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Sample records for polar ultraviolet imager

  1. Coordinated measurements made by the Sondrestrom radar and the Polar Bear ultraviolet imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.; Vondrak, R.; Dabbs, T.; Vickrey, J.; Eastes, R.; Del Greco, F.; Huffman, R.; Meng, C.; Daniell, R.; Strickland, D.; Vondrak, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1986 and 1987 the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar in Greenland was operated routinely in coordination with selected overpasses of the Polar Bear satellite. For these experiments the auroral ionospheric remote sensor on Polar Bear obtained images of auroral emissions in two far ultraviolet wavelength bands centered at approximately 136 and 160 nm and one visible band centered at 391.4 nm. Measurements at these three wavelengths were extracted from the images for comparison with the coincident radar measurements. Model calculations have shown that for Maxwellian incident electron distributions the ratio between the 136-nm luminosity and 391.4-nm luminosity can be used to estimate the mean energy of precipitating electrons. Once the mean energy is known, then either of the two emissions can be used to determine the total energy flux. This procedure is used to determine the properties of the incident electron distribution during three midnight sector auroral events over Sondre Stromfjord. The incident electron flux is then used to calculate the expected height profile of electron density which is compared with the simultaneous and coincident radar measurements. The results show that the derived profiles agree well with the measured profiles both in the peak electron density and the altitude of the peak. The accuracy with which the peak of the profile is predicted by this technique is such that many important ionospheric parameters can be reliably inferred from remote measurements, including, for example, the height-integrated electrical conductivities

  2. Polarized vacuum ultraviolet and X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.A.R.

    1978-01-01

    The most intense source of polarized vacuum UV and X-radiation is synchrotron radiation, which exhibits a degree of partially polarized light between about 80-100%. However, the radiation transmitted by vacuum UV monochromators can also be highly polarized. The Seya-Namioka type of monochromator can produce partially polarized radiation between 50-80%. For certain experiments it is necessary to know the degree of polarisation of the radiation being used. Also, when synchrotron radiation and a monochromator are combined the polarization characteristic of both should be known in order to make full use of these polarization properties. The polarizing effect on monochromators (i.e. diffraction gratings) have been measured at the Seya angle and at grazing angles for various spectral orders. The author presents the first experimental evidence that the reciprocity law holds for polarization by reflection where the angle of incidence and diffraction are unequal. These results are reviewed along with the techniques for measuring the degree of polarization. (Auth.)

  3. Variations in ultraviolet extinction: effect of polarization revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.; Chlewicki, G.; Rijksuniversiteit Groningen

    1987-01-01

    The alignment of the particles responsible for the polarization and visual extinction is shown to provide a basis for changing the saturation level of the ultraviolet extinction without changing the particle sizes. If the particles are well aligned, it is predicted that there should be significantly lower extinction in the ultraviolet relative to the visible for stars viewed perpendicular to magnetic-field lines (maximum polarization) as compared with those viewed across the field lines. Preliminary evidence for such an effect is noted in Carina. (author)

  4. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  5. Making Ultraviolet Spectro-Polarimetry Polarization Measurements with the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program. This paper will concentrate on SUMI's VUV optics, and discuss their spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics. While SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria, there are several areas that will be improved for its second and third flights. This paper will emphasize the MgII linear polarization measurements and describe the changes that will be made to the sounding rocket and how those changes will improve the scientific data acquired by SUMI.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet spectropolarimeter design for precise polarization measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Auchère, Frédéric; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Kano, Ryouhei; Tsuneta, Saku; Winebarger, Amy R; Kobayashi, Ken

    2015-03-10

    Precise polarization measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region provide a new means for inferring weak magnetic fields in the upper atmosphere of the Sun and stars. We propose a VUV spectropolarimeter design ideally suited for this purpose. This design is proposed and adopted for the NASA-JAXA chromospheric lyman-alpha spectropolarimeter (CLASP), which will record the linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) of the hydrogen Lyman-α line (121.567 nm) profile. The expected degree of polarization is on the order of 0.1%. Our spectropolarimeter has two optically symmetric channels to simultaneously measure orthogonal linear polarization states with a single concave diffraction grating that serves both as the spectral dispersion element and beam splitter. This design has a minimal number of reflective components with a high VUV throughput. Consequently, these design features allow us to minimize the polarization errors caused by possible time variation of the VUV flux during the polarization modulation and by statistical photon noise.

  7. JUDE: An Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, J.; Rahna, P. T.; Sutaria, F.; Safonova, M.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.

    2017-07-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) was launched as part of the multi-wavelength Indian AstroSat mission on 28 September, 2015 into a low Earth orbit. A 6-month performance verification (PV) phase ended in March 2016, and the instrument is now in the general observing phase. UVIT operates in three channels: visible, near-ultraviolet (NUV) and far-ultraviolet (FUV), each with a choice of broad and narrow band filters, and has NUV and FUV gratings for low-resolution spectroscopy. We have written a software package (JUDE) to convert the Level 1 data from UVIT into scientifically useful photon lists and images. The routines are written in the GNU Data Language (GDL) and are compatible with the IDL software package. We use these programs in our own scientific work, and will continue to update the programs as we gain better understanding of the UVIT instrument and its performance. We have released JUDE under an Apache License.

  8. A Compact Extreme Ultraviolet Imager

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Just how far can one shrink a solar/heliospheric image??? — Can you shrink it small enough to fit on a cube-sat? What can we image — successfully — from a cube-sat?...

  9. Polarization-multiplexing ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongfeng, Shi; Jiamin, Zhang; Jian, Huang; Yingjian, Wang; Kee, Yuan; Kaifa, Cao; Chenbo, Xie; Dong, Liu; Wenyue, Zhu

    2018-03-01

    A novel technique for polarization-multiplexing ghost imaging is proposed to simultaneously obtain multiple polarimetric information by a single detector. Here, polarization-division multiplexing speckles are employed for object illumination. The light reflected from the objects is detected by a single-pixel detector. An iterative reconstruction method is used to restore the fused image containing the different polarimetric information by using the weighted sum of the multiplexed speckles based on the correlation coefficients obtained from the detected intensities. Next, clear images of the different polarimetric information are recovered by demultiplexing the fused image. The results clearly demonstrate that the proposed method is effective.

  10. Ultraviolet light imaging technology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Takane; Suzuki, Kenji; Oba, Koichiro

    1991-06-01

    Demands on the high-quality imaging in ultraviolet (UV) light region have been increasing recently, especially in fields such as forensic investigations, laser experiments, spent fuel identification, and so on. Important requirements on the UV imaging devices in such applications are high sensitivity, excellent solar blindness, and small image distortion, since the imaging of very weak UV images are usually carried out under natural sunlight or room illuminations and the image data have to be processed to produce useful two-dimensional quantitative data. A new photocathode has been developed to meet these requirements. It is specially made of RbTe on a sapphire window and its quantum efficiency is as high as 20% with the solar blindness of 10,000. The tube is specially designed to meet UV light optics and to minimize image distortion. It has an invertor type image intensifier tube structure and intensifies the incident UV light up to approximately 10,000 times. The distortion of the output image is suppressed less than 1.8%, because of a specially designed electron optic lens system. The device has shown excellent results in the observation of such objects as fingerprints and footprints in forensic investigations, the Cherenkov light produced by the spent fuels stored in a cooling water pool in the nuclear power station, and UV laser beam path in excimer laser experiments. Furthermore, many other applications of the UV light imaging will be expected in various fields such as semiconductors, cosmetics, and electrical power.

  11. Polar synthetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jonathan K.

    2013-05-01

    In the search for low-cost wide spectrum imagers it may become necessary to sacrifice the expense of the focal plane array and revert to a scanning methodology. In many cases the sensor may be too unwieldy to physically scan and mirrors may have adverse effects on particular frequency bands. In these cases, photonic masks can be devised to modulate the incoming light field with a code over time. This is in essence code-division multiplexing of the light field into a lower dimension channel. In this paper a simple method for modulating the light field with masks of the Archimedes' spiral is presented and a mathematical model of the two-dimensional mask set is developed.

  12. In-orbit Calibrations of the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, S. N.; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Girish, V.; Postma, J.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Sriram, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Mondal, C.; Sahu, S.; Joseph, P.; Hutchings, J.; Ghosh, S. K.; Barve, I. V.; George, K.; Kamath, P. U.; Kathiravan, S.; Kumar, A.; Lancelot, J. P.; Leahy, D.; Mahesh, P. K.; Mohan, R.; Nagabhushana, S.; Pati, A. K.; Kameswara Rao, N.; Sreedhar, Y. H.; Sreekumar, P.

    2017-09-01

    The Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) is one of the payloads in ASTROSAT, the first Indian Space Observatory. The UVIT instrument has two 375 mm telescopes: one for the far-ultraviolet (FUV) channel (1300-1800 Å), and the other for the near-ultraviolet (NUV) channel (2000-3000 Å) and the visible (VIS) channel (3200-5500 Å). UVIT is primarily designed for simultaneous imaging in the two ultraviolet channels with spatial resolution better than 1.″8, along with provisions for slit-less spectroscopy in the NUV and FUV channels. The results of in-orbit calibrations of UVIT are presented in this paper.

  13. In-orbit Calibrations of the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, S. N. [Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (India); Subramaniam, Annapurni; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Sriram, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Mondal, C.; Sahu, S.; Joseph, P.; Barve, I. V.; George, K.; Kamath, P. U.; Kathiravan, S.; Kumar, A.; Lancelot, J. P.; Mahesh, P. K. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala II Block, Bangalore-560034 (India); Girish, V. [ISRO Satellite Centre, HAL Airport Road, Bangalore 560017 (India); Postma, J.; Leahy, D. [University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta Canada (Canada); Hutchings, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Ghosh, S. K., E-mail: purni@iiap.res.in [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Pune (India); and others

    2017-09-01

    The Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) is one of the payloads in ASTROSAT, the first Indian Space Observatory. The UVIT instrument has two 375 mm telescopes: one for the far-ultraviolet (FUV) channel (1300–1800 Å), and the other for the near-ultraviolet (NUV) channel (2000–3000 Å) and the visible (VIS) channel (3200–5500 Å). UVIT is primarily designed for simultaneous imaging in the two ultraviolet channels with spatial resolution better than 1.″8, along with provisions for slit-less spectroscopy in the NUV and FUV channels. The results of in-orbit calibrations of UVIT are presented in this paper.

  14. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayahsi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  15. Imaging differential polarization microscope with electronic readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickols, W.; Tinoco, I.; Katz, J.E.; Maestre, M.F.; Bustamante, C.

    1985-01-01

    A differential polarization microscope forms two images: one of the transmitted intensity and the other due to the change in intensity between images formed when different polarizations of light are used. The interpretation of these images for linear dichroism and circular dichroism are described. The design constraints on the data acquisition systems and the polarization modulation are described. The advantage of imaging several biological systems which contain optically anisotropic structures are described

  16. Ultraviolet imaging of planetary nebulae with GALEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luciana; Thilker, David

    2018-05-01

    Over four hundred Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) have been imaged by GALEX in two ultraviolet (UV) bands, far-UV (FUV, 1344-1786 Å, λ _{eff}= 1528 Å) and near-NUV (NUV, 1771-2831 Å, λ _{eff} = 2271 Å). We present examples of extended PNe, for which UV spectroscopy is also available, to illustrate the variety in UV morphology and color, which reflects ionization conditions. The depth of the GALEX imaging varies from flux ≈ 0.4/5× 10 ^{-18} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} Å^{-1} \\square ^'' -1} (FUV/NUV) for exposures of the order of ˜ 100 seconds, typical of the survey with the largest area coverage, to ˜ 0.3/8.3× 10^{-19} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} Å^{-1} \\square ^'' -1} (FUV/NUV) for ˜ 1500 sec exposures, typical of the second largest survey (see Bianchi in Astrophys. Space Sci. 320:11, 2009; Bianchi et al. in Adv. Space Res. 53:900, 2014). GALEX broad-band FUV and NUV fluxes include nebular emission lines and in some cases nebular continuum emission. The sensitivity of the GALEX instrument and the low sky background, especially in FUV, enable detection and mapping of very faint ionization regions and fronts, including outermost wisps and bow shocks. The FUV-NUV color of the central star provides a good indication of its T_{eff}, because the GALEX FUV-NUV color is almost reddening-free for Milky Way type dust (Bianchi et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 230:24, 2017; Bianchi in Astrophys. Space Sci. 335:51, 2011, Bianchi in Astrophys. Space Sci. 354:103, 2014) and it is more sensitive to hot temperatures than optical colors.

  17. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope images of the reflection nebula NGC 7023 - Derivation of ultraviolet scattering properties of dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Petersohn, Jens K.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope as part of the Astro-1 mission, was used to obtain high-resolution surface brightness distribution data in six ultraviolet wavelength bands for the bright reflection nebula NGC 7023. From the quantitative comparison of the measured surface brightness gradients ratios of nebular to stellar flux, and detail radial surface brightness profiles with corresponding data from the visible, two major conclusions results: (1) the scattering in the near- and far-ultraviolet in this nebula is more strongly forward-directed than in the visible; (2) the dust albedo in the ultraviolet for wavelengths not less than 140 nm is identical to that in the visible, with the exception of the 220 nm bump in the extinction curve. In the wavelengths region of the bump, the albedo is reduced by 25 to 30 percent in comparison with wavelengths regions both shorter and longer. This lower albedo is expected, if the bump is a pure absorption feature.

  18. Material and device studies for the development of ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) along polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya

    Over the past few years, significant effort was dedicated to the development of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for a variety of applications. Such applications include chemical and biological detection, water purification and solid-state lighting. III-Nitride LEDs based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown along the conventional [0001] (polar) direction suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), due to the existence of strong electric fields that arise from spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization. Thus, there is strong motivation to develop MQW-based III-nitride LED structures grown along non-polar and semi-polar directions. The goal of this dissertation is to develop UV-LEDs along the [0001] polar and [11 2¯ 0] non-polar directions by the method of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The polar and non-polar LEDs were grown on the C-plane and R-plane sapphire substrates respectively. This work is a combination of materials science studies related to the nucleation, growth and n- and p-type doping of III-nitride films on these two substrates, as well as device studies related to fabrication and characterization of UV-LEDs. It was observed that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films grown on R-plane sapphire depends strongly on the kinetic conditions of growth of the Aluminum Nitride (AIN) buffer. Specifically, growth of the AIN buffer under group III-rich conditions leads to nitride films having the (11 2¯ 0) non polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface, while growth of the buffer under nitrogen rich conditions leads to nitride films with the (11 2¯ 6) semi-polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface. The electron concentration and mobility for the films grown along the polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions were investigated. P-type doping of Gallium Nitride (GaN) films grown on the nonpolar (11 2¯ 0) plane do not suffer from polarity inversion and thus the material was doped p-type with a hole concentration

  19. Sensitivity Calibration of Far-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. -J. Kim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the in-flight sensitivity calibration of the Far ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FIMS, also known as SPEAR onboard the first Korean science satellite, STSAT-1, which was launched in September 2003. The sensitivity calibration is based on a comparison of the FIMS observations of the hot white dwarf G191B2B, and two O-type stars Alpha-Cam, HD93521 with the HUT (Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope observations. The FIMS observations for the calibration targets have been conducted from November 2003 through May 2004. The effective areas calculated from the targets are compared with each other.

  20. UV Coatings, Polarization, and Coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Quijada, Manuel; West, Garrett; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Martin, Stefan; Sabatke, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Presenation for the Large UltraViolet Optical Infrared (LUVOIR) and Habitable Exoplanet Imager (HabEx) Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDT) on technical considerations regarding ultraviolet coatings, polarization, and coronagraphy. The presentations review the state-of-the-art in ultraviolet coatings, how those coatings generate polarization aberrations, and recent study results from both the LUVOIR and HabEx teams.

  1. Polarization Imaging Apparatus with Auto-Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yingyin Kevin (Inventor); Zhao, Hongzhi (Inventor); Chen, Qiushui (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus measures the Stokes image of a sample. The apparatus consists of an optical lens set, a first variable phase retarder (VPR) with its optical axis aligned 22.5 deg, a second variable phase retarder with its optical axis aligned 45 deg, a linear polarizer, a imaging sensor for sensing the intensity images of the sample, a controller and a computer. Two variable phase retarders were controlled independently by a computer through a controller unit which generates a sequential of voltages to control the phase retardations of the first and second variable phase retarders. A auto-calibration procedure was incorporated into the polarization imaging apparatus to correct the misalignment of first and second VPRs, as well as the half-wave voltage of the VPRs. A set of four intensity images, I(sub 0), I(sub 1), I(sub 2) and I(sub 3) of the sample were captured by imaging sensor when the phase retardations of VPRs were set at (0,0), (pi,0), (pi,pi) and (pi/2,pi), respectively. Then four Stokes components of a Stokes image, S(sub 0), S(sub 1), S(sub 2) and S(sub 3) were calculated using the four intensity images.

  2. Development of a quantitative assessment method of pigmentary skin disease using ultraviolet optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Onseok; Park, Sunup; Kim, Jaeyoung; Oh, Chilhwan

    2017-11-01

    The visual scoring method has been used as a subjective evaluation of pigmentary skin disorders. Severity of pigmentary skin disease, especially melasma, is evaluated using a visual scoring method, the MASI (melasma area severity index). This study differentiates between epidermal and dermal pigmented disease. The study was undertaken to determine methods to quantitatively measure the severity of pigmentary skin disorders under ultraviolet illumination. The optical imaging system consists of illumination (white LED, UV-A lamp) and image acquisition (DSLR camera, air cooling CMOS CCD camera). Each camera is equipped with a polarizing filter to remove glare. To analyze images of visible and UV light, images are divided into frontal, cheek, and chin regions of melasma patients. Each image must undergo image processing. To reduce the curvature error in facial contours, a gradient mask is used. The new method of segmentation of front and lateral facial images is more objective for face-area-measurement than the MASI score. Image analysis of darkness and homogeneity is adequate to quantify the conventional MASI score. Under visible light, active lesion margins appear in both epidermal and dermal melanin, whereas melanin is found in the epidermis under UV light. This study objectively analyzes severity of melasma and attempts to develop new methods of image analysis with ultraviolet optical imaging equipment. Based on the results of this study, our optical imaging system could be used as a valuable tool to assess the severity of pigmentary skin disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Correspondence of vacuum ultraviolet aurora image with the inverted-V structure observed by Kyokko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Eisuke; Mukai, Toshifumi; Hirao, Kunio.

    1982-01-01

    Since the Kyokko has been in an orbit with the inclination of 65.3 degree, various patterns of the inverted-V structure can be observed. Correspondence of vacuum ultraviolet aurora image with the inverted-V structure was studied. The energy-time diagrams were obtained. The inverted-V event occurrence map was made. The down-dusk asymmetry was recognized. The patterns of the inverted-V structure observed at present were not much different from previous ones. The observed aurora images showed not only the patterns of aurora, but also the state of aurora spreading in the polar region. Some of the observed results of energy characteristics and the aurora images are shown. (Kato, T.)

  4. Issues in Quantitative Analysis of Ultraviolet Imager (UV) Data: Airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, G. A.; Richards, P. G.; Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1999-01-01

    The GGS Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) has proven to be especially valuable in correlative substorm, auroral morphology, and extended statistical studies of the auroral regions. Such studies are based on knowledge of the location, spatial, and temporal behavior of auroral emissions. More quantitative studies, based on absolute radiometric intensities from UVI images, require a more intimate knowledge of the instrument behavior and data processing requirements and are inherently more difficult than studies based on relative knowledge of the oval location. In this study, UVI airglow observations are analyzed and compared with model predictions to illustrate issues that arise in quantitative analysis of UVI images. These issues include instrument calibration, long term changes in sensitivity, and imager flat field response as well as proper background correction. Airglow emissions are chosen for this study because of their relatively straightforward modeling requirements and because of their implications for thermospheric compositional studies. The analysis issues discussed here, however, are identical to those faced in quantitative auroral studies.

  5. GLOBAL SIMULATION OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING TELESCOPE WAVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    We use the observation of an Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave in the lower solar corona, seen with the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft in extreme ultraviolet light on 2007 May 19, to model the same event with a three-dimensional (3D) time-depending magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code that includes solar coronal magnetic fields derived with Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetogram data, and a solar wind outflow accelerated with empirical heating functions. The model includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) of Gibson and Low flux rope type above the reconstructed active region with parameters adapted from observations to excite the EIT wave. We trace the EIT wave running as circular velocity enhancement around the launching site of the CME in the direction tangential to the sphere produced by the wave front, and compute the phase velocities of the wave front. We find that the phase velocities are in good agreement with theoretical values for a fast magnetosonic wave, derived with the physical parameters of the model, and with observed phase speeds of an incident EIT wave reflected by a coronal hole and running at about the same location. We also produce in our 3D MHD model the observed reflection of the EIT wave at the coronal hole boundary, triggered by the magnetic pressure difference between the wave front hitting the hole and the boundary magnetic fields of the coronal hole, and the response of the coronal hole, which leads to the generation of secondary reflected EIT waves radiating away in different directions than the incident EIT wave. This is the first 3D MHD model of an EIT wave triggered by a CME that includes realistic solar magnetic field, with results comparing favorably to STEREO Extreme Ultraviolet Imager observations.

  6. POLARIZATION IMAGING AND SCATTERING MODEL OF CANCEROUS LIVER TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONGZHI LI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We apply different polarization imaging techniques for cancerous liver tissues, and compare the relative contrasts for difference polarization imaging (DPI, degree of polarization imaging (DOPI and rotating linear polarization imaging (RLPI. Experimental results show that a number of polarization imaging parameters are capable of differentiating cancerous cells in isotropic liver tissues. To analyze the contrast mechanism of the cancer-sensitive polarization imaging parameters, we propose a scattering model containing two types of spherical scatterers and carry on Monte Carlo simulations based on this bi-component model. Both the experimental and Monte Carlo simulated results show that the RLPI technique can provide a good imaging contrast of cancerous tissues. The bi-component scattering model provides a useful tool to analyze the contrast mechanism of polarization imaging of cancerous tissues.

  7. The Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission

    CERN Document Server

    André, Philippe; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J.A.P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford; Cabrera, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM

  8. Optimizing image-based patterned defect inspection through FDTD simulations at multiple ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Bryan M.; Zhou, Hui; Henn, Mark-Alexander; Sohn, Martin Y.; Silver, Richard M.

    2017-06-01

    The sizes of non-negligible defects in the patterning of a semiconductor device continue to decrease as the dimensions for these devices are reduced. These "killer defects" disrupt the performance of the device and must be adequately controlled during manufacturing, and new solutions are required to improve optics-based defect inspection. To this end, our group has reported [Barnes et al., Proc. SPIE 1014516 (2017)] our initial five-wavelength simulation study, evaluating the extensibility of defect inspection by reducing the inspection wavelength from a deep-ultraviolet wavelength to wavelengths in the vacuum ultraviolet and the extreme ultraviolet. In that study, a 47 nm wavelength yielded enhancements in the signal to noise (SNR) by a factor of five compared to longer wavelengths and in the differential intensities by as much as three orders-of-magnitude compared to 13 nm. This paper briefly reviews these recent findings and investigates the possible sources for these disparities between results at 13 nm and 47 nm wavelengths. Our in-house finite-difference time-domain code (FDTD) is tested in both two and three dimensions to determine how computational conditions contributed to the results. A modified geometry and materials stack is presented that offers a second viewpoint of defect detectability as functions of wavelength, polarization, and defect type. Reapplication of the initial SNR-based defect metric again yields no detection of a defect at λ = 13 nm, but additional image preprocessing now enables the computation of the SNR for λ = 13 nm simulated images and has led to a revised defect metric that allows comparisons at all five wavelengths.

  9. A Polarization-Adjustable Picosecond Deep-Ultraviolet Laser for Spin- and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Feng-Feng; Yang Feng; Zhang Shen-Jin; Wang Zhi-Min; Xu Feng-Liang; Peng Qin-Jun; Zhang Jing-Yuan; Xu Zu-Yan; Wang Xiao-Yang; Chen Chuang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    We report on a polarization-adjustable picosecond deep-ultraviolet (DUV) laser at 177.3 nm. The DUV laser was produced by second harmonic generation from a mode-locked laser at 355 nm in nonlinear optical crystal KBBF. The laser delivered a maximum average output power of 1.1 mW at 177.3 nm. The polarization of the 177.3 nm beam was adjusted with linear and circular polarization by means of λ/4 and λ/2 wave plates. To the best of our knowledge, the laser has been employed as the circularly polarized and linearly polarized DUV light source for a spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high resolution for the first time. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  10. [Research on Spectral Polarization Imaging System Based on Static Modulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-bo; Li, Huan; Lin, Xu-ling; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    The main disadvantages of traditional spectral polarization imaging system are: complex structure, with moving parts, low throughput. A novel method of spectral polarization imaging system is discussed, which is based on static polarization intensity modulation combined with Savart polariscope interference imaging. The imaging system can obtain real-time information of spectral and four Stokes polarization messages. Compared with the conventional methods, the advantages of the imaging system are compactness, low mass and no moving parts, no electrical control, no slit and big throughput. The system structure and the basic theory are introduced. The experimental system is established in the laboratory. The experimental system consists of reimaging optics, polarization intensity module, interference imaging module, and CCD data collecting and processing module. The spectral range is visible and near-infrared (480-950 nm). The white board and the plane toy are imaged by using the experimental system. The ability of obtaining spectral polarization imaging information is verified. The calibration system of static polarization modulation is set up. The statistical error of polarization degree detection is less than 5%. The validity and feasibility of the basic principle is proved by the experimental result. The spectral polarization data captured by the system can be applied to object identification, object classification and remote sensing detection.

  11. Analysis and design of the ultraviolet warning optical system based on interference imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-cong; Hu, Hui-jun; Jin, Dong-dong; Chu, Xin-bo; Shi, Yu-feng; Song, Juan; Liu, Jin-sheng; Xiao, Ting; Shao, Si-pei

    2017-10-01

    Ultraviolet warning technology is one of the important methods for missile warning. It provides a very effective way to detect the target for missile approaching alarm. With the development of modern technology, especially the development of information technology at high speed, the ultraviolet early warning system plays an increasingly important role. Compared to infrared warning, the ultraviolet warning has high efficiency and low false alarm rate. In the modern warfare, how to detect the threats earlier, prevent and reduce the attack of precision-guided missile has become a new challenge of missile warning technology. Because the ultraviolet warning technology has high environmental adaptability, the low false alarm rate, small volume and other advantages, in the military field applications it has been developed rapidly. For the ultraviolet warning system, the optimal working waveband is 250 nm 280 nm (Solar Blind UV) due to the strong absorption of ozone layer. According to current application demands for solar blind ultraviolet detection and warning, this paper proposes ultraviolet warning optical system based on interference imaging, which covers solar blind ultraviolet (250nm-280nm) and dual field. This structure includes a primary optical system, an ultraviolet reflector array, an ultraviolet imaging system and an ultraviolet interference imaging system. It makes use of an ultraviolet beam-splitter to achieve the separation of two optical systems. According to the detector and the corresponding application needs of two visual field of the optical system, the calculation and optical system design were completed. After the design, the MTF of the two optical system is more than 0.8@39lp/mm.A single pixel energy concentration is greater than 80%.

  12. Study on polarized optical flow algorithm for imaging bionic polarization navigation micro sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Le; Liu, Sheng; Li, Shi-qi; Lin, Wei; Zhai, Li-yuan; Chu, Jin-kui

    2018-05-01

    At present, both the point source and the imaging polarization navigation devices only can output the angle information, which means that the velocity information of the carrier cannot be extracted from the polarization field pattern directly. Optical flow is an image-based method for calculating the velocity of pixel point movement in an image. However, for ordinary optical flow, the difference in pixel value as well as the calculation accuracy can be reduced in weak light. Polarization imaging technology has the ability to improve both the detection accuracy and the recognition probability of the target because it can acquire the extra polarization multi-dimensional information of target radiation or reflection. In this paper, combining the polarization imaging technique with the traditional optical flow algorithm, a polarization optical flow algorithm is proposed, and it is verified that the polarized optical flow algorithm has good adaptation in weak light and can improve the application range of polarization navigation sensors. This research lays the foundation for day and night all-weather polarization navigation applications in future.

  13. Instrument Design for the CubeSat Ultraviolet Transient/Imaging Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing a mission concept for a CubeSat-based synoptic imaging survey to explore the ultraviolet sky for several key discoveries in time-domain...

  14. A polarizing neutron periscope for neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael; Boeni, Peter; Calzada, Elbio; Muehlbauer, Martin; Neubauer, Andreas; Schillinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    Optical neutron polarizers like guides or benders destroy the collimation of a neutron beam due to multiple reflections or scattering. This makes them unsuitable for their use in polarized neutron radiography, because the beam collimation is essential to obtain high spatial resolution. We have developed a neutron polarizer based on the principle of an optical periscope with a zigzag double reflection on two parallel high-m supermirror polarizers. If the supermirrors are perfectly parallel and flat, the beam collimation is left unchanged by such a device. A first proof of concept version of this type of polarizer was built and tested. We expect to achieve a beam polarization of up to 99% with an improved version yet to be built.

  15. Polarimetric imaging of retinal disease by polarization sensitive SLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Elsner, Ann E.; Iwasaki, Takuya; Goto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Polarimetry imaging is used to evaluate different features of the macular disease. Polarimetry images were recorded using a commercially- available polarization-sensitive scanning laser opthalmoscope at 780 nm (PS-SLO, GDx-N). From data sets of PS-SLO, we computed average reflectance image, depolarized light images, and ratio-depolarized light images. The average reflectance image is the grand mean of all input polarization states. The depolarized light image is the minimum of crossed channel. The ratio-depolarized light image is a ratio between the average reflectance image and depolarized light image, and was used to compensate for variation of brightness. Each polarimetry image is compared with the autofluorescence image at 800 nm (NIR-AF) and autofluorescence image at 500 nm (SW-AF). We evaluated four eyes with geographic atrophy in age related macular degeneration, one eye with retinal pigment epithelium hyperplasia, and two eyes with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. Polarization analysis could selectively emphasize different features of the retina. Findings in ratio depolarized light image had similarities and differences with NIR-AF images. Area of hyper-AF in NIR-AF images showed high intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light image, representing melanin accumulation. Areas of hypo-AF in NIR-AF images showed low intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light images, representing melanin loss. Drusen were high-intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light image, but NIR-AF images was insensitive to the presence of drusen. Unlike NIR-AF images, SW-AF images showed completely different features from the ratio depolarized images. Polarization sensitive imaging is an effective tool as a non-invasive assessment of macular disease.

  16. Research on fusion algorithm of polarization image in tetrolet domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dexiang; Yuan, BaoHong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-12-01

    Tetrolets are Haar-type wavelets whose supports are tetrominoes which are shapes made by connecting four equal-sized squares. A fusion method for polarization images based on tetrolet transform is proposed. Firstly, the magnitude of polarization image and angle of polarization image can be decomposed into low-frequency coefficients and high-frequency coefficients with multi-scales and multi-directions using tetrolet transform. For the low-frequency coefficients, the average fusion method is used. According to edge distribution differences in high frequency sub-band images, for the directional high-frequency coefficients are used to select the better coefficients by region spectrum entropy algorithm for fusion. At last the fused image can be obtained by utilizing inverse transform for fused tetrolet coefficients. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect image features more effectively and the fused image has better subjective visual effect

  17. A NOISE ADAPTIVE FUZZY EQUALIZATION METHOD FOR PROCESSING SOLAR EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druckmueller, M., E-mail: druckmuller@fme.vutbr.cz [Institute of Mathematics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-08-15

    A new image enhancement tool ideally suited for the visualization of fine structures in extreme ultraviolet images of the corona is presented in this paper. The Noise Adaptive Fuzzy Equalization method is particularly suited for the exceptionally high dynamic range images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. This method produces artifact-free images and gives significantly better results than methods based on convolution or Fourier transform which are often used for that purpose.

  18. Strongly transverse-electric-polarized emission from deep ultraviolet AlGaN quantum well light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Reich@tu-berlin.de; Guttmann, Martin; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, Berlin 10623 (Germany); Feneberg, Martin; Goldhahn, Rüdiger [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Universitätsplatz 2, Magdeburg 39106 (Germany); Rass, Jens; Kneissl, Michael [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, Berlin 10623 (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Knauer, Arne; Kueller, Viola; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2015-10-05

    The optical polarization of emission from ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (0001)-oriented Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) has been studied by simulations and electroluminescence measurements. With increasing aluminum mole fraction in the quantum well x, the in-plane intensity of transverse-electric (TE) polarized light decreases relative to that of the transverse-magnetic polarized light, attributed to a reordering of the valence bands in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N. Using k ⋅ p theoretical model calculations, the AlGaN MQW active region design has been optimized, yielding increased TE polarization and thus higher extraction efficiency for bottom-emitting LEDs in the deep UV spectral range. Using (i) narrow quantum wells, (ii) barriers with high aluminum mole fractions, and (iii) compressive growth on patterned aluminum nitride sapphire templates, strongly TE-polarized emission was observed at wavelengths as short as 239 nm.

  19. Generation of Bright Phase-matched Circularly-polarized Extreme Ultraviolet High Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-08

    1995). 42. Eichmann , H. et al. Polarization-dependent high-order two-color mixing. Phys. Rev. A 51, R3414–R3417 (1995). 43. Fleischer, A., Kfir, O...calculations of polarization-dependent two- color high-harmonic generation. Phys. Rev. A 52, 2262–2278 (1995). 10. Eichmann , H. et al. polarization

  20. Polarization images of the inner regions of Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, N.; Scarrott, S.M.; Warren-Smith, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The present CCD polarimeter images of intensity and polarization within the near-nucleus regions of Comet Halley show the occurrence of dust jets on two days in January, 1986, which exhibit increased polarizations above the level of the surrounding coma. Three possible reasons for the enhanced polarization in the jets are considered, assuming that the polarization increase is due to dust grains: (1) the size distribution of the grains could be different from the surrounding coma; (2) the material of the grains could have a different refractive index; and (3) the ratio of dust to gas emission could be different in the jets. 13 references

  1. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and FUV calibration facility for special sensor ultraviolet limb imager (SSULI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Craig N.; Osterman, Steven N.; Thonnard, Stefan E.; McCoy, Robert P.; Williams, J. Z.; Parker, S. E.

    1994-09-01

    A facility for calibrating far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet instruments has recently been completed at the Naval Research Laboratory. Our vacuum calibration vessel is 2-m in length, 1.67-m in diameter, and can accommodate optical test benches up to 1.2-m wide by 1.5-m in length. A kinematically positioned frame with four axis precision pointing capability of 10 microns for linear translation and .01 degrees for rotation is presently used during vacuum optical calibration of SSULI. The chamber was fabricated from 304 stainless steel and polished internally to reduce surface outgassing. A dust-free environment is maintained at the rear of the vacuum chamber by enclosing the 2-m hinged vacuum access door in an 8 ft. by 8 ft. class 100 clean room. Every effort was made to obtain an oil-free environment within the vacuum vessel. Outgassing products are continually monitored with a 1 - 200 amu residual gas analyzer. An oil-free claw and vane pump evacuates the chamber to 10-2 torr through 4 in. diameter stainless steel roughing lines. High vacuum is achieved and maintained with a magnetically levitated 480 l/s turbo pump and a 3000 l/s He4 cryopump. Either of two vacuum monochrometers, a 1-m f/10.4 or a 0.2-m f/4.5 are coaxially aligned with the optical axis of the chamber and are used to select single UV atomic resonance lines from a windowless capillary or penning discharge UV light source. A calibrated channeltron detector is coaxially mounted with the SSULI detector during calibration. All vacuum valves, the cooling system for the cryopump compressor, and the roughing pump are controlled through optical fibers which are interfaced to a computer through a VME board. Optical fibers were chosen to ensure that complete electrical isolation is maintained between the computer and the vacuum system valves-solenoids and relays.

  2. Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Polarization Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Waluschka, Eugene; Wang, Menghua

    2016-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of five instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on October 28, 2011. It is a whiskbroom radiometer that provides +/-56.28deg scans of the Earth view. It has 22 bands, among which 14 are reflective solar bands (RSBs). The RSBs cover a wavelength range from 410 to 2250 nm. The RSBs of a remote sensor are usually sensitive to the polarization of incident light. For VIIRS, it is specified that the polarization factor should be smaller than 3% for 410 and 862 nm bands and 2.5% for other RSBs for the scan angle within +/-45deg. Several polarization sensitivity tests were performed prelaunch for SNPP VIIRS. The first few tests either had large uncertainty or were less reliable, while the last one was believed to provide the more accurate information about the polarization property of the instrument. In this paper, the measured data in the last polarization sensitivity test are analyzed, and the polarization factors and phase angles are derived from the measurements for all the RSBs. The derived polarization factors and phase angles are band, detector, and scan angle dependent. For near-infrared bands, they also depend on the half-angle mirror side. Nevertheless, the derived polarization factors are all within the specification, although the strong detector dependence of the polarization parameters was not expected. Compared to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on both Aqua and Terra satellites, the polarization effect on VIIRS RSB is much smaller.

  3. Ultraviolet interstellar linear polarization. I - Applicability of current dust grain models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Meade, Marilyn R.

    1993-01-01

    UV spectropolarimetric observations yielding data on the wavelength-dependence of interstellar polarization along eight lines of sight facilitate the evaluation of dust grain models previously used to fit the extinction and polarization in the visible and IR. These models pertain to bare silicate/graphite grains, silicate cores with organic refractory mantles, silicate cores with amorphous carbon mantles, and composite grains. The eight lines-of-sight show three different interstellar polarization dependences.

  4. RMB identification based on polarization parameters inversion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoyan; Gao, Kun; Liu, Xuefeng; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    Social order is threatened by counterfeit money. Conventional anti-counterfeit technology is much too old to identify its authenticity or not. The intrinsic difference between genuine notes and counterfeit notes is its paper tissue. In this paper a new technology of detecting RMB is introduced, the polarization parameter indirect microscopic imaging technique. A conventional reflection microscopic system is used as the basic optical system, and inserting into it with polarization-modulation mechanics. The near-field structural characteristics can be delivered by optical wave and material coupling. According to coupling and conduction physics, calculate the changes of optical wave parameters, then get the curves of the intensity of the image. By analyzing near-field polarization parameters in nanoscale, finally calculate indirect polarization parameter imaging of the fiber of the paper tissue in order to identify its authenticity.

  5. Active polarization imaging system based on optical heterodyne balanced receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Sun, Jianfeng; Lu, Zhiyong; Zhou, Yu; Luan, Zhu; Hou, Peipei; Liu, liren

    2017-08-01

    Active polarization imaging technology has recently become the hot research field all over the world, which has great potential application value in the military and civil area. By introducing active light source, the Mueller matrix of the target can be calculated according to the incident light and the emitted or reflected light. Compared with conventional direct detection technology, optical heterodyne detection technology have higher receiving sensitivities, which can obtain the whole amplitude, frequency and phase information of the signal light. In this paper, an active polarization imaging system will be designed. Based on optical heterodyne balanced receiver, the system can acquire the horizontal and vertical polarization of reflected optical field simultaneously, which contain the polarization characteristic of the target. Besides, signal to noise ratio and imaging distance can be greatly improved.

  6. Retinal processing and opponent mechanisms mediating ultraviolet polarization sensitivity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsden, Samuel D.; Anderson, Leslie; Mussi, Martina; Kamermans, Maarten; Hawryshyn, Craig W.

    2008-01-01

    A number of teleost fishes have photoreceptor mechanisms to detect linearly polarized light. We studied the neuronal mechanism underlying this ability. It was found that a polarized signal could be detected in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) both in the electroretinogram (ERG) and in the

  7. Circularly polarized antennas for active holographic imaging through barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA; Severtsen, Ronald H [Richland, WA; Lechelt, Wayne M [West Richland, WA; Prince, James M [Kennewick, WA

    2011-07-26

    Circularly-polarized antennas and their methods of use for active holographic imaging through barriers. The antennas are dielectrically loaded to optimally match the dielectric constant of the barrier through which images are to be produced. The dielectric loading helps to remove barrier-front surface reflections and to couple electromagnetic energy into the barrier.

  8. A simple polarized-based diffused reflectance colour imaging system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple polarized-based diffuse reflectance imaging system has been developed. The system is designed for both in vivo and in vitro imaging of agricultural specimen in the visible region. The system uses a commercial web camera and a halogen lamp that makes it relatively simple and less expensive for diagnostic ...

  9. Robust reflective ghost imaging against different partially polarized thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Guo; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Hong-Chao; Li, Zong-Guo; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the influence of degree of polarization (DOP) of thermal light on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the reflective ghost imaging (RGI), which is a novel and indirect imaging modality. An expression for the CNR of RGI with partially polarized thermal light is carefully derived, which suggests a weak dependence of CNR on the DOP, especially when the ratio of the object size to the speckle size of thermal light has a large value. Different from conventional imaging approaches, our work reveals that RGI is much more robust against the DOP of the light source, which thereby has advantages in practical applications, such as remote sensing.

  10. Forensic photography. Ultraviolet imaging of wounds on skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsley, R E; West, M H; Fair, J A

    1990-12-01

    The use of ultraviolet light (UVL) to study and document patterned injuries on human skin has opened a new frontier for law enforcement. This article discusses the photographic techniques involved in reflective and fluorescent UVL. Documentation of skin wounds via still photography and dynamic video photographic techniques, which utilize various methods of UV illumination, are covered. Techniques important for courtroom presentation of evidence gathered from lacerations, contusions, abrasions, and bite marks are presented through case studies and controlled experiments. Such injuries are common sequelae in the crimes of child abuse, rape, and assault.

  11. Modulus design multiwavelength polarization microscope for transmission Mueller matrix imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jialing; He, Honghui; Chen, Zhenhua; Wang, Ye; Ma, Hui

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a polarization microscope based on a commercial transmission microscope. We replace the halogen light source by a collimated LED light source module of six different colors. We use achromatic polarized optical elements that can cover the six different wavelength ranges in the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state analyzer (PSA) modules. The dual-rotating wave plate method is used to measure the Mueller matrix of samples, which requires the simultaneous rotation of the two quarter-wave plates in both PSG and PSA at certain angular steps. A scientific CCD detector is used as the image receiving module. A LabView-based software is developed to control the rotation angels of the wave plates and the exposure time of the detector to allow the system to run fully automatically in preprogrammed schedules. Standard samples, such as air, polarizers, and quarter-wave plates, are used to calibrate the intrinsic Mueller matrix of optical components, such as the objectives, using the eigenvalue calibration method. Errors due to the images walk-off in the PSA are studied. Errors in the Mueller matrices are below 0.01 using air and polarizer as standard samples. Data analysis based on Mueller matrix transformation and Mueller matrix polarization decomposition is used to demonstrate the potential application of this microscope in pathological diagnosis. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  12. Digital all-sky polarization imaging of partly cloudy skies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pust, Nathan J; Shaw, Joseph A

    2008-12-01

    Clouds reduce the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) of skylight relative to that of a clear sky. Even thin subvisual clouds in the "twilight zone" between clouds and aerosols produce a drop in skylight DOLP long before clouds become visible in the sky. In contrast, the angle of polarization (AOP) of light scattered by a cloud in a partly cloudy sky remains the same as in the clear sky for most cases. In unique instances, though, select clouds display AOP signatures that are oriented 90 degrees from the clear-sky AOP. For these clouds, scattered light oriented parallel to the scattering plane dominates the perpendicularly polarized Rayleigh-scattered light between the instrument and the cloud. For liquid clouds, this effect may assist cloud particle size identification because it occurs only over a relatively limited range of particle radii that will scatter parallel polarized light. Images are shown from a digital all-sky-polarization imager to illustrate these effects. Images are also shown that provide validation of previously published theories for weak (approximately 2%) polarization parallel to the scattering plane for a 22 degrees halo.

  13. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H.; Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Su, Yan-Kuin; Wang, Kang L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL

  14. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shyh-Jer, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Su, Yan-Kuin, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, Kun-Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kang L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL.

  15. Optical Design of the far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Ryu

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the design specifications and the performance estimation of the FUVS (Far Ultraviolet Spectrograph proposed for the observations of aurora, day/night airglow and astronomical objects on small satelltes in the spectral range of . The design of FUVS is carried out with the full consideration of optical characteristics of the grating and the aspheric substrate. Two independent methods, ray-tracing and the wave front aberration theory, are employed to estimate the performance of the optical design and it is verified that both procedures yield the resolution of in the entire spectral range. MDF (Minimum Detectable Flux is also estimated using the known characteristics of the reflecting material and MCP, to study the feasibility of detection for faint emission lines from the hot interstellar plasmas. The results give that the observations from 1 day to 1 week, depending on the line intensity, can detect such faint emission lines from diffuse interstellar plasmas.

  16. Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging With Cascaded Dual-Polarity Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Guo, Yuexin; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2018-04-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound imaging using plane or diverging waves, instead of focused beams, has advanced greatly the development of novel ultrasound imaging methods for evaluating tissue functions beyond anatomical information. However, the sonographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ultrafast imaging remains limited due to the lack of transmission focusing, and thus insufficient acoustic energy delivery. We hereby propose a new ultrafast ultrasound imaging methodology with cascaded dual-polarity waves (CDWs), which consists of a pulse train with positive and negative polarities. A new coding scheme and a corresponding linear decoding process were thereby designed to obtain the recovered signals with increased amplitude, thus increasing the SNR without sacrificing the frame rate. The newly designed CDW ultrafast ultrasound imaging technique achieved higher quality B-mode images than coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC) and multiplane wave (MW) imaging in a calibration phantom, ex vivo pork belly, and in vivo human back muscle. CDW imaging shows a significant improvement in the SNR (10.71 dB versus CPWC and 7.62 dB versus MW), penetration depth (36.94% versus CPWC and 35.14% versus MW), and contrast ratio in deep regions (5.97 dB versus CPWC and 5.05 dB versus MW) without compromising other image quality metrics, such as spatial resolution and frame rate. The enhanced image qualities and ultrafast frame rates offered by CDW imaging beget great potential for various novel imaging applications.

  17. Potential of ultraviolet widefield imaging and multiphoton microscopy for analysis of dehydroergosterol in cellular membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Dehydroergosterol (DHE) is an intrinsically fluorescent sterol with absorption/emission in the ultraviolet (UV) region and biophysical properties similar to those of cholesterol. We compared the potential of UV-sensitive low-light-level wide-field (UV-WF) imaging with that of multiphoton (MP) exc...

  18. Polarization imaging enhancement for target vision through haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-Ying; Zhang, San-Xi; Li, Jie; LI, Bin; Tang, Zi-li; Liu, Biao; Jia, Wen-Wu

    2016-10-01

    Haze, fog, and smoke are turbid medium in the atmosphere which usually degrade viewing condition of outdoor scenes. The resulted images lose contrast and color fidelity with serious degradation. Due to loss of large detailed information of measured scene, it will usually lead to invalid detection and measurement. The suspended particles in the atmosphere and the scene being measured give rise to polarization changes by their reflection. In the process of reflection, absorption and scattering, the object itself can be determined by its own polarization characteristics. Based on this point, we proposed an approach for target vision through haze. This approach is based on the polarization differences between the scene being measured and the scattering background to move the haze effects. It can realize a great visibility enhancement and enable the scene rendering even if imaged under restricted viewing conditions with low polarization. In this work, the detailed theoretical operation principle is presented. A validating imaging system is established and the corresponding experiment is carried out. We present the experimental results of haze-free image of scene with recovered high contrast. This method also can be used to effectively enhance the imaging performance of any other optical system.

  19. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging of Electron Heated Targets in Petawatt Laser Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; Key, M.; Akli, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Chen, C.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R.; King, J.; Link, A.; Offermann, D.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Patel, P.; Stephens, R.; VanWoerkom, L.; Zhang, B.; Beg, F.

    2007-01-01

    The study of the transport of electrons, and the flow of energy into a solid target or dense plasma, is instrumental in the development of fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. An extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging diagnostic at 256 eV and 68 eV provides information about heating and energy deposition within petawatt laser-irradiated targets. XUV images of several irradiated solid targets are presented

  20. ULTRAVIOLET AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET EMISSIONS AT THE FLARE FOOTPOINTS OBSERVED BY ATMOSPHERE IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Liu Wenjuan [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Sturrock, Zoe [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A solar flare is composed of impulsive energy release events by magnetic reconnection, which forms and heats flare loops. Recent studies have revealed a two-phase evolution pattern of UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops: a rapid pulse lasting for a few seconds to a few minutes, followed by a gradual decay on timescales of a few tens of minutes. Multiple band EUV observations by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly further reveal very similar signatures. These two phases represent different but related signatures of an impulsive energy release in the corona. The rapid pulse is an immediate response of the lower atmosphere to an intense thermal conduction flux resulting from the sudden heating of the corona to high temperatures (we rule out energetic particles due to a lack of significant hard X-ray emission). The gradual phase is associated with the cooling of hot plasma that has been evaporated into the corona. The observed footpoint emission is again powered by thermal conduction (and enthalpy), but now during a period when approximate steady-state conditions are established in the loop. UV and EUV light curves of individual pixels may therefore be separated into contributions from two distinct physical mechanisms to shed light on the nature of energy transport in a flare. We demonstrate this technique using coordinated, spatially resolved observations of UV and EUV emissions from the footpoints of a C3.2 thermal flare.

  1. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

    1993-05-18

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 [mu]m, and preferably less than 100 [mu]m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 [mu]m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm [times] 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  2. Vacuum ultraviolet images of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.M.; Cornett, R.H.; Hill, R.S.; ST Systems Corp., Lanham, MD)

    1987-01-01

    Linearized, absolutely calibrated VUV images of the LMC with a resolution of about 50 arcsec are presented. The images were made by a sounding rocket payload in two bandpasses with effective wavelengths for hot stars near 1500 A and 1930 A. The flux in each bandpass is measured for the associations in the list of Lucke and Hodge (1970). The results are discussed and their relationship to the overall characteristics of star formation in the LMC are discussed. A simple model for propagating star formation in the LMC is presented whose results closely resemble the distribution of associations revealed by the VUV images. 63 references

  3. Performance characteristics of proximity focused ultraviolet image converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. T.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Bendix type BX 8025-4522 proximity focused image tubes for UV to visible light conversion are presented. Quantum efficiency, resolution, background, geometric distortion, and environmental test results are discussed. The converters use magnesium fluoride input windows with Cs-Te photocathodes and P-11 phosphors on fiber optic output windows.

  4. SOLARNET & LAIME: Imaging & Spectroscopy in the Far Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Koutchmy, Serge

    SOLARNET is a medium size high resolution solar physics mission proposed to CNES and ESA for a new start in 2007 and a possible launch in 2012 (CNES) or later (ESA Cosmic Vision framework: 2015-2016). Partnerships with India and China are under discussion, and several European contributions are considered. At the center of the SOLARNET mission is a 3-telescope interferometer of 1 meter baseline capable to provide 40 times the best ever spatial resolution achieved in Space with previous, current or even planned solar missions: 20 mas - 20 km on the Sun in the FUV. The interferometer is associated to an on-axis Subtractive Double Monochromator coupled to an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer capable of high spectral (0.01 nm) and high temporal resolutions (50 ms) on a field of view of 40 arcsec and covering the FUV and UV spectral domains (from 117.5 to 400 nm). This will allow to access process scales of magnetic reconnection, dissipation, emerging flux and much more, from the chromosphere to the low corona with emphasis on the transition zone where the magnetic confinement is expected to be maximum. A whole new chapter of the physics of solar magnetic field structuring, evolution and mapping from the photosphere to the high atmosphere will be opened. The interferometer is completed by instruments providing larger field of view and higher temperature (EUV-XUV coronal imaging & spectroscopy) to define the context and extension of the solar phenomena. The 3-telescope interferometer design results of an extensive laboratory demonstration program of interferometric imaging of extended objects. We will review the scientific program of SOLARNET, describe the interferometer concept and design, present the results of the breadboard and give a short overview of the mission aspects. In a different category, LAIME, the Lyman Alpha Imaging-Monitor Experiment, is a remarkably simple (no mechanisms) and compact full Sun imager to be flown with TESIS on the CORONAS

  5. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols, Clouds, and Surface Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    values found in this region only during episodes of intense wildfire smoke. Detailed analysis of the aerosols in this smoke plume and their effect...Continuous outdoor operation of an all-sky polarization imager,” Proc. SPIE 7672 (Polarization: Measurement, Analysis , and Remote Sensing IX), 76720A-1-7, 7...Pust, “ Lunar corona in ice wave cloud,” 10th International Meeting on Light and Color in Nature, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, 16-20 June 2010. 2

  6. Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10 6 frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs

  7. Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M. [Applied Physics, Caltech, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10{sup 6} frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs.

