WorldWideScience

Sample records for polar region construction

  1. Constructing Regional advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asheim, Bjørn T.; Boschma, Ron; Cooke, Phil

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a regional innovation policy model based on the idea of constructing regional advantage. This policy model brings together concepts like related variety, knowledge bases and policy platforms. Related variety attaches importance to knowledge spillovers across complementary sect...... economic development within and between regions in action lines appropriate to incorporate the basic principles behind related variety and differentiated knowledge bases.......This paper presents a regional innovation policy model based on the idea of constructing regional advantage. This policy model brings together concepts like related variety, knowledge bases and policy platforms. Related variety attaches importance to knowledge spillovers across complementary...

  2. Sustainable construction in remote cold regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this project was to identify sustainable construction techniques appropriate for remote and cold regions, some of which apply to : operations and maintenance as well. The vast body of literature regarding green construction in warm region...

  3. Environmental impact on the polar regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, D.A.; Leighton, E.; Tumeo, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The remote and frigid polar regions are no longer isolated from the activities, pollutants, and controversies that bedevil their more temperate neighbors, say three researchers at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. For example, Daniel A. Jaffe, Elizabeth Leighton, and Mark A. Tumeo point to traces of DDT, PCBs, and heavy metals that routinely turn up in arctic marine mammals and to the ozone hole over the Antarctic. While similar in environmental makeup, the arctic and Antarctic are poles apart in their political structure and, thus, in their environmental exposure, the researchers note. The Antarctic is managed under a long-standing international treaty, while the arctic is sovereign territory to eight separate nations. The international treaty sets aside the Antarctic for peaceful scientific research within strict environmental boundaries. It bans both military activity and minerals extraction-the two activities that have caused the most damage in the arctic. The main threats to Antarctica's environment come from the intrusion of major scientific research operations and the growing tourism industry. On the other hand, the arctic suffered from the massive Cold War military buildup by both the United States and the former Soviet Union. The environmental residue from that buildup is only now being revealed, the authors say. Major oil and gas drilling and coal and metal-ore mining also have taken a huge environmental toll, they add

  4. Satellite Data Sets in the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have generated about two decades of consistently derived geophysical parameters in the polar regions. The key parameters are sea ice concentration, surface temperature, albedo, and cloud cover statistics. Sea ice concentrations were derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data and the Special Scanning Cl Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data from several platforms using the enhanced Bootstrap Algorithm for the period 1978 through 1999. The new algorithm reduces the errors associated with spatial and temporal variations in the emissivity and surface temperatures of sea ice. Also, bad data at ocean/land interfaces are identified and deleted in an unsupervised manner. Surface ice temperature, albedo and cloud cover statistics are derived simultaneously from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data from 1981 through 1999 and mapped at a higher resolution but the same format as the ice concentration data. The technique makes use these co-registered ice concentration maps to enable cloud masking to be done separately for open ocean, sea ice and land areas. The effect of inversion is minimized by taking into consideration the expected changes in the effect of inversion with altitude, especially in the Antarctic. A technique for ice type regional classification has also been developed using multichannel cluster analysis and a neural network. This provide a means to identify large areas of thin ice, first year ice, and older ice types. The data sets have been shown to be coherent with each other and provide a powerful tool for in depth studies of the currently changing Arctic and Antarctic environment.

  5. Aerosol Remote Sensing in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness tau(lambda) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent alpha were calculated. Analyzing these data, the monthly mean values of tau(0.50 micrometers) and alpha and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter-spring and summer-autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of alpha versus tau(0.50 micrometers) showed: (i) a considerable increase in tau(0.50 micrometers) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter-spring, without marked changes in alpha; and (ii) a marked increase in tau(0.50 micrometer) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas alpha decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of tau(lambda) and alpha at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterize vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of tau(lambda) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were

  6. Biological Rhythms During Residence in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 × 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with “normal” working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75°S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within

  7. Adapting the HSV polarization-color mapping for regions with low irradiance and high polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Tyo, J; Ratliff, Bradley M; Alenin, Andrey S

    2016-10-15

    Many mappings from polarization into color have been developed so that polarization information can be displayed. One of the most common of these maps the angle of linear polarization into color hue and degree of linear polarization into color saturation, while preserving the irradiance information from the polarization data. While this strategy enjoys wide popularity, there is a large class of polarization images for which it is not ideal. It is common to have images where the strongest polarization signatures (in terms of degree of polarization) occur in regions of relatively low irradiance: either in shadow in reflective bands or in cold regions in emissive bands. Since the irradiance is low, the chromatic properties of the resulting images are generally not apparent. Here we present an alternate mapping that uses the statistics of the angle of polarization as a measure of confidence in the polarization signature, then amplifies the irradiance in regions of high confidence, and leaves it unchanged in regions of low confidence. Results are shown from an LWIR and a visible spectrum imager.

  8. Regions – between History and Social Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakk Miklós

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to give a comprehensive explanation on how regional construction took place in the European history related to the state-building processes and how the historical heritage of the European state-construction influences today the social construction of the regions. With regard to the state-building processes, the study started from Hechter’s model of ‘primary’ and ‘secondary’ state and his interpretation on the relationship between core regions and peripheries. This model operates with the centralizing power of the state, but from the last decades of the 20th century it was proved via the ‘new regionalism’ that social construction processes became more relevant in shaping new subnational regions. This last aspect is described by Paasi, and the study argues for a new concept of regional identity as a territorial ‘product’ of interacting governance and local society.

  9. Hydrogen Distribution in the Lunar Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Bakhtin, B. N.; Bodnarik, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Harshmann, K.; Fedosov, F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a method of conversion of the lunar neutron counting rate measured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument collimated neutron detectors, to water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) in the top approximately 1 m layer of lunar regolith. Polar maps of the Moon’s inferred hydrogen abundance are presented and discussed.

  10. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. A growing body of evidence suggests that some, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. The inner AGN components cannot be spatially resolved with current instruments and must be studied by numerical simulations of observed spectroscopy and polarization data. Aims: We run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We obtain geometry-sensitive polarization spectra and images to improve our previous AGN models and their comparison with the observations. Methods: We use the latest public version 1.2 of the Monte Carlo code stokes presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate the importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. Results: In comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectra and show a decrease in the net polarization percentage at all lines of sight. The resulting polarization position angle depends on the morphology of the clumpy structure, with extended tori favoring parallel polarization while compact tori produce orthogonal polarization position angles. In the case of polar scattering regions, fragmentation increases the net polarization unless the cloud filling factor is small. A complete AGN model constructed from the individual, fragmented regions can produce low polarization percentages (<2%), with a parallel polarization angle for observer inclinations up to 70° for a torus half opening angle of 60°. For

  11. Advancing Environmental Prediction Capabilities for the Polar Regions and Beyond during The Year of Polar Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kirstin; Goessling, Helge; Hoke, Winfried; Kirchhoff, Katharina; Jung, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Environmental changes in polar regions open up new opportunities for economic and societal operations such as vessel traffic related to scientific, fishery and tourism activities, and in the case of the Arctic also enhanced resource development. The availability of current and accurate weather and environmental information and forecasts will therefore play an increasingly important role in aiding risk reduction and safety management around the poles. The Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) has been established by the World Meteorological Organization's World Weather Research Programme as the key activity of the ten-year Polar Prediction Project (PPP; see more on www.polarprediction.net). YOPP is an internationally coordinated initiative to significantly advance our environmental prediction capabilities for the polar regions and beyond, supporting improved weather and climate services. Scheduled to take place from mid-2017 to mid-2019, the YOPP core phase covers an extended period of intensive observing, modelling, prediction, verification, user-engagement and education activities in the Arctic and Antarctic, on a wide range of time scales from hours to seasons. The Year of Polar Prediction will entail periods of enhanced observational and modelling campaigns in both polar regions. With the purpose to close the gaps in the conventional polar observing systems in regions where the observation network is sparse, routine observations will be enhanced during Special Observing Periods for an extended period of time (several weeks) during YOPP. This will allow carrying out subsequent forecasting system experiments aimed at optimizing observing systems in the polar regions and providing insight into the impact of better polar observations on forecast skills in lower latitudes. With various activities and the involvement of a wide range of stakeholders, YOPP will contribute to the knowledge base needed to managing the opportunities and risks that come with polar climate change.

  12. Construction and performance of BL28 of the Photon Factory for circularly polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagoshima, Y.; Muto, S.; Miyahara, T.; Koide, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Kitamura, H.

    1992-01-01

    A branch beamline, BL28A, has been constructed for the application of circularly polarized vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The radiation can be obtained in the helical undulator operation mode of an insertion device, EMPW number-sign 28, which is also cut for elliptically polarized hard x-ray radiation. T first harmonic of the helical undulator radiation can be tuned from 40 to 350 eV with its corresponding K value from 3 to 0.2. A monochromator working basically with constant deviation optics was installed, and has started its operation. A circularly polarized flux of ∼10 10 photons/s has been achieved with energy resolution of around 500--1000 at the first harmonic peak. The circular polarization after the monochromator was estimated to be higher than 70% by comparing theory and experiment on the magnetic circular dichroism of nickel films in the 3p-3d excitation region. The design philosophy of the beamline and recent results on the performance tests are presented

  13. Regional approaches in high-rise construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconopisceva, O. G.; Proskurin, G. A.

    2018-03-01

    The evolutionary process of high-rise construction is in the article focus. The aim of the study was to create a retrospective matrix reflecting the tasks of the study such as: structuring the most iconic high-rise objects within historic boundaries. The study is based on contemporary experience of high-rise construction in different countries. The main directions and regional specifics in the field of high-rise construction as well as factors influencing the further evolution process are analyzed. The main changes in architectural stylistics, form-building, constructive solutions that focus on the principles of energy efficiency and bio positivity of "sustainable buildings", as well as the search for a new typology are noted. The most universal constructive methods and solutions that turned out to be particularly popular are generalized. The new typology of high-rises and individual approach to urban context are noted. The results of the study as a graphical scheme made it possible to represent the whole high-rise evolution. The new spatial forms of high-rises lead them to new role within the urban environments. Futuristic hyperscalable concepts take the autonomous urban space functions itself and demonstrate us how high-rises can replace multifunctional urban fabric, developing it inside their shells.

  14. CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES ON THE BOSPORUS REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yazicioglu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Bosporus is a unique place with its traditional architecture. The construction of new buildings along the Bosporus coast line are forbidden and only reconstructions of demolished original historic buildings are possible. Since 1984 legal authorities act different legislations about these reconstructions. Until 2005 the legislation gives permission for the usage of any structural material unless the overall appearance is the same as the original building. But after 2005 the legislation changed and the usage of original structural material became mandatory. The underlying reason of this is to protect the originality and authenticity of the Bosporus buildings both with their appearances and construction techniques. But the practical output became promoting the constructers for making the reconstructions without following the approved reconstruction projects or changing the reconstructions afterwards. In this paper structural system, external wall, window, and roof alternatives for reconstructions are compared and contrasted by evaluating the performance requirements. Examples of inappropriate reconstructions are documented and a tentative proposal is made for the reconstructions of the Bosporus region.

  15. Cloud morphology and dynamics in Saturn's northern polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antuñano, Arrate; del Río-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of the cloud morphology and motions in the north polar region of Saturn, from latitude ∼ 70°N to the pole based on Cassini ISS images obtained between January 2009 and November 2014. This region shows a variety of dynamical structures: the permanent hexagon wave and its intense eastward jet, a large field of permanent ;puffy; clouds with scales from 10 - 500 km, probably of convective origin, local cyclone and anticyclones vortices with sizes of ∼1,000 km embedded in this field, and finally the intense cyclonic polar vortex. We report changes in the albedo of the clouds that delineate rings of circulation around the polar vortex and the presence of ;plume-like; activity in the hexagon jet, in both cases not accompanied with significant variations in the corresponding jets. No meridional migration is observed in the clouds forming and merging in the field of puffy clouds, suggesting that their mergers do not contribute to the maintenance of the polar vortex. Finally, we analyze the dominant growing modes for barotropic and baroclinic instabilities in the hexagon jet, showing that a mode 6 barotropic instability is dominant at the latitude of the hexagon.

  16. Illumination Conditions of the Lunar Polar Regions Using LOLA Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Torrence, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    We use high-resolution altimetry data obtained by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to characterize present illumination conditions in the polar regions of the Moon. Compared to previous studies, both the spatial and temporal extent of the simulations are increased significantly, as well as the coverage (fill ratio) of the topographic maps used, thanks to the 28 Hz firing rate of the five-beam instrument. We determine the horizon elevation in a number of directions based on 240 m-resolution polar digital elevation models reaching down to 75 latitude. The illumination of both polar regions extending to 80 can be calculated for any geometry from those horizon longitudinal profiles. We validated our modeling with recent Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide-Angle Camera images. We assessed the extent of permanently shadowed regions (PSRs, defined as areas that never receive direct solar illumination), and obtained total areas generally larger than previous studies (12,866 and 16,055 km2, in the north and south respectively). We extended our direct illumination model to account for singly-scattered light, and found that every PSR does receive some amount of scattered light during the year. We conducted simulations over long periods (several 18.6-years lunar precession cycles) with a high temporal resolution (6 h), and identified the most illuminated locations in the vicinity of both poles. Because of the importance of those sites for exploration and engineering considerations, we characterized their illumination more precisely over the near future. Every year, a location near the Shackleton crater rim in the south polar region is sunlit continuously for 240 days, and its longest continuous period in total darkness is about 1.5 days. For some locations small height gains ( 10 m) can dramatically improve their average illumination and reduce the night duration, rendering some of those particularly attractive energy-wise as

  17. DVCS in the fragmentation region of polarized electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akushevich, I.; Kuraev, E.A.; Nikolaev, N.N.

    2000-01-01

    For the kinematical region when a hard photon is emitted predominantly close to the direction of motion of a longitudinally polarized initial electron and relatively small momentum transfer to a proton we calculate the azimuthal asymmetry of a photon emission. It arises from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude and those which are described by a heavy photon impact factor. The azimuthal asymmetry does not decrease in the limit of infinite cms energy. The lowest order expression for the impact factor of a heavy photon is presented

  18. Radiative Forcing from Emissivity Response in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.; Feldman, D.; Huang, X.; Flanner, M.; Chen, X.; Yang, P.; Kuo, C.

    2016-12-01

    A detailed assessment of the radiative balance and its controlling factors in polar regions is a critical prerequisite for understanding and predicting the polar amplification of climate change. Accordingly, we investigate the role of infrared surface emissivity in polar regions as a potential feedback mechanism following Feldman et al, 2014. In this work, we investigate the climatic response of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with spectral emissivity values that are implemented in a physically consistent manner for non-vegetated surfaces. In a control model run where 1850 CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr) is fixed, the updated spectral emissivity values are imposed for modified surface boundary conditions in the atmospheric model component. Climatic stability in the emergent globally averaged surface temperature is observed on decadal scales for an unforced (control) run. Analytic kernels representing the change in top of the atmosphere OLR given changes in emissivity are calculated on-line during the model runs, incorporating spatially and temporally varied humidity profiles impactful to transmission. Globally averaged kernels of the sensitivity of OLR to surface emissivity calculated for control and ramped CO2 runs exhibit temporal evolution with statistically significant differences in shape. Additionally, kernel and spectrally-averaged emissivity differences between monthly-averaged maps of control and ramped runs demonstrate a seasonal cycle. Similar to the treatment of cryosphere radiative forcing in Flanner et al, 2011, we define emissivity response as the product of the emissivity kernel and the change in month-to-month emissivity. At the end of 20th century, the 10-year emissivity forcing averaged at latitudes > 60°, is found to be negative (positive) in January (July), due to increasing (decreasing) sea-ice. These findings indicate that differences in surface emissivity between frozen and unfrozen surfaces decrease wintertime and increase summertime

  19. Preserving Geological Samples and Metadata from Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, A.; Sjunneskog, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Office of Polar Programs at the National Science Foundation (NSF-OPP) has long recognized the value of preserving earth science collections due to the inherent logistical challenges and financial costs of collecting geological samples from Polar Regions. NSF-OPP established two national facilities to make Antarctic geological samples and drill cores openly and freely available for research. The Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility (AMGRF) at Florida State University was established in 1963 and archives Antarctic marine sediment cores, dredge samples and smear slides along with ship logs. The United States Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) at Ohio State University was established in 2003 and archives polar rock samples, marine dredges, unconsolidated materials and terrestrial cores, along with associated materials such as field notes, maps, raw analytical data, paleomagnetic cores, thin sections, microfossil mounts, microslides and residues. The existence of the AMGRF and USPRR helps to minimize redundant sample collecting, lessen the environmental impact of doing polar field work, facilitates field logistics planning and complies with the data sharing requirement of the Antarctic Treaty. USPRR acquires collections through donations from institutions and scientists and then makes these samples available as no-cost loans for research, education and museum exhibits. The AMGRF acquires sediment cores from US based and international collaboration drilling projects in Antarctica. Destructive research techniques are allowed on the loaned samples and loan requests are accepted from any accredited scientific institution in the world. Currently, the USPRR has more than 22,000 cataloged rock samples available to scientists from around the world. All cataloged samples are relabeled with a USPRR number, weighed, photographed and measured for magnetic susceptibility. Many aspects of the sample metadata are included in the database, e.g. geographical location, sample

  20. An assessment of ten ocean reanalyses in the polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uotila, Petteri

    2017-04-01

    Ocean reanalysis (ORA) combines observations either statistically or with a hydrodynamical model, to reconstruct historical changes in the ocean. Global and regional ORA products are increasingly used in polar research, but their quality remains to be systematically assessed. To address this, the Polar ORA Intercomparison Project (PORA-IP) has been established following on from the ORA-IP project (Balmaseda et al. 2015, with other papers in a special issue of Climate Dynamics). The PORA-IP is constituted under the COST EOS initiative with plans to review reanalyses products in both the Arctic and Antarctic, and is endorsed by YOPP - the Year of Polar Prediction project. Currently, the PORA-IP team consists of 21 researchers from 15 institutes and universities. The ORA-IP products with polar physics, such as sea ice, have been updated where necessary and collected in a public database. In addition to model output, available observational polar climatologies are collected and used in the assessments. Due to the extensive variety of products, this database should become a valuable resource outside the PORA-IP community. For a comprehensive evaluation of the ten ORA products (CGLORSv5, ECDA3.1, GECCO2, Glorys2v4, GloSea5_GO5, MOVEG2i, ORAP5, SODA3.3.1, TOPAZ4 and UR025.4) in the Arctic and Southern Oceans several specific diagnostics are assessed. The PORA-IP diagnostics target the following topics: hydrography; heat, salinity and freshwater content; ocean transports and surface currents; mixed layer depth; sea-ice concentration and thickness; and snow thickness over sea ice. Based on these diagnostics, ORA product biases against observed data and their mutual spread are quantified, and possible reasons for discrepancies discussed. So far, we have identified product outliers and evaluated the multi-model mean. We have identified the importance of the atmospheric forcing, air-ocean coupling protocol and sea-ice data assimilation for the product performance. Moreover, we

  1. Vortex chain formation in regions of ion concentration polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Srinivas; Diez, Francisco J

    2015-09-07

    The local vortical flow generated inside an ion concentration polarization (ICP) region is evaluated experimentally. The ICP is induced by a patterned nanoporous self-assembling membrane integrated inside a single microchannel. A bottom-view image of the depletion region near the membrane revealed a primary vortex which results from the electric field amplification. A unique perspective of the flow is obtained by imaging the microchannel from its side. This visualization shows for the first time the formation of a chain of three vortices all rotating in the same direction in the depletion region. While observation of multiple vortices has been previously reported, it was in reference to counter rotating vortex pairs and not to the same direction of rotating vortex chain formation. A physical model is proposed which considers a two dimensionally varying concentration profile in the depletion region to account for the formation of multiple vortices rotating in the same direction. The fast rotating primary vortex changes the local concentration in regions adjacent to it, as the advection time scale is much higher than the diffusion time scale. Near the membrane, it moves the low concentration electrolyte from the bottom wall upwards into a higher concentration region. Away from the membrane, it moves the high concentration electrolyte from the middle of the channel downwards into a low concentration region. These local changes in the wall concentration result in a varying slip velocity capable of inducing a secondary vortex. Similarly, this secondary vortex can induce a tertiary one. A numerical simulation is performed using the proposed varying slip velocity model which showed excellent agreement with the experimental observations.

