces; therefore the determination of water vapor over land is an important contribution to extend the use of the SAC-D/Aquarius radiometer measurements beyond the ocean surface. The CWVs computed by our algorithm are compared against radiosonde CWV observations and show a bias of about -0.6 mm, a root mean square (rms) of about 6 mm and a correlation of 0.89.

  2. Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfide budgets in the Black Sea : a biogeochemical model of the whole water column coupling the oxic and anoxic parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grégoire, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfide budgets are derived for the Black Sea water column from a coupled physical–biogeochemical model. The model is applied in the deep part of the sea and simulates processes over the whole water column including the anoxic layer that extends from similar, equals115 m

  3. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: History of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric water cycle at the present epoch involves summertime sublimation of water from the north polar cap, transport of water through the atmosphere, and condensation on one or both winter CO2 caps. Exchange with the regolith is important seasonally, but the water content of the atmosphere appears to be controlled by the polar caps. The net annual transport through the atmosphere, integrated over long timescales, must be the driving force behind the long-term evolution of the polar caps; clearly, this feeds back into the evolution of the layered terrain. We have investigated the behavior of the seasonal water cycle and the net integrated behavior at the pole for the last 10 exp 7 years. Our model of the water cycle includes the solar input, CO2 condensation and sublimation, and summertime water sublimation through the seasonal cycles, and incorporates the long-term variations in the orbital elements describing the Martian orbit.

  4. The Mars water cycle at other epochs - Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model is presented of the integrated role of seasonal water cycle on the evolution of polar deposits on Mars over the last 10 million years. From the model, it is concluded that the only major difference between the polar caps which affects their long-term behavior is ultimately the difference in their elevations. Because of that difference, there is a preference for CO2 frost to stay longer on the northern polar cap. The average difference in sublimation at the caps results in a net south-to-north transport of water ice over long time scales. Superimposed on any long-term behavior is a transfer of water ice between the caps on the 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr time scales. The amount of water exchanged is small compared to the total ice content of the polar deposits.

  5. A nanoparticle catalyst for heterogeneous phase para-hydrogen-induced polarization in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöggler, Stefan; Grunfeld, Alexander M; Ertas, Yavuz N; McCormick, Jeffrey; Wagner, Shawn; Schleker, P Philipp M; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-02-16

    Para-hydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) is a technique capable of producing spin polarization at a magnitude far greater than state-of-the-art magnets. A significant application of PHIP is to generate contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Clinically viable and effective contrast agents not only require high levels of polarization but heterogeneous catalysts that can be used in water to eliminate the toxicity impact. Herein, we demonstrate the use of Pt nanoparticles capped with glutathione to induce heterogeneous PHIP in water. The ligand-inhibited surface diffusion on the nanoparticles resulted in a (1) H polarization of P=0.25% for hydroxyethyl propionate, a known contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography. Transferring the (1) H polarization to a (13) C nucleus using a para-hydrogen polarizer yielded a polarization of 0.013%. The nuclear-spin polarizations achieved in these experiments are the first reported to date involving heterogeneous reactions in water. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. [The multi-angle polarization spectral character of water and its applications in water color remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tai-Xia; Yan, Lei; Xiang, Yun; Zhao, Yun-Sheng; Chen, Wei

    2010-02-01

    The reflectance of pure water is very low at visible and near infrared bands. Its spectral characteristics are not obvious. Water always shows dark hue in optical remote sensing images. This dark hue causes the difficulties in water remote sensing identification. There is an interesting phenomenon when the authors research the water polarization spectroscopy. The authors measured water's polarization spectra and reflectance spectra at different view zenith angles using the ASD spectrometer. When the view zenith angle was zero (measured vertically), as the spectrum people commonly measure, there was no polarization phenomenon at the water surface, and the reflectance was low at each band. Along with the increase in view zenith angle, the DOP spectra curves increased evidently, while the reflectance curves only changed a little. When the view zenith angle was over 30 degree, the values of DOP spectrum were much larger than the reflectance spectrum values at the entire visible and near infrared bands. At some bands, the DOP value was several dozen times than its reflectance value. This phenomenon shows that the water's brightness in DOP image is much higher than its brightness in intensity image under the same condition. This rule was verified by the PARASOL multiangle polarization satellite data. Comparing the average brightness of DOP images with the average brightness of intensity images at 490, 670 and 865 nm band, the former is higher than the latter apparently. The brighter DOP images are better for water remote sensing identification It is the first time that the authors found this special multiangle polarization spectral character of water. It revealed the advantage of water detection using the multiangle polarization remote sensing data. This method solved the low reflectivity problem of water color remote sensing. It will greatly improve the capability of water remote sensing identification and the retrieval accuracy of water quality parameters.

  7. Analysis of method of polarization surveying of water surface oil pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    A method of polarization surveying of oil films on the water surface is analyzed. Model calculations of contrasted oil and water obtained with different orientations of the analyzer are discussed. The model depends on the spectral range, water transparency and oil film, and the selection of observational direction.

  8. 4SM: A Novel Self-Calibrated Algebraic Ratio Method for Satellite-Derived Bathymetry and Water Column Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann G. Morel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available All empirical water column correction methods have consistently been reported to require existing depth sounding data for the purpose of calibrating a simple depth retrieval model; they yield poor results over very bright or very dark bottoms. In contrast, we set out to (i use only the relative radiance data in the image along with published data, and several new assumptions; (ii in order to specify and operate the simplified radiative transfer equation (RTE; (iii for the purpose of retrieving both the satellite derived bathymetry (SDB and the water column corrected spectral reflectance over shallow seabeds. Sea truth regressions show that SDB depths retrieved by the method only need tide correction. Therefore it shall be demonstrated that, under such new assumptions, there is no need for (i formal atmospheric correction; (ii conversion of relative radiance into calibrated reflectance; or (iii existing depth sounding data, to specify the simplified RTE and produce both SDB and spectral water column corrected radiance ready for bottom typing. Moreover, the use of the panchromatic band for that purpose is introduced. Altogether, we named this process the Self-Calibrated Supervised Spectral Shallow-sea Modeler (4SM. This approach requires a trained practitioner, though, to produce its results within hours of downloading the raw image. The ideal raw image should be a “near-nadir” view, exhibit homogeneous atmosphere and water column, include some coverage of optically deep waters and bare land, and lend itself to quality removal of haze, atmospheric adjacency effect, and sun/sky glint.

  9. Estimating trans-seasonal variability in water column biomass for a highly migratory, deep diving predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm D O'Toole

    Full Text Available The deployment of animal-borne electronic tags is revolutionizing our understanding of how pelagic species respond to their environment by providing in situ oceanographic information such as temperature, salinity, and light measurements. These tags, deployed on pelagic animals, provide data that can be used to study the ecological context of their foraging behaviour and surrounding environment. Satellite-derived measures of ocean colour reveal temporal and spatial variability of surface chlorophyll-a (a useful proxy for phytoplankton distribution. However, this information can be patchy in space and time resulting in poor correspondence with marine animal behaviour. Alternatively, light data collected by animal-borne tag sensors can be used to estimate chlorophyll-a distribution. Here, we use light level and depth data to generate a phytoplankton index that matches daily seal movements. Time-depth-light recorders (TDLRs were deployed on 89 southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina over a period of 6 years (1999-2005. TDLR data were used to calculate integrated light attenuation of the top 250 m of the water column (LA(250, which provided an index of phytoplankton density at the daily scale that was concurrent with the movement and behaviour of seals throughout their entire foraging trip. These index values were consistent with typical seasonal chl-a patterns as measured from 8-daySea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFs images. The availability of data recorded by the TDLRs was far greater than concurrent remotely sensed chl-a at higher latitudes and during winter months. Improving the spatial and temporal availability of phytoplankton information concurrent with animal behaviour has ecological implications for understanding the movement of deep diving predators in relation to lower trophic levels in the Southern Ocean. Light attenuation profiles recorded by animal-borne electronic tags can be used more broadly and routinely to estimate

  10. A novel methodology to measure methane bubble sizes in the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemond, H.; Delwiche, K.; Senft-Grupp, S.; Manganello, T.

    2014-12-01

    The fate of methane ebullition from lake sediments is dependent on initial bubble size. Rising bubbles are subject to dissolution, reducing the fraction of methane that ultimately enters the atmosphere while increasing concentrations of aqueous methane. Smaller bubbles not only rise more slowly, but dissolve more rapidly larger bubbles. Thus, understanding methane bubble size distributions in the water column is critical to predicting atmospheric methane emissions from ebullition. However, current methods of measuring methane bubble sizes in-situ are resource-intensive, typically requiring divers, video equipment, sonar, or hydroacoustic instruments. The complexity and cost of these techniques points to the strong need for a simple, autonomous device that can measure bubble size distributions and be deployed unattended over long periods of time. We describe a bubble sizing device that can be moored in the subsurface and can intercept and measure the size of bubbles as they rise. The instrument uses a novel optical measurement technique with infrared LEDs and IR-sensitive photodetectors combined with a custom-designed printed circuit board. An on-board microcomputer handles raw optical signals and stores the relevant information needed to calculate bubble volume. The electronics are housed within a pressure case fabricated from standard PVC fittings and are powered by size C alkaline batteries. The bill of materials cost is less than $200, allowing us to deploy multiple sensors at various locations within Upper Mystic Lake, MA. This novel device will provide information on how methane bubble sizes may vary both spatially and temporally. We present data from tests under controlled laboratory conditions and from deployments in Upper Mystic Lake.

  11. Century-Long Warming Trends in the Upper Water Column of Lake Tanganyika.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Kraemer

    Full Text Available Lake Tanganyika, the deepest and most voluminous lake in Africa, has warmed over the last century in response to climate change. Separate analyses of surface warming rates estimated from in situ instruments, satellites, and a paleolimnological temperature proxy (TEX86 disagree, leaving uncertainty about the thermal sensitivity of Lake Tanganyika to climate change. Here, we use a comprehensive database of in situ temperature data from the top 100 meters of the water column that span the lake's seasonal range and lateral extent to demonstrate that long-term temperature trends in Lake Tanganyika depend strongly on depth, season, and latitude. The observed spatiotemporal variation in surface warming rates accounts for small differences between warming rate estimates from in situ instruments and satellite data. However, after accounting for spatiotemporal variation in temperature and warming rates, the TEX86 paleolimnological proxy yields lower surface temperatures (1.46 °C lower on average and faster warming rates (by a factor of three than in situ measurements. Based on the ecology of Thaumarchaeota (the microbes whose biomolecules are involved with generating the TEX86 proxy, we offer a reinterpretation of the TEX86 data from Lake Tanganyika as the temperature of the low-oxygen zone, rather than of the lake surface temperature as has been suggested previously. Our analyses provide a thorough accounting of spatiotemporal variation in warming rates, offering strong evidence that thermal and ecological shifts observed in this massive tropical lake over the last century are robust and in step with global climate change.

  12. Effects of salt pond restoration on benthic flux: Sediment as a source of nutrients to the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Brent R.; Kuwabara, James S.; Carter, James L.; Garrettt, Krista K.; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sarah; Takekawa, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding nutrient flux between the benthos and the overlying water (benthic flux) is critical to restoration of water quality and biological resources because it can represent a major source of nutrients to the water column. Extensive water management commenced in the San Francisco Bay, Beginning around 1850, San Francisco Bay wetlands were converted to salt ponds and mined extensively for more than a century. Long-term (decadal) salt pond restoration efforts began in 2003. A patented device for sampling porewater at varying depths, to calculate the gradient, was employed between 2010 and 2012. Within the former ponds, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus and that of dissolved ammonia were consistently positive (i.e., moving out of the sediment into the water column). The lack of measurable nitrate or nitrite concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface suggested negligible fluxes for dissolved nitrate and nitrite. The dominance of ammonia in the porewater indicated anoxic sediment conditions, even at only 1 cm depth, which is consistent with the observed, elevated sediment oxygen demand. Nearby openestuary sediments showed much lower benthic flux values for nutrients than the salt ponds under resortation. Allochthonous solute transport provides a nutrient advective flux for comparison to benthic flux. For ammonia, averaged for all sites and dates, benthic flux was about 80,000 kg/year, well above the advective flux range of −50 to 1500 kg/year, with much of the variability depending on the tidal cycle. By contrast, the average benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus was about 12,000 kg/year, of significant magnitude, but less than the advective flux range of 21,500 to 30,000 kg/year. These benthic flux estimates, based on solute diffusion across the sediment-water interface, reveal a significant nutrient source to the water column of the pond which stimulates algal blooms (often autotrophic). This benthic source may be

  13. Polarization Lidar for High Precision Water Depth Measurements of Glacial Melt Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton-Grimley, R. A.; Thayer, J. P.; Koenig, L.; Moussavi, M. S.; Gisler, A.; Crowley, G.

    2016-12-01

    In the past decade, warming temperatures over the GrIS have significantly increased the surface melt flowing through the supraglacial hydrologic system - melt ponds, lakes, and rivers - all playing a crucial role in the mass loss of land ice. The smaller melt ponds, rivers and streams on the ice sheets, which evacuate more water than is contained in the larger lakes [Smith et al., 2015], are not sufficiently measured to quantify melt. Scientific requirements established by the cryospheric community call for hydrographic lidar measurements with water depth accuracy better than ±10 cm over meter-scale depths during the melt season. Lakes observed in Southwest, Greenland were on average 2-3 meters deep with maxima near 8 m. Stream depths ranged from 0.6 to 3.4 m with a mean depth of 2.0 m [Moussavi et al., 2016, Pope et al., 2016 and Smith et al., 2015]. In response, a 532nm topographic/hydrographic lidar demonstrator implementing a novel measurement scheme has been developed. The lab demonstrator isolates water surface and ice substrate returns using polarization scattering attributes, and fast timing, to range resolve the two surfaces at centimeter precision. Results of the lidar demonstrator on polarization properties of surface water roughness and varied ice substrates expected during measurement of supraglacial streams, rivers, and shallow melt ponds will be presented. Demonstrating the measurement techniques in a number of controlled scenarios, necessary for understanding the subsequent instrument response, provides a baseline for future measurements in flow regimes that include stream cross-sectional area and discharge estimates. Supporting analysis indicates benefits in system scalability, applicability, and adaptability using this lidar technique, and offers the means to accurately quantify the predominantly shallow, melt ponds, sinuous rivers, and streams that are not currently identifiable from satellite imagery.

  14. SEPARATION OF Ca AND Fe METAL ION IN SOURCE WATER BY ADSORPTION COLUMN TECHNIC WITH LOCAL ZEOLITE AND ACTIVE CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims are to separate of Ca and Fe metal ion in source water, with local zeolite and active carbon by adsorption column technic. Efficiency of separation are control by adsorption time and size of zeolite. Method that used was column adsorption with a flow system in which sample is applied to the filtration tube containing zeolite and active carbon. Initial and final concentrations of the samples were analyzed using Atomic Adsorption Spectrophotometer instrument. The results obtained shows that ability adsorption of zeolite to Ca and Fe metal ion are a good. Zeolite 1 (10 mesh can reduce iron concentration until 93.98 % and zeolite 2 (5mesh until 98.88% for 1 – 4 week range time. Whereas reducing of calcium concentration is not good, until 2 week period time adsorption of calcium ion is about 50%.   Keywords: adsorption, zeolite, source water

  15. Primary hydrothermal input above nonbuoyant plume level in the water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.

    2008-12-01

    discuss on internal structure of rising plume. The primary hydrothermal input above nonbuoyant plume level is important for vertical chemical and biological transport in the water column as well as exploration strategy to locate vents on the seafloor.

  16. A novel application of methacrylate based short monolithic columns: concentrating Potato spindle tuber viroid from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruščić, Jelena; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Urbas, Lidija; Kramberger, Petra; Mehle, Nataša; Škorić, Dijana; Barut, Miloš; Ravnikar, Maja; Krajačić, Mladen

    2013-01-25

    Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is the causal agent of a number of agriculturally important diseases. It is a single-stranded, circular and unencapsidated RNA molecule with only 356-360 nucleotides and no coding capacity. Because of its peculiar structural features, it is very stable ex vivo and it is easily transmitted mechanically by contaminated hands, tools, machinery, etc. In this work, we describe the development and optimization of a method for concentrating PSTVd using Convective Interaction Media (CIM) monolithic columns. The ion-exchange chromatography on diethylamine (DEAE) monolithic analytical column (CIMac DEAE-0.1 mL) resulted in up to 30% PSTVd recovery whilst the hydrophobic interaction chromatography on C4 monolithic analytical column (CIMac C4-0.1 mL) improved it up to 60%. This was due to the fact that the binding of the viroid to the C4 matrix was less strong than to the highly charged anion-exchange matrix and could be easier and more completely eluted under the applied chromatographic conditions. Based on these preliminary results, a C4 HLD-1 (High Ligand Density) 1 mL monolithic tube column was selected for further experiments. One-litre-water samples were mixed with different viroid quantities and loaded onto the column. By using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the viroid RNA was quantified in the elution fraction (≈5 mL) indicating that 70% of the viroid was recovered and concentrated by at least two orders of magnitude. This approach will be helpful in screening irrigation waters and/or hydroponic systems' nutrient solutions for the presence of even extremely low concentrations of PSTVd. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular diffusion of stable water isotopes in polar firn as a proxy for past temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Christian; Gkinis, Vasileios; Vinther, Bo M.

    2018-03-01

    Polar precipitation archived in ice caps contains information on past temperature conditions. Such information can be retrieved by measuring the water isotopic signals of δ18O and δD in ice cores. These signals have been attenuated during densification due to molecular diffusion in the firn column, where the magnitude of the diffusion is isotopologue specific and temperature dependent. By utilizing the differential diffusion signal, dual isotope measurements of δ18O and δD enable multiple temperature reconstruction techniques. This study assesses how well six different methods can be used to reconstruct past surface temperatures from the diffusion-based temperature proxies. Two of the methods are based on the single diffusion lengths of δ18O and δD , three of the methods employ the differential diffusion signal, while the last uses the ratio between the single diffusion lengths. All techniques are tested on synthetic data in order to evaluate their accuracy and precision. We perform a benchmark test to thirteen high resolution Holocene data sets from Greenland and Antarctica, which represent a broad range of mean annual surface temperatures and accumulation rates. Based on the benchmark test, we comment on the accuracy and precision of the methods. Both the benchmark test and the synthetic data test demonstrate that the most precise reconstructions are obtained when using the single isotope diffusion lengths, with precisions of approximately 1.0 °C . In the benchmark test, the single isotope diffusion lengths are also found to reconstruct consistent temperatures with a root-mean-square-deviation of 0.7 °C . The techniques employing the differential diffusion signals are more uncertain, where the most precise method has a precision of 1.9 °C . The diffusion length ratio method is the least precise with a precision of 13.7 °C . The absolute temperature estimates from this method are also shown to be highly sensitive to the choice of fractionation factor

  18. Molecular density functional theory of water including density-polarization coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-06-22

    We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived from first-principles that relies on the particle's density and multipolar polarization density and includes the density-polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar density and vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give more physical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the full density-polarization coupling of water, that is known to be non-vanishing but has never been taken into account. Furthermore, the theory requires only the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the Fourier components of the longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities.

  19. Aluminum-based water treatment residual use in a constructed wetland for capturing urban runoff phosphorus: Column study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum-based water treatment residuals (Al-WTR) have a strong affinity to sorb phosphorus. In a proof-of-concept greenhouse column study, Al-WTR was surface-applied at 0, 62, 124, and 248 Mg/ha to 15 cm of soil on top of 46 cm of sand; Al-WTR rates were estimated to capture 0, 10, 20, and 40 year...

  20. Microbial ecology of the stratified water column of the Black Sea as revealed by a comprehensive biomarker study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakeham, Stuart G.; Amann, Rudi; Freemann, Katherine H.

    2007-01-01

    to date for lipid biomarker analysis and bacterioplankton for enumeration of major prokaryotic groups. Abundances of several prokaryotic groups were estimated using CARD-FISH probes specific for Bacteria, Archaea (Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota), epsilonproteobacteria (mainly sulfide oxidizers...... reduction, and sulfide oxidation at the chemocline, and bacterial sulfate reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane by archaea in the anoxic zone. Cell densities for archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria are estimated based on water column biomarker concentrations and compared with CARD-FISH results....

  1. The Contribution of Water Ice Clouds to the Water Cycle in the North Polar Region of Mars: Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    While it has long been known that Mars' north residual polar cap and the Martian regolith are significant sources of atmospheric water vapor, the amount of water vapor observed in the northern spring season by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector instrument (MAWD) cannot be attributed to cap and regolith sources alone. Kahn suggested that ice hazes may be the mechanism by which additional water is supplied to the Martian atmosphere. Additionally, a significant decrease in atmospheric water vapor was observed in the late northern summer that could not be correlated with the return of the cold seasonal C02 ice. While the detection of water ice clouds on Mars indicate that water exists in Mars' atmosphere in several different phases, the extent to which water ice clouds play a role in moving water through the Martian atmosphere remains uncertain. Work by Bass et. al. suggested that the time dependence of water ice cap seasonal variability and the increase in atmospheric water vapor depended on the polar cap center reaching 200K, the night time saturation temperature. Additionally, they demonstrated that a decrease in atmospheric water vapor may be attributed to deposition of water ice onto the surface of the polar cap; temperatures were still too warm at this time in the summer for the deposition of carbon dioxide. However, whether water ice clouds contribute significantly to this variability is unknown. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  2. Water absorption in PEEK and PEI matrices. Contribution to the understanding of water-polar group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvoisier, E.; Bicaba, Y.; Colin, X.

    2016-05-01

    The water absorption in two aromatic linear polymers (PEEK and PEI) was studied between 10% and 90% RH at 30, 50 and 70°C. It was found that these polymers display classical Henry and Fick's behaviors. Moreover, they have very close values of equilibrium water concentration C∞ and water diffusivity D presumably because their respective polar groups establish molecular interactions of the same nature with water. This assumption was checked from a literature compilation of values of C∞ and D for a large variety of linear and tridimensional polymers containing a single type of polar group. It was then evidenced that almost all types of carbonyl group (in particular, those belonging to imides, amides and ketones) have the same molar contribution to water absorption, except those belonging to esters which are much less hydrophilic. Furthermore, hydroxyl and sulfone groups are much more hydrophilic than carbonyl groups so that their molar contribution is located on another master curve. On this basis, semi-empirical structure/water transport property relationships were proposed. It was found that C∞ increases exponentially with the concentration of polar groups (presumably because water is doubly bonded), but also with the intensity of their molecular interactions with water. In contrast, D is inversely proportional to C∞, which means that polar group-water interactions slow down the rate of water diffusion.

  3. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crancon, P., E-mail: pierre.crancon@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Pili, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique (LGIT-OSUG), University of Grenoble-I, UMR5559-CNRS-UJF, BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2010-04-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the < 50 {mu}m mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean porewater velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both {sup 238}U initially present in the soil column and {sup 233}U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  4. Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) retrievals of total column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone during the Arm Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalsky, J.J.; Min, Qilong; Harrison, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    The ARESE provided an opportunity to compare MFRSR retrievals of total column aerosol optical depth, total column water vapor, and total column ozone with independent measurements of the same quantities during this campaign in the fall of 1995. MFRSR ozone was compared to ozonesondes that reached altitudes of at least 30 km. MFRSR water vapor was compared to microwave radiometer water vapor on several clear days during the campaign. Aerosol was measured by the ARM MFRSR and the Penn State Reagan sun photometer at high time resolution on a few days of the experiment. Only total column measurements of these constituents were compared. These comparisons were part of an effort to validate MFRSR retrievals that date from 1992. The daily total column aerosol optical depth record since that year illustrates the archival data and the variability of aerosol seasonally and during the decay of the Mt. Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol layer

  5. Six-channel multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar for aerosol and water vapor profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaofei; Mao, Jiandong; Li, Juan; Zhao, Hu; Zhou, Chunyan; Sheng, Hongjiang

    2017-07-10

    Aerosols and water vapor are important atmospheric components, and have significant effects on both atmospheric energy conversion and climate formation. They play the important roles in balancing the radiation budget between the atmosphere and Earth, while water vapor also directly affects rainfall and other weather processes. To further research atmospheric aerosol optical properties and water vapor content, an all-time six-channel multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar has been developed at Beifang University of Nationalities. In addition to 1064, 532, and 355 nm Mie scattering channels, the lidar has a polarization channel for 532 nm return signals, a 660 nm water vapor channel, and a 607 nm nitrogen detection channel. Experiments verified the lidar's feasibility and return signals from six channels were detected. Using inversion algorithms, extinction coefficient profiles at 1064, 532 and 355 nm, Ångström exponent profiles, depolarization ratio profiles, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles were all obtained. The polarization characteristics and water vapor content of cirrus clouds, the polarization characteristics of dusty weather, and the water vapor profiles over different days were also analyzed. Results show that the lidar has the full-time detection capability for atmospheric aerosol optical properties and water vapor profiles, and real-time measurements of aerosols and water vapor over the Yinchuan area were realized, providing important information for studying the environmental quality and climate change in this area.

  6. Seabed gallery intakes: Investigation of the water pretreatment effectiveness of the active layer using a long-term column experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Abdullah

    2017-05-11

    Seabed gallery intake systems used for seawater reverse osmosis facilities employ the same principle of water treatment as slow sand filtration in freshwater systems. An investigation concerning the effectiveness of the active layer (top layer) in improving raw water quality was conducted by using a long-term bench-scale columns experiment. Two different media types, silica and carbonate sand, were tested in 1 m columns to evaluate the effectiveness of media type in terms of algae, bacteria, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) removal over a period of 620 days. Nearly all algae in the silica sand column, 87% (σ = 0.04) of the bacteria, 59% (σ = 0.11) of the biopolymer fraction of NOM, 59% (σ = 0.16) of particulate and 32% (σ = 0.25) of colloidal TEP were removed during the last 330 days of the experiment. Total removal was observed in the carbonate sand column for algal concentration, while the bacterial removal was lower at 74% (σ = 0.08). Removal of biopolymers, particulate and colloidal TEP were higher in the carbonate column during the last 330 days with 72% (σ = 0.15), 66% (σ = 0.08) and 36% (σ = 0.12) removed for these organics respectively. Removal of these key organics through the 1 m thick column, representing the active layer, will likely reduce the rate of biofouling, reduce chemical usage and minimize operating cost in SWRO systems. The data show that the media will require several months at the beginning of operation to reach equilibrium so that high organic removal rates can be achieved. No development of a “schmutzdecke” layer occurred. The experimental results suggest that unlike freshwater slow sand filtration wherein most water treatment occurs in the upper 10 cm, in seawater systems treatment occurs throughout the full active layer depth of 1 m. The results of this study will help in designing and operating seabed gallery intake systems in varied geological conditions.

  7. Seabed gallery intakes: Investigation of the water pretreatment effectiveness of the active layer using a long-term column experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehwah, Abdullah H A; Missimer, Thomas M

    2017-09-15

    Seabed gallery intake systems used for seawater reverse osmosis facilities employ the same principle of water treatment as slow sand filtration in freshwater systems. An investigation concerning the effectiveness of the active layer (top layer) in improving raw water quality was conducted by using a long-term bench-scale columns experiment. Two different media types, silica and carbonate sand, were tested in 1 m columns to evaluate the effectiveness of media type in terms of algae, bacteria, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) removal over a period of 620 days. Nearly all algae in the silica sand column, 87% (σ = 0.04) of the bacteria, 59% (σ = 0.11) of the biopolymer fraction of NOM, 59% (σ = 0.16) of particulate and 32% (σ = 0.25) of colloidal TEP were removed during the last 330 days of the experiment. Total removal was observed in the carbonate sand column for algal concentration, while the bacterial removal was lower at 74% (σ = 0.08). Removal of biopolymers, particulate and colloidal TEP were higher in the carbonate column during the last 330 days with 72% (σ = 0.15), 66% (σ = 0.08) and 36% (σ = 0.12) removed for these organics respectively. Removal of these key organics through the 1 m thick column, representing the active layer, will likely reduce the rate of biofouling, reduce chemical usage and minimize operating cost in SWRO systems. The data show that the media will require several months at the beginning of operation to reach equilibrium so that high organic removal rates can be achieved. No development of a "schmutzdecke" layer occurred. The experimental results suggest that unlike freshwater slow sand filtration wherein most water treatment occurs in the upper 10 cm, in seawater systems treatment occurs throughout the full active layer depth of 1 m. The results of this study will help in designing and operating seabed gallery intake systems in varied geological conditions. Copyright

  8. Coastal circulation and water-column properties in the National Park of American Samoa, February–July 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt; Cheriton, Olivia; Rosenberger, Kurt; Logan, Joshua; Clark, Timothy B.

    2017-06-06

    There is little information on the oceanography in the National Park of American Samoa (NPSA). The transport pathways for potentially harmful constituents of land-derived runoff, as well as larvae and other planktonic organisms, are driven by nearshore circulation patterns. To evaluate the processes affecting coral reef ecosystem health, it is first necessary to understand the oceanographic processes driving nearshore circulation, residence times, exposure rates, and transport pathways. Information on how the NPSA’s natural resources may be affected by anthropogenic sources of pollution, sediment runoff, larval transport, or modifications to the marine protected areas is critical to NPSA resource managers for understanding and ultimately managing coastal and marine resources. To address this need, U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. National Park Service researchers conducted a collaborative study in 2015 to determine coastal circulation patterns and water-column properties along north-central Tutuila, American Samoa, in an area focused on NPSA’s Tutuila Unit and its coral reef ecosystem. The continuous measurements of waves, currents, tides, and water-column properties from these instrument deployments over 150 days, coupled with available meteorological measurements of wind and rainfall, provide information on nearshore circulation and the variability in these hydrodynamic properties for NPSA’s Tutuila Unit. In general, circulation was strongly driven by regional winds at longer (greater than day) timescales and by tides at shorter (less than day) timescales. Flows were primarily directed along shore, with current speeds faster offshore to the north and slower closer to shore, especially in embayments. Water-column properties exhibit strong seasonality coupled to the shift from non-trade wind season to trade wind season. During the non-trade wind season that was characterized by variable winds and larger waves in the NPSA, waters were warmer, slightly more

  9. Numerical analysis of regular waves over an onshore oscillating water column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davyt, D.P.; Teixeira, P.R.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), RS (Brazil)], E-mail: pauloteixeira@furg.br; Ramalhais, R. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal). Fac. de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Didier, E. [Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: edidier@lnec.pt

    2010-07-01

    The potential of wave energy along coastal areas is a particularly attractive option in regions of high latitude, such as the coasts of northern Europe, North America, New Zealand, Chile and Argentina where high densities of annual average wave energy are found (typically between 40 and 100 kW/m of wave front). Power estimated in the south of Brazil is 30kW/m, creating a possible alternative of source energy in the region. There are many types and designs of equipment to capture energy from waves under analysis, such as the oscillating water column type (OWC) which has been one of the first to be developed and installed at sea. Despite being one of the most analyzed wave energy converter devices, there are few case studies using numerical simulation. In this context, the numerical analysis of regular waves over an onshore OWC is the main objective of this paper. The numerical models FLUINCO and FLUENT are used for achieving this goal. The FLUINCO model is based on RANS equations which are discretized using the two-step semi-implicit Taylor-Galerkin method. An arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation is used to enable the solution of problems involving free surface movements. The FLUENT code (version 6.3.26) is based on the finite volume method to solve RANS equations. Volume of Fluid method (VOF) is used for modeling free surface flows. Time integration is achieved by a second order implicit scheme, momentum equations are discretized using MUSCL scheme and HRIC (High Resolution Interface Capturing) scheme is used for convective term of VOF transport equation. The case study consists of a 10.m deep channel with a 10 m wide chamber at its end. One meter high waves with different periods are simulated. Comparisons between FLUINCO and FLUENT results are presented. Free surface elevation inside the chamber; velocity distribution and streamlines; amplification factor (relation between wave height inside the chamber and incident wave height); phase angle (angular

  10. Quantifying Methane Flux from a Prominent Seafloor Crater with Water Column Imagery Filtering and Bubble Quantification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Gharib, J. J.; Doolittle, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    Methane gas flux from the seafloor to atmosphere is an important variable for global carbon cycle and climate models, yet is poorly constrained. Methodologies used to estimate seafloor gas flux commonly employ a combination of acoustic and optical techniques. These techniques often use hull-mounted multibeam echosounders (MBES) to quickly ensonify large volumes of the water column for acoustic backscatter anomalies indicative of gas bubble plumes. Detection of these water column anomalies with a MBES provides information on the lateral distribution of the plumes, the midwater dimensions of the plumes, and their positions on the seafloor. Seafloor plume locations are targeted for visual investigations using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to determine bubble emission rates, venting behaviors, bubble sizes, and ascent velocities. Once these variables are measured in-situ, an extrapolation of gas flux is made over the survey area using the number of remotely-mapped flares. This methodology was applied to a geophysical survey conducted in 2013 over a large seafloor crater that developed in response to an oil well blowout in 1983 offshore Papua New Guinea. The site was investigated by multibeam and sidescan mapping, sub-bottom profiling, 2-D high-resolution multi-channel seismic reflection, and ROV video and coring operations. Numerous water column plumes were detected in the data suggesting vigorously active vents within and near the seafloor crater (Figure 1). This study uses dual-frequency MBES datasets (Reson 7125, 200/400 kHz) and ROV video imagery of the active hydrocarbon seeps to estimate total gas flux from the crater. Plumes of bubbles were extracted from the water column data using threshold filtering techniques. Analysis of video images of the seep emission sites within the crater provided estimates on bubble size, expulsion frequency, and ascent velocity. The average gas flux characteristics made from ROV video observations is extrapolated over the number

  11. Effects of design parameters on enrichment of heavy water in batch-type flat-plate thermal diffusion columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.-M.