  8. Application of blue-green and ultraviolet micro-LEDs to biological imaging and detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H; Zhang, J; Nurmikko, A V; Davitt, K M; Song, Y-K

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews authors' laboratory's work on the development of nitride-based blue-green and ultraviolet microscale LED devices with particular classes of imaging and spectroscopic applications in cellular level biology. Starting from neuroscience, we illustrate the utility of blue-green micro-LEDs for voltage-sensitive dye imaging of individual neural cells, as well as their ultraviolet counterparts for photostimulation of neurons. Arrays of micro-LEDs are also shown to be useful in projecting spatiotemporal patterns of photoexcitation to study the visual system development in living animals. As another illustration of the utility of the emerging nitride microdevice technology, we demonstrate the application of UV micro-LED arrays in bio-sensing technology as the core of a real-time fluorescence spectroscopy biowarning system. (invited paper)

  9. Advances in polarization sensitive multiphoton nano-bio-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zyss J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this talk, we shall shortly review four main directions of ongoing research in our laboratories, directed at the conception and demonstration of a variety of innovative configurations in nanoscale multiphoton imaging. A common feature to all of these directions appears to be the central role played by the involvement of polarization features, both in- and outgoing, moreover so in view of the tensorial aspects inherent to nonlinear schemes such second-harmonic generation, electro-optic modulation or two-photon fluorescence which will ne emphasized. These advances relate to the new domain of nonlinear ellipsometry in multiphoton imaging [1], of high relevance to fundamental aspects of nanophotonics and nanomaterial engineering as well as towards basic life science issues. The four domains to be shortly reported are: a polarization resolved second-harmonic generation in semiconductor QD’s with record small sizes in the 10-12 nm range [2] b original use of two-photon confocal polarization resolved microscopy in DNA stained by two photon fluorescent dyes in different LC phases arrangements so as to characterize these as well as ascertain the respective DNA-dye orientation (intercalant or groves [3] c elaboration and demonstration of an electrooptic confocal microscope in a highly sensitive interferometric and homodyne detection configuration allowing to map weak electric potentials such as in artificial functionalized membranes, the dynamical investigation of firing and propagation aspects of action potentials in neurones being currently the next step [4] d original plasmon based enhanced nanoscale confocal imaging involving a dual detection scheme (fluorescence imaging and ATR plasmon coupling in reflection whereby adequate preparation and switching of the incoming polarization state between radial, linear and azimuthal configurations, entail different images and plasmon enhancement levels [5].

  10. Polarization Imaging Apparatus for Cell and Tissue Imaging and Diagnostics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to capitalize on our Phase I success in a novel visible-near infrared Stokes polarization imaging technology based on high performance fast...

  11. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR

  12. On the possibility of auroral remote sensing with the Viking ultraviolet imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.P.; McEwen, D.J.; Murphree, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the value of ultraviolet auroral images for remote sensing of electron precipitation. The authors compared auroral images, obtained by both cameras of the Viking Ultraviolet Imager during April and early May 1986, with simultaneous measurements of electron precipitation from the DMSP F7 and HiLat satellites at low altitudes above the auroral zone. The electron data were averaged over the image pixels and were used to normalize the imager signals to unit electron energy flux. The resulting quantity, here termed the effective sensitivity, showed large scatter about the mean values for both cameras that tended to mask any energy dependence except a decrease at electron energies above 6 keV. The mean effective sensitivities were 11.3 ± 1.1 digitization numbers (DN)/(erg cm -2 s -1 ) for the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) camera and 15.9 ± 2.5 DN/(erg cm -2 s -1 ) for the 1304 camera. The signal ratio in simultaneous images from both cameras was insensitive to electron energy in the two cases examined, consistent with the weak energy dependences of the effective sensitivities. Unusually high LBH camera effective sensitivities of 45-60 DN/(erg cm -2 s -1 ) were obtained during several orbits on May 2 and 3. They conclude that images from either Viking camera may be used to infer the instantaneous distribution of electron energy deposition, with roughly 50% accuracy

  13. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue, E-mail: shenyue@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouy@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The humidity dramatically affects the contrast of scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) imaging on mica surface. • This influence roots in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the humidity change. • A strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM is proposed. - Abstract: Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  14. Optical image encryption method based on incoherent imaging and polarized light encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Xiong, D.; Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.

    2018-05-01

    We propose an incoherent encoding system for image encryption based on a polarized encoding method combined with an incoherent imaging. Incoherent imaging is the core component of this proposal, in which the incoherent point-spread function (PSF) of the imaging system serves as the main key to encode the input intensity distribution thanks to a convolution operation. An array of retarders and polarizers is placed on the input plane of the imaging structure to encrypt the polarized state of light based on Mueller polarization calculus. The proposal makes full use of randomness of polarization parameters and incoherent PSF so that a multidimensional key space is generated to deal with illegal attacks. Mueller polarization calculus and incoherent illumination of imaging structure ensure that only intensity information is manipulated. Another key advantage is that complicated processing and recording related to a complex-valued signal are avoided. The encoded information is just an intensity distribution, which is advantageous for data storage and transition because information expansion accompanying conventional encryption methods is also avoided. The decryption procedure can be performed digitally or using optoelectronic devices. Numerical simulation tests demonstrate the validity of the proposed scheme.

  15. Random laser illumination: an ideal source for biomedical polarization imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Mariana T.; Lotay, Amrit S.; Kenny, Fiona M.; Girkin, John M.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging applications increasingly require light sources with high spectral density (power over spectral bandwidth. This has led in many cases to the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers and superluminescent diodes. Although lasers and superluminescent diodes appear to be ideal light sources due to their narrow bandwidth and power, however, in the case of full-field imaging, their spatial coherence leads to coherent artefacts, such as speckle, that corrupt the image. LEDs, in contrast, have lower spatial coherence and thus seem the natural choice, but they have low spectral density. Random Lasers are an unconventional type of laser that can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence with high spectral density. These characteristics makes them potential sources for biological imaging applications where specific absorption and reflection are the characteristics required for state of the art imaging. In this work, a Random Laser (RL) is used to demonstrate speckle-free full-field imaging for polarization-dependent imaging in an epi-illumination configuration. We compare LED and RL illumination analysing the resulting images demonstrating that the RL illumination produces an imaging system with higher performance (image quality and spectral density) than that provided by LEDs.

  16. Imaging, object detection, and change detection with a polarized multistatic GPR array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W.

    2015-07-21

    A polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection factoring in the orientation of an object relative to the orientation of transceivers. The polarized detection system may operate on one of several modes of operation based on whether the imaging, object detection, or change detection is performed separately for each transceiver orientation. In combined change mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines changes across polarizations. In combined object mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging and object detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines objects across polarizations and performs change detection on the result. In combined image mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines images across polarizations and performs object detection followed by change detection on the result.

  17. Ion pair formation in the vacuum ultraviolet region of NO studied by negative ion imaging spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikosaka, Y.; Kaneyasu, T.; Shigemasa, E.

    2007-01-01

    The pair formation of positive and negative fragment ions has been studied in the vacuum ultraviolet region of NO, with negative ion imaging spectroscopy. The negative ion yield curve obtained in the photon energy region of 19-25 eV exhibits many structures which are absent from the photoabsorption spectrum in the same region. The partial yields and asymmetry parameters associated with the dissociations into individual ion pair limits have been extracted from the negative ion images observed. On the basis of these quantities, the assignments for the structures exhibited on the negative ion yield curve are given and the dynamical properties on the ion pair dissociation are discussed

  18. Simultaneous observation of auroral substorm onset in Polar satellite global images and ground-based all-sky images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Akimasa; Kauristie, Kirsti; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Miyashita, Yukinaga; Frey, Harald U.; Juusola, Liisa; Whiter, Daniel; Nosé, Masahito; Fillingim, Matthew O.; Honary, Farideh; Rogers, Neil C.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Miura, Tsubasa; Kawashima, Takahiro; Machida, Shinobu

    2018-05-01

    Substorm onset has originally been defined as a longitudinally extended sudden auroral brightening (Akasofu initial brightening: AIB) followed a few minutes later by an auroral poleward expansion in ground-based all-sky images (ASIs). In contrast, such clearly marked two-stage development has not been evident in satellite-based global images (GIs). Instead, substorm onsets have been identified as localized sudden brightenings that expand immediately poleward. To resolve these differences, optical substorm onset signatures in GIs and ASIs are compared in this study for a substorm that occurred on December 7, 1999. For this substorm, the Polar satellite ultraviolet global imager was operated with a fixed-filter (170 nm) mode, enabling a higher time resolution (37 s) than usual to resolve the possible two-stage development. These data were compared with 20-s resolution green-line (557.7 nm) ASIs at Muonio in Finland. The ASIs revealed the AIB at 2124:50 UT and the subsequent poleward expansion at 2127:50 UT, whereas the GIs revealed only an onset brightening that started at 2127:49 UT. Thus, the onset in the GIs was delayed relative to the AIB and in fact agreed with the poleward expansion in the ASIs. The fact that the AIB was not evident in the GIs may be attributed to the limited spatial resolution of GIs for thin auroral arc brightenings. The implications of these results for the definition of substorm onset are discussed herein.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. EIT: Solar corona synoptic observations from SOHO with an Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaboudiniere, J. P.; Gabriel, A. H.; Artzner, G. E.; Michels, D. J.; Dere, K. P.; Howard, R. A.; Catura, R.; Stern, R.; Lemen, J.; Neupert, W.

    1988-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) of SOHO (solar and heliospheric observatory) will provide full disk images in emission lines formed at temperatures that map solar structures ranging from the chromospheric network to the hot magnetically confined plasma in the corona. Images in four narrow bandpasses will be obtained using normal incidence multilayered optics deposited on quadrants of a Ritchey-Chretien telescope. The EIT is capable of providing a uniform one arc second resolution over its entire 50 by 50 arc min field of view. Data from the EIT will be extremely valuable for identifying and interpreting the spatial and temperature fine structures of the solar atmosphere. Temporal analysis will provide information on the stability of these structures and identify dynamical processes. EIT images, issued daily, will provide the global corona context for aid in unifying the investigations and in forming the observing plans for SOHO coronal instruments.

  20. Imaging of Polarization-dependent Photocurrent in Graphene Photodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjung; Yoon, Duhee; Ang Yoon, Ho; Lee, Sang Wook; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2012-02-01

    Recently, a metal-graphene-metal photodetector for high-speed optical communications was reported. In addition, a graphene-based photodetector was reported to be able to absorb broadband light owing to the unique band structure of graphene [Mueller et al., Nature Photonics 4, 297 (2010)]. We investigated the polarization dependence of the photocurrent generated in metal-graphene-metal junctions. The graphene photodevice was fabricated by depositing Pd/Au and Ti/Au electrodes on single-layer graphene samples. When the polarization of incident laser beam is rotated with respect to the metal-graphene-metal junction, the photocurrent is significantly modulated. In addition, we measured the exact positions where the photocurrent is generated by measuring the photocurrent and Raman images of the graphene photodevices simultaneously.

  1. Static dual-channel polarization imaging spectrometer for simultaneous acquisition of inphase and antiphase interference images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Tingkui; Zhang, Chunmin; Ren, Wenyi; Jian, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    The raw data acquired by Fourier-transform imaging spectrometers are the physical superposition of an interferogram and image. To reconstruct an accurate spectrum from a pure interferogram via Fourier transformation and get a pure image that is undisturbed by fringes, the interferogram and the image need to be separated. Although it can be achieved by digital image processing, heavy computations with approximation would be introduced. To overcome these drawbacks and in the meantime avoid the influence of the rapid changes of the observed scene and the perturbations of the rotating elements, a static dual-channel polarization imaging spectrometer that can simultaneously acquire inphase and antiphase interference images is presented. The extraction of a pure image and pure fringe can be simply achieved from the difference and the summation of the two interference images, respectively. The feasibility of the spectrometer and its features are described, and the influence of the polarization direction of the polarizers on the background image and fringe is discussed

  2. NON-RACEMIC AMINO ACID PRODUCTION BY ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION OF ACHIRAL INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS WITH CIRCULARLY POLARIZED LIGHT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marcellus, Pierre; Nuevo, Michel; Danger, Gregoire; Deboffle, Dominique; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis; Meinert, Cornelia; Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Nahon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The delivery of organic matter to the primitive Earth via comets and meteorites has long been hypothesized to be an important source for prebiotic compounds such as amino acids or their chemical precursors that contributed to the development of prebiotic chemistry leading, on Earth, to the emergence of life. Photochemistry of inter/circumstellar ices around protostellar objects is a potential process leading to complex organic species, although difficult to establish from limited infrared observations only. Here we report the first abiotic cosmic ice simulation experiments that produce species with enantiomeric excesses (e.e.'s). Circularly polarized ultraviolet light (UV-CPL) from a synchrotron source induces asymmetric photochemistry on initially achiral inter/circumstellar ice analogs. Enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography measurements show significant e.e.'s of up to 1.34% for ( 13 C)-alanine, for which the signs and absolute values are related to the helicity and number of CPL photons per deposited molecule. This result, directly comparable with some L excesses measured in meteorites, supports a scenario in which exogenous delivery of organics displaying a slight L excess, produced in an extraterrestrial environment by an asymmetric astrophysical process, is at the origin of biomolecular asymmetry on Earth. As a consequence, a fraction of the meteoritic organic material consisting of non-racemic compounds may well have been formed outside the solar system. Finally, following this hypothesis, we support the idea that the protosolar nebula has indeed been formed in a region of massive star formation, regions where UV-CPL of the same helicity is actually observed over large spatial areas.

  3. Ultraviolet Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Side-by-Side Comparison Click on image for larger view This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, also know as Messier 83 or M83. It is located 15 million light-years away in the southern constellation Hydra. Ultraviolet light traces young populations of stars; in this image, young stars can be seen way beyond the main spiral disk of M83 up to 140,000 light-years from its center. Could life exist around one of these far-flung stars? Scientists say it's unlikely because the outlying regions of a galaxy are lacking in the metals required for planets to form. The image was taken at scheduled intervals between March 15 and May 20, 2007. It is one of the longest-exposure, or deepest, images ever taken of a nearby galaxy in ultraviolet light. Near-ultraviolet light (or longer-wavelength ultraviolet light) is colored yellow, and far-ultraviolet light is blue. What Lies Beyond the Edge of a Galaxy The side-by-side comparison shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, or M83, as seen in ultraviolet light (right) and at both ultraviolet and radio wavelengths (left). While the radio data highlight the galaxy's long, octopus-like arms stretching far beyond its main spiral disk (red), the ultraviolet data reveal clusters of baby stars (blue) within the extended arms. The ultraviolet image was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer between March 15 and May 20, 2007, at scheduled intervals. Back in 2005, the telescope first photographed M83 over a shorter period of time. That picture was the first to reveal far-flung baby stars forming up to 63,000 light-years from the edge of the main spiral disk. This came as a surprise to astronomers because a galaxy's outer territory typically lacks high densities of star-forming materials. The newest picture of M83 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer is shown at the right, and was taken over a longer period of time. In fact, it is one of the

  4. Astronomical Polarimetry with the RIT Polarization Imaging Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry V.; Ninkov, Zoran; Brock, Neal

    2018-06-01

    In the last decade, imaging polarimeters based on micropolarizer arrays have been developed for use in terrestrial remote sensing and metrology applications. Micropolarizer-based sensors are dramatically smaller and more mechanically robust than other polarimeters with similar spectral response and snapshot capability. To determine the suitability of these new polarimeters for astronomical applications, we developed the RIT Polarization Imaging Camera to investigate the performance of these devices, with a special attention to the low signal-to-noise regime. We characterized the device performance in the lab, by determining the relative throughput, efficiency, and orientation of every pixel, as a function of wavelength. Using the resulting pixel response model, we developed demodulation procedures for aperture photometry and imaging polarimetry observing modes. We found that, using the current calibration, RITPIC is capable of detecting polarization signals as small as ∼0.3%. The relative ease of data collection, calibration, and analysis provided by these sensors suggest than they may become an important tool for a number of astronomical targets.

  5. Polarization information processing and software system design for simultaneously imaging polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yahui; Liu, Jing; Jin, Weiqi; Wen, Renjie

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous imaging polarimetry can realize real-time polarization imaging of the dynamic scene, which has wide application prospect. This paper first briefly illustrates the design of the double separate Wollaston Prism simultaneous imaging polarimetry, and then emphases are put on the polarization information processing methods and software system design for the designed polarimetry. Polarization information processing methods consist of adaptive image segmentation, high-accuracy image registration, instrument matrix calibration. Morphological image processing was used for image segmentation by taking dilation of an image; The accuracy of image registration can reach 0.1 pixel based on the spatial and frequency domain cross-correlation; Instrument matrix calibration adopted four-point calibration method. The software system was implemented under Windows environment based on C++ programming language, which realized synchronous polarization images acquisition and preservation, image processing and polarization information extraction and display. Polarization data obtained with the designed polarimetry shows that: the polarization information processing methods and its software system effectively performs live realize polarization measurement of the four Stokes parameters of a scene. The polarization information processing methods effectively improved the polarization detection accuracy.

  6. Extreme Ultraviolet Solar Images Televised In-Flight with a Rocket-Borne SEC Vidicon System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousey, R; Limansky, I

    1972-05-01

    A TV image of the entire sun while an importance 2N solar flare was in progress was recorded in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation band 171-630 A and transmitted to ground from an Aerobee-150 rocket on 4 November 1969 using S-band telemetry. The camera tube was a Westinghouse Electric Corporation SEC vidicon, with its fiber optic faceplate coated with an XUV to visible conversion layer of p-quaterphenyl. The XUV passband was produced by three 1000-A thick aluminum filters in series together with the platinized reflecting surface of the off-axis paraboloid that imaged the sun. A number of images were recorded with integration times between 1/30 see and 2 sec. Reconstruction of pictures was enhanced by combining several to reduce the noise.

  7. Theory and analysis of a large field polarization imaging system with obliquely incident light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaotian; Jin, Weiqi; Li, Li; Wang, Xia; Qiu, Su; Liu, Jing

    2018-02-05

    Polarization imaging technology provides information about not only the irradiance of a target but also the polarization degree and angle of polarization, which indicates extensive application potential. However, polarization imaging theory is based on paraxial optics. When a beam of obliquely incident light passes an analyser, the direction of light propagation is not perpendicular to the surface of the analyser and the applicability of the traditional paraxial optical polarization imaging theory is challenged. This paper investigates a theoretical model of a polarization imaging system with obliquely incident light and establishes a polarization imaging transmission model with a large field of obliquely incident light. In an imaging experiment with an integrating sphere light source and rotatable polarizer, the polarization imaging transmission model is verified and analysed for two cases of natural light and linearly polarized light incidence. Although the results indicate that the theoretical model is consistent with the experimental results, the theoretical model distinctly differs from the traditional paraxial approximation model. The results prove the accuracy and necessity of the theoretical model and the theoretical guiding significance for theoretical and systematic research of large field polarization imaging.

  8. Polarization-dependent imaging contrast in abalone shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Rebecca A.; Zhou, Dong; Abrecht, Mike; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Guo, Jinghua; Ariosa, Daniel; Coppersmith, Susan N.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2008-02-01

    Many biominerals contain micro- or nanocrystalline mineral components, organized accurately into architectures that confer the material with improved mechanical performance at the macroscopic scale. We present here an effect which enables us to observe the relative orientation of individual crystals at the submicron scale. We call it polarization-dependent imaging contrast (PIC), as it is an imaging development of the well-known x-ray linear dichroism. Most importantly, PIC is obtained in situ, in biominerals. We present here PIC in the prismatic and nacreous layers of Haliotis rufescens (red abalone), confirm it in geologic calcite and aragonite, and corroborate the experimental data with theoretical simulated spectra. PIC reveals different and unexpected aspects of nacre architecture that have inspired theoretical models for nacre formation.

  9. Bench-top endomicroscope for visualization and imaging of nuclei using ultraviolet autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bevin

    The long range goal of this research was to develop autofluorescence technology and instrumentation for transition towards an in vivo endomicroscopy imaging system. This approach would provide resolution sufficient to image nuclei for real-time categorization of normal and abnormal tissue implicative of disease progression. Esophageal adenocarcinoma was the chosen model to develop this diagnostic imaging system because the heterogeneous and multifocal nature of this disease makes early diagnosis extremely challenging during the window of time when the prognosis for survival is high. The asymptomatic character of this disease generally presents at a malignant stage when removal of the esophagus has become the standard treatment. The traditional gold standard of histologic diagnosis suffers from a slow turn-around-time from tissue removal to microscopic observation, compounded by error in random biopsy sampling and tissue-processing artifacts, in addition to significant variation in pathologist diagnosis. Optical biopsy has thus been developed to alleviate the problems associated with current standard video endoscopy and histopathology. Following tremendous research in the realm of optical biopsy, some traction has been gained using confocal endomicroscopy. However, current confocal methods require contrast agents and optical sectioning in order to provide images at a cellular level. We have developed a minimally invasive imaging system using autofluorescence that highlights the short photon penetration depth of ultraviolet excitation. This approach provides cellular level resolution with a clinically relevant field of view without requiring contrast agents or optical sectioning. Optical histopathology has been demonstrated using unprocessed ex vivo human gastrointestinal tissues providing diagnostic assessment in real-time, a function imperative for improved patient care and quality of life. This robust bench-top prototype endomicroscopy system is capable of rapid

  10. Comparative evaluation of an ultraviolet and an orthochromatic rare-earth imaging system for veterinary radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.R.; Wortman, J.A.; Lloyd, J.K.F.; Saunders, H.M.; Biery, D.N.; Rhodes, W.H.; Evans, S.M.; Walker, L.M.; Green, P.; Mendez-Aguillar, R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative quality and speed of a new ultraviolet-emitting screen, ultraviolet-sensitive film rare-earth system (DuPont Ultra-Vision) was compared to an orthochromatic rare-earth system (Kodak Lanex) in a clinical trial. Seven different sets of radiographs of a human foot phantom, or actual canine anatomical structures (tarsus, pelvis, skull, chest, abdomen) were evaluated independently by radiologists, radiology residents and technicians who were unaware of the screen/film combinations used. The 400-speed, Ultra-Vision Rapid/UVG screen/film combination produced superior image detail compared to blue/green emitting 400 and 200-speed screen/film combinations. The image detail of the Ultra-Vision Rapid/UVG system was nearly equivalent to that produced using a 100-speed, fine-detail blue/green emitting screen/film combination. A 200-speed Ultra-Vision system was also tested and produced thoracic and abdominal radiographs of equivalent to slightly superior quality than those produced using blue/green emitting system

  11. A portable microscopy system for fluorescence, polarized, and brightfield imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Paul; Wattinger, Rolla; Lewis, Cody; Venancio, Vinicius Paula; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U.; Coté, Gerard

    2018-02-01

    The use of mobile phones to conduct diagnostic microscopy at the point-of-care presents intriguing possibilities for the advancement of high-quality medical care in remote settings. However, it is challenging to create a single device that can adapt to the ever-varying camera technologies in phones or that can image with the customization that multiple modalities require for applications such as malaria diagnosis. A portable multi-modal microscope system is presented that utilizes a Raspberry Pi to collect and transmit data wirelessly to a myriad of electronic devices for image analysis. The microscopy system is capable of providing to the user correlated brightfield, polarized, and fluorescent images of samples fixed on traditional microscopy slides. The multimodal diagnostic capabilities of the microscope were assessed by measuring parasitemia of Plasmodium falciparum-infected thin blood smears. The device is capable of detecting fluorescently-labeled DNA using FITC excitation (490 nm) and emission (525 nm), the birefringent P. falciparum byproduct hemozoin, and detecting brightfield absorption with a resolution of 0.78 micrometers (element 9-3 of a 1951 Air Force Target). This microscopy system is a novel portable imaging tool that may be a viable candidate for field implementation if challenges of system durability, cost considerations, and full automation can be overcome.

  12. Stokes image reconstruction for two-color microgrid polarization imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, Daniel A

    2011-07-18

    The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed a new microgrid polarization imaging system capable of simultaneously reconstructing linear Stokes parameter images in two colors on a single focal plane array. In this paper, an effective method for extracting Stokes images is presented for this type of camera system. It is also shown that correlations between the color bands can be exploited to significantly increase overall spatial resolution. Test data is used to show the advantages of this approach over bilinear interpolation. The bounds (in terms of available reconstruction bandwidth) on image resolution are also provided.

  13. Adaptive polarization image fusion based on regional energy dynamic weighted average

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong-qiang; PAN Quan; ZHANG Hong-cai

    2005-01-01

    According to the principle of polarization imaging and the relation between Stokes parameters and the degree of linear polarization, there are much redundant and complementary information in polarized images. Since man-made objects and natural objects can be easily distinguished in images of degree of linear polarization and images of Stokes parameters contain rich detailed information of the scene, the clutters in the images can be removed efficiently while the detailed information can be maintained by combining these images. An algorithm of adaptive polarization image fusion based on regional energy dynamic weighted average is proposed in this paper to combine these images. Through an experiment and simulations,most clutters are removed by this algorithm. The fusion method is used for different light conditions in simulation, and the influence of lighting conditions on the fusion results is analyzed.

  14. Computational On-Chip Imaging of Nanoparticles and Biomolecules using Ultraviolet Light

    KAUST Repository

    Daloglu, Mustafa Ugur

    2017-03-09

    Significant progress in characterization of nanoparticles and biomolecules was enabled by the development of advanced imaging equipment with extreme spatial-resolution and sensitivity. To perform some of these analyses outside of well-resourced laboratories, it is necessary to create robust and cost-effective alternatives to existing high-end laboratory-bound imaging and sensing equipment. Towards this aim, we have designed a holographic on-chip microscope operating at an ultraviolet illumination wavelength (UV) of 266 nm. The increased forward scattering from nanoscale objects at this short wavelength has enabled us to detect individual sub-30 nm nanoparticles over a large field-of-view of >16 mm2 using an on-chip imaging platform, where the sample is placed at ≤0.5 mm away from the active area of an opto-electronic sensor-array, without any lenses in between. The strong absorption of this UV wavelength by biomolecules including nucleic acids and proteins has further enabled high-contrast imaging of nanoscopic aggregates of biomolecules, e.g., of enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, abnormal aggregation of which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - a fatal neurodegenerative disease. This UV-based wide-field computational imaging platform could be valuable for numerous applications in biomedical sciences and environmental monitoring, including disease diagnostics, viral load measurements as well as air- and water-quality assessment.

  15. Computational On-Chip Imaging of Nanoparticles and Biomolecules using Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloglu, Mustafa Ugur; Ray, Aniruddha; Gorocs, Zoltan; Xiong, Matthew; Malik, Ravinder; Bitan, Gal; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-09

    Significant progress in characterization of nanoparticles and biomolecules was enabled by the development of advanced imaging equipment with extreme spatial-resolution and sensitivity. To perform some of these analyses outside of well-resourced laboratories, it is necessary to create robust and cost-effective alternatives to existing high-end laboratory-bound imaging and sensing equipment. Towards this aim, we have designed a holographic on-chip microscope operating at an ultraviolet illumination wavelength (UV) of 266 nm. The increased forward scattering from nanoscale objects at this short wavelength has enabled us to detect individual sub-30 nm nanoparticles over a large field-of-view of >16 mm 2 using an on-chip imaging platform, where the sample is placed at ≤0.5 mm away from the active area of an opto-electronic sensor-array, without any lenses in between. The strong absorption of this UV wavelength by biomolecules including nucleic acids and proteins has further enabled high-contrast imaging of nanoscopic aggregates of biomolecules, e.g., of enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, abnormal aggregation of which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - a fatal neurodegenerative disease. This UV-based wide-field computational imaging platform could be valuable for numerous applications in biomedical sciences and environmental monitoring, including disease diagnostics, viral load measurements as well as air- and water-quality assessment.

  16. Early diagnosis of teeth erosion using polarized laser speckle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Christelle Abou; Pellen, Fabrice; Loutfi, Hadi; Mansour, Rassoul; Jeune, Bernard Le; Brun, Guy Le; Abboud, Marie

    2016-07-01

    Dental erosion starts with a chemical attack on dental tissue causing tooth demineralization, altering the tooth structure and making it more sensitive to mechanical erosion. Medical diagnosis of dental erosion is commonly achieved through a visual inspection by the dentist during dental checkups and is therefore highly dependent on the operator's experience. The detection of this disease at preliminary stages is important since, once the damage is done, cares become more complicated. We investigate the difference in light-scattering properties between healthy and eroded teeth. A change in light-scattering properties is observed and a transition from volume to surface backscattering is detected by means of polarized laser speckle imaging as teeth undergo acid etching, suggesting an increase in enamel surface roughness.

  17. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziani, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France); Delmotte, F., E-mail: Franck.Delmotte@InstitutOptique.fr [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Le Paven-Thivet, C. [Institut d' Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes (IETR) UMR-CNRS 6164, Université de Rennes 1, UEB, IUT Saint Brieuc, 18 rue Henri Wallon, 22004 Saint Brieuc cedex France (France); Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Roulliay, M. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay UMR 8214, Univ Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay France (France); Bridou, F. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Gasc, K. [Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France)

    2014-02-03

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B{sub 4}C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source.

  18. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziani, A.; Delmotte, F.; Le Paven-Thivet, C.; Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A.; Roulliay, M.; Bridou, F.; Gasc, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B 4 C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source

  19. Orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) imaging and topographical characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Mathura, Keshen R.; Ince, Can

    2006-01-01

    Tumor microcirculatory characteristics until now have only been assessed by histological examination of biopsies or invasive imaging technique. The recent introduction of orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) imaging as a new tool for in vivo visualization of human microcirculation makes it

  20. Orthogonal polarization spectral imaging of the microcirculation during acute hypervolemic hemodilution and epidural lidocaine injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, Huub L. A.; Dzoljic, Misa; Ince, Can; Hollmann, Markus W.; Mokken, Fleur C.

    2006-01-01

    We used Orthogonal Polarization Spectral Imaging to examine the microcirculation of the vaginal mucosa in nine anesthetized patients during two consecutive anesthetic interventions: hypervolemic hemodilution using hydroxyethyl starch followed by thoracic epidural lidocaine. Images taken before and

  1. Investigation of the noise effect on tomographic reconstructions for a tangentially viewing vacuum ultraviolet imaging diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Tingfeng; Ohdachi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction for a tangentially viewing two-dimensional (2D) imaging system is studied. A method to calculate the geometry matrix in 2D tomography is introduced. An algorithm based on a Phillips-Tikhonov (P-T) type regularization method is investigated, and numerical tests using the P-T method are conducted with both tokamak and Heliotron configurations. The numerical tests show that the P-T method is not sensitive to the added noise levels and the emission profiles with higher mode numbers can be reconstructed with adequate resolution. The results indicate that this method is suitable for 2D tomographic reconstruction for a tangentially viewing vacuum ultraviolet telescope system. (author)

  2. The Preflight Photometric Calibration of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope EIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, K. P.; Moses, J. D.; Delaboudiniere, J. -P.; Brunaud, J.; Carabetian, C.; Hochedez, J. -F.; Song, X. Y.; Catura, R. C.; Clette, F.; Defise, J. -M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the preflight photometric calibration of the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The EIT consists of a Ritchey-Chretien telescope with multilayer coatings applied to four quadrants of the primary and secondary mirrors, several filters and a backside-thinned CCD detector. The quadrants of the EIT optics were used to observe the Sun in 4 wavelength bands that peak near 171, 195, 284, and 304 . Before the launch of SOHO, the EIT mirror reflectivities, the filter transmissivities and the CCD quantum efficiency were measured and these values are described here. The instrumental throughput in terms of an effective area is presented for each of the various mirror quadrant and filter wheel combinations. The response to a coronal plasma as a function of temperature is also determined and the expected count rates are compared to the count rates observed in a coronal hole, the quiet Sun and an active region.

  3. Atomic force imaging microscopy investigation of the interaction of ultraviolet radiation with collagen thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, A.; Yova, D.; Alexandratou, E.; Petri, A.

    2013-02-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous protein in the extracellular matrix and consists a significant component of skin, bone, cartilage and tendon. Due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as scaffold or culture substrate for tissue regeneration or/and cell-substrate interaction studies. The ultraviolet light-collagen interaction investigations are crucial for the improvement of many applications such as that of the UV irradiation in the field of biomaterials, as sterilizing and photo-cross-linking method. The aim of this paper was to investigate the mechanisms of UV-collagen interactions by developing a collagen-based, well characterized, surface with controlled topography of collagen thin films in the nanoscale range. The methodology was to quantify the collagen surface modification induced on ultraviolet radiation and correlate it with changes induced in cells. Surface nanoscale characterization was performed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) which is a powerful tool and offers quantitative and qualitative information with a non-destructive manner. In order to investigate cells behavior, the irradiated films were used for in vitro cultivation of human skin fibroblasts and the cells morphology, migration and alignment were assessed with fluorescence microscopy imaging and image processing methods. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen thin films and the way of cells behavior to the different modifications that UV induced to the collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell-matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist the appropriate use of UV light for developing biomaterials.

  4. Polarized near-infrared autofluorescence imaging combined with near-infrared diffuse reflectance imaging for improving colonic cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiaozhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-11-08

    We evaluate the diagnostic feasibility of the integrated polarized near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) and NIR diffuse reflectance (DR) imaging technique developed for colonic cancer detection. A total of 48 paired colonic tissue specimens (normal vs. cancer) were measured using the integrated NIR DR (850-1100 nm) and NIR AF imaging at the 785 nm laser excitation. The results showed that NIR AF intensities of cancer tissues are significantly lower than those of normal tissues (ppolarization conditions gives a higher diagnostic accuracy (of ~92-94%) compared to non-polarized NIR AF imaging or NIR DR imaging. Further, the ratio imaging of NIR DR to NIR AF with polarization provides the best diagnostic accuracy (of ~96%) among the NIR AF and NIR DR imaging techniques. This work suggests that the integrated NIR AF/DR imaging under polarization condition has the potential to improve the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  5. Imaging the Dynamics of CH2BrI Photodissociation in the Near Ultraviolet Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Changen; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Joseph D; Kidwell, Nathanael M

    2018-04-19

    The photodissociation dynamics of jet-cooled CH 2 BrI were investigated in the near-ultraviolet (UV) region from 280-310 nm using velocity map imaging. We report the translational and internal energy distributions of the CH 2 Br radical and ground state I ( 2 P 3/2 ) or spin-orbit excited I ( 2 P 1/2 ) fragments determined by velocity map imaging of the ionized iodine fragments following 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of the nascent neutral iodine products. The velocity distributions indicate that most of the available energy is partitioned into the internal energy of the CH 2 Br radical with only modest translational excitation imparted to the cofragments, which is consistent with a simple impulsive model. Furthermore, from extrapolation of the velocity distribution results, the first determination of the C-I bond dissociation energy of CH 2 BrI is presented in this work to be D 0 = 16 790 ± 590 cm -1 . The ion images appear anisotropic, indicative of a prompt dissociation, and the derived anisotropy parameters are consistently positive. Additionally, the angular distributions report on the electronic excited state dynamics, which validate recent works characterizing the electronic states responsible for the first absorption band of CH 2 BrI. In the current work, photolysis of CH 2 BrI on the red edge of the absorption spectrum reveals an additional channel producing I ( 2 P 3/2 ) fragments.

  6. Target recognition of log-polar ladar range images using moment invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenze; Han, Shaokun; Cao, Jie; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-01-01

    The ladar range image has received considerable attentions in the automatic target recognition field. However, previous research does not cover target recognition using log-polar ladar range images. Therefore, we construct a target recognition system based on log-polar ladar range images in this paper. In this system combined moment invariants and backpropagation neural network are selected as shape descriptor and shape classifier, respectively. In order to fully analyze the effect of log-polar sampling pattern on recognition result, several comparative experiments based on simulated and real range images are carried out. Eventually, several important conclusions are drawn: (i) if combined moments are computed directly by log-polar range images, translation, rotation and scaling invariant properties of combined moments will be invalid (ii) when object is located in the center of field of view, recognition rate of log-polar range images is less sensitive to the changing of field of view (iii) as object position changes from center to edge of field of view, recognition performance of log-polar range images will decline dramatically (iv) log-polar range images has a better noise robustness than Cartesian range images. Finally, we give a suggestion that it is better to divide field of view into recognition area and searching area in the real application.

  7. A GALEX ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SURVEY OF GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL VOLUME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Janice C.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr; Bothwell, Matthew; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Funes S. J., Jose G.; Sakai, Shoko; Skillman, Evan; Tremonti, Christy; Van Zee, Liese

    2011-01-01

    We present results from a GALEX ultraviolet (UV) survey of a complete sample of 390 galaxies within ∼11 Mpc of the Milky Way. The UV data are a key component of the composite Local Volume Legacy, an ultraviolet-to-infrared imaging program designed to provide an inventory of dust and star formation in nearby spiral and irregular galaxies. The ensemble data set is an especially valuable resource for studying star formation in dwarf galaxies, which comprise over 80% of the sample. We describe the GALEX survey programs that obtained the data and provide a catalog of far-UV (∼1500 A) and near-UV (∼2200 A) integrated photometry. General UV properties of the sample are briefly discussed. We compute two measures of the global star formation efficiency, the star formation rate (SFR) per unit H I gas mass, and the SFR per unit stellar mass, to illustrate the significant differences that can arise in our understanding of dwarf galaxies when the FUV is used to measure the SFR instead of Hα. We find that dwarf galaxies may not be as drastically inefficient in converting gas into stars as suggested by prior Hα studies. In this context, we also examine the UV properties of late-type dwarf galaxies that appear to be devoid of star formation because they were not detected in previous Hα narrowband observations. Nearly all such galaxies in our sample are detected in the FUV and have FUV SFRs that fall below the limit where the Hα flux is robust to Poisson fluctuations in the formation of massive stars. Otherwise, the UV colors and star formation efficiencies of Hα-undetected, UV-bright dwarf irregulars appear to be relatively unremarkable with respect to those exhibited by the general population of star-forming galaxies.

  8. Band-Bending of Ga-Polar GaN Interfaced with Al2O3 through Ultraviolet/Ozone Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangeun; Ryu, Jae Ha; Kim, Jisoo; Cho, Sang June; Liu, Dong; Park, Jeongpil; Lee, In-Kyu; Moody, Baxter; Zhou, Weidong; Albrecht, John; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2017-05-24

    Understanding the band bending at the interface of GaN/dielectric under different surface treatment conditions is critically important for device design, device performance, and device reliability. The effects of ultraviolet/ozone (UV/O 3 ) treatment of the GaN surface on the energy band bending of atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) Al 2 O 3 coated Ga-polar GaN were studied. The UV/O 3 treatment and post-ALD anneal can be used to effectively vary the band bending, the valence band offset, conduction band offset, and the interface dipole at the Al 2 O 3 /GaN interfaces. The UV/O 3 treatment increases the surface energy of the Ga-polar GaN, improves the uniformity of Al 2 O 3 deposition, and changes the amount of trapped charges in the ALD layer. The positively charged surface states formed by the UV/O 3 treatment-induced surface factors externally screen the effect of polarization charges in the GaN, in effect, determining the eventual energy band bending at the Al 2 O 3 /GaN interfaces. An optimal UV/O 3 treatment condition also exists for realizing the "best" interface conditions. The study of UV/O 3 treatment effect on the band alignments at the dielectric/III-nitride interfaces will be valuable for applications of transistors, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaics.

  9. Nonlinear Dichroism in Back-to-Back Double Ionization of He by an Intense Elliptically Polarized Few-Cycle Extreme Ultraviolet Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J M; Manakov, N L; Meremianin, A V; Hu, S X; Madsen, L B; Starace, Anthony F

    2014-11-28

    Control of double ionization of He by means of the polarization and carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of an intense, few-cycle extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse is demonstrated numerically by solving the six-dimensional two-electron, time-dependent Schrödinger equation for He interacting with an elliptically polarized XUV pulse. Guided by perturbation theory (PT), we predict the existence of a nonlinear dichroic effect (∝I^{3/2}) that is sensitive to the CEP, ellipticity, peak intensity I, and temporal duration of the pulse. This dichroic effect (i.e., the difference of the two-electron angular distributions for opposite helicities of the ionizing XUV pulse) originates from interference of first- and second-order PT amplitudes, allowing one to probe and control S- and D-wave channels of the two-electron continuum. We show that the back-to-back in-plane geometry with unequal energy sharing is an ideal one for observing this dichroic effect that occurs only for an elliptically polarized, few-cycle attosecond pulse.

  10. Two-color visible/vacuum ultraviolet photoelectron imaging dynamics of Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenge, Jürgen; Nicolas, Christophe; Caster, Allison G; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R

    2006-10-07

    An experimental two-color photoionization dynamics study of laser-excited Br2 molecules is presented, combining pulsed visible laser excitation and tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation with photoelectron imaging. The X 1Sigmag + -B 3Pi0+u transition in Br2 is excited at 527 nm corresponding predominantly to excitation of the v' = 28 vibrational level in the B 3Pi0+u state. Tunable VUV undulator radiation in the energy range of 8.40-10.15 eV is subsequently used to ionize the excited molecules to the X 2Pi32,12 state of the ion, and the ionic ground state is probed by photoelectron imaging. Similar experiments are performed using single-photon synchrotron ionization in the photon energy range of 10.75-12.50 eV without any laser excitation. Photoelectron kinetic energy distributions are extracted from the photoelectron images. In the case of two-color photoionization using resonant excitation of the intermediate B 3Pi0+u state, a broad distribution of photoelectron kinetic energies is observed, and in some cases even a bimodal distribution, which depends on the VUV photon energy. In contrast, for single-photon ionization, a single nearly Gaussian-shaped distribution is observed, which shifts to higher energy with photon energy. Simulated spectra based on Franck-Condon factors for the transitions Br2(X 1Sigmag+, v" = 0)-Br2 +(X 2Pi12,32, v+) and Br2(B 3Pi0+u, v' = 28)-Br2 +(X 2Pi12,32, v+) are generated. Comparison of these calculated spectra with the measured images suggests that the differences in the kinetic energy distributions for the two ionization processes reflect the different extensions of the vibrational wave functions in the v" = 0 electronic ground state (X 1Sigmag+) versus the electronically and vibrationally excited state (B 3Pi0+u, v' = 28).

  11. UVUDF: Ultraviolet Imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with Wide-Field Camera 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Kurczynski, Peter; Bond, Nicholas A.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Atek, Hakim; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Colbert, James W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Gronwall, Caryl; Hanish, Daniel J.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; de Mello, Duilia F.; Ravindranath, Swara; Ryan, Russell E.; Siana, Brian D.; Scarlata, Claudia; Soto, Emmaris; Voyer, Elysse N.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2013-12-01

    We present an overview of a 90 orbit Hubble Space Telescope treasury program to obtain near-ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. This survey is designed to: (1) investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 dropouts at redshifts 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 is largely consistent with the number predicted by published luminosity functions. We also confirm that the image mosaics have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to support the analysis of the evolution of star-forming clumps, reaching 28-29th magnitude depth at 5σ in a 0.''2 radius aperture depending on filter and observing epoch. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are #12534.

  12. Simulation of the influence of line edge roughness on the performance of deep ultraviolet wire grid polarizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefke, Thomas; Rojas Hurtado, Carol B.; Dickmann, Johannes; Heusinger, Martin; Kroker, Stefanie

    2017-06-01

    Controlling the polarization of light is crucial in numerous applications such as spectroscopy, ellipsometry, photo lithography or industrial vision. Polarization control can be realized by wire grid polarizers (WGPs), which are large aspect ratio, zero order gratings. These elements provide an anisotropic transmittance depending on the polarization direction of the incident light. WGPs' high attractiveness originates from their large free aperture, while simultaneously being extremely thin. Furthermore, these elements can be easily integrated into other nano-optical devices. Recently, such elements were successfully developed for applications down to the deep ultra violet spectral range. However, at shorter wavelengths the influence of roughness of the structures poses a severe limitation on the feasible optical performance. To tackle this problem, we numerically simulated the impact of line edge roughness on the polarization properties of WPGs. Therefore, we generated edge position data of rough grating lines by means of the Thorsos method and calculated the resulting optical response by finite difference time domain method. With this procedure the influence of standard deviation, correlation length, Hurst exponents and wavelength was investigated. We find that for standard deviations of 2.5 nm and 5.0 nm the polarization contrast is reduced by a factor of 3 and 7, respectively. The polarization contrast shows a minimum for intermediate correlation lengths, while virtually no impact of the Hurst exponent is observed. This is explained by several mechanisms occurring for different ratios between the spatial frequency of the roughness and the frequency of incident light. Our theoretical findings correlate well with experimental results we retrieved with measured roughness parameters of fabricated elements.

  13. Investigation on principle of polarization-difference imaging in turbid conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Guan, Jinge

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the principle of polarization-difference imaging (PDI) of objects in optically scattering environments. The work is performed by both Marius's law and Mueller-Stokes formalism, and is further demonstrated by simulation. The results show that the object image is obtained based on the difference in polarization direction between the scatter noise and the target signal, and imaging performance is closely related to the choice of polarization analyzer axis. In addition, this study illustrates the potential of Stoke vector for promoting application of PDI system in the real world scene.

  14. Dominant transverse-electric polarized emission from 298 nm MBE-grown AlN-delta-GaN quantum well ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Ooi, Yu Kee; Islam, S. M.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Zhang, Jing

    2017-02-01

    III-nitride based ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) are of considerable interest in replacing gas lasers and mercury lamps for numerous applications. Specifically, AlGaN quantum well (QW) based LEDs have been developed extensively but the external quantum efficiencies of which remain less than 10% for wavelengths UV wavelengths is by the use of the AlGaN-delta-GaN QW where the insertion of the delta-GaN layer can ensure the dominant conduction band (C) - heavyhole (HH) transition, leading to large transverse-electric (TE) optical output. Here, we proposed and investigated the physics and polarization-dependent optical characterizations of AlN-delta- GaN QW UV LED at 300 nm. The LED structure is grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) where the delta-GaN layer is 3-4 monolayer (QW-like) sandwiched by 2.5-nm AlN sub-QW layers. The physics analysis shows that the use of AlN-delta-GaN QW ensures a larger separation between the top HH subband and lower-energy bands, and strongly localizes the electron and HH wave functions toward the QW center and hence resulting in 30-time enhancement in TEpolarized spontaneous emission rate, compared to that of a conventional Al0.35Ga0.65N QW. The polarization-dependent electroluminescence measurements confirm our theoretical analysis; a dominant TE-polarized emission was obtained at 298 nm with a minimum transverse-magnetic (TM) polarized emission, indicating the feasibility of high-efficiency TEpolarized UV emitters based on our proposed QW structure.

  15. The impact of Faraday effects on polarized black hole images of Sagittarius A*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rosales, Alejandra; Dexter, Jason

    2018-05-01

    We study model images and polarization maps of Sagittarius A* at 230 GHz. We post-process GRMHD simulations and perform a fully relativistic radiative transfer calculation of the emitted synchrotron radiation to obtain polarized images for a range of mass accretion rates and electron temperatures. At low accretion rates, the polarization map traces the underlying toroidal magnetic field geometry. At high accretion rates, we find that Faraday rotation internal to the emission region can depolarize and scramble the map. We measure the net linear polarization fraction and find that high accretion rate "jet-disc" models are heavily depolarized and are therefore disfavoured. We show how Event Horizon Telescope measurements of the polarized "correlation length" over the image provide a model-independent upper limit on the strength of these Faraday effects, and constrain plasma properties like the electron temperature and magnetic field strength.

  16. Potential applications of near infrared auto-fluorescence spectral polarized imaging for assessment of food quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kenneth J.; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    The current growing of food industry for low production costs and high efficiency needs for maintenance of high-quality standards and assurance of food safety while avoiding liability issues. Quality and safety of food depend on physical (texture, color, tenderness etc.), chemical (fat content, moisture, protein content, pH, etc.), and biological (total bacterial count etc.) features. There is a need for a rapid (less than a few minutes) and accurate detection system in order to optimize quality and assure safety of food. However, the fluorescence ranges for known fluorophores are limited to ultraviolet emission bands, which are not in the tissue near infrared (NIR) "optical window". Biological tissues excited by far-red or NIR light would exhibit strong emission in spectral range of 650-1,100 nm although no characteristic peaks show the emission from which known fluorophores. The characteristics of the auto-fluorescence emission of different types of tissues were found to be different between different tissue components such as fat, high quality muscle food. In this paper, NIR auto-fluorescence emission from different types of muscle food and fat was measured. The differences of fluorescence intensities of the different types of muscle food and fat emissions were observed. These can be explained by the change of the microscopic structure of physical, chemical, and biological features in meat. The difference of emission intensities of fat and lean meat tissues was applied to monitor food quality and safety using spectral polarized imaging, which can be detect deep depth fat under the muscle food up to several centimeter.

  17. Results from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on the Astro-2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, T. P.; Bohlin, R. C.; Neff, S. G.; O'Connell, R. W.; Roberts, M. R.; Smith, A. M.

    1995-03-01

    The solar-blind UIT camera with a CsI cathode obtained 722 frames with a cumulative exposure time of 260705 seconds during the March 1995 Astro-2 mission of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Filters were used to isolate selected bandpasses in the range 1200-1800 Angstroms, over the 40 arcmin field of view. Spatial resolution on most of the images is about 3 arcsec. Calibrated data, converted to machine-readable form, are under analysis and several posters on these investigations are presented in the Astro-2 poster session at this meeting (a first look at the UIT observations of Omega Cen, M31, and the Cygnus Loop is further elaborated here). UIT imagery of 20 spiral galaxies was obtained as part of a Guest Investigator program (Wendy Freedman et al.). UV imaging suppresses the red stellar population as expected and enhances the appearance of tracers of recent star formation. Known \\hii regions in these galaxies are made apparent through the scattering of stellar ultraviolet light by interstellar dust; typically their shapes differ from those seen in \\ha. A radial color gradient investigation will be delayed until ground observations can be made as the long-wavelength camera failed on launch and only the 1520 Angstroms and 1620 Angstroms images were made. The far-UV (1520 Angstroms) features are detected well beyond the Holmberg radius. UV/visible color-magnitude diagrams will be made as they were for the data from Astro-1. Our deepest images of the Magellanic Clouds reveal a rich field of luminous clusters and stars that are being searched for UV counterparts of the known x-ray sources in the photographed areas. The observed stars in the Clouds will be used to determine the current mass function. The respective contributions of nebular and stellar UV light in reflection nebulae are will be studied as several nebulae were observed with differing geometries and will provide interesting results on the far-UV albedo and phase function of nebular dust. A dozen globular and

  18. Enhancing the far-ultraviolet sensitivity of silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor imaging arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Bai, Yibin; Ryu, Kevin K.; Gregory, James A.; Welander, Paul B.; Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Winters, Gregory S.; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi; Beletic, James W.

    2015-10-01

    We report our progress toward optimizing backside-illuminated silicon P-type intrinsic N-type complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices developed by Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) for far-ultraviolet (UV) planetary science applications. This project was motivated by initial measurements at Southwest Research Institute of the far-UV responsivity of backside-illuminated silicon PIN photodiode test structures, which revealed a promising QE in the 100 to 200 nm range. Our effort to advance the capabilities of thinned silicon wafers capitalizes on recent innovations in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) doping processes. Key achievements to date include the following: (1) representative silicon test wafers were fabricated by TIS, and set up for MBE processing at MIT Lincoln Laboratory; (2) preliminary far-UV detector QE simulation runs were completed to aid MBE layer design; (3) detector fabrication was completed through the pre-MBE step; and (4) initial testing of the MBE doping process was performed on monitoring wafers, with detailed quality assessments.

  19. USING HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER TO CONFIRM A SEISMOLOGICALLY INFERRED CORONAL TEMPERATURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the HINODE satellite is used to examine the loop system described in Marsh et al. by applying spectroscopic diagnostic methods. A simple isothermal mapping algorithm is applied to determine where the assumption of isothermal plasma may be valid, and the emission measure locii technique is used to determine the temperature profile along the base of the loop system. It is found that, along the base, the loop has a uniform temperature profile with a mean temperature of 0.89 ± 0.09 MK which is in agreement with the temperature determined seismologically in Marsh et al., using observations interpreted as the slow magnetoacoustic mode. The results further strengthen the slow mode interpretation, propagation at a uniform sound speed, and the analysis method applied in Marsh et al. It is found that it is not possible to discriminate between the slow mode phase speed and the sound speed within the precision of the present observations.