  2. Improved construction materials for polar regions using microcellular thermoplastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Microcellular polymer foams (MCF) are thermoplastic foams with very small cell diameters, less than 10 microns, and very large cell densities, 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 15) cells per cubic centimeter of unfoamed material. The concept of foaming polymers with microcellular voids was conceived to reduce the amount of material used for mass-produced items without compromising the mechanical properties. The reasoning behind this concept was that if voids smaller than the critical flaw size pre-existing in polymers were introduced into the matrix, they would not affect the overall strength of the product. MCF polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were examined to determine the effects of the microstructure towards the mechanical properties of the materials at room and arctic temperatures. Batch process parameters were discovered for these materials and foamed samples of three densities were produced for each material. To quantify the toughness and strength of these polymers, the tensile yield strength, tensile toughness, and impact resistance were measured at room and arctic temperatures. The feasibility of MCF polymers has been demonstrated by the consistent and repeatable MCF microstructures formed, but the improvements in the mechanical properties were not conclusive. Therefore the usefulness of the MCF polymers to replace other materials in arctic environments is questionable.

  3. Mars at Ls 53o: North Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    30 May 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 53o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 53o occurred in mid-May 2006. The picture shows the north polar region of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  4. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  5. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Hernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST showed different sequence types (STs, previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  6. Thermospheric density structures over the polar regions observed with CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schlegel

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the unexpected detection of considerable structure in high latitude thermospheric densities, as derived from an accelerometer onboard the CHAMP satellite. The width of the structures, which can either be maxima or minima, varies between a few hundred km and 2000 km. The amplitudes of these density extrema can reach 50% of ambient. Maxima cluster around 75° (N and S, while minima are found closer to the poles. In a magnetic latitude-magnetic local time frame the maxima are found mainly around the cusp region. Overall, the observed structures somewhat resemble so-called density cells previously found in model calculations. However the models generate their cells around 140–300 km altitude and show little, if any remnant at 400 km or above. This has to be contrasted with the fact that the CHAMP observations were obtained near 430 km altitude. We have explored Joule heating as a possible mechanism for the generation of the structures, at least in density enhancement regions, using Hall currents measured on CHAMP and simultaneous incoherent scatter measurements with EISCAT. However, the electric fields were usually quite small during the period of observation, making the quest for an explanation for the structures all the more challenging. Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Thermospheric dynamics – Magnetospheric physics (Polar cap phenomena – Atmospheric composition and structure (Pressure, density, and temperature

  7. Tropospheric ozone variations in polar regions; Troposphaerische Ozonvariationen in Polarregionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessel, S.

    1997-08-01

    An extensive analysis for the description of chemical and dynamical processes during tropospheric ozone minima in the Arctic and Antarctic was carried out in this work. One main task was the analysis of the source regions of tropospheric ozone destruction and the following transport of ozone depleted air masses to the measuring site. Furtheron the ozone destruction mechanism itself should be examined as well as the efficiency of heterogeneous reactions for the regeneration of non-reative bromine compounds, which seems to be necessary because bromine may be the key component in the destruction of tropospheric ozone in polar regions. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde eine umfangreiche Analyse zur Beschreibung der chemischen und dynamischen Prozesse waehrend troposphaerischer Ozonminima in der Arktis und Antarktis durchgefuehrt. Ziel war es, die Quellregion des Ozonabbaus sowie den ausloesenden ozonabbauenden Mechanismus zu benennen, die Effizienz heterogener Reaktionen zur Regenerierung nichtreaktiver Bromverbindungen waehrend des Ozonabbaus zu ermitteln und den Transport der ozonarmen Luftmassen zum Messort zu untersuchen. (orig./KW)

  8. Putting constructed regional advantage into Swedish practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, L.; Moodysson, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the pre-history and evolution of a regional innovation system initiative supporting activities at the intersection of traditional food production and modern biotechnology. Drawing on established ideas on the triple helix of industry, university and government and its

  9. Construction and characterization of a spin polarized helium ion beam for surface electronic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Ion neutralization and metastable de-excitation spectroscopy, INS and MDS, allow detailed analysis of the surface electronic configuration of metals. The orthodox application of these spectroscopies may be enhanced by electronic spin polarization of the probe beams. For this reason, a spin polarized helium ion beam has been constructed. The electronic spin of helium metastables created within an rf discharge may be spacially aligned by optically pumping the atoms. Subsequent collisions between metastables produce helium ions which retain the orientation of the electronic spin. Extracted ion polarization, although not directly measurable, may be estimated from extracted electron polarization, metastable polarization, pumping radiation absorption and current modulation measurements. Ions extracted from the optically pumped discharge exhibit an estimated polarization of about ten per cent at a beam current of a few tenths of a microampere. Extraction of helium ions from the discharge requires that the ions have a high kinetic energy. However, to avoid undesirable kinetic electron ejection from the target surface, the ions must be decelerated. Examination of various deceleration configurations, in paticular exponential and linear deceleration fields, and experimental observation indicate that a linear decelerating field produces the best low energy beam to the target surface

  10. Construction of the spin-polarized slow positron beam with the RI source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajyo, Terunobu; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Kanazawa, Ikuzo [Tokyo Gakugei Univ., Koganei (Japan); Komori, Fumio; Murata, Yoshimasa; Ito, Yasuo

    1997-03-01

    The electrostatic slow-positron beam is constructed by using {sup 22}Na source. We design the electrostatic lens, the system of the detector, and the Wien filter for the experiment`s system of the spin-polarized slow positron beam. The reemitted spin-polarized slow-positron spectroscopy is proposed for studying magnetic thin films and magnetic multilayers. We calculated the depolarized positron fractions in the Fe thin film Fe(10nm)/Cu(substrate) and the multilayers Cu(1nm)/Fe(10nm)/Cu(substrate). (author)

  11. South Polar Region of Mars: Topography and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The polar layered deposits of Mars represent potentially important volatile reservoirs and tracers for the planet's geologically recent climate history. Unlike the north polar cap, the uppermost surface of the bright residual south polar deposit is probably composed of carbon dioxide ice. It is unknown whether this ice extends through the entire thickness of the deposit. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL), launched in January 1999, is due to arrive in December 1999 to search for water and carbon dioxide on layered deposits near the south pole (SP) of Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. The Need for System Scale Studies in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzman, L. D.; Newman, D.

    2010-12-01

    The understanding of polar regions has advanced tremendously in the past two decades and much of the improved insight into our knowledge of environmental dynamics is due to multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary studies conducted by coordinated and collaborative research programs supported by national funding agencies. Although much remains to be learned with respect to component processes, many of the most urgent scientific, engineering and social questions can only be addressed through the broader perspective of studies on system scales in which these components are coupled to each other. Questions such as quantifying feedbacks, understanding the implications of sea ice loss to adjacent land areas or society, resolving future predictions of ecosystem evolution or population dynamics all require consideration of complex interactions and interdependent linkages among system components. Research that has identified physical controls on biological processes, or quantified impact/response relationships in physical and biological systems is critically important, and must be continued; however we are approaching a limitation in our ability to accurately project how the Arctic and the Antarctic will respond to a continued warming climate. Complex issues, such as developing accurate model algorithms of feedback processes require higher level synthesis of multiple component interactions. Several examples of important questions that may only be addressed through coupled complex systems analyses will be addressed.

  13. ICEPOD: A Multidisciplinary Imaging System for Application in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, C. J.; Frearson, N.

    2012-12-01

    The ICEPOD program is in it's third year of a five-year effort to develop a modular airborne ice imaging system mounted on New York Air National Guard (NYANG) LC-130 aircraft to map the surface and sub-surface topography of ice sheets, ice streams, outlet glaciers, ice-shelves and sea-ice for the NSF Major Research Instrumentation program. The project is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The fundamental goal of the ICEPOD program is to develop an instrumentation package that can capture the dynamics of the changing polar regions, focusing on ice, ice margins and ocean systems. To achieve this the instruments include a Scanning Lidar for precise measurements of the ice surface, Stereo photogrammetry from both a high sensitivity Infra-Red camera and a high resolution Visible Imaging camera to document the ice surface and temperature, sea-ice thickness imaging radar and a deep ice radar used to study interior and basal processes of glaciers, ice streams and ice-sheets. All instrument data sets will be time-tagged and geo-referenced by recording precision GPS satellite data. Aircraft orientation will be corrected using inertial measurement technology integrated into the pod. The vision is that this instrumentation will be operated both on routine flights of the NYANG in the polar regions, such as on missions between McMurdo and South Pole Station and on missions throughout Greenland, and on targeted science missions, from mapping sea ice in marginal ice zones and outlet glaciers such as those surrounding Ross Island or Greenland to quantifying large sub-glacial drainage systems in East Antarctica. Recent years have seen extreme changes in the Arctic. Particularly striking are changes within the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean, and especially in the seas north of the Alaskan coast. These areas have experienced record warming, reduced sea ice extent, and loss of ice in areas that had been ice-covered throughout human memory. Even the oldest and

  14. New space technology advances knowledge of the remote polar regions. [Arctic and Antarctic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The application of ERTS-1 imagery is rapidly increasing man's knowledge of polar regions. Products compiled from this imagery at scales of 1:250,000, 1:500,000 and 1:1,000,000 are already providing valuable information to earth scientists working in Antarctica. Significant finds detected by these bench mark products were glaciological changes, advancement in ice fronts, discovery of new geographic features, and the repositioning of nunataks, islands, and ice tongues. Tests conducted in Antarctica have proven the feasibility of tracking Navy navigation satellites to establish ground control for positioning ERTS-1 imagery in remote areas. ERTS imagery coupled with satellite geodesy shows great promise and may prove to be the most practical and cost effective way to meet the small-scale cartographic requirements of the polar science community.

  15. Wire-grid polarizer sheet in the terahertz region fabricated by nanoimprint technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Ichii, Akira; Morimoto, Isao; Hangyo, Masanori

    2011-07-15

    Wire-grid polarizer sheets in the terahertz region have been fabricated on flexible substrates by nanoimprint technology. They show an ideal polarization property in the terahertz frequency region, whereas the cost is very low. Since the wire pitch is far smaller than the wavelength, the effective medium theory agrees well with experimental results. The effective medium theory shows the possibility of further improvement of polarization properties by selecting appropriate materials for wire grids. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Some like it cold: microbial transformations of mercury in polar regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkay, Tamar; Kroer, Niels A.; Poulain, Alexandre J.

    2011-01-01

    The contamination of polar regions with mercury that is transported from lower latitudes as inorganic mercury has resulted in the accumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in food chains, risking the health of humans and wildlife. While production of MeHg has been documented in polar marine and terres......The contamination of polar regions with mercury that is transported from lower latitudes as inorganic mercury has resulted in the accumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in food chains, risking the health of humans and wildlife. While production of MeHg has been documented in polar marine...

  17. Protecting polar wilderness : Just a western philosophical idea or a useful concept for regulating human activities in the polar regions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastmeijer, Kees; Leary, D.; Koivurova, T.; Alfredsson, G.

    2009-01-01

    Governments involved in Arctic and Antarctic governance have been well aware of the increasing human pressure on the Polar Regions and particularly the last two decades many initiatives have been taken to protect the Arctic and Antarctic environment. But what values are to be protected? This paper

  18. Construction of non-polar mutants in Haemophilus influenzae using FLP recombinase technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Beth D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is a gram-negative bacterium that causes otitis media in children as well as other infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract in children and adults. We are employing genetic strategies to identify and characterize virulence determinants in NTHi. NTHi is naturally competent for transformation and thus construction of most mutants by common methodologies is relatively straightforward. However, new methodology was required in order to construct unmarked non-polar mutations in poorly expressed genes whose products are required for transformation. We have adapted the lambda red/FLP-recombinase-mediated strategy used in E. coli for use in NTHi. Results A cassette containing a spectinomycin resistance gene and an rpsL gene flanked by FRT sites was constructed. A PCR amplicon containing 50 base pairs of DNA homologous to the 5' and 3' ends of the gene to be disrupted and the cassette was generated, then recombineered into the target NTHi gene, cloned on a plasmid, using the lambda recombination proteins expressed in E. coli DY380. Thus, the gene of interest was replaced by the cassette. The construct was then transformed into a streptomycin resistant NTHi strain and mutants were selected on spectinomycin-containing growth media. A plasmid derived from pLS88 with a temperature sensitive replicon expressing the FLP recombinase gene under the control of the tet operator/repressor was constructed. This plasmid was electroporated into the NTHi mutant at the permissive temperature and FLP expression was induced using anhydrotetracycline. The recombinase recognizes the FRT sites and eliminates the antibiotic cassette by site-specific recombination, creating the unmarked non-polar mutation. The plasmid is cured by growth of cells at the restrictive temperature. Conclusion The products of the genes in the NTHi pilABCD operon are required for type IV pilus biogenesis and have a role in

  19. Workshop on the Polar Regions of Mars: Geology, Glaciology, and Climate History, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, S. M. (Editor); Howard, A. D. (Editor); Paterson, W. S. B. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers and abstract of papers presented at the workshop are presented. Some representative titles are as follows: Glaciation in Elysium; Orbital, rotational, and climatic interactions; Water on Mars; Rheology of water-silicate mixtures at low temperatures; Evolution of the Martian atmosphere (the role of polar caps); Is CO2 ice permanent; Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes; Mars observer radio science (MORS) observations in polar regions; and Wind transport near the poles of Mars (timescales of changes in deposition and erosion).

  20. Geologic history of the polar regions of Mars based on Mars Global survey data. I. Noachian and Hesperian Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.L.; Kolb, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    During the Noachian Period, the south polar region of Mars underwent intense cratering, construction of three groups of volcanoes, widespread contractional deformation, resurfacing of low areas, and local dissection of valley networks; no evidence for polar deposits, ice sheets, or glaciation is recognized. South polar Hesperian geology is broadly characterized by waning impacts, volcanism, and tectonism. Emplacement of the polar Dorsa Argentea Formation (DAF) occurred during the Hesperian Period. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter topographic data and Mars Orbiter Camera images elucidate stratigraphic, morphologic, and topographic relations, permitting the dividing of the DAF into eight members, which surround and underlie about half of the Amazonian south polar layered deposits. The lobate fronts and lack of typical volcanic-flow morphology of the six plains units indicate that they may be made up of debris flows. We think that these flows, tens of meters to 200 m thick, may have originated by the discharge of huge volumes of slurry fluidized by ground water or liquid CO2, perhaps triggered by local impacts, igneous activity, or basal melting beneath polar deposits. The cavi and rugged members include irregular depressions that penetrate the subsurface; some of the pits have raised rims. The depressions may have formed by collapse due to expulsion of subsurface material in which local explosive activity built up the raised rims. Further, smaller eruptions of volatile-rich material may have resulted in narrow, sinuous channel deposits within aggrading fine-grained unconsolidated material perhaps produced by gaseous discharge of subsurface volatiles; preferential erosion of the latter material could have produced the Dorsa Argentea-type ginuous ridges associated mainly with the DAF. Alternatively, the ridges may be eskers, but the lack of associated glacial and fluvial morphologies casts doubt on this interpretation. The knobby, degraded materials forming Scandia Colles

  1. Average thermospheric wind patterns over the polar regions, as observed by CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the CHAMP accelerometer are utilized to investigate the average thermospheric wind distribution in the polar regions at altitudes around 400 km. This study puts special emphasis on the seasonal differences in the wind patterns. For this purpose 131 days centered on the June solstice of 2003 are considered. Within that period CHAMP's orbit is precessing once through all local times. The cross-track wind estimates of all 2030 passes are used to construct mean wind vectors for 918 equal-area cells. These bin averages are presented in corrected geomagnetic coordinates. Both hemispheres are considered simultaneously providing summer and winter responses for the same prevailing geophysical conditions. The period under study is characterized by high magnetic activity (Kp=4− but moderate solar flux level (F10.7=124. Our analysis reveals clear wind features in the summer (Northern Hemisphere. Over the polar cap there is a fast day-to-night flow with mean speeds surpassing 600 m/s in the dawn sector. At auroral latitudes we find strong westward zonal winds on the dawn side. On the dusk side, however, an anti-cyclonic vortex is forming. The dawn/dusk asymmetry is attributed to the combined action of Coriolis and centrifugal forces. Along the auroral oval the sunward streaming plasma causes a stagnation of the day-to-night wind. This effect is particularly clear on the dusk side. On the dawn side it is evident only from midnight to 06:00 MLT. The winter (Southern Hemisphere reveals similar wind features, but they are less well ordered. The mean day-to-night wind over the polar cap is weaker by about 35%. Otherwise, the seasonal differences are mainly confined to the dayside (06:00–18:00 MLT. In addition, the larger offset between geographic and geomagnetic pole in the south also causes hemispheric differences of the thermospheric wind distribution.