    2008-01-01

    The influences of inclination angle, plate-spacing and plate aspect-ratio changes on the performance of batch-type flat-plate thermal diffusion columns that are used for the enrichment of heavy water from water-isotope mixtures have been investigated, while the total expense was kept unchanged. Considerable improvement in the performance is achievable if operation is carried out by increasing plate aspect ratio, and/or properly increasing the inclination angle and/or properly decreasing plate spacing. The temperature differences between hot and cold plates, needed for keeping the operating expense unchanged, are also described

  12. Impacts of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Justin

    Acoustical oceanography is one way to study the ocean, its internal layers, boundaries and all processes occurring within using underwater acoustics. Acoustical sensing techniques allows for the measurement of ocean processes from within that logistically or financially preclude traditional in-situ measurements. Acoustic signals propagate as pressure wavefronts from a source to a receiver through an ocean medium with variable physical parameters. The water column physical parameters that change acoustic wave propagation in the ocean include temperature, salinity, current, surface roughness, seafloor bathymetry, and vertical stratification over variable time scales. The impacts of short-time scale water column variability on acoustic wave propagation include coherent and incoherent surface reflections, wavefront arrival time delay, focusing or defocusing of the intensity of acoustic beams and refraction of acoustic rays. This study focuses on high-frequency broadband acoustic waves, and examines the influence of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustics, wavefronts, from 7 to 28 kHz, in shallow water. Short-time scale variability is on the order of seconds to hours and the short-spatial scale variability is on the order of few centimeters. Experimental results were collected during an acoustic experiment along 100 m isobaths and data analysis was conducted using available acoustic wave propagation models. Three main topics are studied to show that acoustic waves are viable as a remote sensing tool to measure oceanographic parameters in shallow water. First, coherent surface reflections forming striation patterns, from multipath receptions, through rough surface interaction of broadband acoustic signals with the dynamic sea surface are analyzed. Matched filtered results of received acoustic waves are compared with a ray tracing numerical model using a sea surface boundary generated from measured water wave spectra at the time of

  13. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  14. Remote sensing of water vapour profiles in the framework of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that the near infrared solar absorption spectra recorded in the framework of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON can be used to derive the vertical distribution of tropospheric water vapour. The resolution of the TCCON spectra of 0.02 cm−1 is sufficient for retrieving lower and middle/upper tropospheric water vapour concentrations with a vertical resolution of about 3 and 8 km, respectively. We document the good quality of the remotely-sensed profiles by comparisons with coincident in-situ Vaisala RS92 radiosonde measurements. Due to the high measurement frequency, the TCCON water vapour profile data offer novel opportunities for estimating the water vapour variability at different timescales and altitudes.

  15. Leaching of Uranium from pit-water application to soil columns. Effect of vegetation, phosphate fertilizer and amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetto, Juan P.

    2006-01-01

    Pit-water accumulated in the San Rafael uranium (U) Mining and Processing Facility (CMFSR) poses a risk of contaminant dispersion and hinders mining labours in the flooded pits. Soil application of the pit-water may be a way of eliminating it through evapotranspiration, but it requires minimization of U migration to the subsurface water courses in order to be considered an adequate disposal practice. The pH > 7 and carbonate content of the soil may induce the formation of uranyl-carbonate complexes, which have high mobility in soils. Furthermore, its physical and chemical characteristics suggest low metal retention capabilities. A 30 cm long soil column experiment was carried out irrigating pit-water on CMFSR soil with the aim of knowing its U retention capacity, as well as the effect of a phosphate fertilizer, an organic amendment and of vegetation cover on such retention. It was concluded that soil alone was able to retain 60 % of the applied U mass in its first 3 centimeters, leaching 0,6 %. Plant presence enhanced U mobility. However, reduced leachate volume caused by higher evapotranspiration rates balanced this mobility, producing a decrease in the mass of leached U. Phosphate fertilizer incorporated to the soil increased U retention in tits upper centimeters. It also increased vegetation growth, and, accordingly, evapotranspiration in the columns. On the contrary, the use of ground plant material as soil amendment increased U migration. (author) [es

  16. Visualisation of air–water bubbly column flow using array Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munkhbat Batsaikhan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an experimental study of bubbly two-phase flow in a rectangular bubble column was performed using two ultrasonic array sensors, which can measure the instantaneous velocity of gas bubbles on multiple measurement lines. After the sound pressure distribution of sensors had been evaluated with a needle hydrophone technique, the array sensors were applied to two-phase bubble column. To assess the accuracy of the measurement system with array sensors for one and two-dimensional velocity, a simultaneous measurement was performed with an optical measurement technique called particle image velocimetry (PIV. Experimental results showed that accuracy of the measurement system with array sensors is under 10% for one-dimensional velocity profile measurement compared with PIV technique. The accuracy of the system was estimated to be under 20% along the mean flow direction in the case of two-dimensional vector mapping.

  17. Responses of invertebrates to temperature and water stress: A polar perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everatt, Matthew J; Convey, Pete; Bale, Jeffrey S; Worland, M Roger; Hayward, Scott A L

    2015-12-01

    As small bodied poikilothermic ectotherms, invertebrates, more so than any other animal group, are susceptible to extremes of temperature and low water availability. In few places is this more apparent than in the Arctic and Antarctic, where low temperatures predominate and water is unusable during winter and unavailable for parts of summer. Polar terrestrial invertebrates express a suite of physiological, biochemical and genomic features in response to these stressors. However, the situation is not as simple as responding to each stressor in isolation, as they are often faced in combination. We consider how polar terrestrial invertebrates manage this scenario in light of their physiology and ecology. Climate change is also leading to warmer summers in parts of the polar regions, concomitantly increasing the potential for drought. The interaction between high temperature and low water availability, and the invertebrates' response to them, are therefore also explored. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Water column particulate matter: A key contributor to phosphorus regeneration in a coastal eutrophic environment, the Chesapeake Bay: Particulate phosphorus in the Chesapeake Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiying [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Reardon, Patrick [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at NMR Facility, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; McKinley, James P. [Geochemistry Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Joshi, Sunendra R. [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Bai, Yuge [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Bear, Kristi [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Jaisi, Deb P. [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA

    2017-04-01

    Particulate phosphorus (PP) in the water column is an essential component of phosphorus (P) cycling in aquatic ecosystems yet its composition and transformations remain largely uncharacterized. To understand the roles of suspended particulates on regeneration of inorganic P (Pi) into the water column as well as sequestration into more stable mineral precipitates, we studied seasonal variation in both organic and inorganic P speciation in suspended particles in three sites in the Chesapeake Bay using sequential P extraction, 1D (31P) and 2D (1H-31P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and electron microprobe analyses (EMPA). Remineralization efficiency of particulate P average 8% and 56% in shallow and deep sites respectively, suggesting the importance of PP remineralization is in resupplying water column Pi. Strong temporal and spatial variability of organic P composition, distributions, and remineralization efficiency were observed relating to water column parameters such as temperature and redox conditions: concentration of orthophosphate monoesters and diesters, and diester-to-monoester (D/M) ratios decreased with depth. Both esters and the D/M ratios were lower in the hypoxic July and September. In contrast, pyrophosphate and orthophosphate increased with depth, and polyphosphates was high in the anoxic water column. Sequential extraction and EMPA analyses of the suspended particles suggest presence of Ca-bound phosphate in the water column. We hypothesize authigenic precipitation of carbonate fluorapatite and/or its precursor mineral(s) in Pi rich water column, supported by our thermodynamic calculations. Our results, overall, reveal the important role suspended particles play in P remineralization and P sequestration in the Chesapeake Bay water column, provide important implications on P bioavailability and P sinks in similar eutrophic coastal environments.

  19. Column densities resulting from shuttle sublimator/evaporator operation. [optical density of nozzle flow containing water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The proposed disposal of H2O from the shuttle fuel cell operation by ejecting it in vapor form through a supersonic nozzle at the rate of 100 lb/day has been investigated from the point of view of the possible interference to astronomical experiments. If the nozzle is located at the tail and directed along the shuttle longitudinal axis, the resulting column density will be less than 10 to th 12th power molecules/sq cm at viewing angles larger than 48 deg above the longitudinal axis. The molecules in the trail will diffuse rapidly. The column density contribution from molecules expelled on the previous orbit is 1.3 x 10 to the 8th power molecules/sq cm. This contribution diminishes by the inverse square root of the number of orbits since the molecules were expelled. The molecular backscatter from atmospheric molecules is also calculated. If the plume is directed into the flight path, the column density along a perpendicular is found to be 1.5 x 10 to the 11th power molecules/sq cm. The return flux is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the 12th power molecules/sq cm/sec at the stagnation point. With reasonable care in design of experiments to protect them from the backscatter flux of water molecules, the expulsion of 100 lb/day does not appear to create an insurmountable difficulty for the shuttle experiments.

  20. Organic matter diagenesis within the water column and surface sediments of the northern Sargasso Sea revealed by lipid biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, M. H.; Pedrosa Pàmies, R.; Weber, J.

    2017-12-01

    The intensity of particle cycling processes within the mesopelagic and bathypelagic ocean controls the length scale of organic material (OM) remineralization and diagenetic transformations of OM composition through the water column and into the sediments. To elucidate the OM cycling in the oligotrophic North Atlantic gyre, we analyzed lipid biomarkers in the suspended particles (30-4400 m depth, 100 mab), the particle flux (500 m, 1500 m and 3200 m depth), and in the underlying surficial sediments (0-0.5 cm, 4500-4600 m depth) collected at the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) time series site located 75km SE of Bermuda. Changes in lipid biomarker concentration and composition with depth highlight the rapid remineralization of OM within the upper mesopelagic layer and continuing diagenetic transformations of OM throughout the water column and within surficial sediments. Despite observed similarities in biomarker composition in suspended and sinking particles, results show there are also consistent differences in relative contributions of phytoplankton-, bacterial- and zooplankton-derived sources that are maintained throughout the water column. For example, sinking particles are more depleted in labile biomarkers (e.g. polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)) and more enriched in bacteria-derived biomarkers (e.g. hopanoids and odd/branched fatty acids) and indicators of fecal-derived OM (e.g. saturated fatty acids, FA 18:1w9 and cholesterol) than in the suspended pool. Strong seasonality in deep (3200 m) fluxes of phytoplankton-derived biomarkers reflect the seasonal input of bloom-derived material to underlying sediments. The rapid diagenetic alteration of this bloom-derived input is evidenced by depletion of PUFAs and enrichment of microbial biomarkers (e.g. odd/branched fatty acids) in surficial sediments over a two month period.

  1. Water adsorption on non polar ZnO surfaces: from single molecules to multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmoe, Stephane; Biedermann, P. Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    The interface between water and ZnO plays an important role in many domains of technological relevance. Following the vital role of adsorbed water on substrate properties and the fascinating properties of interfacial water, there is a great interest in characterizing this interface. We use DFT to study the possible aggregation regimes that can form on the ZnO non-polar low-index (1010) and (1120) surfaces. We study the adsorption of water monomers, small water clusters like water dimers, water chains, ladder-like water structures, water thin films and water multilayers. Based on this, trends in binding energy as well as the binding mechanisms are analyzed to understand the driving forces and the nature of the fundamental interactions that stabilize the adsorbed layers.

  2. Changes in viability of two Antarctic marine bacteria exposed to solar radiation in the water column: influence of vertical mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of UV radiation on two Antarctic marine bacterial strains (UVps and UVvi) was studied in the water column of Potter Cove (South Shetland, Antarctica). Quartz flasks were filled with the bacterial suspensions and exposed to solar radiation at 0 m, 1 m and 3 m depth. Assays using flasks exposed to direct solar radiation and others using flasks covered with/by interferential filters which discriminate between UVA and UVB, were performed. In other assays, a vertical mixing of 4 m/h was simulated. Both strains showed a significant decrease in viability (expressed as colony - forming units) when exposed to a surface UVB dose of 8.4 kJ m -2 . Studies with interferential filters showed a significant decrease at 0 and 1 m depth under both UV treatments. The UVps strain appeared to be more sensitive to UVB than to UVA. Damage produced by UVB was attenuated by the vertical mixing when the surface UVB dose was 4.8 kJ m -2 . This effect was not observed when surface UVB dose was 7.7 kJ m -2 . These results show that the negative effect caused by UVB radiation on the bacterio plankton would be significant only in the first meter of water column of the Antarctic coastal waters with high levels of suspended particulate material. (author) [es

  3. Microbial nitrogen sinks in the water column of a large coastal hypoxic area, the Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogener, M. K.; Roberts, B. J.; Rabalais, N. N.; Stewart, F. J.; Joye, S. B.

    2016-02-01

    Excess nitrogen in coastal environments leads to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, habitat loss, oxygen depletion and reductions in biodiversity. As such, biological nitrogen (N) removal through the microbially-mediated process of denitrification is a critical ecosystem function that can mitigate the negative consequences of excess nitrogen loading. However, denitrification can produce nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, as a byproduct under some environmental conditions. To understand how excess nitrogen loading impacts denitrification, we measured rates of this process in the water column of the Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone" three times over the summer of 2015. The Dead Zone is generated by excessive nitrogen loading from the Mississippi River co-occurring with strong water column stratification, which leads to a large summer-time hypoxic/anoxic area at the mouth of the river and along the coast of Louisiana. Rates of denitrification ranged from 31 to 153 nmol L-1 d-1. Dead Zone waters are also enriched in methane and aerobic methane oxidation rates ranged from 0.1 to 4.3 nmol L-1 d-1. Maximal denitrification rates were observed at stations with the lowest oxygen concentrations and highest methane oxidation rates, suggesting a potential coupling between nitrate reduction and methane oxidation which both scrubs reactive N and methane from the system, thus performing a duel ecosystem service.

  4. [Impact of Light Polarization on the Measurement of Water Particulate Backscattering Coefficient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Gong, Fang; He, Xian-qiang; Zhu, Qian-kun; Huang, Hai-qing

    2016-01-01

    Particulate backscattering coefficient is a main inherent optical properties (IOPs) of water, which is also a determining factor of ocean color and a basic parameter for inversion of satellite ocean color remote sensing. In-situ measurement with optical instruments is currently the main method for obtaining the particulate backscattering coefficient of water. Due to reflection and refraction by the mirrors in the instrument optical path, the emergent light source from the instrument may be partly polarized, thus to impact the measurement accuracy of water backscattering coefficient. At present, the light polarization of measuring instruments and its impact on the measurement accuracy of particulate backscattering coefficient are still poorly known. For this reason, taking a widely used backscattering coefficient measuring instrument HydroScat6 (HS-6) as an example in this paper, the polarization characteristic of the emergent light from the instrument was systematically measured, and further experimental study on the impact of the light polarization on the measurement accuracy of the particulate backscattering coefficient of water was carried out. The results show that the degree of polarization(DOP) of the central wavelength of emergent light ranges from 20% to 30% for all of the six channels of the HS-6, except the 590 nm channel from which the DOP of the emergent light is slightly low (-15%). Therefore, the emergent light from the HS-6 has significant polarization. Light polarization has non-neglectable impact on the measurement of particulate backscattering coefficient, and the impact degree varies with the wave band, linear polarization angle and suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration. At different SPM concentrations, the mean difference caused by light polarization can reach 15.49%, 11.27%, 12.79%, 14.43%, 13.76%, and 12.46% in six bands, 420, 442, 470, 510, 590, and 670 nm, respectively. Consequently, the impact of light polarization on the

  5. Spectral and Angular Degree of Polarization of the Water Leaving Radiance from the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D. J.; Gillis, D. B.; Bowles, J. H.; Korwan, D.; Miller, D.; Lamela, G.

    2016-02-01

    The polarization of the light field reflected from the ocean is now being recognized to contain additional information that can aid in the retrieval of biogeochemical properties of the ocean. But there are currently very few remote sensing systems that can take advantage of this information. We have developed a hyperspectral polarimeter to measure the full linear polarization of the ocean reflectance. The polarimeter uses four lenses with calcite polarizers oriented at 0, 45, 90, and 135 degrees relative to horizontal and measures the linear Stokes vector parameters (I, Q, U) over the spectral range from 350 - 950 nm. The degree and angle of polarization were measured in different water types and found to strongly depend on the inherent optical properties of the water, specifically on the single-scatter albedo, but also phase function, and viewing geometry. We show results for different water types as a function of viewing angle relative to nadir and azimuthal angle relative to the sun. We also show the importance of understanding the effects of the atmosphere on the upwelling polarization signal.

  6. Water and dissolved carbon transport in an eroding soil landscape using column experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieckh, Helene; Gerke, Horst; Glæsner, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    -40 cm and 40-60 cm) horizons of the eroded Haplic Luvisol and Ap (0-20 cm) and CBkg (20-40 cm) horizon of the Haplic Regosol. Leaching experiments were performed on intact soil columns (20 cm diameter, 20 cm height) and carried out during unsaturated conditions with a suction applied at the lower...... the finding of a substantially lower leaching of particles from all Regosol horizons, we assume a lower transport of particulate C from the Haplic Regosol than from the eroded Haplic Luvisol. Results suggest that soil erosion not only affected the pedological structure and physical soil properties but also...

  7. Characterization of retentivity of reversed phase liquid chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, P T; Dorsey, J G

    1991-03-01

    There are dozens of commercially available reversed phase columns, most marketed as C-8 or C-18 materials, but with no useful way of classifying their retentivity. A useful way of ranking these columns in terms of column "strength" or retentivity is presented. The method utilizes a value for ln k'(w), the estimated retention of a solute from a mobile phase of 100% water, and the slope of the plot of ln k' vsE(T)(30), the solvent polarity. The method is validated with 26 solutes varying in ln k'(w) from about 2 to over 20, on 14 different reversed phase columns. In agreement with previous work, it is found that the phase volume ratio of the column is the most important parameter in determining retentivity. It is strongly suggested that manufacturers adopt a uniform method of calculating this value and that it be made available in advertising, rather than the uninterpretable "% carbon".

  8. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  9. Inert carriers for column extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katykhin, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    Inert carriers used in column extraction chromatography are reviewed. Such carriers are devided into two large groups: hydrophilic carriers which possess high surface energy and are well wetted only with strongly polar liquids (kieselguhrs, silica gels, glasses, cellulose, Al 2 O 3 ) and water-repellent carriers which possess low surface energy and are well wetted with various organic solvents (polyethylene, polytetrafluorethylene polytrifluorochlorethylene). Properties of various carriers are presented: structure, chemical and radiation stability, adsorption properties, extracting agent capacity. The effect of structure and sizes of particles on the efficiency of chromatography columns is considered. Ways of immovable phase deposition on the carrier and the latter's regeneration. Peculiarities of column packing for preparative and continuous chromatography are discussed

  10. Dissolved methane concentrations in the water column and surface sediments of Hanna Shoal and Barrow Canyon, Northern Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Laura; Marshall, Kathleen; Magen, Cédric; Lyubchich, Viacheslav; Cooper, Lee W.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.

    2017-10-01

    Current estimates of methane (CH4) flux suggest that Arctic shelves may be a significant source of atmospheric CH4, a potent greenhouse gas. However, little information is known about the CH4 flux from most Arctic shelves, other than the East Siberian Arctic Shelf. We report here dissolved CH4 concentrations in the water column and within surface sediments of the Northern Chukchi Sea. We hypothesized that this area contains high concentrations of CH4 because it receives nutrient rich waters through the Bering Strait, promoting primary production that enhances an organic-rich material flux to the seafloor and eventual microbial methanogenesis in the sediments. In August 2012, as part of the Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area (COMIDA) project, fourteen stations were sampled on Hanna Shoal, a shallow feature on the shelf, and ten stations across the undersea Barrow Canyon. On Hanna Shoal, water column CH4 concentrations ranged from 14 to 74 nM, and surface concentrations were up to 15 times supersaturated in CH4 compared to equilibrium with the average atmospheric concentrations (3 nM). CH4 concentrations at the sediment-water interface were around 1,500 nM, and typically increased with depth in the sediment. At the head of Barrow Canyon, water column CH4 concentrations ranged from 5 to 46 nM, with the highest concentrations in the deepest waters that were sampled (118 m). Overall, the calculated fluxes to the atmosphere ranged from 1 to 80 μmol CH4 m-2 d-1 for Hanna Shoal and 4 to 17 μmol CH4 m-2 d-1 across the Barrow Canyon stations. Although there was a large range in these fluxes, the average atmospheric flux (20 μmol CH4 m-2 d-1) across Hanna Shoal was 12 times lower than the flux reported from the East Siberian Arctic Shelf in summer. We conclude that while there is a positive flux of CH4 to the atmosphere, this part of the Chukchi Sea is not a significant source of atmospheric CH4 compared to the East Siberian Sea shelf.

  11. Managing the solvent water polarization to obtain improved NMR spectra of large molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, Sebastian; Wider, Gerhard; Etezady-Esfarjani, Touraj; Horst, Reto; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In large molecular structures, the magnetization of all hydrogen atoms in the solute is strongly coupled to the water magnetization through chemical exchange between solvent water and labile protons of macromolecular components, and through dipole-dipole interactions and the associated 'spin diffusion' due to slow molecular tumbling. In NMR experiments with such systems, the extent of the water polarization is thus of utmost importance. This paper presents a formalism that describes the propagation of the water polarization during the course of different NMR experiments, and then compares the results of model calculations for optimized water polarization with experimental data. It thus demonstrates that NMR spectra of large molecular structures can be improved with the use of paramagnetic spin relaxation agents which selectively enhance the relaxation of water protons, so that a substantial gain in signal-to-noise can be achieved. The presently proposed use of a relaxation agent can also replace the water flip-back pulses when working with structures larger than about 30 kDa. This may be a valid alternative in situations where flip-back pulses are difficult to introduce into the overall experimental scheme, or where they would interfere with other requirements of the NMR experiment

  12. Seasonal dynamics of microbial mercury transformations in sediments and water column of Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koron N.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of relatively simple incubation experiments to assess and evaluate microbial mercury (Hg transformations in water column and sediments were performed monthly or bimonthly in a period from March 2011 to December 2011. Sampling campaigns were performed at station F in the southeastern part of Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea. Gulf of Trieste has been for the last 500 year continuously impacted with inflow of Hg, originating from the Idrija Hg mine. The microbial mercury transformations were assessed using a short-lived (t1/2=64.12 h radioisotope 197Hg. Calculated activities of microbial Hg reduction and methylation were correlated with other environmental factors, such as temperature, nutrient availability, oxygenation, organic matter, substrate (Hg in bioavailable chemical form availability, structure of microbial community and presence of mer operon. Preliminary results show that in water column a substantial Hg reduction occurs, whereas methylation was not observed. On the other hand, long-term incubation experiments with sediments show that methylation process is active however preliminary results also suggest a significant MeHg degradation.

  13. Evaluation of an in-situ x-ray fluorescence analyzer for inorganic pollutants in sediments and water columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.

    1979-09-01

    The applicability of an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for measurement of trace elements in sediments and in water columns from Coast Guard vessels has been investigated. This investigation was conducted in both freshwater and saltwater areas and included Puget Sound, Lake Washington, Lake Union, and the ship canal in the State of Washington. The spectrometer system consisted of a solid cryogen-cooled Si(Li) detector and a 109 Cd excitation source. Sediments and water columns were viewed through a 0.2 mm Be window. This study showed the feasibility of measuring trace elements at concentrations ranging from 20 to about 100 ppM. Measurements of this sensitivity with a 100 mCi 109 Cd source are possible for time intervals as short as 5 minutes. This in-situ measurement capability permits the on-site mapping of pollution and avoids the problem of sediment disturbance which is inherent in the collection of grab samples of the sediment surface. Recommendations for an improved analyzer system included a detector assembly which could be towed, or allow continuous sediment surface analysis thereby recording the average composition of a large area

  14. Spin density measurement of water-bridged Co-dimer using polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard-Møller, Emil; Overgaard, Jacob; Chilton, Nick

    present an experimentally determined spin density using polarized neutron diffraction in a simple water-bridged cobalt dimer [Co2(H2O)(piv)4(Hpiv)2(py)2] which is known to have a small ferromagnetic coupling between the spin centers. Visualizing the SDD could get us one step further in understanding...

  15. Impact of trophic state on the distribution of intact polar lipids in surface waters of lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bale, N.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schoon, P.; de Kluijver, A.; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the intact polar lipid (IPL) composition in the surface waters of 22 lakes from Minnesota and Iowa, ranging in trophic state between eutrophic and oligo-mesotrophic, to investigate the impact of trophic state on IPL composition. A high diversity of IPL classes was detected. Most IPL

  16. Coccolithophores in Polar Waters: Papposphaera sarion HET and HOL revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Heldal, Mikal; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2016-01-01

    Papposphaera sarion was first described from West Greenland waters and has not since then been reported from other sites. We present here additional material of P. sarion from the type locality, transmission electron images of P. sarion from the NEW polynya (NE Greenland) and scanning electron......NEWpolynya as was also the holococcolithophore Turrisphaera phase of this species. Papposphaera sarion has in its life-cycle previously been associated with Turrisphaera arctica.However, a careful re-examination of the micrographs accompanying the description of T. arctica and unpublished material available to us...

  17. Future Retrievals of Water Column Bio-Optical Properties using the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Devred

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of remote sensing reflectance from coastal waters at different wavelengths of light yields valuable information about water column constituents, which in turn, gives information on a variety of processes occurring in coastal waters, such as primary production, biogeochemical cycles, sediment transport, coastal erosion, and harmful algal blooms. The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI is well suited to produce global, seasonal maps and specialized observations of coastal ecosystems and to improve our understanding of how phytoplankton communities are spatially distributed and structured, and how they function in coastal and inland waters. This paper draws from previously published studies on high-resolution, hyperspectral remote sensing of coastal and inland waters and provides an overview of how the HyspIRI mission could enable the retrieval of new aquatic biophysical products or improve the retrieval accuracy of existing satellite-derived products (e.g., inherent optical properties, phytoplankton functional types, pigment composition, chlorophyll-a concentration, etc.. The intent of this paper is to introduce the development of the HyspIRI mission to the coastal and inland remote sensing community and to provide information regarding several potential data products that were not originally part of the HyspIRI mission objectives but could be applicable to research related to coastal and inland waters. Further work toward quantitatively determining the extent and quality of these products, given the instrument and mission characteristics, is recommended.

  18. A combined monitoring and modeling approach to quantify water and nitrate leaching using effective soil column hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, V.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.; Baram, S.; Mairesse, H.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    There is a worldwide growing concern for agricultural lands input to groundwater pollution. Nitrate contamination of groundwater across the Central Valley of California has been related to its diverse and intensive agricultural practices. However, there has been no study comparing leaching of nitrate in each individual agricultural land within the complex and diversely managed studied area. A combined field monitoring and modeling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content at several depths within the root zone, soil matric potential at two depths below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. In the modeling part, unsaturated water flow and solute transport are simulated with the software HYDRUS in a soil profile fragmented in up to two soil hydraulic types, whose effective hydraulic properties are optimized with an inverse modeling method. The applicability of the method will first be demonstrated "in-silico", with synthetic soil water dynamics data generated with HYDRUS, and considering the soil column as the layering of several soil types characterized in-situ. The method will then be applied to actual soil water status data from various crops in California including tomato, citrus, almond, pistachio, and walnut. Eventually, improvements of irrigation and fertilization management practices (i.e. mainly questions of quantity and frequency of application minimizing leaching under constraint of water and nutrient availability) will be investigated using coupled modeling and optimization tools.

  19. Influence of water column dynamics on sulfide oxidation and other major biogeochemical processes in the chemocline of Mariager Fjord (Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zopfi, J.; Ferdelman, TG; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    steady-stare conditions, the upward fluxes of reductants and downward fluxes of oxidants in the water column were balanced. However, changes in the hydrographical conditions caused a transient nonsteady-state at the chemocline and had a great impact on process rates and the distribution of chemical...... a high formation rare and (b) was only transient, caused by chemocline perturbations. Kinetic calculations of chemical sulfide oxidation based on actual conditions in the chemocline revealed that under steady-state conditions with a narrow chemocline and low reactant concentrations, biological sulfide...... oxidation may account for more than 88% of the total sulfide oxidation. Under nonsteady-state conditions, where oxic and sulfidic water masses were recently mixed, resulting in an expanded chemocline, the proportion of chemical sulfide oxidation increased. The sulfide oxidation rate determined by incubation...

  20. Diel vertical interactions between Atlantic cod Gadus morhua and sprat Sprattus sprattus in a stratified water column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Gerner; Lundgren, Bo; Neuenfeldt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    distribution, time of ingestion of individual sprat estimated from cod stomach content data and observed vertical profiles of salinity, temperature and oxygen content. Predation by cod took place primarily at dusk and dawn during ascent and descent of sprat associated with school dissolution and formation......, respectively. Cod resided close to the bottom outside these temporal predation windows. Sprat schools were located at the same depth as cod in the daylight hours, whereas at night dispersed sprat were situated higher in the water column. These vertical dynamics could be explained by fitness optimization using...... bioenergetics and trade-offs between temperature, oxygen saturation of the water and predation risk. This study forms a first step towards providing a mechanistic background for the predatory impact of cod at the basin scale and beyond...

  1. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, Luke A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  2. A ten year summary of concurrent ambient water column and sediment toxicity tests in the Chesapeake Bay watershed: 1990-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D; Alden, Raymond W

    2002-06-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the relative toxicity of ambient areas in the Chesapeake Bay watershed by using a suite of concurrent water column and sediment toxicity tests at seventy-five ambient stations in 20 Chesapeake Bay rivers from 1990 through 1999. Spatial and temporal variability was examined at selected locations throughout the 10 yr study. Inorganic and organic contaminants were evaluated in ambient water and sediment concurrently with water column and sediment tests to assess possible causes of toxicity although absolute causality can not be established. Multivariate statistical analysis was used to develop a multiple endpoint toxicity index (TOX-INDEX) at each station for both water column and sediment toxicity data. Water column tests from the 10 yr testing period showed that 49% of the time, some degree of toxicity was reported. The most toxic sites based on water column results were located in urbanized areas such as the Anacostia River, Elizabeth River and the Middle River. Water quality criteria for copper, lead, mercury, nickel and zinc were exceeded at one or more of these sites. Water column toxicity was also reported in localized areas of the South and Chester Rivers. Both spatial and temporal variability was reported from the suite of water column toxicity tests. Some degree of sediment toxicity was reported from 62% of the tests conducted during the ten year period. The Elizabeth River and Baltimore Harbor stations were reported as the most toxic areas based on sediment results. Sediment toxicity guidelines were exceeded for one or more of the following metals at these two locations: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc. At the Elizabeth River stations nine of sixteen semi-volatile organics and two of seven pesticides measured exceeded the ER-M values in 1990. Ambient sediment toxicity tests in the Elizabeth River in 1996 showed reduced toxicity. Various semi-volatile organics exceeded the ER-M values at a

  3. Stratospheric water vapour in the vicinity of the Arctic polar vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maturilli, M. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam (Germany); Fierli, F. [CNR (Italy). Inst. for Atmospheric Sciences and Climate; Yushkov, V.; Lukyanov, A.; Khaykin, S. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hauchecorne, A. [CNRS, Verrieres-le-Buisson (France). Service d' Aeronomie

    2006-07-01

    The stratospheric water vapour mixing ratio inside, outside, and at the edge of the polar vortex has been accurately measured by the FLASH-B Lyman-Alpha hygrometer during the LAUTLOS campaign in Sodankylae, Finland, in January and February 2004. The retrieved H{sub 2}O profiles reveal a detailed view on the Arctic lower stratospheric water vapour distribution, and provide a valuable dataset for the validation of model and satellite data. Analysing the measurements with the semi-lagrangian advection model MIMOSA, water vapour profiles typical for the polar vortex' interior and exterior have been identified, and laminae in the observed profiles have been correlated to filamentary structures in the potential vorticity field. Applying the validated MIMOSA transport scheme to specific humidity fields from operational ECMWF analyses, large discrepancies from the observed profiles arise. Although MIMOSA is able to reproduce weak water vapour filaments and improves the shape of the profiles compared to operational ECMWF analyses, both models reveal a dry bias of about 1 ppmv in the lower stratosphere above 400 K, accounting for a relative difference from the measurements in the order of 20%. The large dry bias in the analysis representation of stratospheric water vapour in the Arctic implies the need for future regular measurements of water vapour in the polar stratosphere to allow the validation and improvement of climate models. (orig.)