  20. Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Polarity Switching for Concurrent Acquisition of Positive and Negative Ion Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Andrew R.; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-06-01

    We have recently developed a multiplex mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) method which incorporates high mass resolution imaging and MS/MS and MS3 imaging of several compounds in a single data acquisition utilizing a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Perdian and Lee, Anal. Chem. 82, 9393-9400, 2010). Here we extend this capability to obtain positive and negative ion MS and MS/MS spectra in a single MS imaging experiment through polarity switching within spiral steps of each raster step. This methodology was demonstrated for the analysis of various lipid class compounds in a section of mouse brain. This allows for simultaneous imaging of compounds that are readily ionized in positive mode (e.g., phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins) and those that are readily ionized in negative mode (e.g., sulfatides, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines). MS/MS imaging was also performed for a few compounds in both positive and negative ion mode within the same experimental set-up. Insufficient stabilization time for the Orbitrap high voltage leads to slight deviations in observed masses, but these deviations are systematic and were easily corrected with a two-point calibration to background ions.

  1. Prostate Cancer Detection Using Near Infrared Spectral Polarization Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfano, R. R; Wang, W. B

    2005-01-01

    .... The technique is based on the spectral and polarization properties of light scattered, absorbed and emitted from prostate cancerous and normal tissues, and contrast agents targeted to the prostate cancers. Results of finding...

  2. UVUDF: Ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble ultra deep field with wide-field camera 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Colbert, James W.; Hanish, Daniel J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Bond, Nicholas A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; De Mello, Duilia F. [Laboratory for Observational Cosmology, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Gronwall, Caryl [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lee, Kyoung-Soo [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Ravindranath, Swara, E-mail: hit@ipac.caltech.edu [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (India); and others

    2013-12-01

    We present an overview of a 90 orbit Hubble Space Telescope treasury program to obtain near-ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. This survey is designed to: (1) investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5; (2) probe the evolution of massive galaxies by resolving sub-galactic units (clumps); (3) examine the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies at z ∼ 2-3; (4) greatly improve the reliability of photometric redshift estimates; and (5) measure the star formation rate efficiency of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at z ∼ 1-3. In this overview paper, we describe the survey details and data reduction challenges, including both the necessity of specialized calibrations and the effects of charge transfer inefficiency. We provide a stark demonstration of the effects of charge transfer inefficiency on resultant data products, which when uncorrected, result in uncertain photometry, elongation of morphology in the readout direction, and loss of faint sources far from the readout. We agree with the STScI recommendation that future UVIS observations that require very sensitive measurements use the instrument's capability to add background light through a 'post-flash'. Preliminary results on number counts of UV-selected galaxies and morphology of galaxies at z ∼ 1 are presented. We find that the number density of UV dropouts at redshifts 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 is largely consistent with the number predicted by published luminosity functions. We also confirm that the image mosaics have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to support the analysis of the evolution of star-forming clumps, reaching 28-29th magnitude depth at 5σ in a 0.''2 radius aperture depending on filter and observing epoch.

  3. High spatial precision nano-imaging of polarization-sensitive plasmonic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunbo; Wang, Yipei; Lee, Somin Eunice

    2018-02-01

    Precise polarimetric imaging of polarization-sensitive nanoparticles is essential for resolving their accurate spatial positions beyond the diffraction limit. However, conventional technologies currently suffer from beam deviation errors which cannot be corrected beyond the diffraction limit. To overcome this issue, we experimentally demonstrate a spatially stable nano-imaging system for polarization-sensitive nanoparticles. In this study, we show that by integrating a voltage-tunable imaging variable polarizer with optical microscopy, we are able to suppress beam deviation errors. We expect that this nano-imaging system should allow for acquisition of accurate positional and polarization information from individual nanoparticles in applications where real-time, high precision spatial information is required.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging through turbid media based on polarization-difference liquid-crystal microlens array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhaowei; Wei, Dong; Li, Dapeng; Xie, Xingwang; Chen, Mingce; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Haiwei; Xie, Changsheng

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a polarization difference liquid-crystal microlens array (PD-LCMLA) for three dimensional imaging application through turbid media is fabricated and demonstrated. This device is composed of a twisted nematic liquidcrystal cell (TNLCC), a polarizer and a liquid-crystal microlens array. The polarizer is sandwiched between the TNLCC and LCMLA to help the polarization difference system achieving the orthogonal polarization raw images. The prototyped camera for polarization difference imaging has been constructed by integrating the PD-LCMLA with an image sensor. The orthogonally polarized light-field images are recorded by switching the working state of the TNLCC. Here, by using a special microstructure in conjunction with the polarization-difference algorithm, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional information in the scattering media can be retrieved from the polarization-difference imaging system with an electrically tunable PD-LCMLA. We further investigate the system's potential function based on the flexible microstructure. The microstructure provides a wide operation range in the manipulation of incident beams and also emerges multiple operation modes for imaging applications, such as conventional planar imaging, polarization imaging mode, and polarization-difference imaging mode. Since the PD-LCMLA demonstrates a very low power consumption, multiple imaging modes and simple manufacturing, this kind of device presents a potential to be used in many other optical and electro-optical systems.

  5. Direct visualization of polarization reversal of organic ferroelectric memory transistor by using charge modulated reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takako; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2017-11-01

    By using the charge modulated reflectance (CMR) imaging technique, charge distribution in the pentacene organic field-effect transistor (OFET) with a ferroelectric gate insulator [P(VDF-TrFE)] was investigated in terms of polarization reversal of the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the polarization reversal process and the carrier spreading process in the OFET channel. The I-V measurement showed a hysteresis behavior caused by the spontaneous polarization of P(VDF-TrFE), but the hysteresis I-V curve changes depending on the applied drain bias, possibly due to the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position in the OFET channel. CMR imaging visualized the gradual shift of the polarization reversal position and showed that the electrostatic field formed by the polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) contributes to hole and electron injection into the pentacene layer and the carrier distribution is significantly dependent on the direction of the polarization. The polarization reversal position in the channel region is governed by the electrostatic potential, and it happens where the potential reaches the coercive voltage of P(VDF-TrFE). The transmission line model developed on the basis of the Maxwell-Wagner effect element analysis well accounts for this polarization reversal process in the OFET channel.

  6. Imaging Local Polarization in Ferroelectric Thin Films by Coherent X-Ray Bragg Projection Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Highland, M. J.; Holt, M. V.; Kim, Dongjin; Folkman, C. M.; Thompson, Carol; Tripathi, A.; Stephenson, G. B.; Hong, Seungbum; Fuoss, P. H.

    2013-04-01

    We used x-ray Bragg projection ptychography (BPP) to map spatial variations of ferroelectric polarization in thin film PbTiO3, which exhibited a striped nanoscale domain pattern on a high-miscut (001) SrTiO3 substrate. By converting the reconstructed BPP phase image to picometer-scale ionic displacements in the polar unit cell, a quantitative polarization map was made that was consistent with other characterization. The spatial resolution of 5.7 nm demonstrated here establishes BPP as an important tool for nanoscale ferroelectric domain imaging, especially in complex environments accessible with hard x rays.

  7. Dual-polarization interference microscopy for advanced quantification of phase associated with the image field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, Petr; Chmelík, Radim; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2018-02-01

    A new concept of dual-polarization spatial light interference microscopy (DPSLIM) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The method works with two orthogonally polarized modes in which signal and reference waves are combined to realize the polarization-sensitive phase-shifting, thus allowing advanced reconstruction of the phase associated with the image field. The image phase is reconstructed directly from four polarization encoded interference records by a single step processing. This is a progress compared with common methods, in which the phase of the image field is reconstructed using the optical path difference and the amplitudes of interfering waves, which are calculated in multiple-step processing of the records. The DPSLIM is implemented in a common-path configuration using a spatial light modulator, which is connected to a commercial microscope Nikon E200. The optical performance of the method is demonstrated in experiments using both polystyrene microspheres and live LW13K2 cells.

  8. Study on Low Illumination Simultaneous Polarization Image Registration Based on Improved SURF Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanjun; Yang, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Registration of simultaneous polarization images is the premise of subsequent image fusion operations. However, in the process of shooting all-weather, the polarized camera exposure time need to be kept unchanged, sometimes polarization images under low illumination conditions due to too dark result in SURF algorithm can not extract feature points, thus unable to complete the registration, therefore this paper proposes an improved SURF algorithm. Firstly, the luminance operator is used to improve overall brightness of low illumination image, and then create integral image, using Hession matrix to extract the points of interest to get the main direction of characteristic points, calculate Haar wavelet response in X and Y directions to get the SURF descriptor information, then use the RANSAC function to make precise matching, the function can eliminate wrong matching points and improve accuracy rate. And finally resume the brightness of the polarized image after registration, the effect of the polarized image is not affected. Results show that the improved SURF algorithm can be applied well under low illumination conditions.

  9. Diffusion weighted imaging with circularly polarized oscillating gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Dyrby, Tim B

    2015-01-01

    presented. One major hurdle in practical implementation is the low effective diffusion weighting provided at high frequency with limited gradient strength. THEORY: As a solution to the low diffusion weighting of OGSE, circularly polarized OGSE (CP-OGSE) is introduced. CP-OGSE gives a twofold increase...

  10. DUST AND INFRARED IMAGING OF POLAR RING GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARNABOLDI, M; FREEMAN, KC; SACKETT, PD; SPARKE, LS; CAPACCIOLI, M

    1995-01-01

    We have derived surface photometry for a sample of five polar ring(PR) galaxies in the optical (B and R bands) and in the near-IR (K band). Our preliminary results show that the morphology of these objects is heavily perturbed by dust, which sometimes completely hides the real distribution of the

  11. A study on high NA and evanescent imaging with polarized illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung-Hune

    Simulation techniques are developed for high NA polarized microscopy with Babinet's principle, partial coherence and vector diffraction for non-periodic geometries. A mathematical model for the Babinet approach is developed and interpreted. Simulation results of the Babinet's principle approach are compared with those of Rigorous Coupled Wave Theory (RCWT) for periodic structures to investigate the accuracy of this approach and its limitations. A microscope system using a special solid immersion lens (SIL) is introduced to image Blu-Ray (BD) optical disc samples without removing the protective cover layer. Aberration caused by the cover layer is minimized with a truncated SIL. Sub-surface imaging simulation is achieved by RCWT, partial coherence, vector diffraction and Babinet's Principle. Simulated results are compared with experimental images and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement. A technique for obtaining native and induced using a significant amount of evanescent energy is described for a solid immersion lens (SIL) microscope. Characteristics of native and induced polarization images for different object structures and materials are studied in detail. Experiments are conducted with a NA = 1.48 at lambda = 550nm microscope. Near-field images are simulated and analyzed with an RCWT approach. Contrast curve versus object spatial frequency calculations are compared with experimental measurements. Dependencies of contrast versus source polarization angles and air gap for native and induced polarization image profiles are evaluated. By using the relationship between induced polarization and topographical structure, an induced polarization image of an alternating phase shift mask (PSM) is converted into a topographical image, which shows very good agreement with AFM measurement. Images of other material structures include a dielectric grating, chrome-on-glass grating, silicon CPU structure, BD-R and BD-ROM.

  12. Anchored LH2 complexes in 2D polarization imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubasum, Sumera; Sakai, Shunsuke; Dewa, Takehisa; Sundström, Villy; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Nango, Mamoru; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2013-09-26

    Protein is a soft material with inherently large structural disorder. Consequently, the bulk spectroscopies of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes provide averaged information where many details are lost. Here we report spectroscopy of single light-harvesting complexes where fluorescence excitation and detection polarizations are both independently rotated. Two samples of peripheral antenna (LH2) complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila were studied. In one, the complexes were embedded in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film; in the other, they were anchored on the glass surface and covered by the PVA film. LH2 contains two rings of pigment molecules-B800 and B850. The B800 excitation polarization properties of the two samples were found to be very similar, indicating that orientation statistics of LH2s are the same in these two very different preparations. At the same time, we found a significant difference in B850 emission polarization statistics. We conclude that the B850 band of the anchored sample is substantially more disordered. We argue that both B800 excitation and B850 emission polarization properties can be explained by the tilt of the anchored LH2s due to the spin-casting of the PVA film on top of the complexes and related shear forces. Due to the tilt, the orientation statistics of two samples become similar. Anchoring is expected to orient the LH2s so that B850 is closer to the substrate. Consequently, the tilt-related strain leads to larger deformation and disorder in B850 than in B800.

  13. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, P.O. Box 3064350, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States); Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Buder, I. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kusaka, A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monsalve, R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Næss, S. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Newburgh, L. B. [Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Reeves, R. [CePIA, Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gundersen, J. O., E-mail: huffenbe@physics.fsu.edu [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  14. Averaged subtracted polarization imaging for endoscopic diagnostics of surface microstructures on translucent mucosae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Katsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    An endoscopic image processing technique for enhancing the appearance of microstructures on translucent mucosae is described. This technique employs two pairs of co- and cross-polarization images under two different linearly polarized lights, from which the averaged subtracted polarization image (AVSPI) is calculated. Experiments were then conducted using an acrylic phantom and excised porcine stomach tissue using a manual experimental setup with ring-type lighting, two rotating polarizers, and a color camera; better results were achieved with the proposed method than with conventional color intensity image processing. An objective evaluation method that uses texture analysis was developed and used to evaluate the enhanced microstructure images. This paper introduces two types of online, rigid-type, polarimetric endoscopic implementations using a polarized ring-shaped LED and a polarimetric camera. The first type uses a beam-splitter-type color polarimetric camera, and the second uses a single-chip monochrome polarimetric camera. Microstructures on the mucosa surface were enhanced robustly with these online endoscopes regardless of the difference in the extinction ratio of each device. These results show that polarimetric endoscopy using AVSPI is both effective and practical for hardware implementation.

  15. Imaging of dental material by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Sabine; Baumgartner, Angela; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Moritz, Andreas; Wernisch, Johann; Robl, Barbara; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer; Sperr, Wolfgang; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-05-01

    Partial coherence interferometry (PCI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are noninvasive and noncontact techniques for high precision biometry and for obtaining cross- sectional images of biologic structures. OCT was initially introduced to depict the transparent tissue of the eye. It is based on interferometry employing the partial coherence properties of a light source with high spatial coherence ut short coherence length to image structures with a resolution of the order of a few microns. Recently this technique has been modified for cross section al imaging of dental and periodontal tissues. In vitro and in vivo OCT images have been recorded, which distinguish enamel, cemento and dentin structures and provide detailed structural information on clinical abnormalities. In contrast to convention OCT, where the magnitude of backscattered light as a function of depth is imaged, polarization sensitive OCT uses backscattered light to image the magnitude of the birefringence in the sample as a function of depth. First polarization sensitive OCT recordings show, that changes in the mineralization status of enamel or dentin caused by caries or non-caries lesions can result in changes of the polarization state of the light backscattered by dental material. Therefore polarization sensitive OCT might provide a new diagnostic imaging modality in clinical and research dentistry.

  16. Imaging and manipulation of a polar molecule on Ag(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, R.; Braun, K.F.; Tang, H.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to image and laterally manipulate isolated phosphangulene molecules on Ag(111) at 6 K. Atomic-resolution images clearly revealed three characteristic types of appearances (three-lobed, fish and bump shape) for the adsorbed molecules, which could...

  17. Statistical Image Recovery From Laser Speckle Patterns With Polarization Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    several techniques for speckle suppression in optical imaging [19]. However, averaging nonimaged laser speckle patterns does not yield the same result...Comparison”. Applied Optics , 21(15):2758–2769, August 1982. 13. Fienup, James R. “Image Formation from Nonimaged Laser Speckle Patterns”. S. R. Robinson...6 ν Optical Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 t Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ϕ

  18. Parametric imaging of collagen structural changes in human osteoarthritic cartilage using optical polarization tractography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanfar, Mohammadreza; Pfeiffer, Ferris M.; Bozynski, Chantelle C.; Wang, Yuanbo; Yao, Gang

    2017-12-01

    Collagen degeneration is an important pathological feature of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT)-based optical polarization tractography (OPT) can be useful in imaging collagen structural changes in human osteoarthritic cartilage samples. OPT eliminated the banding artifacts in conventional PSOCT by calculating the depth-resolved local birefringence and fiber orientation. A close comparison between OPT and PSOCT showed that OPT provided improved visualization and characterization of the zonal structure in human cartilage. Experimental results obtained in this study also underlined the importance of knowing the collagen fiber orientation in conventional polarized light microscopy assessment. In addition, parametric OPT imaging was achieved by quantifying the surface roughness, birefringence, and fiber dispersion in the superficial zone of the cartilage. These quantitative parametric images provided complementary information on the structural changes in cartilage, which can be useful for a comprehensive evaluation of collagen damage in osteoarthritic cartilage.

  19. Real time polarization sensor image processing on an embedded FPGA/multi-core DSP system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednara, Marcus; Chuchacz-Kowalczyk, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    Most embedded image processing SoCs available on the market are highly optimized for typical consumer applications like video encoding/decoding, motion estimation or several image enhancement processes as used in DSLR or digital video cameras. For non-consumer applications, on the other hand, optimized embedded hardware is rarely available, so often PC based image processing systems are used. We show how a real time capable image processing system for a non-consumer application - namely polarization image data processing - can be efficiently implemented on an FPGA and multi-core DSP based embedded hardware platform.

  20. Polarization image segmentation of radiofrequency ablated porcine myocardial tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Ahmad

    Full Text Available Optical polarimetry has previously imaged the spatial extent of a typical radiofrequency ablated (RFA lesion in myocardial tissue, exhibiting significantly lower total depolarization at the necrotic core compared to healthy tissue, and intermediate values at the RFA rim region. Here, total depolarization in ablated myocardium was used to segment the total depolarization image into three (core, rim and healthy zones. A local fuzzy thresholding algorithm was used for this multi-region segmentation, and then compared with a ground truth segmentation obtained from manual demarcation of RFA core and rim regions on the histopathology image. Quantitative comparison of the algorithm segmentation results was performed with evaluation metrics such as dice similarity coefficient (DSC = 0.78 ± 0.02 and 0.80 ± 0.02, sensitivity (Sn = 0.83 ± 0.10 and 0.91 ± 0.08, specificity (Sp = 0.76 ± 0.17 and 0.72 ± 0.17 and accuracy (Acc = 0.81 ± 0.09 and 0.71 ± 0.10 for RFA core and rim regions, respectively. This automatic segmentation of parametric depolarization images suggests a novel application of optical polarimetry, namely its use in objective RFA image quantification.

  1. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  2. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoît, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations

  3. An Image Matching Method Based on Fourier and LOG-Polar Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijia Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This Traditional template matching methods are not appropriate for the situation of large angle rotation between two images in the online detection for industrial production. Aiming at this problem, Fourier transform algorithm was introduced to correct image rotation angle based on its rotatary invariance in time-frequency domain, orienting image under test in the same direction with reference image, and then match these images using matching algorithm based on log-polar transform. Compared with the current matching algorithms, experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can not only match two images with rotation of arbitrary angle, but also possess a high matching accuracy and applicability. In addition, the validity and reliability of algorithm was verified by simulated matching experiment targeting circular images.

  4. Polarization and infrared imaging of regions of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moneti, A.

    1985-01-01

    Observational studies of two regions of star formation, the Taurus cloud and the BN-KL region of Orion, are presented. The magnetic field structure in the Taurus cloud was studied in order to investigate its possible role in the evolution of the cloud. It was found that the magnetic field is generally perpendicular to the elongated structures that make up the cloud, and it is deduced that the observed structure could be due to the effects of the magnetic field during the early stages of collapse. In addition, it was found that the magnetic field may have prevented the formation of massive stars by inhibiting the collapse of large cores, while not affecting the collapse of the small ones. Using a new near-infrared array camera, high resolution (1'') images of several young stars embedded in the cloud were obtained. Most of these sources have extended, spatially resolved circumstellar shells. High resolution images of the BN-KL region of Orion at four wavelengths between 1.65 and 4.7 μm were also obtained. At 1.65 μm a large trough is seen in the overall nebulosity; it is suggested that the observed trough is due to the doughnut of material around IRc2 as it obscures the background nebulosity

  5. ASTROSAT CZT IMAGER OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 151006A: TIMING, SPECTROSCOPY, AND POLARIZATION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, A. R.; Chand, Vikas; Hingar, M. K.; Iyyani, S.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Paul, D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai (India); Bhalerao, V. B.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A. M. [Inter University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (India); Chattopadhyay, T.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N. [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); Basak, R. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Pradeep, P.; Samuel, Essy, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India); and others

    2016-12-10

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that the CZT Imager can localize this GRB correctly to about a few degrees, and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift , spectral parameters similar to those obtained from Fermi /GBM. Hence, the CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments ( Swift and Fermi ). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localization for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift . We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: the CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarization information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows hints of a polarization signal at 100–300 keV (though at a low significance level). We point out that the CZT Imager should provide significant time resolved polarization measurements for GRBs that have fluence three times higher than that of GRB 151006A. We estimate that the number of such bright GRBs detectable by the CZT Imager is five to six per year. The CZT Imager can also act as a good hard X-ray monitoring device for possible electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events.

  6. Stokes vector based interpolation method to improve the efficiency of bio-inspired polarization-difference imaging in turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jinge; Ren, Wei; Cheng, Yaoyu

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate an efficient polarization-difference imaging system in turbid conditions by using the Stokes vector of light. The interaction of scattered light with the polarizer is analyzed by the Stokes-Mueller formalism. An interpolation method is proposed to replace the mechanical rotation of the polarization axis of the analyzer theoretically, and its performance is verified by the experiment at different turbidity levels. We show that compared with direct imaging, the Stokes vector based imaging method can effectively reduce the effect of light scattering and enhance the image contrast.

  7. Ultraviolet Imaging with Low Cost Smartphone Sensors: Development and Application of a Raspberry Pi-Based UV Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Wilkes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the modification of a low cost sensor, designed for the smartphone camera market, to develop an ultraviolet (UV camera system. This was achieved via adaptation of Raspberry Pi cameras, which are based on back-illuminated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS sensors, and we demonstrated the utility of these devices for applications at wavelengths as low as 310 nm, by remotely sensing power station smokestack emissions in this spectral region. Given the very low cost of these units, ≈ USD 25, they are suitable for widespread proliferation in a variety of UV imaging applications, e.g., in atmospheric science, volcanology, forensics and surface smoothness measurements.

  8. Integrating image processing and classification technology into automated polarizing film defect inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Lai, Chun-Yu; Kao, Chih-Hsiang; Chiu, Chin-Hsun

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the current manual inspection and classification process for polarizing film on production lines, this study proposes a high precision automated inspection and classification system for polarizing film, which is used for recognition and classification of four common defects: dent, foreign material, bright spot, and scratch. First, the median filter is used to remove the impulse noise in the defect image of polarizing film. The random noise in the background is smoothed by the improved anisotropic diffusion, while the edge detail of the defect region is sharpened. Next, the defect image is transformed by Fourier transform to the frequency domain, combined with a Butterworth high pass filter to sharpen the edge detail of the defect region, and brought back by inverse Fourier transform to the spatial domain to complete the image enhancement process. For image segmentation, the edge of the defect region is found by Canny edge detector, and then the complete defect region is obtained by two-stage morphology processing. For defect classification, the feature values, including maximum gray level, eccentricity, the contrast, and homogeneity of gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) extracted from the images, are used as the input of the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) and back-propagation neural network (BPNN) classifier, 96 defect images are then used as training samples, and 84 defect images are used as testing samples to validate the classification effect. The result shows that the classification accuracy by using RBFNN is 98.9%. Thus, our proposed system can be used by manufacturing companies for a higher yield rate and lower cost. The processing time of one single image is 2.57 seconds, thus meeting the practical application requirement of an industrial production line.

  9. Garnet film rotator applied in polarizing microscope for domain image modulation (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Numata, T.; Inokuchi, S.

    1991-04-01

    A garnet film polarization rotator placed before the analyzer in a polarizing microscope was investigated to obtain the difference image of a positive and a negative one of magnetic domain in real time along with an image processor. In the difference image, a nonmagnetic image can be reduced and hence the weak magnetic contrast enhanced. Theoretical calculation of S/N and contrast C of the domain image as a function of the rotation shows they take maxima at the rotation angle of 2.6° and 0.1°, respectively, with the extinction ratio of e=4×10-6 of a polarizing microscope. Thus, since the thickness of the garnet film required is 1 μm or so, the absorption by the garnet rotator does not bring a serious problem even in a visible region for the domain observation. The optimum rotation of the rotator for a high quality observation was obtained by a quantitative study of images obtained experimentally as well as by a visual evaluation. A magnetically unsaturated garnet film with perpendicular magnetization (i.e., multidomain) was employed as a rotator, in which the polarization rotation angle θm of the undeflected beam with respect to the light diffraction could be continuously varied by an applied magnetic field. The dependences of S/N and C on θm were measured, resulting in a well agreement between the measured and the calculated. The visually best image was obtained at θm=0.5° which made the product of S/N and C maximum. The domain image of the Kerr rotation angle of θk=0.22° was observed in S/N=47 dB and C=0.4 when Ar+ laser (λ=515 nm) of tenths of a watt was employed as a light source. Since the domain image with 47 dB S/N does not need an image summation for a noise reduction, a garnet film rotator makes it possible to invert the contrast of a domain image in a real time for an improved domain observation.

  10. Polarization Imaging Apparatus for Cell and Tissue Imaging and Diagnostics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the propagation of polarized light in randomly scattering media. The investigation of backscattered light is...

  11. Emerging Massive Star Clusters Revealed: High-Resolution Imaging of NGC 4449 from the Radio to the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reines, Amy E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Goss, W. M.

    2008-06-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of embedded massive clusters in the nearby (3.9 Mpc) starburst galaxy NGC 4449 in an effort to uncover the earliest phases of massive cluster evolution. By combining high-resolution imaging from the radio to the ultraviolet, we reveal these clusters to be in the process of emerging from their gaseous and dusty birth cocoons. We use Very Large Array (VLA) observations at centimeter wavelengths to identify young clusters surrounded by ultra-dense H II regions, detectable via their production of thermal free-free radio continuum. Ultraviolet, optical and infrared observations are obtained from the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope archives for comparison. We detect 39 compact radio sources toward NGC 4449 at 3.6 cm using the highest resolution (1farcs3) and sensitivity (~12 μJy) VLA image of the galaxy to date. We reliably identify 13 thermal radio sources and derive their physical properties using both nebular emission from the H II regions and spectral energy distribution fitting to the stellar continuum. These radio-detected clusters have ages lsim5 Myr and stellar masses of order 104 M sun. The measured extinctions are quite low: 12 of the 13 thermal radio sources have A V lsim 1.5, while the most obscured source has A V ≈ 4.3. By combining results from the nebular and stellar emission, we find an I-band excess that is anti-correlated with cluster age and an apparent mass-age correlation. Additionally, we find evidence that local processes such as supernovae and stellar winds likely play an important role in triggering the current bursts of star formation within NGC 4449.

  12. Research on Copy-Move Image Forgery Detection Using Features of Discrete Polar Complex Exponential Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yanfen; Zhong, Junliu

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of sophisticated photo-editing software, such as Photoshop, copy-move image forgery operation has been widely applied and has become a major concern in the field of information security in the modern society. A lot of work on detecting this kind of forgery has gained great achievements, but the detection results of geometrical transformations of copy-move regions are not so satisfactory. In this paper, a new method based on the Polar Complex Exponential Transform is proposed. This method addresses issues in image geometric moment, focusing on constructing rotation invariant moment and extracting features of the rotation invariant moment. In order to reduce rounding errors of the transform from the Polar coordinate system to the Cartesian coordinate system, a new transformation method is presented and discussed in detail at the same time. The new method constructs a 9 × 9 shrunk template to transform the Cartesian coordinate system back to the Polar coordinate system. It can reduce transform errors to a much greater degree. Forgery detection, such as copy-move image forgery detection, is a difficult procedure, but experiments prove our method is a great improvement in detecting and identifying forgery images affected by the rotated transform.

  13. Spectroscopic imaging studies of nanoscale polarity and mass transport phenomena in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Nagasaka, Shinobu; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Takashi; Higgins, Daniel A

    2017-08-02

    Synthetic organic nanotubes self-assembled from bolaamphiphile surfactants are now being explored for use as drug delivery vehicles. In this work, several factors important to their implementation in drug delivery are explored. All experiments are performed with the nanotubes immersed in ethanol. First, Nile Red (NR) and a hydroxylated Nile Red derivative (NR-OH) are loaded into the nanotubes and spectroscopic fluorescence imaging methods are used to determine the apparent dielectric constant of their local environment. Both are found in relatively nonpolar environments, with the NR-OH molecules preferring regions of relatively higher dielectric constant compared to NR. Unique two-color imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (imaging FCS) measurements are then used along with the spectroscopic imaging results to deduce the dielectric properties of the environments sensed by mobile and immobile populations of probe molecules. The results reveal that mobile NR molecules pass through less polar regions, likely within the nanotube walls, while immobile NR molecules are found in more polar regions, possibly near the nanotube surfaces. In contrast, mobile and immobile NR-OH molecules are found to locate in environments of similar polarity. The imaging FCS results also provide quantitative data on the apparent diffusion coefficient for each dye. The mean diffusion coefficient for the NR dye was approximately two-fold larger than that of NR-OH. Slower diffusion by the latter could result from its additional hydrogen bonding interactions with polar triglycine, amine, and glucose moieties near the nanotube surfaces. The knowledge gained in these studies will allow for the development of nanotubes that are better engineered for applications in the controlled transport and release of uncharged, dipolar drug molecules.

  14. Adaptive polarimetric image representation for contrast optimization of a polarized beacon through fog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Fade, Julien; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    We present a contrast-maximizing optimal linear representation of polarimetric images obtained from a snapshot polarimetric camera for enhanced vision of a polarized light source in obscured weather conditions (fog, haze, cloud) over long distances (above 1 km). We quantitatively compare the gain in contrast obtained by different linear representations of the experimental polarimetric images taken during rapidly varying foggy conditions. It is shown that the adaptive image representation that depends on the correlation in background noise fluctuations in the two polarimetric images provides an optimal contrast enhancement over all weather conditions as opposed to a simple difference image which underperforms during low visibility conditions. Finally, we derive the analytic expression of the gain in contrast obtained with this optimal representation and show that the experimental results are in agreement with the assumed correlated Gaussian noise model. (paper)

  15. Imaging and modeling of collagen architecture in living tissue with polarized light transfer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang

    2016-03-01

    The extra-cellular space in connective tissue of animals and humans alike is comprised in large part of collagen. Monitoring of collagen arrangement and cross-linking has been utilized to diagnose a variety of medical conditions and guide surgical intervention. For example, collagen monitoring is useful in the assessment and treatment of cervical cancer, skin cancer, myocardial infarction, and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. We have developed a suite of tools and models based on polarized light transfer for the assessment of collagen presence, cross-linking, and orientation in living tissue. Here we will present some example of such approach applied to the human cervix. We will illustrate a novel Mueller Matrix (MM) imaging system for the study of cervical tissue; furthermore we will show how our model of polarized light transfer through cervical tissue compares to the experimental findings. Finally we will show validation of the methodology through histological results and Second Harmonic imaging microscopy.

  16. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  17. Lagrangian displacement tracking using a polar grid between endocardial and epicardial contours for cardiac strain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2012-04-01

    Accurate cardiac deformation analysis for cardiac displacement and strain imaging over time requires Lagrangian description of deformation of myocardial tissue structures. Failure to couple the estimated displacement and strain information with the correct myocardial tissue structures will lead to erroneous result in the displacement and strain distribution over time. Lagrangian based tracking in this paper divides the tissue structure into a fixed number of pixels whose deformation is tracked over the cardiac cycle. An algorithm that utilizes a polar-grid generated between the estimated endocardial and epicardial contours for cardiac short axis images is proposed to ensure Lagrangian description of the pixels. Displacement estimates from consecutive radiofrequency frames were then mapped onto the polar grid to obtain a distribution of the actual displacement that is mapped to the polar grid over time. A finite element based canine heart model coupled with an ultrasound simulation program was used to verify this approach. Segmental analysis of the accumulated displacement and strain over a cardiac cycle demonstrate excellent agreement between the ideal result obtained directly from the finite element model and our Lagrangian approach to strain estimation. Traditional Eulerian based estimation results, on the other hand, show significant deviation from the ideal result. An in vivo comparison of the displacement and strain estimated using parasternal short axis views is also presented. Lagrangian displacement tracking using a polar grid provides accurate tracking of myocardial deformation demonstrated using both finite element and in vivo radiofrequency data acquired on a volunteer. In addition to the cardiac application, this approach can also be utilized for transverse scans of arteries, where a polar grid can be generated between the contours delineating the outer and inner wall of the vessels from the blood flowing though the vessel.

  18. Electrostatic force microscopy: imaging DNA and protein polarizations one by one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikamo-Satoh, Eriko; Yamada, Fumihiko; Takagi, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Takuya; Kawai, Tomoji

    2009-01-01

    We present electrostatic force microscopy images of double-stranded DNA and transcription complex on an insulating mica substrate obtained with molecular resolution using a frequency-mode noncontact atomic force microscope. The electrostatic potential images show that both DNA and transcription complexes are polarized with an upward dipole moment. Potential differences of these molecules from the mica substrate enabled us to estimate dipole moments of isolated DNA and transcription complex in zero external field to be 0.027 D/base and 0.16 D/molecule, respectively. Scanning capacitance microscopy demonstrates characteristic contrast inversion between DNA and transcription complex images, indicating the difference in electric polarizability of these molecules. These findings indicate that the electrostatic properties of individual biological molecules can be imaged on an insulator substrate while retaining complex formation.

  19. Analysis of dual polarization images of precipitating clouds collected by the COSMO SkyMed constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Luca; Roberto, Nicoletta; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Fritz, Jason; Chandrasekar, V.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, several satellite missions are employing X-band synthetic aperture radars (SAR) with polarimetric capabilities. In images collected over land by X-band SAR, precipitation results mainly in evident attenuation of the surface returns. Effects of precipitation in polarimetric SAR images and how to exploit them for precipitation studies are emerging topics of interest. This paper investigates polarimetric signatures of precipitation in images collected by the X-band SARs of the Italian Space Agency COSMO SkyMed constellation using the HH-VV alternate polarimetric mode. Analyzed images were collected in 2010 when the constellation was composed of three satellites and operated in the “tandem like” interferometric configuration, which allowed acquisition of the same scene with the same viewing geometry and a minimum decorrelation time of one day. Observations collected in Piedmont (Italy) and Tampa Bay (Florida, US) have been analyzed along with coincident observations collected by operational weather radars, used to reconstruct the component of SAR returns due to precipitation at horizontal and vertical polarization states. Different techniques are used depending on the different characteristics of terrestrial radars. SAR observations reconstructed from terrestrial measurements are in fairly good agreement with actual SAR observations. Results confirm that the attenuation signature in SAR images collected over land is particularly pronounced in the presence of precipitation cells and can be related to the radar reflectivity integrated along the same path. The difference between copolar HH and VV power measurements reveals a differential attenuation due to anisotropy of precipitation, whose range is limited when the SAR incidence angle is low. A specific feature observed in the CosmoSkyMed alternate polarization implementation is the presence of the scalloping effect, a periodic effect along the azimuth direction that cannot always be removed by standard de

  20. THE PDS 66 CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AS SEEN IN POLARIZED LIGHT WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Schuyler G.; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Perrin, Marshall; Hines, Dean C.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Wang, Jason; Dong, Ruobing; Duchêne, Gaspard; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Draper, Zachary H.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Hung, Li-Wei; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Grady, Carol A.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    We present H- and K-band imaging polarimetry for the PDS 66 circumstellar disk obtained during the commissioning of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Polarization images reveal a clear detection of the disk in to the 0.″12 inner working angle (IWA) in the H band, almost three times closer to the star than the previous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations with NICMOS and STIS (0.″35 effective IWA). The centro-symmetric polarization vectors confirm that the bright inner disk detection is due to circumstellar scattered light. A more diffuse disk extends to a bright outer ring centered at 80 AU. We discuss several physical mechanisms capable of producing the observed ring + gap structure. GPI data confirm enhanced scattering on the east side of the disk that is inferred to be nearer to us. We also detect a lateral asymmetry in the south possibly due to shadowing from material within the IWA. This likely corresponds to a temporally variable azimuthal asymmetry observed in HST/STIS coronagraphic imaging

  1. THE PDS 66 CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AS SEEN IN POLARIZED LIGHT WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Schuyler G.; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Perrin, Marshall; Hines, Dean C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Nielsen, Eric L. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Wang, Jason; Dong, Ruobing; Duchêne, Gaspard; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cardwell, Andrew [LBT Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Room 552, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Chilcote, Jeffrey [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Draper, Zachary H. [University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Hung, Li-Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Goodsell, Stephen J. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Grady, Carol A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: swolff9@jh.edu [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2016-02-10

    We present H- and K-band imaging polarimetry for the PDS 66 circumstellar disk obtained during the commissioning of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Polarization images reveal a clear detection of the disk in to the 0.″12 inner working angle (IWA) in the H band, almost three times closer to the star than the previous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations with NICMOS and STIS (0.″35 effective IWA). The centro-symmetric polarization vectors confirm that the bright inner disk detection is due to circumstellar scattered light. A more diffuse disk extends to a bright outer ring centered at 80 AU. We discuss several physical mechanisms capable of producing the observed ring + gap structure. GPI data confirm enhanced scattering on the east side of the disk that is inferred to be nearer to us. We also detect a lateral asymmetry in the south possibly due to shadowing from material within the IWA. This likely corresponds to a temporally variable azimuthal asymmetry observed in HST/STIS coronagraphic imaging.

  2. The use of the multiple-gradient array for geoelectrical resistivity and induced polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizebeokhai, Ahzegbobor P.; Oyeyemi, Kehinde D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of most conventional electrode configurations in electrical resistivity survey is often time consuming and labour intensive, especially when using manual data acquisition systems. Often, data acquisition teams tend to reduce data density so as to speed up field operation thereby reducing the survey cost; but this could significantly degrade the quality and resolution of the inverse models. In the present work, the potential of using the multiple-gradient array, a non-conventional electrode configuration, for practical cost effective and rapid subsurface resistivity and induced polarization mapping was evaluated. The array was used to conduct 2D resistivity and time-domain induced polarization imaging along two traverses in a study site at Ota, southwestern Nigeria. The subsurface was characterised and the main aquifer delineated using the inverse resistivity and chargeability images obtained. The performance of the multiple-gradient array was evaluated by correlating the 2D resistivity and chargeability images with those of the conventional Wenner array as well as the result of some soundings conducted along the same traverses using Schlumberger array. The multiple-gradient array has been found to have the advantage of measurement logistics and improved image resolution over the Wenner array.

  3. Restoration of s-polarized evanescent waves and subwavelength imaging by a single dielectric slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Gawhary, Omar; Schilder, Nick J; Costa Assafrao, Alberto da; Pereira, Silvania F; Paul Urbach, H

    2012-01-01

    It was predicted a few years ago that a medium with negative index of refraction would allow for perfect imaging. Although no material has been found so far that behaves as a perfect lens, some experiments confirmed the theoretical predictions in the near-field, or quasi-static, regime where the behaviour of a negative index medium can be mimicked by a thin layer of noble metal, such as silver. These results are normally attributed to the excitation of surface plasmons in the metal, which only leads to the restoration of p-polarized evanescent waves. In this work, we show that the restoration of s-polarized evanescent waves and, correspondingly, sub-wavelength imaging by a single dielectric slab are possible. Specifically, we show that at λ = 632 nm a thin layer of GaAs behaves as a superlens for s-polarized waves. Replacing the single-metal slab by a dielectric is not only convenient from a technical point of view, it being much easier to deposit and control the thickness and flatness of dielectric films than metal ones, but also invites us to re-think the connection between surface plasmon excitation and the theory of negative refraction. (paper)

  4. SENSITIVITY OF STACKED IMAGING DETECTORS TO HARD X-RAY POLARIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muleri, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo, E-mail: fabio.muleri@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Computational On-Chip Imaging of Nanoparticles and Biomolecules using Ultraviolet Light

    KAUST Repository

    Daloglu, Mustafa Ugur; Ray, Aniruddha; Gorocs, Zoltan; Xiong, Matthew; Malik, Ravinder; Bitan, Gal; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    wavelength (UV) of 266 nm. The increased forward scattering from nanoscale objects at this short wavelength has enabled us to detect individual sub-30 nm nanoparticles over a large field-of-view of >16 mm2 using an on-chip imaging platform, where the sample

  6. Wavelet analysis of polarization azimuths maps for laser images of myocardial tissue for the purpose of diagnosing acute coronary insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchuliak, O. Ya.; Peresunko, A. P.; Bakko, Bouzan Adel; Kushnerick, L. Ya.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the foundations of a large scale - localized wavelet - polarization analysis - inhomogeneous laser images of histological sections of myocardial tissue. Opportunities were identified defining relations between the structures of wavelet coefficients and causes of death. The optical model of polycrystalline networks of myocardium protein fibrils is presented. The technique of determining the coordinate distribution of polarization azimuth of the points of laser images of myocardium histological sections is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order) parameters are presented which characterize distributions of wavelet - coefficients polarization maps of myocardium layers and death reasons.

  7. Optical image security using Stokes polarimetry of spatially variant polarized beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Areeba; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2018-06-01

    We propose a novel security scheme that uses vector beam characterized by the spatially variant polarization distribution. A vector beam is so generated that its helical components carry tailored phases corresponding to the image/images that is/are to be encrypted. The tailoring of phase has been done by employing the modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for phase retrieval. Stokes parameters for the final vector beam is evaluated and is used to construct the ciphertext and one of the keys. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that it generates real ciphertext and keys which are easier to transmit and store than complex quantities. Moreover, the known plaintext attack is not applicable to this system. As a proof-of-concept, simulation results have been presented for securing single and double gray-scale images.

  8. Three-dimensional super-resolved live cell imaging through polarized multi-angle TIRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cheng; Zhao, Guangyuan; Liu, Wenjie; Chen, Youhua; Zhang, Zhimin; Jin, Luhong; Xu, Yingke; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2018-04-01

    Measuring three-dimensional nanoscale cellular structures is challenging, especially when the structure is dynamic. Owing to the informative total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) imaging under varied illumination angles, multi-angle (MA) TIRF has been examined to offer a nanoscale axial and a subsecond temporal resolution. However, conventional MA-TIRF still performs badly in lateral resolution and fails to characterize the depth image in densely distributed regions. Here, we emphasize the lateral super-resolution in the MA-TIRF, exampled by simply introducing polarization modulation into the illumination procedure. Equipped with a sparsity and accelerated proximal algorithm, we examine a more precise 3D sample structure compared with previous methods, enabling live cell imaging with a temporal resolution of 2 s and recovering high-resolution mitochondria fission and fusion processes. We also shared the recovery program, which is the first open-source recovery code for MA-TIRF, to the best of our knowledge.

  9. An investigation of polarized atomic photofragments using the ion imaging technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracker, A.S.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis describes measurement and analysis of the recoil angle dependence of atomic photofragment polarization (atomic v-J correlation). This property provides information on the electronic rearrangement which occurs during molecular photodissociation. Chapter 1 introduces concepts of photofragment vector correlations and reviews experimental and theoretical progress in this area. Chapter 2 described the photofragment ion imaging technique, which the author has used to study the atomic v-J correlation in chlorine and ozone dissociation. Chapter 3 outlines a method for isolating and describing the contribution to the image signal which is due exclusively to angular momentum alignment. Ion imaging results are presented and discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 discusses a different set of experiments on the three-fragment dissociation of azomethane. 122 refs.

  10. Advances in vacuum ultraviolet detection with multistep gaseous detectors and application to Cherenkov ring imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Breskin, Amos; Charpak, Georges; Peisert, Anna; Policarpo, Armando; Sauli, Fabio

    1981-01-01

    The multistep avalanche chamber permits an efficient detection of VUV photons. In a two-step proportional mode charges higher than 1 pC are obtained from single electrons. By using as the final localization step a spark chamber viewed by a TV digitizer it is easy to have imaging of complex patterns. This is applied to Cherenkov ring imaging and (K, pi ) separation with 3 sigma up to 320 GeV is envisaged. The properties of various photoionizable vapours have been studied. By combining a scintillation xenon chamber with a photoionization wire chamber, a resolution of 8.3% (FWHM) has been obtained for 5.9 keV X- rays using tetrakis(dimethylamine)-ethylene vapour. (15 refs).

  11. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF CONTINUOUS OUTFLOWS AND PROPAGATING WAVES FROM NOAA 10942 WITH EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER/HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizuka, N.; Hara, H.

    2011-01-01

    We focused on 'sit-and-stare' observations of an outflow region at the edge of active region NOAA 10942 on 2007 February 20 obtained by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode. We analyzed the data above the base of the outflow and found both continuous outflows and waves, which propagate from the base of the outflow. The spectra at the base of the outflow and at higher locations show different properties. The line profiles show blue-side asymmetry at the base of the outflow where nonthermal broadening becomes large because of fast upflows generated by heating events. On the other hand, at higher locations line profiles are symmetric and the intensity disturbances vary in phase with the velocity disturbances. The correlations between the intensity and velocity disturbances become noticeable at higher locations, so this indicates evidence of (at least locally) upward propagating slow-mode waves along the outflow. We also found a transient oscillation of different period in the wavelet spectrum. This indicates that a different wave is additionally observed during a limited period. High cadence spectroscopic observations revealed intermittent signatures of nonthermal velocities. Each of them seems to correspond to the base of the propagating disturbances. Furthermore, a jet was captured by the sit-and-stare observations across the slit. The similarity of line profiles of the outflow and the jet may indicate that the flows and waves originate in unresolved explosive events in the lower atmosphere of the corona.

  12. STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES IN BARRED GALAXIES (SFB). I. ULTRAVIOLET TO INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF NGC 7479

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhimin; Meng Xianmin; Wu Hong; Cao Chen

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale bars and minor mergers are important drivers for the secular evolution of galaxies. Based on ground-based optical images and spectra as well as ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we present a multi-wavelength study of star formation properties in the barred galaxy NGC 7479, which also has obvious features of a minor merger. Using various tracers of star formation, we find that under the effects of both a stellar bar and a minor merger, star formation activity mainly takes place along the galactic bar and arms, while the star formation rate changes from the bar to the disk. With the help of spectral synthesis, we find that strong star formation took place in the bar region about 100 Myr ago, and the stellar bar might have been ∼10 Gyr old. By comparing our results with the secular evolutionary scenario from Jogee et al., we suggest that NGC 7479 is possibly in a transitional stage of secular evolution at present, and it may eventually become an earlier type galaxy or a luminous infrared galaxy. We also note that the probable minor merger event happened recently in NGC 7479, and we find two candidates for minor merger remnants.

  13. Development of a thinned back-illuminated CMOS active pixel sensor for extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging in space science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltham, N.R.; Prydderch, M.; Mapson-Menard, H.; Pool, P.; Harris, A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our programme to develop a large-format, science-grade, monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor for future space science missions, and in particular an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrograph for solar physics studies on ESA's Solar Orbiter. Our route to EUV sensitivity relies on adapting the back-thinning and rear-illumination techniques first developed for CCD sensors. Our first large-format sensor consists of 4kx3k 5 μm pixels fabricated on a 0.25 μm CMOS imager process. Wafer samples of these sensors have been thinned by e2v technologies with the aim of obtaining good sensitivity at EUV wavelengths. We present results from both front- and back-illuminated versions of this sensor. We also present our plans to develop a new sensor of 2kx2k 10 μm pixels, which will be fabricated on a 0.35 μm CMOS process. In progress towards this goal, we have designed a test-structure consisting of six arrays of 512x512 10 μm pixels. Each of the arrays has been given a different pixel design to allow verification of our models, and our progress towards optimizing a design for minimal system readout noise and maximum dynamic range. These sensors will also be back-thinned for characterization at EUV wavelengths

  14. Polarization-dependent Imaging Contrast (PIC) mapping reveals nanocrystal orientation patterns in carbonate biominerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Pupa U.P.A., E-mail: pupa@physics.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocrystal orientation shown by Polarization-dependent Imaging Contrast (PIC) maps. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIC-mapping of carbonate biominerals reveals their ultrastructure at the nanoscale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation mechanisms of biominerals is discovered by PIC-mapping using PEEM. -- Abstract: Carbonate biominerals are one of the most interesting systems a physicist can study. They play a major role in the CO{sub 2} cycle, they master templation, self-assembly, nanofabrication, phase transitions, space filling, crystal nucleation and growth mechanisms. A new imaging modality was introduced in the last 5 years that enables direct observation of the orientation of carbonate single crystals, at the nano- and micro-scale. This is Polarization-dependent Imaging Contrast (PIC) mapping, which is based on X-ray linear dichroism, and uses PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (PEEM). Here we present PIC-mapping results from biominerals, including the nacre and prismatic layers of mollusk shells, and sea urchin teeth. We describe various PIC-mapping approaches, and show that these lead to fundamental discoveries on the formation mechanisms of biominerals.

  15. Assessment of tissue polarimetric properties using Stokes polarimetric imaging with circularly polarized illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ji; He, Honghui; Lin, Jianyu; Dong, Yang; Chen, Dongsheng; Ma, Hui; Elson, Daniel S

    2018-04-01

    Tissue-depolarization and linear-retardance are the main polarization characteristics of interest for bulk tissue characterization, and are normally interpreted from Mueller polarimetry. Stokes polarimetry can be conducted using simpler instrumentation and in a shorter time. Here, we use Stokes polarimetric imaging with circularly polarized illumination to assess the circular-depolarization and linear-retardance properties of tissue. Results obtained were compared with Mueller polarimetry in transmission and reflection geometry, respectively. It is found that circular-depolarization obtained from these 2 methods is very similar in both geometries, and that linear-retardance is highly quantitatively similar for transmission geometry and qualitatively similar for reflection geometry. The majority of tissue circular-depolarization and linear-retardance image information (represented by local image contrast features) obtained from Mueller polarimetry is well preserved from Stokes polarimetry in both geometries. These findings can be referred to for further understanding tissue Stokes polarimetric data, and for further application of Stokes polarimetry under the circumstances where short acquisition time or low optical system complexity is a priority, such as polarimetric endoscopy and microscopy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation (EPS-SG) micro-wave imaging (MWI) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojkov, B. R.; Accadia, C.; Klaes, D.; Canestri, A.; Cohen, M.

    2017-12-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) will be followed by a second generation system called EPS-SG. This new family of missions will contribute to the Joint Polar System being jointly set up with NOAA in the timeframe 2020-2040. These satellites will fly, like Metop (EPS), in a sun synchronous, low earth orbit at 830 km altitude and 09:30 local time descending node, providing observations over the full globe with revisit times of 12 hours. EPS-SG consists of two different satellites configurations, the EPS-SGa series dedicated to IR and MW sounding, and the EPS-SGb series dedicated to microwave imaging and scatterometry. The EPS-SG family will consist of three successive launches of each satellite-type. The Microwave Imager (MWI) will be hosted on Metop-SGb series of satellites, with the primary objective of supporting Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) at regional and global scales. Other applications will be observation of surface parameters such as sea ice concentration and hydrology applications. The 18 MWI instrument frequencies range from 18.7 GHz to 183 GHz. All MWI channels up to 89 GHz will measure V- and H polarizations. The MWI was also designed to provide continuity of measurements for select heritage microwave imager channels (e.g. SSM/I, AMSR-E). The additional sounding channels such as the 50-55 and 118 GHz bands will provide additional cloud and precipitation information over sea and land. This combination of channels was successfully tested on the NPOESS Aircraft Sounder Testbed - Microwave Sounder (NAST-M) airborne radiometer, and it is the first time that will be implemented in a conical scanning configuration in a single instrument. An overview of the EPS-SG programme and the MWI instrument will be presented.

  17. Retrieve polarization aberration from image degradation: a new measurement method in DUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhongbo; Li, Yanqiu

    2017-10-01

    Detailed knowledge of polarization aberration (PA) of projection lens in higher-NA DUV lithographic imaging is necessary due to its impact to imaging degradations, and precise measurement of PA is conductive to computational lithography techniques such as RET and OPC. Current in situ measurement method of PA thorough the detection of degradations of aerial images need to do linear approximation and apply the assumption of 3-beam/2-beam interference condition. The former approximation neglects the coupling effect of the PA coefficients, which would significantly influence the accuracy of PA retrieving. The latter assumption restricts the feasible pitch of test masks in higher-NA system, conflicts with the Kirhhoff diffraction model of test mask used in retrieving model, and introduces 3D mask effect as a source of retrieving error. In this paper, a new in situ measurement method of PA is proposed. It establishes the analytical quadratic relation between the PA coefficients and the degradations of aerial images of one-dimensional dense lines in coherent illumination through vector aerial imaging, which does not rely on the assumption of 3-beam/2- beam interference and linear approximation. In this case, the retrieval of PA from image degradation can be convert from the nonlinear system of m-quadratic equations to a multi-objective quadratic optimization problem, and finally be solved by nonlinear least square method. Some preliminary simulation results are given to demonstrate the correctness and accuracy of the new PA retrieving model.