  2. Average thermospheric wind patterns over the polar regions, as observed by CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the CHAMP accelerometer are utilized to investigate the average thermospheric wind distribution in the polar regions at altitudes around 400 km. This study puts special emphasis on the seasonal differences in the wind patterns. For this purpose 131 days centered on the June solstice of 2003 are considered. Within that period CHAMP's orbit is precessing once through all local times. The cross-track wind estimates of all 2030 passes are used to construct mean wind vectors for 918 equal-area cells. These bin averages are presented in corrected geomagnetic coordinates. Both hemispheres are considered simultaneously providing summer and winter responses for the same prevailing geophysical conditions. The period under study is characterized by high magnetic activity (Kp=4− but moderate solar flux level (F10.7=124. Our analysis reveals clear wind features in the summer (Northern Hemisphere. Over the polar cap there is a fast day-to-night flow with mean speeds surpassing 600 m/s in the dawn sector. At auroral latitudes we find strong westward zonal winds on the dawn side. On the dusk side, however, an anti-cyclonic vortex is forming. The dawn/dusk asymmetry is attributed to the combined action of Coriolis and centrifugal forces. Along the auroral oval the sunward streaming plasma causes a stagnation of the day-to-night wind. This effect is particularly clear on the dusk side. On the dawn side it is evident only from midnight to 06:00 MLT. The winter (Southern Hemisphere reveals similar wind features, but they are less well ordered. The mean day-to-night wind over the polar cap is weaker by about 35%. Otherwise, the seasonal differences are mainly confined to the dayside (06:00–18:00 MLT. In addition, the larger offset between geographic and geomagnetic pole in the south also causes hemispheric differences of the thermospheric wind distribution.

  3. The ionospheric impact on GPS performance in southern polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, C.-K.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D. A.; Arslan, N.; Willis, M.; Hothem, L.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to present the results of the study of the effects of varying ionospheric conditions on the GPS signal tracking in the southern polar region. In the first stage of this study, the data collected by the OSU/USGS team in October-November 2003 within the TAMDEF (Transantarctic Mountains Deformation) network were used together with some IGS Antarctic stations to study the effect of severe ionospheric storms on GPS hardware. Note that TAMDEF is a joint USGS/OSU project with the primary objective of measuring crustal motion in the Transantarctic Mountains of Southern Victoria Land using GPS techniques. This study included ten Antarctic stations equipped with different dual-frequency GPS hardware, and the data were evaluated for two 24-hour periods of severe ionospheric storm (2003/10/29) and moderate ionospheric conditions (minor storm of 2003/11/11). The results of this study were presented at the LAG Assembly in Cairns, Australia (Grejner-Brzezinska et al., 2005). Additional tests, in a more controlled environment, were carried out at the US Antarctic station, McMurdo, between January 10 and February 6, 2006, under varying ionospheric conditions, where several different types of receivers were connected to the same antenna located on the rooftop of the Crary Laboratory (the primary test site). In this scenario, each antenna was subject to identical ionospheric effects during each day of the test, and no spatial decorrelation effects were present, as seen in the previous study, due to the spatial separation of the receivers tested. It should be noted, however, that no moderate or severe ionospheric storms occurred during the experiment, so, unfortunately, this type of conditions was not tested here. The test was repeated with different receivers connected to different antenna types; a total of four 5-day sessions were carried out. The following receiver types were used at the primary site: Trimble 5700, Ashtech Z-Surveyor, JNS Euro

  4. Power spectra of mesospheric velocities in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowsky, P.; Ruster, R.

    1985-01-01

    The mobile SOUSY radar was operated on Andoya in Northern Norway during the MAP/WINE campaign from November 1983 to February 1984 and for about two weeks in June 1984 to study the seasonal dependence of mesospheric structures and dynamics at polar latitudes. During the winter period, measurements were carried out on 57 days, primarily in coordination with the schedule of the rocket experiments. Echoes were detected in the troposphere and stratosphere up to 30 km and at mesospheric heights from about 50 to 90 km with a distinct maximum around noon. In summer, the radar system was operated continuously from 19th to the 28th of June 1984. Echoes occurred almost for 24 hours in the height range from 70 to 95 km showing no recognizable diurnal variation. Similar observations in polar latitudes were carried out for several years with the Poker Flat Radar in Alaska.

  5. Possible recent and ancient glacial ice flow in the south polar region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.

    Martian polar science began almost as soon as small telescopes were trained on the planet. The seasonal expansion and contraction of the polar caps and their high albedoes led most astronomers to think that water ice is the dominant constituent. In 1911 Lowell perceived a bluish band around the retreating edge of the polar caps, and interpreted it as water from melting polar ice and seasonal snow. An alternative idea in his time was that the polar caps consist of frozen carbonic acid. Lowell rejected the carbonic acid hypothesis on account of his blue band. He also pointed out that carbonic acid would sublimate rather than melt at confining pressures near and below one bar, hence, carbonic acid could not account for the blue band. In comparing Lowell's theories with today's knowledge, it is recognized that (1) sublimation is mainly responsible for the growth and contraction of Mars' polar caps, (2) carbon dioxide is a major component of the southern polar cap, and (3) Lowell's blue band was probably seasonal dust and/or clouds. Geomorphic evidence that glacial ice and glacial melt waters once flowed over broad areas of the southern polar region. Two aspects of the south polar region suggest possible glacial processes during two distinct eras in Mars' history.

  6. Blind polarization demultiplexing by constructing a cost function for coherent optical PDM-OFDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenming; Chen, Minghua; Chen, Hongwei; Yi, Xingwen; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-07-13

    We propose a training symbols-free polarization demultiplexing method by constructing a cost function (CCF-PDM) for coherent optical PDM-OFDM. This method is applicable for high-speed, wide-bandwidth OFDM signals, different subcarrier modulation formats and long-haul transmission. It shows comparable performance with that of conventional method but without overhead and converges fast. Since the neighboring subcarriers experience similar polarization effects, we set the initial matrix parameters by the neighboring subcarrier to reduce the number of iteration for the gradient algorithm and prevent swapping the data of the two orthogonal polarizations. We verify this method in experiment by transmitting 66.6-Gb/s PDM-OFDM signal with 4QAM subcarrier modulation over 5440 km SSMF and 133.3-Gb/s PDM-OFDM signal with 16QAM subcarrier modulation over 960 km SSMF respectively. We compare its performance with that of training symbols. We also analyze the convergence speed of this method.

  7. Phytoremediation of disturbed lands in Polar Regions of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsutdinova, Evgeniya

    2017-04-01

    its effectiveness in quarries and construction materials in the vicinity of Syktyvkar. In the course of practical activities carried out in the area of Monchegorsk, on the copper-Nickel plant, the possibility of using willow for remediation of metal contaminated land is also being discussed, as this plant is efficient for phytoextraction. For land reclamation along the pipeline messoyakha-Noril'sk in the region of the drilling rigs on the Taimyr Peninsula and industrial tailings of the Norilsk industrial district, it is recommended to use the red and sheep fescue, Alpine and meadow bluegrass, arctophila reddish, meadow foxtail. In biological recultivation of disturbed territories on the Yamal Peninsula to accelerate the growth and development of plants peat textiles with sowing of red and meadow fescue, awnless brome, timothy grass, couch grass, kentucky bluegrass, beckman's grass were used. The technology of phytoremediation is widely used in Alaska. For recultivation of zinc mines in Northwest Alaska glaucous spear grass, blue joint grass, slough grass were used. The positive effect of Alaska red fescue and ryegrass multiflorous on degradation of hydrocarbons in contaminated soils was also studied. To clean the territory of Alaska from the polychlorinated biphenyls arctic willow and spruce were used.

  8. Verification of global numerical weather forecasting systems in polar regions using TIGGE data

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Thomas; Matsueda, Mio

    2016-01-01

    High-latitude climate change is expected to increase the demand for reliable weather and environmental forecasts in polar regions. In this study, a quantitative assessment of the skill of state-of-the-art global weather prediction systems in polar regions is given using data from the THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) for the period 2006/2007 – 2012/2013. Forecast skill in the Arctic is comparable to that found in the North- ern Hemisphere ...

  9. Constructing regional advantage: platform policies based on related variety and differentiated knowledge bases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asheim, B.T.; Boschma, R.A.; Cooke, P.

    2011-01-01

    Constructing regional advantage: platform policies based on related variety and differentiated knowledge bases, Regional Studies. This paper presents a regional innovation policy model based on the idea of constructing regional advantage. This policy model brings together concepts like related

  10. Characterization of the Morphometry of Impact Craters Hosting Polar Deposits in Mercury's North Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpe Matthieu; Zuber, Maria T.; Yang, Di; Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Mazarico, Erwan; Vilas, Faith

    2012-01-01

    Earth-based radar images of Mercury show radar-bright material inside impact craters near the planet s poles. A previous study indicated that the polar-deposit-hosting craters (PDCs) at Mercury s north pole are shallower than craters that lack such deposits. We use data acquired by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MESSENGER spacecraft during 11 months of orbital observations to revisit the depths of craters at high northern latitudes on Mercury. We measured the depth and diameter of 537 craters located poleward of 45 N, evaluated the slopes of the northern and southern walls of 30 PDCs, and assessed the floor roughness of 94 craters, including nine PDCs. We find that the PDCs appear to have a fresher crater morphology than the non-PDCs and that the radar-bright material has no detectable influence on crater depths, wall slopes, or floor roughness. The statistical similarity of crater depth-diameter relations for the PDC and non-PDC populations places an upper limit on the thickness of the radar-bright material (< 170 m for a crater 11 km in diameter) that can be refined by future detailed analysis. Results of the current study are consistent with the view that the radar-bright material constitutes a relatively thin layer emplaced preferentially in comparatively young craters.

  11. Constructing Educational Quality in the Arab Region: A Bottom-Up Critique of Regional Educational Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clara

    2017-01-01

    The article challenges the deficit view in which education in the Arab region is portrayed by examining the process of educational regionalisation. It takes as its case study the Arab Regional Agenda for Improving Educational Quality in order to explore the construction of an educational quality space that uses data as a governance model. Drawing…

  12. Analysis of aerosol optical depth evaluation in polar regions and associated uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ortiz de Galisteo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Some available processing algorithms used to calculate the aerosol optical depth from radiometric measurements were tested. The aim was to evaluate the associated uncertainties in polar regions due to the data processing, in order to adjust the methodology of the calculation and illustrate the importance of these error sources. The measurements were obtained during a sun photometer campaign in Ny-Ålesund within the framework of the POLAR-AOD project.

  13. GEOTECHNICAL SAFETY ISSUES IN THE CITIES OF POLAR REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Grebenets

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arctic settlements built on permafrostface rather unique set of geotechnical challenges. On urbanized areas, technogenic transformation of natural landscapes due toconstruction of various types of infrastructure leads to changes in heat exchange in permafrost-atmosphere system. The spatial distribution and intensity of dangerous cryogenic processes in urbanized areas is substantially different from natural background settings found prior to construction. Climate change, especially pronounced in the Arctic, exacerbated these changes. Combination of technogenic pressure and climate change resulted in potentially hazardous situation in respect to operational safety of the buildings and structures built on permafrost. This paper is focused on geotechnical safety issues faced by the Arctic urban centers built on permafrost. Common types of technogenic impacts characteristic for urban settlements wereevaluated based on field observations and modeling techniques. The basic principles of development of deformations are discussed in respect to changing permafrost conditions and operational mode of the structures built on permafrost.

  14. Construction of the migration flows forecasting into Russian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Tarasyev

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dynamic model that can predict the dynamics of migration flows between source countries and host regions, as well as the dynamics of wage levels there. The model is constructed within the framework of neoclassical economics and human capital theory in continuous time. Thanks to liberalization of migration policy in Russia in 2007, the model could be successfully employed to Russian regions and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS, which have visa-free entry regulations with the Russian Federation. Employing the model on statistical data, we forecast the number and origin composition of foreign labor force from the CIS into Russian regions for 2010-2016. The purpose of our further research is to classify migrants by skills

  15. [Regional ecological planning and ecological network construction: a case study of "Ji Triangle" Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Han, Zeng-Lin; Tong, Lian-Jun

    2009-05-01

    By the methods of in situ investigation and regional ecological planning, the present ecological environment, ecosystem vulnerability, and ecological environment sensitivity in "Ji Triangle" Region were analyzed, and the ecological network of the study area was constructed. According to the ecological resources abundance degree, ecological recovery, farmland windbreak system, environmental carrying capacity, forestry foundation, and ecosystem integrity, the study area was classified into three regional ecological function ecosystems, i. e., east low hill ecosystem, middle plain ecosystem, and west plain wetland ecosystem. On the basis of marking regional ecological nodes, the regional ecological corridor (Haerbin-Dalian regional axis, Changchun-Jilin, Changchun-Songyuan, Jilin-Songyuan, Jilin-Siping, and Songyuan-Siping transportation corridor) and regional ecological network (one ring, three links, and three belts) were constructed. Taking the requests of regional ecological security into consideration, the ecological environment security system of "Ji Triangle" Region, including regional ecological conservation district, regional ecological restored district, and regional ecological management district, was built.

  16. Polarization and infrared imaging of regions of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moneti, A.

    1985-01-01

    Observational studies of two regions of star formation, the Taurus cloud and the BN-KL region of Orion, are presented. The magnetic field structure in the Taurus cloud was studied in order to investigate its possible role in the evolution of the cloud. It was found that the magnetic field is generally perpendicular to the elongated structures that make up the cloud, and it is deduced that the observed structure could be due to the effects of the magnetic field during the early stages of collapse. In addition, it was found that the magnetic field may have prevented the formation of massive stars by inhibiting the collapse of large cores, while not affecting the collapse of the small ones. Using a new near-infrared array camera, high resolution (1'') images of several young stars embedded in the cloud were obtained. Most of these sources have extended, spatially resolved circumstellar shells. High resolution images of the BN-KL region of Orion at four wavelengths between 1.65 and 4.7 μm were also obtained. At 1.65 μm a large trough is seen in the overall nebulosity; it is suggested that the observed trough is due to the doughnut of material around IRc2 as it obscures the background nebulosity

  17. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  18. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases

  19. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases

  20. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  1. Construction and testing of a source for the production of polarized heavy ions at the Heidelberg MP tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    At the Heidelberg MP tandem a source for the production of nuclear-spin polarized lithium and sodium ions was constructed. The ion source works according to the atomic beam principle. By a furnace a thermal atomic beam is produced the electron shell of which is polarized in a quadrupole magnet. This beam passes then three high frequency passages in which by exchange of suitable hyperfine structure levels the nuclear spin is partly polarized. The atoms are ionized on a hot tungsten surface and transcharged in cesium vapour to negative ions. The alignment of the spin in the desired spatial direction is rendered possible by means of a Wien filter rotable around the beam axis. For the beam transport until the accelerator exclusively electrostatic lenses and deviation elements are used. For the checking of the function modus of the different source parts the polarization of the atomic beam and low energy ion beams was studied. The polarization of the accelerated sup(7->)Li beam was measured by the reaction 1 H(sup(7->)Li, α) 4 He at Esub(Li) = 44 MeV. The tensor polarization was determined to Psub(zz) = 0.35 +- 0.01. The polarization of odd stages was determined to >= 80% of the theoretically reachable values. For a tensor polarized 23 Na 9+ beam accelerated to 110 MeV could be shown that during the acceleration 50% of the polarization remains conserved. With this at the first time a powerful source for the production of polarized Na beams of an accelerator is available which permits nuclear physics studies inthe energy range Esub(Na) [de

  2. FIVE REGIONAL PERSPECTIVES OF CONSTRUCTING AN OFFSHORE CORPORATE STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria GEAMÃNU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The offshore company, the emblem of the tax haven jurisdictions, is owned by non-residents and it conducts activities outside the island of incorporation in order to benefit from tax advantages. The purpose of this paper is to conduct a comparative analysis on the trends of constructing the offshore corporate structures at the level of five regions where tax havens have been identified: The Caribbean Sea and Central America; Europe; Asia; The Indian Ocean and The Pacific Ocean. Based on the tax and corporate legislations the analysis is focused on the main tax advantages offered by these entities, the incorporation and administration procedures as well as the costs involved. The results have shown that pure offshore corporate legislation is to be found at the level of only three geographic areas: The Caribbean Sea and Central America; The Indian Ocean and The Pacific Ocean and the offshore law is predominantly international, with only fine regional differences.