  4. Temporal structure of an electric signal produced upon interaction of radiation from a HF laser with the bottom surface of a water column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, Sergei N; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Pashinin, Pavel P; Firsov, K N

    2009-01-01

    Generation of an electric signal is investigated when a HF-laser pulse interacts with the lower surface of a water column in a cell with a bottom transparent to laser radiation, while the upper surface of the water column remains open. The electric signal exhibits a temporal structure of two spikes spaced by time τ which is linearly dependent on the laser output energy. It is found that the value of τ (up to 1.3 ms) is an order of magnitude greater than the time during which the vapour pressure in a cavity produced due to the volume explosive boiling of water in the exposed area is greater than the atmospheric pressure. The second spike was determined to appear upon the collapse of the vapour cavity. A mathematical model is constructed that explains the motion of the water column above the vapour cavity taking into account the temporal evolution of the vapour pressure above it. It is shown that the prolonged lifetime of the vapour cavity after the decrease in the vapour pressure down to the atmospheric value is caused by the inertial motion of the water column acquiring the velocity at the initial stage of the cavity expansion. The calculated time of the water column motion agrees well with the experimental time interval between the spikes of an electric signal. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  5. The stability of the water column in french ponds (limousin region by the calculation of the wedderburn number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOUCHART L.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxygenation and biological life in lakes, reservoirs and ponds depend on the stability of the water column and on the rhythms of stratification and mixing periods. Slight thermal stratification in ponds often is regarded as the same as instability in shallow lakes. Nevertheless fetch in ponds is very short, what reduces the mixing. Wedderburn number (quotient of the buoyancy by the mixing is used to quantify the stability in shallow water bodies. We calculate it for some ponds in French region Limousin, due to original hourly water temperature measurements in all depths and wind data of Météofrance stations. First results show that very high values (above 10 are frequent in summer and spring period (during 41% of the total time of 2 336 hours from May to July in three ponds. That is why we may consider Limousin ponds as stable stratified bodies of water despite their shallowness. Continuous measurements allow to calculate the diurnal cycle and other time scales of the Wedderburn number, with periods of weakening, when air temperatures and surface water temperatures decrease, wind speed increases and when the wind blows in the same direction with the length of the pond. The most complex variable is the depth of the thermocline; a light increase of the breeze thickens the upper warm layer and strengthens the stability, but an important increase of the wind tends to destroy the stratification.

  6. Polarization of 'water-skies' above arctic open waters: how polynyas in the ice-cover can be visually detected from a distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Ramón; Akesson, Susanne; Horváth, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    The foggy sky above a white ice-cover and a dark water surface (permanent polynya or temporary lead) is white and dark gray, phenomena called the 'ice-sky' and the 'water-sky,' respectively. Captains of icebreaker ships used to search for not-directly-visible open waters remotely on the basis of the water sky. Animals depending on open waters in the Arctic region may also detect not-directly-visible waters from a distance by means of the water sky. Since the polarization of ice-skies and water-skies has not, to our knowledge, been studied before, we measured the polarization patterns of water-skies above polynyas in the arctic ice-cover during the Beringia 2005 Swedish polar research expedition to the North Pole region. We show that there are statistically significant differences in the angle of polarization between the water-sky and the ice-sky. This polarization phenomenon could help biological and man-made sensors to detect open waters not directly visible from a distance. However, the threshold of polarization-based detection would be rather low, because the degree of linear polarization of light radiated by water-skies and ice-skies is not higher than 10%.

  7. Perennial water ice identified in the south polar cap of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Poulet, François; Gendrin, Aline; Gondet, Brigitte; Berthé, Michel; Soufflot, Alain; Drossart, Pierre; Combes, Michel; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Moroz, Vassili; Mangold, Nicolas; Schmitt, Bernard

    2004-04-08

    The inventory of water and carbon dioxide reservoirs on Mars are important clues for understanding the geological, climatic and potentially exobiological evolution of the planet. From the early mapping observation of the permanent ice caps on the martian poles, the northern cap was believed to be mainly composed of water ice, whereas the southern cap was thought to be constituted of carbon dioxide ice. However, recent missions (NASA missions Mars Global Surveyor and Odyssey) have revealed surface structures, altimetry profiles, underlying buried hydrogen, and temperatures of the south polar regions that are thermodynamically consistent with a mixture of surface water ice and carbon dioxide. Here we present the first direct identification and mapping of both carbon dioxide and water ice in the martian high southern latitudes, at a resolution of 2 km, during the local summer, when the extent of the polar ice is at its minimum. We observe that this south polar cap contains perennial water ice in extended areas: as a small admixture to carbon dioxide in the bright regions; associated with dust, without carbon dioxide, at the edges of this bright cap; and, unexpectedly, in large areas tens of kilometres away from the bright cap.

  8. Artificial neural network modelling of retention of pesticides in various octadecylsiloxane-bonded reversed-phase columns and water-acetonitrile mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio

    2009-07-30

    Previously, retention of 26 pesticides in the reversed-phase column Gemini (Phenomenex) and water-acetonitrile mobile phase was modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation, accounting for both the effect of solute structure and mobile phase composition. To this end, logK(ow) of solutes and four quantum chemical molecular descriptors (the dipole moment, the mean polarizability, the anisotropy of the polarizability and an hydrogen-bonding descriptor based on the atomic charges located on the acid and basic functional groups) and acetonitrile % (v/v) in the eluent (%ACN) were used as ANN inputs. The above ANN-based approach is here tested on further five similar octadecylsiloxane-bonded columns in water-acetonitrile mobile phase within the %ACN range 30-70%. A quite good predictive performance evaluated on three external solutes in the whole %ACN range is observed, prediction errors being lower than +/-0.1 log k units or slightly higher although still within +/-0.15 log k units. On the other hand, multilinear regression used in place of ANN provides a more diffuse and non-uniform residual distribution for all the investigated columns. ANN multiple-column retention prediction is attempted by adding to the above variables a column descriptor defined as the average retention of calibration solutes extrapolated to 100% water. This more general model is built using 16 solutes and five 5-microm columns in calibration, while its predictive performance is tested on the remaining 10 compounds. Under these conditions, prediction errors are generally within +/-0.2 log k units regardless of the kind of column. The possibility of cross-column prediction is evaluated by column leave-one-out cross-validation within the five 5-microm stationary phases and on a 4-microm external column. This analysis reveals that accuracy of retention prediction for unknown solutes in unknown columns is acceptable provided that the external column is

  9. Artificial neural network modelling of retention of pesticides in various octadecylsiloxane-bonded reversed-phase columns and water-acetonitrile mobile phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Previously, retention of 26 pesticides in the reversed-phase column Gemini (Phenomenex) and water-acetonitrile mobile phase was modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation, accounting for both the effect of solute structure and mobile phase composition. To this end, log K ow of solutes and four quantum chemical molecular descriptors (the dipole moment, the mean polarizability, the anisotropy of the polarizability and an hydrogen-bonding descriptor based on the atomic charges located on the acid and basic functional groups) and acetonitrile % (v/v) in the eluent (%ACN) were used as ANN inputs. The above ANN-based approach is here tested on further five similar octadecylsiloxane-bonded columns in water-acetonitrile mobile phase within the %ACN range 30-70%. A quite good predictive performance evaluated on three external solutes in the whole %ACN range is observed, prediction errors being lower than ±0.1 log k units or slightly higher although still within ±0.15 log k units. On the other hand, multilinear regression used in place of ANN provides a more diffuse and non-uniform residual distribution for all the investigated columns. ANN multiple-column retention prediction is attempted by adding to the above variables a column descriptor defined as the average retention of calibration solutes extrapolated to 100% water. This more general model is built using 16 solutes and five 5-μm columns in calibration, while its predictive performance is tested on the remaining 10 compounds. Under these conditions, prediction errors are generally within ±0.2 log k units regardless of the kind of column. The possibility of cross-column prediction is evaluated by column leave-one-out cross-validation within the five 5-μm stationary phases and on a 4-μm external column. This analysis reveals that accuracy of retention prediction for unknown solutes in unknown columns is acceptable provided that the external column is not very

  10. A Semianalytical Ocean Color Inversion Algorithm with Explicit Water Column Depth and Substrate Reflectance Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinna, Lachlan I. W.; Werdell, P. Jeremy; Fearns, Peter R. C.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Reichstetter, Martina; Franz, Bryan A.; Shea, Donald M.; Feldman, Gene C.

    2015-01-01

    A semianalytical ocean color inversion algorithm was developed for improving retrievals of inherent optical properties (IOPs) in optically shallow waters. In clear, geometrically shallow waters, light reflected off the seafloor can contribute to the water-leaving radiance signal. This can have a confounding effect on ocean color algorithms developed for optically deep waters, leading to an overestimation of IOPs. The algorithm described here, the Shallow Water Inversion Model (SWIM), uses pre-existing knowledge of bathymetry and benthic substrate brightness to account for optically shallow effects. SWIM was incorporated into the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group's L2GEN code and tested in waters of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua time series (2002-2013). SWIM-derived values of the total non-water absorption coefficient at 443 nm, at(443), the particulate backscattering coefficient at 443 nm, bbp(443), and the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 488 nm, Kd(488), were compared with values derived using the Generalized Inherent Optical Properties algorithm (GIOP) and the Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (QAA). The results indicated that in clear, optically shallow waters SWIM-derived values of at(443), bbp(443), and Kd(443) were realistically lower than values derived using GIOP and QAA, in agreement with radiative transfer modeling. This signified that the benthic reflectance correction was performing as expected. However, in more optically complex waters, SWIM had difficulty converging to a solution, a likely consequence of internal IOP parameterizations. Whilst a comprehensive study of the SWIM algorithm's behavior was conducted, further work is needed to validate the algorithm using in situ data.

  11. Vertical distribution of zooplankton in the water column of Lago Amapá, Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlei Cassiano Keppeler

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of investigation was to study the model of vertical distribution in Lago Amapá, taking into consideration the seasonality of its zooplanktonic composition. Lago Amapá (10º2'36"S and 67º50'24"W is located in the floodplain of the Rio Acre. Samplings were conducted at three different depths of the water column, to study the vertical distribution of zooplankton populations and determine some physico-chemical and biological parameters of Lago Amapá. Weekly samples were taken with a Van Dorn sampler. The species showed greater concentrations at the by means of water column. Thirty-eight zooplankton species were found in the samples represented by Rotifera (30, Cladocera (5 and Cyclopoida (3. The temperature of the water column showed a tendency toward relatively high values (about 30ºC with little variation, consequently resulting in low viscosity. Based of Jaccard's index, it was seen that during the low-water phase, S1 and S3 of the three sampling stations studied, had greater similarity (Cj = 0.7058 in the middle of the water column. Lago Amapá showed characteristics in line with the intermediate disturbance hypothesis model, favoring colonization by opportunistic species such as rotifers.O objetivo desta investigação foi observar a distribuição vertical da comunidade do zooplâncton no Lago Amapá (10º2'36"S e 67º50'24"W, localizado na planície de inundação do Rio Acre. Amostragens foram conduzidas em três diferentes profundidades da coluna da água, considerando aspectos sazonais do zooplâncton, parâmetros físicos, químicos e biológicos. Coletas foram realizadas semanalmente com Garrafa de Van Dorn. As espécies apresentaram maiores concentrações no meio da coluna da água. Foram encontradas 38 espécies, assim distribuídas: Rotifera (30, Cladocera (5 e Cyclopoida (3. A temperatura da coluna da água em geral apresentou-se alta, em torno de 30ºC, com pequena variação, resultando em baixa viscosidade. O

  12. Modeling the simultaneous transport of silver nanoparticles and dissolved silver ions in water-saturated sand columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavy, A.; Wang, Y.; Mittelman, A.; Becker, M. D.; Pennell, K. D.; Abriola, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Concerns over the potential adverse impacts of nanosilver particles (nAg) on human health and the environment have arisen based upon their widespread use in various commercial and biomedical products. In addition, in situ dissolution of deposited nAg could enhance its environmental impact through the formation of dissolved silver ion (Ag+) plumes. A hybrid mathematical model is presented that simulates the simultaneous reactive transport of nAg/Ag+ in porous media. The simulator couples a Lagrangian Random Walk-based Particle Tracking (RWPT) method for nAg transport with a conventional Eulerian Finite Differencing (FD) scheme for the reactive transport of dissolved solutes. In the absence of oxidants other than dissolved oxygen (DO), nAg is assumed to dissolve via a cooperative oxidation reaction with DO and proton ions (H+), and dissolution is modeled by a first-order kinetic expression. An existing empirical correlation is implemented for evaluation of the dissolution rate constant from physiochemical characteristics of the system and nanoparticles, including solution pH, particle specific surface area (SSA), and temperature. The hybrid modeling approach enables the consideration of different particle size classes and the associated particle-specific dissolution rates. The utility of simulator is demonstrated by modeling results obtained from nAg/ Ag+ transport studies performed in ca. 10.8-cm long borosilicate glass columns with an inside diameter of 2.5 cm. Three column experiments were performed at a constant flow rate, yielding a particle approach velocity of 7.68±0.04 m/day, at dissolved oxygen concentrations ranging from 1.65 mg/L to 8.99 mg/L. A 3 pore volume pulse of nAg suspension, containing 3.17±0.07 mg/L total Ag and 10mM NaNO3 at pH 7.07, was injected into water-saturated columns packed with washed 40-50 mesh Ottawa sand. Following nAg injection, the columns were flushed with nAg-free background solution for an additional 3 pore volumes, which

  13. Attenuation of Visible Solar Radiation in the Upper Water Column: A Model Based on IOPs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, ZhongPing; Du, KePing; Arnone, Robert; Liew, SooChin; Penta, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    .... Currently, KPAR is estimated based on chlorophyll concentration ([C]) from ocean color. This kind of approach works well for waters where all optical properties can be adequately described by values of [C...

  14. Enhanced adsorption of phenol from water by a novel polar post-crosslinked polymeric adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xiaowei; Fan Yunge; Wu Guolin; Wang Chunhong; Shi Rongfu

    2009-01-01

    A novel post-crosslinked polymeric adsorbent PDM-2 was prepared by Friedel-Crafts reaction of pendant vinyl groups without external crosslinking agent. Both the specific surface area and the pore volume of starting copolymer PDM-1 increased significantly after post-crosslinking. Batch adsorption runs of phenol from aqueous solution onto PDM-1 and PDM-2 were investigated. Commercial macroporous resins XAD-4 and AB-8 were chosen as the comparison. Experimental results showed that isotherms of phenol adsorption onto these four polymeric adsorbents could be represented by Freundlich model reasonably. PDM-2 exhibited higher adsorption capacity of phenol than other three adsorbents, which resulted from synergistic effect of larger specific surface area and polar groups on the network. The adsorption process for phenol was proved to be exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibb's free energy (ΔG), change in enthalpy (ΔH) and change in entropy (ΔS) were calculated. Kinetics studies indicated that phenol uptake onto PDM-1 and PDM-2 followed the pseudo-second order model and the intraparticle diffusion process was a rate-controlling step. Column adsorption runs demonstrated that nearly 100% regeneration efficiency for PDM-2 by 3 BV industrial alcohol and the adsorbate phenol can be easily recovered by further distilling. Continuous column adsorption-regeneration cycles indicated negligible capacity loss of PDM-2 during operation.

  15. Apparent optical properties of the Canadian Beaufort Sea – Part 1: Observational overview and water column relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Antoine

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A data set of radiometric measurements collected in the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic in August 2009 (Malina project is analyzed in order to describe apparent optical properties (AOPs in this sea, which has been subject to dramatic environmental changes for several decades. The two properties derived from the measurements are the spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient for downward irradiance, Kd, and the spectral remote sensing reflectance, Rrs. The former controls light propagation in the upper water column. The latter determines how light is backscattered out of the water and becomes eventually observable from a satellite ocean color sensor. The data set includes offshore clear waters of the Beaufort Basin as well as highly turbid waters of the Mackenzie River plumes. In the clear waters, we show Kd values that are much larger in the ultraviolet and blue parts of the spectrum than what could be anticipated considering the chlorophyll concentration. A larger contribution of absorption by colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM is responsible for these high Kd values, as compared to other oligotrophic areas. In turbid waters, attenuation reaches extremely high values, driven by high loads of particulate materials and also by a large CDOM content. In these two extreme types of waters, current satellite chlorophyll algorithms fail. This questions the role of ocean color remote sensing in the Arctic when Rrs from only the blue and green bands are used. Therefore, other parts of the spectrum (e.g., the red should be explored if one aims at quantifying interannual changes in chlorophyll in the Arctic from space. The very peculiar AOPs in the Beaufort Sea also advocate for developing specific light propagation models when attempting to predict light availability for photosynthesis at depth.

  16. Progress on Development of an Airborne Two-Micron IPDA Lidar for Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Bowen, Stephen C.; Welters, Angela M.; Remus, Ruben G.; Wong, Teh-Hwa; hide

    2014-01-01

    An airborne 2 micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This lidar targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements, simultaneously. Advancements in the development of this IPDA lidar are presented in this paper. Updates on advanced two-micron triple-pulse high-energy laser transmitter will be given including packaging and lidar integration status. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented. This includes a state-of-the-art detection system integrated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This detection system is based on a newly developed HgCdTe (MCT) electron-initiated avalanche photodiode (e-APD) array. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be discussed.

  17. Progress on development of an airborne two-micron IPDA lidar for water vapor and carbon dioxide column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Bowen, Stephen C.; Welters, Angela M.; Remus, Ruben G.; Wong, Teh-Hwa; Reithmaier, Karl; Lee, Jane; Ismail, Syed

    2017-09-01

    An airborne 2-μm triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This lidar targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements, simultaneously. Advancements in the development of this IPDA lidar are presented in this paper. Updates on advanced two-micron triple-pulse high-energy laser transmitter will be given including packaging and lidar integration status. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented. This includes a state-of-the-art detection system integrated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This detection system is based on a newly developed HgCdTe (MCT) electron-initiated avalanche photodiode (e-APD) array. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be discussed.

  18. Water column characterisation on the Azores platform and at the sea mounts south of the archipelago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, Carla; Lillebø, Ana I.; Borges, Carlos; Souto, Miguel; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C.; Abreu, Manuel Pinto de

    2012-01-01

    This study provides data concerning the hydrography and water chemistry of the Atlantic region between 29–38° N and 27–31° W, and establishes background values for dissolved Cu, Cd, Pb and As. Three water masses were identified: the Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW), the Mediterranean Water (MW) and the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). The ENACW exhibits a clear meridional gradient of temperature and salinity, with comparatively high values at the southern sites and lower values on the Azores platform. The ENACW, which includes the euphotic zone, also had comparatively high concentrations of oxygen and lower concentrations of nutrients and metals. The Cu, Cd and Pb results suggest that new background concentrations for OSPAR Region V (the Wider Atlantic) should be established as follows: 0.15–13 nM for Cu, 0.05–1.4 nM for Cd and 0.03–5 nM for Pb. The background concentrations of As for OSPAR Region V should be 7–28 nM.

  19. Combined impact of water column oxygen and temperature on internal oxygen status and growth of Zostera marina seedlings and adult shoots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Borum, Jens

    2013-01-01

    at temperatures of ≥25°C. In the present study we experimentally examine the impact of combined water column oxygen and temperature on oxygen dynamics in leaf meristems of seedlings and adult shoots to better understand how stressful environmental conditions affect eelgrass oxygen dynamics and subsequent growth...... and mortality. There was a strong interaction between water column oxygen and temperature on meristem pO implying that eelgrass is rather resistant to unfavorable oxygen conditions in winter but becomes increasingly vulnerable in summer, especially at high temperatures. At 25°C meristems became anoxic...... were less prone to meristem anoxia than adult shoots suggesting that seedlings would better tolerate unfavorable combinations of water column oxygen conditions and temperature. The results suggest that eelgrass die-offs will occur more frequently in eutrophied coastal areas with the more frequent...

  20. Investigation of simultaneous tritium and deuterium transfer in a catalytic isotope exchange column for water detritiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, I.; Tamm, U.; Cristescu, Ioana-R.; Glugla, M.; Caldwell-Nichols, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A catalytic isotope exchange facility for water detritiation is operated at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) in order to investigate the simultaneous transfer of tritium and deuterium between various molecular hydrogen isotopes and deuteriated/tritiated water. Four catalyst-packing combinations from different manufacturers (SCK-CEN Belgium, Mendeleev University Russia, Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies (ICIT) Romania-TLK, Showa Eng. Japan) are currently being tested. Experiments have been performed to determine the height equivalent of theoretical plate (HETP) and the mass transfer coefficients during deuterium, tritium or simultaneous deuterium and tritium exchange between deuteriated and tritiated water and gaseous hydrogen isotopes. In the simultaneously tritium and deuterium transfer experiments, both the transfer of tritium and deuterium from liquid to gas and the transfer of tritium from liquid to gas and deuterium in the opposite direction from gas to liquid was investigated

  1. 137Cs inventories in the water column collected from the South and South China Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, M.; Wang, Z.-L.; Zheng, J.

    2006-01-01

    Seawater samples were collected in the Sulu and South China Seas and their 137 Cs activities were determined by γ spectrometry. A significant difference in intermediate water 137 Cs activities in the 750-1500 m depth was observed between the Sulu and South China Seas. The 137 Cs inventories in the Sulu Sea was 5.7 times higher than that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout at the same latitude of 0-10degN. A possible mechanism controlling this extremely high 137 Cs inventories may be inflows of 137 Cs rich North Pacific Tropical Water and upper North Pacific Intermediate Water through the Luzon Straight from the West Philippine Sea, and lateral transport across the Mindoro Strait into the Sulu Sea, then conveyance into the deep layer in the Sulu Sea basin. (author)

  2. Effect of pore water velocities and solute input methods on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns of Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, BeiBei; Wang, QuanJiu

    2017-09-01

    Studies on solute transport under different pore water velocity and solute input methods in undisturbed soil could play instructive roles for crop production. Based on the experiments in the laboratory, the effect of solute input methods with small pulse input and large pulse input, as well as four pore water velocities, on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns obtained from the Loess Plateau under controlled condition was studied. Chloride breakthrough curves (BTCs) were generated using the miscible displacement method under water-saturated, steady flow conditions. Using the 0.15 mol L-1 CaCl2 solution as a tracer, a small pulse (0.1 pore volumes) was first induced, and then, after all the solution was wash off, a large pulse (0.5 pore volumes) was conducted. The convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R) were used to describe the BTCs, and their prediction accuracies and fitted parameters were compared as well. All the BTCs obtained for the different input methods and the four pore water velocities were all smooth. However, the shapes of the BTCs varied greatly; small pulse inputs resulted in more rapid attainment of peak values that appeared earlier with increases in pore water velocity, whereas large pulse inputs resulted in an opposite trend. Both models could fit the experimental data well, but the prediction accuracy of the T-R was better. The values of the dispersivity, λ, calculated from the dispersion coefficient obtained from the CDE were about one order of magnitude larger than those calculated from the dispersion coefficient given by the T-R, but the calculated Peclet number, Pe, was lower. The mobile-immobile partition coefficient, β, decreased, while the mass exchange coefficient increased with increases in pore water velocity.

  3. Depth-Resolved Variations of Cultivable Bacteria and Their Extracellular Enzymes in the Water Column of the New Britain Trench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianfeng Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms and their extracellular enzymes (ECEs play an important role in the remineralization of organic material by hydrolyzing high-molecular-weight substrates to sizes sufficiently small to be transported through cell membrane, yet the diversity of the enzyme-producing bacteria and the types of ECEs involved in the degradation process are largely unknown. In this work, we investigated the diversity of cultivable bacteria and their ECEs and the potential activities of aminopeptidase in the water column at eight different depths of the New Britain Trench. There was a great diversity of cultivable bacteria and ECEs, and depth appears an important driver of the diversity. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed that the cultivable bacteria were affiliated mostly with the phyla Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, and the predominant genera were Pseudoalteromonas (62.7% and Halomonas (17.3%. Moreover, 70.7% of the isolates were found to produce hydrolytic zone on casein and gelatin plates, in which Pseudoalteromonas was the predominant group, exhibiting relatively high protease production. Inhibitor analysis showed that the extracellular proteases from the isolated bacteria were serine proteases in the surface water and metalloproteases in the deep water. Meanwhile, the Vmax and Km of aminopeptidase exhibited a maximum in the surface water and low values in the deep bathy- and abyssopelagic water, indicating lower rates of hydrolysis and higher substrate affinity in the deeper waters. These results shed new insights into the diversity of the cultivable bacteria and bacterial ECEs and their likely biogeochemical functions in the trench environment.

  4. Water or sediment? Partitioning the role of water column and sediment chemistry as drivers of macroinvertebrate communities in an austral South African stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalu, Tatenda; Wasserman, Ryan J; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Mwedzi, Tongayi; Magoro, Mandla L; Weyl, Olaf L F

    2017-12-31

    Water pollution is a critical management issue, with many rivers and streams draining urban areas being polluted by the disposal of untreated solid waste and wastewater discharge, storm water and agricultural runoff. This has implications for biodiversity, and many rivers in the developing world are now considered compromised. We investigated benthic macroinvertebrate community structure and composition in relation to physico-chemical conditions of the water column and sediments. The study was conducted in an Austral catchment subject to both urban and agricultural pollutants in two different seasons. We assessed whether sediment characteristics were more important drivers of macroinvertebrate community composition than water column characteristics. We expected clear differences in macroinvertebrate community composition and in the associated community metrics due to distinct flow conditions between the two seasons. A combination of multivariate analyses (canonical correspondence analysis (CCA)) and biological indicator analysis were used to examine these patterns. Chironomidae was the most abundant family (>60%) in the upper mainstem river and stream sites. Stream sites were positively associated with CCA axis 2, being characterised by high turbidity and lower pH, salinity, phosphate concentration, channel width and canopy cover. Canopy cover, channel width, substrate embeddedness, phosphate concentration, pH, salinity and turbidity all had a significant effect on macroinvertebrate community composition. Using CCA variation partitioning, water quality was, however, a better predictor of benthic macroinvertebrate composition than sediment chemical conditions. Furthermore, our results suggest that seasonality had little effect on structuring benthic macroinvertebrate communities in this south-eastern zone of South Africa, despite clear changes in sediment chemistry. This likely reflects the relative lack of major variability in water chemistry compared to sediment

  5. A water column study of methane around gas flares located at the West Spitsbergen continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentz, Torben; Damm, Ellen; von Deimling, Jens Schneider

    2014-01-01

    L1. Our results suggest that the methane dissolved from gas bubbles is efficiently trapped below the pycnocline and thus limits the methane concentration in surface water and the air–sea exchange during summer stratification. During winter the lateral stratification breaks down and fractions...

  6. Biodegradation of Jet Fuel in Vented Columns of Water-Unsaturated Sandy Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    photodegradation , volatilization and microbial degradation; however, microbial degradation is the most significant process by which many pesticides are degraded...Biodegradation . 12 Soil Water Content and Pesticide Biodegradation ... ............. . 16 Aeration . . . . . . ................. 18 Soil Venting and... Pesticide Biodegradation While petroleum hydrocarbons and pesticides may differ considerably in chemical composition and structure, they share at least

  7. Chaotic behavior of water column oscillator simulating pressure balanced injection system in passive safety reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Madarame, H.; Okamoto, K.

    2001-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) proposed a passive safety reactor called the System-integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR). In a loss of coolant accident, the Pressurizing Line (PL) and the Injection Line (IL) are passively opened. Vapor generated by residual heat pushes down the water level in the Reactor Vessel (RV). When the level is lower than the inlet of the PL, the vapor is ejected into the Containment Vessel (CV) through the PL. Then boronized water in the CV is injected into the RV through the IL by the static head. In an experiment using a simple apparatus, gas ejection and water injection were found to occur alternately under certain conditions. The gas ejection interval was observed to fluctuate considerably. Though stochastic noise affected the interval, the experimental results suggested that the large fluctuation was produced by an inherent character in the system. A set of piecewise linear differential equations was derived to describe the experimental result. The large fluctuation was reproduced in the analytical solution. Thus it was shown to occur even in a deterministic system without any source of stochastic noise. Though the derived equations simulated the experiment well, they had ten independent parameters governing the behavior of the solution. There appeared chaotic features and bifurcation, but the analytical model was too complicated to examine the features and mechanism of bifurcation. In this study, a new simple model is proposed which consists of a set of piecewise linear ordinary differential equations with only four independent parameters. (authors)

  8. Water on Mars: Inventory, distribution, and possible sources of polar ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and various lines of morphologic evidence suggest that, in addition to the normal seasonal and climatic exchange of H2O that occurs between the Martian polar caps, atmosphere, and mid to high latitude regolith, large volumes of water have been introduced into the planet's long term hydrologic cycle by the sublimation of equatorial ground ice, impacts, catastrophic flooding, and volcanism. Under the climatic conditions that are thought to have prevailed on Mars throughout the past 3 to 4 b.y., much of this water is expected to have been cold trapped at the poles. The amount of polar ice contributed by each of the planet's potential crustal sources is discussed and estimated. The final analysis suggests that only 5 to 15 pct. of this potential inventory is now in residence at the poles.

  9. Feasibility of retrieving dust properties and total column water vapor from solar spectra measured using a lander camera on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Naohiro; Noguchi, Katsuyuki; Hashimoto, George L.; Senshu, Hiroki; Otobe, Naohito; Suzuki, Makoto; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2017-12-01

    Dust and water vapor are important constituents in the Martian atmosphere, exerting significant influence on the heat balance of the atmosphere and surface. We have developed a method to retrieve optical and physical properties of Martian dust from spectral intensities of direct and scattered solar radiation to be measured using a multi-wavelength environmental camera onboard a Mars lander. Martian dust is assumed to be composed of silicate-like substrate and hematite-like inclusion, having spheroidal shape with a monomodal gamma size distribution. Error analysis based on simulated data reveals that appropriate combinations of three bands centered at 450, 550, and 675 nm wavelengths and 4 scattering angles of 3°, 10°, 50°, and 120° lead to good retrieval of four dust parameters, namely, aerosol optical depth, effective radius and variance of size distribution, and volume mixing ratio of hematite. Retrieval error increases when some of the observational parameters such as color ratio or aureole are omitted from the retrieval. Also, the capability of retrieving total column water vapor is examined through observations of direct and scattered solar radiation intensities at 925, 935, and 972 nm. The simulation and error analysis presented here will be useful for designing an environmental camera that can elucidate the dust and water vapor properties in a future Mars lander mission.