  18. Delineation of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination at a former hydrogenation plant using spectral induced polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas; Oberdörster, Christoph; Zschornack, Ludwig; Leven, Carsten; Dietrich, Peter; Weiss, Holger

    2012-08-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements were conducted at a former hydrogenation plant in Zeitz (NE Germany) to investigate the potential of SIP imaging to delineate areas with different BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) concentrations. Conductivity images reveal a poor correlation with the distribution of contaminants; whereas phase images exhibit two main anomalies: low phase shift values (product (BTEX concentrations > 1.7 g/l), and higher phase values for lower BTEX concentrations. Moreover, the spectral response of the areas with high BTEX concentration and free-phase products reveals a flattened spectrum in the low frequencies (< 40 Hz), while areas with lower BTEX concentrations exhibit a response characterized by a frequency peak. The SIP response was modelled using a Debye decomposition to compute images of the median relaxation-time. Consistent with laboratory studies, we observed an increase in the relaxation-time associated with an increase in BTEX concentrations. Measurements were also collected in the time domain (TDIP), revealing imaging results consistent with those obtained for frequency domain (SIP) measurements. Results presented here demonstrate the potential of the SIP imaging method to discriminate source and plume of dissolved contaminants at BTEX contaminated sites.

  19. Imaging of human breast tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Y.; Gautam, M.; Divakar Rao, K.; Swami, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We report a study on the use of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) for discriminating malignant (invasive ductal carcinoma), benign (fibroadenoma) and normal (adipocytes) breast tissue sites. The results show that while conventional OCT, that utilizes only the intensity of light back-scattered from tissue microstructures, is able to discriminate breast tissues as normal (adipocytes) and abnormal (malignant and benign) tissues, PS-OCT helps in discriminating between malignant and benign tissue sites also. The estimated values of birefringence obtained from the PSOCT imaging show that benign breast tissue samples have significantly higher birefringence as compared to the malignant tissue samples.

  20. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - UV fluxes of M31 globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, R.C.; Cornett, R.H.; Hill, J.K.; Hill, R.S.; Stecher, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Images obtained by a rocket-borne UV imaging telescope are used here to determine near-UV fluxes for 17 sources in M31 that are optical globular-cluster candidates and for the bright open cluster vdB0 in M31. Far-UV fluxes or flux limits are determined for the same clusters. The m(NUV)-V colors for M31 clusters are similar to those of Galactic clusters, except for the high-metallicity M31 cluster Bo 171. Four of the detected clusters have optical, m(NUV) - V, and m(FUV) - V colors indicating ages of about 100 million years. These four clusters are probably similar to the so-called 'blue globular' clusters of the LMC. The existence of young LMC-type blue globulars and the possible existence of middle-aged metal-rich globulars may indicate that M31 has continued to form globular clusters throughout its life. 39 references

  1. Imaging Polarized Secretory Traffic at the Immune Synapse in Living T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Víctor; Izquierdo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Immune synapse (IS) formation by T lymphocytes constitutes a crucial event involved in antigen-specific, cellular and humoral immune responses. After IS formation by T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells, the convergence of secretory vesicles toward the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and MTOC polarization to the IS are involved in polarized secretion at the synaptic cleft. This specialized mechanism appears to specifically provide the immune system with a fine strategy to increase the efficiency of crucial secretory effector functions of T lymphocytes, while minimizing non-specific, cytokine-mediated stimulation of bystander cells, target cell killing and activation-induced cell death. The molecular bases involved in the polarized secretory traffic toward the IS in T lymphocytes have been the focus of interest, thus different models and several imaging strategies have been developed to gain insights into the mechanisms governing directional secretory traffic. In this review, we deal with the most widely used, state-of-the-art approaches to address the molecular mechanisms underlying this crucial, immune secretory response.

  2. Knockin' on pollen's door: live cell imaging of early polarization events in germinating Arabidopsis pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Frank; Konrad, Sebastian S. A.; Sprunck, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes are an excellent system for studying the cellular dynamics and complex signaling pathways that coordinate polarized tip growth. Although several signaling mechanisms acting in the tip-growing pollen tube have been described, our knowledge on the subcellular and molecular events during pollen germination and growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane is rather scarce. To simultaneously track germinating pollen from up to 12 genetically different plants we developed an inexpensive and easy mounting technique, suitable for every standard microscope setup. We performed high magnification live-cell imaging during Arabidopsis pollen activation, germination, and the establishment of pollen tube tip growth by using fluorescent marker lines labeling either the pollen cytoplasm, vesicles, the actin cytoskeleton or the sperm cell nuclei and membranes. Our studies revealed distinctive vesicle and F-actin polarization during pollen activation and characteristic growth kinetics during pollen germination and pollen tube formation. Initially, the germinating Arabidopsis pollen tube grows slowly and forms a uniform roundish bulge, followed by a transition phase with vesicles heavily accumulating at the growth site before switching to rapid tip growth. Furthermore, we found the two sperm cells to be transported into the pollen tube after the phase of rapid tip growth has been initiated. The method presented here is suitable to quantitatively study subcellular events during Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth, and for the detailed analysis of pollen mutants with respect to pollen polarization, bulging, or growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane. PMID:25954283

  3. Polarization effect of CdZnTe imaging detector based on high energy γ source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Miao; Xiao Shali; Wang Xi; Shen Min; Zhang Liuqiang; Cao Yulin; Chen Yuxiao

    2011-01-01

    The inner electric potential distribution of CdZnTe detector was derived by applying poisson equation with the first type boundary condition, and the polarization effect of CdZnTe pixellated detector for imaging 137 Cs γ source was investigated. The results of numerical calculation and experiment indicate that electric potential distribution is mainly influenced by applied bias for low charge density in CdZnTe crystal and, in turn, there is linear relationship between electric potential distribution and applied bias that induces uniform electric field under low irradiated flux. However, the electric potential appears polarization phenomenon, and the electric field in CdZnTe crystal is distorted when CdZnTe detector is under high irradiated flux. Consequently, charge carriers in CdZnTe crystal drift towards the edge pixels of irradiated region, and hence, the shut-off central pixels are surrounded by a ring of low counting pixels. The polarization effect indeed deteriorates the performance of CdZnTe detector severely and the event counts of edge pixels for irradiated region reduce about 70%. (authors)

  4. Sensing Noncollinear Magnetism at the Atomic Scale Combining Magnetic Exchange and Spin-Polarized Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Gerritsen, Jan W; Wegner, Daniel; Khajetoorians, Alexander A

    2017-09-13

    Storing and accessing information in atomic-scale magnets requires magnetic imaging techniques with single-atom resolution. Here, we show simultaneous detection of the spin-polarization and exchange force with or without the flow of current with a new method, which combines scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy. To demonstrate the application of this new method, we characterize the prototypical nanoskyrmion lattice formed on a monolayer of Fe/Ir(111). We resolve the square magnetic lattice by employing magnetic exchange force microscopy, demonstrating its applicability to noncollinear magnetic structures for the first time. Utilizing distance-dependent force and current spectroscopy, we quantify the exchange forces in comparison to the spin-polarization. For strongly spin-polarized tips, we distinguish different signs of the exchange force that we suggest arises from a change in exchange mechanisms between the probe and a skyrmion. This new approach may enable both nonperturbative readout combined with writing by current-driven reversal of atomic-scale magnets.

  5. Free Radical Imaging Using In Vivo Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori

    2015-01-01

    Redox reactions that generate free radical intermediates are essential to metabolic processes, and their intermediates can produce reactive oxygen species, which may promote diseases related to oxidative stress. The development of an in vivo electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer and its imaging enables us noninvasive and direct measurement of in vivo free radical reactions in living organisms. The dynamic nuclear polarization magnetic resonance imaging (DNP-MRI), also called PEDRI or OMRI, is also a new imaging method for observing free radical species in vivo. The spatiotemporal resolution of free radical imaging with DNP-MRI is comparable with that in MRI, and each of the radical species can be distinguished in the spectroscopic images by changing the frequency or magnetic field of ESR irradiation. Several kinds of stable nitroxyl radicals were used as spin probes to detect in vivo redox reactions. The signal decay of nitroxyl probes, which is determined with in vivo DNP-MRI, reflects the redox status under oxidative stress, and the signal decay is suppressed by prior administration of antioxidants. In addition, DNP-MRI can also visualize various intermediate free radicals from the intrinsic redox molecules. This noninvasive method, in vivo DNP-MRI, could become a useful tool for investigating the mechanism of oxidative injuries in animal disease models and the in vivo effects of antioxidant drugs. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Polarization-based and specular-reflection-based noncontact latent fingerprint imaging and lifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Schön; Yemelyanov, Konstantin M.; Pugh, Edward N., Jr.; Engheta, Nader

    2006-09-01

    In forensic science the finger marks left unintentionally by people at a crime scene are referred to as latent fingerprints. Most existing techniques to detect and lift latent fingerprints require application of a certain material directly onto the exhibit. The chemical and physical processing applied to the fingerprint potentially degrades or prevents further forensic testing on the same evidence sample. Many existing methods also have deleterious side effects. We introduce a method to detect and extract latent fingerprint images without applying any powder or chemicals on the object. Our method is based on the optical phenomena of polarization and specular reflection together with the physiology of fingerprint formation. The recovered image quality is comparable to existing methods. In some cases, such as the sticky side of tape, our method shows unique advantages.

  7. Polarization-Sensitive Hyperspectral Imaging in vivo: A Multimode Dermoscope for Skin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Saager, Rolf B.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Chave, Robert; Lindsley, Erik H.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-05-01

    Attempts to understand the changes in the structure and physiology of human skin abnormalities by non-invasive optical imaging are aided by spectroscopic methods that quantify, at the molecular level, variations in tissue oxygenation and melanin distribution. However, current commercial and research systems to map hemoglobin and melanin do not correlate well with pathology for pigmented lesions or darker skin. We developed a multimode dermoscope that combines polarization and hyperspectral imaging with an efficient analytical model to map the distribution of specific skin bio-molecules. This corrects for the melanin-hemoglobin misestimation common to other systems, without resorting to complex and computationally intensive tissue optical models. For this system's proof of concept, human skin measurements on melanocytic nevus, vitiligo, and venous occlusion conditions were performed in volunteers. The resulting molecular distribution maps matched physiological and anatomical expectations, confirming a technologic approach that can be applied to next generation dermoscopes and having biological plausibility that is likely to appeal to dermatologists.

  8. The Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe PHIPS: First Stereo-Imaging and Polar Scattering Function Measurements of Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmonem, A.; Schnaiter, M.; Schön, R.; Leisner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Cirrus clouds impact climate by their influence on the water vapour distribution in the upper troposphere. Moreover, they directly affect the radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere by the scattering of incoming solar radiation and the absorption of outgoing thermal emission. The link between the microphysical properties of ice cloud particles and the radiative forcing of the clouds is not as yet well understood and the influence of the shapes of ice crystals on the radiative budget of cirrus clouds is currently under debate. PHIPS is a new experimental device for the stereo-imaging of individual cloud particles and the simultaneous measurement of the polar scattering function of the same particle. PHIPS uses an automated particle event triggering system that ensures that only those particles are captured which are located in the field of view - depth of field volume of the microscope unit. Efforts were made to improve the resolution power of the microscope unit down to about 3 µm and to facilitate a 3D morphology impression of the ice crystals. This is realised by a stereo-imaging set up composed of two identical microscopes which image the same particle under an angular viewing distance of 30°. The scattering part of PHIPS enables the measurement of the polar light scattering function of cloud particles with an angular resolution of 1° for forward scattering directions (from 1° to 10°) and 8° for side and backscattering directions (from 18° to 170°). For each particle the light scattering pulse per channel is stored either as integrated intensity or as time resolved intensity function which opens a new category of data analysis concerning details of the particle movement. PHIPS is the first step to PHIPS-HALO which is one of the in situ ice particle and water vapour instruments that are currently under development for the new German research aircraft HALO. The instrument was tested in the ice cloud characterisation campaign HALO-02 which was conducted

  9. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - Young clusters in H II regions of M83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, R.C.; Cornett, R.H.; Hill, J.K.; Stecher, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    UV images of M83 at 1540 and 2360 A reveal 18 compact sources that are associated with H II regions. E(B - V) values were estimated individually from the observed UV and optical colors and the Galactic UV extinction curve, using theoretical flux distributions. The dereddened colors are consistent with ages up to 3 x 10 to the 6th yr. A maximum possible age of 6.5 x 10 to the 6th yr is obtained assuming foreground reddening only. The distribution of observed colors is consistent with the Galactic reddening curve but not with enhanced far-UV extinction, as in the LMC 30 Dor curve. The H-alpha fluxes suggest either that dust within the H II regions absorbs up to 70 percent of the Lyman continuum radiation or that a similar fraction of the H-alpha flux is below the surface brightness detection limit. Cluster mass estimates depend on the range of stellar masses present but are probably in the range 10,000-100,000 solar masses. 25 refs

  10. Microstructural analysis of human white matter architecture using Polarized Light Imaging (PLI: Views from neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus eAxer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available To date, there are several methods for mapping connectivity, ranging from the macroscopic to molecular scales. However, it is difficult to integrate this multiply-scaled data into one concept. Polarized light imaging (PLI is a method to quantify fiber orientation in gross histological brain sections based on the birefringent properties of the myelin sheaths. The method is capable of imaging fiber orientation of larger-scale architectural patterns with higher detail than diffusion MRI of the human brain. PLI analyses light transmission through a gross histological section of a human brain under rotation of a polarization filter combination. Estimates of the angle of fiber direction and the angle of fiber inclination are automatically calculated at every point of the imaged section. Multiple sections can be assembled into a 3D volume. We describe the principles of PLI and present several studies of fiber anatomy in the human brain: 6 brainstems were serially sectioned, imaged with PLI, and 3D reconstructed. Pyramidal tract and lemniscus medialis were segmented in the PLI datasets. PLI data from the internal capsule was related to results from confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is a method of smaller scale fiber anatomy. PLI fiber architecture of the extreme capsule was compared to macroscopical dissection, which represents a method of larger scale anatomy. The microstructure of the anterior human cingulum bundle was analyzed in serial sections of 6 human brains. PLI can generate highly-resolved 3D datsets of fiber orientation of the human brain and has, therefore, a high comparability to diffusion MR. To get additional information regarding axon structure and density, PLI can also be combined with classical histological stains. It brings the directional aspects of diffusion MRI into the range of histology and may represent a promising tool to close the gap between larger scale diffusion orientation and microstructural histological analysis

  11. Tasmanian tigers and polar bears: The documentary moving image and (species loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Smaill

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I explore how two divergent examples of the nonfiction moving image can be understood in relation to the problem of representing species loss. The species that provide the platform for this consideration are the thylacine, better known as the Tasmanian tiger, and the polar bear. They represent the two contingencies of species loss: endangerment and extinction. My analysis is structured around moving images from the 1930s of the last known thylacine and the very different example of Arctic Tale (Adam Ravetch, Sarah Robertson, 2007, a ‘Disneyfied’ film that dramatises climate change and its impact on the polar bear. Species loss is frequently perceived in a humanist sense, reflecting how we ‘imagine ourselves’ or anthropocentric charactersations of non-human others. I offer a close analysis of the two films, examining the problem of representing extinction through a consideration of the play of absence and presence, vitality and extinguishment, that characterises both the ontology of cinema and narratives about species loss.

  12. Galileo multispectral imaging of the north polar and eastern limb regions of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, M.J.S.; Greeley, R.; Greenberg, R.; McEwen, A.; Klaasen, K.P.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C.; Neukum, G.; Chapman, C.R.; Geissler, P.; Heffernan, C.; Breneman, H.; Anger, C.; Carr, M.H.; Davies, M.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Gierasch, P.J.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Pilcher, C.B.; Thompson, W.R.; Veverka, J.; Sagan, C.

    1994-01-01

    Multispectral images obtained during the Galileo probe's second encounter with the moon reveal the compositional nature of the north polar regions and the northeastern limb. Mare deposits in these regions are found to be primarily low to medium titanium lavas and, as on the western limb, show only slight spectral heterogeneity. The northern light plains are found to have the spectral characteristics of highlands materials, show little evidence for the presence of cryptomaria, and were most likely emplaced by impact processes regardless of their age.Multispectral images obtained during the Galileo probe's second encounter with the moon reveal the compositional nature of the north polar regions and the northeastern limb. Mare deposits in these regions are found to be primarily low to medium titanium lavas and, as on the western limb, show only slight spectral heterogeneity. The northern light plains are found to have the spectral characteristics of highlands materials, show little evidence for the presence of cryptomaria, and were most likely emplaced by impact processes regardless of their age.

  13. In vivo imaging of human oral hard and soft tissues by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Golde, Jonas; Kirsten, Lars; Tetschke, Florian; Hempel, Franz; Rosenauer, Tobias; Hannig, Christian; Koch, Edmund

    2017-12-01

    Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides three-dimensional high-resolution images of biological tissue, the benefit of polarization contrast in the field of dentistry is highlighted in this study. Polarization-sensitive OCT (PS OCT) with phase-sensitive recording is used for imaging dental and mucosal tissues in the human oral cavity in vivo. An enhanced polarization contrast of oral structures is reached by analyzing the signals of the co- and crosspolarized channels of the swept source PS OCT system quantitatively with respect to reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and depolarization. The calculation of these polarization parameters enables a high tissue-specific contrast imaging for the detailed physical interpretation of human oral hard and soft tissues. For the proof-of-principle, imaging of composite restorations and mineralization defects at premolars as well as gingival, lingual, and labial oral mucosa was performed in vivo within the anterior oral cavity. The achieved contrast-enhanced results of the investigated human oral tissues by means of polarization-sensitive imaging are evaluated by the comparison with conventional intensity-based OCT.

  14. Imaging through Fog Using Polarization Imaging in the Visible/NIR/SWIR Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    Atmosphere.” International Journal of Computer Vision 48, 2002 13. Tan , R. T. "Visibility in bad weather from a single image." IEEE Conference on Computer...34 2011 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP), Prague, 2011 26. Hautiere, Nicolas et al. “Blind contrast

  15. Prospects for the design of an ultraviolet imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    Recent results from solar observations in the far and extremeultraviolet (FUV/EUV) obtained from SOHO (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory) and TRACE (Transition Region Camera) show the extreme variability of the solar atmosphere. Within the limited resolution of the instruments (1-2 arcseconds) horizontal and vertical velocities up-to 100 to 400 km s-1 have been measured. With an horizontal velocity of 100 km s-1 an one arsecond structure crosses the one arcsecond slit width of a classical slit spectrometer in less than 10 seconds. In the future, with higher angular resolution (e.g. 0.1 arcsecond), the capability to study small structures will be greatly reduced by a classical slit spectrometer. To be able to characterize the small scale solar atmospheric structures formed in the 104 K to 106 K temperature range (which emit in the 30 to 180 nm wavelength range) a spectrometer without slit (or with wide slit) is required. At the same time to obtain an accurate measurement of the doppler velocity an high spectral resolution is needed. The two requirements, high spectral resolution and large slit, are difficult to be simultaneously fulfilled with a classical slit spectrometer within the limited volume of a space instrumentation. Also, we propose to use an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) to provide simultaneously a bidimensionnal field and an accurate determination of line profiles and positions. The development of Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS), although popular in the infrared, has been very limited in the UV/FUV by the lack of very high quality beam splitter. Since 10 years, the use of diffraction gratings as beam splitters has been suggested and few intruments have been built ([Chak 94]; [Clea 92]; [File 00]). These instruments illustrate some applications in the new wavelength domain opened by using a beam splitter grating, but do not yet provide the full capabilities of an FTS. In this paper we present several optical schemes which can

  16. Chromospheric Evaporation in an M1.8 Flare Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a flare that occurred on 9 March 2012 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit reached almost the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, fortunately EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km/s upflows was observed in several locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20 - 60 km/s upflows in a host of million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XI - Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex. At a point close to strong energy input, the flare ions reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK. At this point there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. The results to be presented are refined from the preliminary data given above and combined with context AIA observations for a comparison with predictions of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

  17. Use of a Reflective Ultraviolet Imaging System (RUVIS) on Two-Dimensional Dust Impressions Created with Footwear on Multiple Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelson, Brian Aaron

    Footwear impression evidence in dust is often difficult to locate in ambient light and is a fragile medium that both collection and enhancement techniques can destroy or distort. The collection of footwear impression evidence always begins with non-destructive photographic techniques; however, current methods are limited to oblique lighting of the impression followed by an attempt to photograph in situ. For the vast majority of footwear impressions, an interactive collection method, and thus a potentially destructive procedure, is subsequently carried out to gather the evidence. Therefore, alternative non-destructive means for the preservation and enhancement of footwear impressions in dust merits further attention. Previous research performed with reflected ultraviolet (UV) photography and reflected ultraviolet imaging systems (RUVIS) has shown that there are additional non-destructive methodologies that can be applied to the search for and documentation of footwear impressions in dust. Unfortunately, these prior studies did not include robust comparisons to traditional oblique white light, instead choosing to focus on different UV wavelengths. This study, however, seeks to evaluate the use of a RUVIS device paired with a 254 nanometer (nm) UV light source to locate 2-D footwear impressions in dust on multiple substrates against standard oblique white light techniques and assess the visibility of the impression and amount of background interference present. The optimal angle of incident UV light for each substrate was also investigated. Finally, this study applied an image enhancement technique in order to evaluate its usefulness when looking at the visibility of a footwear impression and the amount of background interference present for enhanced white light and RUVIS pictures of footwear impressions in dust. A collection of eight different substrate types was gathered for investigation, including vinyl composition tile (VCT), ceramic tile, marble tile, magazine

  18. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at low temperature and high magnetic eld for biomedical applications in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutailler, Florent

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis work was to design, build and optimize a large volume multi-samples DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) polarizer dedicated to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging applications. The experimental system is made up of a high magnetic field magnet (3,35 T) in which takes place a cryogenic system with a pumped bath of liquid helium ("4He) allowing temperatures lower than 1,2 K. A set of inserts is used for the different steps of DNP: irradiation of the sample by a microwave field (f=94 GHz and P=50 mW), polarization measurement by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance... With this system, up to three samples of 1 mL volume can be polarized to a rate of few per-cents. The system has a long autonomy of four hours, so it can be used for polarizing molecules with a long time constant of polarization. Finally, the possibility to get quasi-simultaneously, after dissolution, several samples with a high rate of polarization opens the way of new applications in biomedical imaging. (author) [fr

  19. Energetic neutral atom imaging with the Polar CEPPAD/IPS instrument: Initial forward modeling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Moore, K.R.; Spence, H.E.; Jorgensen, A.M.; Roelof, E.C.

    1997-01-01

    Although the primary function of the CEP-PAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current, detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper, the authors present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies

  20. Ultraviolet radiation and immunosuppression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G M

    2009-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen. The effects of UV radiation are mediated via direct damage to cellular DNA in the skin and suppression of image surveillance mechanisms. In the context of organ transplantation, addiction of drugs which suppress the immune system add greatly to the carcinogenicity of UV radiation. This review considers the mechanisms of such effects.

  1. Ultraviolet-light-induced multi-physics behaviors of 0–3 polarized transparent PLZT plates: II. Finite element analysis and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Quantian; Tong, Liyong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel finite element formulation for 0–3 polarized PbLaZrTi (PLZT) plates and a comparison of the predicted and measured bending displacements. The coupled multi-physics fields and Hamilton's principle for piezoelectric (PZT) materials are first extended to PLZT ceramics by including the anomalous photovoltaic and photo-thermal effects. The photo-induced non-uniform electrical field and mechanical strains across the thickness are modeled in the present finite element formulation for 0–3 polarized PLZT plates, and the associated actuator and sensor equations are derived. The transverse displacements of a 0–3 polarized PLZT plate are predicted using the present finite element formulation and compared with the measured data given in part I. A reasonably good correlation is noted for the transverse displacements at the ten measurement points

  2. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s –1 upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s –1 upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s –1 . We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive

  3. Chromospheric Evaporation in an M1.8 Flare Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s-1 upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s-1 upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s-1. We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive tests of

  4. Ultraviolet sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenck, G.O.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial ultraviolet radiation sources can supply bactericidal energy in such a high dosage that in less than a second a higher degree of disinfection is accomplished than by sun irradiation in hours. Bacteria, viruses, phages, and organic micropollutants can be degraded by photochemical wet combustion down to and below detection limits of organic carbon. There are no known ultraviolet-resistant microorganisms. There are limitations to ultraviolet treatment which can often be overcome by adequate technical measures. Unlike other water purification processes, ultraviolet irradiation only exterminates living organisms. The radiation must be able to penetrate to the objects of the kill; in a dose large enough to kill, and long enough to kill and prevent new growth. Contrary to filters, ultraviolet flow-through reactors do not restrict free flow significantly. In contrast to distillation, ultraviolet irradiation imposes no phase changes to the water. Used as a sequence in ultrapure water systems, maintenance requirements are virtually nonexistent; because of the absence of dissolved and particulate matter in purified water, mechanical cleaning of the photoreactor chambers is not essential. The process is highly economical; energy consumption is low and supervision minimal. 103 refs., 45 figs., 15 tabs

  5. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm for retinal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torzicky, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to develop a Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) device for ocular imaging in the 1 µm wavelength range and to explore its capabilities to image healthy subjects and patients with various retinal disorders. PS-OCT set-ups working in the 840 nm range have been used in several clinical studies, for examining different retinal pathologies. Especially the segmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) based on PS-OCT data shows advantages in cases of age related macular degeneration (AMD) in comparison to segmentation based on intensity images from commercial OCT systems. OCT imaging in the 1 µm wavelength region has recently gained popularity for ophthalmic applications due to the fact that it is perfectly suitable for enhanced visualization of choroid and sclera. This is due to decreased scattering and absorption in the RPE with increasing wavelength and due to the local absorption minimum of water (the vitreous of the eye consists mainly of water) for wavelengths around 1060 nm. An additional advantage is that a higher imaging quality in patients with corneal haze or cataract can be achieved when using OCT systems working at 1 µm. In this work we combine the advantages of PS-OCT imaging with the enhanced penetration depth of the 1 µm wavelength range for acquiring intensity, retardation, axis orientation and degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU) images of choroid and sclera. As a first step different PS-OCT set-ups working at 1060 nm were developed and a comparison regarding set-up parameters and imaging performance was accomplished. The two different set-ups that were built and investigated were a spectrometer based Fourier Domain OCT set-up and a swept source Fourier Domain OCT set-up. The swept source set-up was tested with two different light sources, a commercially available swept source laser (A-Scan rate of 100 kHz) and a prototype of a Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser (A-Scan rate of 350

  6. Subsurface imaging of water electrical conductivity, hydraulic permeability and lithology at contaminated sites by induced polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, P. K.; Balbarini, N.; Møller, I.; Rønde, V.; Christiansen, A. V.; Bjerg, P. L.; Auken, E.; Fiandaca, G.

    2018-05-01

    At contaminated sites, knowledge about geology and hydraulic properties of the subsurface and extent of the contamination is needed for assessing the risk and for designing potential site remediation. In this study, we have developed a new approach for characterizing contaminated sites through time-domain spectral induced polarization. The new approach is based on: (1) spectral inversion of the induced polarization data through a reparametrization of the Cole-Cole model, which disentangles the electrolytic bulk conductivity from the surface conductivity for delineating the contamination plume; (2) estimation of hydraulic permeability directly from the inverted parameters using a laboratory-derived empirical equation without any calibration; (3) the use of the geophysical imaging results for supporting the geological modelling and planning of drilling campaigns. The new approach was tested on a data set from the Grindsted stream (Denmark), where contaminated groundwater from a factory site discharges to the stream. Two overlapping areas were covered with seven parallel 2-D profiles each, one large area of 410 m × 90 m (5 m electrode spacing) and one detailed area of 126 m × 42 m (2 m electrode spacing). The geophysical results were complemented and validated by an extensive set of hydrologic and geologic information, including 94 estimates of hydraulic permeability obtained from slug tests and grain size analyses, 89 measurements of water electrical conductivity in groundwater, and four geological logs. On average the IP-derived and measured permeability values agreed within one order of magnitude, except for those close to boundaries between lithological layers (e.g. between sand and clay), where mismatches occurred due to the lack of vertical resolution in the geophysical imaging. An average formation factor was estimated from the correlation between the imaged bulk conductivity values and the water conductivity values measured in groundwater, in order to

  7. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  8. SuperDARN HF Scattering and Propagation in the Presence of Polar Patches Imaged Using RISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, R. G.; Perry, G. W.; Varney, R. H.; Gillies, D. M.; Donovan, E.

    2017-12-01

    The global array of High Frequency (HF) Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars continuously monitors ionospheric convection in the middle-to-high latitude region. The radars measure coherent backscatter from decameter scale field-aligned irregularities. One of the main generation mechanisms for these field-aligned irregularities is the gradient drift instability (GDI). The edges of ionospheric density structures, such as polar cap patches, provide ideal locations for GDI growth. The geometry required for GDI growth results in irregularities forming on the trailing edge of polar patches. However, irregularities generated by the non-linear evolution of the GDI can become prevalent throughout the patch within minutes. Modelling the irregularity growth and measurements of backscatter within patches have both confirmed this. One aspect that has often been overlooked in studies of coherent backscatter within patches is the effect of HF propagation on echo location. This study examines HF echo locations in the vicinity of patches that were imaged using the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radars (RISR). The effect of both vertical and lateral refraction of the HF wave on echo location is examined.

  9. Image sensor pixel with on-chip high extinction ratio polarizer based on 65-nm standard CMOS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Shishido, Sanshiro; Ando, Keisuke; Matsuoka, Hitoshi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Kakiuchi, Kiyomi; Ohta, Jun

    2013-05-06

    In this study, we demonstrate a polarization sensitive pixel for a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor based on 65-nm standard CMOS technology. Using such a deep-submicron CMOS technology, it is possible to design fine metal patterns smaller than the wavelengths of visible light by using a metal wire layer. We designed and fabricated a metal wire grid polarizer on a 20 × 20 μm(2) pixel for image sensor. An extinction ratio of 19.7 dB was observed at a wavelength 750 nm.

  10. Proton magnetic resonance with parahydrogen induced polarization. Imaging strategies and continuous generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechent, Jan Falk Frederik

    2012-12-17

    A major challenge in imaging is the detection of small amounts of molecules of interest. In the case of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) their signals are typically concealed by the large background signal of e.g. the tissue of the body. This problem can be tackled by hyperpolarization which increases the NMR signals up to several orders of magnitude. However, this strategy is limited for {sup 1}H, the most widely used nucleus in NMR and MRI, because the enormous number of protons in the body screen the small amount of hyperpolarized ones. Here, I describe a method giving rise to high {sup 1}H MRI contrast for hyperpolarized molecules against a large background signal. The contrast is based on the J-coupling induced rephasing of the NMR signal of molecules hyperpolarized via parahydrogen induce polarization (PHIP) and it can easily be implemented in common pulse sequences. Hyperpolarization methods typically require expensive technical equipment (e.g. lasers or microwaves) and most techniques work only in batch mode, thus the limited lifetime of the hyperpolarization is limiting its applications. Therefore, the second part of my thesis deals with the simple and efficient generation of an hyperpolarization. These two achievements open up alternative opportunities to use the standard MRI nucleus {sup 1}H for e.g. metabolic imaging in the future.

  11. Proton magnetic resonance with parahydrogen induced polarization. Imaging strategies and continuous generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechent, Jan Falk Frederik

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in imaging is the detection of small amounts of molecules of interest. In the case of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) their signals are typically concealed by the large background signal of e.g. the tissue of the body. This problem can be tackled by hyperpolarization which increases the NMR signals up to several orders of magnitude. However, this strategy is limited for 1 H, the most widely used nucleus in NMR and MRI, because the enormous number of protons in the body screen the small amount of hyperpolarized ones. Here, I describe a method giving rise to high 1 H MRI contrast for hyperpolarized molecules against a large background signal. The contrast is based on the J-coupling induced rephasing of the NMR signal of molecules hyperpolarized via parahydrogen induce polarization (PHIP) and it can easily be implemented in common pulse sequences. Hyperpolarization methods typically require expensive technical equipment (e.g. lasers or microwaves) and most techniques work only in batch mode, thus the limited lifetime of the hyperpolarization is limiting its applications. Therefore, the second part of my thesis deals with the simple and efficient generation of an hyperpolarization. These two achievements open up alternative opportunities to use the standard MRI nucleus 1 H for e.g. metabolic imaging in the future.

  12. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    André, Philippe [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bielewicz, Pawel [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136, Trieste (Italy); Banday, Anthony [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Barbosa, Domingos [Grupo de Radio Astronomia Basic Sciences and Enabling Technologies Instituto de Telecomunicações, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Barreiro, Belen [Instituto de Fìsica de Cantabria (CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria) Avda. de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Bartlett, James [APC, AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/lrfu, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris, Cité, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Bartolo, Nicola [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei" , Università degli studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Battistelli, Elia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma La Sapienza, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Battye, Richard; Bonaldi, Anna [Jordell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bendo, George [U.K. ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Benoȋt, Alain [Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Bersanelli, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, 16, Milano (Italy); Béthermin, Matthieu, E-mail: naselsky@nbi.dk [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-02-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The data obtained will allow us to precisely measure the absolute sky brightness and polarization of all the components of the sky emission in the observed frequency range, separating the primordial and extragalactic components cleanly from the galactic and zodiacal light emissions. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM, which include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, detecting approximately 10{sup 6} clusters extending to large redshift, including a characterization of the gas temperature of the brightest ones (through the relativistic corrections to the classic SZ template) as well as a peculiar velocity survey using the kinetic SZ effect that comprises our entire Hubble volume; (2) a detailed characterization of the properties and evolution of dusty galaxies, where the most of the star formation in the universe took place, the faintest population of which constitute the diffuse CIB (Cosmic Infrared Background); (3) a characterization of the B modes from primordial gravity waves generated during

  13. Reversing the polarity of a cochlear implant magnet after magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ju Hyun; Bae, Mi Ran; Chang, Jae Won; Choi, Jae Young

    2012-08-01

    The number of patients with cochlear implant (CI) has been rapidly increasing in recent years, and these patients show a growing need of examination by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the use of MRI on patients with CI is restricted by the internal magnet of the CI. Many studies have investigated the safety of performing 1.5T MRI on patients with CI, which is now being practiced in a clinical setting. We experienced a case in which the polarity of the cochlear implant magnet was reversed after the patient was examined using 1.5T MRI. The external device was attached to the internal device oppositely. We could not find displacement of the internal device, magnet, or electrode upon radiological evaluation. We came up with two possible mechanisms by which the polarity of the magnet reversed. The first possibility was that the magnetic field of MRI reversed the polarity of the magnet. The second was that the internal magnet was physically realigned while interacting with the MRI. We believe the second hypothesis to be more reliable. A removable magnet and a loose magnet boundary of a CI device may have allowed for physical reorientation of the internal magnet. Therefore, in order to avoid these complications, first, the internal magnet must not be aligned anti-parallel with the magnetic polarity of MRI. In the Siemens MRI, the vector of the magnetic field is downward, so implant site should be placed in facing upwards to minimize demagnetization. In the GE Medical Systems MRI, the vector of the magnetic field is upward, so the implant site should be placed facing downwards. Second, wearing of a commercial mold which is fixed to the internal device before performing MRI can be helpful. In addition, any removable internal magnets in a CI device should be removed before MRI, especially in the trunk. However, to ultimately solve this problem, the pocket of the internal magnet should be redesigned for safety. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of the polarization properties of a Philips-type prism for the construction of imaging polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Borda, R.; Waluschka, E.; Pellicori, S.; Martins, J. V.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Cieslak, J. D.; Thompson, P.

    2009-08-01

    The design and construction of wide FOV imaging polarimeters for use in atmospheric remote sensing requires significant attention to the prevention of artificial polarization induced by the optical elements. Surface, coatings, and angles of incidence throughout the system must be carefully designed in order to minimize these artifacts because the remaining instrumental bias polarization is the main factor which drives the final polarimetric accuracy of the system. In this work, we present a detailed evaluation and analysis to explore the possibility of retrieving the initial polarization state of the light traveling through a generic system that has inherent instrumental polarization. Our case is a wide FOV lens and a splitter device. In particular, we chose as splitter device a Philips-type prism, because it is able to divide the signal in 3 independent channels that could be simultaneously analyze to retrieve the three first elements of the Stoke vector (in atmospheric applications the elliptical polarization can be neglected [1]). The Philips-type configuration is a versatile, compact and robust prism device that is typically used in three color camera systems. It has been used in some commercial polarimetric cameras which do not claim high accuracy polarization measurements [2]. With this work, we address the accuracy of our polarization inversion and measurements made with the Philips-type beam divider.

  15. Single input state, single–mode fiber–based polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging by eigenpolarization referencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippok, Norman; Villiger, Martin; Jun, Chang–Su; Bouma, Brett E.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber–based polarization sensitive OFDI is more challenging than free–space implementations. Using multiple input states, fiber–based systems provide sample birefringence information with the benefit of a flexible sample arm but come at the cost of increased system and acquisition complexity, and either reduce acquisition speed or require increased acquisition bandwidth. Here we show that with the calibration of a single polarization state, fiber–based configurations can approach the conceptual simplicity of traditional free–space configurations. We remotely control the polarization state of the light incident at the sample using the eigenpolarization states of a wave plate as a reference, and determine the Jones matrix of the output fiber. We demonstrate this method for polarization sensitive imaging of biological samples. PMID:25927775

  16. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  17. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Polar Winds from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains the Level 3 Polar Winds Northern and Southern Hemisphere datasets. The Level 3 Polar Winds data from VIIRS for the Arctic and Antarctic from 65...

  18. Biologically inspired autonomous agent navigation using an integrated polarization analyzing CMOS image sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkaer, M.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Van Hoof, C.; Theuwissen, A.

    2010-01-01

    The navigational strategies of insects using skylight polarization are interesting for applications in autonomous agent navigation because they rely on very little information for navigation. A polarization navigation sensor using the Stokes parameters to determine the orientation is presented. The

  19. Polar Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    These three images were taken on three different orbits over the north polar cap in April 1999. Each shows a different part of the same ice-free trough. The left and right images are separated by a distance of more than 100 kilometers (62 miles). Note the similar layers in each image.

  20. Mass balance of Mars' residual south polar cap from CTX images and other data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. C.; Calvin, W.; Cantor, B.; Haberle, R.; James, P. B.; Lee, S. W.

    2016-04-01

    Erosion of pits in the residual south polar cap (RSPC) of Mars concurrent with deposition and fluctuating cap boundaries raises questions about the mass balance and long term stability of the cap. Determining a mass balance by measurement of a net gain or loss of atmospheric CO2 by direct pressure measurements (Haberle, R.M. et al. [2014]. Secular climate change on Mars: An update using one Mars year of MSL pressure data. American Geophysical Union (Fall). Abstract 3947), although perhaps the most direct method, has so far given ambiguous results. Estimating volume changes from imaging data faces challenges, and has previously been attempted only in isolated areas of the cap. In this study we use 6 m/pixel Context Imager (CTX) data from Mars year 31 to map all the morphologic units of the RSPC, expand the measurement record of pit erosion rates, and use high resolution images to place limits on vertical changes in the surface of the residual cap. We find the mass balance in Mars years 9-31 to be -6 to +4 km3/♂y, or roughly -0.039% to +0.026% of the mean atmospheric CO2 mass/♂y. The indeterminate sign results chiefly from uncertainty in the amounts of deposition or erosion on the upper surfaces of deposits (as opposed to scarp retreat). Erosion and net deposition in this period appear to be controlled by summertime planetary scale dust events, the largest occurring in MY 9, another, smaller one in MY 28. The rates of erosion and the deposition observed since MY 9 appear to be consistent with the types of deposits and erosional behavior found in most of the residual cap. However, small areas (100 ♂y) of depositional and/or erosional conditions different from those occurring in the period since MY 9, although these environmental differences could be subtle.

  1. Wide-field imaging of birefringent synovial fluid crystals using lens-free polarized microscopy for gout diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon Celine; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Gout is a form of crystal arthropathy where monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposit and elicit inflammation in a joint. Diagnosis of gout relies on identification of MSU crystals under a compensated polarized light microscope (CPLM) in synovial fluid aspirated from the patient’s joint. The detection of MSU crystals by optical microscopy is enhanced by their birefringent properties. However, CPLM partially suffers from the high-cost and bulkiness of conventional lens-based microscopy, and its relatively small field-of-view (FOV) limits the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis. Here we present a lens-free polarized microscope which adopts a novel differential and angle-mismatched polarizing optical design achieving wide-field and high-resolution holographic imaging of birefringent objects with a color contrast similar to that of a standard CPLM. The performance of this computational polarization microscope is validated by imaging MSU crystals made from a gout patient’s tophus and steroid crystals used as negative control. This lens-free polarized microscope, with its wide FOV (>20 mm2), cost-effectiveness and field-portability, can significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis, reduce costs, and can be deployed even at the point-of-care and in resource-limited clinical settings.

  2. A HOT COMPANION TO A BLUE STRAGGLER IN NGC 188 AS REVEALED BY THE ULTRA-VIOLET IMAGING TELESCOPE (UVIT) ON ASTROSAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramaniam, Annapurni; Sindhu, N.; Tandon, S. N.; Rao, N. Kameswara; George, K.; Mohan, R.; Murthy, J.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Stalin, C. S.; Sutaria, F.; Mondal, C.; Sahu, S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala II Block, Bangalore-560034 (India); Postma, J. [University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Côté, Patrick; Hutchings, J. B. [National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Ghosh, S. K. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Pune (India); Girish, V., E-mail: purni@iiap.res.in [ISRO Satellite Centre, HAL Airport Road, Bangalore 560017 (India)

    2016-12-20

    We present early results from the Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) on board the ASTROSAT observatory. We report the discovery of a hot companion associated with one of the blue straggler stars (BSSs) in the old open cluster, NGC 188. Using fluxes measured in four filters in UVIT’s far-UV (FUV) channel, and two filters in the near-UV (NUV) channel, we have constructed the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the star WOCS-5885, after combining with flux measurements from GALEX , Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, Ultraviolet Optical Telescope, SPITZER , WISE , and several ground-based facilities. The resulting SED spans a wavelength range of 0.15 μ m to 7.8 μ m. This object is found to be one of the brightest FUV sources in the cluster. An analysis of the SED reveals the presence of two components. The cooler component is found to have a temperature of 6000 ± 150 K, confirming that it is a BSS. Assuming it to be a main-sequence star, we estimate its mass to be ∼1.1–1.2 M {sub ⊙}. The hotter component, with an estimated temperature of 17,000 ± 500 K, has a radius of ∼ 0.6 R {sub ⊙} and L ∼30 L {sub ⊙}. Bigger and more luminous than a white dwarf, yet cooler than a sub-dwarf, we speculate that it is a post-AGB/HB star that has recently transferred its mass to the BSS, which is known to be a rapid rotator. This binary system, which is the first BSS with a post-AGB/HB companion identified in an open cluster, is an ideal laboratory to study the process of BSS formation via mass transfer.

  3. A HOT COMPANION TO A BLUE STRAGGLER IN NGC 188 AS REVEALED BY THE ULTRA-VIOLET IMAGING TELESCOPE (UVIT) ON ASTROSAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramaniam, Annapurni; Sindhu, N.; Tandon, S. N.; Rao, N. Kameswara; George, K.; Mohan, R.; Murthy, J.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Stalin, C. S.; Sutaria, F.; Mondal, C.; Sahu, S.; Postma, J.; Côté, Patrick; Hutchings, J. B.; Ghosh, S. K.; Girish, V.

    2016-01-01

    We present early results from the Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) on board the ASTROSAT observatory. We report the discovery of a hot companion associated with one of the blue straggler stars (BSSs) in the old open cluster, NGC 188. Using fluxes measured in four filters in UVIT’s far-UV (FUV) channel, and two filters in the near-UV (NUV) channel, we have constructed the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the star WOCS-5885, after combining with flux measurements from GALEX , Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, Ultraviolet Optical Telescope, SPITZER , WISE , and several ground-based facilities. The resulting SED spans a wavelength range of 0.15 μ m to 7.8 μ m. This object is found to be one of the brightest FUV sources in the cluster. An analysis of the SED reveals the presence of two components. The cooler component is found to have a temperature of 6000 ± 150 K, confirming that it is a BSS. Assuming it to be a main-sequence star, we estimate its mass to be ∼1.1–1.2 M _⊙. The hotter component, with an estimated temperature of 17,000 ± 500 K, has a radius of ∼ 0.6 R _⊙ and L ∼30 L _⊙. Bigger and more luminous than a white dwarf, yet cooler than a sub-dwarf, we speculate that it is a post-AGB/HB star that has recently transferred its mass to the BSS, which is known to be a rapid rotator. This binary system, which is the first BSS with a post-AGB/HB companion identified in an open cluster, is an ideal laboratory to study the process of BSS formation via mass transfer.

  4. Laser-polarized xenon-129 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The development of a method for in vivo perfusion measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Matthew Scot

    2001-07-01

    This thesis presents in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies with laser-polarized 129Xe delivered to living rats by inhalation and transported to tissue via blood flow. The results presented herein include the observation, assignment, and dynamic measurement of 129Xe resonances in the brain and body, the first one- and two-dimensional chemical-shift-resolved images of 129Xe in blood, tissue, and gas in the thorax, and the first images of 129Xe in brain tissue. These results establish that laser-polarized 129Xe can be used as a magnetic resonance tracer in vivo. NMR resonances at 0, 191, 198, and 209 ppm relative to the 129 Xe gas resonance are observed in the rat thorax and assigned to 129Xe in gas, fat, tissue, and blood respectively. Resonances at 189, 192, 195, 198, and 209 ppm are observed in the brain, and the 195 and 209 ppm resonances are assigned to 129Xe in grey matter, and blood, respectively. The design and construction of a laser-polarized 129Xe production and delivery system is described. This system produces liter-volumes of laser- polarized 129Xe by spin-exchange optical- pumping. It represented an order of magnitude increase over previously reported production volumes of polarized 129Xe. At approximately 3-7% polarization, 157 cc-atm of xenon is produced and stored as ice every 5 minutes. This reliable, effective, and simple production method for large volumes of 129Xe can be applied to other areas of research involving the use of laser-polarized noble gases. A model of the in vivo transport of laser polarized 129Xe to tissue under realistic experimental NMR conditions is described. Appropriate control of the NMR parameters is shown to allow tissue perfasion and 129Xe tissue T1 to be extracted from measurement of the steady-state 129Xe tissue signal. In vivo rodent 129Xe NMR results are used to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of this technique, and an inhaled 30% xenon/70% O2 mixture polarized to 5

  5. High-contrast fluorescence imaging based on the polarization dependence of the fluorescence enhancement using an optical interference mirror slide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    High-contrast fluorescence imaging using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide that enhances the fluorescence from a fluorophore located on top of the OIM surface is reported. To enhance the fluorescence and reduce the background light of the OIM, transverse-electric-polarized excitation light was used as incident light, and the transverse-magnetic-polarized fluorescence signal was detected. As a result, an approximate 100-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved through a 13-fold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and an 8-fold reduction of the background light.

  6. Effect of birefringence of lens material on polarization status and optical imaging characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Chin; Park, No-Cheol

    2018-04-01

    In most cases of molding with glass or optical polymers, it is expected that there will be birefringence caused by the internal mechanical stresses remaining in the molding material. The distribution of the residual stress can be annealed by slow cooling, but this approach is disadvantageous with respect to the shape accuracy and manufacturing time. In this study, we propose an analytical model to calculate the diffracted field near the focal plane by considering two primary parameters, the orientation angle of the fast axis and the path difference. In order to verify the reliability of the analytical model, we compared the measured beam spot of the F-theta lens of the laser scanning unit (LSU) with the analytical result. In addition, we analyzed the calculated result from the perspective of the polarization status in the exit pupil. The proposed analysis method can be applied to enhance the image quality for cases in which birefringence occurs in a lens material by suitably modeling the amplitude and phase of the incident light flux.

  7. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, V. E., E-mail: vef@lanl.gov; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  8. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  9. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J; Schlom, Darrell G; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-31

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  10. Stellar extreme ultraviolet astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, W.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The design, calibration, and launch of a rocket-borne imaging telescope for extreme ultraviolet astronomy are described. The telescope, which employed diamond-turned grazing incidence optics and a ranicon detector, was launched November 19, 1976, from the White Sands Missile Range. The telescope performed well and returned data on several potential stellar sources of extreme ultraviolet radiation. Upper limits ten to twenty times more sensitive than previously available were obtained for the extreme ultraviolet flux from the white dwarf Sirius B. These limits fall a factor of seven below the flux predicted for the star and demonstrate that the temperature of Sirius B is not 32,000 K as previously measured, but is below 30,000 K. The new upper limits also rule out the photosphere of the white dwarf as the source of the recently reported soft x-rays from Sirius. Two other white dwarf stars, Feige 24 and G191-B2B, were observed. Upper limits on the flux at 300 A were interpreted as lower limits on the interstellar hydrogen column densities to these stars. The lower limits indicate interstellar hydrogen densitites of greater than .02 cm -3 . Four nearby stars (Sirius, Procyon, Capella, and Mirzam) were observed in a search for intense low temperature coronae or extended chromospheres. No extreme ultraviolet radiation from these stars was detected, and upper limits to their coronal emisson measures are derived

  11. Optically controlled polarizer using a ladder transition for high speed Stokesmetric Imaging and Quantum Zeno Effect based optical logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Subramanian; Wang, Y; Tu, Y; Tseng, S; Shahriar, M S

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate an optically controlled polarizer at ~1323 nm using a ladder transition in a Rb vapor cell. The lower leg of the 5S(1/2),F = 1->5P(1/2),F = 1,2->6S(1/2),F = 1,2 transitions is excited by a Ti:Sapphire laser locked to a saturated absorption signal, representing the control beam. A tunable fiber laser at ~1323 nm is used to excite the upper leg of the transitions, representing the signal beam. When the control beam is linearly polarized, it produces an excitation of the intermediate level with a particular orientation of the angular momentum. Under ideal conditions, this orientation is transparent to the signal beam if it has the same polarization as the control beam and is absorbed when it is polarized orthogonally. We also present numerical simulations of the system using a comprehensive model which incorporates all the relevant Zeeman sub-levels in the system, and identify means to improve the performance of the polarizer. A novel algorithm to compute the evolution of large scale quantum system enabled us to perform this computation, which may have been considered too cumbersome to carry out previously. We describe how such a polarizer may serve as a key component for high-speed Stokesmetric imaging. We also show how such a polarizer, combined with an optically controlled waveplate, recently demonstrated by us, can be used to realize a high speed optical logic gate by making use of the Quantum Zeno Effect. Finally, we describe how such a logic gate can be realized at an ultra-low power level using a tapered nanofiber embedded in a vapor cell.