  3. Initial Alignment for SINS Based on Pseudo-Earth Frame in Polar Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Meng; Li, Guangchun; Guang, Xingxing

    2017-06-16

    An accurate initial alignment must be required for inertial navigation system (INS). The performance of initial alignment directly affects the following navigation accuracy. However, the rapid convergence of meridians and the small horizontalcomponent of rotation of Earth make the traditional alignment methods ineffective in polar regions. In this paper, from the perspective of global inertial navigation, a novel alignment algorithm based on pseudo-Earth frame and backward process is proposed to implement the initial alignment in polar regions. Considering that an accurate coarse alignment of azimuth is difficult to obtain in polar regions, the dynamic error modeling with large azimuth misalignment angle is designed. At the end of alignment phase, the strapdown attitude matrix relative to local geographic frame is obtained without influence of position errors and cumbersome computation. As a result, it would be more convenient to access the following polar navigation system. Then, it is also expected to unify the polar alignment algorithm as much as possible, thereby further unifying the form of external reference information. Finally, semi-physical static simulation and in-motion tests with large azimuth misalignment angle assisted by unscented Kalman filter (UKF) validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Application of NASA's Advanced Life Support Technologies in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    1997-01-01

    The problems of obtaining adequate pure drinking water and disposing of liquid and solid waste in the U.S Arctic, a region where virtually all water is frozen solid for much of the year, has led to unsanitary solutions. Sanitation and a safe water supply are particularly problems in rural villages. These villages are without running water and use plastic buckets for toilets. The outbreak of diseases is believed to be partially attributable to exposure to human waste and lack of sanitation. Villages with the most frequent outbreaks of disease are those in which running water is difficult to obtain. Waste is emptied into open lagoons, rivers, or onto the sea coast. It does not degrade rapidly and in addition to affecting human health, can be harmful to the fragile ecology of the Arctic and the indigenous wildlife and fish populations. Current practices for waste management and sanitation pose serious human hazards as well as threaten the environment. NASA's unique knowledge of water/wastewater treatment systems for extreme environments, identified in the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment report entitled An Alaskan Challenge: Native Villagt Sanitation, may offer practical solutions addressing the issues of safe drinking water and effective sanitation practices in rural villages. NASA's advanced life support technologies are being combined with Arctic science and engineering knowledge to address the unique needs of the remote communities of Alaska through the Advanced Life Systems for Extreme Environments (ALSEE) project. ALSEE is a collaborative effort involving the NASA, the State of Alaska, the University of Alaska, the North Slope Borough of Alaska, Ilisagvik College in Barrow and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The focus is a major issue in the State of Alaska and other areas of the Circumpolar North; the health and welfare of its people, their lives and the subsistence lifestyle in remote communities, economic opportunity, and care for the

  5. Large plasma density enhancements occurring in the northern polar region during the 6 April 2000 superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2014-06-01

    We focus on the ionospheric response of northern high-latitude region to the 6 April 2000 superstorm and aim to investigate how the storm-enhanced density (SED) plume plasma became distributed in the regions of auroral zone and polar cap plus to study the resultant ionospheric features and their development. Multi-instrument observational results combined with model-generated, two-cell convection maps permitted identifying the high-density plasma's origin and the underlying plasma transportation processes. Results show the plasma density feature of polar cap enhancement (PCE; 600 × 103 i+/cm3) appearing for 7 h during the main phase and characterized by increases reaching up to 6 times of the quiet time values. Meanwhile, strong westward convections ( 17,500 m/s) created low plasma densities in a wider region of the dusk cell. Oppositely, small ( 750 m/s) but rigorous westward drifts drove the SED plume plasma through the auroral zone, wherein plasma densities doubled. As the SED plume plasma traveled along the convection streamlines and entered the polar cap, a continuous enhancement of the tongue of ionization (TOI) developed under steady convection conditions. However, convection changes caused slow convections and flow stagnations and thus segmented the TOI feature by locally depleting the plasma in the affected regions of the auroral zone and polar cap. From the strong correspondence of polar cap potential drop and subauroral polarization stream (SAPS), we conclude that the SAPS E-field strength remained strong, and under its prolonged influence, the SED plume provided a continuous supply of downward flowing high-density plasma for the development and maintenance of PCEs.

  6. Malaysia's EOC Strategy in Strengthening the Science Knowledge, Awareness and National Interest towards the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabudin, Ahmad Firdaus Ahmad; Said, Noor Azzah; Rahim, Rashidah Abdul; Ng, Theam Foo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine Malaysia's involvement in the Polar Regions, in the context of education, outreach, and communication (EOC), and consequently, to determine the effectiveness of these initiatives. Using qualitative and quantitative research analyses, this study found that Malaysia's experiences in EOC can be used to increase public…

  7. Diversity and dispersal capacities of a terrestrial algal genus Klebsormidium (Streptophyta) in polar regions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryšánek, D.; Elster, Josef; Kováčik, L.; Škaloud, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 4 (2016), s. 1-9, č. článku fiw039. ISSN 0168-6496 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : gene tic diversity * Klebsormidium * phylogeography * polar regions Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2016

  8. Comparative evaluation of NeQuick and IRI models over Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrella, Marco; Nava, Bruno; Pezzopane, Michael; Migoya-Orue, Yenca; Scotto, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the AUSPICIO (AUtomatic Scaling of Polar Ionograms and Cooperative Ionospheric Observations) project, the ionograms recorded at Hobart (middle latitude), Macquarie Island, Livingstone Island and Comandante Ferraz (middle-high latitude) and those recorded at the ionospheric observatories of Casey, Mawson, Davis, and Scott Base (Antarctic Polar Circle), have been taken into account to study the capability of NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models in predicting the behavior of the ionosphere, mainly in the polar region. In particular, the applicability of NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models was evaluated under two different modes: a) as assimilative models ingesting the foF2 and hmF2 measurements obtained from the electron density profiles provided by the Adaptive Ionospheric Profiler (AIP); b) as climatological models taking as input F10.7 solar activity index. The results obtained from the large number of comparisons made for each ionospheric observatory when NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models work according to the two modes above mentioned, reveal that the best description of the ionosphere electron density at the polar regions is provided when peak parameter data are ingested in near-real-time into NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models which, indeed, are not always able to represent efficiently the behavior of the ionosphere over the polar regions when operating in long term prediction mode. The statistical analysis results expressed in terms of root mean square errors (r.m.s.e.) for each ionospheric observatory show that, outside the Antarctic Polar Circle (APC), NeQuick-2 performance is better than the IRI-2012 performance; on the contrary, inside the APC IRI-2012 model performs better than NeQuick-2.

  9. Study of the Effect of Active Regions on the Scattering Polarization in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouich, M.; Badruddin

    2018-03-01

    The solar photospheric/chromospheric light exciting atoms/ions is not homogeneous because of the presence of active regions (ARs). The effect of ARs on the scattering polarization at the coronal level is an important ingredient for a realistic determination of the magnetic field. This effect is usually disregarded or mixed with other effects in the sense that the degree of its importance is not well known. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of atmospheric inhomogeneities on the coronal scattering polarization. We determined quantitatively the importance of the atmospheric inhomogeneities by using given geometries of solar ARs (plages and sunspots).

  10. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Finlay, Chris; Hesse, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagneticmain field. Observations from...... the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine...

  11. Physics in the GeV region with polarized targets in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    There is evidence from the D(γ,p)n reaction that the meson-exchange model is failing in the GeV region. Surprisingly, it appears that the new (Dγ,p)n data favor the energy dependence of the nuclear chromodynamics model rather that of the meson-exchange model. Application of the polarization method to electron scattering studies is in its infancy, and it is potentially a very powerful technique. The internal target method coupled with laser-driven polarized targets should represent an important tool for nuclear physics

  12. CryoSat Mission over Polar Region: Data quality status and product evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, J.; Parrinello, T.; Féménias, P.; Fornari, M.; Scagliola, M.; Baker, S.; Brockley, D.; Mannan, R.; Hall, A.; Webb, E.; Garcia-Mondéjar, A.; Roca, M.; Mantovani, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, satellite radar altimetry has shown its ability to revolutionize our understanding of the ocean and climate. These advances were mainly limited to ice-free regions, leaving aside large portions of Polar Regions. Launched in 2010, the polar-orbiting CryoSat Satellite was designed to measure the changes in the thickness of polar sea ice and the elevation of the ice sheets and mountain glaciers. To reach this goal, the CryoSat products have to meet the highest performance, through constant improvements of the associated Instrument Processing Facility. Since April 2015, the CryoSat ice products are generated with the Baseline C; which represents a major processor upgrade. Several improvements have been implemented belong this new Baseline, such as SAR retracker optimized for Freeboard retrieval and a coarse slant correction, which is applied directly on the stack data in conjunction with the window delay alignment. The resulting waveforms show more power and the trailing edge is modified, leading to improved L2 geophysical parameters. This paper provides an overview of the CryoSat data characteristics, assessment and exploitation over Polar Regions. In this respect, new science-oriented diagnostics have been implemented to thoroughly understand the signatures within the altimeter signals over sea-ice and land ice areas, to validate the data and therefore propose potential way of improvements for next CryoSat processing Baselines.

  13. Problems of development and ecological construction in terms of design and construction activities in the Volgograd region

    OpenAIRE

    Taranova Anna Valer'evna; Borisova Natal'ja Ivanovna

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of existing problems and the further development of ecological construction in the Volgograd region. Discusses the problem of socio-environmental plan in terms of project construction activities. The necessity of identifying the sources of negative impact on the construction of residential properties, define solutions for their further elimination, the authors show the necessity of using environmental innovation techniques in modern construction industry.

  14. Economic Polarization Across European Union Regions in the years 2007–2012 at NUTS 2 Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piętak Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the economic polarization in countries of the EU at NUTS 2 level in the years 2007–2012. The studies have to decide on positive or negative verification of the hypothesis, which states that the economic crisis of 2008–2013 had an influence on rising economic polarization in EU countries. The method used in this article is an application of some measures of economic polarization and inequality of income distribution. The carried out research did not allow for the positive verification of the hypothesis. Only in a few countries did the economic crisis have an influence on a reduction of the middle class. In most cases the economic collapse did not play any role in the raising of the economic polarization index. The statistical data used in this paper was taken from the following databases: Statistical Yearbook of the Regions – Poland from 2009 to 2013 and Eurostat – Regional statistics by NUTS classification*.

  15. Cloud Masking and Surface Temperature Distribution in the Polar Regions Using AVHRR and other Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Joey C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface temperature is one of the key variables associated with weather and climate. Accurate measurements of surface air temperatures are routinely made in meteorological stations around the world. Also, satellite data have been used to produce synoptic global temperature distributions. However, not much attention has been paid on temperature distributions in the polar regions. In the polar regions, the number of stations is very sparse. Because of adverse weather conditions and general inaccessibility, surface field measurements are also limited. Furthermore, accurate retrievals from satellite data in the region have been difficult to make because of persistent cloudiness and ambiguities in the discrimination of clouds from snow or ice. Surface temperature observations are required in the polar regions for air-sea-ice interaction studies, especially in the calculation of heat, salinity, and humidity fluxes. They are also useful in identifying areas of melt or meltponding within the sea ice pack and the ice sheets and in the calculation of emissivities of these surfaces. Moreover, the polar regions are unique in that they are the sites of temperature extremes, the location of which is difficult to identify without a global monitoring system. Furthermore, the regions may provide an early signal to a potential climate change because such signal is expected to be amplified in the region due to feedback effects. In cloud free areas, the thermal channels from infrared systems provide surface temperatures at relatively good accuracies. Previous capabilities include the use of the Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite which was launched in 1978. Current capabilities include the use of the Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA satellites. Together, these two systems cover a span of 16 years of thermal infrared data. Techniques for retrieving surface temperatures with these sensors in the polar regions have

  16. Review of 100 facts: polar lands; 365 penguins; Amazing Arctic & Antarctic projects you can build yourself; Apun: the Arctic snow; Matthew Henson: the quest for the North Pole; Polar bears in danger; Polar regions; Race to the South Poleetc.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Helle

    2010-01-01

    The polar regions have captured the world’s attention, and children’s book authors and publishers are no exception. These dozen titles are just a sample of the bucketload of polar-themed children’s books that have been published during the last couple of years.

  17. Polarization splitting phenomenon of photonic crystals constructed by two-fold rotationally symmetric unit-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasa, U. G.; Giden, I. H.; Turduev, M.; Kurt, H.

    2017-09-01

    We present an intrinsic polarization splitting characteristic of low-symmetric photonic crystals (PCs) formed by unit-cells with C 2 rotational symmetry. This behavior emerges from the polarization sensitive self-collimation effect for both transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) modes depending on the rotational orientations of the unit-cell elements. Numerical analyzes are performed in both frequency and time domains for different types of square lattice two-fold rotational symmetric PC structures. At incident wavelength of λ = 1550 nm, high polarization extinction ratios with ˜26 dB (for TE polarization) and ˜22 dB (for TM polarization) are obtained with an operating bandwidth of 59 nm. Moreover, fabrication feasibilities of the designed structure are analyzed to evaluate their robustness in terms of the unit-cell orientation: for the selected PC unit-cell composition, corresponding extinction ratios for both polarizations still remain to be over 18 dB for the unit-cell rotation interval of θ = [40°-55°]. Taking all these advantages, two-fold rotationally symmetric PCs could be considered as an essential component in photonic integrated circuits for polarization control of light.

  18. The Venus Emissivity Mapper - Investigating the Atmospheric Structure and Dynamics of Venus' Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widemann, T.; Marcq, E.; Tsang, C.; Mueller, N. T.; Kappel, D.; Helbert, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Venus' climate evolution is driven by the energy balance of its global cloud layers. Venus displays the best-known case of polar vortices evolving in a fast-rotating atmosphere. Polar vortices are pervasive in the Solar System and may also be present in atmosphere-bearing exoplanets. While much progress has been made since the early suggestion that the Venus clouds are H2O-H2SO4 liquid droplets (Young 1973), several cloud parameters are still poorly constrained, particularly in the lower cloud layer and optically thicker polar regions. The average particle size is constant over most of the planet but increases toward the poles. This indicates that cloud formation processes are different at latitudes greater than 60°, possibly as a result of the different dynamical regimes that exist in the polar vortices (Carlson et al. 1993, Wilson et al. 2008, Barstow et al. 2012). Few wind measurements exist in the polar region due to unfavorable viewing geometry of currently available observations. Cloud-tracking data indicate circumpolar circulation close to solid-body rotation. E-W winds decrease to zero velocity close to the pole. N-S circulation is marginal, with extremely variable morphology and complex vorticity patterns (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2008, Luz et al. 2011, Garate-Lopez et al. 2013). The Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM; Helbert et al., 2016) proposed for NASA's Venus Origins Explorer (VOX) and the ESA M5/EnVision orbiters has the capability to better constrain the microphysics (vertical, horizontal, time dependence of particle size distribution, or/and composition) of the lower cloud particles in three spectral bands at 1.195, 1.310 and 1.510 μm at a spatial resolution of 10 km. Circular polar orbit geometry would provide an unprecedented study of both polar regions within the same mission. In addition, VEM's pushbroom method will allow short timescale cloud dynamics to be assessed, as well as local wind speeds, using repeated imagery at 90 minute intervals

  19. The Venus Emissivity Mapper - Investigating the Atmospheric Structure and Dynamics of Venus’ Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widemann, Thomas; Marcq, Emmanuel; Tsang, Constantine; Mueller, Nils; Kappel, David; Helbert, Joern; Dyar, Melinda; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2017-10-01

    Venus displays the best-known case of polar vortices evolving in a fast-rotating atmosphere. Polar vortices are pervasive in the Solar System and may also be present in atmosphere-bearing exoplanets. While much progress has been made since the early suggestion that the Venus clouds are H2O-H2SO4 liquid droplets (Young 1973), several cloud parameters are still poorly constrained, particularly in the lower cloud layer and optically thicker polar regions. The average particle size is constant over most of the planet but increases toward the poles. This indicates that cloud formation processes are different at latitudes greater than 60°, possibly as a result of the different dynamical regimes that exist in the polar vortices (Carlson et al. 1993, Wilson et al. 2008, Barstow et al. 2012).Few wind measurements exist in the polar region due to unfavorable viewing geometry of currently available observations. Cloud-tracking data indicate circumpolar circulation close to solid-body rotation. E-W winds decrease to zero velocity close to the pole. N-S circulation is marginal, with extremely variable morphology and complex vorticity patterns (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2008, Luz et al. 2011, Garate-Lopez et al. 2013).The Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM; Helbert et al., 2016) proposed for NASA’s Venus Origins Explorer (VOX) and the ESA M5/EnVision orbiters has the capability to better constrain the microphysics (vertical, horizontal, time dependence of particle size distribution, or/and composition) of the lower cloud particles in three spectral bands at 1.195, 1.310 and 1.510 μm at a spatial resolution of ~10 km. Circular polar orbit geometry would provide an unprecedented simultaneous study of both polar regions within the same mission. In addition, VEM’s pushbroom method will allow short timescale cloud dynamics to be assessed, as well as local wind speeds, using repeated imagery at 90 minute intervals. Tracking lower cloud motions as proxies for wind measurements at high

  20. Polarization Reversal Over Flooded Regions and Applications to Large-Scale Flood Mapping with Spaceborne Scatterometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiao-Su

    1999-01-01

    We present the polarization reversal in backscatter over flooded land regions, and demonstrate for the first time the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. Scatterometer data were collected over the globe by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) operated at 14 GHz on the Japanese ADEOS spacecraft from September 1996 to June 1997. During this time span, several severe floods occurred. Over most land surface, vertical polarization backscatter (Sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is larger than horizontal polarization backscatter (sigma(sub hh)). Such polarization characteristics is reversed and sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is smaller than sigma(sub hh) over flooded regions, except under a dense forest canopy. The total backscatter from the flooded landscape consists of direct backscatter and boundary-interaction backscatter. The direct term is contributed by direct backscattering from objects protruding above the water surface, and by backscattering from waves on the water surface. The boundary-interaction term is contributed by the forward scattering from the protruding objects and then reflected from the water surface, and also by the forward scattering from these objects after the water-surface reflection. Over flooded regions, the boundary-interaction term is dominant at large incidence angles and the strong water-surface reflection is much larger for horizontal polarization than the vertical one due to the Brewster effect in transverse-magnetic waves. These scattering mechanisms cause the polarization reversal over flooded regions. An example obtained with the Analytic Wave Theory is used to illustrate the scattering mechanisms leading to the polarization reversal. We then demonstrate the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. We process NSCAT data to obtain the polarization ratio sigma(sub hh)/sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) with colocated data at incidence angles larger than 40 deg. The results over Asian

  1. Comparison of the CMAM30 data set with ACE-FTS and OSIRIS: polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendlebury, D.; Plummer, D.; Scinocca, J.; Sheese, P.; Strong, K.; Walker, K.; Degenstein, D.