  10. Iron removal, energy consumption and operating cost of electrocoagulation of drinking water using a new flow column reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Khalid S; Shaw, Andy; Al Khaddar, Rafid; Pedrola, Montserrat Ortoneda; Phipps, David

    2017-03-15

    The goal of this project was to remove iron from drinking water using a new electrocoagulation (EC) cell. In this research, a flow column has been employed in the designing of a new electrocoagulation reactor (FCER) to achieve the planned target. Where, the water being treated flows through the perforated disc electrodes, thereby effectively mixing and aerating the water being treated. As a result, the stirring and aerating devices that until now have been widely used in the electrocoagulation reactors are unnecessary. The obtained results indicated that FCER reduced the iron concentration from 20 to 0.3 mg/L within 20 min of electrolysis at initial pH of 6, inter-electrode distance (ID) of 5 mm, current density (CD) of 1.5 mA/cm 2 , and minimum operating cost of 0.22 US $/m 3 . Additionally, it was found that FCER produces H 2 gas enough to generate energy of 10.14 kW/m 3 . Statistically, it was found that the relationship between iron removal and operating parameters could be modelled with R 2 of 0.86, and the influence of operating parameters on iron removal followed the order: C 0 >t>CD>pH. Finally, the SEM (scanning electron microscopy) images showed a large number of irregularities on the surface of anode due to the generation of aluminium hydroxides. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. REDUCTION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF OLEAGINUOS WATER BY MEANS OF A FIX BED COLUMN FILLED WITH SUGAR CANE BAGASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastora de la C. Martínez Nodal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the environmental assessment conducted in the centrifugation process fuel that is used as raw material for generating electricity in Power Plants (CE operating with diesel and the physicochemical characterization of oleaginuos water (ARO that it generates, it was performed the environmental impact assessment of these waters if they are discharged without any treatment. A matrix of importance was made, which allowed us to identify the impact on the actions and factors by the activity and the generated waste. From the physico-chemical characterization of ARO, a sustainable treatment is proposed with the use of a fixed-bed column filled with sugar cane bagasse as biosorbent material to minimize the environmental impact caused by oleaginous water if spilled. A physicochemical characterization was made to the natural sugar cane bagasse in terms of moisture, density, porosity and high adsorption capacity. The results allowed to define the fraction of interest (+1 -2 mm, given by the performance in the screening (41%, the homogeneity of this fraction and sorption capacity (2g diesel/g BN. The breakthrough curve was obtained by a continuous flow system 2 l/h of ARO through a fixed bed of 59.997 g of BN and an initial concentration of hydrocarbon of 1444.9 mg/l. Studies showed that the sugarcane bagasse has potential as biosorbent oil, achieving a significant removal of the indicator total hydrocarbon, of 65%.

  12. Water vapor total column measurements using the Elodie Archive at Observatoire de Haute Provence from 1994 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarkissian

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor total column measurements at Observatoire de Haute Provence (5°42´ E, +43°55´ N, south of France, were obtained using observations of astronomical objects made between July 1994 and December 2004 on the 193-cm telescope with the high-resolution spectrometer Elodie. Spectra of stars, nebulae, and other astronomical objects were taken regularly during 10 years. More than 18 000 spectra from 400 nm to 680 nm are available on-line in the Elodie Archive. This archive, usually explored by astronomers, contains information to study the atmosphere of the Earth. Water vapor absorption lines appear in the visible in delimited bands that astronomers often avoid for their spectral analysis. We used the Elodie Archive with two objectives: firstly, to retrieve seasonal variability and long-term trend of atmospheric water vapor, and secondly, to remove signatures in spectra for further astronomical or geophysical use. The tools presented here (the workflow, the interoperable Elodie Archive and the web service Tellodie are developed following, when possible, formats and standards recommended by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance.

  13. Effect of Water Chemistry and Hydrodynamics on Nitrogen Transformation Activity and Microbial Community Functional Potential in Hyporheic Zone Sediment Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; School; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; School; Nelson, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; School of Environmental; Xu, Fen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; School of Environmental; Liu, Yunde [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; School of Environmental; Yan, Ailan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Institute; Zhong, Lirong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Thompson, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States

    2017-04-11

    Nitrogen (N) transformation in hyporheic zone (HZ) is an important component in N-cycling in ecosystems. A column study was conducted to investigate N transformation in a HZ sediment with a focus on how characteristic HZ properties including water chemistry, fluid residence time, and dynamic groundwater and surface water exchange affect on N transformation. Metagenomic and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses were performed to evaluate the dynamic changes in microbial community structure and its function in response to N transformation. The results indicated that N transformation in the HZ sediment was collectively controlled by microbial community functions including: denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), nitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). However, the spatial distribution of the microbial community functions and associated biogeochemical reaction rates and products changed quickly in response to experimental perturbation, and was influenced by various factors including water chemistry (dissolved O2 and N species), desorption of sediment associated organic carbon, ion exchange reactions of NH4+, and fluid residence time. The results of this study implied that the microbial community in the HZ would exhibit strong function zonation along N and O gradients, which in turn would control the rates and products of N transformation.

  14. Vertical transport of particulate-associated plutonium and americium in the upper water column of the Northeast Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.; Ballestra, S.; La Rosa, J.; Fukai, R.

    1983-01-01

    Concentrations of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) were determined in seawater, suspended particulate matter, sediment trap samples, and biogenic material collected at the VERTEX I site in the North Pacific off central California. From a vertical profile taken over the upper 1500 m, the presence of sub-surface maxima of sup(239+240)Pu and 241 Am were identified between 100 to 750 m and 250 to 750 m, respectively. A large fraction (32%) of the filterable sup(239+240)Pu in surface waters was associated with cells during a phytoplankton bloom; Pu:Am activity ratios in surface water and the suspended particles indicated that Pu was concentrated by the cells to a greater degree than Am. However, similar measurements beneath the surface layer showed an overall enrichment of Am over Pu on fine suspended particles with depth. Freshly produced zooplankton fecal pellets and large, fast sinking particles collected in PITS contained relatively high concentrations of Pu and Am. Both transuranic concentrations in trapped particles and transuranic flux tended to increase with depth down to 750 m, suggesting that their scavenging is in the upper water column. Am appeared to be scavenged by sinking biogenic particles to a greater extent than Pu. The results are discussed. (author)

  15. EU-wide survey of polar organic persistent pollutants in European river waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, Robert [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Via Enrico Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)], E-mail: robert.loos@jrc.it; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; Locoro, Giovanni; Rimaviciute, Erika; Contini, Serafino; Bidoglio, Giovanni [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Via Enrico Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2009-02-15

    This study provides the first EU-wide reconnaissance of the occurrence of polar organic persistent pollutants in European river waters. More than 100 individual water samples from over 100 European rivers from 27 European Countries were analysed for 35 selected compounds, comprising pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFOS, PFOA, benzotriazoles, hormones, and endocrine disrupters. Around 40 laboratories participated in this sampling exercise. The most frequently and at the highest concentration levels detected compounds were benzotriazole, caffeine, carbamazepine, tolyltriazole, and nonylphenoxy acetic acid (NPE{sub 1}C). Only about 10% of the river water samples analysed could be classified as 'very clean' in terms of chemical pollution. The rivers responsible for the major aqueous emissions of PFOS and PFOA from the European Continent could be identified. For the target compounds chosen, we are proposing 'indicative warning levels' in surface waters, which are (for most compounds) close to the 90th percentile of all water samples analysed. - More than 100 river water samples from 27 European Countries were analysed for 35 selected polar organic contaminants.

  16. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Single Leaves from Optical Polarization Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Dahlgren, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. For monitoring canopy water status, existing approaches such as the Crop Water Stress Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness have limitations. The CWSI does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWI is based upon the physics of water-light interaction, not plant physiology. In this research, we applied optical polarization techniques to monitor the VIS/NIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both changed nonlinearly as each leaf dried, R increasing and T decreasing. Our results tie changes in the VIS/NIR R and T to leaf physiological changes - linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf - and perhaps of a plant canopy - might be possible in the future. However, using our approach to estimate the water status of a leaf does not appear possible at present, because our results display too much variability that we do not yet understand.

  17. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Single Leaves from Optical Polarization Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long-term goals of remote sensing research. For monitoring canopy water status, existing approaches such as the Crop Water Stress Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness have limitations. The CWSI does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWI is based upon the physics of water-light interaction, not plant physiology. In this research, we applied optical polarization techniques to monitor the VISNIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both changed nonlinearly as each leaf dried, R increasing and T decreasing. Our results tie changes in the VISNIR R and T to leaf physiological changes linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf and perhaps of a plant canopy might be possible in the future. However, using our approach to estimate the water status of a leaf does not appear possible at present, because our results display too much variability that we do not yet understand.

  18. Energy efficient electrocoagulation using a new flow column reactor to remove nitrate from drinking water - Experimental, statistical, and economic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Khalid S; Shaw, Andy; Al Khaddar, Rafid; Pedrola, Montserrat Ortoneda; Phipps, David

    2017-07-01

    In this investigation, a new bench-scale electrocoagulation reactor (FCER) has been applied for drinking water denitrification. FCER utilises the concepts of flow column to mix and aerate the water. The water being treated flows through the perforated aluminium disks electrodes, thereby efficiently mixing and aerating the water. As a result, FCER reduces the need for external stirring and aerating devices, which until now have been widely used in the electrocoagulation reactors. Therefore, FCER could be a promising cost-effective alternative to the traditional lab-scale EC reactors. A comprehensive study has been commenced to investigate the performance of the new reactor. This includes the application of FCER to remove nitrate from drinking water. Estimation of the produced amount of H 2 gas and the yieldable energy from it, an estimation of its preliminary operating cost, and a SEM (scanning electron microscope) investigation of the influence of the EC process on the morphology of the surface of electrodes. Additionally, an empirical model was developed to reproduce the nitrate removal performance of the FCER. The results obtained indicated that the FCER reduced the nitrate concentration from 100 to 15 mg/L (World Health Organization limitations for infants) after 55 min of electrolysing at initial pH of 7, GBE of 5 mm, CD of 2 mA/cm 2 , and at operating cost of 0.455 US $/m 3 . Additionally, it was found that FCER emits H 2 gas enough to generate a power of 1.36 kW/m 3 . Statistically, the relationship between the operating parameters and nitrate removal could be modelled with R 2 of 0.848. The obtained SEM images showed a large number dents on anode's surface due to the production of aluminium hydroxides. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-07

    The goal of the Fall Removal Experiment 1987 was to determine the processes affecting the dependent and fate of low salinity coastal water and of biological material therein during fall when winds are mainly south-to westward. Five zooplankton taxa, Acartia tonsa, (A. tonsa) Paracalanus species (sp), Temora turbinata (T. turbinata), Oncaea sp, and Sagitta enflata were examined. Data on the distribution of all five taxa were presented, and distribution over time was also studied. The abundance of A. tonsa decreased tenfold over the 13 day sampling period, Paracalanus varied twofold and T. Turbinata showed little variability. The A. tonsa decrease was postulated to result from food abundance or predation, although the possible role of size distribution, water displacement and chlorophyll distribution will be examined in the future. A possible role of turbulence in zooplankton abundance is being examined. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Flow structures generated by elongated plates settling in a water column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Jensen, Anna Lyhne; Hærvig, Jakob

    angle of 15° in a 0.60 m x 0.30 m  0.35 m (LBH) glass container filled with water. Continuous Particle Image Velocimetry is used to analyse both the velocity field of the continuous phase and the motion of the plates. The experiments show a well-defined oscillating motion of the plate. A stall occurs...

  1. Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns

    KAUST Repository

    Bougouffa, Salim

    2013-03-29

    Atlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools.

  2. Characterization of cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid positional isomers in edible fat and oil using gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with highly polar ionic liquid capillary column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Asanuma, Masaharu; Mizobe, Hoyo; Kojima, Koichi; Nagai, Toshiharu; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the characterisation of all cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid (C18:1) positional isomers in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil (PHVO) and milk fat, which contain several cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers, was achieved by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with a highly polar ionic liquid capillary column (SLB-IL111). Prior to analysis, the cis- and trans-C18:1 fractions in PHVO and milk fat were separated using a silver-ion cartridge. The resolution of all cis-C18:1 positional isomers was successfully accomplished at the optimal isothermal column temperature of 120 °C. Similarly, the positional isomers of trans-C18:1, except for trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1, were separated at 120 °C. The resolution of trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1 isomers was made possible by increasing the column temperature to 160 °C. This analytical method is suitable for determining the cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers in edible fats and oils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detecting Canopy Water Status Using Shortwave Infrared Reflectance Data From Polar Orbiting and Geostationary Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fensholt, Rasmus; Huber Gharib, Silvia; Proud, Simon Richard

    2010-01-01

    analyses performed on SEVIRI SIWSI during a dry period within the growing season support these findings. These results suggest that the combined advantage of an improved temporal resolution and a fixed viewing angle potentially makes the SEVIRI sensor an interesting complementary data source to POES data......-based canopy water status detection from geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) data as compared to polar orbiting environmental satellite (POES)-based moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The EO-based SWIR water stress index...

  4. Biogeochemical controls on the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur distributions in the water column of Golfo Dulce: an anoxic basin on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Thamdrup, Bo; Canfield, Donald E.; Noehr Glud, Ronnie; Kuever, Jan; Lillebaek, Rolf; Birger Ramsing, Niels; Wawer, Cathrin

    2006-01-01

    Chemical distributions, respiration rates, and bacterial distributions were measured in 1994 in the water column and sediments of a small, tropical, anoxic basin (Golfo Dulce, Pacific coast of Costa Rica) to examine the biogeochemical controls on anoxia, sulfide, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, and organic carbon consumption. As reported previously, the deepest 100 m of the water column were anoxic, and sulfide concentrations in the bottom waters were less than 7 μM and then only transiently. Both free-swimming sulfide-oxidizing bacteria and Beggiatoa sp. (containing large vacuoles) were observed in the anoxic bottom waters or at the sediment-water interface. Aerobic respiration dominated the decomposition of organic matter in the surface waters and pycnocline, whereas sulfate reduction was principally restricted to the sediments. Bacteria were distributed in discrete zones and exhibited the highest densities where oxygen decreased below 1 μM around 100 m depth, and near the sediment-water interface. The sub-oxic, sub-pycnocline water column was characterized by a dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficit of 2.9 mole m -2 . With a water residence time of 35 - 57 d, estimated from a salt balance, this deficit corresponded to a DIN loss of 51 - 85 mmol m -2 d -1 , comparable to the sub-pycnocline oxygen consumption. Sulfide in the water column was maintained at low concentrations by frequent inputs of oxygenated water from the Pacific Ocean. Sulfide production in the sediments due to bacterial sulfate reduction was scavenged by frequent deposition of iron-rich turbidites. Based on 210 Pb distributions, the most recent emplacement of a turbidite in the basin sediments was determined to have occurred between 1989 and 1992. (author) [es

  5. Zirconium oxide-coated sand based batch and column adsorptive removal of arsenic from water: Isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ali Chaudhry

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports zirconium oxide-coated sand preparation, characterization by SEM, EDX, XRD, FT-IR and thermoanalytical techniques, and use as an adsorbent for the removal of most toxic form of arsenic, As(III, from aqueous solution in both batch and column methods. Batch experimental parameters such as contact time, concentration, dose of adsorbent, pH of As(III solution and temperature were optimized. The adsorption data was fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms at 303, 308 and 313 K. The maximum Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 136.98 μg/g at 313 K. Values of ΔH°, ΔG° and ΔS° were found to be −12.90, −8.74 to –8.28 and 0.014 kJ/mol, suggesting exothermic and spontaneous adsorption process with slight increase in entropy. The adsorption process followed pseudo-second order kinetics and was controlled by film diffusion step. The column studies showed that when flow rate was increased from 3.0 to 5.0 mL/min, the arsenic adsorption capacity of ZrOCS increased from 33.104 to 42.231 μg/g and breakthrough, and exhaustion times got reduced reduced. The results indicated that zirconium oxide-coated sand (ZrOCS is an excellent adsorbent for the removal of As(III from water.

  6. Defluoridation of drinking water using a new flow column-electrocoagulation reactor (FCER) - Experimental, statistical, and economic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Khalid S; Shaw, Andy; Al Khaddar, Rafid; Ortoneda Pedrola, Montserrat; Phipps, David

    2017-07-15

    A new batch, flow column electrocoagulation reactor (FCER) that utilises a perforated plate flow column as a mixer has been used to remove fluoride from drinking water. A comprehensive study has been carried out to assess its performance. The efficiency of fluoride removal (R%) as a function of key operational parameters such as initial pH, detention time (t), current density (CD), inter-electrode distance (ID) and initial concentration (C 0 ) has been examined and an empirical model has been developed. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation of the influence of the EC process on morphology of the surface of the aluminium electrodes, showed the erosion caused by aluminium loss. A preliminary estimation of the reactor's operating cost is suggested, allowing for the energy from recycling of hydrogen gas hydrogen gas produced amount. The results obtained showed that 98% of fluoride was removed within 25 min of electrolysis at pH of 6, ID of 5 mm, and CD of 2 mA/cm 2 . The general relationship between fluoride removal and operating parameters could be described by a linear model with R 2 of 0.823. The contribution of the operating parameters to the suggested model followed the order: t > CD > C 0  > ID > pH. The SEM images obtained showed that, after the EC process, the surface of the anodes, became non-uniform with a large number of irregularities due to the generation of aluminium hydroxides. It is suggested that these do not materially affect the performance. A provisional estimate of the operating cost was 0.379 US $/m 3 . Additionally, it has been found that 0.6 kW/m 3 is potentially recoverable from the H 2 gas. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simplified mathematical models for interpreting the results of tests carried out by labelling the whole piezometric column in water wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, H.A.

    1974-01-01

    Approximate methods used to interpret the results of tests based on radioactive tracer dilution in a single water well by labelling the whole piezometric column are described; these simple mathematical models have been used to obtain semi-quantitative data on the apparent velocity (horizontal) in non-homogeneous aquifers with flow rates of metres daily. Measurements have also been made in a homogeneous aquifer with velocities of centimetres daily. Interpretation is based on determination of the average concentration for the various well zones; this involves recognition of a mean velocity for each region. All the tracer dilution effects that are not due to horizontal or vertical flow between two zones, i.e. convection, artificial mixing, diffusion and so on, are grouped together as a single term, which is taken arbitrarily to be proportional to the difference in concentration between the regions under consideration; its value is obtained from the experimental dilution curve. The model was applied to the solution of the three cases encountered most frequently during our measurements in Colombia: (a) when the well penetrates a permeable zone and adjacent impermeable zone; (b) when the well penetrates a permeable zone contained between impermeable regions; and (c) when the well traverses an aquifer with two adjacent zones of different permeability contained between impermeable zones. The shape of the dilution curve (logarithm of concentration versus time, usually with two or more slopes) is predicted by the model, the approximate nature of which is consistent with the fact that the method of labelling the whole piezometric column is semi-quantitative. The results obtained for measurements made when there are considerable vertical flows are apparently correct, but there is no other experimental measurement available to confirm them. (author) [es

  8. Dynamics of microalgal communities in the water-column/sediment interface of the inner shelf off Parana State, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Luiz Queiroz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The composition and biomass of the microalgal community at the water-column/sediment interface on the continental shelf off Parana State (Brazil were studied every 2 months during 1999. Samples for cell identification and determination of chlorophyll a were taken from the interface layer and at discrete depths up to 4 m above the sediment. Results showed a community mainly formed by benthic and planktonic diatoms >30 µm, benthic diatoms 30 µm, which accounted for most of the pigment biomass, were resuspended from the interface after turbulent periods, and may take advantage of calm periods to stay and grow at the interface. Small benthic diatoms were more susceptible to wind-induced turbulence occurring in higher densities in the water column just above the water-sediment interface. A cyanobacterial bloom (Trichodesmiun was observed at these bottom layers in the spring-summer periods.A composição geral e a biomassa da comunidade microalgal da interface sedimento/água da plataforma do Estado do Paraná (Brasil foram estudadas em 1999 em relação ao regime de ventos. A cada dois meses foram coletadas amostras para a identificação de organismos e determinação de clorofila a, na interface água-sedimento e em profundidades discretas, ao longo da coluna d'água, até 4m acima do sedimento. Os resultados obtidos revelaram uma comunidade constituída principalmente por diatomáceas planctônicas e bentônicas maiores que 30 µm, diatomáceas bentônicas menores que 30 µm, e cianobactérias coloniais. As densidades celulares foram geralmente mais altas na interface. Eventos de mistura e sedimentação parecem ser determinantes na regulação da composição e biomassa de tais comunidades. Formas menores, mais susceptíveis à turbulência, dominaram a comunidade de água de fundo na maioria das ocasiões, e foram as mais abundantes na interface apenas em períodos de extrema estabilidade. Células maiores, aparentemente contendo a maior parte

  9. Metagenomics of the water column in the pristine upper course of the Amazon river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; McMahon, Katherine D; Toyama, Danyelle; Rinke, Raquel; Cristina Souza de Oliveira, Tereza; Wagner Garcia, José; Pellon de Miranda, Fernando; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2011-01-01

    River water is a small percentage of the total freshwater on Earth but represents an essential resource for mankind. Microbes in rivers perform essential ecosystem roles including the mineralization of significant quantities of organic matter originating from terrestrial habitats. The Amazon river in particular is famous for its size and importance in the mobilization of both water and carbon out of its enormous basin. Here we present the first metagenomic study on the microbiota of this river. It presents many features in common with the other freshwater metagenome available (Lake Gatun in Panama) and much less similarity with marine samples. Among the microbial taxa found, the cosmopolitan freshwater acI lineage of the actinobacteria was clearly dominant. Group I Crenarchaea and the freshwater sister group of the marine SAR11 clade, LD12, were found alongside more exclusive and well known freshwater taxa such as Polynucleobacter. A metabolism-centric analysis revealed a disproportionate representation of pathways involved in heterotrophic carbon processing, as compared to those found in marine samples. In particular, these river microbes appear to be specialized in taking up and mineralizing allochthonous carbon derived from plant material.

  10. Metagenomics of the Water Column in the Pristine Upper Course of the Amazon River

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Katherine D.; Toyama, Danyelle; Rinke, Raquel; Cristina Souza de Oliveira, Tereza; Wagner Garcia, José; Pellon de Miranda, Fernando; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2011-01-01

    River water is a small percentage of the total freshwater on Earth but represents an essential resource for mankind. Microbes in rivers perform essential ecosystem roles including the mineralization of significant quantities of organic matter originating from terrestrial habitats. The Amazon river in particular is famous for its size and importance in the mobilization of both water and carbon out of its enormous basin. Here we present the first metagenomic study on the microbiota of this river. It presents many features in common with the other freshwater metagenome available (Lake Gatun in Panama) and much less similarity with marine samples. Among the microbial taxa found, the cosmopolitan freshwater acI lineage of the actinobacteria was clearly dominant. Group I Crenarchaea and the freshwater sister group of the marine SAR11 clade, LD12, were found alongside more exclusive and well known freshwater taxa such as Polynucleobacter. A metabolism-centric analysis revealed a disproportionate representation of pathways involved in heterotrophic carbon processing, as compared to those found in marine samples. In particular, these river microbes appear to be specialized in taking up and mineralizing allochthonous carbon derived from plant material. PMID:21915244

  11. Using Performance Reference Compounds (PRCs) to measure dissolved water concentrations (Cfree) in the water column: Assessing equilibrium models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equilibrium-based passive sampling methods are often used in aquatic environmental monitoring to measure hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and in the subsequent evaluation of their effects on ecological and human health. HOCs freely dissolved in water (Cfree) will partition...

  12. The Inter Facility Testing of a Standard Oscillating Water Column (OWC) Type Wave Energy Converter (WEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg

    will be refereed to as The Round Robin Programme. The rationale for the work is based on the MaRINET proposal: A key aspect of the standardisation of device testing is that results from independent trials will be compatible between different test centres. Even when similar procedures are followed this may...... not be guaranteed. A specially selected test programme will, therefore, be implemented at certain MaRINET facilities to investigate this matter. Due to budget restrictions only laboratory scale centres can be considered but the open water operators will be consulted continuously during the formalisation...... at Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg. For further information regarding the content of this report please contact Morten Thøtt Andersen (mta@civil.aau.dk) or Jonas Bjerg Thomsen (jbt@civil.aau.dk) from the Department of Civil Engineering....

  13. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.

    1992-09-25

    This study sought to determine and understand the major processes governing the abundance, distribution, composition and eventual fate of zooplankton on the southeastern shelf of the US in relation to water circulation. Over much of the shelf circulation is dominated by the Gulf Stream and/or atmospheric forcing. Most of our studies concentrated on processes on the middle and outer shelf. On the latter, pronounced biological production occurs year-round at frequent intervals and is due to Gulf Stream eddies which move by at an average frequency of one every week. These eddies are rich in nutrients which, when upwelled into the euphoric zone, lead to pronounced primary production which then triggers zooplankton production.

  14. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.

    1992-09-25

    This study sought to determine and understand the major processes governing the abundance, distribution, composition and eventual fate of zooplankton on the southeastern shelf of the US in relation to water circulation. Over much of the shelf circulation is dominated by the Gulf Stream and/or atmospheric forcing. Most of our studies concentrated on processes on the middle and outer shelf. On the latter, pronounced biological production occurs year-round at frequent intervals and is due to Gulf Stream eddies which move by at an average frequency of one every week. These eddies are rich in nutrients which, when upwelled into the euphoric zone, lead to pronounced primary production which then triggers zooplankton production.

  15. Development of a numerical model for calculating exposure to toxic and nontoxic stressors in the water column and sediment from drilling discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rye, H.; Reed, M.; Frost, T.K.; Smit, M.G.D.; Durgut, S.

    2008-01-01

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of chemical components and particles which might lead to toxic and nontoxic stress in the environment. In order to be able to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of such discharges in the water column and in sediments, a numerical model was

  16. Water column anoxia, enhanced productivity, and concomitant changes in δ13C and δ34S across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary (Kowala - Holy Cross Mountains/Poland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Joachimski, M.M.; Ostertag-Henning, C.; Pancost, R.D.; Strauss, H.; Freeman, K.; Littke, R.; Racki, G.

    2001-01-01

    The investigation of the trace element and organic geochemistry of the Frasnian Famennian boundary section at Kowala (Holy Cross Mountains/Poland) shows that the lower water column was oxygen-deficient during late Frasnian and early Famennian times. The abundance and carbon isotopic composition of

  17. Distribution of biochemical constituents in the surface sediments of western coastal Bay of Bengal: Influence of river discharge and water column properties

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, B.S.K.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Krishna, M.S.

    region characterized by low nutrients suspended particulate matter (SPM), high phytoplankton biomass in the water column and high SOC while contrasting to that observed in the SW region. The isotopic ratios of SOC (-22 ppt) in the NW region were close...

  18. Quantification of octanol-water partition coefficients of several aldehydes in a bubble column using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heynderickx, P. M.; Španěl, Patrik; Van Langenhove, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 367, APR 2014 (2014), s. 22-28 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : SIFT-MS * Octanol-water partition coefficient * bubble column Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2014

  19. Importance of intertidal sediment processes and porewater exchange on the water column biogeochemistry in a pristine mangrove creek (Ras Dege, Tanzania)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouillon, S.; Middelburg, J.J.; Dehairs, F.; Borges, A.V.; Abril, G.; Flindt, M.R.; Ulomi, S.; Kristensen, E.

    2007-01-01

    We sampled a tidal creek (Ras Dege, Tanzania) during a 24-h cycle to document the variations in a suite of creek water column characteristics and to determine the relative influence of tidal and biological driving forces. Since the creek has no upstream freshwater inputs, highest salinity was

  20. Airborne Lidar for Simultaneous Measurement of Column CO2 and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    The 2-micron wavelength region is suitable for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements due to the existence of distinct absorption feathers for the gas at this particular wavelength. For more than 20 years, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several high-energy and high repetition rate 2-micron pulsed lasers. This paper will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both CO2 and water vapor (H2O) in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver telescope, detection system and data acquisition. Future plans for the IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  1. Airborne lidar for simultaneous measurement of column CO2 and water vapor in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2016-10-01

    The 2-micron wavelength region is suitable for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements due to the existence of distinct absorption feathers for the gas at this particular wavelength. For more than 20 years, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several high-energy and high repetition rate 2-micron pulsed lasers. This paper will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both CO2 and water vapor (H2O) in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver telescope, detection system and data acquisition. Future plans for the IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  2. Can neap-spring tidal cycles modulate biogeochemical fluxes in the abyssal near-seafloor water column?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnewitsch, Robert; Dale, Andrew; Lahajnar, Niko; Lampitt, Richard S.; Sakamoto, Kei

    2017-05-01

    Before particulate matter that settles as 'primary flux' from the interior ocean is deposited into deep-sea sediments it has to traverse the benthic boundary layer (BBL) that is likely to cover almost all parts of the seafloor in the deep seas. Fluid dynamics in the BBL differ vastly from fluid dynamics in the overlying water column and, consequently, have the potential to lead to quantitative and compositional changes between primary and depositional fluxes. Despite this potential and the likely global relevance very little is known about mechanistic and quantitative aspects of the controlling processes. Here, results are presented for a sediment-trap time-series study that was conducted on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the abyssal Northeast Atlantic, with traps deployed at 2, 40 and 569 m above bottom (mab). The two bottommost traps were situated within the BBL-affected part of the water column. The time series captured 3 neap and 4 spring tides and the arrival of fresh settling material originating from a surface-ocean bloom. In the trap-collected material, total particulate matter (TPM), particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), biogenic silica (BSi), particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), total hydrolysable amino acids (AA), hexosamines (HA) and lithogenic material (LM) were determined. The biogeochemical results are presented within the context of time series of measured currents (at 15 mab) and turbidity (at 1 mab). The main outcome is evidence for an effect of neap/spring tidal oscillations on particulate-matter dynamics in BBL-affected waters in the deep sea. Based on the frequency-decomposed current measurements and numerical modelling of BBL fluid dynamics, it is concluded that the neap/spring tidal oscillations of particulate-matter dynamics are less likely due to temporally varying total free-stream current speeds and more likely due to temporally and vertically varying turbulence intensities that result from the temporally varying

  3. Temporal Dynamic Distributions of Coccolithophorids in Water Column on Continental Shelf Break of the Southern East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Wei, K.; Yang, Y. J.; Tang, T. Y.

    2002-12-01

    This study is to quantify the dynamic distribution of coccolithophorid assemblages at a single site (25o42.3­ÝN, 122o28.8­ÝE) on the shelf-break of the southern East China Sea where the internal tide is conspicuous. Particle samples from six water-depths at 0, 20, 30, 50, 70 and 100 m were filtered at 12:00, 18:00 and 21:00 Nov. 12 and 00:00 Nov. 13, 1995 and investigated. The biomasses of coccolithophorid ranged from 78.6 x 102 to 444.0 x 102 cells l-1. The lowest biomass was recorded at 100 m at 18:00 and 00:00, while the largest one occurred at 30 m at 21:00. During the monitoring period, light-cycle, growth and herbivore feeding showed little influence on the vertical distribution of coccolithophorids. To unravel the effects of internal tide on the distribution pattern of coccolithophorids, a triangular coordinate diagram was constructed following Okada (Utrecht Micropaleontology Bulletin 30, 271-285, 1983) and Winter et al. (Coccolithophores, 161-177, 1994) to categorize the coccolithophorid assemblages into three groups. The triangular diagrams show that the floral compositions of the surface water were relatively static, while that of the water column between 20 and 100 m displayed complicated dynamics in corresponding to tidal currents and concomitant temperature variations. It is evident that the internal tide caused strong effects on the vertical distribution of coccolithophorids in the study area.

  4. Fluctuation contents of phosphorus and natural radionuclide in the water column of the Mersing river, Johor, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saili, Noor Affizah Bujang; Mohamed, Che Abd Rahim

    2013-01-01

    Studies on natural radionuclides such as 210 Po and 210 Pb with the concentration of phosphorus in water column related to suspended particulate matter (SPM) were carried out at the Mersing River, Johor, Malaysia. Sixteen water samples were collected from nine stations on the 4 th July 2010. 210 Po and 210 Pb activities varied between 0.76 to 2.24 mBq/L and 0.16 to 1.60 mBq/L respectively. The phosphorus concentrations, comprising total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP), were within the ranges of 6.06 to 23.31 μg/L, 2.24 to 13.42 μg/L and 0.47 to 16.10 μ/L, respectively. The concentration of TDP and salinity shows weak positive correlation (r = 0.39), perhaps due to the shallow depth of the Mersing River. There is a high positive correlation (r = 0.85) of 210 Po activity with SPM concentration and a moderately positive correlation (r =0.59) of 210 Po and TDP in water. The K d values in suspended particulate matter are much higher compare to that in dissolved phase, proving that the adsorption of radionuclides to particles is more dominant. This implies that SPM significantly influences the variation of the P compound and both radionuclides in the Mersing River. This corresponds with agricultural activities from palm oil estates; erosion of the river bank due to river runoff; advection of suspended particulates from surface sediment due to boat and ferry traffic at the jetties; sedimentation; domestic sewage from nearby terrestrial areas; and natural processes; all of which might have resulted in their introduction to the Mersing River. (author)

  5. Effect of Interfacial Polarization and Water Absorption on the Dielectric Properties of Epoxy-Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Marx

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Five types of nanofillers, namely, silica, surface-silylated silica, alumina, surface-silylated alumina, and boron nitride, were tested in this study. Nanocomposites composed of an epoxy/amine resin and one of the five types of nanoparticles were tested as dielectrics with a focus on (i the surface functionalization of the nanoparticles and (ii the water absorption by the materials. The dispersability of the nanoparticles in the resin correlated with the composition (OH content of their surfaces. The interfacial polarization of the thoroughly dried samples was found to increase at lowered frequencies and increased temperatures. The β relaxation, unlike the interfacial polarization, was not significantly increased at elevated temperatures (below the glass-transition temperature. Upon the absorption of water under ambient conditions, the interfacial polarization increased significantly, and the insulating properties decreased or even deteriorated. This effect was most pronounced in the nanocomposite containing silica, and occurred as well in the nanocomposites containing silylated silica or non-functionalized alumina. The alternating current (AC breakdown strength of all specimens was in the range of 30 to 35 kV·mm−1. In direct current (DC breakdown tests, the epoxy resin exhibited the lowest strength of 110 kV·mm−1; the nanocomposite containing surface-silylated alumina had a strength of 170 kV·mm−1. In summary, water absorption had the most relevant impact on the dielectric properties of nanocomposites containing nanoparticles, the surfaces of which interacted with the water molecules. Nanocomposites containing silylated alumina particles or boron nitride showed the best dielectric properties in this study.