  12. Dual-Polarization, Multi-Frequency Antenna Array for use with Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in common aperture antenna technology were employed to utilize its proprietary genetic algorithmbased modeling tools in an effort to develop, build, and test a dual-polarization array for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) applications. Final program results demonstrate the ability to achieve a lightweight, thin, higher-gain aperture that covers the desired spectral band. NASA employs various passive microwave and millimeter-wave instruments, such as spectral radiometers, for a range of remote sensing applications, from measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, to cosmic background emission. These instruments such as the HIRAD, SFMR (Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer), and LRR (Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer), provide unique data accumulation capabilities for observing sea surface wind, temperature, and rainfall, and significantly enhance the understanding and predictability of hurricane intensity. These microwave instruments require extremely efficient wideband or multiband antennas in order to conserve space on the airborne platform. In addition, the thickness and weight of the antenna arrays is of paramount importance in reducing platform drag, permitting greater time on station. Current sensors are often heavy, single- polarization, or limited in frequency coverage. The ideal wideband antenna will have reduced size, weight, and profile (a conformal construct) without sacrificing optimum performance. The technology applied to this new HIRAD array will allow NASA, NOAA, and other users to gather information related to hurricanes and other tropical storms more cost effectively without sacrificing sensor performance or the aircraft time on station. The results of the initial analysis and numerical design indicated strong potential for an antenna array that would satisfy all of the design requirements for a replacement HIRAD array. Multiple common aperture antenna methodologies were employed to achieve exceptional gain over the entire

  13. Mapping of Polar Areas Based on High-Resolution Satellite Images: The Example of the Henryk Arctowski Polish Antarctic Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurczyński, Zdzisław; Różycki, Sebastian; Bylina, Paweł

    2017-12-01

    To produce orthophotomaps or digital elevation models, the most commonly used method is photogrammetric measurement. However, the use of aerial images is not easy in polar regions for logistical reasons. In these areas, remote sensing data acquired from satellite systems is much more useful. This paper presents the basic technical requirements of different products which can be obtain (in particular orthoimages and digital elevation model (DEM)) using Very-High-Resolution Satellite (VHRS) images. The study area was situated in the vicinity of the Henryk Arctowski Polish Antarctic Station on the Western Shore of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Western Antarctic. Image processing was applied on two triplets of images acquired by the Pléiades 1A and 1B in March 2013. The results of the generation of orthoimages from the Pléiades systems without control points showed that the proposed method can achieve Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) of 3-9 m. The presented Pléiades images are useful for thematic remote sensing analysis and processing of measurements. Using satellite images to produce remote sensing products for polar regions is highly beneficial and reliable and compares well with more expensive airborne photographs or field surveys.

  14. Near infrared spectral polarization imaging of prostate cancer tissues using Cybesin: a receptor-targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, W. B.; Tang, G. C.; Liang, Kexian; Achilefu, S.; Alfano, R. R.

    2013-03-01

    Cybesin, a smart contrast agent to target cancer cells, was investigated using a near infrared (NIR) spectral polarization imaging technique for prostate cancer detection. The approach relies on applying a contrast agent that can target cancer cells. Cybesin, as a small ICG-derivative dye-peptide, emit fluorescence between 750 nm and 900 nm, which is in the "tissue optical window". Cybesin was reported targeting the over-expressed bombesin receptors in cancer cells in animal model and the human prostate cancers over-expressing bombesin receptors. The NIR spectral polarization imaging study reported here demonstrated that Cybesin can be used as a smart optical biomarker and as a prostate cancer receptor targeted contrast agent.

  15. CT image reconstruction of steel pipe section from few projections using the method of rotating polar-coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Shuaijun; Wu Zhifang

    2008-01-01

    Fast online inspection in steel pipe production is a big challenge. Radiographic CT imaging technology, a high performance non-destructive testing method, is quite appropriate for inspection and quality control of steel pipes. The method of rotating polar-coordinate is used to reconstruct the steel pipe section from few projections with the purpose of inspecting it online. It reduces the projection number needed and the data collection time, and accelerates the reconstruction algorithm and saves the inspection time evidently. The results of simulation experiment and actual experiment indicate that the image quality and reconstruction time of rotating polar-coordinate method meet the requirements of inspecting the steel tube section online basically. The study is of some theoretical significance and the method is expected to be widely used in practice. (authors)

  16. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modica, Paola; De Marcellus, Pierre; D'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee L ) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee L that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee L in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee L = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee L = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee L depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  17. Resistivity and Induced Polarization Imaging at a Hydrocarbon Contaminated Site in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustra, A.; Elis, V.; Hiodo, F.; Bondioli, A.; Miura, G.

    2012-12-01

    An area contaminated by accidental BTEX spills was investigated with resistivity and induced polarization methods. The main objective in this study was to relate the geophysical signature of the area with zones that were possibly undergoing microbial degradation of the contaminants. The spills took place over a decade ago; however, the exact location of these spills is unknown, as well as the amount of contaminant that was released into the subsurface. DC-resistivity identified a high contrast between the background (rho up to 2000 ohm.m) and a relatively conductive zone (rho 30 mV/V). Normalized chargeability is enhanced in this anomaly zone (mn > 0.1). Soil samples collected in the area were submitted to direct bacterial count, clay content estimation, X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The electrical properties of each samples was also measured. The samples collected from the "background" (high resistivity zone) presented total bacterial amounts much smaller (dozens of colony forming units) than the samples from the conductive zone (millions of colony forming units). This observation could lead us to interpret that the zone of higher bacteria amount is undergoing biodegradation that would explain the increased conductivity at that portion of the subsurface. However, the geophysical properties observed at this zone could also be related to the clay content distribution throughout the surveyed area (concentrations up to 30%). Moreover, despite the fact that more microbes were found in the area, SEM images did not find any biodegradation typical feature of the grains, which are for example, mineral corrosion and dissolution or even biomineralization. This study is still undergoing and we are searching for more evidence of biodegradation in the samples. This study shows the limitation of the use of geophysical methods to access contaminant presence and/or biodegradation zones when the exact location of the contamination is unknown.

  18. Universal power law of the gravity wave manifestation in the AIM CIPS polar mesospheric cloud images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Pingping; Yue, Jia; Russell, James M., III; Siskind, David E.; Randall, Cora E.

    2018-01-01

    We aim to extract a universal law that governs the gravity wave manifestation in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). Gravity wave morphology and the clarity level of display vary throughout the wave population manifested by the PMC albedo data. Higher clarity refers to more distinct exhibition of the features, which often correspond to larger variances and a better-organized nature. A gravity wave tracking algorithm based on the continuous Morlet wavelet transform is applied to the PMC albedo data at 83 km altitude taken by the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument to obtain a large ensemble of the gravity wave detections. The horizontal wavelengths in the range of ˜ 20-60 km are the focus of the study. It shows that the albedo (wave) power statistically increases as the background gets brighter. We resample the wave detections to conform to a normal distribution to examine the wave morphology and display clarity beyond the cloud brightness impact. Sample cases are selected at the two tails and the peak of the normal distribution to represent the full set of wave detections. For these cases the albedo power spectra follow exponential decay toward smaller scales. The high-albedo-power category has the most rapid decay (i.e., exponent = -3.2) and corresponds to the most distinct wave display. The wave display becomes increasingly blurrier for the medium- and low-power categories, which hold the monotonically decreasing spectral exponents of -2.9 and -2.5, respectively. The majority of waves are straight waves whose clarity levels can collapse between the different brightness levels, but in the brighter background the wave signatures seem to exhibit mildly turbulent-like behavior.

  19. Power-scalable, polarization-stable, dual-colour DFB fibre laser system for CW terahertz imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, Finn; Pedersen, Jens Engholm; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    Imaging with electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz (THz) range has received a large amount of attention during recent years. THz imaging systems have diverse potential application areas such as security screening, medical diagnostics and non-destructive testing. We will discuss a power......-scalable, dual-colour, polarization-maintaining distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser system with an inherent narrow linewidth from the DFB fibre laser oscillators. The laser system can be used as source in CW THz systems employing photomixing (optical heterodyning) for generation and detection...

  20. A method for automatic grain segmentation of multi-angle cross-polarized microscopic images of sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Gu, Qing; Hao, Huizhen; Li, Na; Wang, Bingqian; Hu, Xiumian

    2018-06-01

    Automatic grain segmentation of sandstone is to partition mineral grains into separate regions in the thin section, which is the first step for computer aided mineral identification and sandstone classification. The sandstone microscopic images contain a large number of mixed mineral grains where differences among adjacent grains, i.e., quartz, feldspar and lithic grains, are usually ambiguous, which make grain segmentation difficult. In this paper, we take advantage of multi-angle cross-polarized microscopic images and propose a method for grain segmentation with high accuracy. The method consists of two stages, in the first stage, we enhance the SLIC (Simple Linear Iterative Clustering) algorithm, named MSLIC, to make use of multi-angle images and segment the images as boundary adherent superpixels. In the second stage, we propose the region merging technique which combines the coarse merging and fine merging algorithms. The coarse merging merges the adjacent superpixels with less evident boundaries, and the fine merging merges the ambiguous superpixels using the spatial enhanced fuzzy clustering. Experiments are designed on 9 sets of multi-angle cross-polarized images taken from the three major types of sandstones. The results demonstrate both the effectiveness and potential of the proposed method, comparing to the available segmentation methods.

  1. Bio-Inspired Sensing and Imaging of Polarization Information in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-04

    Neurobiology of polarization vision,” Trends Neu- rosci. 12, 353–359 (1989). 32. R. Wehner, “‘Matched filters’: neural models of the external world,” J...degrees of polarization,” J. Exp. Biol. 199, 1467–1475 (1996). 47. T. Labhart and E. P. Meyer, Neural mechanisms in insect navigation: polarization...mm by 0.3–0.5 in. 7.6–12.7 mm while a typical ight bulb is 3 in. 76 mm in diameter and needs to be laced at least 7 in. 177.8 mm from the

  2. Polarization Calculation and Underwater Target Detection Inspired by Biological Visual Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In challenging underwater environments, the polarization parameter maps calculated by the Stokes model are characterized by the high noise and error, harassing the underwater target detection tasks. In order to solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel bionic polarization calculation and underwater target detection method by modeling the visual system of mantis shrimps. This system includes many operators including a polarization-opposition calculation, a factor optimization and a visual neural network model. A calibration learning method is proposed to search the optimal value of the factors in the linear subtraction model. Finally, a six-channel visual neural network model is proposed to detect the underwater targets. Experimental results proved that the maps produced by the polarization-opposition parameter is more accurate and have lower noise than that produced by the Stokes parameter, achieving better performance in underwater target detection tasks.

  3. Anatomical Reconstruction and Functional Imaging Reveal an Ordered Array of Skylight Polarization Detectors in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Peter T; Henze, Miriam J; Bleul, Christiane; Baumann-Klausener, Franziska; Labhart, Thomas; Dickinson, Michael H

    2016-05-11

    Many insects exploit skylight polarization as a compass cue for orientation and navigation. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, photoreceptors R7 and R8 in the dorsal rim area (DRA) of the compound eye are specialized to detect the electric vector (e-vector) of linearly polarized light. These photoreceptors are arranged in stacked pairs with identical fields of view and spectral sensitivities, but mutually orthogonal microvillar orientations. As in larger flies, we found that the microvillar orientation of the distal photoreceptor R7 changes in a fan-like fashion along the DRA. This anatomical arrangement suggests that the DRA constitutes a detector for skylight polarization, in which different e-vectors maximally excite different positions in the array. To test our hypothesis, we measured responses to polarized light of varying e-vector angles in the terminals of R7/8 cells using genetically encoded calcium indicators. Our data confirm a progression of preferred e-vector angles from anterior to posterior in the DRA, and a strict orthogonality between the e-vector preferences of paired R7/8 cells. We observed decreased activity in photoreceptors in response to flashes of light polarized orthogonally to their preferred e-vector angle, suggesting reciprocal inhibition between photoreceptors in the same medullar column, which may serve to increase polarization contrast. Together, our results indicate that the polarization-vision system relies on a spatial map of preferred e-vector angles at the earliest stage of sensory processing. The fly's visual system is an influential model system for studying neural computation, and much is known about its anatomy, physiology, and development. The circuits underlying motion processing have received the most attention, but researchers are increasingly investigating other functions, such as color perception and object recognition. In this work, we investigate the early neural processing of a somewhat exotic sense, called

  4. Solar ultraviolet hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmah Ali

    1995-01-01

    The paper discussed the following subjects: the sources of ultraviolet radiation, solar ultraviolet radiation definition, effects of over exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation, exposure limits and radiation protection of this radiation

  5. Imaging linear and circular polarization features in leaves with complete Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patty, C H Lucas; Luo, David A; Snik, Frans; Ariese, Freek; Buma, Wybren Jan; Ten Kate, Inge Loes; van Spanning, Rob J M; Sparks, William B; Germer, Thomas A; Garab, Győző; Kudenov, Michael W

    2018-06-01

    Spectropolarimetry of intact plant leaves allows to probe the molecular architecture of vegetation photosynthesis in a non-invasive and non-destructive way and, as such, can offer a wealth of physiological information. In addition to the molecular signals due to the photosynthetic machinery, the cell structure and its arrangement within a leaf can create and modify polarization signals. Using Mueller matrix polarimetry with rotating retarder modulation, we have visualized spatial variations in polarization in transmission around the chlorophyll a absorbance band from 650 nm to 710 nm. We show linear and circular polarization measurements of maple leaves and cultivated maize leaves and discuss the corresponding Mueller matrices and the Mueller matrix decompositions, which show distinct features in diattenuation, polarizance, retardance and depolarization. Importantly, while normal leaf tissue shows a typical split signal with both a negative and a positive peak in the induced fractional circular polarization and circular dichroism, the signals close to the veins only display a negative band. The results are similar to the negative band as reported earlier for single macrodomains. We discuss the possible role of the chloroplast orientation around the veins as a cause of this phenomenon. Systematic artefacts are ruled out as three independent measurements by different instruments gave similar results. These results provide better insight into circular polarization measurements on whole leaves and options for vegetation remote sensing using circular polarization. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Polarized proton spin density images the tyrosyl radical locations in bovine liver catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Zimmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A tyrosyl radical, as part of the amino acid chain of bovine liver catalase, supports dynamic proton spin polarization (DNP. Finding the position of the tyrosyl radical within the macromolecule relies on the accumulation of proton polarization close to it, which is readily observed by polarized neutron scattering. The nuclear scattering amplitude due to the polarization of protons less than 10 Å distant from the tyrosyl radical is ten times larger than the amplitude of magnetic neutron scattering from an unpaired polarized electron of the same radical. The direction of DNP was inverted every 5 s, and the initial evolution of the intensity of polarized neutron scattering after each inversion was used to identify those tyrosines which have assumed a radical state. Three radical sites, all of them close to the molecular centre and the haem, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369, the radical state of which had previously been proven by electron paramagnetic resonance.

  7. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope STIS observations of GRB 000301C: CCD imaging and near-ultraviolet MAMA spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.S.; Gull, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of the optical transient (OT) counterpart of the c-ray burster GRB 000301C obtained 5 days after the burst, on 2000 March 6. CCD clear-aperture imaging reveals a R similar or equal to 21.50 +/- 0.15 source with no apparent host galaxy...... Telescope images appear to lie on the stellar field of a host galaxy, and as the large H I column density measured here and in later ground-based observations is unlikely on a random line of sight, we believe we are probably seeing absorption from H I in the host galaxy. In any case, this represents...

  9. Correlation of collagen synthesis with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography imaging of in vitro human atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Shyu, Jeou-Jong; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Lai, Chih-Ming; Tien, En-Kuang; Huang, Huan-Jang; Chou, Chien; Jan, Gwo-Jen

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is unquestionably the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. In the mean time, the worldwide importance of acute vascular syndromes is increasing. Because collagen fiber is a critical component of atherosclerotic lesions; it constitutes up to 60% of the total atherosclerotic plaque protein. The uncontrolled collagen accumulation leads to arterial stenosis, whereas excessive collagen breakdown weakens plaques thereby making them prone to rupture finally. Thus, in this study, we present the first application, to our knowledge, of using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) in human atherosclerosis. We demonstrate this technique for imaging of intensity, birefringence, and fast-axis orientation simultaneously in atherosclerotic plaques. This in vitro study suggests that the birefringence change in plaque is due to the prominent deposition of collagen according to the correlation of PS-OCT images with histological counterpart. Moreover, we can acquire quantitative criteria based on the change of polarization of incident beam to estimate whether the collagen synthesized is "too much" or "not enough". Thus by combining of high resolution intensity imaging and birefringence detection makes PS-OCT could be a potentially powerful tool for early assessment of atherosclerosis appearance and the prediction of plaque rupture in clinic.

  10. Imaging of polarity during zygotic and somatic embryogenesis of carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, A.C.J.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis a study of the regulation of coordinated growth and the development of polarity during embryogenesis of carrot, Daucus carota L., is described. To this end, several microscopical techniques were used, such as light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy,

  11. Applying laser speckle images to skin science: skin lesion differentiation by polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Sotoodian, Bahman; Kalai, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is a worldwide health problem. It is the most common cancer in the countries with a large white population; furthermore, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, has been increasing steadily over the last three decades. There is an urgent need to develop in-vivo, noninvasive diagnostic tools for the disease. This paper attempts to response to the challenge by introducing a simple and fast method based on polarization and laser speckle. The degree of maintaining polarization estimates the fraction of linearly maintaining polarization in the backscattered speckle field. Clinical experiments of 214 skin lesions including malignant melanomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, nevi, and seborrheic keratoses demonstrated that such a parameter can potentially diagnose different skin lesion types. ROC analyses showed that malignant melanoma and seborrheic keratosis could be differentiated by both the blue and red lasers with the area under the curve (AUC) = 0.8 and 0.7, respectively. Also malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma could be separated by the blue laser (AUC = 0.9), while nevus and seborrheic keratosis could be identified using the red laser (AUC = 0.7). These experiments demonstrated that polarization could be a potential in-vivo diagnostic indicator for skin diseases.

  12. 1x3 beam splitter for TE polarization based on self-imaging phenomena in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Min; Malureanu, Radu; Krüger, Asger Christian

    2010-01-01

    Based on inspiration from multi-mode interference self-imaging and theoretical FDTD simulations, a 1x3 beam splitter was designed, fabricated and characterized. Measurements show that for TE-polarized incident light the power is distributed equally between the output ports within 1dB in the range...... from 1541nm to 1552nm, and the total transmission of the 1x3 splitter is equal to the corresponding length of a single-line-defect PhCW within the measurement uncertainty....

  13. Ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.

    1986-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun or artificial sources is reflected or transmitted at the surface of the skin, about 5% of normally incident rays being directly reflected. The transmitted fraction is scattered, photochemically absorbed or dissipated as heat within the skin, or passes from it to contribute to the variable total amount of reflected and transmitted radiation. The UVR absorbers in skin are not definitely known, but DNA is a definite target and probably lipoprotein membranes, RNA, proteins, mucopolysaccharides, elastin and collagen. Photochemical or free radical damage to absorber or nearby organelles leads to pharmacological, ultrastructural, histological and clinical changes. Most frequent DNA damage is pyrimidine dimer formation, apparently inhibiting cell function and replication. This is largely enzymatically repaired in man in the dark by excision repair, post-replication repair and possible other enzymatic mechanisms, and at least in some organisms by light-induced photoreactivation repair. UVR exposure causes well recognized acute and chronic clinical syndromes in man. These are discussed in this paper

  14. Spatiotemporal change of sky polarization during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey: polarization patterns of the eclipsed sky observed by full-sky imaging polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipocz, Brigitta; Hegedüs, Ramón; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-12-01

    Using 180 degrees field-of-view (full-sky) imaging polarimetry, we measured the spatiotemporal change of the polarization of skylight during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey. We present our observations here on the temporal variation of the celestial patterns of the degree p and angle alpha of linear polarization of the eclipsed sky measured in the red (650 nm), green (550 nm), and blue (450 nm) parts of the spectrum. We also report on the temporal and spectral change of the positions of neutral (unpolarized, p = 0) points, and points with local minima or maxima of p of the eclipsed sky. Our results are compared with the observations performed by the same polarimetric technique during the total solar eclipse on 11 August 1999 in Hungary. Practically the same characteristics of celestial polarization were encountered during both eclipses. This shows that the observed polarization phenomena of the eclipsed sky may be general.

  15. CONSTRAINING POLARIZED FOREGROUNDS FOR EoR EXPERIMENTS. I. 2D POWER SPECTRA FROM THE PAPER-32 IMAGING ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Moore, D. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, Grahamstown (South Africa); Pober, J. C. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Ali, Z. S.; DeBoer, D. R.; Parsons, A. R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bradley, R. F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, C. L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Gugliucci, N. E. [Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH (United States); Jacobs, D. C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Klima, P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); MacMahon, D. H. E. [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Manley, J. R.; Walbrugh, W. P. [SKA South Africa, Pinelands (South Africa); Stefan, I. I., E-mail: saulkohn@sas.upenn.edu [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge ) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window ). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  16. Knockin’ on pollen’s door: live cell imaging of early polarization events in germinating Arabidopsis pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eVogler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pollen tubes are an excellent system for studying the cellular dynamics and complex signaling pathways that coordinate polarized tip growth. Although several signaling mechanisms acting in the tip-growing pollen tube have been described, our knowledge on the subcellular and molecular events during pollen germination and growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane is rather scarce. To simultaneously track germinating pollen from up to 12 genetically different plants we developed an inexpensive and easy mounting technique, suitable for every standard microscope setup. We performed high magnification live-cell imaging during Arabidopsis pollen activation, germination, and the establishment of pollen tube tip growth by using fluorescent marker lines labeling either the pollen cytoplasm, vesicles, the actin cytoskeleton or the sperm cell nuclei and membranes. Our studies revealed distinctive vesicle and F-actin polarization during pollen activation and characteristic growth kinetics during pollen germination and pollen tube formation. Initially, the germinating Arabidopsis pollen tube grows slowly and forms a uniform roundish bulge, followed by a transition phase with vesicles heavily accumulating at the growth site before switching to rapid tip growth. Furthermore, we found the two sperm cells to be transported into the pollen tube after the phase of rapid tip growth has been initiated. The method presented here is suitable to quantitatively study subcellular events during Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth, and for the detailed analysis of pollen mutants with respect to pollen polarization, bulging, or growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane.

  17. MR image enhancement as a function of tissue gadolinium concentration, measured with polarized X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.C.; Morita, Y.; White, D.L.; Kaufman, L.; Brasch, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging contrast agents alter intensities nonlinearly relative to their tissue concentrations. To extract Gd concentrations from image intensity data, a 13-tube phantom (Gd-DTPA dilutions, 0-10/sup -2/M) was imaged (2 T, 3 mm, spin echo, 300 = msec repetition time, 15 = msec echo time, 128 X 256, four excitations). Also, 18 rats were studied with Gd-DTPA or albumin-(Gd-DTPA)/sub 19/ (nine each, three doses). Liver and renal cortex were imaged before and 10 minutes after contrast material administration, with immediate killing and harvesting, and enhancement was calculated. These samples were assayed by x-ray fluorescent excitation analysis (150-kVp beam, B/sub 4/C ceramic polarizer, Mo-Cu-Ni filter, Si[Li] detector). Gd levels as low as 0.5 ppm (--3.18 x 10/sup -6/M) could be detected in liquid or solid samples. Enhancement increased with a nonlinear relationship to Gd in the range measured. This assay for Gd permits empiric assessment of the relationship between pulse variables, intensity, and paramagnet concentration, allowing Gd values to be estimated from image intensities

  18. Polarization ratio property and material classification method in passive millimeter wave polarimetric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yayun; Qi, Bo; Liu, Siyuan; Hu, Fei; Gui, Liangqi; Peng, Xiaohui

    2016-10-01

    Polarimetric measurements can provide additional information as compared to unpolarized ones. In this paper, linear polarization ratio (LPR) is created to be a feature discriminator. The LPR properties of several materials are investigated using Fresnel theory. The theoretical results show that LPR is sensitive to the material type (metal or dielectric). Then a linear polarization ratio-based (LPR-based) method is presented to distinguish between metal and dielectric materials. In order to apply this method to practical applications, the optimal range of incident angle have been discussed. The typical outdoor experiments including various objects such as aluminum plate, grass, concrete, soil and wood, have been conducted to validate the presented classification method.

  19. Exploration of a Polarized Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Model Using the Ground-Based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Diner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of surface reflection is essential for retrieval of aerosols using downward-looking remote sensors. In this paper, observations from the Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI are used to evaluate a surface polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function (PBRDF model. GroundMSPI is an eight-band spectropolarimetric camera mounted on a rotating gimbal to acquire pushbroom imagery of outdoor landscapes. The camera uses a very accurate photoelastic-modulator-based polarimetric imaging technique to acquire Stokes vector measurements in three of the instrument’s bands (470, 660, and 865 nm. A description of the instrument is presented, and observations of selected targets within a scene acquired on 6 January 2010 are analyzed. Data collected during the course of the day as the Sun moved across the sky provided a range of illumination geometries that facilitated evaluation of the surface model, which is comprised of a volumetric reflection term represented by the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete function plus a specular reflection term generated by a randomly oriented array of Fresnel-reflecting microfacets. While the model is fairly successful in predicting the polarized reflection from two grass targets in the scene, it does a poorer job for two manmade targets (a parking lot and a truck roof, possibly due to their greater degree of geometric organization. Several empirical adjustments to the model are explored and lead to improved fits to the data. For all targets, the data support the notion of spectral invariance in the angular shape of the unpolarized and polarized surface reflection. As noted by others, this behavior provides valuable constraints on the aerosol retrieval problem, and highlights the importance of multiangle observations.

  20. Copper-free click reactions with polar bicyclononyne derivatives for modulation of cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunissen, E H P; Meuleners, M H L; Verkade, J M M; Dommerholt, J; Hoenderop, J G J; van Delft, F L

    2014-07-07

    The ability of cells to incorporate azidosugars metabolically is a useful tool for extracellular glycan labelling. The exposed azide moiety can covalently react with alkynes, such as bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne (BCN), by strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC). However, the use of SPAAC can be hampered by low specificity of the cycloalkyne. In this article we describe the synthesis of more polar BCN derivatives and their properties for selective cellular glycan labelling. The new polar derivatives [amino-BCN, glutarylamino-BCN and bis(hydroxymethyl)-BCN] display reaction rates similar to those of BCN and are less cell-permeable. The labelling specificity in HEK293 cells is greater than that of BCN, as determined by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Interestingly, amino-BCN appears to be highly specific for the Golgi apparatus. In addition, the polar BCN derivatives label the N-glycan of the membrane calcium channel TRPV5 in HEK293 cells with significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Determining the source region of auroral emissions in the prenoon oval using coordinated Polar BEAR UV-imaging and DMSP particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Patrick T.; Meng, CHING-I.; Huffman, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The Polar Beacon Experiment and Auroral Research (Polar BEAR) satellite included the capability for imaging the dayside auroral oval in full sunlight at several wavelengths. Particle observations from the DMSP F7 satellite during dayside auroral oval crossings are compared with approximately simultaneous Polar BEAR 1356-A images to determine the magnetospheric source region of the dayside auroral oval. The source region is determined from the DMSP particle data, according to recent work concerning the classification and identification of precipitation source regions. The close DMSP/Polar BEAR coincidences all occur when the former satellite is located between 0945 and 1000 MLT. Instances of auroral arcs mapping to each of several different regions, including the boundary plasma sheet, the low-latitude boundary layer, and the plasma mantle were found. It was determined that about half the time the most prominent auroral arcs are located at the interfaces between distinct plasma regions, at least at the local time studied here.

  2. Polarization resolved imaging with a reflection near-field optical microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Xiao, Mufei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using a rigorous microscopic point-dipole description of probe-sample interactions, we study imaging with a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope. Optical content, topographical artifacts, sensitivity window-i.e., the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...... configuration is preferable to the cross-linear one, since it ensures more isotropic (in the surface plane) near-field imaging of surface features. The numerical results are supported with experimental near-field images obtained by using a reflection microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  3. Application of Laser Plasma Sources of Soft X-rays and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) in Imaging, Processing Materials and Photoionization Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P. W.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Ahad, I. U.; Fok, T.; Szczurek, A.; Wȩgrzyński, Ł.

    In the paper we present new applications of laser plasma sources of soft X-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) in various areas of plasma physics, nanotechnology and biomedical engineering. The sources are based on a gas puff target irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from commercial Nd: YAG lasers, generating pulses with time duration from 1 to 10 ns and energies from 0.5 to 10 J at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The targets are produced with the use of a double valve system equipped with a special nozzle to form a double-stream gas puff target which allows for high conversion efficiency of laser energy into soft X-rays and EUV without degradation of the nozzle. The sources are equipped with various optical systems to collect soft X-ray and EUV radiation and form the radiation beam. New applications of these sources in imaging, including EUV tomography and soft X-ray microscopy, processing of materials and photoionization studies are presented.

  4. Polarization-dependent Character of 1x3 Beam Splitter Using Self-Imaging Phenomena in Air-Slab PhCW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Min; Malureanu, Radu; Kristensen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    A 1x3 beam splitter in PhCWs using multi-mode interference (MMI) based on self-imaging principle is investigated. The 1x3 splitter is polarization-dependent. The total TE-polarized transmission of the 1x3 splitter is almost equal to the corresponding length of W1 PhCW. The TE-polarized input power...... is distributed equally be-tween the output ports within 1dB from 1541nm to 1552nm....

  5. Polarization Control with Plasmonic Antenna Tips: A Universal Approach to Optical Nanocrystallography and Vector-Field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Raschke, Markus B.

    2018-05-01

    Controlling the propagation and polarization vectors in linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy enables to probe the anisotropy of optical responses providing structural symmetry selective contrast in optical imaging. Here we present a novel tilted antenna-tip approach to control the optical vector-field by breaking the axial symmetry of the nano-probe in tip-enhanced near-field microscopy. This gives rise to a localized plasmonic antenna effect with significantly enhanced optical field vectors with control of both \\textit{in-plane} and \\textit{out-of-plane} components. We use the resulting vector-field specificity in the symmetry selective nonlinear optical response of second-harmonic generation (SHG) for a generalized approach to optical nano-crystallography and -imaging. In tip-enhanced SHG imaging of monolayer MoS$_2$ films and single-crystalline ferroelectric YMnO$_3$, we reveal nano-crystallographic details of domain boundaries and domain topology with enhanced sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution. The approach is applicable to any anisotropic linear and nonlinear optical response, and provides for optical nano-crystallographic imaging of molecular or quantum materials.

  6. Scanning differential polarization microscope: Its use to image linear and circular differential scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickols, W.; Maestre, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    A differential polarization microscope that couples the sensitivity of single-beam measurement of circular dichroism and circular differential scattering with the simultaneous measurement of linear dichroism and linear differential scattering has been developed. The microscope uses a scanning microscope stage and single-point illumination to give the very shallow depth of field found in confocal microscopy. This microscope can operate in the confocal mode as well as in the near confocal condition that can allow one to program the coherence and spatial resolution of the microscope. This microscope has been used to study the change in the structure of chromatin during the development of sperm in Drosophila

  7. Imaging and tuning polarity at SrTiO3 domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Yiftach; Haham, Noam; Shperber, Yishai; Bell, Christopher; Xie, Yanwu; Chen, Zhuoyu; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Kalisky, Beena

    2017-12-01

    Electrostatic fields tune the ground state of interfaces between complex oxide materials. Electronic properties, such as conductivity and superconductivity, can be tuned and then used to create and control circuit elements and gate-defined devices. Here we show that naturally occurring twin boundaries, with properties that are different from their surrounding bulk, can tune the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface 2DEG at the nanoscale. In particular, SrTiO3 domain boundaries have the unusual distinction of remaining highly mobile down to low temperatures, and were recently suggested to be polar. Here we apply localized pressure to an individual SrTiO3 twin boundary and detect a change in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface current distribution. Our data directly confirm the existence of polarity at the twin boundaries, and demonstrate that they can serve as effective tunable gates. As the location of SrTiO3 domain walls can be controlled using external field stimuli, our findings suggest a novel approach to manipulate SrTiO3-based devices on the nanoscale.

  8. Setup for polarized neutron imaging using in situ 3He cells at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, I; Ziesche, Ralf; Wang, Tianhao; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Lou; Tong, X; Jiang, C Y; Manke, Ingo; Treimer, Wolfgang; Chatterji, Tapan; Kardjilov, Nikolay

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we report a new setup for polarized neutron imaging at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline using an in situ 3 He polarizer and analyzer. This development is very important for extending the capabilities of the imaging instrument at ORNL providing a polarized beam with a large field-of-view, which can be further used in combination with optical devices like Wolter optics, focusing guides, or other lenses for the development of microscope arrangement. Such a setup can be of advantage for the existing and future imaging beamlines at the pulsed neutron sources. The first proof-of-concept experiment is performed to study the ferromagnetic phase transition in the Fe 3 Pt sample. We also demonstrate that the polychromatic neutron beam in combination with in situ 3 He cells can be used as the initial step for the rapid measurement and qualitative analysis of radiographs.

  9. Afterglow Imaging and Polarization of Misaligned Structured GRB Jets and Cocoons: Breaking the Degeneracy in GRB 170817A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    The X-ray to radio afterglow emission of GRB 170817A / GW 170817 so far scales as Fν∝ν-0.6t0.8 with observed frequency and time, consistent with a single power-law segment of the synchrotron spectrum from the external shock going into the ambient medium. This requires the effective isotropic equivalent afterglow shock energy in the visible region to increase as ˜t1.7. The two main channels for such an energy increase are (i) radial: more energy carried by slower material (in the visible region) gradually catches up with the afterglow shock and energizes it, and (ii) angular: more energy in relativistic outflow moving at different angles to our line of sight, whose radiation is initially beamed away from us but its beaming cone gradually reaches our line of sight as it decelerates. One cannot distinguish between these explanations (or combinations of them) using only the X-ray to radio Fν(t). Here we demonstrate that the most promising way to break this degeneracy is through afterglow imaging and polarization, by calculating the predicted evolution of the afterglow image (its size, shape and flux centroid) and linear polarization Π(t) for different angular and/or radial outflow structures that fit Fν(t). We consider two angular profiles - a Gaussian and a narrow core with power-law wings in energy per solid angle, as well as a (cocoon motivated) (quasi-) spherical flow with radial velocity profile. For a jet viewed off-axis (and a magnetic field produced in the afterglow shock) Π(t) peaks when the jet's core becomes visible, at ≈2tp where the lightcurve peaks at tp, and the image can be elongated with aspect ratios ≳ 2. A quasi-spherical flow has an almost circular image and a much lower Π(t) (peaking at ≈tp) and flux centroid displacement θfc (a spherical flow has Π(t) = θfc = 0 and a perfectly circular image).

  10. Induced Polarization with Electromagnetic Coupling: 3D Spectral Imaging Theory, EMSP Project No. 73836

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, F. Dale; Sogade, John

    2004-12-14

    This project was designed as a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for characterization of contaminated sites. It encompassed laboratory studies of the effects of chemistry on induced polarization, development of 3D forward modeling and inversion codes, and investigations of inductive and capacitive coupling problems. In the laboratory part of the project a physico-chemical model developed in this project was used to invert laboratory IP spectra for the grain size and the effective grain size distribution of the sedimentary rocks as well as the formation factor, porosity, specific surface area, and the apparent fractal dimension. Furthermore, it was established that the IP response changed with the solution chemistry, the concentration of a given solution chemistry, valence of the constituent ions, and ionic radius. In the field part of the project, a 3D complex forward and inverse model was developed. It was used to process data acquired at two frequencies (1/16 Hz and 1/ 4Hz) in a cross-borehole configuration at the A-14 outfall area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) during March 2003 and June 2004. The chosen SRS site was contaminated with Tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and Trichloroethylene (PCE) that were disposed in this area for several decades till the 1980s. The imaginary conductivity produced from the inverted 2003 data correlated very well with the log10 (PCE) concentration derived from point sampling at 1 ft spacing in five ground-truth boreholes drilled after the data acquisition. The equivalent result for the 2004 data revealed that there were significant contaminant movements during the period March 2003 and June 2004, probably related to ground-truth activities and nearby remediation activities. Therefore SIP was successfully used to develop conceptual models of volume distributions of PCE/TCE contamination. In addition, the project developed non-polarizing electrodes that can be deployed in boreholes for years. A total of 28

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization for magnetic resonance imaging. An in-bore approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummenacker, Jan G.

    2012-07-01

    In this thesis, the development of an in-bore liquid state DNP polarizer for MRI applications operating in flow through mode at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 T was described. After an introductory chapter 1 and a chapter 2 on the theoretical background, chapter 3 dealt chiefly with the challenge of performing liquid state DNP at a high magnetic field of 9.2 T. The feasibility of performing liquid state DNP at this field was demonstrated for various solvents, as well as for metabolites in solution. Chapter 4 then moved to the aim of this work, the application of liquid state DNP for MRI experiments. It introduced the rationale of our approach, the hardware that was developed and demonstrated its performance in a clinical MRI tomograph.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization for magnetic resonance imaging. An in-bore approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krummenacker, Jan G.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of an in-bore liquid state DNP polarizer for MRI applications operating in flow through mode at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 T was described. After an introductory chapter 1 and a chapter 2 on the theoretical background, chapter 3 dealt chiefly with the challenge of performing liquid state DNP at a high magnetic field of 9.2 T. The feasibility of performing liquid state DNP at this field was demonstrated for various solvents, as well as for metabolites in solution. Chapter 4 then moved to the aim of this work, the application of liquid state DNP for MRI experiments. It introduced the rationale of our approach, the hardware that was developed and demonstrated its performance in a clinical MRI tomograph.

  13. An ultra-bright white LED based non-contact skin cancer imaging system with polarization control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, A.; Basu, C.; Roth, B.; Meinhardt-Wollweber, M.

    2013-06-01

    Early detection and excision of melanoma skin cancer is crucial for a successful therapy. Dermoscopy in direct contact with the skin is routinely used for inspection, but screening is time consuming for high-risk patients with a large number of nevi. Features like symmetry, border, color and most importantly changes like growth or depigmentation of a nevus may indicate malignancy. We present a non-contact remote imaging system for human melanocytic nevi with homogenous illumination by an ultra-bright white LED. The advantage compared to established dermoscopy systems requiring direct skin contact is that deformation of raised nevi is avoided and full-body scans of the patients may time-efficiently be obtained while they are in a lying, comfortable position. This will ultimately allow for automated screening in the future. In addition, calibration of true color rendering, which is essential for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions and to ensure reproducibility and comparison between individual check-ups in order to follow nevi evolution is implemented as well as suppression of specular highlights on the skin surface by integration of polarizing filters. Important features of the system which will be crucial for future integration into automated systems are the possibility to record images without artifacts in combination with short exposure times which both reduce image blurring caused by patient motion.

  14. On the classification of mixed floating pollutants on the Yellow Sea of China by using a quad-polarized SAR image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Shao, Yun; Tian, Wei; Li, Kun

    2018-06-01

    This study explored different methodologies using a C-band RADARSAT-2 quad-polarized Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image located over China's Yellow Sea to investigate polarization decomposition parameters for identifying mixed floating pollutants from a complex ocean background. It was found that solitary polarization decomposition did not meet the demand for detecting and classifying multiple floating pollutants, even after applying a polarized SAR image. Furthermore, considering that Yamaguchi decomposition is sensitive to vegetation and the algal variety Enteromorpha prolifera, while H/A/alpha decomposition is sensitive to oil spills, a combination of parameters which was deduced from these two decompositions was proposed for marine environmental monitoring of mixed floating sea surface pollutants. A combination of volume scattering, surface scattering, and scattering entropy was the best indicator for classifying mixed floating pollutants from a complex ocean background. The Kappa coefficients for Enteromorpha prolifera and oil spills were 0.7514 and 0.8470, respectively, evidence that the composite polarized parameters based on quad-polarized SAR imagery proposed in this research is an effective monitoring method for complex marine pollution.

  15. A System for Compressive Spectral and Polarization Imaging at Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-18

    UV -­‐ VIS -­‐IR   60mm   Apo   Macro  lens   Jenoptik-­‐Inc   $5,817.36   IR... VIS /NIR Compressive Spectral Imager”, Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP ’15), Quebec City, Canada, (September...imaging   system   will   lead   to   a   wide-­‐band   VIS -­‐NIR-­‐SWIR   compressive  spectral  and  polarimetric

  16. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using an inhomogeneous polarizing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguet, A.; Chaillout, J.; Goldman, M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, it is indicated how to reconstruct nuclear magnetic resonance images acquired in an inhomogeneous static magnetic field without the previous knowledge of its spatial distribution. The method provides also the map of the static magnetic field through the sample volume; furthermore it allows the use of non uniform but spatially controlled encoding gradients [fr

  17. Neural coding of image structure and contrast polarity of Cartesian, hyperbolic, and polar gratings in the primary and secondary visual cortex of the tree shrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, Jordan; De Luna, Paolo; Rainer, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    We comprehensively characterize spiking and visual evoked potential (VEP) activity in tree shrew V1 and V2 using Cartesian, hyperbolic, and polar gratings. Neural selectivity to structure of Cartesian gratings was higher than other grating classes in both visual areas. From V1 to V2, structure selectivity of spiking activity increased, whereas corresponding VEP values tended to decrease, suggesting that single-neuron coding of Cartesian grating attributes improved while the cortical columnar organization of these neurons became less precise from V1 to V2. We observed that neurons in V2 generally exhibited similar selectivity for polar and Cartesian gratings, suggesting that structure of polar-like stimuli might be encoded as early as in V2. This hypothesis is supported by the preference shift from V1 to V2 toward polar gratings of higher spatial frequency, consistent with the notion that V2 neurons encode visual scene borders and contours. Neural sensitivity to modulations of polarity of hyperbolic gratings was highest among all grating classes and closely related to the visual receptive field (RF) organization of ON- and OFF-dominated subregions. We show that spatial RF reconstructions depend strongly on grating class, suggesting that intracortical contributions to RF structure are strongest for Cartesian and polar gratings. Hyperbolic gratings tend to recruit least cortical elaboration such that the RF maps are similar to those generated by sparse noise, which most closely approximate feedforward inputs. Our findings complement previous literature in primates, rodents, and carnivores and highlight novel aspects of shape representation and coding occurring in mammalian early visual cortex. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Polar Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    18 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark-outlined polygons on a frost-covered surface in the south polar region of Mars. In summer, this surface would not be bright and the polygons would not have dark outlines--these are a product of the presence of seasonal frost. Location near: 77.2oS, 204.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  19. Prospects for sub-micron solid state nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2010-06-14

    We evaluate the feasibility of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with sub-micron voxel dimensions using a combination of low temperatures and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Experiments are performed on nitroxide-doped glycerol-water at 9.4 T and temperatures below 40 K, using a 30 mW tunable microwave source for DNP. With DNP at 7 K, a 0.5 microL sample yields a (1)H NMR signal-to-noise ratio of 770 in two scans with pulsed spin-lock detection and after 80 db signal attenuation. With reasonable extrapolations, we infer that (1)H NMR signals from 1 microm(3) voxel volumes should be readily detectable, and voxels as small as 0.03 microm(3) may eventually be detectable. Through homonuclear decoupling with a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg spin echo technique, we obtain 830 Hz (1)H NMR linewidths at low temperatures, implying that pulsed field gradients equal to 0.4 G/d or less would be required during spatial encoding dimensions of an imaging sequence, where d is the resolution in each dimension.

  20. Fluorescence life-time imaging and steady state polarization for examining binding of fluorophores to gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Shmulik; Fixler, Dror; Popovtzer, Rachela; Shefi, Orit

    2015-11-01

    Nanocomposites as multifunctional agents are capable of combing imaging and cell biology technologies. The conventional methods used for validation of the conjugation process of nanoparticles (NPs) to fluorescent molecules such as spectroscopy analysis and surface potential measurements, are not sufficient. In this paper we present a new and highly sensitive procedure that uses the combination of (1) fluorescence spectrum, (2) fluorescence lifetime, and (3) steady state fluorescence polarization measurements. We characterize and analyze gold NPs with Lucifer yellow (LY) surface coating as a model. We demonstrate the ability to differentiate between LY-GNP (the conjugated complex) and a mixture of coated NP and free dyes. We suggest the approach for neuroscience applications where LY is used for detecting and labeling cells, studying morphology and intracellular communications. Histograms of Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of free LY dye (Left) in comparison to the conjugated dye to gold nanoparticles, LY-GNP (Middle) enable the differentiation between LY-GNP (the conjugated complex) and a mixture of coated NP and free dyes (Right). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Subsurface imaging of water electrical conductivity, hydraulic permeability and lithology at contaminated sites by induced polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurya, P. K.; Balbarini, Nicola; Møller, I.

    2018-01-01

    At contaminated sites, knowledge about geology and hydraulic properties of the subsurface and extent of the contamination is needed for assessing the risk and for designing potential site remediation. In this study, we have developed a new approach for characterizing contaminated sites through time...... geological logs. On average the IP-derived and measured permeability values agreed within one order of magnitude, except for those close to boundaries between lithological layers (e.g. between sand and clay), where mismatches occurred due to the lack of vertical resolution in the geophysical imaging...

  2. DARK SPOT DETECTION USING INTENSITY AND THE DEGREE OF POLARIZATION IN FULLY POLARIMETRIC SAR IMAGES FOR OIL POLUTION MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zakeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill surveillance is of great environmental and economical interest, directly contributing to improve environmental protection. Monitoring of oil spills using synthetic aperture radar (SAR has received a considerable attention over the past few years, notably because of SAR data abilities like all-weather and day-and-night capturing. The degree of polarization (DoP is a less computationally complex quantity characterizing a partially polarized electromagnetic field. The key to the proposed approach is making use of DoP as polarimetric information besides intensity ones to improve dark patches detection as the first step of oil spill monitoring. In the proposed approach first simple intensity threshold segmentation like Otsu method is applied to the image. Pixels with intensities below the threshold are regarded as potential dark spot pixels while the others are potential background pixels. Second, the DoP of potential dark spot pixels is estimated. Pixels with DoP below a certain threshold are the real dark-spot pixels. Choosing the threshold is a critical and challenging step. In order to solve choosing the appropriate threshold, we introduce a novel but simple method based on DoP of potential dark spot pixels. Finally, an area threshold is used to eliminate any remaining false targets. The proposed approach is tested on L band NASA/JPL UAVSAR data, covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Comparing the obtained results from the new method with conventional approaches like Otsu, K-means and GrowCut shows better achievement of the proposed algorithm. For instance, mean square error (MSE 65%, Overall Accuracy 20% and correlation 40% are improved.

  3. Dark SPOT Detection Using Intensity and the Degree of Polarization in Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Oil Polution Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, F.; Amini, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spill surveillance is of great environmental and economical interest, directly contributing to improve environmental protection. Monitoring of oil spills using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has received a considerable attention over the past few years, notably because of SAR data abilities like all-weather and day-and-night capturing. The degree of polarization (DoP) is a less computationally complex quantity characterizing a partially polarized electromagnetic field. The key to the proposed approach is making use of DoP as polarimetric information besides intensity ones to improve dark patches detection as the first step of oil spill monitoring. In the proposed approach first simple intensity threshold segmentation like Otsu method is applied to the image. Pixels with intensities below the threshold are regarded as potential dark spot pixels while the others are potential background pixels. Second, the DoP of potential dark spot pixels is estimated. Pixels with DoP below a certain threshold are the real dark-spot pixels. Choosing the threshold is a critical and challenging step. In order to solve choosing the appropriate threshold, we introduce a novel but simple method based on DoP of potential dark spot pixels. Finally, an area threshold is used to eliminate any remaining false targets. The proposed approach is tested on L band NASA/JPL UAVSAR data, covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Comparing the obtained results from the new method with conventional approaches like Otsu, K-means and GrowCut shows better achievement of the proposed algorithm. For instance, mean square error (MSE) 65%, Overall Accuracy 20% and correlation 40% are improved.

  4. I. The effect of volcanic aerosols on ultraviolet radiation in Antarctica. II. A novel method for enhancing subsurface radar imaging using radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitas, Steven Ronald

    The theory of radiative transfer is used to explain how a stratospheric aerosol layer may, for large solar zenith angles, increase the flux of UV-B light at the ground. As previous explanations are heuristic and incomplete, I first provide a rigorous and complete explanation of how this occurs. I show that an aerosol layer lying above Antarctica during spring will decrease the integrated daily dose of biologically weighted irradiance, weighted by the erythema action spectrum, by only up to 5%. Thus after a volcanic eruption, life in Antarctica during spring will suffer the combined effects of the spring ozone hole and ozone destruction induced by volcanic aerosols, with the latter effect only slightly offset by aerosol scattering. I extend subsurface radar imaging by considering the additional information that may be derived from radar interferometry. I show that, under the conditions that temporal and spatial decorrelation between observations is small so that the effects of these decorrelations do not swamp the signature expected from a subsurface layer, the depth of burial of the lower surface may be derived. Also, the echoes from the lower and upper surfaces may be separated. The method is tested with images acquired by SIR-C of the area on the Egypt/Sudan border where buried river channels were first observed by SIR-A. Temporal decorrelation between the images, due to some combination of physical changes in the scene, changes in the spacecraft attitude and errors in the processing by NASA of the raw radar echoes into the synthetic aperture radar images, swamps the expected signature for a layer up to 40 meters thick. I propose a test to determine whether or not simultaneous observations are required, and then detail the radar system requirements for successful application of the method for both possible outcomes of the test. I also describe in detail the possible applications of the method. These include measuring the depth of burial of ice in the polar

  5. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemen, J. R.; Freeland, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on development and implementation of the SolarSoft (SSW) data analysis system. From an EIT analysis perspective, this system was designed to facilitate efficient reuse and conversion of software developed for Yohkoh/SXT and to take advantage of a large existing body of software developed by the SDAC, Yohkoh, and SOHO instrument teams. Another strong motivation for this system was to provide an EIT analysis environment which permits coordinated analysis of EIT data in conjunction with data from important supporting instruments, including Yohkoh/SXT and the other SOHO coronal instruments; CDS, SUMER, and LASCO. In addition, the SSW system will support coordinated EIT/TRACE analysis (by design) when TRACE data is available; TRACE launch is currently planned for March 1998. Working with Jeff Newmark, the Chianti software package (K.P. Dere et al) and UV /EUV data base was fully integrated into the SSW system to facilitate EIT temperature and emission analysis.

  6. Polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The book on 'polarized neutrons' is intended to inform researchers in condensed matter physics and chemistry of the diversity of scientific problems that can be investigated using polarized neutron beams. The contents include chapters on:- neutron polarizers and instrumentation, polarized neutron scattering, neutron polarization analysis experiments and precessing neutron polarization. (U.K.)

  7. Hygroscopic Swelling Determination of Cellulose Nanocrystal (CNC) Films by Polarized Light Microscopy Digital Image Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Shikha; Diaz, Jairo A; Ghanbari, Siavash; Youngblood, Jeffrey P

    2017-05-08

    The coefficient of hygroscopic swelling (CHS) of self-organized and shear-oriented cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films was determined by capturing hygroscopic strains produced as result of isothermal water vapor intake in equilibrium. Contrast enhanced microscopy digital image correlation enabled the characterization of dimensional changes induced by the hygroscopic swelling of the films. The distinct microstructure and birefringence of CNC films served in exploring the in-plane hygroscopic swelling at relative humidity values ranging from 0% to 97%. Water vapor intake in CNC films was measured using dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) at constant temperature. The obtained experimental moisture sorption and kinetic profiles were analyzed by fitting with Guggenheim, Anderson, and deBoer (GAB) and Parallel Exponential Kinetics (PEK) models, respectively. Self-organized CNC films showed isotropic swelling, CHS ∼0.040 %strain/%C. By contrast, shear-oriented CNC films exhibited an anisotropic swelling, resulting in CHS ∼0.02 and ∼0.30 %strain/%C, parallel and perpendicular to CNC alignment, respectively. Finite element analysis (FEA) further predicted moisture diffusion as the predominant mechanism for swelling of CNC films.

  8. Polarized Light Imaging of the HD 142527 Transition Disk with the Gemini Planet Imager: Dust around the Close-in Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Follette, Katherine B.; Weinberger, Alycia; Close, Laird; Hines, Dean C.

    2014-08-01

    When giant planets form, they grow by accreting gas and dust. HD 142527 is a young star that offers a scaled-up view of this process. It has a broad, asymmetric ring of gas and dust beyond ~100 AU and a wide inner gap. Within the gap, a low-mass stellar companion orbits the primary star at just ~12 AU, and both the primary and secondary are accreting gas. In an attempt to directly detect the dusty counterpart to this accreted gas, we have observed HD 142527 with the Gemini Planet Imager in polarized light at Y band (0.95-1.14 μm). We clearly detect the companion in total intensity and show that its position and photometry are generally consistent with the expected values. We also detect a point source in polarized light that may be spatially separated by ~ a few AU from the location of the companion in total intensity. This suggests that dust is likely falling onto or orbiting the companion. Given the possible contribution of scattered light from this dust to previously reported photometry of the companion, the current mass limits should be viewed as upper limits only. If the dust near the companion is eventually confirmed to be spatially separated, this system would resemble a scaled-up version of the young planetary system inside the gap of the transition disk around LkCa 15. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministrio da Cincia, Tecnologia e Inovao (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologa e Innovacin Productiva (Argentina).