    2015-11-01

    CMAM30 is a 30-year data set extending from 1979 to 2010 that is generated using a version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) in which the winds and temperatures are relaxed to the Interim Reanalysis product from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-Interim). The data set has dynamical fields that are very close to the reanalysis below 1 hPa and chemical tracers that are self-consistent with respect to the model winds and temperature. The chemical tracers are expected to be close to actual observations. The data set is here compared to two satellite records - the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer and the Odin Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System - for the purpose of validating the temperature, ozone, water vapour and methane fields. Data from the Aura microwave limb sounder are also used for validation of the chemical processing in the polar vortex. It is found that the CMAM30 temperature is warmer by up to 5 K in the stratosphere, with a low bias in the mesosphere of ~ 5-15 K. Ozone is reasonable (±15 %), except near the tropopause globally and in the Southern Hemisphere winter polar vortex. Water vapour is consistently low by 10-20 %, with corresponding high methane of 10-20 %, except in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex. Discrepancies in this region are shown to stem from the treatment of polar stratospheric cloud formation in the model.

  2. Complex researches on substantiation of construction and seismic stability of large dams in seismic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negmatullaev, S.Kh.; Yasunov, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    This article is devoted to complex researches on substantiation of construction and seismic stability of large dams (Nurec hydroelectric power station) in seismic region. Geological, seismological, model, and engineering investigations are discussed in this work. At construction of Nurec hydroelectric power station the rich experience is accumulated. This experience can be used in analogous seismically active regions at construction similar hydroelectric power stations.

  3. Regional contamination versus regional dietary differences: Understanding geographic variation in brominated and chlorinated contaminant levels in polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, M.A.; Letcher, R.J.; Aars, Jon; Born, E.W.; Branigan, M.; Dietz, R.; Evans, T.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Muir, D.C.G.; Peacock, E.; Sonne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The relative contribution of regional contamination versus dietary differences to geographic variation in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) contaminant levels is unknown. Dietary variation between Alaska Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard subpopulations was assessed by muscle nitrogen and carbon stable isotope (?? 15N, ?? 13C) and adipose fatty acid (FA) signatures relative to their main prey (ringed seals). Western and southern Hudson Bay signatures were characterized by depleted ?? 15N and ??13C, lower proportions of C20 and C22 monounsaturated FAs and higher proportions of C18 and longer chain polyunsaturated FAs. East Greenland and Svalbard signatures were reversed relative to Hudson Bay. Alaskan ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Mechanisms of impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the atmosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the impact of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O on the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular on its expected recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circu-lation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the North to South Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar strato-spheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abun-dance of the greenhouse gases on the long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2, essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weak-ness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification be-gins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard

  5. Dynamics and Morphology of Saturn’s North Polar Region During Cassini’s Final Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn; McCabe, Ryan M.; Gunnarson, Jacob; Garland, Justin; Gallego, Angelina

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of Saturn’s north polar region utilizing Cassini ISS images captured in visible and near-infrared wavelengths during late 2016 and 2017, including images captured during Cassini’s Grand Finale orbits. To measure the wind field in the region, we utilize the two-dimensional correlation imaging velocimetry (CIV) technique. We also calculate the relative vorticity and divergence from the wind field. To detect changes in the dynamics, we compare measurements of the wind, relative vorticity, and divergence in 2012 and 2013 with those from 2016/2017. We also compare cloud reflectivity between 2012/2013 and 2016/2017 in images that show the north pole under similar illumination conditions. To detect changes in cloud reflectivity, we utilize a Minnaert correction to calculate the zonal mean reflectivity as a function of latitude. Furthermore, we compare the winds and cloud reflectivity at several wavelengths in order to look for changes occurring at different altitudes. Our results indicate that while the dynamics of the north polar region have remained relatively stable, there have been significant morphology changes that have resulted in dramatic color changes. We hypothesize that these changes are a result of the seasonal cycle and linked to the increased production of photochemical hazes in the atmosphere. Our work has been supported by NASA PATM NNX14AK07G, NSF AAG 1212216, and NASA NESSF NNX15AQ70H.

  6. High Frequency Backscatter from the Polar and Auroral E-Region Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Victoriya V.

    The Earth's ionosphere contains collisional and partially-ionized plasma. The electric field, produced by the interaction between the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, drives the plasma bulk motion, also known as convection, in the F-region of the ionosphere. It can also destabilize the plasma in the E-region, producing irregularities or waves. Intermediate-scale waves with wavelengths of hundreds of meters can cause scintillation and fading of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals, whereas the small-scale waves (lambda processes that generate small-scale plasma waves, and experimentally, by analyzing data collected with the newly-deployed high-southern-latitude radars within the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). The theoretical part of this work focuses on symmetry properties of the general dispersion relation that describes wave propagation in the collisional plasma in the two-stream and gradient-drift instability regimes. The instability growth rate and phase velocity are examined under the presence of a background parallel electric field, whose influence is demonstrated to break the spatial symmetry of the wave propagation patterns. In the observational part of this thesis, a novel dual radar setup is used to examine E-region irregularities in the magnetic polar cap by probing the E-region along the same line from opposite directions. The phase velocity analysis together with raytracing simulations demonstrated that, in the polar cap, the radar backscatter is primarily controlled by the plasma density conditions. In particular, when the E-region layer is strong and stratified, the radar backscatter properties are controlled by the convection velocity, whereas for a tilted E-layer, the height and aspect angle conditions are more important. Finally, the fundamental dependence of the E-region irregularity phase velocity on the component of the plasma convection is investigated using two new SuperDARN radars at high southern

  7. Assessing polar bear (Ursus maritimus) population structure in the Hudson Bay region using SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viengkone, Michelle; Derocher, Andrew Edward; Richardson, Evan Shaun; Malenfant, René Michael; Miller, Joshua Moses; Obbard, Martyn E; Dyck, Markus G; Lunn, Nick J; Sahanatien, Vicki; Davis, Corey S

    2016-12-01

    Defining subpopulations using genetics has traditionally used data from microsatellite markers to investigate population structure; however, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have emerged as a tool for detection of fine-scale structure. In Hudson Bay, Canada, three polar bear ( Ursus maritimus ) subpopulations (Foxe Basin (FB), Southern Hudson Bay (SH), and Western Hudson Bay (WH)) have been delineated based on mark-recapture studies, radiotelemetry and satellite telemetry, return of marked animals in the subsistence harvest, and population genetics using microsatellites. We used SNPs to detect fine-scale population structure in polar bears from the Hudson Bay region and compared our results to the current designations using 414 individuals genotyped at 2,603 SNPs. Analyses based on discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) and STRUCTURE support the presence of four genetic clusters: (i) Western-including individuals sampled in WH, SH (excluding Akimiski Island in James Bay), and southern FB (south of Southampton Island); (ii) Northern-individuals sampled in northern FB (Baffin Island) and Davis Strait (DS) (Labrador coast); (iii) Southeast-individuals from SH (Akimiski Island in James Bay); and (iv) Northeast-individuals from DS (Baffin Island). Population structure differed from microsatellite studies and current management designations demonstrating the value of using SNPs for fine-scale population delineation in polar bears.

  8. Optical polarization maps of star-forming regions in Perseus, Taurus, and Ophiuchus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, A.A.; Bastien, P.; Menard, F.; Myers, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    New optical linear polarization maps are presented of the star-forming regions near L1506 in Taurus, L1755 in Ophiuchus, and the complex of dark cloud which extends from L1448 in B5 in Perseus. The former two show a well-defined peak magnetic field direction in the plane of the sky with a finite dispersion about that peak which is smaller than would be expected for a random distribution of field distributions. The dispersion in the position angle of filamentary clouds within these complexes implies that clouds which appear elongated on the plane of the sky are not all associated with a pattern of polarization vectors particularly parallel or perpendicular to their geometry. Instead, clouds tend to be oriented at the angle formed by their axis and the mean direction of the local large-scale field. For the dark cloud complex, a bimodal distribution of the polarization vector angle is taken to result from at least two distributions of gas along the line of sight which appear as a complex in projection. 55 refs

  9. CONSTRUCTING A MULTI-REGIONAL SOCIAL ACCOUNTING MATRIX FOR TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Piskin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regional impacts of public policies in Turkey have led to Regional Development Agencies and related institutions having responsibility for setting and achieving sustainability policies at the regional level. As a result, there is a significant interest in developing empirical models that can deal with the macro, micro and regional impacts of economic policies and interregional spillover effects. Spatial or Multi-Regional Computable General Equilibrium models are the most capable models to handle a wide range of policy relevant regional questions and the effects of policies on a comprehensive set of regional and national economic variables. However, an important ingredient in meeting the Multi-Regional CGE analysis is Multi-Regional Social Accounting Matrices. This study is focusing on the building the first Multi-Regional Social Accounting Matrix for Turkey with 11 regions and 8 sectors. We utilize from the most updated available datasets and implement the most conveninent non-survey methods which fit to data availability in Turkey.

  10. Requirements assessment and operational demands for a resource mapping rover mission to the lunar polar regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KLARER,PAUL R.; BINDER,ALAN B.; LENARD,ROGER X.

    2000-01-26

    A preliminary set of requirements for a robotic rover mission to the lunar polar region are described and assessed. Tasks to be performed by the rover include core drill sample acquisition, mineral and volatile soil content assay, and significant wide area traversals. Assessment of the postulated requirements is performed using first order estimates of energy, power, and communications throughput issues. Two potential rover system configurations are considered, a smaller rover envisioned as part of a group of multiple rovers, and a larger single rover envisioned along more traditional planetary surface rover concept lines.

  11. Plasma Irregularity Production in the Polar Cap F-Region Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Leslie

    Plasma in the Earth's ionosphere is highly irregular on scales ranging between a few centimeters and hundreds of kilometers. Small-scale irregularities or plasma waves can scatter radio waves resulting in a loss of signal for navigation and communication networks. The polar region is particularly susceptible to strong disturbances due to its direct connection with the Sun's magnetic field and energetic particles. In this thesis, factors that contribute to the production of decameter-scale plasma irregularities in the polar F region ionosphere are investigated. Both global and local control of irregularity production are studied, i.e. we consider global solar control through solar illumination and solar wind as well as much more local control by plasma density gradients and convection electric field. In the first experimental study, solar control of irregularity production is investigated using the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar at McMurdo, Antarctica. The occurrence trends for irregularities are analyzed statistically and a model is developed that describes the location of radar echoes within the radar's field-of-view. The trends are explained through variations in background plasma density with solar illumination affecting radar beam propagation. However, it is found that the irregularity occurrence during the night is higher than expected from ray tracing simulations based on a standard ionospheric density model. The high occurrence at night implies an additional source of plasma density and it is proposed that large-scale density enhancements called polar patches may be the source of this density. Additionally, occurrence maximizes around the terminator due to different competing irregularity production processes that favor a more or less sunlit ionosphere. The second study is concerned with modeling irregularity characteristics near a large-scale density gradient reversal, such as those expected near polar patches, with a particular focus on

  12. Mediating Data and Building Community for Informed, Intelligent Decision Making for the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsifer, P. L.; Stieglitz, M.

    2017-12-01

    Much has been written about the state of data and related systems for the polar regions, however work remains to be done to achieve an envisioned integrated and well-defined pan-Arctic observing and data network that enables access to high quality data, expertise and information in support of scientific understanding, stakeholder needs, and agency operations. In this paper we argue that priorities for establishing such a network are in the area of machine-enhanced data mediation and the human aspects of community building. The authors have engaged in a U.S.-based, multi-agency process with the goal of applying modern cyberinfrastructure to improve capabilities for integrating data. A particular case-study focuses on establishing a carbon budget for the Arctic region. This effort contributes to broader global efforts aimed at establishing an international observing and data network. Results are based on a series meetings, workshops, systems design activities, and publications. Analysis reveals that there are a large number of polar data resources interacting in a network that functions as a data ecosystem. Given the size and complexity of the network, achieving broad data discovery and access and meaningful data integration (i.e. developing a carbon budget) will require advanced techniques including machine learning, semantic mediation, and the use of highly connected virtual research environments. To achieve the aforementioned goal will require a community of engaged researchers, technologists, and stakeholders to establish requirements and the social and organizational context needed for effective machine-based approaches. The results imply that: i) the polar research and application community must be more aware of advances in technology; ii) funders must adopt a long-term, sustainable infrastructure approach to systems development; iii) the community must work together to enable interoperability; iv) we must recognize that the challenge is socio-technical and

  13. Operation and Funding of the Regional Wartime Construction Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    for 75 days, but construction requirements continue for a total of 90 days. a. Threat Forces The countries of Tiburon, Perro , Pared, Zorritos, Barco...country of Perro through to the country of Cisnes. Concurrently, BP forces from their eastern command (Pared, Zorritos, Barco, and Mariposa) launch

  14. Goldschmidt crater and the Moon's north polar region: Results from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, L.C.; Pieters, C.M.; Boardman, J.W.; Clark, R.N.; Combe, J.-P.; Head, J.W.; Isaacson, P.J.; McCord, T.B.; Moriarty, D.; Nettles, J.W.; Petro, N.E.; Sunshine, J.M.; Taylor, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Soils within the impact crater Goldschmidt have been identified as spectrally distinct from the local highland material. High spatial and spectral resolution data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) on the Chandrayaan-1 orbiter are used to examine the character of Goldschmidt crater in detail. Spectral parameters applied to a north polar mosaic of M3 data are used to discern large-scale compositional trends at the northern high latitudes, and spectra from three widely separated regions are compared to spectra from Goldschmidt. The results highlight the compositional diversity of the lunar nearside, in particular, where feldspathic soils with a low-Ca pyroxene component are pervasive, but exclusively feldspathic regions and small areas of basaltic composition are also observed. Additionally, we find that the relative strengths of the diagnostic OH/H2O absorption feature near 3000 nm are correlated with the mineralogy of the host material. On both global and local scales, the strongest hydrous absorptions occur on the more feldspathic surfaces. Thus, M3 data suggest that while the feldspathic soils within Goldschmidt crater are enhanced in OH/H2O compared to the relatively mafic nearside polar highlands, their hydration signatures are similar to those observed in the feldspathic highlands on the farside.

  15. Coronal temperatures, heating, and energy flow in a polar region of the sun at solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.; Kohl, J. L.; Weiser, H.; Munro, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The profiles of resonantly scattered Lyman-alpha coronal radiation have been used to determine the hydrogen kinetic temperature from 1.5 to 4 solar radius from the center of the polar region of the corona observed in 1980 at solar maximum. Hydrogen temperatures derived from the line profiles were found to decrease with height from 1.2 million K at r = 1.5 solar radii to 600,000 K at r = 4 solar radius. Comparison of the measured kinetic temperatures with predictions from a semiempirical two-fluid model showed evidence of a small amount of heating or a nonthermal contribution to the motions of coronal protons between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. The widths of the profiles confirmed an upper limit of 110 + or - 15 km/s on the rms magnitude of the line-of-sight component of velocities between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. Density measurements obtained in situ in the solar wind in the ecliptic were used to locate the sources of low speed and high-speed winds in the polar region. An eclipse photograph of the corona at solar maximum is provided.

  16. Thermal Stability of Frozen Volatiles in the North Polar Region of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, David A.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Harmon, John K.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    Earth-based radar observations have revealed the presence on Mercury of anomalously bright, depolarizing features that appear to be localized in the permanently shadowed regions of high-latitude impact craters [1]. Observations of similar radar signatures over a range of radar wavelengths implies that they correspond to deposits that are highly transparent at radar wavelengths and extend to depths of several meters below the surface [1]. Thermal models using idealized crater topographic profiles have predicted the thermal stability of surface and subsurface water ice at these same latitudes [2]. One of the major goals of the MESSENGER mission is to characterize the nature of radar-bright craters and presumed associated frozen volatile deposits at the poles of Mercury through complementary orbital observations by a suite of instruments [3]. Here we report on an examination of the thermal stability of water ice and other frozen volatiles in the north polar region of Mercury using topographic profiles obtained by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) instrument [4] in conjunction with a three-dimensional ray-tracing thermal model previously used to study the thermal environment of polar craters on the Moon [5].