  6. Optimization and Annual Average Power Predictions of a Backward Bent Duct Buoy Oscillating Water Column Device Using the Wells Turbine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Willits, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fontaine, Arnold A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This Technical Report presents work completed by The Applied Research Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University, in conjunction with Sandia National Labs, on the optimization of the power conversion chain (PCC) design to maximize the Average Annual Electric Power (AAEP) output of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device. The design consists of two independent stages. First, the design of a floating OWC, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), and second the design of the PCC. The pneumatic power output of the BBDB in random waves is optimized through the use of a hydrodynamically coupled, linear, frequency-domain, performance model that links the oscillating structure to internal air-pressure fluctuations. The PCC optimization is centered on the selection and sizing of a Wells Turbine and electric power generation equipment. The optimization of the PCC involves the following variables: the type of Wells Turbine (fixed or variable pitched, with and without guide vanes), the radius of the turbine, the optimal vent pressure, the sizing of the power electronics, and number of turbines. Also included in this Technical Report are further details on how rotor thrust and torque are estimated, along with further details on the type of variable frequency drive selected.

  7. Prediction of regular wave loads on a fixed offshore oscillating water column-wave energy converter using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elhanafi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, hydrodynamic wave loads on an offshore stationary–floating oscillating water column (OWC are investigated via a 2D and 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling based on the RANS equations and the VOF surface capturing scheme. The CFD model is validated against previous experiments for nonlinear regular wave interactions with a surface-piercing stationary barge. Following the validation stage, the numerical model is modified to consider the pneumatic damping effect, and an extensive campaign of numerical tests is carried out to study the wave–OWC interactions for different wave periods, wave heights and pneumatic damping factors. It is found that the horizontal wave force is usually larger than the vertical one. Also, there a direct relationship between the pneumatic and hydrodynamic vertical forces with a maximum vertical force almost at the device natural frequency, whereas the pneumatic damping has a little effect on the horizontal force. Additionally, simulating the turbine damping with an orifice plate induces higher vertical loads than utilizing a slot opening. Furthermore, 3D modeling significantly escalates and declines the predicted hydrodynamic vertical and horizontal wave loads, respectively.

  8. Estimating energy loss due to vortex shedding and pneumatic efficiency of an oscillating water column device: experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Xu, C.

    2014-12-01

    In laboratory tests of oscillating-water-column (OWC) devices for extracting wave energy from ocean waves, an orifice is often used as the power-takeoff mechanism. Calculations of the energy loss due to vortex shedding and the pneumatic extraction efficiency of the OWC chamber are two challenging issues. Direct measurement of the energy loss due to vortex shedding is difficult. The pneumatic extraction efficiency is often calculated by using a one-point measurement method, in which one pressure senor is used to measure the air pressure variation and one wave gauge is used to measure the instantaneous surface displacement inside the OWC chamber. This method is simple, but a systematic error may be introduced, especially for shorter waves. Based on our recent laboratory and theoretical studies of a pile-supported OWC device, we present a method for estimating the energy loss due to vortex shedding and improving the accuracy in the calculation of pneumatic extraction efficiency using one-point method. The method in this study is designed for an OWC device whose chamber has a circular cross section, but can be extended to other cases where development of an analytical theory is possible.

  9. Near-Bottom Hypoxia Impacts Dynamics of Bacterioplankton Assemblage throughout Water Column of the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, Peeter; Šatova, Elina; Lips, Inga; Lips, Urmas; Simm, Jaak; Kisand, Veljo; Metsis, Madis

    2016-01-01

    Over the past century the spread of hypoxia in the Baltic Sea has been drastic, reaching its ‘arm’ into the easternmost sub-basin, the Gulf of Finland. The hydrographic and climatological properties of the gulf offer a broad suite of discrete niches for microbial communities. The current study explores spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterioplankton community in the Gulf of Finland using massively parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments obtained by amplifying community DNA from spring to autumn period. The presence of redoxcline and drastic seasonal changes make spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterioplankton community composition (BCC) and abundances in such estuary remarkably complex. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that analyses spatiotemporal dynamics of BCC in relation to phytoplankton bloom throughout the water column (and redoxcline), not only at the surface layer. We conclude that capability to survive (or benefit from) shifts between oxic and hypoxic conditions is vital adaptation for bacteria to thrive in such environments. Our results contribute to the understanding of emerging patterns in BCCs that occupy hydrographically similar estuaries dispersed all over the world, and we suggest the presence of a global redox- and salinity-driven metacommunity. These results have important implications for understanding long-term ecological and biogeochemical impacts of hypoxia expansion in the Baltic Sea (and similar ecosystems), as well as global biogeography of bacteria specialized inhabiting similar ecosystems. PMID:27213812

  10. Boiling of simulated tap water: effect on polar brominated disinfection byproducts, halogen speciation, and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Xiangru; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Osiol, Jennifer; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Tap water typically contains numerous halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) as a result of disinfection, especially of chlorination. Among halogenated DBPs, brominated ones are generally significantly more toxic than their chlorinated analogues. In this study, with the aid of ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry by setting precursor ion scans of m/z 79/81, whole spectra of polar brominated DBPs in simulated tap water samples without and with boiling were revealed. Most polar brominated DBPs were thermally unstable and their levels were substantially reduced after boiling via decarboxylation or hydrolysis; the levels of a few aromatic brominated DBPs increased after boiling through decarboxylation of their precursors. A novel adsorption unit for volatile total organic halogen was designed, which enabled the evaluation of halogen speciation and mass balances in the simulated tap water samples during boiling. After boiling for 5 min, the overall level of brominated DBPs was reduced by 62.8%, of which 39.8% was volatilized and 23.0% was converted to bromide; the overall level of chlorinated DBPs was reduced by 61.1%, of which 44.4% was volatilized and 16.7% was converted to chloride; the overall level of halogenated DBPs was reduced by 62.3%. The simulated tap water sample without boiling was cytotoxic in a chronic (72 h) exposure to mammalian cells; this cytotoxicity was reduced by 76.9% after boiling for 5 min. The reduction in cytotoxicity corresponded with the reduction in overall halogenated DBPs. Thus, boiling of tap water can be regarded as a "detoxification" process and may reduce human exposure to halogenated DBPs through tap water ingestion.

  11. The diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Lai, Qiliang; Sun, Fengqin; Zheng, Tianling; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946–4746 m. While the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium, and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis, and Stappia were found to be PAH degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these bacteria have been identified in this context. In summary, this report revealed significant diversity among the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea water column. These bacteria may play a role in PAH removal in deep-sea environments. PMID:26379634

  12. Sequential injection chromatography with post-column reaction/derivatization for the determination of transition metal cations in natural water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Jarošová, Patrícia; Chocholouš, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the applicability of Sequential Injection Chromatography for the determination of transition metals in water is evaluated for the separation of copper(II), zinc(II), and iron(II) cations. Separations were performed using a Dionex IonPAC™ guard column (50mm×2mm i.d., 9 µm). Mobile phase composition and post-column reaction were optimized by modified SIMPLEX method with subsequent study of the concentration of each component. The mobile phase consisted of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as analyte-selective compound, sodium sulfate, and formic acid/sodium formate buffer. Post-column addition of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol was carried out for spectrophotometric detection of the analytes׳ complexes at 530nm. Approaches to achieve higher robustness, baseline stability, and detection sensitivity by on-column stacking of the analytes and initial gradient implementation as well as air-cushion pressure damping for post-column reagent addition were studied. The method allowed the rapid separation of copper(II), zinc(II), and iron(II) within 6.5min including pump refilling and aspiration of sample and 1mmol HNO3 for analyte stacking on the separation column. High sensitivity was achieved applying an injection volume of up to 90µL. A signal repeatability of<2% RSD of peak height was found. Analyte recovery evaluated by spiking of different natural water samples was well suited for routine analysis with sub-micromolar limits of detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of microbial communities in Lake Tahoe surface sample with Tonga Trench water column samples using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization - Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC - ESI - MS) and Global Natural Products Social Molecular Network (GNPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Intact polar lipids (IPLs) are lipids composed of a head group, a glycerol, and a fatty acid chain that make up the lipid bilayer of cell membranes in living cells; and the varying head groups can be indicative of the type of microbes present in the environment (Van Mooy 2010). So by distinguishing and identifying the IPL distribution in an environment one can make inferences about the microbial communities in the said environment. In this study, we used High Pressure Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization- Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC-ESI-MS) and Global Natural Products Social Molecular Networking (GNPS) to compare the IPL distributions of two oligotrophic environments: surface waters of Lake Tahoe in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the water column of the Tonga Trench in the South Pacific. We hypothesized that the similar nutrient dynamics of the two oligotrophic environments would result in similar eukaryotic and prokaryotic communities, which would be reflected in the IPL composition of suspended particulate organic matter (POM). For simplicity we focused on the classes of IPLs most commonly observed in the marine environment: phosphotidylglycerol (PG), phosphotidylethanolamine (PE), diacylglyceryl-trimethyl-homoserine (DGTS), diacylglyceryl-hydroxymethyl-trimethylalanine (DGTA), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), monoglycosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and diglycosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). Our results showed that all of the marine IPLs of interest were present in Lake Tahoe which confirms that there are many of the same microbial communities in the fresh waters of Lake Tahoe and the salt waters Tonga Trench.

  14. Water Column Profile Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories conducts standardized fisheries independent resource surveys in the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic,...

  15. Discrete Water Column Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories conducts standardized fisheries independent resource surveys in the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic,...

  16. CFD-PBM Approach with Different Inlet Locations for the Gas-Liquid Flow in a Laboratory-Scale Bubble Column with Activated Sludge/Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel computational fluid dynamics-population balance model (CFD-PBM for the simulation of gas mixing in activated sludge (i.e., an opaque non-Newtonian liquid in a bubble column is developed and described to solve the problem of measuring the hydrodynamic behavior of opaque non-Newtonian liquid-gas two-phase flow. We study the effects of the inlet position and liquid-phase properties (water/activated sludge on various characteristics, such as liquid flow field, gas hold-up, liquid dynamic viscosity, and volume-averaged bubble diameter. As the inlet position changed, two symmetric vortices gradually became a single main vortex in the flow field in the bubble column. In the simulations, when water was in the liquid phase, the global gas hold-up was higher than when activated sludge was in the liquid phase in the bubble column, and a flow field that was dynamic with time was observed in the bubble column. Additionally, when activated sludge was used as the liquid phase, no periodic velocity changes were found. When the inlet position was varied, the non-Newtonian liquid phase had different peak values and distributions of (dynamic liquid viscosity in the bubble column, which were related to the gas hold-up. The high gas hold-up zone corresponded to the low dynamic viscosity zone. Finally, when activated sludge was in the liquid phase, the volume-averaged bubble diameter was much larger than when water was in the liquid phase.

  17. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil columns packed to different bulk densities and water uptake by plantroots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi-Pisa, P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory metbod used to determine both the soil moisture retention curve and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in soil columns under transient flow conditions during evaporation.

  18. Electrocoagulation with polarity switch for fast oil removal from oil in water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Lorena C A; Nascimento, Izabela L; Muniz, Eduardo P; Rocha, Sandra M S; Porto, Paulo S S

    2018-05-01

    An electrocoagulation technique using a 3.5 L reactor, with aluminum electrodes in a monopolar arrangement with polarity switch at each 10 s was used to separate oil from synthetic oily water similar in oil concentration to produced water from offshore platforms. Up to 98% of oil removal was achieved after 20 min of processing. Processing time dependence of the oil removal and pH was measured and successfully adjusted to exponential models, indicating a pseudo first order behavior. Statistical analysis was used to prove that electrical conductivity and total solids depend significantly on the concentration of electrolyte (NaCl) in the medium. Oil removal depends mostly on the distance between the electrodes but is proportional to electrolyte concentration when initial pH is 8. Electrocoagulation with polarity switch maximizes the lifetime of the electrodes. The process reduced oil concentration to a value below that stipulated by law, proving it can be an efficient technology to minimize the offshore drilling impact in the environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The Martian polar caps and layered terrain presumably evolves by the deposition and removal of small amounts of water and dust each year, the current cap attributes therefore represent the incremental transport during a single year as integrated over long periods of time. The role was studied of condensation and sublimation of water ice in this process by examining the seasonal water cycle during the last 10(exp 7) yr. In the model, axial obliquity, eccentricity, and L sub s of perihelion vary according to dynamical models. At each epoch, the seasonal variations in temperature are calculated at the two poles, keeping track of the seasonal CO2 cap and the summertime sublimation of water vapor into the atmosphere; net exchange of water between the two caps is calculated based on the difference in the summertime sublimation between the two caps (or on the sublimation from one cap if the other is covered with CO2 frost all year). Results from the model can help to explain (1) the apparent inconsistency between the timescales inferred for layer formation and the much older crater retention age of the cap and (2) the difference in sizes of the two residual caps, with the south being smaller than the north.

  20. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of phosphate and silicate ions in river water by using ion-exclusion chromatographic separation and post-column derivatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Masuda, Wakako; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of phosphate and silicate ions in river water was examined by using ion-exclusion chromatography and post-column derivatization. Phosphate and silicate ions were separated by the ion-exclusion column packed with a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H + -form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) by using ultra pure water as an eluent. After the post-column derivatization with molybdate and ascorbic acid, so-called molybdenum-blue, both ions were determined simultaneously by spectrophotometry. The effects of sulfuric acid, sodium molybdate and ascorbic acid concentrations and reaction coil length, which have relation to form the reduced complexes of molybdate and ions, on the detector response for phosphate and silicate ions were investigated. Under the optimized conditions (color-forming reactant, 50 mM sulfuric acid-10 mM sodium molybdate; reducing agent, 50 mM ascorbic acid; reaction coil length, 6 m), the calibration curves of phosphate and silicate ions were linear in the range of 50-2000 μg L -1 as P and 250-10,000 μg L -1 as Si. This method was successfully applied to water quality monitoring of Kurose-river watershed and it suggested that the effluent from a biological sewage treatment plant was significant source of phosphate ion in Kurose-river water

  1. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  2. Growth and physiological responses of submerged plant Vallisneria natans to water column ammonia nitrogen and sediment copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengjie; Song, Siyuan; Li, Pengshan; Jeelani, Nasreen; Wang, Penghe; Yuan, Hezhong; Zhang, Jinghan; An, Shuqing; Leng, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The decline of submerged plant populations due to high heavy metal (e.g., Cu) levels in sediments and ammonia nitrogen (ammonia-N) accumulation in the freshwater column has become a significant global problem. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of ammonia-N on submerged macrophytes, but few have focused on the influence of sediment Cu on submerged macrophytes and their combined effects. Methods. In this paper, we selected three levels of ammonia-N (0, 3, and 6 mg L(-1)) and sediment Cu (25.75 ± 6.02 as the control, 125.75 ± 6.02, and 225.75 ± 6.02 mg kg(-1)), to investigate the influence of sediment Cu and ammonia-N on submerged Vallisneria natans. We measured the relative growth rate (RGR), above- and below- ground biomass, chlorophyll, non-protein thiol (NP-SH), and free proline. Results and Discussion. The below-ground biomass of V. natans decreased with increasing Cu sediment levels, suggesting that excessive sediment Cu can result in significant damage to the root of V. natans. Similarly, the above-ground biomass significantly decreased with increasing ammonia-N concentrations, indicating that excessive water ammonia-N can cause significant toxicity to the leaf of V. natans. In addition, high ammonia-N levels place a greater stress on submerged plants than sediment Cu, which is indicated by the decline of RGR and chlorophyll, and the increase of (NP-SH) and free proline. Furthermore, high sediment Cu causes ammonia-N to impose greater injury on submerged plants, and higher sediment Cu levels (Cu ≥ 125.75 mg kg(-1)) led to the tolerant values of ammonia-N for V. natans decreasing from 6 to 3 mg L(-1). This study suggests that high sediment Cu restricts the growth of plants and intensifies ammonia-N damage to V. natans.

  3. Growth and physiological responses of submerged plant Vallisneria natans to water column ammonia nitrogen and sediment copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjie Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The decline of submerged plant populations due to high heavy metal (e.g., Cu levels in sediments and ammonia nitrogen (ammonia-N accumulation in the freshwater column has become a significant global problem. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of ammonia-N on submerged macrophytes, but few have focused on the influence of sediment Cu on submerged macrophytes and their combined effects. Methods. In this paper, we selected three levels of ammonia-N (0, 3, and 6 mg L−1 and sediment Cu (25.75 ± 6.02 as the control, 125.75 ± 6.02, and 225.75 ± 6.02 mg kg−1, to investigate the influence of sediment Cu and ammonia-N on submerged Vallisneria natans. We measured the relative growth rate (RGR, above- and below- ground biomass, chlorophyll, non-protein thiol (NP-SH, and free proline. Results and Discussion. The below-ground biomass of V. natans decreased with increasing Cu sediment levels, suggesting that excessive sediment Cu can result in significant damage to the root of V. natans. Similarly, the above-ground biomass significantly decreased with increasing ammonia-N concentrations, indicating that excessive water ammonia-N can cause significant toxicity to the leaf of V. natans. In addition, high ammonia-N levels place a greater stress on submerged plants than sediment Cu, which is indicated by the decline of RGR and chlorophyll, and the increase of (NP-SH and free proline. Furthermore, high sediment Cu causes ammonia-N to impose greater injury on submerged plants, and higher sediment Cu levels (Cu ≥ 125.75 mg kg−1 led to the tolerant values of ammonia-N for V. natans decreasing from 6 to 3 mg L−1. This study suggests that high sediment Cu restricts the growth of plants and intensifies ammonia-N damage to V. natans.

  4. Intense molybdenum accumulation in sediments underneath a nitrogenous water column and implications for the reconstruction of paleo-redox conditions based on molybdenum isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Siebert, Christopher; Dale, Andrew W.; Frank, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The concentration and isotope composition of molybdenum (Mo) in sediments and sedimentary rocks are widely used proxies for anoxic conditions in the water column of paleo-marine systems. While the mechanisms leading to Mo fixation in modern restricted basins with anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) conditions are reasonably well constrained, few studies have focused on Mo cycling in the context of open-marine anoxia. Here we present Mo data for water column particulate matter, modern surface sediments and a paleo-record covering the last 140,000 years from the Peruvian continental margin. Mo concentrations in late Holocene and Eemian (penultimate interglacial) shelf sediments off Peru range from ∼70 to 100 μg g-1, an extent of Mo enrichment that is thought to be indicative of (and limited to) euxinic systems. To investigate if this putative anomaly could be related to the occasional occurrence of sulfidic conditions in the water column overlying the Peruvian shelf, we compared trace metal (Mo, vanadium, uranium) enrichments in particulate matter from oxic, nitrate-reducing (nitrogenous) and sulfidic water masses. Coincident enrichments of iron (Fe) (oxyhydr)oxides and Mo in the nitrogenous water column as well as co-variation of dissolved Fe and Mo in the sediment pore water suggest that Mo is delivered to the sediment surface by Fe (oxyhydr)oxides. Most of these precipitate in the anoxic-nitrogenous water column due to oxidation of sediment-derived dissolved Fe with nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor. Upon reductive dissolution in the surface sediment, a fraction of the Fe and Mo is re-precipitated through interaction with pore water sulfide. The Fe- and nitrate-dependent mechanism of Mo accumulation proposed here is supported by the sedimentary Mo isotope composition, which is consistent with Mo adsorption onto Fe (oxyhydr)oxides. Trace metal co-variation patterns as well as Mo and nitrogen isotope systematics suggest that the same mechanism of Mo delivery

  5. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  6. Elastic oscillations of water column in the 2003 Tokachi-oki tsunami source: in-situ measurements and 3-D numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Nosov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2003 Tokachi-Oki tsunamigenic earthquake the real-time JAMSTEC observatory obtained records which provided a unique opportunity to have a look deep inside the tsunami source. Considering water column as a compressible medium we processed the bottom pressure records in order to estimate amplitude, duration and velocity of bottom displacement. Spectral analysis of the records revealed a clear manifestation of the low-frequency elastic oscillations of water column. We also presented 3-D finite-difference numerical model developed in the framework of linear potential theory of ideal compressible fluid to better understand dynamical processes in the tsunami source. The model reproduces position of the main spectral maximum rather correctly. However, due to neglecting of crust elasticity and to lack of exact knowledge of spatiotemporal laws of bottom motion, there is an essential difference between in-situ observed and computed spectra.

  7. The effect of feed water dissolved organic carbon concentration and composition on organic micropollutant removal and microbial diversity in soil columns simulating river bank filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelkamp, C; van der Hoek, J P; Schoutteten, K; Hulpiau, L; Vanhaecke, L; Vanden Bussche, J; Cabo, A J; Callewaert, C; Boon, N; Löwenberg, J; Singhal, N; Verliefde, A R D

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated organic micropollutant (OMP) biodegradation rates in laboratory-scale soil columns simulating river bank filtration (RBF) processes. The dosed OMP mixture consisted of 11 pharmaceuticals, 6 herbicides, 2 insecticides and 1 solvent. Columns were filled with soil from a RBF site and were fed with four different organic carbon fractions (hydrophilic, hydrophobic, transphilic and river water organic matter (RWOM)). Additionally, the effect of a short-term OMP/dissolved organic carbon (DOC) shock-load (e.g. quadrupling the OMP concentrations and doubling the DOC concentration) on OMP biodegradation rates was investigated to assess the resilience of RBF systems. The results obtained in this study imply that - in contrast to what is observed for managed aquifer recharge systems operating on wastewater effluent - OMP biodegradation rates are not affected by the type of organic carbon fraction fed to the soil column, in case of stable operation. No effect of a short-term DOC shock-load on OMP biodegradation rates between the different organic carbon fractions was observed. This means that the RBF site simulated in this study is resilient towards transient higher DOC concentrations in the river water. However, a temporary OMP shock-load affected OMP biodegradation rates observed for the columns fed with the river water organic matter (RWOM) and the hydrophilic fraction of the river water organic matter. These different biodegradation rates did not correlate with any of the parameters investigated in this study (cellular adenosine triphosphate (cATP), DOC removal, specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), richness/evenness of the soil microbial population or OMP category (hydrophobicity/charge). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. IMPROVED PARAMETERIZATION OF WATER CLOUD MODEL FOR HYBRID-POLARIZED BACKSCATTER SIMULATION USING INTERACTION FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chauhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The prime aim of this study was to assess the potential of semi-empirical water cloud model (WCM in simulating hybrid-polarized SAR backscatter signatures (RH and RV retrieved from RISAT-1 data and integrate the results into a graphical user interface (GUI to facilitate easy comprehension and interpretation. A predominant agricultural wheat growing area was selected in Mathura and Bharatpur districts located in the Indian states of Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan respectively to carry out the study. The three-date datasets were acquired covering the crucial growth stages of the wheat crop. In synchrony, the fieldwork was organized to measure crop/soil parameters. The RH and RV backscattering coefficient images were extracted from the SAR data for all the three dates. The effect of four combinations of vegetation descriptors (V1 and V2 viz., LAI-LAI, LAI-Plant water content (PWC, Leaf water area index (LWAI-LWAI, and LAI-Interaction factor (IF on the total RH and RV backscatter was analyzed. The results revealed that WCM calibrated with LAI and IF as the two vegetation descriptors simulated the total RH and RV backscatter values with highest R2 of 0.90 and 0.85 while the RMSE was lowest among the other tested models (1.18 and 1.25 dB, respectively. The theoretical considerations and interpretations have been discussed and examined in the paper. The novelty of this work emanates from the fact that it is a first step towards the modeling of hybrid-polarized backscatter data using an accurately parameterized semi-empirical approach.

  9. Influence of pycnocline topography and water-column structure on marine distributions of alcids (Aves: Alcidae) in Anadyr Strait, Northern Bering Sea, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, J. Christopher

    1991-01-01

    Systematic ship-board surveys were used to simultaneously record seabird abundances and resolve coarse-scale (3 to 10 km) horizontal and fine-scale (1 to 10 m) vertical variability in water-column structure and bathymetry for portions of the coastal zone in Anadyr Strait near western St. Lawrence Island, northern Bering Sea, Alaska, during August and September 1987. Three plankton-feeding alcids, parakeet (Cyclorrhynchus psittacula), crested (Aethia cristatella) and least (A. pusilla) auklets, each exhibited distinct associations for different pycnocline characteristics. Least auklets were more abundant in mixed water, but they also occurred within stratified water where the pycnocline and upper-mixed layer were shallow (≤8 m) and thin (≤10 m), respectively. Low body mass (85 g), high buoyancy, and relatively poor diving ability may have restricted this auklet to areas where water-column strata nearly intersected the surface, or to areas from which strata were absent altogether due to strong vertical mixing. Parakeet and crested auklets, which are larger-bodied (ca. 260 g) planktivores with presumably greater diving ability, were more abundant in stratified water, and both species exhibited less specific affinities for water-column characteristic at intermediate and shallow levels. All three auklets avoided locations with strong pycnocline gradients (≤0.22σtm−1), a crude index of the strong, subsurface shear in water velocities characteristic of this region. Auklet distributions in Anadyr Strait were consistent with: (1) strata accessibility, as estimated from relationships between body mass and relative diving ability, (2) possible avoidance of strong subsurface water motions, and (3) habits and distributions of plankton prey. In contrast, largebodied (>450 g) alcids [i.e., common (Uria aalge) and thick-billed (U. lomvia) murres, pigeon guillemots (Cephus columba), tufted (Fratercula cirrhata), and horned (F. corniculata) puffins feeding on fish or

  10. Simple Physics-Based Analytical Formulas for the Potentials of Mean Force of the Interaction of Amino Acid Side Chains in Water. VII. Charged-Hydrophobic/Polar and Polar-Hydrophobic/Polar Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2017-01-19

    The physics-based potentials of side-chain-side-chain interactions corresponding to pairs composed of charged and polar, polar and polar, charged and hydrophobic, and hydrophobic and hydrophobic side chains have been determined. A total of 144 four-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMFs) of all possible pairs of molecules modeling these pairs were determined by umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water as functions of distance and orientation, and the analytical expressions were then fitted to the PMFs. Depending on the type of interacting sites, the analytical approximation to the PMF is a sum of terms corresponding to van der Waals interactions and cavity-creation involving the nonpolar sections of the side chains and van der Waals, cavity-creation, and electrostatic (charge-dipole or dipole-dipole) interaction energies and polarization energies involving the charged or polar sections of the side chains. The model used in this work reproduces all features of the interacting pairs. The UNited RESidue force field with the new side-chain-side-chain interaction potentials was preliminarily tested with the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDBL 1BDD ; a three-α-helix bundle) and UPF0291 protein YnzC from Bacillus subtilis (PDB: 2HEP ; an α-helical hairpin).

  11. Body water distribution in severe obesity and its assessment from eight-polar bioelectrical impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, A; Malavolti, M; Agosti, F; Marinone, P G; Caiti, O; Battistini, N; Bedogni, G

    2005-02-01

    To measure body water distribution and to evaluate the accuracy of eight-polar bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) for the assessment of total body water (TBW) and extracellular water (ECW) in severe obesity. Cross-sectional study. Obesity clinic. In all, 75 women aged 18-66 y, 25 with body mass index (BMI) between 19.1 and 29.9 kg/m(2) (ie not obese), 25 with BMI between 30.0 and 39.9 kg/m(2) (ie class I and II obese), and 25 with BMI between 40.0 and 48.2 kg/m(2) (ie class III obese). TBW and ECW were measured by (2)H(2)O and Br dilution. Body resistance (R) was obtained by summing the resistances of arms, trunk and legs as measured by eight-polar BIA (InBody 3.0, Biospace, Seoul, Korea). The resistance index at a frequency of x kHz (RI(x)) was calculated as height (2)/R(x). ECW : TBW was similar in women with class III (46+/-3%, mean+/-s.d.) and class I-II obesity (45+/-3%) but higher than in nonobese women (39+/-3%, P<0.05). In a random subsample of 37 subjects, RI(500) explained 82% of TBW variance (P<0.0001) and cross-validation of the obtained algorithm in the remaining 38 subjects gave a percent root mean square error (RMSE%) of 5% and a pure error (PE) of 2.1 l. In the same subjects, RI(5) explained 87% of ECW variance (P<0.0001) and cross-validation of the obtained algorithm gave a RMSE% of 8% and a PE of 1.4 l. The contribution of weight and BMI to the prediction of TBW and ECW was nil or negligible on practical grounds. ECW : TBW is similar in women with class I-II and class III obesity up to BMI values of 48.2 kg/m(2). Eight-polar BIA offers accurate estimates of TBW and ECW in women with a wide range of BMI (19.1-48.2 kg/m(2)) without the need of population-specific formulae.

  12. An ultra-sensitive method for the analysis of perfluorinated alkyl acids in drinking water using a column switching high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasu, Kavitha; Nakayama, Shoji F; Yoshikane, Mitsuha; Mills, Marc A; Wright, J Michael; Ehrlich, Shelley

    2017-04-21

    In epidemiological research, it has become increasingly important to assess subjects' exposure to different classes of chemicals in multiple environmental media. It is a common practice to aliquot limited volumes of samples into smaller quantities for specific trace level chemical analyses. A novel method was developed for the determination of 14 perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) in small volumes (10mL) of drinking water using off-line solid phase extraction (SPE) pre-treatment followed by on-line pre-concentration on a WAX column before analysis on column-switching high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). In general, large volumes (100-1000mL) have been used for the analysis of PFAAs in drinking water. The current method requires approximately 10mL of drinking water concentrated by using an SPE cartridge and eluted with methanol. A large volume injection of the extract was introduced on to a column-switching HPLC-MS/MS using a mix-mode SPE column for the trace level analysis of PFAAs in water. The recoveries for most of the analytes in the fortified laboratory blanks ranged from 73±14% to 128±5%. The lowest concentration minimum reporting levels (LCMRL) for the 14 PFAAs ranged from 0.59 to 3.4ng/L. The optimized method was applied to a pilot-scale analysis of a subset of drinking water samples from an epidemiological study. These samples were collected directly from the taps in the households of Ohio and Northern Kentucky, United States and the sources of drinking water samples are both surface water and ground water, and supplied by different water distribution facilities. Only five PFAAs, perfluoro-1-butanesulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluoro-1- -hexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluoro-1-octanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluoro-n-heptanoic acid (PFHpA) and perfluoro-n-octanoic acid (PFOA) are detected above the LCMRL values. The median concentrations of these five PFAAs detected in the samples was ≤4.1ng/L with PFOS at 7.6ng

  13. Polarization Impacts on the Water-Leaving Radiance Retrieval from Above-Water Radiometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Society of America OCIS codes: 010.0010, 280.0280, 010.4450, 010.1320. 1. Introduction coastal water-quality monitoring as well as in var ...reflection from waves and wavelets at the sea surface. Follow- ing Cox and Munk [28-30], the ocean surface can be modeled based on a distribution of...performed for a fixed relative azimuth angle of 90° whereas HyperSAS data are acquired for var - ious relative azimuth angles, here comprising those

  14. Multimission empirical ocean tide modeling for shallow waters and polar seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    A new global ocean tide model named DTU10 (developed at Technical University of Denmark) representing all major diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents is proposed based on an empirical correction to the global tide model FES2004 (Finite Element Solutions), with residual tides determined using...... to recover twice the spatial variations of the tidal signal which is particularly important in shallow waters where the spatial scale of the tidal signal is scaled down. Outside the +/- 66 degrees parallel combined Envisat, GEOSAT Follow-On, and ERS-2, data sets have been included to solve for the tides up...... to the +/- 82 degrees parallel. A new approach to removing the annual sea level variations prior to estimating the residual tides significantly improved tidal determination of diurnal constituents from the Sun-synchronous satellites (e. g., ERS-2 and Envisat) in the polar seas. Extensive evaluations with six...