  9. Lesion size detection in geographic atrophy by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography and correlation to conventional imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Christopher; Bolz, Matthias; Sayegh, Ramzi; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2013-01-28

    To investigate the reproducibility of automated lesion size detection in patients with geographic atrophy (GA) using polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and to compare findings with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and intensity-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT). Twenty-nine eyes of 22 patients with GA were examined by PS-OCT, selectively identifying the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A novel segmentation algorithm was applied, automatically detecting and quantifying areas of RPE atrophy. The reproducibility of the algorithm was assessed, and lesion sizes were correlated with manually delineated SLO, FAF, and intensity-based SD-OCT images to validate the clinical applicability of PS-OCT in GA evaluation. Mean GA lesion size of all patients was 5.28 mm(2) (SD: 4.92) in PS-OCT. Mean variability of individual repeatability measurements was 0.83 mm(2) (minimum: 0.05; maximum: 3.65). Mean coefficient of variation was 0.07 (min: 0.01; max: 0.19). Mean GA area in SLO (Spectralis OCT) was 5.15 mm(2) (SD: 4.72) and 2.5% smaller than in PS-OCT (P = 0.9, Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.98, P < 0.01). Mean GA area in intensity-based SD-OCT pseudo-SLO images (Cirrus OCT) was 5.14 mm(2) (SD: 4.67) and 2.7% smaller than in PS-OCT (P = 0.9, Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.98, P < 0.01). Mean GA area of all eyes measured 5.41 mm(2) (SD: 4.75) in FAF, deviating by 2.4% from PS-OCT results (P = 0.89, Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.99, P < 0.01). PS-OCT demonstrated high reproducibility of GA lesion size determination. Results correlated well with SLO, FAF, and intensity-based SD-OCT fundus imaging. PS-OCT may therefore be a valuable and specific imaging modality for automated GA lesion size determination in scientific studies and clinical practice.

  10. Polar Biomedical Research - An Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    on agriculture and imported food and fuel silviculture Attenuated solar spectrum Reduces ultraviolet radiation, leading to possible vitamin D...for an expanded population. Any experiments in polar regions in food production involving geothermal heat, solar energy, hydroponics, or aquaculture...to water problems are those of accumulation of solid waste. During winter, such waste, including garbage and disposable diapers , near dwellings is a

  11. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    2000-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L- Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  12. Atomically-resolved mapping of polarization and electric fields across ferroelectric-oxide interfaces by Z-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Albina; Chang, Hye Jung; Kalinin, Sergei; Morozovska, Anna; Chu, Ying-Hao; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Pennycook, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Polarization, electric field, charge and potential across ferroelectric-oxide interfaces are obtained from direct atomic position mapping by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with Ginsburg-Landau-Devonshire theory. We compare two antiparallel polarization orientations, which allows separation of the polarization and intrinsic interface charge contributions. Using the Born effective charges, the complete interface electrostatics is obtained in real space, providing an alternative method to holography. The results provide new microscopic insight into the thermodynamics of polarization distribution at the atomic level. Research is sponsored by the of Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, U.S. DOE.

  13. Semi-automatic measures of activity in selected south polar regions of Mars using morphological image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Klaus-Michael; Portyankina, Ganna; Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicolas

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been used to monitor the seasonal evolution of several regions at high southern latitudes. Of particular interest have been jet-like activities that may result from the process described by Kieffer (2007), involving translucent CO2 ice. These jets are assumed to create fan-shaped ground features, as studied e.g. in Hansen et.al. (2010) and Portyankina et.al. (2010). In Thomas et.al. (2009), a small region of interest (ROI) inside the south polar Inca City region (81° S, 296° E) was defined for which the seasonal change of the number of fans was determined. This ROI was chosen for its strong visual variability in ground features. The mostly manual counting work showed, that the number of apparent fans increases monotonously for a considerable amount of time from the beginning of the spring time observations at Ls of 178° until approx. 230° , following the increase of available solar energy for the aforementioned processes of the Kieffer model. This fact indicates that the number of visual fan features can be used as an activity measure for the seasonal evolution of this area, in addition to commonly used evolution studies of surface reflectance. Motivated by these results, we would like to determine the fan count evolution for more south polar areas like Ithaca, Manhattan, Giza and others. To increase the reproducibility of the results by avoiding potential variability in fan shape recognition by human eye and to increase the production efficiency, efforts are being undertaken to automise the fan counting procedure. The techniques used, cleanly separated in different stages of the procedure, the difficulties for each stage and an overview of the tools used at each step will be presented. After showing a proof of concept in Aye et.al. (2010), for a ROI that is comparable to the one previously used for manual counting in Thomas et.al. (2009), we now will show

  14. Distribution of Citations Received by Scientific Papers Published in the Imaging Literature From 2001 to 2010: Decreasing Inequality and Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soo Jeong; Yoon, Dae Young; Lee, Hyung Jin; Baek, Sora; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Seo, Young Lan; Yun, Eun Joo

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the distribution of citations received by scientific papers published in the imaging literature between 2001 and 2010. We extracted the number of citations of all articles and reviews for 5 years after publication using the Scopus (Elsevier) citation database of imaging journals between 2001 and 2010. We quantitatively analyzed article and review citations from each journal and each year, including the number, proportion, and annual number of citations of the most- (≥ 20 citations) and least-cited (three or fewer citations) papers; ratio of most-cited to least-cited papers; 75/25 percentile citation ratio; 90/10 percentile citation ratio; Gini coefficient; and Kolkata index. Our analysis of 124,331 articles and 13,575 reviews from 121 journals showed that the proportion of most-cited articles (from 19.6% to 27.1%) and reviews (from 19.1% to 37.2%) increased from 2001 to 2010, whereas the proportion of least-cited articles (from 32.3% to 23.0%) and reviews (from 31.9% to 15.8%) declined over the same period. The annual numbers of citations of most-cited articles and reviews both reached a peak in the fourth year after publication, whereas those of least-cited articles and reviews reached a peak in the second and fist years, respectively, after publication and thereafter decreased. The 75/25 percentile ratio for articles declined from 41.1 to 27.5 between 2001 and 2010. Over the same time, the 75/25 percentile ratio for reviews declined from 47.4 to 22.9. The 90/10 percentile ratio for articles declined from 1730.8 to 188.7; for reviews, the 90/10 percentile ratio declined from 5788.0 to 100.7. The Gini coefficient of articles and reviews also declined from 0.6116 to 0.5721 for articles and from 0.6507 to 0.5649 for reviews; the k index, from 0.7260 to 0.7088 for articles from 0.7409 to 0.7072 for reviews. Inequality and polarization of citations consistently decreased in the imaging literature from 2001 to 2010.

  15. Determining the source region of auroral emissions in the prenoon oval using coordinated Polar BEAR UV-imaging and DMSP particle measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, P.T.; Meng, C.I.; Huffman, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The Polar Beacon Experiment and Auroral Research (Polar BEAR) satellite included the capability for imaging the dayside auroral oval in full sunlight at several wavelengths. The authors compare particle observations from the DMSP F7 satellite during dayside auroral oval crossings with approximately simultaneous Polar BEAR 1,356-angstrom images to determine the magnetospheric source region of the dayside auroral oval. The source region is determined from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) particle data, according to recent work concerning the classification and identification of precipitation source regions. The close DMSP/Polar BEAR coincidences all occur when the former satellite is located between 0945 and 1,000 MLT. The authors found instances of auroral arcs mapping to each of several different regions, including the boundary plasma sheet, the low-latitude boundary layer, and the plasma mantle. However, the results indicate that about half the time the most prominent auroral arcs are located at the interfaces between distinct plasma regions, at least at the local time studied here

  16. Commissioning and modification of the low temperature scanning polarization microscope (TTSPM) and imaging of the local magnetic flux density distribution in superconducting niobium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenzweig, Matthias Sebastian Peter

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation is separated into two different parts, which will be presented in the following. Part I of the dissertation is about the commissioning and the modification of the ''low-temperature scanning polarization microscope'' which was designed in a previous dissertation of Stefan Guenon [1]. A scanning polarization microscope has certain advantages compared to conventional polarization microscopes. With a scanning polarization microscope it is easily possible to achieve a high illumination intensity, which is important to realize a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the confocal design of the scanning polarization microscope improves the resolution of the microscope by a factor of 1.4. Normally, it is not necessary to post-process the images by means of differential frame method to eliminate the contrast of non-magnetic origin. In contrast to conventional polarization microscopes the low-temperature scanning polarization microscope is able to image electronic transport properties via beam-induced voltage variation in addition to the magneto-optical effects. In this dissertation, it was possible to demonstrate the performance capability of the scanning polarization microscope at room temperature as well as at low temperatures. The investigation of the polar Kerr-effect has been carried out with a BaFe 12 O 19 -test sample whereas the measurements of the longitudinal Kerr-effect have been carried out with an in-plane magnetized acceleration sensor. Furthermore, an independent room temperature construction for out-of-plane measurements in a magnetic field up to 1 Tesla has been designed and implemented within the framework of a diploma thesis, supervised by the author of this dissertation. Using this construction, it was possible to gain experimental results regarding the interlayer exchange coupling between iron-terbium alloys (Fe 1-x Tb x ) and cobalt-platinum multilayers (vertical stroke Co/Pt vertical stroke n ). Indeed, it has been

  17. A high-resolution combined scanning laser and widefield polarizing microscope for imaging at temperatures from 4 K to 300 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M; Guénon, S; Lever, F; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D

    2017-12-01

    Polarized light microscopy, as a contrast-enhancing technique for optically anisotropic materials, is a method well suited for the investigation of a wide variety of effects in solid-state physics, as, for example, birefringence in crystals or the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). We present a microscopy setup that combines a widefield microscope and a confocal scanning laser microscope with polarization-sensitive detectors. By using a high numerical aperture objective, a spatial resolution of about 240 nm at a wavelength of 405 nm is achieved. The sample is mounted on a 4 He continuous flow cryostat providing a temperature range between 4 K and 300 K, and electromagnets are used to apply magnetic fields of up to 800 mT with variable in-plane orientation and 20 mT with out-of-plane orientation. Typical applications of the polarizing microscope are the imaging of the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization via the longitudinal and polar MOKE, imaging of magnetic flux structures in superconductors covered with a magneto-optical indicator film via the Faraday effect, or imaging of structural features, such as twin-walls in tetragonal SrTiO 3 . The scanning laser microscope furthermore offers the possibility to gain local information on electric transport properties of a sample by detecting the beam-induced voltage change across a current-biased sample. This combination of magnetic, structural, and electric imaging capabilities makes the microscope a viable tool for research in the fields of oxide electronics, spintronics, magnetism, and superconductivity.

  18. Wide-field synovial fluid imaging using polarized lens-free on-chip microscopy for point-of-care diagnostics of gout (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Gout and pseudogout are forms of crystal arthropathy caused by monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD) crystals in the joint, respectively, that can result in painful joints. Detecting the unique-shaped, birefringent MSU/CPPD crystals in a synovial fluid sample using a compensated polarizing microscope has been the gold-standard for diagnosis since the 1960's. However, this can be time-consuming and inaccurate, especially if there are only few crystals in the fluid. The high-cost and bulkiness of conventional microscopes can also be limiting for point-of-care diagnosis. Lens-free on-chip microscopy based on digital holography routinely achieves high-throughput and high-resolution imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable design. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, polarized lens-free on-chip imaging of MSU and CPPD crystals over a wide field-of-view (FOV ~ 20.5 mm2, i.e., gout and pseudogout. Circularly polarizer partially-coherent light is used to illuminate the synovial fluid sample on a glass slide, after which a quarter-wave-plate and an angle-mismatched linear polarizer are used to analyze the transmitted light. Two lens-free holograms of the MSU/CPPD sample are taken, with the sample rotated by 90°, to rule out any non-birefringent objects within the specimen. A phase-recovery algorithm is also used to improve the reconstruction quality, and digital pseudo-coloring is utilized to match the color and contrast of the lens-free image to that of a gold-standard microscope image to ease the examination by a rheumatologist or a laboratory technician, and to facilitate computerized analysis.

  19. A high-resolution combined scanning laser and widefield polarizing microscope for imaging at temperatures from 4 K to 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M.; Guénon, S.; Lever, F.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2017-12-01

    Polarized light microscopy, as a contrast-enhancing technique for optically anisotropic materials, is a method well suited for the investigation of a wide variety of effects in solid-state physics, as, for example, birefringence in crystals or the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). We present a microscopy setup that combines a widefield microscope and a confocal scanning laser microscope with polarization-sensitive detectors. By using a high numerical aperture objective, a spatial resolution of about 240 nm at a wavelength of 405 nm is achieved. The sample is mounted on a 4He continuous flow cryostat providing a temperature range between 4 K and 300 K, and electromagnets are used to apply magnetic fields of up to 800 mT with variable in-plane orientation and 20 mT with out-of-plane orientation. Typical applications of the polarizing microscope are the imaging of the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization via the longitudinal and polar MOKE, imaging of magnetic flux structures in superconductors covered with a magneto-optical indicator film via the Faraday effect, or imaging of structural features, such as twin-walls in tetragonal SrTiO3. The scanning laser microscope furthermore offers the possibility to gain local information on electric transport properties of a sample by detecting the beam-induced voltage change across a current-biased sample. This combination of magnetic, structural, and electric imaging capabilities makes the microscope a viable tool for research in the fields of oxide electronics, spintronics, magnetism, and superconductivity.

  20. Mid-Latitude versus Polar-Latitude Transitional Impact Craters: Geometric Properties from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Observations and Viking Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, A.; Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    1998-01-01

    One intriguing aspect of martian impact crater morphology is the change of crater cavity and ejecta characteristics from the mid-latitudes to the polar regions. This is thought to reflect differences in target properties such as an increasing presence of ice in the polar regions. Previous image-based efforts concerning martian crater morphology has documented some aspects of this, but has been hampered by the lack of adequate topography data. Recent Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic profiles provide a quantitative perspective for interpreting the detailed morphologies of martian crater cavities and ejecta morphology. This study is a preliminary effort to quantify the latitude-dependent differences in morphology with the goal of identifying target-dependent and crater modification effects from the combined of images and MOLA topography. We combine the available MOLA profiles and the corresponding Viking Mars Digital Image Mosaics (MDIMS), and high resolution Viking Orbiter images to focus on two transitional craters; one on the mid-latitudes, and one in the North Polar region. One MOLA pass (MGS Orbit 34) traverses the center of a 15.9 km diameter fresh complex crater located at 12.8degN 83.8degE on the Hesperian ridge plains unit (Hvr). Viking images, as well as MOLA data, show that this crater has well developed wall terraces and a central peak with 429 m of relative relief. Three MOLA passes have been acquired for a second impact crater, which is located at 69.5degN 41degE on the Vastitas Borealis Formation. This fresh rampart crater lacks terraces and central peak structures and it has a depth af 579 m. Correlation between images and MOLA topographic profiles allows us to construct basic facies maps of the craters. Eight main units were identified, four of which are common on both craters.

  1. Toward 3-D E-field visualization in laser-produced plasma by polarization-spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2004-01-01

    A 3-D volume radiator such as laser-produced plasma (LPP) plumes is observed in the form of a 2-D projection of its radiative structure. The traditional approach to 3-D structure reconstruction relies on multiple projections but is not suitable as a general method for unsteady radiating objects. We have developed a general method for 3-D structure reconstruction for LPP plumes in stages of increasing complexity. We have chosen neutral gas-confined LPP plumes from an aluminum target immersed in high-density argon because the plasma experiences Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We make use of two time-resolved, mutually orthogonal side views of a LPP plume and a front-view snapshot. No symmetry assumptions are needed. Two scaling relations are invoked that connects the plasma temperature and pressure to local specific intensity at selected wavelength(s). Two mutually-orthogonal lateral luminosity views of the plume at each known distance from the target surface are compared with those computed from the trial specific intensity profiles and the scaling relations. The luminosity error signals are minimized to find the structure. The front-view snapshot is used to select the initial trial profile and as a weighting function for allocation of the error signal into corrections for specific intensities from the plasma cells along the line of sight. Full Saha equilibrium for multiple stages of ionization is treated, together with the self-absorption, in the computation of the luminosity. We show the necessary optics for determination of local electric fields through polarization-resolved imaging. (author)

  2. An Imaging Polar Nephelometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This invention relates to measuring the light that is scattered from particulates (aerosols) in a gas or liquid. The sample typically flows into the instrument and...

  3. Photodetector of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorogan, V.; Branzari, V.; Vieru, T.; Manole, M.; Canter, V.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to photodetectors on base of semiconductors of ultraviolet radiation and may be used in optoelectronic system for determining the intensity and the dose of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the Sun or other sources. Summary of the invention consists in the fact that in the photodetector of ultraviolet radiation the superficial potential barrier is divided into two identical elements, electrically isolated each of the other, one of them being covered with a layer of transparent material for visible and infrared radiation and absorption the ultra violet radiation. The technical result consists in mutual compensation of visible and infrared components of the radiation spectrum

  4. Solar Cycle Variation of Microwave Polar Brightening and EUV Coronal Hole Observed by Nobeyama Radioheliograph and SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Park, Jong-Yeop; Kim, Yeon-Han

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the solar cycle variation of microwave and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) intensity in latitude to compare microwave polar brightening (MPB) with the EUV polar coronal hole (CH). For this study, we used the full-sun images observed in 17 GHz of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph from 1992 July to 2016 November and in two EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 Å and 171 Å on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) from 2011 January to 2016 November. As a result, we found that the polar intensity in EUV is anti-correlated with the polar intensity in microwave. Since the depression of EUV intensity in the pole is mostly owing to the CH appearance and continuation there, the anti-correlation in the intensity implies the intimate association between the polar CH and the MPB. Considering the report of tet{gopal99} that the enhanced microwave brightness in the CH is seen above the enhanced photospheric magnetic field, we suggest that the pole area during the solar minimum has a stronger magnetic field than the quiet sun level and such a strong field in the pole results in the formation of the polar CH. The emission mechanism of the MPB and the physical link with the polar CH are not still fully understood. It is necessary to investigate the MPB using high resolution microwave imaging data, which can be obtained by the high performance large-array radio observatories such as the ALMA project.

  5. Applications and limitations of micro-XCT imaging in the studies of Permian radiolarians: A new genus with bi-polar main spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfocus X-ray Computed Tomography (micro-XCT has been employed recently in radiolarian studies, though so far primarily to generate high quality tomographic images. Although micro-XCT technique cannot always produce high-quality tomographic images, it frequently can provide valuable information on the internal structure of spongy polycystines. Here we employ micro-XCT to understand internal skeletal structures of several Permian specimens of polycystine radiolarians. Structural inferences from micro-XCT images are compared to images of the same specimens made with SEM and transmitted light microscopy (TLM. The utility of micro-XCT for imaging internal structures is first confirmed by examining the spongy, flat, four-spined species Tetraspongodiscus stauracanthus. Micro-XCT method is then used to examine the internal structures of a spherical to elliptical polycystine with two bi-polar main spines, Dalongicaepa bipolaris Xiao and Suzuki gen. et sp. nov., from the Dalong Formation (Changhsingian of South China. The new genus is characterized by four to seven densely concentric shells with a large spherical hollow in the center and two cylindrical spines at both poles of the cortical shell, and belongs to the family Spongotortilispinidae. Spherical to elliptical polycystines with bi-polar main spines are similar in external appearance, and their phylogenetic relationships are only determinable by examination of the internal structures. We therefore analyzed all Permian and Mesozoic spherical to elliptical polycystines with bi-polar main spines showing internal structures, using cluster analysis to measure similarity. The results show distinctive differences in internal structures and suggest that family level relationships should be revised in the future.

  6. Instrumentation with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeni, P.; Muenzer, W.; Ostermann, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering with polarization analysis is an indispensable tool for the investigation of novel materials exhibiting electronic, magnetic, and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition, polarized neutrons are necessary for neutron spin precession techniques that path the way to obtain extremely high resolution in space and time. Last but not least, polarized neutrons are being used for fundamental studies as well as very recently for neutron imaging. Many years ago, neutron beam lines were simply adapted for polarized beam applications by adding polarizing elements leading usually to unacceptable losses in neutron intensity. Recently, an increasing number of beam lines are designed such that an optimum use of polarized neutrons is facilitated. In addition, marked progress has been obtained in the technology of 3 He polarizers and the reflectivity of large-m supermirrors. Therefore, if properly designed, only factors of approximately 2-3 in neutron intensity are lost. It is shown that S-benders provide neutron beams with an almost wavelength independent polarization. Using twin cavities, polarized beams with a homogeneous phase space and P>0.99 can be produced without significantly sacrificing intensity. It is argued that elliptic guides, which are coated with large m polarizing supermirrors, provide the highest flux.

  7. Far field photoluminescence imaging of single AlGaN nanowire in the sub-wavelength scale using confinement of polarized light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivadasan, A.K.; Dhara, Sandip [Nanomaterials and Sensors Section, Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kalpakkam (India); Sardar, Manas [Theoretical Studies Section, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-03-15

    Till now the nanoscale focusing and imaging in the sub-diffraction limit is achieved mainly with the help of plasmonic field enhancement by confining the light assisted with noble metal nanostructures. Using far field imaging technique, we have recorded polarized spectroscopic photoluminescence (PL) imaging of a single AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∝100 nm using confinement of polarized light. It is found that the PL from a single NW is influenced by the proximity to other NWs. The PL intensity is proportional to 1/(l x d), where l and d are the average NW length and separation between the NWs, respectively. We suggest that the proximity induced PL intensity enhancement can be understood by assuming the existence of reasonably long lived photons in the intervening space between the NWs. A nonzero non-equilibrium population of such photons may cause stimulated emission leading to the enhancement of PL emission with the intensity proportional to 1/(l x d). The enhancement of PL emission facilitates far field spectroscopic imaging of a single semiconductor AlGaN NW of sub-wavelength dimension. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Nanoscale freestanding gratings for ultraviolet blocking filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Beek, J.T.; Fleming, R.C.; Hindle, P.S.; Prentiss, J.D.; Schattenburg, M.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ritzau, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) blocking filters are needed for atomic flux imaging in environments where high levels of ultraviolet radiation are present. Freestanding gratings are a promising candidate for UV filtering. They have a high aspect ratio ({approximately}13), narrow ({approximately}40 nm) slots, and effectively block UV radiation. The grating fabrication process makes use of several etching, electroplating, and lithographic steps and includes an optional step to plug pinholes induced by particles during processing. Gratings were successfully manufactured and tested. Measured UV transmissions of {approximately}10{sup {minus}5} and particle transmissions of {approximately}10{percent} are in agreement with theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  9. Variations in the polar cap area during two substorm cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This study employs observations from several sources to determine the location of the polar cap boundary, or open/closed field line boundary, at all local times, allowing the amount of open flux in the magnetosphere to be quantified. These data sources include global auroral images from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI instrument on board the Polar spacecraft, SuperDARN HF radar measurements of the convection flow, and low altitude particle measurements from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA satellites, and the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST spacecraft. Changes in the open flux content of the magnetosphere are related to the rate of magnetic reconnection occurring at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail, allowing us to estimate the day- and nightside reconnection voltages during two substorm cycles. Specifically, increases in the polar cap area are found to be consistent with open flux being created when the IMF is oriented southwards and low-latitude magnetopause reconnection is ongoing, and decreases in area correspond to open flux being destroyed at substorm breakup. The polar cap area can continue to decrease for 100 min following the onset of substorm breakup, continuing even after substorm-associated auroral features have died away. An estimate of the dayside reconnection voltage, determined from plasma drift measurements in the ionosphere, indicates that reconnection can take place at all local times along the dayside portion of the polar cap boundary, and hence presumably across the majority of the dayside magnetopause. The observation of ionospheric signatures of bursty reconnection over a wide extent of local times supports this finding.Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection; polar ionosphere – Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  10. The Physics and Diagnostic Potential of Ultraviolet Spectropolarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio; Belluzzi, Luca

    2017-09-01

    The empirical investigation of the magnetic field in the outer solar atmosphere is a very important challenge in astrophysics. To this end, we need to identify, measure and interpret observable quantities sensitive to the magnetism of the upper chromosphere, transition region and corona. This paper provides an overview of the physics and diagnostic potential of spectropolarimetry in permitted spectral lines of the ultraviolet solar spectrum, such as the Mg ii h and k lines around 2800 Å, the hydrogen Lyman-α line at 1216 Å, and the Lyman-α line of He ii at 304 Å. The outer solar atmosphere is an optically pumped vapor and the linear polarization of such spectral lines is dominated by the atomic level polarization produced by the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation. Its modification by the action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects in the inhomogeneous and dynamic solar atmosphere needs to be carefully understood because it encodes the magnetic field information. The circular polarization induced by the Zeeman effect in some ultraviolet lines (e.g., Mg ii h & k) is also of diagnostic interest, especially for probing the outer solar atmosphere in plages and more active regions. The few (pioneering) observational attempts carried out so far to measure the ultraviolet spectral line polarization produced by optically pumped atoms in the upper chromosphere, transition region and corona are also discussed. We emphasize that ultraviolet spectropolarimetry is a key gateway to the outer atmosphere of the Sun and of other stars.

  11. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  12. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  13. Evidence of excited state localization and static disorder in LH2 investigated by 2D-polarization single-molecule imaging at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubasum, Sumera; Camacho, Rafael; Meyer, Matthias; Yadav, Dheerendra; Cogdell, Richard J; Pullerits, Tõnu; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2013-12-07

    Two-dimensional polarization fluorescence imaging of single light harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) of Rps. acidophila was carried out to investigate the polarization properties of excitation and fluorescence emission simultaneously, at room temperature. In two separate experiments we excited LH2 with a spectrally narrow laser line matched to the absorption bands of the two chromophore rings, B800 and B850, thereby indirectly and directly triggering fluorescence of the B850 exciton state. A correlation analysis of the polarization modulation depths in excitation and emission for a large number of single complexes was performed. Our results show, in comparison to B800, that the B850 ring is a more isotropic absorber due to the excitonic nature of its excited states. At the same time, we observed a strong tendency for LH2 to emit with dipolar character, from which preferential localization of the emissive exciton, stable for minutes, is inferred. We argue that the observed effects can consistently be explained by static energetic disorder and/or deformation of the complex, with possible involvement of exciton self-trapping.

  14. Comparison study for multiple ionization of carbonyl sulfide by linearly and circularly polarized intense femtosecond laser fields using Coulomb explosion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pan; Wang, Chuncheng; Luo, Sizuo; Yu, Xitao; Li, Xiaokai; Wang, Zhenzhen; Hu, Wenhui; Yu, Jiaqi; Yang, Yizhang; Tian, Xu; Cui, Zhonghua; Ding, Dajun

    2018-05-01

    We studied the relative yields and dissociation dynamics for two- and three-body Coulomb explosion (CE) channels from highly charged carbonyl sulfide molecules in intense laser fields using the CE imaging technique. The electron recollision contributions are evaluated by comparing the relative yields for the multiple ionization process in linearly polarized and circularly polarized (LP and CP) laser fields. The nonsequential multiple ionization is only confirmed for the charge states of 2 to 4 because the energy for further ionization from the inner orbital is much larger than the maximum recollision energy, 3.2U p . The novel deviations of kinetic energy releases distributions between LP and CP pulses are observed for the charge states higher than 4. It can be attributed to the stronger molecular bending in highly charged states before three-body CE with CP light, in which the bending wave packet is initialed by the triple or quartic ionization and spread along their potential curves. Compared to LP light, CP light ionizes a larger fraction of bending molecules in the polarization plane.

  15. Probing nanoscale ferroelectricity by ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenne, D A; Bruchhausen, A; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D; Fainstein, A; Katiyar, R S; Cantarero, A; Soukiassian, A; Vaithyanathan, V; Haeni, J H; Tian, W; Schlom, D G; Choi, K J; Kim, D M; Eom, C B; Sun, H P; Pan, X Q; Li, Y L; Chen, L Q; Jia, Q X; Nakhmanson, S M; Rabe, K M; Xi, X X

    2006-09-15

    We demonstrated that ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to measure the transition temperature (Tc) in ferroelectric ultrathin films and superlattices. We showed that one-unit-cell-thick BaTiO3 layers in BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices are not only ferroelectric (with Tc as high as 250 kelvin) but also polarize the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 layers adjacent to them. Tc was tuned by approximately 500 kelvin by varying the thicknesses of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 layers, revealing the essential roles of electrical and mechanical boundary conditions for nanoscale ferroelectricity.

  16. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  17. FRET structure with non-radiative acceptor provided by dye-linker-glass surface complex and single-molecule photodynamics by TIRFM-polarized imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Mashimo, Kei; Suzuki, Tetsu; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Oda, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    We present our recent study of microscopic single-molecule imaging on the artificial complex of tetramethylrhodamine linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface, i.e. an asymmetric fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) structure with non-radiative acceptor. In the synthesis of the complex, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers to introduce rather small photodynamic difference among them. This isomeric structure change will provide more or less a distinctive photophysical change in e.g. non-radiative relaxation rate. Our recent observation at room temperatures, so far, shows that such contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the fluorescent spot intensities; broad but distinctive multi-components appear. To identify the isomeric difference as a cause of structures, some configurational assumptions are necessary. One such basic prerequisite is that the transition dipoles of the chromophores should be oriented almost parallel to the glass surface. In order to make clear the modeling, we also provide preliminary experiments on the polarization dependence of the imaging under rotating polarization in epi-illumination

  18. Ultraviolet fire detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    System is capable of detecting ultraviolet light emitted by match size flame at distance of 10 ft. System is not affected by high energy or particulate radiation and is therefore particularly suited for applications around nuclear plants and X-ray equipment.

  19. Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, E.M.; Nall, L.

    1993-01-01

    Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs

  20. Photodissociation of aligned CH3I and C6H3F2I molecules probed with time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging by site-selective extreme ultraviolet ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Kasra; Savelyev, Evgeny; Brauße, Felix; Berrah, Nora; Bomme, Cédric; Brouard, Mark; Burt, Michael; Christensen, Lauge; Düsterer, Stefan; Erk, Benjamin; Höppner, Hauke; Kierspel, Thomas; Krecinic, Faruk; Lauer, Alexandra; Lee, Jason W L; Müller, Maria; Müller, Erland; Mullins, Terence; Redlin, Harald; Schirmel, Nora; Thøgersen, Jan; Techert, Simone; Toleikis, Sven; Treusch, Rolf; Trippel, Sebastian; Ulmer, Anatoli; Vallance, Claire; Wiese, Joss; Johnsson, Per; Küpper, Jochen; Rudenko, Artem; Rouzée, Arnaud; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Boll, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    We explore time-resolved Coulomb explosion induced by intense, extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses from a free-electron laser as a method to image photo-induced molecular dynamics in two molecules, iodomethane and 2,6-difluoroiodobenzene. At an excitation wavelength of 267 nm, the dominant reaction pathway in both molecules is neutral dissociation via cleavage of the carbon-iodine bond. This allows investigating the influence of the molecular environment on the absorption of an intense, femtosecond XUV pulse and the subsequent Coulomb explosion process. We find that the XUV probe pulse induces local inner-shell ionization of atomic iodine in dissociating iodomethane, in contrast to non-selective ionization of all photofragments in difluoroiodobenzene. The results reveal evidence of electron transfer from methyl and phenyl moieties to a multiply charged iodine ion. In addition, indications for ultrafast charge rearrangement on the phenyl radical are found, suggesting that time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging is sensitive to the localization of charge in extended molecules.

  1. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnaninchi, P O; Yang, Y; Maffulli, G; El Haj, A; Maffulli, N; Bonesi, M; Meglinski, I; Phelan, C

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  2. PHIPS-HALO: the airborne particle habit imaging and polar scattering probe - Part 2: Characterization and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaiter, Martin; Järvinen, Emma; Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Leisner, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The novel aircraft optical cloud probe PHIPS-HALO has been developed to establish clarity regarding the fundamental link between the microphysical properties of single atmospheric ice particles and their appropriated angular light scattering function. After final improvements were implemented in the polar nephelometer part and the acquisition software of PHIPS-HALO, the instrument was comprehensively characterized in the laboratory and was deployed in two aircraft missions targeting cirrus and Arctic mixed-phase clouds. This work demonstrates the proper function of the instrument under aircraft conditions and highlights the uniqueness, quality, and limitations of the data that can be expected from PHIPS-HALO in cloud-related aircraft missions.

  3. Polarization recovery through scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Hilton B; Gigan, Sylvain; Brasselet, Sophie

    2017-09-01

    The control and use of light polarization in optical sciences and engineering are widespread. Despite remarkable developments in polarization-resolved imaging for life sciences, their transposition to strongly scattering media is currently not possible, because of the inherent depolarization effects arising from multiple scattering. We show an unprecedented phenomenon that opens new possibilities for polarization-resolved microscopy in strongly scattering media: polarization recovery via broadband wavefront shaping. We demonstrate focusing and recovery of the original injected polarization state without using any polarizing optics at the detection. To enable molecular-level structural imaging, an arbitrary rotation of the input polarization does not degrade the quality of the focus. We further exploit the robustness of polarization recovery for structural imaging of biological tissues through scattering media. We retrieve molecular-level organization information of collagen fibers by polarization-resolved second harmonic generation, a topic of wide interest for diagnosis in biomedical optics. Ultimately, the observation of this new phenomenon paves the way for extending current polarization-based methods to strongly scattering environments.

  4. First correlated measurements of the shape and light scattering properties of cloud particles using the new Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdelmonem

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds requires knowledge of the relationship between their microphysics and the single scattering properties of cloud particles. Usually, this relationship is obtained by modeling the optical scattering properties from in situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions. The measured size distribution and the assumed particle shape might be erroneous in case of non-spherical ice particles. We present here a novel optical sensor (the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe, PHIPS designed to measure simultaneously the 3-D morphology and the corresponding optical and microphysical parameters of individual cloud particles. Clouds containing particles ranging from a few micrometers to about 800 μm diameter in size can be characterized systematically with an optical resolution power of 2 μm and polar scattering resolution of 1° for forward scattering directions (from 1° to 10° and 8° for side and backscattering directions (from 18° to 170°. The maximum acquisition rates for scattering phase functions and images are 262 KHz and 10 Hz, respectively. Some preliminary results collected in two ice cloud campaigns conducted in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber are presented. PHIPS showed reliability in operation and produced size distributions and images comparable to those given by other certified cloud particles instruments. A 3-D model of a hexagonal ice plate is constructed and the corresponding scattering phase function is compared to that modeled using the Ray Tracing with Diffraction on Facets (RTDF program. PHIPS is a highly promising novel airborne optical sensor for studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds and correlating the particle habit-scattering properties which will serve as a reference for other single, or multi-independent, measurement instruments.

  5. First correlated measurements of the shape and scattering properties of cloud particles using the new Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS) probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmonem, A.; Schnaiter, M.; Amsler, P.; Hesse, E.; Meyer, J.; Leisner, T.

    2011-05-01

    Studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds requires the knowledge of the link between their microphysics and the single scattering properties of the cloud particles. Usually, this link is created by modeling the optical scattering properties from in situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions. The measured size distribution and the assumed particle shape might be erroneous in case of non-spherical ice particles. We present here a novel optical sensor (the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe, PHIPS) designed to measure the 3-D morphology and the corresponding optical and microphysical parameters of individual cloud particles, simultaneously. Clouds containing particles ranging in size from a few micrometers to about 800 μm diameter can be systematically characterized with an optical resolution power of 2 μm and polar scattering resolution of 1° for forward scattering directions (from 1° to 10°) and 8° for side and backscattering directions (from 18° to 170°). The maximum acquisition rates for scattering phase functions and images are 262 KHz and 10 Hz, respectively. Some preliminary results collected in two ice cloud campaigns which were conducted in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber are presented. PHIPS showed reliability in operation and produced comparable size distributions and images to those given by other certified cloud particles instruments. A 3-D model of a hexagonal ice plate is constructed and the corresponding scattering phase function is compared to that modeled using the Ray Tracing with Diffraction on Facets (RTDF) program. PHIPS is candidate to be a novel air borne optical sensor for studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds and correlating the particle habit-scattering properties which will serve as a reference for other single, or multi-independent, measurements instruments.

  6. First correlated measurements of the shape and light scattering properties of cloud particles using the new Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS) probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmonem, A.; Schnaiter, M.; Amsler, P.; Hesse, E.; Meyer, J.; Leisner, T.

    2011-10-01

    Studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds requires knowledge of the relationship between their microphysics and the single scattering properties of cloud particles. Usually, this relationship is obtained by modeling the optical scattering properties from in situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions. The measured size distribution and the assumed particle shape might be erroneous in case of non-spherical ice particles. We present here a novel optical sensor (the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe, PHIPS) designed to measure simultaneously the 3-D morphology and the corresponding optical and microphysical parameters of individual cloud particles. Clouds containing particles ranging from a few micrometers to about 800 μm diameter in size can be characterized systematically with an optical resolution power of 2 μm and polar scattering resolution of 1° for forward scattering directions (from 1° to 10°) and 8° for side and backscattering directions (from 18° to 170°). The maximum acquisition rates for scattering phase functions and images are 262 KHz and 10 Hz, respectively. Some preliminary results collected in two ice cloud campaigns conducted in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber are presented. PHIPS showed reliability in operation and produced size distributions and images comparable to those given by other certified cloud particles instruments. A 3-D model of a hexagonal ice plate is constructed and the corresponding scattering phase function is compared to that modeled using the Ray Tracing with Diffraction on Facets (RTDF) program. PHIPS is a highly promising novel airborne optical sensor for studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds and correlating the particle habit-scattering properties which will serve as a reference for other single, or multi-independent, measurement instruments.

  7. Coronal Polarization of Pseudostreamers and the Solar Polar Field Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Guennou, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Gibson, S. E.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP polarization data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere, the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015. We present here the evolution of the structure and describe its identification in the Fe XII 1074nm coronal emission line, sensitive to the Hanle effect in the corona.

  8. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  9. Multiple-algorithm parallel fusion of infrared polarization and intensity images based on algorithmic complementarity and synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Fengbao; Ji, Linna; Lv, Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Diverse image fusion methods perform differently. Each method has advantages and disadvantages compared with others. One notion is that the advantages of different image methods can be effectively combined. A multiple-algorithm parallel fusion method based on algorithmic complementarity and synergy is proposed. First, in view of the characteristics of the different algorithms and difference-features among images, an index vector-based feature-similarity is proposed to define the degree of complementarity and synergy. This proposed index vector is a reliable evidence indicator for algorithm selection. Second, the algorithms with a high degree of complementarity and synergy are selected. Then, the different degrees of various features and infrared intensity images are used as the initial weights for the nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). This avoids randomness of the NMF initialization parameter. Finally, the fused images of different algorithms are integrated using the NMF because of its excellent data fusing performance on independent features. Experimental results demonstrate that the visual effect and objective evaluation index of the fused images obtained using the proposed method are better than those obtained using traditional methods. The proposed method retains all the advantages that individual fusion algorithms have.

  10. Resist image quality control via acid diffusion constant and/or photodecomposable quencher concentration in the fabrication of 11 nm half-pitch line-and-space patterns using extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph; Itani, Toshiro

    2018-05-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will be applied to the high-volume production of semiconductor devices with 16 nm half-pitch resolution and is expected to be extended to that of devices with 11 nm half-pitch resolution. With the reduction in the feature sizes, the control of acid diffusion becomes a significant concern. In this study, the dependence of resist image quality on T PEB D acid and photodecomposable quencher concentration was investigated by the Monte Carlo method on the basis of the sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified EUV resists. Here, T PEB and D acid are the postexposure baking (PEB) time and the acid diffusion constant, respectively. The resist image quality of 11 nm line-and-space patterns is discussed in terms of line edge roughness (LER) and stochastic defect generation. For the minimization of LER, it is necessary to design and control not only the photodecomposable quencher concentration but also T PEB D acid. In this case, D acid should be adjusted to be 0.3–1.5 nm2 s‑1 for a PEB time of 60 s with optimization of the balance among LER and stochastic pinching and bridging. Even if it is difficult to decrease D acid to the range of 0.3–1.5 nm2 s‑1, the image quality can still be controlled via only the photodecomposable quencher concentration, although LER and stochastic pinching and bridging are slightly increased. In this case, accurate control of the photodecomposable quencher concentration and the reduction in the initial standard deviation of the number of protected units are required.

  11. Displaced dual-mode imaging with desorption electrospray ionization for simultaneous mass spectrometry imaging in both polarities and with several scan modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janfelt, Christian; Wellner, Niels; Hansen, Harald S

    2013-01-01

    only. Simultaneous full-scan and MS/MS imaging was demonstrated on the same mouse kidney, as the mouse had been given a relatively low dose of the antidepressive drug amitriptyline. While the full-scan data allowed imaging of the endogenous phospholipids, the drug and its metabolites were only visible...

  12. Quantitative cell polarity imaging defines leader-to-follower transitions during collective migration and the key role of microtubule-dependent adherens junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenu, Céline; Streichan, Sebastian; Donà, Erika; Lecaudey, Virginie; Hufnagel, Lars; Gilmour, Darren

    2014-03-01

    The directed migration of cell collectives drives the formation of complex organ systems. A characteristic feature of many migrating collectives is a 'tissue-scale' polarity, whereby 'leader' cells at the edge of the tissue guide trailing 'followers' that become assembled into polarised epithelial tissues en route. Here, we combine quantitative imaging and perturbation approaches to investigate epithelial cell state transitions during collective migration and organogenesis, using the zebrafish lateral line primordium as an in vivo model. A readout of three-dimensional cell polarity, based on centrosomal-nucleus axes, allows the transition from migrating leaders to assembled followers to be quantitatively resolved for the first time in vivo. Using live reporters and a novel fluorescent protein timer approach, we investigate changes in cell-cell adhesion underlying this transition by monitoring cadherin receptor localisation and stability. This reveals that while cadherin 2 is expressed across the entire tissue, functional apical junctions are first assembled in the transition zone and become progressively more stable across the leader-follower axis of the tissue. Perturbation experiments demonstrate that the formation of these apical adherens junctions requires dynamic microtubules. However, once stabilised, adherens junction maintenance is microtubule independent. Combined, these data identify a mechanism for regulating leader-to-follower transitions within migrating collectives, based on the relocation and stabilisation of cadherins, and reveal a key role for dynamic microtubules in this process.

  13. Images of Polar Bears and Penguins, Storms, Deforestation and More - Middle School Students Perceptions of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, S.; Melaas, E. K.; Malmrose, M.; Mullokandov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global change studies aim to foster a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of global change on planet Earth. The study of global change presents a rich domain of inquiry, exploration, and discovery at all grade levels. The main objective of this exploratory study was to assess middle school students' perceptions of global change as part of their participation in the NSF GK12 program called GLACIER (Global Change Initiative - Education and Research) during the academic year 2012-13. The middle schools are located in the Metro Boston area. As part of the program, participating students were asked to draw pictures of their perceptions and ideas on global change. The drawings of 150 children, ages 11 to 13, were qualitatively analyzed. The analysis focused on (a) the type of concepts children chose to convey, (b) the specific context of the global change described (polar bears in floating glaciers), (c) students direct representation of anthropocentric impacts (such as pollution or deforestation), and (d) the match between students concepts and the recent IPCC reports. About 20% of the students focused on the iconic imagery of the melting glaciers and impact on animals such as penguins and polar bears, more than 25% focused on natural disasters (such as storms, sea level changes) while 30% focused on urban problems. These concepts are matched with the recent IPCC report. These results are notable and suggest students in middle schools understand the varied dimensions of global change and the role of human activities in bringing about change. Students' perspectives may help in developing a suitable curriculum using existing science standards to discuss this significant topic in middle school classrooms. In addition, students' drawings illustrate their perception of the coupled human and natural systems.

  14. Polarized Disk Emission from Herbig Ae/Be Stars Observed Using Gemini Planet Imager: HD 144432, HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnier, John D.; Aarnio, Alicia; Adams, Fred C.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee [Astronomy Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Harries, Tim J.; Hinkley, Sasha; Kraus, Stefan [University of Exeter, Exeter (United Kingdom); Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 91023 (United States); Espaillat, Catherine [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); McClure, Melissa [European Southern Observatory, Garching (Germany); Oppenheimer, Rebecca [American Museum of Natural History, New York (United States); Perrin, Marshall [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-03-20

    In order to look for signs of ongoing planet formation in young disks, we carried out the first J -band polarized emission imaging of the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142 using the Gemini Planet Imager, along with new H band observations of HD 144432. We confirm the complex “double ring” structure for the nearly face-on system HD 169142 first seen in H -band, finding the outer ring to be substantially redder than the inner one in polarized intensity. Using radiative transfer modeling, we developed a physical model that explains the full spectral energy distribution and J - and H -band surface brightness profiles, suggesting that the differential color of the two rings could come from reddened starlight traversing the inner wall and may not require differences in grain properties. In addition, we clearly detect an elongated, off-center ring in HD 163296 (MWC 275), locating the scattering surface to be 18 au above the midplane at a radial distance of 77 au, co-spatial with a ring seen at 1.3 mm by ALMA linked to the CO snow line. Lastly, we report a weak tentative detection of scattered light for HD 150193 (MWC 863) and a non-detection for HD 144432; the stellar companion known for each of these targets has likely disrupted the material in the outer disk of the primary star. For HD 163296 and HD 169142, the prominent outer rings we detect could be evidence for giant planet formation in the outer disk or a manifestation of large-scale dust growth processes possibly related to snow-line chemistry.

  15. Polarized Disk Emission from Herbig Ae/Be Stars Observed Using Gemini Planet Imager: HD 144432, HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, John D.; Aarnio, Alicia; Adams, Fred C.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Harries, Tim J.; Hinkley, Sasha; Kraus, Stefan; Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David; Espaillat, Catherine; McClure, Melissa; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Perrin, Marshall

    2017-01-01

    In order to look for signs of ongoing planet formation in young disks, we carried out the first J -band polarized emission imaging of the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142 using the Gemini Planet Imager, along with new H band observations of HD 144432. We confirm the complex “double ring” structure for the nearly face-on system HD 169142 first seen in H -band, finding the outer ring to be substantially redder than the inner one in polarized intensity. Using radiative transfer modeling, we developed a physical model that explains the full spectral energy distribution and J - and H -band surface brightness profiles, suggesting that the differential color of the two rings could come from reddened starlight traversing the inner wall and may not require differences in grain properties. In addition, we clearly detect an elongated, off-center ring in HD 163296 (MWC 275), locating the scattering surface to be 18 au above the midplane at a radial distance of 77 au, co-spatial with a ring seen at 1.3 mm by ALMA linked to the CO snow line. Lastly, we report a weak tentative detection of scattered light for HD 150193 (MWC 863) and a non-detection for HD 144432; the stellar companion known for each of these targets has likely disrupted the material in the outer disk of the primary star. For HD 163296 and HD 169142, the prominent outer rings we detect could be evidence for giant planet formation in the outer disk or a manifestation of large-scale dust growth processes possibly related to snow-line chemistry.

  16. Dynamical structure of extreme ultraviolet macrospicules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karovska, Margarita; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1994-01-01

    We describe the substructures forming the macrospicules and their temporal evolution, as revealed by the application of an image enhancement algorithm to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations of macrospicules. The enhanced images uncover, for the first time, the substructures forming the column-like structures within the macrospicules and the low-lying arches at their base. The spatial and temporal evolution of macrospicules clearly show continuous interaction between these substructures with occasional ejection of plasma following a ballistic trajectory. We comment on the importance of these results for planning near future space observations of macrospicules with better temporal and spatial resolution.

  17. South Polar Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    4 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a polgyon-cracked surface, into which deep, somewhat kidney-bean-shaped pits have formed. These are landscapes of the martian south polar residual cap. This view was captured during May 2005. Location near: 86.9oS, 5.1oW Image width: 1.5 km (0.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season Southern Spring

  18. Neutron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firk, F.W.K.

    1976-01-01

    Some recent experiments involving polarized neutrons are discussed; they demonstrate how polarization studies provide information on fundamental aspects of nuclear structure that cannot be obtained from more traditional neutron studies. Until recently, neutron polarization studies tended to be limited either to very low energies or to restricted regions at higher energies, determined by the kinematics of favorable (p, vector n) and (d, vector n) reactions. With the advent of high intensity pulsed electron and proton accelerators and of beams of vector polarized deuterons, this is no longer the case. One has entered an era in which neutron polarization experiments are now being carried out, in a routine way, throughout the entire range from thermal energies to tens-of-MeV. The significance of neutron polarization studies is illustrated in discussions of a wide variety of experiments that include the measurement of T-invariance in the β-decay of polarized neutrons, a search for the effects of meson exchange currents in the photo-disintegration of the deuteron, the determination of quantum numbers of states in the fission of aligned 235 U and 237 Np induced by polarized neutrons, and the double- and triple-scattering of fast neutrons by light nuclei

  19. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  20. Occupational applications of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A large population of workers are exposed to ultraviolet radiation in various occupational environments which often necessitates protection. Since ultraviolet radiation may create other environmental problems an occupational hazard- and protection evaluation can be complicated. Threshold Limit Values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) on ultraviolet radiation are used in most countries as guidelines for risk assessment and control measures. This review addresses the levels of ultraviolet radiation met in occupational environments, its measurement and evaluation, and discusses different protection methods. Ultraviolet lasers are beginning to find their way into industrial processes but are still limited in number and they will not be covered here. Emphasis is on broad band incoherent radiation in high risk environments such as welding, and on the evaluation of protective eyewear, see-through curtains and plastics. Other occupational risks associated with the emission of ultraviolet radiation are discussed

  1. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  2. Linear polarization observations of some X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhovskoy, N.M.; Efimov, Yu.S.

    1975-01-01

    Multicolour linear polarization of optical radiation of the X-ray sources Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, Cyg X-1 and Her X-1 was measured at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in 1970-1973. These observations indicate that polarization of Sco X-1 in the ultraviolet, blue and red spectral regions appears to be variable. No statistically significant variations of polarization were found for the other three sources observed. (Auth.)

  3. Optimising the measurement of bruises in children across conventional and cross polarized images using segmentation analysis techniques in Image J, Photoshop and circle diameter measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C; Alcock, A; Trefan, L; Nuttall, D; Evans, S T; Maguire, S; Kemp, A M

    2018-02-01

    Bruising is a common abusive injury in children, and it is standard practice to image and measure them, yet there is no current standard for measuring bruise size consistently. We aim to identify the optimal method of measuring photographic images of bruises, including computerised measurement techniques. 24 children aged Photoshop 'ruler' software (Photoshop diameter)). Inter and intra-observer effects were determined by two individuals repeating 11 electronic measurements, and relevant Intraclass Correlation Coefficient's (ICC's) were used to establish reliability. Spearman's rank correlation was used to compare in vivo with computerised measurements; a comparison of measurement techniques across imaging modalities was conducted using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Significance was set at p 0.5 for all techniques, with maximum Feret diameter and maximum Photoshop diameter on conventional images having the strongest correlation with in vivo measurements. There were significant differences between in vivo and computer-aided measurements, but none between different computer-aided measurement techniques. Overall, computer aided measurements appeared larger than in vivo. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was high for all maximum diameter measurements (ICC's > 0.7). Whilst there are minimal differences between measurements of images obtained, the most consistent results were obtained when conventional images, segmented by Image J Software, were measured with a Feret diameter. This is therefore proposed as a standard for future research, and forensic practice, with the proviso that all computer aided measurements appear larger than in vivo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. AUTOMATED WETLAND DELINEATION FROM MULTI-FREQUENCY AND MULTI-POLARIZED SAR IMAGES IN HIGH TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moser

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is one of the main challenges posed by the changing climate. Especially in semi-arid regions where water reservoirs are filled during the very short rainy season, but have to store enough water for the extremely long dry season, the intelligent handling of water resources is vital. This study focusses on Lac Bam in Burkina Faso, which is the largest natural lake of the country and of high importance for the local inhabitants for irrigated farming, animal watering, and extraction of water for drinking and sanitation. With respect to the competition for water resources an independent area-wide monitoring system is essential for the acceptance of any decision maker. The following contribution introduces a weather and illumination independent monitoring system for the automated wetland delineation with a high temporal (about two weeks and a high spatial sampling (about five meters. The similarities of the multispectral and multi-polarized SAR acquisitions by RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are studied as well as the differences. The results indicate that even basic approaches without pre-classification time series analysis or post-classification filtering are already enough to establish a monitoring system of prime importance for a whole region.

  5. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  6. The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Kalet, M. W.; Kenny, P. J.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E. A.; Bruner, E. C.; Beckers, J. M.; Henze, W.; Knox, E. D.; Hyder, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described, including the experiment objectives, system design, performance, and modes of operation. The instrument operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 A with better than 2 arcsec spatial resolution, raster range 256 x 256 sq arcsec, and 20 mA spectral resolution in second order. Observations can be made with specific sets of four lines simultaneously, or with both sides of two lines simultaneously for velocity and polarization. A rotatable retarder can be inserted into the spectrometer beam for measurement of Zeeman splitting and linear polarization in the transition region and chromosphere.