  17. Pitch Angle Scattering of Upgoing Electron Beams in Jupiter's Polar Regions by Whistler Mode Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Clark, G.; Mauk, B. H.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    The Juno spacecraft's Jupiter Energetic-particle Detector Instrument has observed field-aligned, unidirectional (upgoing) electron beams throughout most of Jupiter's entire polar cap region. The Waves instrument detected intense broadband whistler mode emissions occurring in the same region. In this paper, we investigate the pitch angle scattering of the upgoing electron beams due to interactions with the whistler mode waves. Profiles of intensity versus pitch angle for electron beams ranging from 2.53 to 7.22 Jovian radii show inconsistencies with the expected adiabatic invariant motion of the electrons. It is believed that the observed whistler mode waves perturb the electron motion and scatter them away from the magnetic field line. The diffusion equation has been solved by using diffusion coefficients which depend on the magnetic intensity of the whistler mode waves.

  18. On the validity of the ambipolar diffusion assumption in the polar mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Ballinger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The decay of underdense meteor trails in the polar mesopause region is thought to be predominantly due to ambipolar diffusion, a process governed by the ambient temperature and pressure. Hence, observations of meteor decay times have been used to indirectly measure the temperature of the mesopause region. Using meteor observations from a SKiYMET radar in northern Sweden during 2005, this study found that weaker meteor trails have shorter decay times (on average than relatively stronger trails. This suggests that processes other than ambipolar diffusion can play a significant role in trail diffusion. One particular mechanism, namely electron-ion recombination, is explored. This process is dependent on the initial electron density within the meteor trail, and can lead to a disproportionate reduction in decay time, depending on the strength of the meteor.

  19. Corrosion rate of construction materials in hot phosphoric acid with the contribution of anodic polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouril, M.; Christensen, Erik; Eriksen, S.

    2011-01-01

    ). Several grades of stainless steels were tested as well as tantalum, niobium, titanium, nickel alloys and silicon carbide. The corrosion rate was evaluated by means of mass loss at free corrosion potential as well as under various levels of polarization. The only corrosion resistant material in 85...... to tantalum, titanium is free of any corrosion resistance in hot phosphoric acid. Its corrosion rate ranges from tens of millimetres to metres per year depending on temperature of the acid. Alloy bonded tantalum coating was recognized as an effective corrosion protection for both titanium and stainless steel...

  20. Construction of opening regional geological hazards risk assessment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jixiang; Zhang, Lizhong; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Qian

    2011-10-01

    It's the basis of the regional geological hazard assessment of regional geological hazard risk research, and the result can provide foundation for planning of land and resources, selection of important project site, controlling, monitoring, and forecasting geological disaster, developing contingency measures for disaster, and environmental protection. With the development of GIS technology, methods and models of regional geological hazard assessment have made great progress, it gradually change from the qualitative and semi-quantitative to quantitative, systematic, spatial management. This paper proposed a user-oriented, method- oriented, category-oriented system of regional geological hazards risk assessment through discusses the key points of geological hazards risk assessment, and the requirements of geological disaster evaluation system development today. The new evaluation system fit varieties types of geological disaster evaluation in different areas, and it owns a very important practical significance.

  1. A Region-Based Strategy for Collaborative Roadmap Construction

    KAUST Repository

    Denny, Jory

    2015-01-01

    © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. Motion planning has seen much attention over the past two decades. A great deal of progress has been made in sampling-based planning, whereby a planner builds an approximate representation of the planning space. While these planners have demonstrated success inmany scenarios, there are still difficult problems where they lack robustness or efficiency, e.g., certain types of narrow spaces. Conversely, human intuition can often determine an approximate solution to these problems quite effectively, but humans lack the speed and precision necessary to perform the corresponding low-level tasks (such as collision checking) in a timely manner. In this work, we introduce a novel strategy called Region Steering in which the user and a PRM planner work cooperatively to map the space while maintaining the probabilistic completeness property of the PRMplanner. Region Steering utilizes two-way communication to integrate the strengths of both the user and the planner, thereby overcoming the weaknesses inherent to relying on either one alone. In one communication direction, a user can input regions, or bounding volumes in the workspace, to bias sampling towards or away from these areas. In the other direction, the planner displays its progress to the user and colors the regions based on their perceived usefulness.We demonstrate that Region Steering provides roadmap customizability, reduced mapping time, and smaller roadmap sizes compared with fully automated PRMs, e.g., Gaussian PRM.

  2. Goldstone/VLA 3.5cm Mars Radar Observations - "Stealths" and South Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Bryan; Chizek, M. R.; Slade, M. A.; Haldemann, A. F.; Muhleman, D. O.; Mao, T. F.

    2006-09-01

    The opposition of Mars in 2003 provided a fantastic opportunity to use the combined Goldstone/VLA radar to probe the surface with the highest resolution ever obtained on Mars with that instrument (as good as 70 km). Observations were made on August 11, 19, 28, and September 8. Details of data reduction and analysis of the radar echoes from the volcanic regions of the planet are presented in a companion paper in these proceedings (Chizek et al.). We will present results related to "Stealth" (and other radar-dark regions of the planet, including the Argyre and Hellas Planitiae, and a region to the west of the Elysium Mons caldera), and the south polar residual and seasonal ice caps. The size, shape, and reflectivity characteristics of Stealth and "mega-Stealth" (Edgett et al. 1997) are reaffirmed, with a better viewing geometry of the western extent of the feature than had been obtained previously. It had been speculated previously that Hellas Planitia should also be radar dark - this is confirmed by our imaging, though the reflectivity is not as low as for Stealth. We find a new radar dark area to the west of Elysium Mons, which is likely an ash fall from that volcano (similar to the relationship between Stealth and the Tharsis volcanoes). The south polar residual ice cap is a very bright reflector, as seen previously, but we now also see a very bright reflection from the seasonal cap, not seen previously. The cap is not uniformly bright, however, and the extent of the bright reflection does not correspond to that expected from the retreat of the cap as measured either from albedo or thermal emission characteristics. The NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  3. Quantitative studies of the Martian south polar region using spacecraft images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herkenhoff, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Mariner 9 images were processed for comparison with nearly simultaneous infrared spectra of the south polar cap of Mars. Combined analysis of these observations indicates that the southern residual cap was covered by carbon dioxide frost throughout the summer of 1971-72. Five color/albedo units have been recognized and mapped in the southern layered deposits on Mars. Shadow brightnesses were measured and modeled in order to correct for the effects of atmospheric scattering and quantify the albedo and color of the surface. The layered deposits appear to be mantled by red dust, except where eolian stripping has exposed the darker, less red underlying bedrock. Frost and bare ground are mixed below the resolution of the images in many areas, some of which appear to be younger than the surrounding layered terrain. The available observational data suggest that the layered deposits are composed of bright dust, water ice, and a small amount of dark material. Weathering of the layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the data presented here and previous observations of the north polar deposits. The non-volatile component of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust or sand. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particle upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. Eventual destruction of the particle could allow recycling of the dark dust into the layered deposits via atmospheric suspension

  4. On the construction of a regional atmospheric climate model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J. H.; Van Meijgaard, E.

    1992-01-01

    A Regional Atmospheric Climate Model which combines the physical parameterization package of the General Circulation or Climate Model (ECHAM) used at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, and the dynamics package of the Nordic - Dutch - Irish Limited Area Model (HIRLAM), has been...

  5. Bouncing continents: insights into the physics of the polar regions of the Earth from the POLENET project in the International Polar Year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reading, Anya M

    2008-01-01

    When ice sheets melt, and reduce the load on the surface of the Earth, the land areas beneath them bounce back up. New, accurate observations are needed to investigate this uplift and its implications effectively. This article provides a topical starting point for investigating some applications of physics applied to the polar regions of the Earth, and interaction between the solid Earth, ice and oceans

  6. 3 mm GMVA Observations of Total and Polarized Emission from Blazar and Radio Galaxy Core Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Casadio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present total and linearly polarized 3 mm Global mm-VLBI Array (GMVA; mm-VLBI: Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations at millimetre wavelengths images of a sample of blazars and radio galaxies from the VLBA-BU-BLAZAR 7 mm monitoring program designed to probe the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN jets and locate the sites of gamma-ray emission observed by the Fermi-LAT. The lower opacity at 3 mm and improved angular resolution—on the order of 50 microarcseconds—allow us to distinguish features in the jet not visible in the 7 mm VLBA data. We also compare two different methods used for the calibration of instrumental polarisation and we analyze the resulting images for some of the sources in the sample.

  7. Source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediment in the north polar region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian sand dunes are prominent features on the landscapes of Earth, Mars, Venus and Titan and sedimentary deposits interpreted as aeolian in origin are found in the rock records of Earth and Mars. The widespread occurrence of aeolian dunes on the surface of these worlds and within their deep-time depositional records suggests that aeolian systems are and likely have been a default depositional environment for the Solar System. Within an aeolian source-to-sink context, we hypothesize that planet-specific boundary conditions strongly impact production, transport, accumulation and preservation of aeolian sediment, whereas dunes and dune-field patterns remain largely similar. This hypothesis is explored within the north polar region of Mars, which hosts the most extensive aeolian dune fields and aeolian sedimentary deposits yet recognized on Mars and appears to be a region of dynamic source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediments. The Planum Boreum Cavi Unit rests beneath north polar ice cap of Mars and is composed of several hundred meters of niveo-aeolian dune cross-stratification. The overall architecture of the unit consists of sets of preserved dune topography with an upward increase in the abundance of ice. Dune sets are defined by stabilized, polygonally fractured bounding surfaces, erosional bounding surfaces and typical internal lee foresets made of sediment and ice. The accumulation of the Cavi Unit is interpreted as occurring through freezing and serves as an example of a cold temperature boundary condition on aeolian sediment accumulation. Preservation of the Cavi Unit arises because of deposition of the overlying ice cap and contrasts with preservation of aeolian sediment on Earth, which is largely driven by eustasy and tectonics. The Cavi Unit is thought to be one source of sediment for the north polar Olympia Undae Dune Field. The region of Olympia Undae near the Cavi Unit shows a reticulate dune field pattern composed of two sets of nearly orthogonal

  8. Polarized dependence of nonlinear susceptibility in a single layer graphene system in infrared region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solookinejad, G., E-mail: ghsolooki@gmail.com

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of a single-layer graphene nanostructure driven by a weak probe light and an elliptical polarized coupling field is discussed theoretically. The Landau levels of graphene can be separated in infrared or terahertz regions under the strong magnetic field. Therefore, by using the density matrix formalism in quantum optic, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of the medium can be derived. It is demonstrated that by adjusting the elliptical parameter, one can manipulate the linear and nonlinear absorption as well as Kerr nonlinearity of the medium. It is realized that the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be possible with zero linear absorption and nonlinear amplification at some values of elliptical parameter. Our results may be having potential applications in quantum information science based on Nano scales devices.

  9. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, Aymeric-Pierre B.; Kocurek, Gary; Bourke, Mary

    2010-08-01

    High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery of the central Olympia Undae Dune Field in the north polar region of Mars shows a reticulate dune pattern consisting of two sets of nearly orthogonal dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarse-grained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis of dune crest length, spacing, defect density, and orientation indicates that the pattern is complex, representing two constructional generations of dunes. The oldest and best-organized generation forms the primary crestlines and is transverse to circumpolar easterly winds. Gross bed form-normal analysis of the younger pattern of crestlines indicates that it emerged with both circumpolar easterly winds and NE winds and is reworking the older pattern. Mapping of secondary flow fields over the dunes indicates that the most recent transporting winds were from the NE. The younger pattern appears to represent an influx of sediment to the dune field associated with the development of the Olympia Cavi reentrant, with NE katabatic winds channeling through the reentrant. A model of the pattern reformation based upon the reconstructed primary winds and resulting secondary flow fields shows that the development of the secondary pattern is controlled by the boundary condition of the older dune topography.

  10. On the importance for climate science communication - the climate office for polar regions and sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffeisen, Renate; Lemke, Peter; Dethloff, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    Climate change presents a major challenge for national and international action and cooperation. A wide variation in the vulnerability is to be expected across different regions, due to regional differences in local environmental conditions, preexisting stresses to ecosystems, current resource-use patterns, and the framework of factors affecting decision-making including government policies, prices, preferences, and values. Thus, considerable regional impact differences will be faced as a result of climate change. Being aware will help to prepare for these inevitable consequences in time. Climate change is nowhere more strongly expressed than in the polar regions which respond to even small changes in climate. Given the major role played by these regions within the Earth's climate system the climate office for polar regions and sea level rise is hosted by the Foundation Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) which conducts research in the Arctic, the Antarctic and at temperate latitudes since 1980. The major goal of the climate office is to encourage the communication and dialogue between science and public. Primarily, this is done by the unique close contact and cooperation to the research center scientists. A continuous exchange is supported beyond the research center towards universities and authorities at state and federal level. The climate office represents polar aspects of climate related research based on the scientific expertise from the hosting research institute e.g. the understanding of the ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions, the animal and plant kingdoms of the Arctic and Antarctic, and the evolution of the polar continents and seas. The climate office translates the scientific work into English, making complex issues accessible to policymakers and the public. It compiles, evaluates, comprehensively process and transparently communicate the latest findings from polar related climate research. The paper will present different

  11. Sources of reactive bromine in polar regions and its implications for ozone in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Paul; Archibald, Alex; Yang, Xin; Pyle, John

    2014-05-01

    In the last two decades, significant depletion of boundary layer ozone (ozone depletion events, ODEs) has been observed in both Arctic and Antarctic spring. ODEs are attributed to catalytic destruction by bromine radicals (Br plus BrO), especially during bromine explosion events, when high concentrations of BrO periodically occur. The source of bromine and the mechanism that sustains the high BrO levels are still the subject of study, and there remains scope for improving our understanding of reactive bromine budgets in polar regions. Yang et al. (2008) suggested snow could provide a source of (depleted) sea-salt aerosol if blown from the surface of ice, while recent work by Pratt et al. (2013) posits Br2 production within saline snow and sea ice. In this poster, we consider the production of sea-salt aerosol from a mixture of snow and sea ice during periods of strong wind. We use a combination of box models and the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols scheme, run as a component of the UK Met Office Unified Model, to quantify the effect of bromine release in the boundary layer and its effect on ozone at the regional scale. The importance of heterogeneous reactions is quantified and new data from the recent Polarstern cruise by members of the British Antarctic Survey as part of the NERC-funded BLOWSEA project will be considered.

  12. Catalogue of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) maternal den locations in the Beaufort Sea and neighboring regions, Alaska, 1910-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, George M.; Fischbach, Anthony S.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents data on the approximate locations and methods of discovery of 392 polar bear (Ursus maritimus) maternal dens found in the Beaufort Sea and neighboring regions between 1910 and 2010 that are archived by the U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center, Anchorage, Alaska. A description of data collection methods, biases associated with collection method, primary time periods, and spatial resolution are provided. Polar bears in the Beaufort Sea and nearby regions den on both the sea ice and on land. Standardized VHF surveys and satellite radio telemetry data provide a general understanding of where polar bears have denned in this region over the past 3 decades. Den observations made during other research activities and anecdotal reports from other government agencies, coastal residents, and industry personnel also are reported. Data on past polar bear maternal den locations are provided to inform the public and to provide information for natural resource agencies in planning activities to avoid or minimize interference with polar bear maternity dens.

  13. Invited review: climate change impacts in polar regions: lessons from Antarctic moss bank archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royles, Jessica; Griffiths, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Mosses are the dominant plants in polar and boreal regions, areas which are experiencing rapid impacts of regional warming. Long-term monitoring programmes provide some records of the rate of recent climate change, but moss peat banks contain an unrivalled temporal record of past climate change on terrestrial plant Antarctic systems. We summarise the current understanding of climatic proxies and determinants of moss growth for contrasting continental and maritime Antarctic regions, as informed by 13C and 18O signals in organic material. Rates of moss accumulation are more than three times higher in the maritime Antarctic than continental Antarctica with growing season length being a critical determinant of growth rate, and high carbon isotope discrimination values reflecting optimal hydration conditions. Correlation plots of 13C and 18O values show that species (Chorisodontium aciphyllum / Polytrichum strictum) and growth form (hummock / bank) are the major determinants of measured isotope ratios. The interplay between moss growth form, photosynthetic physiology, water status and isotope composition are compared with developments of secondary proxies, such as chlorophyll fluorescence. These approaches provide a framework to consider the potential impact of climate change on terrestrial Antarctic habitats as well as having implications for future studies of temperate, boreal and Arctic peatlands. There are many urgent ecological and environmental problems in the Arctic related to mosses in a changing climate, but the geographical ranges of species and life-forms are difficult to track individually. Our goal was to translate what we have learned from the more simple systems in Antarctica, for application to Arctic habitats. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ices on Mercury: Chemistry of volatiles in permanently cold areas of Mercury's north polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Paige, D. A.; Siegler, M. A.; Harju, E. R.; Schriver, D.; Johnson, R. E.; Travnicek, P.