  15. Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a multi-element contaminated soil profile assessed by in-situ soil pore water sampling, column leaching and sequential extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Luke; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Clemente, Rafael; Lepp, Nicholas; Dickinson, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Three methods for predicting element mobility in soils have been applied to an iron-rich soil, contaminated with arsenic, cadmium and zinc. Soils were collected from 0 to 30 cm, 30 to 70 cm and 70 to 100 cm depths in the field and soil pore water was collected at different depths from an adjacent 100 cm deep trench. Sequential extraction and a column leaching test in the laboratory were compared to element concentrations in pore water sampled directly from the field. Arsenic showed low extractability, low leachability and occurred at low concentrations in pore water samples. Cadmium and zinc were more labile and present in higher concentrations in pore water, increasing with soil depth. Pore water sampling gave the best indication of short term element mobility when field conditions were taken into account, but further extraction and leaching procedures produced a fuller picture of element dynamics, revealing highly labile Cd deep in the soil profile.

  16. Occurence of antibiotic compounds found in the water column and bottom sediments from a stream receiving two waste water treatment plant effluents in northern New Jersey, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibs, Jacob; Heckathorn, Heather A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Klapinski, Frank R.; Alebus, Marzooq; Lippincott, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An urban watershed in northern New Jersey was studied to determine the presence of four classes of antibiotic compounds (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines) and six degradates in the water column and bottom sediments upstream and downstream from the discharges of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and a drinking-water intake (DWI). Many antibiotic compounds in the four classes not removed by conventional WWTPs enter receiving waters and partition to stream sediments. Samples were collected at nine sampling locations on 2 days in September 2008. Two of the nine sampling locations were background sites upstream from two WWTP discharges on Hohokus Brook. Another background site was located upstream from a DWI on the Saddle River above the confluence with Hohokus Brook. Because there is a weir downstream of the confluence of Hohokus Brook and Saddle River, the DWI receives water from Hohokus Brook at low stream flows. Eight antibiotic compounds (azithromycin (maximum concentration 0.24 μg/L), ciprofloxacin (0.08 μg/L), enrofloxacin (0.015 μg/L), erythromycin (0.024 μg/L), ofloxacin (0.92 μg/L), sulfamethazine (0.018 μg/L), sulfamethoxazole (0.25 μg/L), and trimethoprim (0.14 μg/L)) and a degradate (erythromycin-H2O (0.84 μg/L)) were detected in the water samples from the sites downstream from the WWTP discharges. The concentrations of six of the eight detected compounds and the detected degradate compound decreased with increasing distance downstream from the WWTP discharges. Azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and trimethoprim were detected in stream-bottom sediments. The concentrations of three of the four compounds detected in sediments were highest at a sampling site located downstream from the WWTP discharges. Trimethoprim was detected in the sediments from a background site. Pseudo-partition coefficients normalized for streambed sediment organic carbon concentration were calculated for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and

  17. On-line solid-phase extraction-short-column liquid chromatography combined with various tandem mass spectrometric scanning strategies for the rapid study of transformation of pesticides in surface water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenboom, A.C.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    The applicability of solid-phase extraction-short-column liquid chromatography using two short columns (i.e., 10 and 20 mm long) coupled on-line with tandem mass spectrometric detection is demonstrated for the rapid degradation study of pesticides and their transformation products in water at the

  18. Electron and positron collisions with polar molecules: studies with the benchmark water molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Rui; Tennyson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Faure, Alexandre [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, UMR 5571 CNRS, Universite Joseph-Fourier, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: j.tennyson@ucl.ac.uk

    2009-07-15

    It is difficult to measure low-energy cross sections for collisions of charged particles with strongly dipolar systems since the magnitude of such cross sections is completely dominated by collisions in the forward direction. Theoretically, it is possible to account for the strong forward scattering using the Born approximation but the procedure for combining Born 'top-up' with the more sophisticated treatments required to treat the scattering in other directions is not unique. This comment describes recent progress in describing both electron and positron collisions with polar molecules taking the important water molecule as a benchmark. Previous calculations on electron water at collision energies below 7 eV are compared with new experiments. Positron water studies up to 10 eV are re-analysed based on given experimental acceptance profiles, which depend on the details of the apparatus and method used in the measurements. It is suggested that theory is capable of giving reliable results for elastic and rotationally inelastic electron/positron collisions with strongly dipolar species.

  19. Evolution of oil/water interface in the presence of SDBS detected by dual polarization interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming; Ding, Ziling; Wang, Hu; Xiong, Yan; Fang, Shenwen; Shi, Peng; Liu, Shuai

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the technique of dual polarization interferometry (DPI) was applied to establish a new method to monitor the real-time evolution of oil/water interface in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) at molecular level. A three-stage model of adsorption-desorption-detachment had been proposed and was systematically discussed upon the addition of different SDBS concentrations based on the variation of the interfacial mass with time. The results demonstrated two patterns of adsorption morphology at the oil/water interface, SDBS mono-molecules and SDBS hemi-micelles at SDBS concentrations below and above cmc respectively according to the relaxation time obtained by theoretical model and the reaction order calculated by integral method in the analysis of adsorbed dynamics. The capability of oil detachment with the aid of SDBS as well as the properties of the outlet fluid were investigated under two patterns of adsorption morphologies, which showed different effects of oil detachment with the aid of SDBS molecules. The speed of oil detachment and the fluorescence intensity of the outlet fluid during the detachment process indicated the fact that the oil detachment capability was significantly promoted by the morphology of the absorbed hemi-micelles. The findings in the present study are crucial for fully understanding the interfacial behavior of surfactants applied in oil/water interface, which is of great significance in enhanced oil recovery and pollution industry.

  20. Latitudinal patterns of export production recorded in surface sediments of the Chilean Patagonian fjords (41-55°S) as a response to water column productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aracena, Claudia; Lange, Carina B.; Luis Iriarte, José; Rebolledo, Lorena; Pantoja, Silvio

    2011-03-01

    The Chilean Patagonian fjords region (41-56°S) is characterized by highly complex geomorphology and hydrographic conditions, and strong seasonal and latitudinal patterns in precipitation, freshwater discharge, glacier coverage, and light regime; all of these directly affect biological production in the water column. In this study, we compiled published and new information on water column properties (primary production, nutrients) and surface sediment characteristics (biogenic opal, organic carbon, molar C/N, bulk sedimentary δ13C org) from the Chilean Patagonian fjords between 41°S and 55°S, describing herein the latitudinal pattern of water column productivity and its imprint in the underlying sediments. Based on information collected at 188 water column and 118 sediment sampling sites, we grouped the Chilean fjords into four main zones: Inner Sea of Chiloé (41° to ˜44°S), Northern Patagonia (44° to ˜47°S), Central Patagonia (48-51°S), and Southern Patagonia (Magellan Strait region between 52° and 55°S). Primary production in the Chilean Patagonian fjords was the highest in spring-summer, reflecting the seasonal pattern of water column productivity. A clear north-south latitudinal pattern in primary production was observed, with the highest average spring and summer estimates in the Inner Sea of Chiloé (2427 and 5860 mg C m -2 d -1) and Northern Patagonia (1667 and 2616 mg C m -2 d -1). This pattern was closely related to the higher availability of nutrients, greater solar radiation, and extended photoperiod during the productive season in these two zones. The lowest spring value was found in Caleta Tortel, Central Patagonia (91 mg C m -2 d -1), a site heavily influenced by glacier meltwater and river discharge loaded with glacial sediments. Biogenic opal, an important constituent of the Chilean fjord surface sediments (Si OPAL ˜1-13%), reproduced the general north-south pattern of primary production and was directly related to water column silicic

  1. Chromium(VI) removal from water using fixed bed column of polypyrrole/Fe3O4 nanocomposite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bhaumik, M

    2013-06-07

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Cr(VI) using polypyrrole/Fe3O4nanocomposite adsorbent was investigated in a continuous flow fixed-bed column. The effects of composition of the nanocomposite, adsorbent mass, influent Cr(VI) concentration and flow rate...

  2. Sensitivity of polarization fluctuations to the nature of protein-water interactions: Study of biological water in four different protein-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rikhia; Banerjee, Saikat; Hazra, Milan; Roy, Susmita; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-12-01

    Since the time of Kirkwood, observed deviations in magnitude of the dielectric constant of aqueous protein solution from that of neat water (˜80) and slower decay of polarization have been subjects of enormous interest, controversy, and debate. Most of the common proteins have large permanent dipole moments (often more than 100 D) that can influence structure and dynamics of even distant water molecules, thereby affecting collective polarization fluctuation of the solution, which in turn can significantly alter solution's dielectric constant. Therefore, distance dependence of polarization fluctuation can provide important insight into the nature of biological water. We explore these aspects by studying aqueous solutions of four different proteins of different characteristics and varying sizes, chicken villin headpiece subdomain (HP-36), immunoglobulin binding domain protein G (GB1), hen-egg white lysozyme (LYS), and Myoglobin (MYO). We simulate fairly large systems consisting of single protein molecule and 20000-30000 water molecules (varied according to the protein size), providing a concentration in the range of ˜2-3 mM. We find that the calculated dielectric constant of the system shows a noticeable increment in all the cases compared to that of neat water. Total dipole moment auto time correlation function of water ⟨δMW(0)δMW(t)⟩ is found to be sensitive to the nature of the protein. Surprisingly, dipole moment of the protein and total dipole moment of the water molecules are found to be only weakly coupled. Shellwise decomposition of water molecules around protein reveals higher density of first layer compared to the succeeding ones. We also calculate heuristic effective dielectric constant of successive layers and find that the layer adjacent to protein has much lower value (˜50). However, progressive layers exhibit successive increment of dielectric constant, finally reaching a value close to that of bulk 4-5 layers away. We also calculate shellwise

  3. [Preparation and application of mixed-mode capillary polymer monolithic column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Abo; Zou, Cunjie; Shan, Yuanhong; Shi, Xianzhe; Xu, Guowang

    2014-05-01

    Based on the diversity of the retention mechanism, mixed-mode capillary monolithic columns have broad application prospect. In this work, a novel capillary polymer monolithic column was prepared with [2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl] dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide (SPE) as monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as crosslinking agent, azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator and butylalcohol/1, 4-butanediol/water as ternary porogens. Under the optimized reaction conditions including the proportion of monomer and porogens, amount of initiator, reaction temperature and polymerization time, the monolithic column showed good mechanical strength up to 10 MPa, high permeability of 2. 17 x 10(-14) m2 and good repeatability. The peak area RSDs of column-to-column and batch-to-batch reproducibility were 1.0% and 4.6%, respectively. Finally, the capillary monolithic column was evaluated with polar and non-polar test mixtures. It showed hydrophilic interaction under high organic phase while hydrophobic interaction under low organic phase, indicating it a mixed-mode monolithic column.

  4. Monitoring of 45 pesticides in Lebanese surface water using Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisha, Al Ashi; Hneine, Wael; Mokh, Samia; Devier, Marie-Hélène; Budzinski, Hélèn; Jaber, Farouk

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the dissolved concentration of 45 pesticides in the surface waters of the Lebanese Republic using Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler "POCIS". All of the sampling sites are located in the major agricultural land areas in Lebanon. POCIS (n = 3) were deployed at Ibrahim River, Qaraoun Lake and Hasbani River for a duration of 14 days. The total concentration of pesticides ranged from not detected (nd) to 137.66 ng.L-1. Chlorpyrifos, DDE-pp, diazinon and Fenpropathrin were the most abundant compounds. Qaraoun Lake and Hasbani River were found to be more polluted than Ibrahim River, since they receive large amounts of waste water derived from nearby agricultural lands and they had the lowest dilution factor. The aqueous average concentration of the target compounds were estimated using sampling rates obtained from the literature. Comparison between Time Weighed Average concentrations "TWA" using POCIS and spot sampling is presented. Results showed that POCIS TWA concentrations are in agreement with spot sampling concentrations for Ibrahim and Hasbani Rivers. The toxicity of the major detected pesticides on three representative aquatic species ( Daphnia magna, Scenedesmus quadricauda and Oncorhynchus mykiss) is also reported.

  5. Determination of commonly used polar herbicides in agricultural drainage waters in Australia by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Anh T K; Hyne, Ross V; Doble, Philip

    2007-03-01

    The present study describes the application of different extraction techniques for the preconcentration of ten commonly found acidic and non-acidic polar herbicides (2,4-D, atrazine, bensulfuron-methyl, clomazone, dicamba, diuron, MCPA, metolachlor, simazine and triclopyr) in the aqueous environment. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with dichloromethane, solid-phase extraction (SPE) using Oasis HLB cartridges or SBD-XC Empore disks were compared for extraction efficiency of these herbicides in different matrices, especially water samples from contaminated agricultural drainage water containing high concentrations of particulate matter. Herbicides were separated and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an ultraviolet detector. SPE using SDB-XC Empore disks was applied to determine target herbicides in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area (NSW, Australia) during a two-week survey from October 2005 to November 2005. The daily aqueous concentrations of herbicides from 24-h composite samples detected at two sites increased after run-off from a storm event and were in the range of: 0.1-17.8 microg l(-1), diuron, respectively.

  6. Sedimentary deposition and reflux of phosphorus (P in the Eastern Gotland Basin and their coupling with P concentrations in the water column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Hille

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe the role of sedimentary processes for the phosphorus (P cycle in the open Baltic Proper, P deposition and reflux were quantified for the predominately anoxic sediments of the Eastern Gotland Basin. The study is based on investigations of 53 surface sediment samples and pore water samples from 8 sediment cores. The average P deposition rate was estimated at 0.20 g ± 0.18 g -2 yr-1, the fluctuation being due to variable bulk sediment deposition rates. P refluxes were estimated by applying Fick's First Law of Diffusion. A fairly good positive correlation between sedimentary P deposition and P release was obtained. P release from sediments by diffusion exceeds net P deposition by a factor of 2. This suggests that 2/3 of the deposited gross P is recycled in the sediments and released back into the water column; only 1/3 remains in the sediment permanently. A budget calculation demonstrates that the released dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP accounts for the observed increase in DIP concentrations in the deep water during periods of stagnation, which is noticeable even at the surface P concentrations. Under such conditions and with the present remediation conditions it is not possible to freely manage P concentrations in the water column on short time scales.

  7. Mars Water Ice and Carbon Dioxide Seasonal Polar Caps: GCM Modeling and Comparison with Mars Express Omega Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Levrard, B.; Montmessin, F.; Schmitt, B.; Doute, S.; Langevin, Y.; Bibring, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the behavior of the Mars CO2 ice seasonal polar caps, and in particular interpret the the Mars Express Omega observations of the recession of the northern seasonal cap, we present some simulations of the Martian Climate/CO2 cycle/ water cycle as modeled by the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) global climate model.

  8. Low temporal variation in the intact polar lipid composition of North Sea coastal marine water reveals limited chemotaxonomic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Philippart, C.J.M.; Veldhuis, M.J.W.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of intact polar lipids (IPLs) in North Sea coastal marine water were assessed over a one-year seasonal cycle, and compared with environmental parameters and the microbial community composition. Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was the most

  9. The system uranyl nitrate-dietyl ether-water. Extraction by water in spray and packed columns from uranyl nitrate-either solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Luina, A.; Gutierrez Jodra, L.

    1960-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of the one published in Chemical Engineering Progress. Symposium Series, 50, n. 12, 127 (1954). New runs for spray columns, are given and other concentrations in uranyl nitrate for the packed columns. New correlations for the overall H.T.U. are also given. The individual H.T.U. have been grapycally calculated and show that the film resistances have similar values, being independent of the concentration of the ether phase. (Author) 24 refs

  10. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, S.; Thevenot, M.; Schrack, D.; Gouy, V.; Carluer, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  11. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dousset, S., E-mail: sylvie.dousset@limos.uhp-nancy.f [Nancy-Universite, CNRS, LIMOS, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Thevenot, M. [Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, Geosystemes, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Schrack, D. [INRA-SAD ASTER, 88500 Mirecourt (France); AFSSA, Laboratoire d' Etudes et de Recherches en Hydrologie, 54000 Nancy (France); Gouy, V.; Carluer, N. [UR Milieux Aquatiques, Ecologie et Pollution, Cemagref, 69336 Lyon Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  12. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousset, S; Thévenot, M; Schrack, D; Gouy, V; Carluer, N

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of water dilution and cation tail length on ionic liquid characteristics: Interplay between polar and non-polar interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Govind A.; Bharadwaj, Vivek S.; Kinsinger, Corey L.; Schutt, Timothy C.; Pisierra, Nichole R.; Maupin, C. Mark

    2016-08-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass poses a major challenge that hinders the economical utilization of biomass for the production of biofuel, plastics, and chemicals. Ionic liquids have become a promising solvent that addresses many issues in both the pretreatment process and the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond for the deconstruction of cellulosic materials. However, to make the use of ionic liquids economically viable, either the cost of ionic liquids must be reduced, or a less expensive solvent (e.g., water) may be added to reduce the overall amount of ionic liquid used in addition to reducing the viscosity of the binary liquid mixture. In this work, we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the impact of water dilution on the overall liquid structure and properties of three imidazolium based ionic liquids. It is found that ionic liquid-water mixtures exhibit characteristics that can be grouped into two distinct regions, which are a function of the ionic liquid concentration. The trends observed in each region are found to correlate with the ordering in the local structure of the ionic liquid that arises from the dynamic interactions between the ion pairs. Simulation results suggest that there is a high level of local ordering in the molecular structure at high concentrations of ionic liquids that is driven by the aggregation of the cationic tails and the anion-water interactions. It is found that as the concentration of ionic liquids in the binary mixture is decreased, there is a point at which the competing self and cross interaction energies between the ionic liquid and water shifts away from a cation-anion dominated regime, which results in a significant change in the mixture properties. This break point, which occurs around 75% w/w ionic liquids, corresponds to the point at which water molecules percolate into the ionic liquid network disrupting the ionic liquids' nanostructure. It is observed that as the cationic alkyl

  14. Determination of the cis-trans isomerization barriers of L-alanyl-L-proline in aqueous solutions and at water/hydrophobic interfaces by on-line temperature-jump relaxation HPLC and dynamic on-column reaction HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Masami; Miyake, Ayaka; Eda, Sayaka; Saito, Shingo

    2015-09-15

    Proline cis-trans isomerization is known to play a key role in the rate-determining steps of protein folding. It is thus very important to understand the influence of environments, not only bulk solutions but also microenvironments such as interfaces, on the isomerization reaction of proline peptides. Here we present two HPLC methods for measurements of kinetic and equilibrium parameters for the isomerization reactions in bulk solutions and at liquid/solid interfaces. On-line temperature-jump relaxation HPLC (T-jump HPLC) allows the determination of forward and reverse rate constants of the isomerization in a bulk solution by monitoring the whole time course of conversion of pure isomers from both sides of the reaction, in contrast to other HPLC and capillary zone electrophoresis as well as spectrometric and calorimetric methods, which use a mixture of the isomers. We can then determine cis-trans isomerization barriers of the peptide at liquid/solid interfaces from the kinetic data obtained by dynamic on-column reaction HPLC and T-jump HPLC. We observed that the interconversion around the peptide bond for l-alanyl-l-proline (Ala-Pro) in water is accelerated at the surfaces of an alkyl-bonded silica and a poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) copolymer resin, and this is caused by a remarkable decrease in the enthalpy of activation. The molecular structures of the cis and trans forms of Ala-Pro estimated by quantum mechanics calculation reveal that an equilibrium shift toward the cis form as well as the rapid isomerization of Ala-Pro at the water/hydrophobic interfaces can be attributed to the lower polarity of the interfacial water at the surfaces of the hydrophobic materials compared to that of bulk water.

  15. Resuspension of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated field sediment: release to the water column and determination of site-specific K DOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Carey L; Lohmann, Rainer; Burgess, Robert M; Perron, Monique M; Cantwell, Mark G

    2011-02-01

    Sediments from the New Bedford Harbor (NBH) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Superfund site (Massachusetts, USA), contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were resuspended under different water column redox conditions: untreated, oxidative, and reductive. The partitioning of PCBs to the overlying water column was measured with polyethylene samplers and compared to partitioning without resuspension. Greater concentrations of total aqueous (freely dissolved + dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-associated) PCBs were found in all resuspended treatments for PCBs with mid-range K(OW)s, but no difference was observed in total aqueous concentrations among different redox conditions. The magnitude of increased concentrations depended on resuspension time and congener K(OW), but ranged from approximately one to eight times those found without resuspension. In a parallel study, DOC was flocculated and removed from smaller-scale NBH sediment resuspensions. In situ K(DOC)s were determined and used to calculate freely dissolved and DOC-associated fractions of the increase in total aqueous PCB concentrations due to resuspension. The importance of DOC-associated PCBs increased with increasing K(OW). In situ K(DOC)s were approximately one to two orders of magnitude greater than those calculated with a commonly used linear free energy relationship (LFER). The present study demonstrates that resuspension of contaminated sediments releases PCBs to the water column, of which a significant fraction are DOC-associated (e.g., 28, 65, and 90% for PCBs 28, 66, and 110, respectively). Results also imply that site-specific PCB K(DOC)s are superior to those calculated with generic LFERs. © 2010 SETAC.

  16. A Cascade Disaster Caused by Geological and Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Factors—Water Inrush Mechanism from Karst Collapse Column under Confining Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The water inrush from karst collapse column (KCC is a cascading, vicious cycle disaster caused by geological and mining activities, that can cause serious casualties and property losses. The key to preventing this risk is to study the mechanism of water inrush under confining pressure. Aiming at the investigationg the characteristics of the KCC named X1 in Chensilou mine, a series of methods, including connectivity experiments, water pressure monitoring tests in two side-walls, and numerical simulations based on plastic damage-seepage (PD-S theory have been developed. The methods are used to test the security of the 2519 mining area, the damage thickness, pore water pressure, and seepage vector in the X1. The results indicate that the X1 has a certain water blocking capacity. In addition, with the decrease of confining pressure and increase of shear stress, deviatoric stress could cause the increase of permeability, the reduction of strength, and the reduction of pore water pressure in KCC. Therefore the increased effective stress in the rock will force the rock to become more fractured. Conversely, the broken rock could cause the change of stress, and further initiate new plastic strains, damage and pore water pressure until a new equilibrium is reached. This cascading water inrush mechanism will contribute to the exploitation of deep coal resources in complex geological and hydrogeological conditions.

  17. Evaluation of polar organic micropollutants as indicators for wastewater-related coastal water quality impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nödler, Karsten; Tsakiri, Maria; Aloupi, Maria; Gatidou, Georgia; Stasinakis, Athanasios S.; Licha, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Results from coastal water pollution monitoring (Lesvos Island, Greece) are presented. In total, 53 samples were analyzed for 58 polar organic micropollutants such as selected herbicides, biocides, corrosion inhibitors, stimulants, artificial sweeteners, and pharmaceuticals. Main focus is the application of a proposed wastewater indicator quartet (acesulfame, caffeine, valsartan, and valsartan acid) to detect point sources and contamination hot-spots with untreated and treated wastewater. The derived conclusions are compared with the state of knowledge regarding local land use and infrastructure. The artificial sweetener acesulfame and the stimulant caffeine were used as indicators for treated and untreated wastewater, respectively. In case of a contamination with untreated wastewater the concentration ratio of the antihypertensive valsartan and its transformation product valsartan acid was used to further refine the estimation of the residence time of the contamination. The median/maximum concentrations of acesulfame and caffeine were 5.3/178 ng L −1 and 6.1/522 ng L −1 , respectively. Their detection frequency was 100%. Highest concentrations were detected within the urban area of the capital of the island (Mytilene). The indicator quartet in the gulfs of Gera and Kalloni (two semi-enclosed embayments on the island) demonstrated different concentration patterns. A comparatively higher proportion of untreated wastewater was detected in the gulf of Gera, which is in agreement with data on the wastewater infrastructure. The indicator quality of the micropollutants to detect wastewater was compared with electrical conductivity (EC) data. Due to their anthropogenic nature and low detection limits, the micropollutants are superior to EC regarding both sensitivity and selectivity. The concentrations of atrazine, diuron, and isoproturon did not exceed the annual average of their environmental quality standards (EQS) defined by the European Commission. At two

  18. Study of the hydric behaviour of double-layered columns of unsaturated soils - Analysis of water and suction profiles during infiltration tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi Ichola Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems of sealing of containers or retention pounds are often associated to drainage layers for leachate recovery. The drainage layer can be installed either above the sealing layer or below it. In this paper, double layered columns of alluvia and clayey sand or of alluvia and clay are made up to run infiltration tests. A follow-up of the water content is implemented during the infiltration in multi-layer columns by using TDR probes. The values and changes in infiltration rate are different if the drainage layer is above or below the sealing layer. It is found that the drainage layer saturation is delayed when the sealing layer is above but the equilibrium water content remains the same for the both configuration. The electrical measurements in the drainage layers prove that the increase rate of the solute accumulation is the same for the both configuration and the same equilibrium solute concentration is reached. The measured coefficient of permeability of the double-layered becomes five times higher when the drainage layer is below the sealing layer. The position of the drainage layer influences the infiltration rate, the water and solute migration. The change in coefficient of permeability must be taken into account for the assessment of the flux of pollutant across a barrier system.

  19. Core top confirmation of the carbonate ion effect in multiple species of planktic foraminifera and a reassessment of the upper water column equatorial Pacific δ13CFORAM records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Spero, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera carbon (δ13CFORAM) and oxygen (δ18OFORAM) isotope records play a vital role in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18OFORAM values are typically minimally offset from equilibrium δ18O-calcite and are widely applied in oceanographic reconstructions of upper water column hydrography. In contrast, δ13CFORAM are underutilized in paleoceanographic reconstructions. δ13CFORAM are more difficult to interpret due to species-specific δ13CFORAM offsets from the δ13C of the dissolved inorganic carbon of seawater (δ13CDIC). In this study, we analyzed the δ18OFORAM and δ13CFORAM of individual foraminifera shells from a suite of planktic foraminifer species obtained from core top (Holocene) intervals from Eastern Equatorial Pacific (TR163-19), Western Caribbean (ODP 999A), and Equatorial Indian Ocean (ODP 714A) cores. We also include published records from the Western Equatorial Pacific (MW91-9 15GGC). We find the δ13CFORAM offsets from the local water column δ13CDIC are large, variable, region specific, and are correlated to the ambient carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) of seawater. We show that the regional offsets from δ13CDIC are due to the carbonate ion effect (CIE) on δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997; Bijma et al., 1999) and variations in water column [CO32-]. More importantly, our results demonstrate that regional and/or culture based δ13CFORAM offsets from δ13CDIC are not applicable globally. Rather, owing to regional differences in water column [CO32-] and species-specific relationships between [CO32-] and δ13CFORAM, δ13CFORAM must be corrected for the regional CIE in order to infer vertical δ13CDIC gradients or to compare δ13CFORAM records from one region to another. Laboratory culture suggests the carbonate ion effect on δ18OFORAM is 1/3 that of δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997). Thus, in order to obtain correct δ18OFORAM temperatures or δ18OSW (when used in conjunction with Mg/Ca) the δ18OFORAM offsets from δ18

  20. Comparison of the Experimental and Numerical Results of Modelling a 32-Oscillating Water Column (OWC, V-Shaped Floating Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Ringwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Combining offshore wind and wave energy converting apparatuses presents a number of potentially advantageous synergies. To facilitate the development of a proposed floating platform combining these two technologies, proof of concept scale model testing on the wave energy converting component of this platform has been conducted. The wave energy component is based on the well-established concept of the oscillating water column. A numerical model of this component has been developed in the frequency domain, and the work presented here concerns the results of this modelling and testing. The results of both are compared to assess the validity and usefulness of the numerical model.

  1. Passive sampling for target and nontarget analyses of moderately polar and nonpolar substances in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ian J; Harman, Christopher; Ranneklev, Sissel B; Thomas, Kevin V; Grung, Merete

    2013-08-01

    The applicability of silicone rubber and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) as passive sampling materials for target and nontarget analyses of moderately polar and nonpolar substances was assessed through a field deployment of samplers along a small, polluted stream in Oslo, Norway. Silicone and LDPE samplers of identical surface area (but different volumes) were deployed at 6 sites in the River Alna for 49 d. Quantitative target analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (quadrupole, single-ion monitoring mode) demonstrated that masses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine compounds absorbed in the 2 polymeric materials were consistent with the current understanding of the control and mode of accumulation in these sampler materials. Some deviation was observed for decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and may be linked to the large molecular size of this substance, resulting in lower diffusivity in the LDPE. Target and nontarget analyses with gas chromatography coupled to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry allowed the identification of a wide range of chemicals, including organophosphate compounds (OPCs) and musk compounds (galaxolide and tonalid). Semiquantitative analysis revealed enhanced quantities of the OPCs in silicone material, indicating some limitation in the absorption and diffusion of these substances in LDPE. Overall, silicone allows nontarget screening analysis for compounds with a wider range of log octanol-water partition coefficient values than what can be achieved with LDPE. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  2. The polar warhead of a TRIM24 bromodomain inhibitor rearranges a water-mediated interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiuyang; Li, Fudong; Bao, Hongyu; Jiang, Yiyang; Zhang, Shuya; Ma, Rongsheng; Gao, Jia; Wu, Jihui; Ruan, Ke

    2017-04-01

    Tripartite motif-containing protein 24 (TRIM24) is closely correlated with multiple cancers, and a recent study demonstrated that the bromodomain of TRIM24 is essential for the proliferation of lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we identify three new inhibitors of the TRIM24 bromodomain using NMR fragment-based screening. The crystal structures of two new inhibitors in complex with the TRIM24 bromodomain reveal that the water-bridged interaction network is conserved in the same fashion as those for known benzoimidazolone inhibitors. Interestingly, the polar substitution on the warhead of one new inhibitor pulls the whole ligand approximately 2 Å into the inner side pocket of the TRIM24 bromodomain, and thus exhibits a binding mode significantly different from other known bromodomain ligands. This mode provides a useful handle for further hit-to-lead evolution toward novel inhibitors of the TRIM24 bromodomain. Structural data are available in the PDB under the accession numbers 5H1T, 5H1U, and 5H1V. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Removal efficiency of multiple poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in drinking water using granular activated carbon (GAC) and anion exchange (AE) column tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleaf, Philip; Englund, Sophie; Östlund, Anna; Lindegren, Klara; Wiberg, Karin; Ahrens, Lutz

    2017-09-01

    Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in drinking water at relatively high concentrations throughout the world which has led to implementation of regulatory guidelines for specific PFASs in drinking water in several European countries and in the U.S. The Swedish National Food Agency has determined that the drinking water of over one third of the country's municipal consumers is at risk or already affected by PFAS contamination. The present study investigated the effects of perfluorocarbon chain length, functional group and isomer structure (branched or linear) on removal of multiple PFASs using granular activated carbon (GAC, Filtrasorb ® 400) and anion exchange (AE, Purolite ® A600) column experiments. The removal of 14 different PFASs, i.e. the C 3 C 11 , C 14 perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) (PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA, PFDoDA, PFTeDA), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA), and the C 4 , C 6 , C 8 perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) (PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS), was monitored for a 217 day period. The results indicate the selective nature of PFAS removal as the absorbents are loaded with PFASs and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). A clear relationship between perfluorocarbon chain length and removal efficiency of PFASs using GAC and AE was found while PFASs with sulfonate functional groups displayed greater removal efficiency than those with carboxylate groups. Similarly, time to column breakthrough increased with increasing perfluorocarbon chain length and was greater for the PFSAs than the PFCAs for both GAC and AE. Shorter carbon chained PFASs such as PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA showed desorption behavior and long-chained PFASs showed increased removal towards the end of the experiment indicating agglomeration or micelle development. Linear isomers of PFOS, PFHxS, and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA) had greater column removal efficiencies using GAC (and also for AE at greater bed volume throughput) than the branched

  4. Produced Water Treatment Using the Switchable Polarity Solvent Forward Osmosis (SPS FO) Desalination Process: Preliminary Engineering Design Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Daniel; Adhikari, Birendra; Orme, Christopher; Wilson, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    Switchable Polarity Solvent Forward Osmosis (SPS FO) is a semi-permeable membrane-based water treatment technology. INL is currently advancing SPS FO technology such that a prototype unit can be designed and demonstrated for the purification of produced water from oil and gas production operations. The SPS FO prototype unit will used the thermal energy in the produced water as a source of process heat, thereby reducing the external process energy demands. Treatment of the produced water stream will reduce the volume of saline wastewater requiring disposal via injection, an activity that is correlated with undesirable seismic events, as well as generate a purified product water stream with potential beneficial uses. This paper summarizes experimental data that has been collected in support of the SPS FO scale-up effort, and describes how this data will be used in the sizing of SPS FO process equipment. An estimate of produced water treatment costs using the SPS FO process is also provided.