  7. The ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter on the solar maximum mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodgate, B.E.; Brandt, J.C.; Kalet, M.W.; Kenny, P.J.; Beckers, J.M.; Henze, W.; Hyder, C.L.; Knox, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described, including the experiment objectives, system design. performance, and modes of operation. The instrument operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 Angstreom with better than 2 arc sec spatial resolution, raster range 256 x 256 arc sec 2 , and 20 m Angstroem spectral resolution in second order. Observations can be made with specific sets of 4 lines simultaneously, or with both sides of 2 lines simultaneously for velocity and polarization. A rotatable retarder can be inserted into the spectrometer beam for measurement of Zeeman splitting and linear polarization in the transition region and chromosphere. (orig.)

  8. MgII Observations Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific goals of our sounding rocket program, the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI). This paper will present a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet SUMI's scientific goals, discuss the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI s optics, describe SUMI's flight which was launched 7/30/2010, and discuss what we have learned from that flight.

  9. System and method for controlling depth of imaging in tissues using fluorescence microscopy under ultraviolet excitation following staining with fluorescing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard; Demos, Stavros

    2018-05-08

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a thin tissue sample and adapted to be supported on a slide. The tissue sample may be placed on a slide and exposed to one or more different exogenous fluorophores excitable in a range of about 300 nm-200 nm, and having a useful emission band from about 350 nm-900 nm, and including one or more fluorescent dyes or fluorescently labeled molecular probes that accumulate in tissue or cellular components. The fluorophores may be excited with a first wavelength of UV light between about 200 nm-290 nm. An optical system collects emissions from the fluorophores at a second wavelength, different from the first wavelength, which are generated in response to the first wavelength of UV light, to produce an image for analysis.

  10. High performance volume-of-intersection projectors for 3D-PET image reconstruction based on polar symmetries and SIMD vectorisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheins, J J; Vahedipour, K; Pietrzyk, U; Shah, N J

    2015-01-01

    For high-resolution, iterative 3D PET image reconstruction the efficient implementation of forward-backward projectors is essential to minimise the calculation time. Mathematically, the projectors are summarised as a system response matrix (SRM) whose elements define the contribution of image voxels to lines-of-response (LORs). In fact, the SRM easily comprises billions of non-zero matrix elements to evaluate the tremendous number of LORs as provided by state-of-the-art PET scanners. Hence, the performance of iterative algorithms, e.g. maximum-likelihood-expectation-maximisation (MLEM), suffers from severe computational problems due to the intensive memory access and huge number of floating point operations.Here, symmetries occupy a key role in terms of efficient implementation. They reduce the amount of independent SRM elements, thus allowing for a significant matrix compression according to the number of exploitable symmetries. With our previous work, the PET REconstruction Software TOolkit (PRESTO), very high compression factors (>300) are demonstrated by using specific non-Cartesian voxel patterns involving discrete polar symmetries. In this way, a pre-calculated memory-resident SRM using complex volume-of-intersection calculations can be achieved. However, our original ray-driven implementation suffers from addressing voxels, projection data and SRM elements in disfavoured memory access patterns. As a consequence, a rather limited numerical throughput is observed due to the massive waste of memory bandwidth and inefficient usage of cache respectively.In this work, an advantageous symmetry-driven evaluation of the forward-backward projectors is proposed to overcome these inefficiencies. The polar symmetries applied in PRESTO suggest a novel organisation of image data and LOR projection data in memory to enable an efficient single instruction multiple data vectorisation, i.e. simultaneous use of any SRM element for symmetric LORs. In addition, the calculation

  11. Ionic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    Ferroelectricity occurs in many different kinds of materials. Many of the technologically important solids, which are ferroelectric, can be classified as ionic. Any microscopic theory of ferroelectricity must contain a description of local polarization forces. We have collaborated in the development of a theory of ionic polarization which is quite successful. Its basic assumption is that the polarization is derived from the properties of the individual ions. We have applied this theory successfully to diverse subjects as linear and nonlinear optical response, phonon dispersion, and piezoelectricity. We have developed numerical methods using the local Density approximation to calculate the multipole polarizabilities of ions when subject to various fields. We have also developed methods of calculating the nonlinear hyperpolarizability, and showed that it can be used to explain light scattering experiments. This paper elaborates on this polarization theory

  12. Polarization experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.

    1977-02-01

    In a theoretical review of polarization experiments two important points are emphasized: (a) their versatility and their relevance to a large variety of aspects of hadron physics (tests of basic symmetries; a probe of strong interaction dynamics; a tool for hadron spectroscopy); (b) the wealth of experimental data on polarization parameters in pp and np scattering in the Regge language and in the diffraction language. (author)

  13. Polarization measurement for internal polarized gaseous targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhenyu; Ye Yunxiu; Lv Haijiang; Mao Yajun

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to internal polarized gaseous targets, polarization method, polarization measurement method and procedure. To get the total nuclear polarization of hydrogen atoms (including the polarization of the recombined hydrogen molecules) in the target cell, authors have measured the parameters relating to atomic polarization and polarized hydrogen atoms and molecules. The total polarization of the target during our measurement is P T =0.853 ± 0.036. (authors)

  14. Ultrafast photodynamics of pyrazine in the vacuum ultraviolet region studied by time-resolved photoelectron imaging using 7.8-eV pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horio, Takuya; Suzuki, Yoshi-ichi; Suzuki, Toshinori, E-mail: suzuki@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2016-07-28

    The ultrafast electronic dynamics of pyrazine (C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) were studied by time-resolved photoelectron imaging (TRPEI) using the third (3ω, 4.7 eV) and fifth harmonics (5ω, 7.8 eV) of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (ω). Although the photoionization signals due to the 5ω − 3ω and 3ω − 5ω pulse sequences overlapped near the time origin, we have successfully extracted their individual TRPEI signals using least squares fitting of the observed electron kinetic energy distributions. When the 5ω pulses preceded the 3ω pulses, the 5ω pulses predominantly excited the S{sub 4} (ππ{sup *}, {sup 1}B{sub 1u}+{sup 1}B{sub 2u}) state. The photoionization signal from the S{sub 4} state generated by the time-delayed 3ω pulses was dominated by the D{sub 3}({sup 2}B{sub 2g})←S{sub 4} photoionization process and exhibited a broad electron kinetic energy distribution, which rapidly downshifted in energy within 100 fs. Also observed were the photoionization signals for the 3s, 3p{sub z}, and 3p{sub y} members of the Rydberg series converging to D{sub 0}({sup 2}A{sub g}). The Rydberg signals appeared immediately within our instrumental time resolution of 27 fs, indicating that these states are directly photoexcited from the ground state or populated from S{sub 4} within 27 fs. The 3s, 3p{sub z}, and 3p{sub y} states exhibited single exponential decay with lifetimes of 94 ± 2, 89 ± 2, and 58 ± 1 fs, respectively. With the reverse pulse sequence of 3ω − 5ω, the ultrafast internal conversion (IC) from S{sub 2}(ππ{sup *}) to S{sub 1}(nπ{sup *}) was observed. The decay associated spectrum of S{sub 2} exhibited multiple bands ascribed to D{sub 0}, D{sub 1}, and D{sub 3}, in agreement with the 3ω-pump and 6ω-probe experiment described in our preceding paper [T. Horio et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 044306 (2016)]. The electron kinetic energy and angular distributions from S{sub 1} populated by IC from S{sub 2} are also discussed.

  15. North Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour. In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime. The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen

  16. Areas of Polar Coronal Holes from 1996 Through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Hess S. A.; Karna, N.; Pesnell, W. D.; Kirk, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Polar coronal holes (PCHs) trace the magnetic variability of the Sun throughout the solar cycle. Their size and evolution have been studied as proxies for the global magnetic field. We present measurements of the PCH areas from 1996 through 2010, derived from an updated perimeter-tracing method and two synoptic-map methods. The perimeter tracing method detects PCH boundaries along the solar limb, using full-disk images from the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT). One synoptic-map method uses the line-of-sight magnetic field from the SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to determine the unipolarity boundaries near the poles. The other method applies thresholding techniques to synoptic maps created from EUV image data from EIT. The results from all three methods suggest that the solar maxima and minima of the two hemispheres are out of phase. The maximum PCH area, averaged over the methods in each hemisphere, is approximately 6 % during both solar minima spanned by the data (between Solar Cycles 22/23 and 23/24). The northern PCH area began a declining trend in 2010, suggesting a downturn toward the maximum of Solar Cycle 24 in that hemisphere, while the southern hole remained large throughout 2010.

  17. Sources of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  18. Overview of calibration and validation activities for the EUMETSAT polar system: second generation (EPS-SG) visible/infrared imager (METimage)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, P.; Bonsignori, R.; Schlüssel, P.; Schmülling, F.; Spezzi, L.; Watts, P.; Zerfowski, I.

    2016-10-01

    The EPS-SG Visible/Infrared Imaging (VII) mission is dedicated to supporting the optical imagery user needs for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), Nowcasting (NWC) and climate in the timeframe beyond 2020. The VII mission is fulfilled by the METimage instrument, developed by the German Space Agency (DLR) and funded by the German government and EUMETSAT. Following on from an important list of predecessors such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS), METimage will fly in the mid-morning orbit of the Joint Polar System, whilst the early-afternoon orbits are served by the JPSS (U.S. Joint Polar Satellite System) Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). METimage itself is a cross-purpose medium resolution, multi-spectral optical imager, measuring the optical spectrum of radiation emitted and reflected by the Earth from a low-altitude sun synchronous orbit over a minimum swath width of 2700 km. The top of the atmosphere outgoing radiance will be sampled every 500 m (at nadir) with measurements made in 20 spectral channels ranging from 443 nm in the visible up to 13.345 μm in the thermal infrared. The three major objectives of the EPS-SG METimage calibration and validation activities are: • Verification of the instrument performances through continuous in-flight calibration and characterisation, including monitoring of long term stability. • Provision of validated level 1 and level 2 METimage products. • Revision of product processing facilities, i.e. algorithms and auxiliary data sets, to assure that products conform with user requirements, and then, if possible, exceed user expectations. This paper will describe the overall Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) logic and the methods adopted to ensure that the METimage data products meet performance specifications for the lifetime of the mission. Such methods include inter-comparisons with other missions through simultaneous

  19. The Fly Sensitizing Pigment Enhances UV Spectral Sensitivity While Preventing Polarization-Induced Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Ilić

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Microvillar photoreceptors are intrinsically capable of detecting the orientation of e-vector of linearly polarized light. They provide most invertebrates with an additional sensory channel to detect important features of their visual environment. However, polarization sensitivity (PS of photoreceptors may lead to the detection of polarization-induced false colors and intensity contrasts. Most insect photoreceptors are thus adapted to have minimal PS. Flies have twisted rhabdomeres with microvilli rotated along the length of the ommatidia to reduce PS. The additional UV-absorbing sensitizing pigment on their opsin minimizes PS in the ultraviolet. We recorded voltage from Drosophila photoreceptors R1–6 to measure the spectral dependence of PS and found that PS in the UV is invariably negligible but can be substantial above 400 nm. Using modeling, we demonstrate that in R1–6 without the sensitizing pigment, PS in the UV (PSUV would exceed PS in the visible part of the spectrum (PSVIS by a factor PSUV/PSVIS = 1.2–1.8, as lower absorption of Rh1 rhodopsin reduces self-screening. We use polarimetric imaging of objects relevant to fly polarization vision to show that their degree of polarization outdoors is highest in the short-wavelength part of the spectrum. Thus, under natural illumination, the sensitizing pigment in R1–6 renders even those cells with high PS in the visible part unsuitable for proper polarization vision. We assume that fly ventral polarization vision can be mediated by R7 alone, with R1–6 serving as an unpolarized reference channel.

  20. Imaging polarimetry of forest canopies: how the azimuth direction of the sun, occluded by vegetation, can be assessed from the polarization pattern of the sunlit foliage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Ramón; Barta, András; Bernáth, Balázs; Benno Meyer-Rochow, Victor; Horváth, Gábor

    2007-08-01

    Radiance, color, and polarization of the light in forests combine to create complex optical patterns. Earlier sporadic polarimetric studies in forests were limited by the narrow fields of view of the polarimeters used in such studies. Since polarization patterns in the entire upper hemisphere of the visual environment of forests could be important for forest-inhabiting animals that make use of linearly polarized light for orientation, we measured 180° field-of-view polarization distributions in Finnish forests. From a hot air balloon we also measured the polarization patterns of Hungarian grasslands lit by the rising sun. We found that the pattern of the angle of polarization α of sunlit grasslands and sunlit tree canopies was qualitatively the same as that of the sky. We show here that contrary to an earlier assumption, the α-pattern characteristic of the sky always remains visible underneath overhead vegetation, independently of the solar elevation and the sky conditions (clear or partly cloudy with visible sun's disc), provided the foliage is sunlit and not only when large patches of the clear sky are visible through the vegetation. Since the mirror symmetry axis of the α-pattern of the sunlit foliage is the solar-antisolar meridian, the azimuth direction of the sun, occluded by vegetation, can be assessed in forests from this polarization pattern. Possible consequences of this robust polarization feature of the optical environment in forests are briefly discussed with regard to polarization-based animal navigation.

  1. Polarization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurushev, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Brief review is presented of the high energy polarization study including experimental data and the theoretical descriptions. The mostimportant proposals at the biggest accelerators and the crucial technical developments are also listed which may become a main-line of spin physics. 35 refs.; 10 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Research on generating various polarization-modes in polarized illumination system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinping; Lin, Wumei; Fan, Zhenjie

    2013-08-01

    With the increase of the numerical aperture (NA), the polarization of light affects the imaging quality of projection lens more significantly. On the contrary, according to the mask pattern, the resolution of projection lens can be improved by using the polarized illumination. That is to say, using the corresponding polarized beam (or polarization-mode) along with the off-axis illumination will improve the resolution and the imaging quality of the of projection lens. Therefore, the research on the generation of various polarization modes and its conversion methods become more and more important. In order to realize various polarization modes in polarized illumination system, after read a lot of references, we provide a way that fitting for the illumination system with the wavelength of 193nm.Six polarization-modes and a depolarized mode are probably considered. Wave-plate stack is used to generate linearly polarization-mode, which have a higher degree polarization. In order to generate X-Y and Y-X polarization mode, the equipment consisting of four sectors of λ/2 wave plate was used. We combined 16 sectors of λ/2 wave plate which have different orientations of the "slow" axis to generate radial and azimuthal polarization. Finally, a multi-polarization control device was designed. Using the kind of multi-polarization control device which applying this method could help to choose the polarization modes conveniently and flexibility for the illumination system.

  3. Ultraviolet photovoltaics: Share the spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliron, Delia J.

    2017-08-01

    Electrically controlled windows require power to switch between transparent and tinted states. Now, an ultraviolet light-harvesting solar cell can power smart windows without compromising their control over heat and light.

  4. Solar ultraviolet radiation cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Despite being a treatable disease, cataract is still the leading cause for blindness in the world. Solar ultraviolet radiation is epidemiologically linked to cataract development, while animal and in vitro studies prove a causal relationship. However, the pathogenetic pathways for the disease are not fully understood and there is still no perfect model for human age related cataract. This non-comprehensive overview focus on recent developments regarding effects of solar UV radiation wavebands on the lens. A smaller number of fundamental papers are also included to provide a backdrop for the overview. Future studies are expected to further clarify the cellular and subcellular mechanisms for UV radiation-induced cataract and especially the isolated or combined temporal and spatial effects of UVA and UVB in the pathogenesis of human cataract. Regardless of the cause for cataract, there is a need for advances in pharmaceutical or other treatment modalities that do not require surgical replacement of the lens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Ultraviolet radiation and cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek Kyun; Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Häder, Donat-Peter; Han, Taejun

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are the dominant photosynthetic prokaryotes from an ecological, economical, or evolutionary perspective, and depend on solar energy to conduct their normal life processes. However, the marked increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) caused by the continuous depletion of the stratospheric ozone shield has fueled serious concerns about the ecological consequences for all living organisms, including cyanobacteria. UV-B radiation can damage cellular DNA and several physiological and biochemical processes in cyanobacterial cells, either directly, through its interaction with certain biomolecules that absorb in the UV range, or indirectly, with the oxidative stress exerted by reactive oxygen species. However, cyanobacteria have a long history of survival on Earth, and they predate the existence of the present ozone shield. To withstand the detrimental effects of solar UVR, these prokaryotes have evolved several lines of defense and various tolerance mechanisms, including avoidance, antioxidant production, DNA repair, protein resynthesis, programmed cell death, and the synthesis of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. This study critically reviews the current information on the effects of UVR on several physiological and biochemical processes of cyanobacteria and the various tolerance mechanisms they have developed. Genomic insights into the biosynthesis of MAAs and scytonemin and recent advances in our understanding of the roles of exopolysaccharides and heat shock proteins in photoprotection are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taalas, P.; Koskela, T.; Damski, J.; Supperi, A. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research; Kyroe, E. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1996-12-31

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is damaging for living organisms due to its high energy pro each photon. The UV radiation is often separated into three regions according to the wavelength: UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). The most hazardous part, UVC is absorbed completely in the upper atmosphere by molecular oxygen. UVB radiation is absorbed by atmospheric ozone partly, and it is reaching Earth`s surface, as UVA radiation. Besides atmospheric ozone, very important factors in determining the intensity of UVB radiation globally are the solar zenith angle and cloudiness. It may be calculated from global ozone changes that the clear-sky UVB doses may have enhanced by 10-15 % during spring and 5-10 % during summer at the latitudes of Finland, following the decrease of total ozone between 1979-90. The Finnish ozone and UV monitoring activities have become a part of international activities, especially the EU Environment and Climate Programme`s research projects. The main national level effort has been the Finnish Academy`s climatic change programme, SILMU 1990-95. This presentation summarises the scientific results reached during the SILMU project

  7. Ultraviolet radiation: the eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarini, J.P.; Sliney, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Under most conditions, the eye is well adapted to protect itself against ultraviolet radiation encountered in the outdoor environment as a result of the exposure geometry of the sun. Only when snow is on the ground does one experience acute effects of UV sunlight exposure (i.e. snow blindness, or photokeratitis). With regard to artificial sources, there are many occasions where one views bright light sources such as tungsten-halogen lamps, arc lamps and welding arcs. Such viewing is normally only momentary because of the aversion response to bright light and due to discomfort glare. However, such an aversion does not take place for germicidal lamps and other UV lamps which do not contain a strong visible component in their spectrum. The adverse effects from viewing such sources has been studied for decades and during the last two decades guidelines for limiting exposure to protect the eye have been developed. The guidelines were fostered to a large extent by the growing use of lasers and the quickly recognized hazard posed by viewing laser sources. (author)

  8. Ultraviolet radiation in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taalas, P; Koskela, T; Damski, J; Supperi, A [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research; Kyroe, E [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1997-12-31

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is damaging for living organisms due to its high energy pro each photon. The UV radiation is often separated into three regions according to the wavelength: UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). The most hazardous part, UVC is absorbed completely in the upper atmosphere by molecular oxygen. UVB radiation is absorbed by atmospheric ozone partly, and it is reaching Earth`s surface, as UVA radiation. Besides atmospheric ozone, very important factors in determining the intensity of UVB radiation globally are the solar zenith angle and cloudiness. It may be calculated from global ozone changes that the clear-sky UVB doses may have enhanced by 10-15 % during spring and 5-10 % during summer at the latitudes of Finland, following the decrease of total ozone between 1979-90. The Finnish ozone and UV monitoring activities have become a part of international activities, especially the EU Environment and Climate Programme`s research projects. The main national level effort has been the Finnish Academy`s climatic change programme, SILMU 1990-95. This presentation summarises the scientific results reached during the SILMU project

  9. Ultraviolet Communication for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    DEI procured several UVC phosphors and tested them with vacuum UV (VUV) excitation. Available emission peaks include: 226 nm, 230 nm, 234 nm, 242...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Report contains color. 14. ABSTRACT Under this Phase II SBIR effort, Directed Energy Inc.’s (DEI) proprietary ultraviolet ( UV ...15. SUBJECT TERMS Non-line-of-sight (NLOS), networking, optical communication, plasma-shells, short range, ultraviolet ( UV ) light 16. SECURITY

  10. ULTRAVIOLET TECHNOLOGY FOR FOOD PRESERVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes, AMM; Novello, D; Mendes, GMD; Cristianini, M

    2009-01-01

    ULTRAVIOLET TECHNOLOGY FOR FOOD PRESERVATION This literature review article had as objective to gather information about ultraviolet (UV) technology utilization on the food industry, its effects and potential application. Aspects as the origin, concept and applications of the technology on the equipment industry and running mechanisms were approached. The application of UV radiation on food decontamination is still little used due its low penetration, but it is known that it can be easily app...

  11. Polarization of submillimetre lines from interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic fields play important roles in many astrophysical processes. However, there is no universal diagnostic for the magnetic fields in the interstellar medium (ISM) and each magnetic tracer has its limitation. Any new detection method is thus valuable. Theoretical studies have shown that submillimetre fine-structure lines are polarized due to atomic alignment by ultraviolet photon-excitation, which opens up a new avenue to probe interstellar magnetic fields. We will, for the first time, perform synthetic observations on the simulated three-dimensional ISM to demonstrate the measurability of the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines. The maximum polarization for different absorption and emission lines expected from various sources, including star-forming regions are provided. Our results demonstrate that the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines is a powerful magnetic tracer and add great value to the observational studies of the submilimetre astronomy.

  12. Extreme ultraviolet observations of coronal holes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, J.D.; Sheeley, N.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet Skylab and ground-based solar magnetic field data have been combined to study the origin and evolution of coronal holes. It is shown that holes exist only within the large-scale unipolar magnetic cells into which the solar surface is divided at any given time. A well-defined boundary zone usually exists between the edge of a hole and the neutral line which marks the edge of its magnetic cell. This boundary zone is the region across which a cell is connected by magnetic arcades with adjacent cells of opposite polarity. Three pieces of observational evidence are offered to support the hypothesis that the magnetic lines of force from a hole are open. Kitt Peak magnetograms are used to show that, at least on a relative scale, the average field strengths within holes are quite variable, but indistinguishable from the field strengths in other quiet parts of the Sun's surface. Finally it is shown that the large, equatorial holes characteristic of the declining phase of the last solar cycle during Skylab (1973-74) were all formed as a result of the mergence of bipolar magnetic regions (BMR's), confirming an earlier hypothesis by Timothy et al. (1975). Systematic application of this model to the different aspects of the solar cycle correctly predicts the occurrence of both large, equatorial coronal holes (the 'M-regions' which cause recurrent geomagnetic storms) and the polar cap holes. (Auth.)

  13. VIIRS-J1 Polarization Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waluschka, Eugene; McCorkel, Joel; McIntire, Jeff; Moyer, David; McAndrew, Brendan; Brown, Steven W.; Lykke, Keith; Butler, James; Meister, Gerhard; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2015-01-01

    The VIS/NIR bands polarization sensitivity of Joint Polar Satellite Sensor 1 (JPSS1) Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was measured using a broadband source. While polarization sensitivity for bands M5-M7, I1, and I2 was less than 2.5%, the maximum polarization sensitivity for bands M1, M2, M3, and M4 was measured to be 6.4%, 4.4%, 3.1%, and 4.3%, respectively with a polarization characterization uncertainty of less than 0.3%. A detailed polarization model indicated that the large polarization sensitivity observed in the M1 to M4 bands was mainly due to the large polarization sensitivity introduced at the leading and trailing edges of the newly manufactured VISNIR bandpass focal plane filters installed in front of the VISNIR detectors. This was confirmed by polarization measurements of bands M1 and M4 bands using monochromatic light. Discussed are the activities leading up to and including the instruments two polarization tests, some discussion of the polarization model and the model results, the role of the focal plane filters, the polarization testing of the Aft-Optics-Assembly, the testing of the polarizers at Goddard and NIST and the use of NIST's T-SIRCUS for polarization testing and associated analyses and results.

  14. Coupling of magnetopause-boundary layer to the polar ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, C.Q.; Lee, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors develop a model which seeks to explain ultraviolet auroral images from the Viking satellite which show periodic bright regions which resemble open-quotes beadsclose quotes or open-quotes pearlsclose quotes aligned along the postnoon auroral oval. ULF geomagnetic pulsations observed in the cusp region are also addressed by this model. The model addresses plasma dynamics in the low-latitude boundary layer and interactions with the polar ionosphere by means of field-aligned current. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can develop in the presence of driven plasma flow, which can lead to the formation and growth of plasma vortices in the boundary layer. The finite conductivity of the earth ionosphere causes these vortices to decay. However regions of enhanced field-aligned power density in the postnoon auroral oval can be associated with field-aligned current filaments and boundary layer vortices. These structures may explain the observed bright spots. The authors also discuss the frequency spectrum and the polarization state of the pulsations

  15. High-resolution fiber tract reconstruction in the human brain by means of three-dimensional polarized light imaging (3D-PLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eAxer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional interactions between different brain regions require connecting fiber tracts, the structural basis of the human connectome. To assemble a comprehensive structural understanding of neural network elements from the microscopic to the macroscopic dimensions, a multimodal and multiscale approach has to be envisaged. However, the integration of results from complementary neuroimaging techniques poses a particular challenge. In this paper, we describe a steadily evolving neuroimaging technique referred to as three-dimensional polarized light imaging (3D-PLI. It is based on the birefringence of the myelin sheaths surrounding axons, and enables the high-resolution analysis of myelinated axons constituting the fiber tracts. 3D-PLI provides the mapping of spatial fiber architecture in the postmortem human brain at a sub-millimeter resolution, i.e. at the mesoscale. The fundamental data structure gained by 3D-PLI is a comprehensive 3D vector field description of fibers and fiber tract orientations – the basis for subsequent tractography. To demonstrate how 3D-PLI can contribute to unravel and assemble the human connectome, a multiscale approach with the same technology was pursued. Two complementary state-of-the-art polarimeters providing different sampling grids (pixel sizes of 100 μm and 1.6 μm were used. To exemplarily highlight the potential of this approach, fiber orientation maps and 3D fiber models were reconstructed in selected regions of the brain (e.g., Corpus callosum, Internal capsule, Pons. The results demonstrate that 3D-PLI is an ideal tool to serve as an interface between the microscopic and macroscopic levels of organization of the human connectome.

  16. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  17. X-Ray Polarization Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    diagnosis of abnormal nipple discharge. The contrast agent is generally intro- duced via the orifice in the nipple that has been iden- tified as the...galactography intends to introduce contrast material only into the ductal lu- men . In this context, it is noteworthy that Cabioglu et al (25), in a study of the...differential diagnosis of nipple discharge, reported that one patient had “an unusual communication between the ductal system and a large mammary

  18. Nonlinear wave-mixing processes in the extreme ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misoguti, L.; Christov, I. P.; Backus, S.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.

    2005-01-01

    We present data from two-color high-order harmonic generation in a hollow waveguide, that suggest the presence of a nonlinear-optical frequency conversion process driven by extreme ultraviolet light. By combining the fundamental and second harmonic of an 800 nm laser in a hollow-core fiber, with varying relative polarizations, and by observing the pressure and power scaling of the various harmonic orders, we show that the data are consistent with a picture where we drive the process of high-harmonic generation, which in turn drives four-wave frequency mixing processes in the extreme EUV. This work promises a method for extending nonlinear optics into the extreme ultraviolet region of the spectrum using an approach that has not previously been considered, and has compelling implications for generating tunable light at short wavelengths

  19. Harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Tanning for cosmetic purposes by sunbathing or by using artificial tanning devices is widespread. The hazards associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation are of concern to the medical profession. Depending on the amount and form of the radiation, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed, ultraviolet radiation causes erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancers most commonly produced by ultraviolet radiation are basal and squamous cell carcinomas. There also is much circumstantial evidence that the increase in the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma during the past half century is related to increased sun exposure, but this has not been proved. Effective and cosmetically acceptable sunscreen preparations have been developed that can do much to prevent or reduce most harmful effects to ultraviolet radiation if they are applied properly and consistently. Other safety measures include (1) minimizing exposure to ultraviolet radiation, (2) being aware of reflective surfaces while in the sun, (3) wearing protective clothing, (4) avoiding use of artificial tanning devices, and (5) protecting infants and children

  20. Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Editor); Moos, Warren; VanSteenberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The 'Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy' conference was inspired by the accomplishments of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) Mission. The FUSE mission was launched in June 1999 and spent over eight years exploring the far-ultraviolet universe, gathering over 64 million seconds of high-resolution spectral data on nearly 3000 astronomical targets. The goal of this conference was not only to celebrate the accomplishments of FUSE, but to look toward the future and understand the major scientific drivers for the ultraviolet capabilities of the next generation fo space observatories. Invited speakers presented discussions based on measurements made by FUSE and other ultraviolet instruments, assessed their connection with measurements made with other techniques and, where appropriate, discussed the implications of low-z measurements for high-z phenomena. In addition to the oral presentations, many participants presented poster papers. The breadth of these presentation made it clear that much good science is still in progress with FUSE data and that these result will continue to have relevance in many scientific areas.

  1. The forward ring imaging Cherenkov detector of DELPHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E.; Ambec, I.; Augustinus, A.; Barnoux, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Botner, O.; Budziak, A.P.; Caloba, L.P.; Carecchio, P.; Cavalli, P.; Ceelie, L.; Cereseto, R.; Cerutti, G.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dam, P.; Damgaard, G.; Koning, N. de; De la Vega, A.S.; Dimitriou, N.; Dulinski, W.; Eek, L.O.; Ekeloef, T.; Erikson, J.; Florek, A.; Florek, B.; Fontanelli, F.; Fontenille, A.; Galuszka, K.; Garcia, J.; Gracco, V.; Hallgren, A.; Hao, W.; Henkes, T.; Isenhower, D.; Johansson, H.; Karvelas, E.; Kindblom, P.; Koene, B.; Korporaal, A.; Kostarakis, P.; Lenzen, G.; Lindqvist, L.E.; Lorenz, P.; Loukas, D.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Maltezos, A.; Markou, A.; Mattsson, L.; Medbo, J.; Michalowski, J.; Montano, F.; Nielsen, B.S.; Ostler, J.M.; Pakonski, K.; Perdikis, C.; Polok, G.; Robohm, A.; Sajot, G.; Sannino, M.; Saragas, E.; Schyns, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stodulski, M.; Stopa, Z.; Thadome, J.; Theodosiou, G.E.; Traspedini, L.; Turala, M.; Ullaland, O.; Waerm, A.; Werner, J.; Xyroutsikos, S.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zevgolatakos, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Forward Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector of the DELPHI experiment at LEP provides hadron identification at polar angles 15 6 F 14 and a volume of gaseous C 4 F 10 , in combination provide coverage of momenta up to 40 GeV/c. A single array of photosensitive Time Projection Chambers registers the impact points of ultraviolet photons from both radiators. The design of the detector and of its readout system is described. First results obtained with a partly installed detector are reported. (orig.)

  2. Application of circular polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Tsuneaki; Kawata, Hiroshi

    1988-03-01

    The idea of using the polarizing property of light for physical experiment by controlling it variously has been known from old time, and the Faraday effect and the research by polarizing microscopy are its examples. The light emitted from the electron orbit of an accelerator has the different polarizing characteristics from those of the light of a laboratory light source, and as far as observing it within the electron orbit plane, it becomes linearly polarized light. By utilizing this property well, research is carried out at present in synchrotron experimental facilities. Recently, the technology related to the insert type light cources using permanent magnets has advanced remarkably, and circular polarized light has become to be producible. If the light like this can be obtained with the energy not only in far ultraviolet region but also to x-ray region at high luminance, new possibility should open. At the stage that the design of an insert type light source was finished, and its manufacture was started, the research on the method of evaluating the degree of circular polarization and the research on the utilization of circular polarized synchrotron radiation are earnestly carried out. In this report, the results of researches presented at the study meeting are summarized. Moreover, the design and manufacture of the beam lines for exclusive use will be carried out. (Kako, I.)

  3. Relationship between interplanetary parameters and the magnetopause reconnection rate quantified from observations of the expanding polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Gosling, J. S.; Hubert, B.

    2012-03-01

    Many studies have attempted to quantify the coupling of energy from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. In this paper we parameterize the dependence of the magnetopause reconnection rate on interplanetary parameters from the OMNI data set. The reconnection rate is measured as the rate of expansion of the polar cap during periods when the nightside reconnection rate is thought to be low, determined from observations by the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Far Ultraviolet (FUV) imager. Our fitting suggests that the reconnection rate is determined by the magnetic flux transport in the solar wind across a channel approximately 4 RE in width, with a small correction dependent on the solar wind speed, and a clock angle dependence. The reconnection rate is not found to be significantly dependent on the solar wind density. Comparison of the modeled reconnection rate with SuperDARN measurements of the cross-polar cap potential provides broad support for the magnitude of the predictions. In the course of the paper we discuss the relationship between the dayside reconnection rate and the cross-polar cap potential.

  4. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  5. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of three LINERs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, R. W.; Keel, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Three galaxies known to be LINERs were observed spectroscopically in the ultraviolet in an attempt to detect the presumed nonthermal continuum source thought to be the source of photoionization in the nuclei. NGC 4501 was found to be too faint for study with the IUE spectrographs, while NGC 5005 had an extended ultraviolet light profile. Comparison with the optical light profile of NGC 5005 indicates that the ultraviolet source is distributed spatially in the same manner as the optical starlight, probably indicating that the ultraviolet excess is due to a component of hot stars in the nucleus. These stars contribute detectable absorption features longward of 2500 A; together with optical data, the IUE spectra suggest a burst of star formation about 1 billion yr ago, with a lower rate continuing to produce a few OB stars. In NGC 4579, a point source contributing most of the ultraviolet excess is found that is much different than the optical light distribution. Furthermore, the ultraviolet to X-ray spectral index in NGC 4579 is 1.4, compatible with the UV to X-ray indices found for samples of Seyfert galaxies. This provides compelling evidence for the detection of the photoionizing continuum in NGC 4579 and draws the research fields of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei closer together. The emission-line spectrum of NGC 4579 is compared with calculations from a photoionization code, CLOUDY, and several shock models. The photoionization code is found to give superior results, adding to the increasing weight of evidence that the LINER phenomenon is essentially a scaled-down version of the Seyfert phenomenon.

  6. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Development of a Polarimeter for Magnetic Field Measurements in the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Porter, Jason; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the polarizing optics that are being developed for an ultraviolet magnetograph (SUMI) which will be flown on a sounding rocket payload. With a limited observing program, the polarizing optics were optimized to make simultaneous observation at two magnetic lines CIV (155nm) and MgII (280). This paper will give a brief overview of the SUMI instrument, will describe the polarimeter that will be used in the sounding rocket program and will present some of the measurements that have been made on the (SUMI) polarization optics.

  8. Blazed vector gratings fabricated using photosensitive polymer liquid crystals and control of polarization diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Kuzuwata, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    The blazed vector grating possessing antisymmetric distributions of the birefringence were fabricated by exposing the line-focused linearly polarized ultraviolet light on the photosensitive polymer liquid crystals. The polarization states of the diffraction beams can be highly and widely controlled by designing the blazed structures, and the diffraction properties were well-explained by Jones calculus.

  9. Polarization of Coronal Forbidden Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao; Qu, Zhongquan [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio, E-mail: sayahoro@ynao.ac.cn [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2017-03-20

    Since the magnetic field is responsible for most manifestations of solar activity, one of the most challenging problems in solar physics is the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields, particularly in the outer atmosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools to interpret polarimetric observations in suitable spectral lines. This paper is devoted to analyzing the diagnostic content of linear polarization imaging observations in coronal forbidden lines. Although this technique is restricted to off-limb observations, it represents a significant tool to diagnose the magnetic field structure in the solar corona, where the magnetic field is intrinsically weak and still poorly known. We adopt the quantum theory of polarized line formation developed in the framework of the density matrix formalism, and synthesize images of the emergent linear polarization signal in coronal forbidden lines using potential-field source-surface magnetic field models. The influence of electronic collisions, active regions, and Thomson scattering on the linear polarization of coronal forbidden lines is also examined. It is found that active regions and Thomson scattering are capable of conspicuously influencing the orientation of the linear polarization. These effects have to be carefully taken into account to increase the accuracy of the field diagnostics. We also found that linear polarization observation in suitable lines can give valuable information on the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the solar corona.

  10. Extreme Ultraviolet Stokesmeter for Pulsed Magneto-Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Ruiz-Lopez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Several applications in material science and magnetic holography using extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation require the measurement of the degree and state of polarization. In this work, an instrument to measure simultaneously both parameters from EUV pulses is presented. The instrument determines the Stokes parameters after a reflection on an array of multilayer mirrors at the Brewster angle. The Stokesmeter was tested at Swiss Light Source at different EUV wavelengths. The experimental Stokes patterns of the source were compared with the simulated pattern.

  11. Ultraviolet and Infrared Correlation Studies in Orion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Lakshmi S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the variation of diffuse ultraviolet (UV radiation in the northern part of the Orion constellation using a set of eight areas of the GALEX All-Sky Imaging Survey in the far and near UV. Different components of diffuse UV radiation, like dust scattered emission and H2 fluorescence, were quantified and separated after removing the point sources and the foreground emission in each of the fields. Then the dependence of the individual UV components on the infrared 100 μm dust emission was studied. We did not find any positive correlation between the diffuse-UV and IR-100 micron intensities, probably due to the high optical depth of the region or the entire dust column not contributing to the diffuse UV radiation. However, in the far UV we noticed the presence of an excess emission in addition to the dust scattered radiation, which is clearly absent in the near UV. This excess emission, identified as the H2 fluorescence, is produced by the Trapezium stars in the surrounding molecular clouds. We also compare our results with those of previous studies in the region, based on Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE observations.

  12. Parameterizing the Magnetopause Reconnection Rate from Observations of the Expanding Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Gosling, J. S.; Hubert, B.

    2012-04-01

    We determine an expression for the magnetopause reconnection rate in terms of upstream interplanetary parameters. We quantify the dayside reconnection rate from observations of the expanding polar cap when the nightside reconnection rate is assumed to be zero. The polar cap open flux is calculated from auroral images collected by the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Far Ultraviolet camera (FUV), and its rate of increase is correlated with upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the OMNI data-set. We find that the reconnection rate is successfully reproduced by considering the magnetic flux transport within a 4 Re-wide channel within the solar wind (with an additional small correction for the solar wind velocity) and an IMF clock angle dependence with an exponent of 9/2. Contrary to several previous studies we do not find a dependence of the reconnection rate on solar wind density. We discuss our findings in the context of previous studies and solar wind-magnetosphere coupling models.

  13. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments

  14. Advancements on Radar Polarization Information Acquisition and Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Dahai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study on radar polarization information acquisition and processing has currently been one important part of radar techniques. The development of the polarization theory is simply reviewed firstly. Subsequently, some key techniques which include polarization measurement, polarization anti-jamming, polarization recognition, imaging and parameters inversion using radar polarimetry are emphatically analyzed in this paper. The basic theories, the present states and the development trends of these key techniques are presented and some meaningful conclusions are derived.

  15. Ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of high-redshift quasars with the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, C. D.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Webb, Wayne; Petry, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of three bright high-redshift low-polarization quasars (LPQs) was obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Two of the quasars, PG 1634+706 and PG 2302+029, had polarizations p approximately = 0.5%-1.0% throughout the ultraviolet, and showed no significant variation of polarization amplitude or position angle with wavelength. PG 2302+029 was also marginally (2.4 sigma) circularly polarized in the optical continuum. For the highest redshift quasar, PG 1222+228 (Ton 1530), the polarization was measured down to rest wavelengths below 800 A. Although the continuum of PG 1222+228 was weakened by Lyman limit absorption from an intergalactic gas cloud, the polarization increased sharply from 1% to about 4.5%, a change of 4 sigma significance. This abrupt rise in polarization does not appear attributable to any known instrumental artifact. These UV polarizations were only slightly less than those previously observed for these same objects in the optical. The polarization spectra were flat with a typical slope of the polarized flux pF(sub nu) proportional to nu(exp -0.8 +/- 0.5). Unlike the case of several high luminosity Seyfert 1 nuclei studied previously, polarization caused by scattering from dust grains does not provide the best fit to the polarization spectra of these luminous quasars. These observed spectra are consistent with a wavelength-independent polarization proportional to the total nonstellar light or, possibly, to the contribution of the blue thermal component. The polarization spectra have insufficient signal-to-noise to locate the scatterers with respect to the continuum source and the much larger broad line region. A decrease in amplitude and rotation of the position angle of the polarization vector at the shortest wavelengths, which could result from general relativistic effects near a spinning black hole, was not observed. In fact, in PG 1222+228, the polarization was observed to

  16. Spin-polarized SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoto, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Development of highly effective evaluation technology of magnetic structures on a nanometric scale is a key to understanding spintronics and related phenomena. A high-resolution spin-polarized scanning electron microscope (spin SEM) developed recently is quite suitable for probing such nanostructures because of the capability of analyzing local magnetization vectors in three dimensions. Utilizing the spin SEM, a layered antiferromagnetic structure with the 1nm-alternation of bilayer-sheet magnetization has been successfully resolved. The real-space imaging with full analysis of the temperature-dependent magnetization vectors will be demonstrated. (author)

  17. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  18. FIBRILLAR CHROMOSPHERIC SPICULE-LIKE COUNTERPARTS TO AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET AND SOFT X-RAY BLOWOUT CORONAL JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Harra, Louise K.

    2010-01-01

    We observe an erupting jet feature in a solar polar coronal hole, using data from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), and X-Ray Telescope (XRT), with supplemental data from STEREO/EUVI. From extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) images we identify the erupting feature as a blowout coronal jet: in SXRs it is a jet with a bright base, and in EUV it appears as an eruption of relatively cool (∼50,000 K) material of horizontal size scale ∼30'' originating from the base of the SXR jet. In SOT Ca II H images, the most pronounced analog is a pair of thin (∼1'') ejections at the locations of either of the two legs of the erupting EUV jet. These Ca II features eventually rise beyond 45'', leaving the SOT field of view, and have an appearance similar to standard spicules except that they are much taller. They have velocities similar to that of 'type II' spicules, ∼100 km s -1 , and they appear to have spicule-like substructures splitting off from them with horizontal velocity ∼50 km s -1 , similar to the velocities of splitting spicules measured by Sterling et al. Motions of splitting features and of other substructures suggest that the macroscopic EUV jet is spinning or unwinding as it is ejected. This and earlier work suggest that a subpopulation of Ca II type II spicules are the Ca II manifestation of portions of larger scale erupting magnetic jets. A different subpopulation of type II spicules could be blowout jets occurring on a much smaller horizontal size scale than the event we observe here.

  19. Polar crane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makosinski, S.

    1981-01-01

    In many applications polar cranes have to be repeatedly positioned with high accuracy. A guidance system is disclosed which has two pairs of guides. Each guide consists of two rollers carried by a sheave rotatable mounted on the crane bridge, the rollers being locatable one on each side of a guideway, e.g. the circular track on which the bridge runs. The pairs of guides are interconnected by respective rope loops which pass around and are locked to the respective pairs of sheaves in such a manner that movement of one guide results in equal movement of the other guide in a sense to maintain the repeatability of positioning of the centre of the bridge. A hydraulically-linked guide system is also described. (author)

  20. Ultraviolet observations of AM Herculis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzi, E.G.; Treves, A.; Milan Univ.; Sandford, M.C.W.; Willis, A.J.; Wilson, R.

    1980-01-01

    Seven ultraviolet spectra (1100-3200 Angstroem) of AM Her were obtained with the low resolution spectrometer of the IUE satellite. Strong emission features appear superimposed on a well defined continuum which is well fitted by a Fsub(lambda) D lambda -2 law. The observations are compared with the expectations from models of the source. (orig.) 891 WL/orig. 892 HIS

  1. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  2. Adapting the HSV polarization-color mapping for regions with low irradiance and high polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Tyo, J; Ratliff, Bradley M; Alenin, Andrey S

    2016-10-15

    Many mappings from polarization into color have been developed so that polarization information can be displayed. One of the most common of these maps the angle of linear polarization into color hue and degree of linear polarization into color saturation, while preserving the irradiance information from the polarization data. While this strategy enjoys wide popularity, there is a large class of polarization images for which it is not ideal. It is common to have images where the strongest polarization signatures (in terms of degree of polarization) occur in regions of relatively low irradiance: either in shadow in reflective bands or in cold regions in emissive bands. Since the irradiance is low, the chromatic properties of the resulting images are generally not apparent. Here we present an alternate mapping that uses the statistics of the angle of polarization as a measure of confidence in the polarization signature, then amplifies the irradiance in regions of high confidence, and leaves it unchanged in regions of low confidence. Results are shown from an LWIR and a visible spectrum imager.

  3. Filtering and polychromatic vision in mantis shrimps: themes in visible and ultraviolet vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas W; Bok, Michael J; Marshall, N Justin; Caldwell, Roy L

    2014-01-01

    Stomatopod crustaceans have the most complex and diverse assortment of retinal photoreceptors of any animals, with 16 functional classes. The receptor classes are subdivided into sets responsible for ultraviolet vision, spatial vision, colour vision and polarization vision. Many of these receptor classes are spectrally tuned by filtering pigments located in photoreceptors or overlying optical elements. At visible wavelengths, carotenoproteins or similar substances are packed into vesicles used either as serial, intrarhabdomal filters or lateral filters. A single retina may contain a diversity of these filtering pigments paired with specific photoreceptors, and the pigments used vary between and within species both taxonomically and ecologically. Ultraviolet-filtering pigments in the crystalline cones serve to tune ultraviolet vision in these animals as well, and some ultraviolet receptors themselves act as birefringent filters to enable circular polarization vision. Stomatopods have reached an evolutionary extreme in their use of filter mechanisms to tune photoreception to habitat and behaviour, allowing them to extend the spectral range of their vision both deeper into the ultraviolet and further into the red.

  4. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-01

    EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources

  5. Ortho-Babinet polarization-interrogating filter: an interferometric approach to polarization measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Delden, Jay S

    2003-07-15

    A novel, interferometric, polarization-interrogating filter assembly and method for the simultaneous measurement of all four Stokes parameters across a partially polarized irradiance image in a no-moving-parts, instantaneous, highly sensitive manner is described. In the reported embodiment of the filter, two spatially varying linear retarders and a linear polarizer comprise an ortho-Babinet, polarization-interrogating (OBPI) filter. The OBPI filter uniquely encodes the incident ensemble of electromagnetic wave fronts comprising a partially polarized irradiance image in a controlled, deterministic, spatially varying manner to map the complete state of polarization across the image to local variations in a superposed interference pattern. Experimental interferograms are reported along with a numerical simulation of the method.

  6. XMM-Newton confirmation of a new intermediate polar: XMMU J185330.7-012815

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C. Y.; Sriram, K.; Choi, C.-S.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the results of a detailed spectro-imaging and temporal analysis of an archival XMM-Newton observation of a new intermediate polar XMMU J185330.7-012815. Its X-ray spectrum can be well described by a multitemperature thermal plasma model with the K lines of heavy elements clearly detected. Possible counterparts of XMMU J185330.7-012815 have been identified in optical and ultraviolet (UV) bands. The low values of the inferred X-ray-to-UV and X-ray-to-optical flux ratios safely rule out the possibility of its being an isolated neutron star. We confirm the X-ray periodicity of ˜238 s but, differently from the previous preliminary results, we do not find any convincing evidence of phase shift in this observation. We further investigate its properties through an energy-resolved temporal analysis and find that the pulsed fraction monotonically increases with energy.

  7. Automated multifunction apparatus for spectral and polarization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.N.; Kurakov, A.Ya.

    1992-01-01

    An automated spectral apparatus is described that is based on an SDL-2 spectrometer for spectral and polarization measurements with small specimens (0.15 x 0.15 mm) by the Fourier-coefficient method in the visible and ultraviolet regions over a wide range of temperatures. The absorption, dichroism, birefringence, and polarization orientation of natural waves are determined simultaneously in a single measurement cycle. Polarization-luminescence spectra can also be recorded from one region of the specimen without its adjustment. 3 refs., 3 figs

  8. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy of graphene oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Lai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dispersions of few-layer (1-3 layers, multi-layer (4-10 layers and thick-layer (>10 layers graphene oxide (GO were prepared by a modified Hummers method with different mass ratios of KMnO4 to graphite. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectroscopic data show that few-layer GO dispersions can be distinguished from multi- and thick-layer dispersions by a more intense peak at 230 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM images of few-layer GO contain a single peak, those of multi-layer GO exhibit a shoulder and those of thick-layer GO do not contain a peak or shoulder. These findings allow qualitative analysis of GO dispersions. X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS show that the change of UV-vis absorption intensity of GO is caused by a conjugative effect related to chromophore aggregation that influences the π-π* plasmon peak.

  9. PolarTrack: Optical Outside-In Device Tracking that Exploits Display Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rädle, Roman; Jetter, Hans-Christian; Fischer, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    PolarTrack is a novel camera-based approach to detecting and tracking mobile devices inside the capture volume. In PolarTrack, a polarization filter continuously rotates in front of an off-the-shelf color camera, which causes the displays of observed devices to periodically blink in the camera feed....... The periodic blinking results from the physical characteristics of current displays, which shine polarized light either through an LC overlay to produce images or through a polarizer to reduce light reflections on OLED displays. PolarTrack runs a simple detection algorithm on the camera feed to segment...... displays and track their locations and orientations, which makes PolarTrack particularly suitable as a tracking system for cross-device interaction with mobile devices. Our evaluation of PolarTrack's tracking quality and comparison with state-of-the-art camera-based multi-device tracking showed a better...

  10. System performance modeling of extreme ultraviolet lithographic thermal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, P. A.; Gianoulakis, S. E.; Moen, C. D.; Kanouff, M. P.; Fisher, A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithography Engineering Test Stand. Extensive modeling was applied to predict the impact of thermal loads on key lithographic parameters such as image placement error, focal shift, and loss of CD control. We show that thermal issues can be effectively managed to ensure that their impact on lithographic performance is maintained within design error budgets. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  11. Nuclear polarization and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaettli, H.

    1985-01-01

    Different possibilities for the use of polarized nuclei in thermal neutron scattering on condensed matter are reviewed. Highly polarized nuclei are the starting point for studying dipolar magnetic order. Systematic measurement of spin-dependent scattering lengths is possible on samples with polarized nuclei. Highly polarized hydrogen should help to unravel complicated structures in chemistry and biology. The use of polarized proton targets as an energy-independent neutron polarizer in the thermal and epithermal region should be considered afresh. (author)

  12. Polarization digital holographic microscopy using low-cost liquid crystal polarization rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovhaliuk, Rostyslav Yu

    2018-02-01

    Polarization imaging methods are actively used to study anisotropic objects. A number of methods and systems, such as imaging polarimeters, were proposed to measure the state of polarization of light that passed through the object. Digital holographic and interferometric approaches can be used to quantitatively measure both amplitude and phase of a wavefront. Using polarization modulation optics, the measurement capabilities of such interference-based systems can be extended to measure polarization-dependent parameters, such as phase retardation. Different kinds of polarization rotators can be used to alternate the polarization of a reference beam. Liquid crystals are used in a rapidly increasing number of different optoelectronic devices. Twisted nematic liquid crystals are widely used as amplitude modulators in electronic displays and light valves or shutter glass. Such devices are of particular interest for polarization imaging, as they can be used as polarization rotators, and due to large-scale manufacturing have relatively low cost. A simple Mach-Zehnder polarized holographic setup that uses modified shutter glass as a polarization rotator is demonstrated. The suggested approach is experimentally validated by measuring retardation of quarter-wave film.

  13. Recovering a hidden polarization by ghost polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janassek, Patrick; Blumenstein, Sébastien; Elsäßer, Wolfgang

    2018-02-15

    By exploiting polarization correlations of light from a broadband fiber-based amplified spontaneous emission source we succeed in reconstructing a hidden polarization in a ghost polarimetry experiment in close analogy to ghost imaging and ghost spectroscopy. Thereby, an original linear polarization state in the object arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration which has been camouflaged by a subsequent depolarizer is recovered by correlating it with light from a reference beam. The variation of a linear polarizer placed inside the reference beam results in a Malus law type second-order intensity correlation with high contrast, thus measuring a ghost polarigram.