    2017-01-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its flyby and orbital observations of Mercury in 2008-2015 indicated the presence of cold icy materials hiding in permanently-shadowed craters in Mercury's north polar region. These icy condensed volatiles are thought to be composed of water ice and frozen organics that can persist over long geologic timescales and evolve under the influence of the Mercury space environment. Polar ices never see solar photons because at such high latitudes, sunlight cannot reach over the crater rims. The craters maintain a permanently cold environment for the ices to persist. However, the magnetosphere will supply a beam of ions and electrons that can reach the frozen volatiles and induce ice chemistry. Mercury's magnetic field contains magnetic cusps, areas of focused field lines containing trapped magnetospheric charged particles that will be funneled onto the Mercury surface at very high latitudes. This magnetic highway will act to direct energetic protons, ions and electrons directly onto the polar ices. The radiation processing of the ices could convert them into higher-order organics and dark refractory materials whose spectral characteristics are consistent with low-albedo materials observed by MESSENGER Laser Altimeter (MLA) and RADAR instruments. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR), scattered UV light and solar energetic particles (SEP) also supply energy for ice processing. Cometary impacts will deposit H2O, CH4, CO2 and NH3 raw materials onto Mercury's surface which will migrate to the poles and be converted to more complex Csbnd Hsbnd Nsbnd Osbnd S-containing molecules such as aldehydes, amines, alcohols, cyanates, ketones, hydroxides, carbon oxides and suboxides, organic acids and others. Based on lab experiments in the literature, possible specific compounds produced may be: H2CO, HCOOH, CH3OH, HCO, H2CO3, CH3C(O)CH3, C2O, CxO, C3O2, CxOy, CH3CHO, CH3OCH2CH2OCH3, C2H6, CxHy, NO2, HNO2, HNO3, NH2OH, HNO, N2H2, N3, HCN, Na2O, Na

  15. Phylogenetic relationships between geographically separate Phormidium cyanobacteria: is there a link between north and south polar regions?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strunecký, Otakar; Elster, Josef; Komárek, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 10 (2010), s. 1419-1428 ISSN 0722-4060 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 934; GA MŠk ME 945; GA MŠk MEB080822 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : polar regions * phylogenetic relationships * cyanobacteria Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2010

  16. Present status and trend of oil/gas field exploration technology in polar region. Part 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saka, Koji

    1988-10-01

    The supporting system necessary for the oil/gas field exploration in the polar region includes the transportation of material/equipment between the support base and production site, maintenance/repair of exploration/production equipment, salvage and other systems. For the transportation, ice breakers, supply boats, trucks, helicopters and aircrafts are used. To heighten the ice breaker in ice breaking capacity, there is progress in bow shape, paint coating and power source, of which the main feature is the adoption of spoon shaped bow and diesel or turbine engine. For the transportation of personnel and material/equipment, the aircraft, and long flight range and high transport capacity helicopter being used, the hovercraft and vertical take-off and landing aircraft will be further introduced in no distant future. Besides, Archimedian screw type amphibian vehicle is in expectation for the various work use, and manned or unmanned submarine boat for the submarine work/maintenance use, diving unit for the submarine maintenance/inspection use and submarine burying unit for the pipeline burying use are developed. 23 figures, 18 tables.

  17. Low-frequency electrostatic turbulence in the polar cap E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecseli, H.L.; Primdahl, F.; Bahnsen, A.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic turbulent fluctuations in a broad frequency band were observed in the polar cap E region over Greenland by an instrumented rocket payload. The fluctuations were detected by potential-difference measurements on two sets of boom-mounted spherical probes. The direction and magnitude of the phase velocity of the fluctuations are determined by standard correlation techniques. The driving mechanism for the turbulence is identified as the Farley-Buneman instability. A characteristic velocity close to the sound speed is deduced while the direction of propagation deviates slightly from the E 0 x B 0 direction. A correlation time of 20-150 ms along the rocket trajectory is determined, indicating that the fluctuations are essentially statistically independent for altitude separations of >50 m. A conditional analysis of the signals indicates that to a good approximation they can be described by Gaussian statistics. The data exclude the possibility of wave steepening as a saturation mechanism for the linear instability. It is thus unlikely that wave energy is cascaded toward short wavelengths to be dissipated there

  18. Constructing regional advantage in branding the cross-border Euroregion Galicia-northern Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Silva Oliveira, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This paper employs a constructing regional advantage (CRA) approach in respect of examining the potential of joint branding strategies intended to position and give visibility to cross-border regions. The CRA concept is introduced here to improve understanding about the empirical significance of a

  19. GeoMapApp as a platform for visualizing marine data from Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Goodwillie, A. M.; O'hara, S. H.; Weissel, R.; McLain, K.; Chinhong, C.; Arko, R. A.; Chan, S.; Morton, J. J.; Pomeroy, D.

    2012-12-01

    To maximize the investment in expensive fieldwork the resulting data should be re-used as much as possible. In addition, unnecessary duplication of data collection effort should be avoided. This becomes even more important if access to field areas is as difficult and expensive as it is in Polar Regions. Making existing data discoverable in an easy to use platform is key to improve re-use and avoid duplication. A common obstacle is that use of existing data is often limited to specialists who know of the data existence and also have the right tools to view and analyze these data. GeoMapApp is a free, interactive, map based tool that allows users to discover, visualize, and analyze a large number of data sets. In addition to a global view, it provides polar map projections for displaying data in Arctic and Antarctic areas. Data that have currently been added to the system include Arctic swath bathymetry data collected from the USCG icebreaker Healy. These data are collected almost continuously including from cruises where bathymetry is not the main objective and for which existence of the acquired data may not be well known. In contrast, existence of seismic data from the Antarctic continental margin is well known in the seismic community. They are archived at and can be accessed through the Antarctic Seismic Data Library System (SDLS). Incorporating these data into GeoMapApp makes an even broader community aware of these data and the custom interface, which includes capabilities to visualize and explore these data, allows users without specific software or knowledge of the underlying data format to access the data. In addition to investigating these datasets, GeoMapApp provides links to the actual data sources to allow specialists the opportunity to re-use the original data. Important identification of data sources and data references are achieved on different levels. For access to the actual Antarctic seismic data GeoMapApp links to the SDLS site, where users have

  20. First measurement of target and double spin asymmetries for polarized e- polarized p --> e p pi0 in the nucleon resonance region above the Delta(1232)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biselli, Angela; Burkert, Volker; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bookwalter, Craig; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bosted, Peter; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Feuerbach, Robert; Fersch, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hassall, Neil; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kil; Park, Seungkyung; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Smith, Elton; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weygand, Dennis; Williams, M.; Wolin, Elliott; Wood, Michael; Yegneswaran, Amrit; Yurov, Mikhail; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045204
    The exclusive channel polarized proton(polarized e,e prime p)pi0 was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the Q2 range from 0.187 to 0.770 GeV2 at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Longitudinal target and beam-target asymmetries were extracted over a large range of center-of-mass angles of the pi0 and compared to the unitary isobar model MAID, the dynamic model by Sato and Lee, and the dynamic model DMT. A strong sensitivity to individual models was observed, in particular for the target asymmetry and in the higher invariant mass region. This data set, once included in the global fits of the above models, is expected to place strong constraints on the electrocoupling amplitudes A_{1/2} and S_{1/2} for the Roper resonance N(1400)P11, and the N(1535)S11 and N(1520)D13 states.

  1. A New Lunar Topographic Map of the Moon by KAGUYA-LALT: The First Precise Topography of the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, H.; Ishihara, Y.; Noda, H.; Goossens, S.; Tazawa, S.; Kawano, N.; Sasaki, S.; Oberst, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Japanese lunar explorer KAGUYA (SELENE) was launched successfully on September 14th, 2007. A laser altimeter (LALT) is on board the main orbiter of KAGUYA. The objectives of LALT are (1) determination of lunar global figure, (2) studies in internal structure and surface processes, (3) exploration of the lunar pole regions, and (4) reduction of lunar occultation data. LALT transmits laser pulses whose time width is about 20 nano-seconds and pulse interval is 1 second. Range accuracy is up to 5m. The range data are transformed to the topography of the moon with the aid of position and attitude data of the main orbiter. From the end of December 2007, LALT started continuous operation and a global topography map with unprecedented resolution was produced. Lunar mean radius is estimated as 1737.15±0.01 km and the COM-COF offset is 1.94 km based on the spherical harmonic model STM359_grid-02 derived from LALT topography. The amplitude of the power spectrum of STM359_grid-02 is larger than that of the previous model at L>30 degrees, which may reflect the process of basin formation and/or crustal evolution. In the polar regions where previous CLEMENTINE altimeter did not cover, many topographic features that were difficult to see on the imagery from spacecraft or ground based radar are discovered. The sunlit rate in the lunar polar regions is estimated by using the polar topographic map made from LALT topography. We found that i) the highest sunlit rate is 93~96 % in both polar regions and ii) the eternal shadow area is smaller than previous estimations. These results will be of great use for the planning of the lunar polar exploration in near future.

  2. Construction of transport and energy networks in the Baltic region as an impetus for regional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Alexey

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In light of some new aspects of the EU functioning, particularly, the recovery from the 2008-2009 global crisis, transportation and energy development projects are coming to the forefront in the Baltic region. At the same time, there is a need to consider EU’s recent adoption of a common seven-year financial program (2014—2020, which serves, in effect, as the Union’s budget. Given that, one may conclude that the countries of the Baltic region are entering a new stage of development. We look at the role and significance of transportation and energy projects as an instrument of economic development. Having studied the largest transport and energy projects in the Baltic region, we were able to show that the new infrastructure networks supported the investment expansion of Swedish and Finnish companies into the post-communist countries of the Baltic Region. Which, in its turn, allowed the Nordic investors to expand their domestic markets. The analysis also shows that the experience of private businesses proves a recent theoretical concept — the pyramid of regional development factors. As a result, the actual regional policy of the EU cannot be considered in the narrow sense of the Cohesion Policy alone.

  3. Construction of transport and energy networks in the Baltic region as an impetus for regional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In light of some new aspects of the EU functioning, particularly, the recovery from the 2008-2009 global crisis, transportation and energy development projects are coming to the forefront in the Baltic region. At the same time, there is a need to consider EU’s recent adoption of a common seven-year financial program (2014—2020, which serves, in effect, as the Union’s budget. Given that, one may conclude that the countries of the Baltic region are entering a new stage of development. We look at the role and significance of transportation and energy projects as an instrument of economic development. Having studied the largest transport and energy projects in the Baltic region, we were able to show that the new infrastructure networks supported the investment expansion of Swedish and Finnish companies into the post-communist countries of the Baltic Region. Which, in its turn, allowed the Nordic investors to expand their domestic markets. The analysis also shows that the experience of private businesses proves a recent theoretical concept — the pyramid of regional development factors. As a result, the actual regional policy of the EU cannot be considered in the narrow sense of the Cohesion Policy alone.

  4. Construction of transport and energy networks in the Baltic region as an impetus for regional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Alexey

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In light of some new aspects of the EU functioning, particularly, the recovery from the 2008-2009 global crisis, transportation and energy development projects are coming to the forefront in the Baltic region. At the same time, there is a need to consider EU’s recent adoption of a common seven-year financial program (2014—2020, which serves, in effect, as the Union’s budget. Given that, one may conclude that the countries of the Baltic region are entering a new stage of development. We look at the role and significance of transportation and energy projects as an instrument of economic development. Having studied the largest transport and energy projects in the Baltic region, we were able to show that the new infrastructure networks supported the investment expansion of Swedish and Finnish companies into the post-communist countries of the Baltic Region. Which, in its turn, allowed the Nordic investors to expand their domestic markets. The analysis also shows that the experience of private businesses proves a recent theoretical concept — the pyramid of regional development factors. As a result, the actual regional policy of the EU cannot be considered in the narrow sense of the Cohesion Policy alone.

  5. Estimation of increased regional income that emanates from economically justified road construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Pienaar

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies the possible development benefits than can emanate from economically justified road construction projects. It shows how the once-off increase in regional income resulting from investment in road construction projects, and the recurring additional regional income resulting from the use of new or improved roads can be estimated. The difference is shown that exists between a cost-benefit analysis (to determine how economically justified a project is and a regional economic income analysis (to estimate the general economic benefits that will be developed by investment in and usage of a road. Procedures are proposed through which the once-off and recurring increases in regional income can be estimated by using multiplier and accelerator analyses respectively. Finally guidelines are supplied on the appropriate usage of input variables in the calculation of the regional income multiplier.

  6. An Overview of Design Tools Applied in Civil Construction Area at Brazilian Southeast Region

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Samuel,; Vendrametto, Oduvaldo; González, Miguel,

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Knowledge Discovery and Sharing; International audience; The construction area in Brazil have different challenges to become more productive, efficient and sustainability. The objective is analyze the profile of projects offices at Brazil´s southeast region to determine the design tools used for project development and their characteristics in civil construction area. The strategy was a technical review about this issue in periodic papers and a survey, applied online, for project expe...

  7. Development, construction and characterization of a variable repetitive spin-polarized electron gun with an inverted-geometry insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espig, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Within the scope of this thesis a pulsed source of spin polarized electrons Photo-CATCH was designed, constructed, characterized and has been put into operation. This source is based on the photoemission of spin-polarized electrons from GaAs-photocathodes. Both the design of the electron gun, consisting of an ultra-high vacuum chamber and an electrode with Pierce geometry, as well as the properties of the electron beam have been simulated with CST Studio. Results were a maximum electric field of (0.064±0.001) MV/m/kV on the electrode surface and a beam emittance as a function of the radius of the laser spot on the photocathode of element of n,x =(1.7478(4).10 -4 .(r)/(μm)+2.8(18).10 -5 ) mm mrad at a beam current of 100 μA. Currently Photo-CATCH provides electron beams with an energy of 60 keV, which can be expanded up to 100 keV by upgrading the high-voltage power supply. The electron gun has an inverted-geometry insulator to ensure a compact design of the ultra-high vacuum chamber and a maximum person- and machine-safety from sparkovers. Since the properties of the laser light directly affect the properties of the generated electron beam a pulsed semiconductor laser system has been specially developed and built for Photo-CATCH. This is characterized by a high variability of its operating parameters, in particular its wavelength and repetition rate, in order to fulfill the broad variety of requirements of various nuclear physics experiments. By selecting the wavelength of the used laser diode highly polarized or high-current electron beams can be generated from GaAs-photocathodes. The time profile of the laser has direct influence to the longitudinal profile of the electron bunch. Through the radiofrequency modulation of the pumping current of the impedance-matched semiconductor laser system, consisting of a DC power source and an electrical pulse generator with 881 ps broad pump pulses, Lorentz shaped laser pulses with a minimum FWHM of (43.8±1.2) ps at a

  8. Ice Surface Temperature Variability in the Polar Regions and the Relationships to 2 Meter Air Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, J.; Madsen, K. S.; Englyst, P. N.

    2017-12-01

    Determining the surface and near surface air temperature from models or observations in the Polar Regions is challenging due to the extreme conditions and the lack of in situ observations. The errors in near surface temperature products are typically larger than for other regions of the world, and the potential for using Earth Observations is large. As part of the EU project, EUSTACE, we have developed empirical models for the relationship between the satellite observed skin ice temperatures and 2m air temperatures. We use the Arctic and Antarctic Sea and sea ice Surface Temperatures from thermal Infrared satellite sensors (AASTI) reanalysis to estimate daily surface air temperature over land ice and sea ice for the Arctic and the Antarctic. Large efforts have been put into collecting and quality controlling in situ observations from various data portals and research projects. The reconstruction is independent of numerical weather prediction models and thus provides an important alternative to modelled air temperature estimates. The new surface air temperature data record has been validated against more than 58.000 independent in situ measurements for the four surface types: Arctic sea ice, Greenland ice sheet, Antarctic sea ice and Antarctic ice sheet. The average correlations are 92-97% and average root mean square errors are 3.1-3.6°C for the four surface types. The root mean square error includes the uncertainty of the in-situ measurement, which ranges from 0.5 to 2°C. A comparison with ERA-Interim shows a consistently better performance of the satellite based air temperatures than the ERA-Interim for the Greenland ice sheet, when compared against observations not used in any of the two estimates. This is encouraging and demonstrates the values of these products. In addition, the procedure presented here works on satellite observations that are available in near real time and this opens up for a near real time estimation of the surface air temperature over

  9. GIA Modeling with 3D Rheology and Recent Ice Thickness Changes in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Wal, W.; Wu, P. P.

    2012-12-01

    Models for Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) mainly focus on the response of the solid Earth to ice thickness changes on the scale of thousands of years. However, some of the fastest vertical movement in former glaciated regions is due to changes in ice thickness that occurred within the last 1,000 years. Similar studies for the polar regions are limited, possibly due to a lack of knowledge on past ice sheet thicknesses there. Still, predictions of uplift rate and mass change due to recent ice thickness changes need to improve in order to provide accurate estimates of current mass loss. In order to obtain a measurable response to variations in ice thickness in the last 1,000 years, viscosity in the lithosphere or top of the upper mantle needs to be lower than the mantle viscosity values in conventional GIA models. In the absence of reliable models for recent ice thickness changes we aim to bracket the predicted uplift rates and gravity rates for such changes by assuming simplified past ice growth and melt patterns. Instead of adding a low-viscous layer in the mantle a priori, creep parameters are based on information from experimental constraints, seismology and heatflow measurements. Thus the model includes viscosity varying in space and time. The simulations are performed on a finite element model of a spherical, self-gravitating, incompressible Earth using the commercial software Abaqus. 3D composite rheology is implemented based on temperature fields from heatflow measurements or seismic velocity anomalies. The lithospheric thickness does not need to be specified as the effective elastic thickness is determined by the local effective viscosity. ICE-5G is used as ice loading history while ice changes during and around the Little Ice Age in Greenland are assumed to take place near the coast. A 3D composite rheology has been shown to match historic sea levels well, but uplift rates are somewhat underestimated. With the GIA models that best match uplift rates in

  10. Comparison of Housing Construction Development in Selected Regions of Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorský, Ján; Petráková, Zora; Hollý, Ján

    2017-12-01

    In fast-growing countries, the economic growth, which came after the global financial crisis, ought to be manifested in the development of housing policy. The development of the region is directly related to the increase of the quality of living of its inhabitants. Housing construction and its relation with the availability of housing is a key issue for population overall. Comparison of its development in selected regions is important for experts in the field of construction, mayors of the regions, the state, but especially for the inhabitants themselves. The aim of the article is to compare the number of new dwellings with building permits and completed dwellings with final building approval between selected regions by using a mathematical statistics method - “Analysis of variance”. The article also uses the tools of descriptive statistics such as a point graph, a graph of deviations from the average, basic statistical characteristics of mean and variability. Qualitative factors influencing the construction of flats as well as the causes of quantitative differences in the number of started apartments under construction and completed apartments in selected regions of Central Europe are the subjects of the article’s conclusions.