  5. Coexistence of microalgal sedimentation and water column recycling in a seasonally ice-covered ecosystem (Saroma-ko Lagoon, Sea of Okhotsk, Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C.; Legendre, L.; Taguchi, S.

    1997-02-01

    Seasonal variations in under-ice microalgal sedimentation and plankton dynamics in Saroma-ko, a shallow seasonally ice-covered lagoon (Sea of Okhotsk, Hokkaido, Japan), were followed during a 4-week period at the end of winter. At 3-4 day intervals, sediment traps were deployed at three depths from the undersurface of the ice and water column samples were collected. Sampled variables included chlorophyll a (chl a) and pheopigments, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC, PON), cell identification and enumeration, biogenic silica and dissolved inorganic nutrients. POC/PON, POC/chl a and Si/chl a ratios for suspended biomass as well as cell counts showed the presence of a diversified phytoplankton assemblage with a high microheterotrophic biomass. A major peak in algal sedimentation occurred at the end of the sampling season (chl a flux ca. 5 mg m -2 d -1); the sedimented algae included both ice algae and phytoplankton species. Ice algae did not remain suspended in the plankton biomass, but sedimented rapidly upon release from the ice matrix. Results show that Saroma-ko had a rather special food web structure at the end of winter, when both high microalgal export and water column recycling simultaneously occurred under the ice cover.

  6. Controlling factors of harmful microalgae distribution in water column, biofilm and sediment in shellfish production area (South of Sfax, Gulf of Gabes) from southern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukil-Baklouti, Amira; Feki-Sahnoun, Wafa; Hamza, Asma; Abdennadher, Moufida; Mahfoudhi, Mabrouka; Bouain, Abderrahmen; Jarboui, Othman

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatio-temporal distribution of harmful microalgae coupled with environmental factors in the most important area for natural stocks of the grooved carpet shell Ruditapes decussatus in southern Tunisia. Sampling was performed monthly from May 2010 to April 2011 in five stations through the Tunisian National Monitoring Stations Network of Phytoplankton and Phycotoxins along the southern coasts of Sfax (Gulf of Gabes). The presence of harmful microalgae species was explored in three compartments: water column, biofilm and sediment. Our results revealed fourteen species were identified belonging to dinoflagellates and diatoms with higher densities during the summer period. The co-inertia plot analysis exhibited that the seasonal fluctuations of these species were controlled by the temperature as well as the nutrients (particularly nitrogenous). Ternary diagrams showed that biofilm was the most colonized compartment by toxic benthic dinoflagellates species, namely Amphidinium carterae, Prorocentrum rathymum, Prorocentrum concavum, Prorocentrum lima, Ostreopsis cf. ovata and Coolia monotis. In addition, these species were recorded simultaneously in the water column and the sediment, a fact that could be explained by the resuspension of these benthic dinoflagellates from the biofilm by hydrodynamics. The data suggest that harmful microalgae could be the source of toxins in the studied stations, which provide support to the implication of these results on the future sampling strategy of harmful microalgae in shellfish collecting areas in Tunisia.

  7. Simultaneous quantification of polar and non-polar volatile organic compounds in water samples by direct aqueous injection-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeppli, Christoph; Berg, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Kipfer, Rolf; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2008-02-15

    A direct aqueous injection-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (DAI-GC/MS) method for trace analysis of 24 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples is presented. The method allows for the simultaneous quantification of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylenes (BTEX), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), as well as a variety of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, propane, enthenes and benzenes. Applying a liquid film polyethylene glycol or a porous layer open tubular (PLOT) divinylbenzene GC capillary column to separate the water from the VOCs, volumes of 1-10 microL aqueous sample are directly injected into the GC. No enrichment or pretreatment steps are required and sample volumes as low as 100 microL are sufficient for accurate quantification. Method detection limits determined in natural groundwater samples were between 0.07 and 2.8 microg/L and instrument detection limits of VOCs. DAI-GC/MS offers both good accuracy and precision (relative standard deviations VOC concentration measurements in a polluted aquifer. The wide range of detectable compounds and the lack of labor-intensive sample preparation illustrate that the DAI method is robust and easily applicable for the quantification of important organic groundwater contaminants.

  8. Optimization of extraction of phenolic compounds from flax shives by pressurized low-polarity water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Mazza, G

    2006-10-04

    Pressurized low-polarity water (PLPW) extraction of phenolic compounds from flax shive was investigated using statistically based optimization and the "one-factor-at-a-time" method. Extraction variables examined using central composite design (CCD) included temperature, flow rate, and NaOH concentration of the extracting water. Extraction of phenolic compounds including p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, acetovanillone, and feruric acid was affected by temperature and NaOH concentration; and extraction of all phenolic compounds, except ferulic acid, increased with temperature and NaOH concentration of the extracting water. Flow rate had little effect on concentration of phenolic compounds at equilibrium, but the extraction rate at the early phase was higher for higher flow rates. The mechanism of PLPW extraction of flax shive phenolics was also investigated using a two-site kinetic model and a thermodynamic model. To determine the extraction mechanism, flow rate was varied from 0.3 to 4.0 mL/min while temperature and NaOH concentration were fixed at 180 degrees C and 0.47 M, respectively. The flow rate tests showed the extraction rates of total phenolic (TP) compounds increased with flow rate and can be described by a thermodynamic model. The results from the thermodynamic model demonstrated that a K(D) value of 30 agreed with the experimental data in the flow rate range of 0.3-4.0 mL/min. When the effect of the three independent variables was evaluated simultaneously using CCD, a maximum TP concentration of 5.8 g/kg of dry flax shive (DFS) was predicted from the combination of a high temperature (230.5 degrees C), a high initial concentration of NaOH (0.63 M), and a low flow rate (0.7 mL/min). Maximum TP concentration of 5.7 g/kg of DFS was obtained from extraction conditions of 180 degrees C, 0.3 or 0.5 mL/min, and 0.47 M NaOH at equilibrium. A second-order regression model generated by CCD predicted a maximum TP concentration of 5.8 g

  9. Photocatalytic degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water using a novel cylindrical multi-column photoreactor packed with TiO2-coated silica gel beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dawei; Zhu, Qi; Han, Chengjie; Yang, Yingnan; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhang, Zhenya

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel cylindrical multi-column photocatalytic reactor (CMCPR) was developed. • Methyl orange, amoxicillin and 3-chlorophenol were degraded successfully in CMCPR. • Electrical energy per order (E EO ) was used to evaluate the efficiency of CMCPR. • The CMCPR is high efficient, low-cost and easily repeatable for water purification. - Abstract: A novel cylindrical multi-column photocatalytic reactor (CMCPR) has been developed and successfully applied for the degradation of methyl orange (MO), amoxicillin (AMX) and 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) in water. Due to its higher adsorption capacity and simpler molecular structure, 3-CP compared with MO and AMX obtained the highest photodegradation (100%) and mineralization (78.1%) after 300-min photocatalytic reaction. Electrical energy consumption for photocatalytic degradation of MO, AMX and 3-CP using CMCPR was 5.79 × 10 4 , 7.31 × 10 4 and 2.52 × 10 4 kW h m −3 order −1 , respectively, which were less than one-thousand of those by reported photoreactors. The higher flow rate (15 mL min −1 ), lower initial concentration (5 mg L −1 ) and acidic condition (pH 3) were more favorable for the photocatalytic degradation of MO using CMCPR. Five repetitive operations of CMCPR achieved more than 97.0% photodegradation of MO in each cycle and gave a relative standard deviation of 0.72%. In comparison with reported slurry and thin-film photoreactors, CMCPR exhibited higher photocatalytic efficiency, lower energy consumption and better repetitive operation performance for the degradation of MO, AMX and 3-CP in water. The results demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing CMCPR for the degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water

  10. Photocatalytic degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water using a novel cylindrical multi-column photoreactor packed with TiO{sub 2}-coated silica gel beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dawei; Zhu, Qi; Han, Chengjie [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Yang, Yingnan, E-mail: yo.innan.fu@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Jiang, Weizhong [Key Laboratory of Agricultural Engineering in Structure and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, China Agricultural University, Qinghua Donglu 17, Haidian, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Zhenya, E-mail: zhang.zhenya.fu@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • A novel cylindrical multi-column photocatalytic reactor (CMCPR) was developed. • Methyl orange, amoxicillin and 3-chlorophenol were degraded successfully in CMCPR. • Electrical energy per order (E{sub EO}) was used to evaluate the efficiency of CMCPR. • The CMCPR is high efficient, low-cost and easily repeatable for water purification. - Abstract: A novel cylindrical multi-column photocatalytic reactor (CMCPR) has been developed and successfully applied for the degradation of methyl orange (MO), amoxicillin (AMX) and 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) in water. Due to its higher adsorption capacity and simpler molecular structure, 3-CP compared with MO and AMX obtained the highest photodegradation (100%) and mineralization (78.1%) after 300-min photocatalytic reaction. Electrical energy consumption for photocatalytic degradation of MO, AMX and 3-CP using CMCPR was 5.79 × 10{sup 4}, 7.31 × 10{sup 4} and 2.52 × 10{sup 4} kW h m{sup −3} order{sup −1}, respectively, which were less than one-thousand of those by reported photoreactors. The higher flow rate (15 mL min{sup −1}), lower initial concentration (5 mg L{sup −1}) and acidic condition (pH 3) were more favorable for the photocatalytic degradation of MO using CMCPR. Five repetitive operations of CMCPR achieved more than 97.0% photodegradation of MO in each cycle and gave a relative standard deviation of 0.72%. In comparison with reported slurry and thin-film photoreactors, CMCPR exhibited higher photocatalytic efficiency, lower energy consumption and better repetitive operation performance for the degradation of MO, AMX and 3-CP in water. The results demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing CMCPR for the degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water.

  11. Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses through water-saturated vertically oriented columns packed with glass beads: Gravity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2016-03-01

    The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (ΚGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both vertical up (VU) and vertical down (VD) flow directions. In the presence of KGa-1b, estimated mass recovery values for both viruses were higher for VD than VU flow direction, while in the presence of STx-1b the opposite was observed. However, for all cases examined, the produced mass of viruses attached onto suspended clay particles were higher for VD than VU flow direction, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influences virus attachment onto clays, as well as packed column retention of viruses attached onto suspended clays. KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow, while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow directions. Moreover, KGa-1b and STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in most of the cases examined except of the case where KGa-1b was present under VD flow. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages and virus surface concentrations generated by virus diffusion-limited attachment, as well as virus attachment due to sedimentation. Both sedimentation and diffusion limited virus attachment were higher for VD than VU flow, except the case of MS2 and STx-1b cotransport. The diffusion-limited attachment was higher for MS2 than ΦΧ174 for all cases examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of the 2014 major Baltic inflow on methane and nitrous oxide dynamics in the water column of the central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Myllykangas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In late 2014, a large, oxygen-rich salt water inflow entered the Baltic Sea and caused considerable changes in deep water oxygen concentrations. We studied the effects of the inflow on the concentration patterns of two greenhouse gases, methane and nitrous oxide, during the following year (2015 in the water column of the Gotland Basin. In the eastern basin, methane which had previously accumulated in the deep waters was largely removed during the year. Here, volume-weighted mean concentration below 70 m decreased from 108 nM in March to 16.3 nM over a period of 141 days (0.65 nM d−1, predominantly due to oxidation (up to 79 % following turbulent mixing with the oxygen-rich inflow. In contrast nitrous oxide, which was previously absent from deep waters, accumulated in deep waters due to enhanced nitrification following the inflow. Volume-weighted mean concentration of nitrous oxide below 70 m increased from 11.8 nM in March to 24.4 nM in 141 days (0.09 nM d−1. A transient extreme accumulation of nitrous oxide (877 nM was observed in the deep waters of the Eastern Gotland Basin towards the end of 2015, when deep waters turned anoxic again, sedimentary denitrification was induced and methane was reintroduced to the bottom waters. The Western Gotland Basin gas biogeochemistry was not affected by the inflow.

  13. Depth dependent microbial carbon use efficiency in the capillary fringe as affected by water table fluctuations in a column incubation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, G. J.; Mellage, A.; Milojevic, T.; Smeaton, C. M.; Rezanezhad, F.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial growth and turnover of soil organic carbon (SOC) depend on the availability of electron donors and acceptors. The steep geochemical gradients in the capillary fringe between the saturated and unsaturated zones provide hotspots of soil microbial activity. Water table fluctuations and the associated drying and wetting cycles within these zones have been observed to lead to enhanced turnover of SOC and adaptation of the local microbial communities. To improve our understanding of SOC degradation under changing moisture conditions, we carried out an automated soil column experiment with integrated of hydro-bio-geophysical monitoring under both constant and oscillating water table conditions. An artificial soil mixture composed of quartz sand, montmorillonite, goethite and humus was used to provide a well-defined system. This material was inoculated with a microbial community extracted from a forested riparian zone. The soils were packed into 6 columns (60 cm length and 7.5 cm inner diameter) to a height of 45 cm; and three replicate columns were incubated under constant water table while another three were saturated and drained monthly. The initial soil development, carbon cycling and microbial community development were then characterized during 10 months of incubation. This system provides an ideal artificial gradient from the saturated to the unsaturated zone to study soil development from initially homogeneous materials and the same microbial community composition under controlled conditions. Depth profiles of SOC and microbial biomass after 329 days of incubation showed a depletion of carbon in the transition drying and wetting zone that was not associated with higher accumulation of microbial biomass, indicating a lower carbon use efficiency of the microbial community established within the water table fluctuation zone. This was supported by a higher ATP to microbial biomass carbon ratio within the same zone. The findings from this study highlight the

  14. Modacrylic anion-exchange fibers for Cr(VI) removal from chromium-plating rinse water in batch and flow-through column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Chan; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Sim, Eun-Hye; Choi, Nag-Choul; Kim, Song-Bae

    2017-11-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate Cr(VI) removal from chromium-plating rinse water using modacrylic anion-exchange fibers (KaracaronTM KC31). Batch experiments were performed with synthetic Cr(VI) solutions to characterize the KC31 fibers in Cr(VI) removal. Cr(VI) removal by the fibers was affected by solution pH; the Cr(VI) removal capacity was the highest at pH 2 and decreased gradually with a pH increase from 2 to 12. In regeneration and reuse experiments, the Cr(VI) removal capacity remained above 37.0 mg g -1 over five adsorption-desorption cycles, demonstrating that the fibers could be successfully regenerated with NaCl solution and reused. The maximum Cr(VI) removal capacity was determined to be 250.3 mg g -1 from the Langmuir model. In Fourier-transform infrared spectra, a Cr = O peak newly appeared at 897 cm -1 after Cr(VI) removal, whereas a Cr-O peak was detected at 772 cm -1 due to the association of Cr(VI) ions with ion-exchange sites. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that Cr(VI) was partially reduced to Cr(III) after the ion exchange on the surfaces of the fibers. Batch experiments with chromium-plating rinse water (Cr(VI) concentration = 1178.8 mg L -1 ) showed that the fibers had a Cr(VI) removal capacity of 28.1-186.4 mg g -1 under the given conditions (fiber dose = 1-10 g L -1 ). Column experiments (column length = 10 cm, inner diameter = 2.5 cm) were conducted to examine Cr(VI) removal from chromium-plating rinse water by the fibers under flow-through column conditions. The Cr(VI) removal capacities for the fibers at flow rates of 0.5 and 1.0 mL min -1 were 214.8 and 171.5 mg g -1 , respectively. This study demonstrates that KC31 fibers are effective in the removal of Cr(VI) ions from chromium-plating rinse water.

  15. Mass spectral characterisation of a polar, esterified fraction of an organic extract of an oil sands process water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, S J; Pereira, A S; Martin, J W; Scarlett, A G; West, C E; Lengger, S K; Wilde, M J; Pureveen, J; Tegelaar, E W; Frank, R A; Hewitt, L M

    2014-11-15

    Characterising complex mixtures of organic compounds in polar fractions of heavy petroleum is challenging, but is important for pollution studies and for exploration and production geochemistry. Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) stored in large tailings ponds by Canadian oil sands industries contains such mixtures. A polar OSPW fraction was obtained by silver ion solid-phase extraction with methanol elution. This was examined by numerous methods, including electrospray ionisation (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) and ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (uHPLC)/Orbitrap MS, in multiple ionisation and MS/MS modes. Compounds were also synthesised for comparison. The major ESI ionisable compounds detected (+ion mode) were C15-28 SO3 species with 3-7 double bond equivalents (DBE) and C27-28 SO5 species with 5 DBE. ESI-MS/MS collision-induced losses were due to water, methanol, water plus methanol and water plus methyl formate, typical of methyl esters of hydroxy acids. Once the fraction was re-saponified, species originally detected by positive ion MS, could be detected only by negative ion MS, consistent with their assignment as sulphur-containing hydroxy carboxylic acids. The free acid of a keto dibenzothiophene alkanoic acid was added to an unesterified acid extract of OSPW in known concentrations as a putative internal standard, but attempted quantification in this way proved unreliable. The results suggest the more polar acidic organic SO3 constituents of OSPW include C15-28  S-containing, alicyclic and aromatic hydroxy carboxylic acids. SO5 species are possibly sulphone analogues of these. The origin of such compounds is probably via further biotransformation (hydroxylation) of the related S-containing carboxylic acids identified previously in a less polar OSPW fraction. The environmental risks, corrosivity and oil flow assurance effects should be easier to assess, given that partial structures are now known

  16. Polar Organic Compounds in Surface Waters Collected Near Lead-Zinc Mine and Milling Operations in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C. E.; Schmitt, C. J.; Schumacher, J. G.; Leiker, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    Surface-water samples were collected near a lead mine and mill tailings about 70 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri, during the summer of 2006. The purpose of this sampling was to determine if polar organic compounds were present that could be a cause of documented negative impacts to biota downstream. Water samples contained relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon for surface waters (greater than 20 mg/L), but were colorless, which precluded naturally occurring aquatic humic or fulvic acids. Previous analysis indicated that samples were devoid of pesticides and acid/base/neutral extractable semi-volatile organic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. After isolation by three different types of solid phase extraction, samples were analyzed by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. Polar organic compounds commonly used in the milling process, such as alkyl xanthates, were not found; however, xanthate degradation products were detected. Most of the polar organic compounds identified contained sulfonate groups, which are characteristic of some of the reagents used in the milling process. Sulfonate compounds may have low sorption onto soil or sediments and be mobile in the aqueous environment.

  17. Epitaxial growth of ZnO Nanodisks with large exposed polar facets on nanowire arrays for promoting photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haining; Wei, Zhanhua; Yan, Keyou; Bai, Yang; Zhu, Zonglong; Zhang, Teng; Yang, Shihe

    2014-11-01

    Single-crystalline and branched 1D arrays, ZnO nanowires/nanodisks (NWs/NDs) arrays, are fabricated to significantly enhance the performance of photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. The epitaxial growth of the ZnO NDs with large exposed polar facets on ZnO NWs exhibits a laminated structure, which dramatically increases the light scattering capacity of the NWs arrays, especially in the wavelength region around 400 nm. The ND branching of the 1D arrays in the epitaxial fashion not only increase surface area and light utilization, but also support fast charge transport, leading to the considerable increase of photocurrent. Moreover, the tiny size NDs can facilitate charge separation and reduce charge recombination, while the large exposed polar facets of NDs reduce the external potential bias needed for water splitting. These advantages land the ZnO NWs/NDs arrays a four times higher power conversion efficiency than the ZnO NWs arrays. By sensitizing the ZnO NWs/NDs with CdS and CdSe quantum dots, the PEC performance can be further improved. This work advocates a trunk/leaf in forest concept for the single-crystalline NWs/NDs in array with enlarged exposure of polar facets, which opens the way for optimizing light harvesting and charge separation and transport, and thus the PEC water splitting. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Evidence for Water Ie on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P.D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  19. Evidence for Water Ice on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  20. Multimission empirical ocean tide modeling for shallow waters and polar seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-11-01

    A new global ocean tide model named DTU10 (developed at Technical University of Denmark) representing all major diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents is proposed based on an empirical correction to the global tide model FES2004 (Finite Element Solutions), with residual tides determined using the response method. The improvements are achieved by introducing 4 years of TOPEX-Jason 1 interleaved mission into existing 18 years (1993-2010) of primary joint TOPEX, Jason 1, and Jason 2 mission time series. Hereby the spatial distribution of observations are doubled and satellite altimetry should be able to recover twice the spatial variations of the tidal signal which is particularly important in shallow waters where the spatial scale of the tidal signal is scaled down. Outside the ±66° parallel combined Envisat, GEOSAT Follow-On, and ERS-2, data sets have been included to solve for the tides up to the ±82° parallel. A new approach to removing the annual sea level variations prior to estimating the residual tides significantly improved tidal determination of diurnal constituents from the Sun-synchronous satellites (e.g., ERS-2 and Envisat) in the polar seas. Extensive evaluations with six tide gauge sets show that the new tide model fits the tide gauge measurements favorably to other state of the art global ocean tide models in both the deep and shallow waters, especially in the Arctic Ocean and the Southern Ocean. One example is a comparison with 207 tide gauge data in the East Asian marginal seas where the root-mean-square agreement improved by 35.12%, 22.61%, 27.07%, and 22.65% (M2, S2, K1, and O1) for the DTU10 tide model compared with the FES2004 tide model. A similar comparison in the Arctic Ocean with 151 gauge data improved by 9.93%, 0.34%, 7.46%, and 9.52% for the M2, S2, K1, and O1 constituents, respectively.

  1. Widespread gas emissions in the Sea of Marmara in relation with the tectonic and sedimentary environments: Results from shipborne multibeam echosounder water column imagery (MARMESONET expedition, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Stéphanie; Scalabrin, Carla; Géli, Louis; Henry, Pierre; Grall, Céline; Tary, Jean-Baptiste; Ćaǧatay, Namık.; Imren, Caner

    2010-05-01

    Acoustic systems in marine geosciences are mainly used to explore the seabed and image sub-bottom sedimentary units. However, side-scan sonars and echosounders can detect gas emissions from the seabed into the water column. Recently, advances in technology and computer processing allow carrying out large-scale 3D surveys of the entire water column with multibeam systems, so far dedicated to seabed imagery. A shipborne multibeam survey of the water column in the Sea of Marmara was performed with the R/V Le Suroit during the MARMESONET expedition (4-25 November 2009), that is part of the ESONET (European Seas Observatory NETwork) demonstration mission MarmaraDM. Data were acquired with a Simrad EM302 multibeam echosounder (27-33 kHz, 288 beams, 1°x2°, 2 or 5 ms pulse length) with automatic swath width control and equidistant sounding pattern over water depths varying from 300 to 1300 m. Volume backscattering coefficients were stored with m depth bins along more than 2000 nm acoustic tracks. Gas bubble echoes were very well detected by the EM302 system within the water depth range of the Sea of Marmara, mostly with the central beams but also with the outer beams for the flares with strong backscatter intensity and large imprint. Geo-referenced gas flare 3D visualization is performed with Movies3D software developed for fish school echo description and biomass assessment (Trenkel et al., 2009). The distribution of water column acoustic echoes in the Sea of Marmara reveals that free gas emissions from the seabed are more widespread than expected from previous studies using ROVs, submersibles as well as acoustic methods (Géli et al., 2008; Zitter et al., 2008). Numerous acoustic gas flares were detected in association with the North Anatolian fault system and some appear to be localized on known active fault traces. However, gas emissions also spread around the edges of the sedimentary basins (e.g. Cinarcik and Tekirdag basins) and on structural highs (e.g. Western

  2. Ontwikkeling van een analysemethode voor fenol en cresolen in water middels SPE en on-column derivatisering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde EG; Broekman MH; van de Beek AIM; Groenemeijer GS; Zomer G; LOC

    2001-01-01

    De ontwikkeling van een analysemethode voor de bepaling van fenol, o-cresol, m-cresol en p-cresol in water, met name in eluaten tbv uitloogonderzoek was noodzakelijk vanwege het ontbreken van een genormaliseerd analysevoorschrift voor deze componenten in water. Het experimentele onderzoek is

  3. High bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts in water tracks over permafrost in the high arctic polar desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Blaire; Lionard, Marie; Kuske, Cheryl R; Vincent, Warwick F

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report the bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts (biocrusts) inhabiting polar desert soils at the northern land limit of the Arctic polar region (83° 05 N). Employing pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes this study demonstrated that these biocrusts harbor diverse bacterial communities, often as diverse as temperate latitude communities. The effect of wetting pulses on the composition of communities was also determined by collecting samples from soils outside and inside of permafrost water tracks, hill slope flow paths that drain permafrost-affected soils. The intermittent flow regime in the water tracks was correlated with altered relative abundance of phylum level taxonomic bins in the bacterial communities, but the alterations varied between individual sampling sites. Bacteria related to the Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria demonstrated shifts in relative abundance based on their location either inside or outside of the water tracks. Among cyanobacterial sequences, the proportion of sequences belonging to the family Oscillatoriales consistently increased in relative abundance in the samples from inside the water tracks compared to those outside. Acidobacteria showed responses to wetting pulses in the water tracks, increasing in abundance at one site and decreasing at the other two sites. Subdivision 4 acidobacterial sequences tended to follow the trends in the total Acidobacteria relative abundance, suggesting these organisms were largely responsible for the changes observed in the Acidobacteria. Taken together, these data suggest that the bacterial communities of these high latitude polar biocrusts are diverse but do not show a consensus response to intermittent flow in water tracks over high Arctic permafrost.

  4. High bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts in water tracks over permafrost in the high arctic polar desert.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaire Steven

    Full Text Available In this study we report the bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts (biocrusts inhabiting polar desert soils at the northern land limit of the Arctic polar region (83° 05 N. Employing pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes this study demonstrated that these biocrusts harbor diverse bacterial communities, often as diverse as temperate latitude communities. The effect of wetting pulses on the composition of communities was also determined by collecting samples from soils outside and inside of permafrost water tracks, hill slope flow paths that drain permafrost-affected soils. The intermittent flow regime in the water tracks was correlated with altered relative abundance of phylum level taxonomic bins in the bacterial communities, but the alterations varied between individual sampling sites. Bacteria related to the Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria demonstrated shifts in relative abundance based on their location either inside or outside of the water tracks. Among cyanobacterial sequences, the proportion of sequences belonging to the family Oscillatoriales consistently increased in relative abundance in the samples from inside the water tracks compared to those outside. Acidobacteria showed responses to wetting pulses in the water tracks, increasing in abundance at one site and decreasing at the other two sites. Subdivision 4 acidobacterial sequences tended to follow the trends in the total Acidobacteria relative abundance, suggesting these organisms were largely responsible for the changes observed in the Acidobacteria. Taken together, these data suggest that the bacterial communities of these high latitude polar biocrusts are diverse but do not show a consensus response to intermittent flow in water tracks over high Arctic permafrost.

  5. Nitrogen oxide absorption into water and dilute nitric acid in an engineering-scale sieve-plate column: description of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce, R M

    1978-09-01

    The study reported here is concerned with the absorption of gaseous NO/sub x/ compounds into water and dilute HNO/sub 3/ in a three-stage sieve-plate column with plates designed for high gas-liquid interfacial area. The performance of the column was measured while several operating parameters were varied. A mechanistic model was developed and presented to explain the observed phenomena. The results of the study indicate the importance of three mechanisms in the absorption of gaseous NO/sub x/ compounds: (a) the absorption of NO/sub 2/*, which results in the production of liquid HNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 2/; (b) the dissociation of the liquid HNO/sub 2/ into HNO/sub 3/ and gaseous NO; and (c) the gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO/sub 2/. A useful model was developed to explain the absorption of NO/sub x/ compounds based on the above mechanisms. This model is presented and discussed.

  6. Long-distance swimming by polar bears (Ursus maritimus) of the southern Beaufort Sea during years of extensive open water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) depend on sea ice for catching marine mammal prey. Recent sea-ice declines have been linked to reductions in body condition, survival, and population size. Reduced foraging opportunity is hypothesized to be the primary cause of sea-ice-linked declines, but the costs of travel through a deteriorated sea-ice environment also may be a factor. We used movement data from 52 adult female polar bears wearing Global Positioning System (GPS) collars, including some with dependent young, to document long-distance swimming (>50 km) by polar bears in the southern Beaufort and Chukchi seas. During 6 years (2004-2009), we identified 50 long-distance swims by 20 bears. Swim duration and distance ranged from 0.7 to 9.7 days (mean = 3.4 days) and 53.7 to 687.1 km (mean = 154.2 km), respectively. Frequency of swimming appeared to increase over the course of the study. We show that adult female polar bears and their cubs are capable of swimming long distances during periods when extensive areas of open water are present. However, long-distance swimming appears to have higher energetic demands than moving over sea ice. Our observations suggest long-distance swimming is a behavioral response to declining summer sea-ice conditions.

  7. Applying the polarity rapid assessment method to characterize nitrosamine precursors and to understand their removal by drinking water treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaobin; Bei, Er; Li, Shixiang; Ouyang, Yueying; Wang, Jun; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Krasner, Stuart W; Suffet, I H Mel

    2015-12-15

    Some N-nitrosamines (NAs) have been identified as emerging disinfection by-products during water treatment. Thus, it is essential to understand the characteristics of the NA precursors. In this study, the polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) and the classical resin fractionation method were studied as methods to fractionate the NA precursors during drinking water treatment. The results showed that PRAM has much higher selectivity for NA precursors than the resin approach. The normalized N-nitrosodimethylamine formation potential (NDMA FP) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) FP of four resin fractions was at the same level as the average yield of the bulk organic matter whereas that of the cationic fraction by PRAM showed 50 times the average. Thus, the cationic fraction was shown to be the most important NDMA precursor contributor. The PRAM method also helped understand which portions of the NA precursor were removed by different water treatment processes. Activated carbon (AC) adsorption removed over 90% of the non-polar PRAM fraction (that sorbs onto the C18 solid phase extraction [SPE] cartridge) of NDMA and NDEA precursors. Bio-treatment removed 80-90% of the cationic fraction of PRAM (that is retained on the cation exchange SPE cartridge) and 40-60% of the non-cationic fractions. Ozonation removed 50-60% of the non-polar PRAM fraction of NA precursors and transformed part of them into the polar fraction. Coagulation and sedimentation had very limited removal of various PRAM fractions of NA precursors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The ESA GOME-Evolution "Climate" water vapor product: a homogenized time series of H2O columns from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirle, Steffen; Lampel, Johannes; Wang, Yang; Mies, Kornelia; Dörner, Steffen; Grossi, Margherita; Loyola, Diego; Dehn, Angelika; Danielczok, Anja; Schröder, Marc; Wagner, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    We present time series of the global distribution of water vapor columns over more than 2 decades based on measurements from the satellite instruments GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2 in the red spectral range. A particular focus is the consistency amongst the different sensors to avoid jumps from one instrument to another. This is reached by applying robust and simple retrieval settings consistently. Potentially systematic effects due to differences in ground pixel size are avoided by merging SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 observations to GOME spatial resolution, which also allows for a consistent treatment of cloud effects. In addition, the GOME-2 swath is reduced to that of GOME and SCIAMACHY to have consistent viewing geometries.Remaining systematic differences between the different sensors are investigated during overlap periods and are corrected for in the homogenized time series. The resulting Climate product v2.2 (https://doi.org/10.1594/WDCC/GOME-EVL_water_vapor_clim_v2.2" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1594/WDCC/GOME-EVL_water_vapor_clim_v2.2) allows the study of the temporal evolution of water vapor over the last 20 years on a global scale.

  9. Mesoscale changes in the water column in response to fish farming zones in three coastal areas in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, P.; Apostolaki, E. T.; Giannoulaki, M.; Karakassis, I.

    2005-11-01

    The hypothesis that the presence of fish farming zones affects the water quality and plankton communities at large spatial scales was investigated through sampling carried out in three regions of the Aegean Sea during May and September. In each region, two sub-areas were sampled: one with fish farming zones (within 2-3 nm) and one without fish farms ('reference site', more than 20 nm). Replicated water samples at different depths were taken in each sub-area for each of the investigated regions. Samples were analysed for nutrients, chlorophyll a, phaeopigments, POC and PON as well as for heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, flagellates and ciliates. Statistically significant changes in some nutrient species were found during September, which is in the period of maximal supply of feed to caged fish and nutrient loss to a highly stratified oligotrophic environment. Most of the significant changes of nutrients as well as chlorophyll a or PON were found at the deepest layer of the water column below the thermocline, indicating that it is related to the remineralization of benthic organic material. The data support previously published results in this area indicating that there is a rapid transfer of nutrients up the food web. This study also showed the need for studying the effects of fish farms on water quality at larger spatial scales.