  14. Ultraviolet extensions of particle physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthier, Laure Gaëlle

    The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider completed the Standard Model field content. Many questions though remain unanswered by the Standard Model triggering a search for new physics. New physics could manifest itself at the Large Hadron Collider by the discovery of new...... particles. However, the lack of new resonances might suggest that these new particles are still out of reach which leaves us with few options. Two possibilities are explored in this thesis. The first is to study precision measurements which might indicate new physics as small deviations from the Standard...... are expressed as power series with missing higher order terms. We also show how to connect ultraviolet models of new physics to the Standard Model effective field theory and calculate bounds on them using the Standard Model effective field theory fit results. Finally, we study a nonrelativistic ultraviolet...

  15. Polarization-sensitive color in butterfly scales: polarization conversion from ridges with reflecting elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Tang, Yiwen; Meng, Jinsong; Wang, Ge; Zhou, Han; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2014-11-03

    Polarization-sensitive color originates from polarization-dependent reflection or transmission, exhibiting abundant light information, including intensity, spectral distribution, and polarization. A wide range of butterflies are physiologically sensitive to polarized light, but the origins of polarized signal have not been fully understood. Here we systematically investigate the colorful scales of six species of butterfly to reveal the physical origins of polarization-sensitive color. Microscopic optical images under crossed polarizers exhibit their polarization-sensitive characteristic, and micro-structural characterizations clarify their structural commonality. In the case of the structural scales that have deep ridges, the polarization-sensitive color related with scale azimuth is remarkable. Periodic ridges lead to the anisotropic effective refractive indices in the parallel and perpendicular grating orientations, which achieves form-birefringence, resulting in the phase difference of two different component polarized lights. Simulated results show that ridge structures with reflecting elements reflect and rotate the incident p-polarized light into s-polarized light. The dimensional parameters and shapes of grating greatly affect the polarization conversion process, and the triangular deep grating extends the outstanding polarization conversion effect from the sub-wavelength period to the period comparable to visible light wavelength. The parameters of ridge structures in butterfly scales have been optimized to fulfill the polarization-dependent reflection for secret communication. The structural and physical origin of polarization conversion provides a more comprehensive perspective on the creation of polarization-sensitive color in butterfly wing scales. These findings show great potential in anti-counterfeiting technology and advanced optical material design.

  16. Reproducibility of polar map generation and assessment of defect severity and extent assessment in myocardial perfusion imaging using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.; Miethaner, C.; Nguyen, N.; Ziegler, S.I.; Schwaiger, M.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of new software developed for the analysis of cardiac tomographic data. The algorithm delineates the long axis and defines the basal plane and subsequently generates polar maps to quantitatively and reproducibly assess the size and severity of perfusion defects. The developed technique requires an initial manual estimate of the left ventricular long axis and calculates the volumetric maximum myocardial activity distribution. This surface is used to map three-dimensional tracer accumulation onto a two-dimensional representation (polar map), which is the basis for further processing. The spatial information is used to compute geometrical and mechanical properties of a solid model of the left ventricle including the left heart chamber. A new estimate of the axis is determined from this model, and the previously outlined procedure is repeated together with an automated definition of the valve plane until differences between the polar maps can be neglected. This quantitative analysis software was validated in phantom studies with defects of known masses and in ten data sets from normals and patients with coronary artery disease of various severity. We investigated the reproducibility of the maps with the introduction of a similarity criterion where the ratio of two corresponding polar map elements lies within a 10% interval. The maps were also used to measure intra-and interobserver variability in respect of defect size and severity. In the phantom studies, it was possible to reliably assess mass information over a wide range of defects from 5 to 60 g (slope: 1.02, offset -0.68, r = 0.972). Patient studies revealed a statistically significant increase in the reproducibility of the automatic technique compared with the manual approach: 54%±19% (manual) compared with 88%±9% (automatic) for observer 1 and 61%±20% vs 82%±5% for observer 2, respectively. The intervariability analysis showed a significant

  17. A near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet polarimetric and timing investigation of complex equatorial dusty structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Hameury, J. M.; Goosmann, R. W.

    2018-05-01

    Context. From stars to active galactic nuclei, many astrophysical systems are surrounded by an equatorial distribution of dusty material that is, in a number of cases, spatially unresolved even with cutting edge facilities. Aims: In this paper, we investigate if and how one can determine the unresolved and heterogeneous morphology of dust distribution around a central bright source using time-resolved polarimetric observations. Methods: We used polarized radiative transfer simulations to study a sample of circumnuclear dusty morphologies. We explored a grid of geometrically variable models that are uniform, fragmented, and density stratified in the near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet bands, and we present their distinctive time-dependent polarimetric signatures. Results: As expected, varying the structure of the obscuring equatorial disk has a deep impact on the inclination-dependent flux, polarization degree and angle, and time lags we observe. We find that stratified media are distinguishable by time-resolved polarimetric observations, and that the expected polarization is much higher in the infrared band than in the ultraviolet. However, because of the physical scales imposed by dust sublimation, the average time lags of months to years between the total and polarized fluxes are important; these time lags lengthens the observational campaigns necessary to break more sophisticated, and therefore also more degenerated, models. In the ultraviolet band, time lags are slightly shorter than in the infrared or optical bands, and, coupled to lower diluting starlight fluxes, time-resolved polarimetry in the UV appears more promising for future campaigns. Conclusions: Equatorial dusty disks differ in terms of inclination-dependent photometric, polarimetric, and timing observables, but only the coupling of these different markers can lead to inclination-independent constraints on the unresolved structures. Even though it is complex and time consuming, polarized

  18. TEMPERATURE AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET INTENSITY IN A CORONAL PROMINENCE CAVITY AND STREAMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, T. A. [NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J. [HAO/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, Space Research Building, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Tripathi, D. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag-4, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2012-09-20

    We analyze the temperature and EUV line emission of a coronal cavity and surrounding streamer in terms of a morphological forward model. We use a series of iron line ratios observed with the Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on 2007 August 9 to constrain temperature as a function of altitude in a morphological forward model of the streamer and cavity. We also compare model predictions to the EIS EUV line intensities and polarized brightness (pB) data from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) Mark 4 K-coronameter. This work builds on earlier analysis using the same model to determine geometry of and density in the same cavity and streamer. The fit to the data with altitude-dependent temperature profiles indicates that both the streamer and cavity have temperatures in the range 1.4-1.7 MK. However, the cavity exhibits substantial substructure such that the altitude-dependent temperature profile is not sufficient to completely model conditions in the cavity. Coronal prominence cavities are structured by magnetism so clues to this structure are to be found in their plasma properties. These temperature substructures are likely related to structures in the cavity magnetic field. Furthermore, we find that the model overestimates the EUV line intensities by a factor of 4-10, without overestimating pB. We discuss this difference in terms of filling factors and uncertainties in density diagnostics and elemental abundances.

  19. Neutron polarization in polarized 3He targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.; Gibson, B.F.; Payne, G.L.; Bernstein, A.M.; Chupp, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    Simple formulas for the neutron and proton polarizations in polarized 3 He targets are derived assuming (1) quasielastic final states; (2) no final-state interactions; (3) no meson-exchange currents; (4) large momentum transfers; (5) factorizability of 3 He SU(4) response-function components. Numerical results from a wide variety of bound-state solutions of the Faddeev equations are presented. It is found that this simple model predicts the polarization of neutrons in a fully polarized 3 He target to be 87%, while protons should have a slight residual polarization of -2.7%. Numerical studies show that this model works very well for quasielastic electron scattering

  20. Myosin helical pitch angle as a quantitative imaging biomarker for characterization of cardiac programming in fetal growth restriction measured by polarization second harmonic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat-Roldan, I.; Psilodimitrakopoulos, S.,; Eixarch, E.,; Torre, I.; Wotjas, B.; Crispi, F.; Figueras, F.; Artigas, D.,; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Gratacos, E.,

    2009-07-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) has recently shown a strong association with cardiac programming which predisposes to cardiovascular mortality in adulthood. Polarization Second Harmonic Microscopy can quantify molecular architecture changes with high sensitivity in cardiac myofibrils. In this work, we use myosin helical pitch angle as an example to quantify such alterations related to this high risk population. Importantly, this shows a potential use of the technique as an early diagnostic tool and an alternative method to understand pathophysiological processes.

  1. Oocytes Polar Body Detection for Automatic Enucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Enucleation is a crucial step in cloning. In order to achieve automatic blind enucleation, we should detect the polar body of the oocyte automatically. The conventional polar body detection approaches have low success rate or low efficiency. We propose a polar body detection method based on machine learning in this paper. On one hand, the improved Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG algorithm is employed to extract features of polar body images, which will increase success rate. On the other hand, a position prediction method is put forward to narrow the search range of polar body, which will improve efficiency. Experiment results show that the success rate is 96% for various types of polar bodies. Furthermore, the method is applied to an enucleation experiment and improves the degree of automatic enucleation.

  2. Coherent active polarization control without loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuqian; Hay, Darrick; Shi, Zhimin

    2017-11-01

    We propose a lossless active polarization control mechanism utilizing an anisotropic dielectric medium with two coherent inputs. Using scattering matrix analysis, we derive analytically the required optical properties of the anisotropic medium that can behave as a switchable polarizing beam splitter. We also show that such a designed anisotropic medium can produce linearly polarized light at any azimuthal direction through coherent control of two inputs with a specific polarization state. Furthermore, we present a straightforward design-on-demand procedure of a subwavelength-thick metastructure that can possess the desired optical anisotropy at a flexible working wavelength. Our lossless coherent polarization control technique may lead to fast, broadband and integrated polarization control elements for applications in imaging, spectroscopy, and telecommunication.

  3. Coherent active polarization control without loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Ye

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a lossless active polarization control mechanism utilizing an anisotropic dielectric medium with two coherent inputs. Using scattering matrix analysis, we derive analytically the required optical properties of the anisotropic medium that can behave as a switchable polarizing beam splitter. We also show that such a designed anisotropic medium can produce linearly polarized light at any azimuthal direction through coherent control of two inputs with a specific polarization state. Furthermore, we present a straightforward design-on-demand procedure of a subwavelength-thick metastructure that can possess the desired optical anisotropy at a flexible working wavelength. Our lossless coherent polarization control technique may lead to fast, broadband and integrated polarization control elements for applications in imaging, spectroscopy, and telecommunication.

  4. All-angle negative refraction and active flat lensing of ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Agrawal, Amit; Abashin, Maxim; Chau, Kenneth J; Lezec, Henri J

    2013-05-23

    Decades ago, Veselago predicted that a material with simultaneously negative electric and magnetic polarization responses would yield a 'left-handed' medium in which light propagates with opposite phase and energy velocities--a condition described by a negative refractive index. He proposed that a flat slab of left-handed material possessing an isotropic refractive index of -1 could act like an imaging lens in free space. Left-handed materials do not occur naturally, and it has only recently become possible to achieve a left-handed response using metamaterials, that is, electromagnetic structures engineered on subwavelength scales to elicit tailored polarization responses. So far, left-handed responses have typically been implemented using resonant metamaterials composed of periodic arrays of unit cells containing inductive-capacitive resonators and conductive wires. Negative refractive indices that are isotropic in two or three dimensions at microwave frequencies have been achieved in resonant metamaterials with centimetre-scale features. Scaling the left-handed response to higher frequencies, such as infrared or visible, has been done by shrinking critical dimensions to submicrometre scales by means of top-down nanofabrication. This miniaturization has, however, so far been achieved at the cost of reduced unit-cell symmetry, yielding a refractive index that is negative along only one axis. Moreover, lithographic scaling limits have so far precluded the fabrication of resonant metamaterials with left-handed responses at frequencies beyond the visible. Here we report the experimental implementation of a bulk metamaterial with a left-handed response to ultraviolet light. The structure, based on stacked plasmonic waveguides, yields an omnidirectional left-handed response for transverse magnetic polarization characterized by a negative refractive index. By engineering the structure to have a refractive index close to -1 over a broad angular range, we achieve Veselago

  5. Reflectance confocal microscopy: an effective tool for monitoring ultraviolet B phototherapy in psoriasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolberink, E.A.W.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Boer-van Huizen, R.T. de; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel, noninvasive imaging technique which enables imaging of skin at a cellular resolution comparable to conventional microscopy. Objectives We performed a pilot study to evaluate RCM as a noninvasive tool for monitoring ultraviolet (UV)

  6. ULTRAVIOLET DISCOVERIES AT ASTEROID (21) LUTETIA BY THE ROSETTA ALICE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROGRAPH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. Wm.; Steffl, A.; Birath, E.; Graps, A.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feaga, L.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Slater, D. C.; Versteeg, M.; Scherrer, J. R.; Cunningham, N.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Alice ultraviolet (UV) imaging spectrograph on board the ESA Rosetta comet orbiter successfully conducted a series of flyby observations of the large asteroid (21) Lutetia in the days surrounding Rosetta's closest approach on 2010 July 10. Observations included a search for emission lines from gas, and spectral observations of the Lutetia's surface reflectance. No emissions from gas around Lutetia were observed. Regarding the surface reflectance, we found that Lutetia has a distinctly different albedo and slope than both the asteroid (2867) Steins and Earth's moon, the two most analogous objects studied in the far ultraviolet (FUV). Further, Lutetia's ∼10% geometric albedo near 1800 A is significantly lower than its 16%-19% albedo near 5500 A. Moreover, the FUV albedo shows a precipitous drop (to ∼4%) between 1800 A and 1600 A, representing the strongest spectral absorption feature observed in Lutetia's spectrum at any observed wavelength. Our surface reflectance fits are not unique but are consistent with a surface dominated by an EH5 chondrite, combined with multiple other possible surface constituents, including anorthite, water frost, and SO 2 frost or a similar mid-UV absorber. The water frost identification is consistent with some data sets but inconsistent with others. The anorthite (feldspar) identification suggests that Lutetia is a differentiated body.

  7. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 μm wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  8. Polarized electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prepost, R.

    1994-01-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented

  9. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  10. Polarized neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abov, Yu.G.; Novitskij, V.V.; Alfimenkov, V.P.; Galinskij, E.M.; Mareev, Yu.D.; Pikel'ner, L.B.; Chernikov, A.N.; Lason', L.; Tsulaya, V.M.; Tsulaya, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    The polarized neutron spectrometer, intended for studying the interaction of polarized neutrons with nuclei and condensed media in the area of energies from thermal up to several electron-volt, is developed at the IBR-2 reactor (JINR, Dubna). Diffraction on the Co(92%)-Fe(8%) magnetized monocrystals is used for the neutron polarization and polarization analysis. The neutron polarization within the whole energy range equals ∼ 95% [ru

  11. 3-D spectral Induced Polarization (IP) imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, K.M.; Lesmes, D.P.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.; Shi, W.; Sturrock, J.

    1997-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.'

  12. The Use of Orthogonal Polarizations in Microwave Imagery of Isolated Canine Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L. E.; Jacobi, J. H.

    1980-06-01

    A method of imaging biological targets using microwave radiation at a frequency of 4 GHz is presented. Linearly polarized radiation is transmitted through an isolated canine kidney and received with co-polarized and cross-polarized antennas. Images are displayed as the spatial variation of the magnitude of the transmission scattering parameter S21 for each mode of polarization. The relationship between the spatial variation of the magnitude of S21 and canine renal anatomy is discussed. It is shown that within the kidney the cross-polarized image tends to emphasize linear or piecewise linear structures, whereas the co-polarized image balances renal cortical lobulations.

  13. Ultraviolet spectrographs for thermospheric and ionospheric remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymond, K.F.; McCoy, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been developing far- and extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs for remote sensing the Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The first of these sensors, called the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI), will be flying on the Air Force's Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) block 5D3 satellites as an operational sensor in the 1997-2010 time frame. A second sensor, called the High-resolution ionospheric and Thermospheric Spectrograph (HITS), will fly in late 1995 on the Air Force Space Test Program's Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS, also known as P91-1) as part of NRL's High Resolution Airglow and Auroral Spectroscopy (HIRAAS) experiment. Both of these instruments are compact and do not draw much power and would be good candidates for small satellite applications. The instruments and their capabilities are discussed. Possible uses of these instruments in small satellite applications are also presented

  14. Ultraviolet divergences and supersymmetric theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagnotti, A.

    1984-09-01

    This article is closely related to the one by Ferrara in these same Proceedings. It deals with what is perhaps the most fascinating property of supersymmetric theories, their improved ultraviolet behavior. My aim here is to present a survey of the state of the art as of August, 1984, and a somewhat more detailed discussion of the breakdown of the superspace power-counting beyond N = 2 superfields. A method is also described for simplifying divergence calculations that uses the locality of subtracted Feynman integrals. 74 references

  15. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, R. L. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1990-06-15

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection.

  16. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection

  17. Ultraviolet divergences of Einstein gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goroff, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The author discuss a two-loop calculation showing that the S matrix of Einstein's theory of gravity contains nonrenormalizable ultraviolet divergences in four dimension. The author discusses the calculation in both background field and normal field theory. The author describes a new method for dealing with ghost fields in gauge theories by combining them with suitable extensions of the gauge fields in higher dimensions. The author shows how using subtracted integrals in the calculation of higher loop graphs simplifies the calculation in the background field method by eliminating the need for mixed counterterms. Finally, the author makes some remarks about the implications of the result for supergravity theories

  18. Ultraviolet laser technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, David L

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet Laser Technology and Applications is a hands-on reference text that identifies the main areas of UV laser technology; describes how each is applied; offers clearly illustrated examples of UV opticalsystems applications; and includes technical data on optics, lasers, materials, and systems. This book is unique for its comprehensive, in-depth coverage. Each chapter deals with a different aspect of the subject, beginning with UV light itself; moving through the optics, sources, and systems; and concluding with detailed descriptions of applications in various fields.The text enables pr

  19. Polarized targets and beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.

    1985-01-01

    First the experimental situation of the single-pion photoproduction and the photodisintegration of the deuteron is briefly discussed. Then a description of the Bonn polarization facilities is given. The point of main effort is put on the polarized target which plays a vital role in the program. A facility for photon induced double polarization experiments at ELSA will be presented in section 4. Properties of a tensor polarized deuteron target are discussed in section 5. The development in the field of polarized targets, especially on new target materials, enables a new generation of polarized target experiments with (polarized) electrons. Some comments on the use of a polarized target in combination with electron beams will be discussed in section 6. Electron deuteron scattering from a tensor polarized deuteron target is considered and compared with other experimental possibilities. (orig./HSI)

  20. Dose modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; O'Hare, Neil John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is widely used in the treatment of numerous skin conditions. This treatment is well established and largely beneficial to patients on both physical and psychological levels; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can have detrimental effects, such as erythemal responses and ocular damage in addition to the potentially carcinogenic nature of UVR. For these reasons, it is essential to control and quantify the radiation dose incident upon the patient to ensure that it is both biologically effective and has the minimal possible impact on the surrounding unaffected tissue. Methods: To date, there has been little work on dose modeling, and the output of artificial UVR sources is an area where research has been recommended. This work characterizes these sources by formalizing an approach from first principles and experimentally examining this model. Results: An implementation of a line source model is found to give impressive accuracy and quantifies the output radiation well. Conclusions: This method could potentially serve as a basis for a full computational dose model for quantifying patient dose.

  1. Evolution of solar ultraviolet luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahnle, K.J.; Walker, J.C.G.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the major role of the sun in defining the properties of planetary atmospheres, their evolution cannot be fully understood outside the context of an evolving sun. The ultraviolet radiation is especially interesting because of its strong interaction with planetary atmospheres. We use astronomical observation of stars that are analogous to the sun in order to reconstruct a tentative account of the evolution of solar UV luminosity. A wealth of evidence indicates that the young sun was a much more powerful source of energetic particles and radiation than it is today. While on the main sequence, solar activity has declined as an inverse power law of age (between t -5 and t/sup -1.2/) as a consequence of angular momentum loss to the solar wind. Recent IUE satellite observations of premain sequence stars suggest that before the sun reached the main sequence (at an age of about 50 m.y.), it may have emitted as much as 10 4 times as much ultraviolet radiation (γ<2000 A) than it does today. These results could impact our understanding of the photochemistry and escape of constituents of primordial planetary atmospheres

  2. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  3. S201 catalog of far-ultraviolet objects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, T.; Carruthers, G.K.; Hill, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A catalog of star images was compiled from images obtained by an NRL Far-Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph operated from 21 to 23 April 1972 on the lunar surface during the Apollo-16 mission. These images were scanned on a microdensitometer, and the output recorded on magnetic tapes. The catalog is divided into 11 parts, covering ten fields in the sky (the Sagittarius field being covered by two parts), and each part is headed by a constellation name and the field center coordinates. The errors in position of the detected images are less than about 3 arc-min. Correlations are given with star numbers in the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory catalog. Values are given of the peak density and the density volume. The text includes a discussion of the photometry, corrections thereto due to threshold and saturation effects, and its comparison with theoretical expectation, stellar model atmospheres, and a generalized far-ultraviolet interstellar extinction law. The S201 catalog is also available on a single reel of seven-track magnetic tape

  4. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This extensive review discusses the topic under the following headings: ultraviolet climatology, molecular and cellular ultraviolet photobiology (absorption, photoproducts, repair), effects of solar UVR on aquatic life (phyto and zooplankton), plants and humans. The section on human effects includes tanning, photo-aging, non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers and the effects of solar UVR on the eye. (UK)

  5. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diffey, B.L. (Dryburn Hospital, Durham (UK). Regional Medical Physics Dept.)

    1991-03-01

    This extensive review discusses the topic under the following headings: ultraviolet climatology, molecular and cellular ultraviolet photobiology (absorption, photoproducts, repair), effects of solar UVR on aquatic life (phyto and zooplankton), plants and humans. The section on human effects includes tanning, photo-aging, non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers and the effects of solar UVR on the eye. (UK).

  6. Polarizing aperture stereoscopic cinema camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Lenny

    2012-07-01

    The art of stereoscopic cinematography has been held back because of the lack of a convenient way to reduce the stereo camera lenses' interaxial to less than the distance between the eyes. This article describes a unified stereoscopic camera and lens design that allows for varying the interaxial separation to small values using a unique electro-optical polarizing aperture design for imaging left and right perspective views onto a large single digital sensor, the size of the standard 35 mm frame, with the means to select left and right image information. Even with the added stereoscopic capability, the appearance of existing camera bodies will be unaltered.

  7. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, David H; Gilbert, David W; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315-400 nm), "black-light," electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV "Black-light" ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products.

  8. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazova, M.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of ∼ 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  9. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazova, M.; O' Hagan, J.B. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Did cot (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of {approx} 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  10. Sky light polarization detection with linear polarizer triplet in light field camera inspired by insect vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Liu, Zejin

    2015-10-20

    Stable information of a sky light polarization pattern can be used for navigation with various advantages such as better performance of anti-interference, no "error cumulative effect," and so on. But the existing method of sky light polarization measurement is weak in real-time performance or with a complex system. Inspired by the navigational capability of a Cataglyphis with its compound eyes, we introduce a new approach to acquire the all-sky image under different polarization directions with one camera and without a rotating polarizer, so as to detect the polarization pattern across the full sky in a single snapshot. Our system is based on a handheld light field camera with a wide-angle lens and a triplet linear polarizer placed over its aperture stop. Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. Not only real-time detection but simple and costless architecture demonstrates the superiority of the approach proposed in this paper.

  11. Scattering with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of neutron scattering, it was shown very soon that the use of polarized neutron beams brings much more information than usual scattering with unpolarized neutrons. We shall develop here the different scattering methods that imply polarized neutrons: 1) polarized beams without polarization analysis, the flipping ratio method; 2) polarized beams with a uniaxial polarization analysis; 3) polarized beams with a spherical polarization analysis. For all these scattering methods, we shall give examples of the physical problems which can been solved by these methods, particularly in the field of magnetism: investigation of complex magnetic structures, investigation of spin or magnetization densities in metals, insulators and molecular compounds, separation of magnetic and nuclear scattering, investigation of magnetic properties of liquids and amorphous materials and even, for non magnetic material, separation between coherent and incoherent scattering. (author)

  12. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  13. Tomographic extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs: TESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Stephan, A; Cook, T; Vickers, J; Taylor, V; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-08-01

    We describe the system of Tomographic Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) SpectrographS (TESS) that are the primary instruments for the Tomographic Experiment using Radiative Recombinative Ionospheric EUV and Radio Sources (TERRIERS) satellite. The spectrographs were designed to make high-sensitivity {80 counts/s)/Rayleigh [one Rayleigh is equivalent to 10(6) photons/(4pi str cm(2)s)}, line-of-sight measurements of the oi 135.6- and 91.1-nm emissions suitable for tomographic inversion. The system consists of five spectrographs, four identical nightglow instruments (for redundancy and added sensitivity), and one instrument with a smaller aperture to reduce sensitivity and increase spectral resolution for daytime operation. Each instrument has a bandpass of 80-140 nm with approximately 2- and 1-nm resolution for the night and day instruments, respectively. They utilize microchannel-plate-based two-dimensional imaging detectors with wedge-and-strip anode readouts. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and calibrated at Boston University, and the TERRIERS satellite was launched on 18 May 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  14. Polarization patterns of the twilight sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Warrant, Eric J.; Greiner, Birgit

    2005-08-01

    Although natural light sources produce depolarized light, patterns of partially linearly polarized light appear in the sky due to scattering from air molecules, dust, and aerosols. Many animals, including bees and ants, orient themselves to patterns of polarization that are present in daytime skies, when the intensity is high and skylight polarization is strong and predictable. The halicitid bee Megalopta genalis inhabits rainforests in Central America. Unlike typical bees, it forages before sunrise and after sunset, when light intensities under the forest canopy are very low, and must find its way to food sources and return to its nest in visually challenging circumstances. An important cue for the orientation could be patterns of polarization in the twilight sky. Therefore, we used a calibrated digital camera to image skylight polarization in an overhead patch of sky, 87.6° across, before dawn on Barro Colorado Island in Panama, where the bees are found. We simultaneously measured the spectral properties of polarized light in a cloudless patch of sky 15° across centered on the zenith. We also performed full-sky imaging of polarization before dawn and after dusk on Lizard Island in Australia, another tropical island. During twilight, celestial polarized light occurs in a wide band stretching perpendicular to the location of the hidden sun and reaching typical degrees of polarization near 80% at wavelengths >600 nm. This pattern appears about 45 minutes before local sunrise or disappears 45 minutes after local sunset (about 20 minutes after the onset of astronomical twilight at dawn, or before its end at dusk) and extends with little change through the entire twilight period. Such a strong and reliable orientation cue could be used for flight orientation by any animal with polarization sensitivity that navigates during twilight.

  15. Galactic Astronomy in the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorguev, A. S.; Sachkov, M. E.; Zabolotskikh, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a number of prospective observational programs for the ultraviolet space observatory WSO-UV, which seem to be of great importance to modern galactic astronomy. The programs include the search for binary Cepheids; the search and detailed photometric study and the analysis of radial distribution of UV-bright stars in globular clusters ("blue stragglers", blue horizontal-branch stars, RR Lyrae variables, white dwarfs, and stars with UV excesses); the investigation of stellar content and kinematics of young open clusters and associations; the study of spectral energy distribution in hot stars, including calculation of the extinction curves in the UV, optical and NIR; and accurate definition of the relations between the UV-colors and effective temperature. The high angular resolution of the observatory allows accurate astrometric measurements of stellar proper motions and their kinematic analysis.

  16. Additive effects of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A xenon-mercury high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce ultraviolet (uv) radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated and evaluated by slitlamp biomicroscopy. Corneal threshold (Hc) was 0.05 J.cm-2 and lens threshold (hL) was 0.75 J.cm-2. Other eyes were irradiated with 2 Hc and evaluated from 4 to 24 h at 4 h intervals. Corneal damage was only greater than that expected from a single Hc exposure if the separation between the two Hc exposures did not exceed 8 h. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of uv was the development of corneal epithelial granules

  17. Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry of VV Cephei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woon Kang

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The IUE archival spectra of VV Cephei were collected to investigate the eclipse nature in the ultraviolet. The temperature of the B star has been determined, as approximately 30000K, based on the flux distributions during egress. Light curves of VV Cephei were reduced from the spectrophotometry of the IUE archival spectra. Three light curves at the center wavelengths of 3250 Å, 2550 Å and 2850 Å have been analyzed by the modified Wilson and Devinney light curve program. The radii of the B star and M star were deduced to 0.05 and 0.22 of unit separation, respectively. The UV light curves show an evidence that the light was attenuated by the highly opaque atomsphere of the M star.

  18. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  19. Techniques in polarization physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausnitzer, G.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the current status of the technical tools necessary to perform different kinds of polarization experiments is presented, and the absolute and relative accuracy with which data can be obtained is discussed. A description of polarized targets and sources of polarized fast neutrons is included. Applications of polarization techniques to other fields is mentioned briefly. (14 figures, 3 tables, 110 references) (U.S.)

  20. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  1. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live...

  2. Calculation of polarization effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful

  3. Polarization Sensitive Coherent Raman Measurements of DCVJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Josiah; Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Shiver, Tegan; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Coherent Raman spectroscopy which recently developed into coherent Raman microscopy has been used to produce label free imaging of thin layers of material and find the spatial distributions of certain chemicals within samples, e.g. cancer cells.(1) Not all aspects of coherent scattering have been used for imaging. Among those for example are special polarization sensitive measurements. Therefore we have investigated the properties of polarization sensitive CARS spectra of a highly fluorescent molecule, DCVJ.(2) Spectra has been recorded by using parallel polarized and perpendicular polarized excitations. A special polarization arrangement was developed to suppress the non-resonant background scattering from the sample. These results can be used to improve the imaging properties of a coherent Raman microscope in the future. This is the first time coherent Raman polarization sensitive measurements have been used to characterize the vibrational modes of DCVJ. 1: K. I. Gutkowski, et al., ``Fluorescence of dicyanovinyl julolidine in a room temperature ionic liquid '' Chemical Physics Letters 426 (2006) 329 - 333 2: Fouad El-Diasty, ``Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering: Spectroscopy and microscopy'' Vibrational Spectroscopy 55 (2011) 1-37

  4. Performance of The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Mirror Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Raymond G.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Conard, Steven J.; Friedman, Scott D.; Hampton, Jeffery; Moos, H. Warren; Nikulla, Paul; Oliveira, Cristina M.; Saha, Timo T.; Obenschain, Arthur (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer is a NASA astrophysics satellite which produces high-resolution spectra in the far-ultraviolet (90.5-118.7 nm bandpass) using a high effective area and low background detectors. The observatory was launched on its three-year mission from Cape Canaveral Air Station on 24 June 1999. The instrument contains four coaligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors which illuminate separate Rowland circle spectrograph channels equipped with holographically ruled diffraction gratings and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The telescope mirrors have a 352 x 387 mm aperture and 2245 mm focal length and are attached to actuator assemblies, which provide on-orbit, tip, tilt, and focus control. Two mirrors are coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and two are coated with lithium fluoride over aluminum (Al:LiF). We describe mirror assembly in-flight optical and mechanical performance. On-orbit measurements of the far-ultraviolet point spread function associated with each mirror are compared to expectations based on pre-flight laboratory measurements and modeling using the Optical Surface Analysis Code and surface metrology data. On-orbit imaging data indicate that the mirrors meet their instrument-level requirement of 50 percent and 95 percent slit transmission for the high- and mid-resolution spectrograph entrance slits, respectively. The degradation of mirror reflectivity during satellite integration and test is also discussed. The far-ultraviolet reflectivity of the SiC- and AlLiF-coated mirrors decreased about six percent and three percent, respectively, between coating and launch. Each mirror is equipped with three actuators, which consist of a stepper motor driving a ball screw via a two-stage planetary gear train. We also discuss the mechanical performance of the mirror assemblies, including actuator performance and thermal effects.

  5. Non-uniformity calibration for MWIR polarization imagery obtained with integrated microgrid polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Zheng; Shi, Ze-Lin; Feng, Bin; Hui, Bin; Zhao, Yao-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Integrating microgrid polarimeters on focal plane array (FPA) of an infrared detector causes non-uniformity of polarization response. In order to reduce the effect of polarization non-uniformity, this paper constructs an experimental setup for capturing raw flat-field images and proposes a procedure for acquiring non-uniform calibration (NUC) matrix and calibrating raw polarization images. The proposed procedure takes the incident radiation as a polarization vector and offers a calibration matrix for each pixel. Both our matrix calibration and two-point calibration are applied to our mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) polarization imaging system with integrated microgrid polarimeters. Compared with two point calibration, our matrix calibration reduces non-uniformity by 30 40% under condition of flat-field data test with polarization. The ourdoor scene observation experiment indicates that our calibration can effectively reduce polarization non-uniformity and improve the image quality of our MWIR polarization imaging system.

  6. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from high-Z plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tomita, K.; Nishikino, M.; Fujioka, S.; Endo, A.; Li, B.; Otsuka, T.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6.x nm and the water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics. (paper)

  7. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The focus of the research presented in this ph.d. thesis is refractive index structures photoinduced in germanonsilica waveguides with ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The physical mechanisms involved in photosensitivity and applications of a wide range of UV induced refractive index structures in both...... application of a scanning near-field optical microscope to obtain high resolution images of UV induced refractive index structures and by monitoring the dynamics of UV induced index changes and luminescence. During part of my ph.d. project I have worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technolgy...

  8. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from high-Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tomita, K.; Nishikino, M.; Fujioka, S.; Endo, A.; Li, B.; Otsuka, T.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6.x nm and the water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics.

  9. Acceleration of polarized particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1992-05-01

    The spin kinetics of polarized beams in circular accelerators is reviewed in the case of spin-1/2 particles (electrons and protons) with emphasis on the depolarization phenomena. The acceleration of polarized proton beams in synchrotrons is described together with the cures applied to reduce depolarization, including the use of 'Siberian Snakes'. The in-situ polarization of electrons in storage rings due to synchrotron radiation is studied as well as depolarization in presence of ring imperfections. The applications of electron polarization to accurately calibrate the rings in energy and to use polarized beams in colliding-beam experiments are reviewed. (author) 76 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  10. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  11. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  12. Stratospheric ozone, ultraviolet radiation and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, O.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that an overexposure to ultraviolet radiation is associated with a number of health risks such as an increased risk of cataracts and skin cancers. At a time when climate change is often blamed for all our environmental problems, what is the latest news about the stratospheric ozone layer and other factors controlling ultraviolet radiation at the surface of the Earth? Will the expected changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere and changes in our climate increase or decrease the risk for skin cancer? This article investigates the role of the various factors influencing ultraviolet radiation and presents the latest knowledge on the subject. (author)

  13. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps

    OpenAIRE

    Sliney, David H.; Gilbert, David W.; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315?400?nm), ?black-light,? electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV ?Black-light? ILTs were measured at...

  14. Some aspects of vacuum ultraviolet radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Damany, Nicole; Vodar, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Some Aspects of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics presents some data on the state of research in vacuum ultraviolet radiation in association with areas of physics. Organized into four parts, this book begins by elucidating the optical properties of solids in the vacuum ultraviolet region (v.u.v.), particularly the specific methods of determination of optical constants in v.u.v., the properties of metals, and those of ionic insulators. Part II deals with molecular spectroscopy, with emphasis on the spectra of diatomic and simple polyatomic molecules, paraffins, and condensed phases. Part III

  15. Stimulation of hair cells with ultraviolet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimzadeh, Julien B.; Fabella, Brian A.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Hair bundles are specialized organelles that transduce mechanical inputs into electrical outputs. To activate hair cells, physiologists have resorted to mechanical methods of hair-bundle stimulation. Here we describe a new method of hair-bundle stimulation, irradiation with ultraviolet light. A hair bundle illuminated by ultraviolet light rapidly moves towards its tall edge, a motion typically associated with excitatory stimulation. The motion disappears upon tip-link rupture and is associated with the opening of mechanotransduction channels. Hair bundles can be induced to move sinusoidally with oscillatory modulation of the stimulation power. We discuss the implications of ultraviolet stimulation as a novel hair-bundle stimulus.

  16. Three-dimensional polarization algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Sheppard, Colin J; Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    If light is focused or collected with a high numerical aperture lens, as may occur in imaging and optical encryption applications, polarization should be considered in three dimensions (3D). The matrix algebra of polarization behavior in 3D is discussed. It is useful to convert between the Mueller matrix and two different Hermitian matrices, representing an optical material or system, which are in the literature. Explicit transformation matrices for converting the column vector form of these different matrices are extended to the 3D case, where they are large (81×81) but can be generated using simple rules. It is found that there is some advantage in using a generalization of the Chandrasekhar phase matrix treatment, rather than that based on Gell-Mann matrices, as the resultant matrices are of simpler form and reduce to the two-dimensional case more easily. Explicit expressions are given for 3D complex field components in terms of Chandrasekhar-Stokes parameters.

  17. Workshop on polarized neutron filters and polarized pulsed neutron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shinichi

    2004-07-01

    The workshop was held in KEK by thirty-three participants on April 26, 2004. The polarized neutron filter method was only discussed. It consists of three parts; the first part was discussed on the polarized neutron methods, the second part on the polarized neutron experiments and the third on the pulse neutron spectrometer and polarized neutron experiments. The six papers were presented such as the polarized 3 He neutron spin filter, neutron polarization by proton polarized filter, soft master and neutron scattering, polarized neutron in solid physics, polarization experiments by chopper spectroscope and neutron polarization system in superHRPD. (S.Y.)

  18. Photodetector of ultra-violet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorogan, V.; Vieru, T.; Coseac, V.; Chirita, F.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to photodetectors on the semiconductors base, in particular, to photodetectors of ultra-violet radiation and can be used in the optoelectronics systems for determining the intensity and dose of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the Sun and other sources. In the structure of the photodetector of ultraviolet radiation with a superficial potential barrier formed of semiconductors A 3 B 5 with the prohibited power width Eg 1 , solid solutions thereof with the prohibited power width Eg 2 and SnO 2 or ITO, in the semiconductors A 3 B 5 at a surface distance less than the absorption length of the visible radiation it is formed an isotype heterojunction between the semiconductors A 3 B 5 and solid solutions thereof with the prohibited power width Eg 2 > Eg 1 . The technical result consists in manufacturing of a photodetector sensitive solely to the ultraviolet radiation

  19. Outdoor ultraviolet exposure of children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.; Gibson, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The weekday and weekend outdoor ultraviolet exposure of young people from primary and secondary schools in three geographically distinct regions of England was determined over a 3-month period in summer. Ultraviolet exposure was measured using personal film badges worn by each young person and time spent outdoors, in hourly intervals, assessed using exposure records. In each area a class of 9-10 year-old children from a primary school and a class of 14-15-year-old adolescents from a secondary school took part, giving a total of 180 subjects. We found that primary school children received higher outdoor ultraviolet exposure than young people in secondary schools, and geographical differences in exposure could not be accounted for solely by differences in ambient ultraviolet. There was little difference between the exposure of males and females. Children and adolescents did not behave as homogeneous groups with regard to exposure. (Author)

  20. Ultraviolet light - nature's own disinfection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munkeberg, T [Thorolf Gregersen a/s, Oslo (Norway)

    1978-05-18

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is the means by which natural pollution products, as well as much of the smaller amount of pollution products produced by man, are converted and returned to the cycle of nature. Artificial ultraviolet radiation offers an optimum method for the disinfection of drinking water and can be used in the long term without undesireable effects on man or the enviromment. There is no evidence that ultraviolet irradiation leads to radiation resistant mutations of bacteria. The geometrical arrangement of ultraviolet disinfection units is described and the capacities of typical units is mentioned as being 600-800 m/sup 3/ /hr, though there is no reason why this should not be increased.

  1. Ultraviolet light - nature's own disinfection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munkeberg, T.

    1978-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is the means by which natural pollution products, as well as much of the smaller amount of pollution products produced by man, are converted and returned to the cycle of nature. Artificial ultraviolet radiation offers an optimum method for the disinfection of drinking water and can be used in the long term without undesireable effects on man or the enviromment. There is no evidence that ultraviolet irradiation leads to radiation resistant mutations of bacteria. The geometrical arrangement of ultraviolet disinfection units is described and the capacities of typical units is mentioned as being 600-800 m 3 /hr, though there is no reason why this should not be increased. (JIW)

  2. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation

  3. Stability and Transient Effects in Ultraviolet Filaments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niday, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    .... Much of the work in this field has been done with infrared pulses; however, it has been proposed that ultraviolet pulses have the advantage that longer pulse lengths can be used, thereby delivering more energy...

  4. PMMA Wettability Caused by Ultraviolet Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dehtjars, J; Lancere, L; Poļaka, N; Soudnikovich, A; Tjuļkins, F; Valters, V

    2010-01-01

    The article is targeted to explore ultraviolet radiation (UV) influence on PMMAf or eye prostheses. UV beingt he Sun lightc omponenta nd could effect PMMA surface that in turn contributesi nteractionw ith tear. PMMA wettabilityw as poweredb y UV.

  5. Ultraviolet treatment on high performance filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Huang

    2005-01-01

    Quartz, Kevlar, carbon, and glass filaments were irradiated by ultraviolet ray with various periods. Tensile strength of the treated fibres was tested and analyzed, and the outward appearance of the treated filaments was shown

  6. Investigation on the separability of slums by multi-aspect TerraSAR-X dual-co-polarized high resolution spotlight images based on the multi-scale evaluation of local distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; Sieg, Tobias; Wurm, Michael; Taubenböck, Hannes

    2018-02-01

    Following recent advances in distinguishing settlements vs. non-settlement areas from latest SAR data, the question arises whether a further automatic intra-urban delineation and characterization of different structural types is possible. This paper studies the appearance of the structural type ;slums; in high resolution SAR images. Geocoded Kennaugh elements are used as backscatter information and Schmittlet indices as descriptor of local texture. Three cities with a significant share of slums (Cape Town, Manila, Mumbai) are chosen as test sites. These are imaged by TerraSAR-X in the dual-co-polarized high resolution spotlight mode in any available aspect angle. Representative distributions are estimated and fused by a robust approach. Our observations identify a high similarity of slums throughout all three test sites. The derived similarity maps are validated with reference data sets from visual interpretation and ground truth. The final validation strategy is based on completeness and correctness versus other classes in relation to the similarity. High accuracies (up to 87%) in identifying morphologic slums are reached for Cape Town. For Manila (up to 60%) and Mumbai (up to 54%), the distinction is more difficult due to their complex structural configuration. Concluding, high resolution SAR data can be suitable to automatically trace potential locations of slums. Polarimetric information and the incidence angle seem to have a negligible impact on the results whereas the intensity patterns and the passing direction of the satellite are playing a key role. Hence, the combination of intensity images (brightness) acquired from ascending and descending orbits together with Schmittlet indices (spatial pattern) promises best results. The transfer from the automatically recognized physical similarity to the semantic interpretation remains challenging.

  7. Determination of the polarization states of an arbitrary polarized terahertz beam: vectorial vortex analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Oikawa, Hiroki; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu; Yonemura, Motoki; Yoshizawa, Toru; Tyo, J Scott; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2015-03-24

    Vectorial vortex analysis is used to determine the polarization states of an arbitrarily polarized terahertz (0.1-1.6 THz) beam using THz achromatic axially symmetric wave (TAS) plates, which have a phase retardance of Δ = 163° and are made of polytetrafluorethylene. Polarized THz beams are converted into THz vectorial vortex beams with no spatial or wavelength dispersion, and the unknown polarization states of the incident THz beams are reconstructed. The polarization determination is also demonstrated at frequencies of 0.16 and 0.36 THz. The results obtained by solving the inverse source problem agree with the values used in the experiments. This vectorial vortex analysis enables a determination of the polarization states of the incident THz beam from the THz image. The polarization states of the beams are estimated after they pass through the TAS plates. The results validate this new approach to polarization detection for intense THz sources. It could find application in such cutting edge areas of physics as nonlinear THz photonics and plasmon excitation, because TAS plates not only instantaneously elucidate the polarization of an enclosed THz beam but can also passively control THz vectorial vortex beams.

  8. Vacuum-Ultraviolet Photovoltaic Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Richeng; Ran, Junxue; Zhang, Zhaojun; Ji, Xu; Huang, Feng

    2018-01-23

    Over the past two decades, solar- and astrophysicists and material scientists have been researching and developing new-generation semiconductor-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detectors with low power consumption and small size for replacing traditional heavy and high-energy-consuming microchannel-detection systems, to study the formation and evolution of stars. However, the most desirable semiconductor-based VUV photovoltaic detector capable of achieving zero power consumption has not yet been achieved. With high-crystallinity multistep epitaxial grown AlN as a VUV-absorbing layer for photogenerated carriers and p-type graphene (with unexpected VUV transmittance >96%) as a transparent electrode to collect excited holes, we constructed a heterojunction device with photovoltaic detection for VUV light. The device exhibits an encouraging VUV photoresponse, high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and extremely fast tempera response (80 ns, 10 4 -10 6 times faster than that of the currently reported VUV photoconductive devices). This work has provided an idea for developing zero power consumption and integrated VUV photovoltaic detectors with ultrafast and high-sensitivity VUV detection capability, which not only allows future spacecraft to operate with longer service time and lower launching cost but also ensures an ultrafast evolution of interstellar objects.

  9. Human exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, J.H.; Matthes, R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is that part of the electromagnetic spectrum located between the softest ionizing radiation and visible radiation. The lower limit of 100 nm is equivalent to photon energies of 12.4 eV, which corresponds approximately to the limit for the production of ionization in biologically important materials. A historical subdividing of the UV-region takes some of the biological effects into account. In this arrangement the range 400-315 nm, the so-called black light region, is called UV-A. In this wavelength region, fluorescence can be induced in many substances. UV-B covers the range 315-280 nm (the skin erythemal region). Most of the biologically active and potentially harmful UV from the sun reaching the surface of the earth is part of this spectral region. UV-C includes the radiation of wavelengths less than 280 nm (the germicidal region). It should be noted that this classification is somewhat arbitrary, and today it is more usual to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the whole UV-range from 200 to 400 nm

  10. Unintentional exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliney, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the risks from unintentional exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), and to consider hazard control regulation, one must face first the problem of their state of scientific knowledge and the public's perception of UVR. Few people in the general public would question the health benefits of sunlight. Many flock to the beaches each summer to develop a healthy tan. Since the 1920's scientists have recognized that most of the benefits--and risks--of sunlight exposure result from the UVR present in sunlight. Dermatologists warn sunbathers to avoid exposure or protect themselves against the intense midday UVR or risk skin cancer. A growing number of scientists warn of hazards to the eye if UVR--perhaps even shorter visible wavelengths--are not filtered by lenses. In addition to any intentional exposure for health or cosmetic purposes, many people are also exposed to UVR without being aware of it or without their intent to be exposed. Outdoor workers are exposed to sunlight, many industrial workers (e.g., welders) are exposed to UVR from arc sources, some UVR penetrates clothing, and people indoors are exposed to UVR from artificial lighting

  11. Dermal damage from ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligman, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is increasingly recognized as the cause of a vast number of changes in the skin of humans and animals. These include alterations at the molecular, cellular, tissue and systematic levels. In the recent past, much has been learned about the immediate effects in skin of acute UV exposure (i.e. sunburn) with its epidermal cell death, inflammation and vasolidation. With chronic exposure, many of the clinical and histologic effects can be seen only after decades. Visually, these are hyper- and hypopigmented macules, dry scaly, wrinkled skin with a variety of benign, pre-malignant and malignant neoplasms. All epidermal in origin, they lead, inexorably in humans, to the appearance the authors described as photo-aged. Underlying many of these visible manifestations are drastic changes in the dermis. These relate chiefly to destruction of mature collagen, with a compensatory overproduction of reticulin fibers, hyperplasia of elastic fibers eventuating in elastosis, increased levels of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) comprising the ground substance and changes in the microvasculature. First described in actinically damaged humans, systematic investigation required an animal model

  12. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y.

    1998-01-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed

  13. Ultraviolet complete dark energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Gaurav; Li, Tianjun

    2018-04-01

    We consider a local phenomenological model to explain a nonlocal gravity scenario which has been proposed to address dark energy issues. This nonlocal gravity action has been seen to fit the data as well as Λ -CDM and therefore demands a more fundamental local treatment. The induced gravity model coupled with higher-derivative gravity is exploited for this proposal, as this perturbatively renormalizable model has a well-defined ultraviolet (UV) description where ghosts are evaded. We consider a generalized version of this model where we consider two coupled scalar fields and their nonminimal coupling with gravity. In this simple model, one of the scalar field acquires a vacuum expectation value (VEV), thereby inducing a mass for one of the scalar fields and generating Newton's constant. The induced mass however is seen to be always above the running energy scale thereby leading to its decoupling. The residual theory after decoupling becomes a platform for driving the accelerated expansion under certain conditions. Integrating out the residual scalar generates a nonlocal gravity action. The leading term of which is the nonlocal gravity action used to fit the data of dark energy.

  14. Influence of near ultraviolet light on microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.A.; Rubin, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    Our results and the recent literature data on the biological action of near ultraviolet light (300-380 nm) are examined in the review. Factual material is presented on the principles governing the manifestation of the following effects of near ultraviolet light in microorganisms: inactivation, delayed growth, photoreactivation, photoprotection, photoinduced sporulation (in fungi), and carotene synthesis. The mature and possible mechanisms of the effects examined are discussed

  15. Ultraviolet colors of subdwarf O stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesselius, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    The group of subdwarf O stars consisting of field stars and some central stars of old planetary nebulae does occupy an interesting place in the HR diagram. Greenstein and Sargent (1974) have tried to establish this place, and conclude that especially the hottest ones need ultraviolet data to improve the values of effective temperature and absolute luminosity. The author therefore observed some twenty sdO stars in the far ultraviolet using the spectrophotometer in the Netherlands' satellite ANS. (Auth.)

  16. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  17. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of transient species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw, D.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    Transient species are studied in the isolation of the gas phase using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). A description of the equipment used and a discussion of some theoretical topics, which play a role in the interpretation of PE spectra, are given. Koopmans' theorem, Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) calculations and the sum rule are discussed. A versatile ultraviolet PE spectrometer, designed specifically for this purpose, has been built and the construction and performance of this instrument are described. (Auth.)

  18. Ultraviolet Behavior of N = 8 Supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Lance J.

    2010-01-01

    In these lectures the author describes the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of N = 8 supergravity, which through four loops is no worse than that of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory (a finite theory). I also explain the computational tools that allow multi-loop amplitudes to be evaluated in this theory - the KLT relations and the unitarity method - and sketch how ultraviolet divergences are extracted from the amplitudes.

  19. Polarization control of high order harmonics in the EUV photon energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodungbo, Boris; Barszczak Sardinha, Anna; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Valentin, Constance; Lozano, Magali; Iaquaniello, Grégory; Delmotte, Franck; Sebban, Stéphane; Lüning, Jan; Zeitoun, Philippe

    2011-02-28

    We report the generation of circularly polarized high order harmonics in the extreme ultraviolet range (18-27 nm) from a linearly polarized infrared laser (40 fs, 0.25 TW) focused into a neon filled gas cell. To circularly polarize the initially linearly polarized harmonics we have implemented a four-reflector phase-shifter. Fully circularly polarized radiation has been obtained with an efficiency of a few percents, thus being significantly more efficient than currently demonstrated direct generation of elliptically polarized harmonics. This demonstration opens up new experimental capabilities based on high order harmonics, for example, in biology and materials science. The inherent femtosecond time resolution of high order harmonic generating table top laser sources renders these an ideal tool for the investigation of ultrafast magnetization dynamics now that the magnetic circular dichroism at the absorption M-edges of transition metals can be exploited.

  20. Biological Studies with Laser-Polarized ^129Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C. H.; Oteiza, E. R.; Wong, G. A.; Walsworth, R. L.; Albert, M. S.; Nascimben, L.; Peled, S.; Sakai, K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    1996-05-01

    We have studied several biological systems using laser-polarized ^129Xe. In certain tissues magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using inhaled laser-polarized noble gases may provide images superior to those from conventional proton MRI. High resolution laser-polarized ^3He images of air spaces in the human lung were recently obtained by the Princeton/Duke group. However, ^3He is not very soluble in tissue. Therefore, we are using laser polarized ^129Xe (tissue-soluble), with the long term goal of biomedical functional imaging. We have investigated multi-echo and multi-excitation magnetic resonance detection schemes to exploit the highly non-thermal ^129Xe magnetization produced by the laser polarization technique. We have inhalated live rats with laser-polarized ^129Xe gas and measured three distinct ^129Xe tissue resonances that last 20 to 40 sec. As a demonstration, we obtained a laser polarized ^129Xe image of the human oral cavity. Currently we are measuring the polarization lifetime of ^129Xe dissolved in human blood, the biological transporting medium. These studies and other recent developments will be reported.