  10. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report, FY85 to termination of project: Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry Studies, October 1984 through May 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupferman, S.L. (ed.)

    1987-05-01

    This report covers the work of the Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry (POWCG) Studies Group of the Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) from October 1984 to termination of the project in May 1986. The overview of the work includes an introduction, general descriptions of the activities, and a summary. Detailed discussions are included as appendices. During the period of this report the POWCG Studies Group held a meeting to develop a long-term research plan for the Nares Abyssal Plain, which was recently designated as a study area for the Environmental Study Group of the SDP. The POWCG Studies Group has also planned and participated in two interdisciplinary oceanographic missions to the Nares which have resulted in the acquisition of data and samples which can be used to begin to understand the workings of the ecosystem at the site, and for developing a preliminary site assessment. The papers in the appendices have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  11. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report, FY85 to termination of project: Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry Studies, October 1984 through May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupferman, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    This report covers the work of the Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry (POWCG) Studies Group of the Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) from October 1984 to termination of the project in May 1986. The overview of the work includes an introduction, general descriptions of the activities, and a summary. Detailed discussions are included as appendices. During the period of this report the POWCG Studies Group held a meeting to develop a long-term research plan for the Nares Abyssal Plain, which was recently designated as a study area for the Environmental Study Group of the SDP. The POWCG Studies Group has also planned and participated in two interdisciplinary oceanographic missions to the Nares which have resulted in the acquisition of data and samples which can be used to begin to understand the workings of the ecosystem at the site, and for developing a preliminary site assessment. The papers in the appendices have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  12. Calculation procedure to determine average mass transfer coefficients in packed columns from experimental data for ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieres, Jaime; Fernandez-Seara, Jose [University of Vigo, Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Vigo (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    The ammonia purification process is critical in ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems. In this paper, a detailed and a simplified analytical model are presented to characterize the performance of the ammonia rectification process in packed columns. The detailed model is based on mass and energy balances and simultaneous heat and mass transfer equations. The simplified model is derived and compared with the detailed model. The range of applicability of the simplified model is determined. A calculation procedure based on the simplified model is developed to determine the volumetric mass transfer coefficients in the vapour phase from experimental data. Finally, the proposed model and other simple calculation methods found in the general literature are compared. (orig.)

  13. Surfactant-bound monolithic columns for CEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2009-11-01

    A novel anionic surfactant bound monolithic stationary phase based on 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid is designed for CEC. The monolith possessing bonded undecanoyl groups (hydrophobic sites) and carboxyl groups (weak cationic ion-exchange sites) were evaluated as a mixed-mode stationary phase in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar solutes. Using a multivariate D-optimal design the composition of the polymerization mixture was modeled and optimized with five alkylbenzenes and seven alkyl phenyl ketones as test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of electrochromatographic parameters on the concentration of 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid monomer and porogen (water) in the polymerization mixture. A difference of 6, 8 and 13% RSD between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of efficiency, resolution and retention time, respectively, indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. The physical (i.e. morphology, porosity and permeability) and chromatographic properties of the monolithic columns were thoroughly investigated. With the optimized monolithic column, high efficiency separation of N-methylcarbamates pesticides and positional isomers was successfully achieved. It appears that this type of mixed-mode monolith (containing both chargeable and hydrophobic sites) may have a great potential as a new generation of CEC stationary phase.

  14. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from USCGC POLAR STAR from 1989-11-02 to 1990-04-11 (NODC Accession 9000089)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water depth and temperature data was collected from ship Polar Star. The data was collected from November 2, 1989 to April 11, 1990 as part of project Deep...

  15. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from USCGC POLAR STAR in the South Pacific Ocean from 1992-11-08 to 1993-04-12 (NODC Accession 9300068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water depth and temperature data was collected in South Pacific Ocean as part of project Deep Freeze from ship POLAR STAR. The data was collected from November...

  16. The open sea as the main source of methylmercury in the water column of the Gulf of Lions (Northwestern Mediterranean margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossa, Daniel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Schäfer, Jörg; Lanceleur, Laurent; Guédron, Stéphane; Buscail, Roselyne; Thomas, Bastien; Castelle, Sabine; Naudin, Jean-Jacques

    2017-02-01

    Despite the ecologic and economical importance of coastal areas, the neurotoxic bioaccumulable monomethylmercury (MMHg) fluxes within the ocean margins and exchanges with the open sea remain unassessed. The aim of this paper is to address the questions of the abundance, distribution, production and exchanges of methylated mercury species (MeHgT), including MMHg and dimethylmercury (DMHg), in the waters, atmosphere and sediments of the Northwestern Mediterranean margin including the Rhône River delta, the continental shelf and its slope (Gulf of Lions) and the adjacent open sea (North Gyre). Concentrations of MeHgT ranged from <0.02 to 0.48 pmol L-1 with highest values associated with the oxygen-deficient zone of the open sea. The methylated mercury to total mercury proportion (MeHgT/HgT) increased from 2% to 4% in the Rhône River to up to 30% (averaging 18%) in the North Gyre waters, whereas, within the shelf waters, MeHgT/HgT proportions were the lowest (1-3%). We calculate that the open sea is the major source of MeHgT for the shelf waters, with an annual flux estimated at 0.68 ± 0.12 kmol a-1 (i.e., equivalent to 12% of the HgT flux). This MeHgT influx is more than 80 times the direct atmospheric deposition or the in situ net production, more than 40 times the estimated "maximum potential" annual efflux from shelf sediment, and more than 7 times that of the continental sources. In the open sea, ratios of MMHg/DMHg in waters were always <1 and minimum in the oxygen deficient zones of the water column, where MeHg concentrations are maximum. This observation supports the idea that MMHg could be a degradation product of DMHg produced from inorganic divalent Hg.

  17. A Field Evaluation of Performance Reference Compound Based Estimates of Cfree Using Water Column Deployed Passive Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-Density polyethylene (LDPE) sheets are often used as passive samplers for aquatic environmental monitoring to measure the freely dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). HOCs that are freely dissolved in water (Cfree) will partition into the LDPE u...

  18. Phosphate Adsorption using Modified Iron Oxide-based Sorbents in Lake Water: Kinetics, Equilibrium, and Column Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption behavior of Bayoxide ® E33 (E33) and three E33-modified sorbents for the removal of phosphate from lake water was investigated in this study. E33-modified sorbents were synthesized by coating with manganese (E33/Mn) and silver (E33/AgI and E33/AgII) nanoparticles. Adso...

  19. A novel fiber-packed column for on-line preconcentration and speciation analysis of chromium in drinking water with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monasterio, Romina P; Altamirano, Jorgelina C; Martínez, Luis D; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2009-02-15

    A novel on-line preconcentration and determination system based on a fiber-packed column was developed for speciation analysis of Cr in drinking water samples prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). All variables involved in the development of the preconcentration method including, pH, eluent type, sample and eluent flow rates, interfering effects, etc., were studied in order to achieve the best analytical performance. A preconcentration factor of 32 was obtained for Cr(VI) and Cr(III). The levels of Cr(III) species were calculated by difference of total Cr and Cr(VI) levels. Total Cr was determined after oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) with hydrogen peroxide. The calibration graph was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 at levels near the detection limit and up to at least 50 microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 4.3% (C=5 microg L(-1) Cr(VI), n=10, sample volume=25 mL). The limit of detection (LOD) for both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species was 0.3 microg L(-1). Verification of the accuracy was carried out by the analysis of a standard reference material (NIST SRM 1643e "Trace elements in natural water"). The method was successfully applied to the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species in drinking water samples.

  20. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Whole Water by Continuous Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 69 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on aquatic organisms in wastewater. This method also is useful for evaluating the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are indicators of wastewater or have endocrine-disrupting potential. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Wastewater compounds in whole-water samples were extracted using continuous liquid-liquid extractors and methylene chloride solvent, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 0.5 microgram per liter averaged 72 percent ? 8 percent relative standard deviation. The concentration of 21 compounds is always reported as estimated because method recovery was less than 60 percent, variability was greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation, or standard reference compounds were prepared from technical mixtures. Initial method detection limits averaged 0.18 microgram per liter. Samples were preserved by adding 60 grams of sodium chloride and stored at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory established a sample holding-time limit prior to sample extraction of 14 days from the date of collection.

  1. Site-specific hydration dynamics in the nonpolar core of a molten globule by dynamic nuclear polarization of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Brandon D; Choi, Jennifer; López, Carlos; Wesener, Darryl A; Hubbell, Wayne; Cavagnero, Silvia; Han, Songi

    2011-04-20

    Water-protein interactions play a direct role in protein folding. The chain collapse that accompanies protein folding involves extrusion of water from the nonpolar core. For many proteins, including apomyoglobin (apoMb), hydrophobic interactions drive an initial collapse to an intermediate state before folding to the final structure. However, the debate continues as to whether the core of the collapsed intermediate state is hydrated and, if so, what the dynamic nature of this water is. A key challenge is that protein hydration dynamics is significantly heterogeneous, yet suitable experimental techniques for measuring hydration dynamics with site-specificity are lacking. Here, we introduce Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization at 0.35 T via site-specific nitroxide spin labels as a unique tool to probe internal and surface protein hydration dynamics with site-specific resolution in the molten globular, native, and unfolded protein states. The (1)H NMR signal enhancement of water carries information about the local dynamics of the solvent within ∼10 Å of a spin label. EPR is used synergistically to gain insights on local polarity and mobility of the spin-labeled protein. Several buried and solvent-exposed sites of apoMb are examined, each bearing a covalently bound nitroxide spin label. We find that the nonpoloar core of the apoMb molten globule is hydrated with water bearing significant translational dynamics, only 4-6-fold slower than that of bulk water. The hydration dynamics of the native state is heterogeneous, while the acid-unfolded state bears fast-diffusing hydration water. This study provides a high-resolution glimpse at the folding-dependent nature of protein hydration dynamics.

  2. Differential response of soil texture for leaching of salts receiving different pore volumes of water in saline-sodic soil column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlon, U.Z.; Murtaza, G.; Murtaza, B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the leaching requirement of three saline-sodic soils in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) columns of 50 cm long and 11 cm internal diameter. Air-dried soils were packed in PVC lysimeters receiving different pore volume (PV) of water (EC 0.89 dS m/sup -1/, SAR 1.55, RSC 1.02 mmolc L/sup -1). Leaching with 2.5 PV of water removed 94 % of soluble salts and decreased EC/sub e/from 33.9 to 5.9 dS m/sup -1/ in 0-25 cm layer of sandy clay loam soil. For lowering EC/sub e/ to < 4 dS m/sup -1/ in loamy sand up to 0-25 cm soil layer, 2.0 PV water removed 67 % soluble salts. In silty clay loam soil, 2.5 PV water lowered EC/sub e/ to < 4 dS m/sup -1/only up to 0-10 cm depth with 83 % removal of salts. Relationships between EC/EC 0 and D w/Ds established were for the soils as EC/EC/sub 0/ = 0.329 (D w/D/sub S/)/sup -2.12/ with r= 0.87 for loamy sand; EC/EC/sub 0/ = 0.16sub -0.60/ with r=0.89 for silty clay loam and EC/EC/sub 0/sup = 0.06/ (Dw/D/sub s/)/sup 0.78/ with r=0.98 for sandy clay loam soil. These relationships leads to conclude that reduction in salinity of loamy sand, silty clay loam and sandy clay loam soil was 67, 83 and 94 % when leached with 1.88, 2.72 and 2.67 cm of water, respectively. (author)

  3. Deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in a trickle-bed column packed with novel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D. H.; Baek, S. W.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    1998-01-01

    The activity of a novel catalyst (Pt/SDBC) for deuterium exchange reaction between water and hydrogen streams in a trickle bed was measured. The performance of the catalyst was compared with a commercial catalyst with same metal content. The catalytic activity for the bed of wet-proofed catalyst diluted with hydrophillic packing material also measured. The Pt/SDBC catalyst shows higher activity in the liquid phase reaction than the commercial catalyst as measured in the vapor phase reaction. The performance for 50% dilution of the Pt/SDBC catalyst bed with hydrophillic packing material is better than that of the 100% bed due to more liquid holdup and better water distribution

  4. Cross-shore velocity shear, eddies and heterogeneity in water column properties over fringing coral reefs: West Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; McManus, M.A.; Logan, J.B.; McLaughlin, B.E.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-day hydrographic survey cruise was conducted to acquire spatially extensive, but temporally limited, high-resolution, three-dimensional measurements of currents, temperature, salinity and turbidity off West Maui in the summer of 2003 to better understand coastal dynamics along a complex island shoreline with coral reefs. These data complement long-term, high-resolution tide, wave, current, temperature, salinity and turbidity measurements made at a number of fixed locations in the study area starting in 2001. Analyses of these hydrographic data, in conjunction with numerous field observations, evoke the following conceptual model of water and turbidity flux along West Maui. Wave- and wind-driven flows appear to be the primary control on flow over shallower portions of the reefs while tidal and subtidal currents dominate flow over the outer portions of the reefs and insular shelf. When the direction of these flows counter one another, which is quite common, they cause a zone of cross-shore horizontal shear and often form a front, with turbid, lower-salinity water inshore of the front and clear, higher-salinity water offshore of the front. It is not clear whether these zones of high shear and fronts are the cause or the result of the location of the fore reef, but they appear to be correlated alongshore over relatively large horizontal distances (orders of kilometers). When two flows converge or when a single flow is bathymetrically steered, eddies can be generated that, in the absence of large ocean surface waves, tend to accumulate material. Areas of higher turbidity and lower salinity tend to correlate with regions of poor coral health or the absence of well-developed reefs, suggesting that the oceanographic processes that concentrate and/or transport nutrients, contaminants, low-salinity water or suspended sediment might strongly influence coral reef ecosystem health and sustainability.

  5. Role of sediment denitrification in water column oxygen dynamics: comparison of the North American East and West Coasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bianucci, L.; Fennel, K.; Denman, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Low oxygen concentrations, either natural or anthropogenically driven, can severely affect coastal marine ecosystems. A deeper understanding of oxygen dynamics is required in order to improve numerical models, eventually to predict the timing and severity of hypoxia. In this study we investigate the effect of sediment denitrification on oxygen concentrations in bottom waters over the continental shelf. We used two coupled physical-biological models based on the Regional Ocean Modelling System...

  6. An impaired metabolic response to hydrostatic pressure explains Alcanivorax borkumensis recorded distribution in the deep marine water column

    KAUST Repository

    Scoma, Alberto

    2016-08-12

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is an ubiquitous model organism for hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, which dominates polluted surface waters. Its negligible presence in oil-contaminated deep waters (as observed during the Deepwater Horizon accident) raises the hypothesis that it may lack adaptive mechanisms to hydrostatic pressure (HP). The type strain SK2 was tested under 0.1, 5 and 10 MPa (corresponding to surface water, 500 and 1000 m depth, respectively). While 5 MPa essentially inactivated SK2, further increase to 10 MPa triggered some resistance mechanism, as indicated by higher total and intact cell numbers. Under 10 MPa, SK2 upregulated the synthetic pathway of the osmolyte ectoine, whose concentration increased from 0.45 to 4.71 fmoles cell-1. Central biosynthetic pathways such as cell replication, glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, amino acids metabolism and fatty acids biosynthesis, but not β-oxidation, were upregulated or unaffected at 10 MPa, although total cell number was remarkably lower with respect to 0.1 MPa. Concomitantly, expression of more than 50% of SK2 genes was downregulated, including genes related to ATP generation, respiration and protein translation. Thus, A. borkumensis lacks proper adaptation to HP but activates resistance mechanisms. These consist in poorly efficient biosynthetic rather than energy-yielding degradation-related pathways, and suggest that HP does represent a major driver for its distribution at deep-sea.

  7. Methane excess production in oxygen-rich polar water and a model of cellular conditions for this paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Thoms, S.; Beszczynska-Möller, A.; Nöthig, E. M.; Kattner, G.

    2015-09-01

    Summer sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean has undergone a reduction in the last decade exposing the sea surface to unforeseen environmental changes. Melting sea ice increases water stratification and induces nutrient limitation, which is also known to play a crucial role in methane formation in oxygenated surface water. We report on an excess of methane in the marginal ice zone in the western Fram Strait. Our study is based on measurements of oxygen, methane, DMSP, nitrate and phosphate concentrations as well as on phytoplankton composition and light transmission, conducted along the 79°N oceanographic transect, in the western part of the Fram Strait and in Northeast Water Polynya region off Greenland. Between the eastern Fram Strait, where Atlantic water enters from the south and the western Fram Strait, where Polar water enters from the north, different nutrient limitations occurred and consequently different bloom conditions were established. Ongoing sea ice melting enhances the environmental differences between both water masses and initiates regenerated production in the western Fram Strait. We show that in this region methane is in situ produced while DMSP (dimethylsulfoniopropionate) released from sea ice may serve as a precursor for the methane formation. The methane production occured despite high oxygen concentrations in this water masses. As the metabolic activity (respiration) of unicellular organisms explains the presence of anaerobic conditions in the cellular environment we present a theoretical model which explains the maintenance of anaerobic conditions for methane formation inside bacterial cells, despite enhanced oxygen concentrations in the environment.

  8. Depleted dissolved organic carbon and distinct bacterial communities in the water column of a rapid-flushing coral reef ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Craig E; Alldredge, Alice L; McCliment, Elizabeth A; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Carlson, Craig A

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are highly productive ecosystems bathed in unproductive, low-nutrient oceanic waters, where microbially dominated food webs are supported largely by bacterioplankton recycling of dissolved compounds. Despite evidence that benthic reef organisms efficiently scavenge particulate organic matter and inorganic nutrients from advected oceanic waters, our understanding of the role of bacterioplankton and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the interaction between reefs and the surrounding ocean remains limited. In this study, we present the results of a 4-year study conducted in a well-characterized coral reef ecosystem (Paopao Bay, Moorea, French Polynesia) where changes in bacterioplankton abundance and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were quantified and bacterial community structure variation was examined along spatial gradients of the reef:ocean interface. Our results illustrate that the reef is consistently depleted in concentrations of both DOC and bacterioplankton relative to offshore waters (averaging 79 μmol l−1 DOC and 5.5 × 108 cells l−1 offshore and 68 μmol l−1 DOC and 3.1 × 108 cells l−1 over the reef, respectively) across a 4-year time period. In addition, using a suite of culture-independent measures of bacterial community structure, we found consistent differentiation of reef bacterioplankton communities from those offshore or in a nearby embayment across all taxonomic levels. Reef habitats were enriched in Gamma-, Delta-, and Betaproteobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Specific bacterial phylotypes, including members of the SAR11, SAR116, Flavobacteria, and Synechococcus clades, exhibited clear gradients in relative abundance among nearshore habitats. Our observations indicate that this reef system removes oceanic DOC and exerts selective pressures on bacterioplankton community structure on timescales approximating reef water residence times, observations which are notable both because

  9. Assessment of a Technique for Estimating Total Column Water Vapor Using Measurements of the Infrared Sky Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merceret, Francis J.; Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    A method for estimating the integrated precipitable water (IPW) content of the atmosphere using measurements of indicated infrared zenith sky temperature was validated over east-central Florida. The method uses inexpensive, commercial off the shelf, hand-held infrared thermometers (IRT). Two such IRTs were obtained from a commercial vendor, calibrated against several laboratory reference sources at KSC, and used to make IR zenith sky temperature measurements in the vicinity of KSC and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The calibration and comparison data showed that these inexpensive IRTs provided reliable, stable IR temperature measurements that were well correlated with the NOAA IPW observations.

  10. Preparative separation of the polar part from the rhizomes of Anemarrhena asphodeloides using a hydrophilic C18 stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jianfeng; Xin, Huaxia; Cheng, Lingping; Fu, YanHui; Jiang, Dasen; Feng, Jiatao; Fu, Qing; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2017-09-15

    The goal of this study was to develop a method that utilized a hydrophilic C18 stationary phase in the preparative high performance liquid chromatography to isolate the polar part from the rhizomes of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. The results showed that an initial mobile phase of pure water for the separation could greatly increase the retention and solubility of the polar compounds at the preparative scale. Introducing polar groups on the surface of the hydrophilic C18 column together with the use of optimized mobile phase compositions improved the column separation selectivity for polar compounds. Eleven previously undescribed compounds in Anemarrhena asphodeloides were obtained, indicating that the method developed in this study would facilitate the purification and separation of the polar part of traditional Chinese medicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Laboratory Column Studies to Evaluate the use of pH Triggered Polymers for Hydraulically Isolating Contaminated Vadose Zone Sediments and Perched Water Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K.

    2006-12-01

    Laboratory studies were conduced to evaluate the use of polyacrylic polymers to hydraulically isolate contaminants in vadose zone saturated and unsaturated geologic materials. Similar polymers have been successfully used in the petroleum industry for analogous applications, but this technology has not been applied to environmental remediation activities. Polymers are capable of swelling thousands of times their original size when triggered by changes in pH and ionic strength while exhibiting a very low permeability. Therefore, polymers have the potential to significantly reduce permeability of geologic media, redirecting water infiltration away from contaminated regions of the subsurface. These polymers are polyacrylic acids that when mixed with water, exhibit initial fluid properties similar to water at pH between 2.0 4.0. The solutions are introduced into geologic materials where the acidic solution reacts with the minerals and in situ pore water, altering the pH and the ionic strength of the solution. These changes trigger an increase in solution viscosity as the polymers swell, plugging pores and reducing permeability. The polymer kinetics of these reactions are controlled by the geologic mineralogy, solution flux rate, polymer concentrations, and solvent chemistry. Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center evaluated field emplacement methods that impact polymer rheology kinetics by conducting soil batch experiments and column studies with two commercially available polymers. The researchers were able to identify appropriate polymer and solvent concentrations, solution flux rates, and reaction times required to significantly reduce soil permeability. This poster presentation will present the laboratory methods developed to evaluate the use of polymers for environmental remediation activities and results of these tests.

  12. Subsurface imaging of water electrical conductivity, hydraulic permeability and lithology at contaminated sites by induced polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, PK; Balbarini, N.; Møller, I.; Rønde, V.; Christiansen, AV; Bjerg, PL; Auken, E.; Fiandaca, G.

    2018-01-01

    At contaminated sites, knowledge about geology and hydraulic properties of the subsurface and extent of the contamination is needed for assessing the risk and for designing potential site remediation. In the present study, we have developed a new approach for characterizing contaminated sites through time-domain spectral induced polarization. The new approach is based on: 1) spectral inversion of the induced polarization data through a re-parameterization of the Cole-Cole model, which disentangles the electrolytic bulk conductivity from the surface conductivity for delineating the contamination plume; 2) estimation of hydraulic permeability directly from the inverted parameters using a laboratory-derived empirical equation without any calibration; 3) the use of the geophysical imaging results for supporting the geological modeling and planning of drilling campaigns.

  13. Impact of an intense water column mixing (0-1500 m) on prokaryotic diversity and activities during an open-ocean convection event in the NW Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Tatiana; Sauret, Caroline; Boutrif, Mehdi; Duhaut, Thomas; Kessouri, Fayçal; Oriol, Louise; Caparros, Jocelyne; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Garel, Marc; Tamburini, Christian; Conan, Pascal; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    Open-ocean convection is a fundamental process for thermohaline circulation and biogeochemical cycles that causes spectacular mixing of the water column. Here, we tested how much the depth-stratified prokaryotic communities were influenced by such an event, and also by the following re-stratification. The deep convection event (0-1500 m) that occurred in winter 2010-2011 in the NW Mediterranean Sea resulted in a homogenization of the prokaryotic communities over the entire convective cell, resulting in the predominance of typical surface Bacteria, such as Oceanospirillale and Flavobacteriales. Statistical analysis together with numerical simulation of vertical homogenization evidenced that physical turbulence only was not enough to explain the new distribution of the communities, but acted in synergy with other parameters such as exported particulate and dissolved organic matters. The convection also stimulated prokaryotic abundance (+21%) and heterotrophic production (+43%) over the 0-1500 m convective cell, and resulted in a decline of cell-specific extracellular enzymatic activities (-67%), thus suggesting an intensification of the labile organic matter turnover during the event. The rapid re-stratification of the prokaryotic diversity and activities in the intermediate layer 5 days after the intense mixing indicated a marked resilience of the communities, apart from the residual deep mixed water patch. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Determination of copper, lead and iron in water and food samples after column solid phase extraction using 1-phenylthiosemicarbazide on Dowex Optipore L-493 resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ozden; Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    A novel solid phase extraction procedure for determination of copper, lead and iron in natural water and food samples has been established in the presented work. 1-Phenylthiosemicarbazide (1-PTSC) as ligand and Dowex Optipore L-493 resin as adsorbent were used in a mini chromatographic column. Various analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of analyte ions including pH, amounts of adsorbent, eluent, sample volume, etc. were investigated. The recovery values for analyte ions were higher than 95%. The determination of copper, lead and iron was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of some alkali, alkali earth and transition metals on the recoveries of analyte ions were investigated. The preconcentration factor was 62.5. The limit of detections of the understudied analytes (k=3, N=21) were 0.64 μg L(-1) for copper, 0.55 μg L(-1) for lead and 0.82 μg L(-1) for iron. The relative standard deviation was found to be lower than 6%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with certified reference material (GBW 07605 Tea). The method was successively applied for the determination of copper, lead and iron in water and some food samples including cheese, bread, baby food, pekmez, honey, milk and red wine after microwave digestion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of sediment denitrification in water column oxygen dynamics: comparison of the North American East and West Coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bianucci

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Low oxygen concentrations, either natural or anthropogenically driven, can severely affect coastal marine ecosystems. A deeper understanding of oxygen dynamics is required in order to improve numerical models, eventually to predict the timing and severity of hypoxia. In this study we investigate the effect of sediment denitrification on oxygen concentrations in bottom waters over the continental shelf. We used two coupled physical-biological models based on the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS to compare summer simulations with and without denitrification within the sediments for two North American shelves: the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB and the Vancouver Island Shelf (VIS. These regions belong to western and eastern boundary current systems, respectively, and are characterized by different physical and biological dynamics. Both models assume coupled nitrification-denitrification within the sediments. Denitrification represents a loss of bioavailable nitrogen through the production of dinitrogen gas, with the potential to affect biogeochemical cycles. In our MAB model, this loss of regenerated nutrients through denitrification within the sediments significantly affects primary production, since recycled nitrogen supports most of the primary production in that region. The diminished primary production and consequent decrease of organic matter flux to the seafloor leads to less sediment oxygen consumption and higher oxygen concentrations in bottom waters. However, changes in regenerated nitrogen on the VIS barely affect primary production due to the efficient supply of new nutrients through wind-driven upwelling during summer and the nutrient-rich coastal current. We recommend that modelling experiments focusing on oxygen dynamics (as well as oxygen budget calculations should include sediment denitrification in coastal regions where regenerated primary production dominates productivity.

  16. Role of sediment denitrification in water column oxygen dynamics: comparison of the North American East and West Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianucci, L.; Fennel, K.; Denman, K. L.

    2012-07-01

    Low oxygen concentrations, either natural or anthropogenically driven, can severely affect coastal marine ecosystems. A deeper understanding of oxygen dynamics is required in order to improve numerical models, eventually to predict the timing and severity of hypoxia. In this study we investigate the effect of sediment denitrification on oxygen concentrations in bottom waters over the continental shelf. We used two coupled physical-biological models based on the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) to compare summer simulations with and without denitrification within the sediments for two North American shelves: the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and the Vancouver Island Shelf (VIS). These regions belong to western and eastern boundary current systems, respectively, and are characterized by different physical and biological dynamics. Both models assume coupled nitrification-denitrification within the sediments. Denitrification represents a loss of bioavailable nitrogen through the production of dinitrogen gas, with the potential to affect biogeochemical cycles. In our MAB model, this loss of regenerated nutrients through denitrification within the sediments significantly affects primary production, since recycled nitrogen supports most of the primary production in that region. The diminished primary production and consequent decrease of organic matter flux to the seafloor leads to less sediment oxygen consumption and higher oxygen concentrations in bottom waters. However, changes in regenerated nitrogen on the VIS barely affect primary production due to the efficient supply of new nutrients through wind-driven upwelling during summer and the nutrient-rich coastal current. We recommend that modelling experiments focusing on oxygen dynamics (as well as oxygen budget calculations) should include sediment denitrification in coastal regions where regenerated primary production dominates productivity.

  17. Transport-limited water splitting at ion-selective interfaces during concentration polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer Peder; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical model of salt- and water-ion transport across an ion-selective interface based on an assumption of local equilibrium of the water-dissociation reaction. The model yields current-voltage characteristics and curves of water-ion current versus salt-ion current, which are in ...

  18. Insights into head-column field-amplified sample stacking: Part II. Study of the behavior of the electrophoretic system after electrokinetic injection of cationic compounds across a short water plug

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šesták, Jozef; Thormann, W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1512, AUG (2017), s. 124-132 ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : head- column field-amplified sample stacking * capillary electrophoresis * water plug Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  19. Unexpected attraction of polarotactic water-leaving insects to matt black car surfaces: mattness of paintwork cannot eliminate the polarized light pollution of black cars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklos Blaho

    Full Text Available The horizontally polarizing surface parts of shiny black cars (the reflection-polarization characteristics of which are similar to those of water surfaces attract water-leaving polarotactic insects. Thus, shiny black cars are typical sources of polarized light pollution endangering water-leaving insects. A new fashion fad is to make car-bodies matt black or grey. Since rough (matt surfaces depolarize the reflected light, one of the ways of reducing polarized light pollution is to make matt the concerned surface. Consequently, matt black/grey cars may not induce polarized light pollution, which would be an advantageous feature for environmental protection. To test this idea, we performed field experiments with horizontal shiny and matt black car-body surfaces laid on the ground. Using imaging polarimetry, in multiple-choice field experiments we investigated the attractiveness of these test surfaces to various water-leaving polarotactic insects and obtained the following results: (i The attractiveness of black car-bodies to polarotactic insects depends in complex manner on the surface roughness (shiny, matt and species (mayflies, dolichopodids, tabanids. (ii Non-expectedly, the matt dark grey car finish is much more attractive to mayflies (being endangered and protected in many countries than matt black finish. (iii The polarized light pollution of shiny black cars usually cannot be reduced with the use of matt painting. On the basis of these, our two novel findings are that (a matt car-paints are highly polarization reflecting, and (b these matt paints are not suitable to repel polarotactic insects. Hence, the recent technology used to make matt the car-bodies cannot eliminate or even can enhance the attractiveness of black/grey cars to water-leaving insects. Thus, changing shiny black car painting to matt one is a disadvantageous fashion fad concerning the reduction of polarized light pollution of black vehicles.

  20. Unexpected attraction of polarotactic water-leaving insects to matt black car surfaces: mattness of paintwork cannot eliminate the polarized light pollution of black cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaho, Miklos; Herczeg, Tamas; Kriska, Gyorgy; Egri, Adam; Szaz, Denes; Farkas, Alexandra; Tarjanyi, Nikolett; Czinke, Laszlo; Barta, Andras; Horvath, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    The horizontally polarizing surface parts of shiny black cars (the reflection-polarization characteristics of which are similar to those of water surfaces) attract water-leaving polarotactic insects. Thus, shiny black cars are typical sources of polarized light pollution endangering water-leaving insects. A new fashion fad is to make car-bodies matt black or grey. Since rough (matt) surfaces depolarize the reflected light, one of the ways of reducing polarized light pollution is to make matt the concerned surface. Consequently, matt black/grey cars may not induce polarized light pollution, which would be an advantageous feature for environmental protection. To test this idea, we performed field experiments with horizontal shiny and matt black car-body surfaces laid on the ground. Using imaging polarimetry, in multiple-choice field experiments we investigated the attractiveness of these test surfaces to various water-leaving polarotactic insects and obtained the following results: (i) The attractiveness of black car-bodies to polarotactic insects depends in complex manner on the surface roughness (shiny, matt) and species (mayflies, dolichopodids, tabanids). (ii) Non-expectedly, the matt dark grey car finish is much more attractive to mayflies (being endangered and protected in many countries) than matt black finish. (iii) The polarized light pollution of shiny black cars usually cannot be reduced with the use of matt painting. On the basis of these, our two novel findings are that (a) matt car-paints are highly polarization reflecting, and (b) these matt paints are not suitable to repel polarotactic insects. Hence, the recent technology used to make matt the car-bodies cannot eliminate or even can enhance the attractiveness of black/grey cars to water-leaving insects. Thus, changing shiny black car painting to matt one is a disadvantageous fashion fad concerning the reduction of polarized light pollution of black vehicles.