  11. In Situ Atmospheric Pressure Measurements in the Martian Southern Polar Region: Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor Meteorology Package on the Mars Polar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Polkko, J.; Siili, T.; Crisp, D.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure observations are crucial for the success of the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) Meteorology (MET) package onboard the Mars Polar Lander (MPL), due for launch early next year. The spacecraft is expected to land in December 1999 (L(sub s) = 256 degrees) at a high southern latitude (74 degrees - 78 degrees S). The nominal period of operation is 90 sols but may last up to 210 sols. The MVACS/MET experiment will provide the first in situ observations of atmospheric pressure, temperature, wind, and humidity in the southern hemisphere of Mars and in the polar regions. The martian atmosphere goes through a large-scale atmospheric pressure cycle due to the annual condensation/sublimation of the atmospheric CO2. Pressure also exhibits short period variations associated with dust storms, tides, and other atmospheric events. A series of pressure measurements can hence provide us with information on the large-scale state and dynamics of the atmosphere, including the CO2 and dust cycles as well as local weather phenomena. The measurements can also shed light on the shorter time scale phenomena (e.g., passage of dust devils) and hence be important in contributing to our understanding of mixing and transport of heat, dust, and water vapor.

  12. TADPOL: A 1.3 mm SURVEY OF DUST POLARIZATION IN STAR-FORMING CORES AND REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Heiles, Carl [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Kwon, Woojin [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Carpenter, John M.; Lamb, James W.; Pillai, Thushara [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Looney, Leslie W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Fiege, Jason D.; Franzmann, Erica [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Houde, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hughes, A. Meredith [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Marrone, Daniel P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Matthews, Brenda C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Rd., Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Pound, Marc W. [Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Rahman, Nurur [Physics Department, University of Johannesburg, C1-Lab 140, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Sandell, Göran, E-mail: chat@astro.berkeley.edu [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    We present λ 1.3 mm Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and eight star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ∼2.''5 resolution TADPOL maps with ∼20'' resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings. (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (∼20'') and small (∼2.''5) scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ∼1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ∼2.''5 resolution we see the so-called polarization hole effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article.

  13. TADPOL: A 1.3 mm SURVEY OF DUST POLARIZATION IN STAR-FORMING CORES AND REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Heiles, Carl; Kwon, Woojin; Carpenter, John M.; Lamb, James W.; Pillai, Thushara; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Looney, Leslie W.; Fiege, Jason D.; Franzmann, Erica; Houde, Martin; Hughes, A. Meredith; Marrone, Daniel P.; Matthews, Brenda C.; Pound, Marc W.; Rahman, Nurur; Sandell, Göran

    2014-01-01

    We present λ 1.3 mm Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and eight star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ∼2.''5 resolution TADPOL maps with ∼20'' resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings. (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (∼20'') and small (∼2.''5) scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ∼1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ∼2.''5 resolution we see the so-called polarization hole effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article

  14. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, Aymeric-Pierre B.; Kocurek, Gary; Bourke, Mary

    2010-01-01

    High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery of the central Olympia Undae Dune Field in the north polar region of Mars shows a reticulate dune pattern consisting of two sets of nearly orthogonal dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarse-grained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis of dune crest length, spacing, defect density, and orientation indicates that ...

  15. The Great Solar Active Region NOAA 12192: Helicity Transport, Filament Formation, and Impact on the Polar Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon; McMaken, Tyler C.

    2017-08-01

    The solar active region (AR), NOAA 12192, appeared in 2014 October as the largest AR in 24 years. Here we examine the counterintuitive nature of two diffusion-driven processes in the region: the role of helicity buildup in the formation of a major filament, and the relationship between the effects of supergranular diffusion and meridional flow on the AR and on the polar field. Quantitatively, calculations of current helicity and magnetic twist from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms indicate that, though AR 12192 emerged with negative helicity, positive helicity from subsequent flux emergence, consistent with the hemispheric sign-preference of helicity, increased over time within large-scale, weak-field regions such as those near the polarity inversion line (PIL). Morphologically, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of filament barbs, sigmoidal patterns, and bases of Fe xii stalks initially exhibited signatures of negative helicity, and the long filament that subsequently formed had a strong positive helicity consistent with the helicity buildup along the PIL. We find from full-disk HMI magnetograms that AR 12192's leading positive flux was initially closer to the equator but, owing either to the region’s magnetic surroundings or to its asymmetric flux density distribution, was transported poleward more quickly on average than its trailing negative flux, contrary to the canonical pattern of bipole flux transport. This behavior caused the AR to have a smaller effect on the polar fields than expected and enabled the formation of the very long neutral line where the filament formed.

  16. Brain region distribution and patterns of bioaccumulative perfluoroalkyl carboxylates and sulfonates in east greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Alana K; Letcher, Robert J; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the comparative accumulation of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in eight brain regions of polar bears (Ursus maritimus, n = 19) collected in 2006 from Scoresby Sound, East Greenland. The PFAAs studied were perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs, C(6) -C(15) chain lengths) and sulfonates (C(4) , C(6) , C(8) , and C(10) chain lengths) as well as selected precursors including perfluorooctane sulfonamide. On a wet-weight basis, blood-brain barrier transport of PFAAs occurred for all brain regions, although inner regions of the brain closer to incoming blood flow (pons/medulla, thalamus, and hypothalamus) contained consistently higher PFAA concentrations compared to outer brain regions (cerebellum, striatum, and frontal, occipital, and temporal cortices). For pons/medulla, thalamus, and hypothalamus, the most concentrated PFAAs were perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), ranging from 47 to 58 ng/g wet weight, and perfluorotridecanoic acid, ranging from 43 to 49 ng/g wet weight. However, PFOS and the longer-chain PFCAs (C(10) -C(15) ) were significantly (p  0.05) different among brain regions. The burden of the sum of PFCAs, perfluoroalkyl sulfonates, and perfluorooctane sulfonamide in the brain (average mass, 392 g) was estimated to be 46 µg. The present study demonstrates that both PFCAs and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates cross the blood-brain barrier in polar bears and that wet-weight concentrations are brain region-specific. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  17. Analysing the Relationship between New Housing Supply and Residential Construction Costs with Regional Heterogeneities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiao Liu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available New housing supply in Australia has been experiencing a low increasing rate in conjunction with a dramatic increase in residential construction costs since the 1990s. This study aims to estimate the relationship between new housing supply and residential construction costs with the regional heterogeneities. Based on a panel error correction model, it can be identified that there is a causal link and a significant correlation between new housing supply and construction costs in the Australian sub-national housing construction markets. The model developed in this research assists policy makers to better understand the nature of the supply side of the housing sector and then enact appropriate policies to improve the new housing supply in Australia.

  18. Radio-continuum study of the supernova remnants in the large Magellanic Cloud: An SNR with a highly polarized breakout region: SNR J0455-6838

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of new moderate resolution ATCA observations of SNR J0455-6838. We found that this SNR exhibits a mostly typical appearance with rather steep and curved α=-0.81±0.18 and D=43×31±1 pc. Regions of high polarization were detected, including unusually strong (~70% region corresponding to the northern breakout. Such a strong polarization in breakout regions has not been observed in any other SNR.

  19. Mineralogy and Iron Content of the Lunar Polar Regions Using the Kaguya Spectral Profiler and the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemelin, M.; Lucey, P. G.; Trang, D.; Jha, K.

    2016-12-01

    The lunar polar regions are of high scientific interest, but the extreme lighting conditions have made quantitative analyses using reflectance spectra difficult; some regions are in permanent shadow, and flat surfaces are difficult to correct photometrically due to the extreme grazing incidence and low signal available. Thus, most mineral maps derived from visible and near infrared reflectance spectra have been constrained to within 50° in latitude. The mineralogy of the polar regions, or 44% of the lunar surface, is almost entirely unknown. A few studies have provided compositional analysis based on the spectral shape (where strong absorption bands were present) of lithologies dominated by one or two minerals. In this study, we take a novel approach and use strong signal and well-calibrated reflectance acquired by two different instruments, the Kaguya Spectra Profiler (SP) and the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), in order to derive the first FeO and mineral maps of the polar regions at a spatial resolution of 1 km per pixel. We use reflectance ratios from SP and calibrated reflectance data from LOLA to derive the first polar maps of FeO, which are within 2 wt.% of the FeO measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray spectrometer up to 85° in latitude. We then use the reflectance data from SP and Hapke radiative transfer model to compute the abundance of olivine, low-calcium pyroxene, high-calcium pyroxene and plagioclase, using FeO as a constraint. The radiative transfer model yields an error in mineral abundances of 9 wt.%. We use the mineral maps to study the composition of 27 central peaks and 5 basin rings in the polar regions, and relate their composition to their depth of origin in the lunar crust. We find that the central peaks and basin rings in Feldspathic Highlands Terrane are mostly anorthositic in composition, with modal plagioclase content ranging between 66 and 92 wt.%. The central peaks and basin rings in the South Pole-Aitken basin are noritic

  20. The substantiation of methodical instrumentation to increase the tempo of high-rise construction in region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, Svetlana; Makeeva, Tatyana; Chugunov, Andrei; Andreeva, Peraskovya

    2018-03-01

    One of the important conditions of effective renovation of accommodation in region on the base of realization of high-rise construction projects is attraction of investments by forming favorable investment climate, as well as reduction if administrative barriers in construction and update of main funds of housing and communal services. The article proposes methodological bases for assessing the state of the investment climate in the region, as well as the methodology for the formation and evaluation of the investment program of the housing and communal services enterprise. The proposed methodologies are tested on the example of the Voronezh region. Authors also showed the necessity and expediency of using the consulting mechanism in the development of state and non-state investment projects and programs.

  1. Biotypology, regionalism, and the construction of a plural Brazilian bodily identity, 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimieiro-Gomes, Ana Carolina

    2016-12-01

    This article investigates regional biotypological studies and the construction of biological deterministic discourses about the Brazilian identity in the 1930s. Biotypological research was undertaken to determine the normal body type of the Brazilian man, using its peculiar classificatory lexicon. Studies into the bodily profile of specific regions, like the northeast and São Paulo state, featured in this research. In the context of the contemporary debates about race, miscegenation, and national identity, these investigations were geared towards biological determinism and the influence of the environment and social and cultural aspects on the bodily development of Brazilians. It is shown how regional biotypological studies echoed racial, normalizing, exclusive viewpoints and contributed to the construction of a miscegenated Brazilian bodily identity.

  2. Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of 5 years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anticorrelation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice!free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7% and 10%, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5% 7%. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Because longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  3. The Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of five years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anti-correlation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7 and 10 percent, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5 to 7 percent. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Since longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  4. A one stop website for sharing sea ice, ocean and ice sheet data over the polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Cheng, X.; Liu, J.; Hui, F.; Ding, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The polar regions, including the Arctic and Antarctic, are changing rapidly. Our capabilities to remotely monitor the state of the polar regions are increasing greatly. Satellite and airborne technologies have been deployed and further improvements are underway. Meanwhile, various algorithms have been developed to retrieve important parameters to maximize the effectiveness of available remote sensing data. These technologies and algorithms promise to greatly increase our understanding of variations in sea ice, ocean and ice sheet. However, so much information is scattered out there. It is challenging to find exactly what you are looking for by just searching it through the network. Therefore, we try to establish a common platform to sharing some key parameters for the polar regions. A group of scientists from Beijing Normal University and University at Albany developed a website as a "one-stop shop" for the current state of the polar regions. The website provides real-time (or near real-time) key parameters derived from a variety of operational satellites in an understandable, accessible and credible way. Three types of parameter, which are sea ice, ocean and ice sheet respectively, are shown and available to be downloaded in the website. Several individual parameters are contained in a specific type of parameter. The parameters of sea ice include sea ice concentration, sea ice thickness, melt pond, sea ice leads and sea ice drift. The ocean parameters contain sea surface temperature and sea surface wind. Ice sheet balance, ice velocity and some other parameters are classified into the type of ice sheet parameter. Some parameters are well-calibrated and available to be obtained from other websites, such as sea ice concentration, sea ice thickness sea surface temperature. Since these parameters are retrieved from different sensors, such as SSMI, AMSR2 etc., data format, spatial resolution of the parameters are not unified. We collected and reprocessed these

  5. Intensity of pelagic-benthic coupling in different regions along the Antarctic Polar Front - Clues from abyssal megafauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würzberg, Laura; Zinkann, Ann-Christine; Brandt, Angelika; Janussen, Dorte; Bohn, Jens M.; Schwabe, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    The zone surrounding the Antarctic Polar Front is a region characterized by elevated seasonal primary production. Studies on the implications for the fauna inhabiting the underlying deep-sea floor, however, are rare. The present study focuses on the abundance of megafaunal organisms caught by means of an Agassiz Trawl during the SYSTem COupling in the Southern Ocean II (SYSTCO II) expedition (RV Polarstern cruise ANT XXVIII/3). Biomass estimates in terms of volume as well as species richness of echinoderms were additionally taken into account. Abyssal stations (ca. 4000 m depth) located in three different regions along the Antarctic Polar Front characterized by different primary production regimes and oceanographic features were sampled. One shallower station (337 m depth) was used as reference station. Highest megafaunal abundances were found at the shallow station (147 individuals per 1000 m2). Megafaunal abundances were low to moderate at the abyssal stations (7.2-23.5 individuals per 1000 m2) with the exception of the region northwest of South Georgia, where distinctly higher abundances were found (up to 119.7 individuals per 1000 m2). The same pattern was observed for biomass estimates. At the other regions, magnitude of megafaunal abundances and echinoderm biomasses were found not to be linked to the surface levels of primary production. This indicates that strong pelagic-benthic coupling likely occurs only downstream of South Georgia. Echinoderm species richness does not appear to be directly related to the environmental conditions as it does not differ statistically between the considered areas.

  6. Under-Ice Science in the Polar Regions with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, C.; Murphy, C.; Singh, H.; Das, S. B.; Jackson, R. H.; Kukulya, A.; Littlefield, R.; Maksym, T. L.; Plueddemann, A. J.; Sohn, R. A.; Straneo, F.; Wilkinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Developments in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology over the last decade have enabled scientists to study areas of the ocean at high latitude that were previously unapproachable. In particular, advances in acoustic communications, robotic autonomy and navigation, and compact sensor technology allow AUVs to work in close proximity to sea ice, glacial fronts, and the sea floor under multi-year pack ice. We describe the technology that enabled several expeditions to both polar regions that have used Seabed-class AUVs as the primary platform for making scientific measurements. We also describe current and upcoming missions using the smaller Seabed-100 and REMUS-100 AUVs for shallow-water work near glacial fronts. Several problems must be solved in order to successfully use robots under ice. Acoustic communications must be robust enough for operators on the surface to inform the AUV of changing conditions so that the vehicle can safely return to open water on the surface - during the AGAVE and IceBell expeditions, we experienced sea ice drift rates of tens of centimeters per second, and moving ice floes that constrained the availability of open water. AUV navigation must be flexible enough for the robot to switch reference frames during a mission depending on the conditions and on the scientific objective. During a single deployment during the IceBell expedition, it was typical for the robot to switch from ship-relative (using acoustic transponders), to ice-relative (using a doppler velocity log), to ice-relative (using a distinct set of acoustic transponders), and back again; an AUV may also need to navigate relative to the sea floor (as during the AGAVE expedition). Making ice-relative measurements also requires taking ice floe rotation into account, and on-board navigation relative to a rotating frame may be necessary. Finally, specialized scenarios such as when navigating near a glacial front require navigation relative to vertical, rather than horizontal

  7. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  8. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  9. Polarization resolved classification of winter road condition in the near-infrared region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselgren, Johan; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2012-05-20

    Three different configurations utilizing polarized short-wave infrared light to classify winter road conditions have been investigated. In the first configuration, polarized broadband light was detected in the specular and backward directions, and the quotient between the detected intensities was used as the classification parameter. Best results were obtained for the SS-configuration. This sensor was shown to be able to distinguish between the smooth road conditions of water and ice from the diffuse road conditions of snow and dry asphalt with a probability of wrong classification as low as 7%. The second sensor configuration was a pure backward architecture utilizing polarized light with two distinct wavelengths. This configuration was shown to be effective for the important problem of distinguishing water from ice with a probability of wrong classification of only 1.5%. The third configuration was a combination of the two previous ones. This combined sensor utilizing bispectral illumination and bidirectional detection resulted in a probability of wrong classification as low as 2% among all four surfaces.

  10. Recovery of native prairie after pipeline construction in the Sand Hills region of Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.; Kremer, L.; Marshall, W.

    1996-01-01

    Land reclamation measures taken after construction of a large diameter natural gas pipeline in the Great Sand Hills region of southwestern Saskatchewan were detailed. Mitigation measures included modified construction procedures to minimize the size of the disturbance, worker educational programs to sensitize them to the prevailing fragile environment, dormant season construction, efforts to salvage topsoil seedbank, fertilizer application, straw bale wind barriers, brush mulch wind barriers, surface manipulation with the Hodder Gouger, fencing-out cattle, and the application of a seed mixture of agronomic legumes and native grasses. Vegetation and soil erosion were monitored over a period of four years. After four years the canopy cover was 88 per cent native species. On low-lying, protected sites vegetation was stable enough to support cattle grazing. Exposed sites will not reach this level of vegetation stability for some years to come due soil erosion by wind

  11. Characterization of traditional raw materials used in housing construction in Huambo region - Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Elsa; Duarte, Isabel; Varum, Humberto; Pinho, António; Norman, Antónia

    2016-04-01

    The sustainability of buildings associated to the use of raw earth has motivated the studies and the development of techniques and methods in the context of this type of construction. In the region of Huambo, Angola, these construction techniques are widely used, especially for low-income families who represent the majority of the population. Much of the buildings in Huambo province are built with adobe. Due to the climate in this region, subtropical, hot and humid, with altitudes above 1000 meters and extensive river system, these buildings are particularly vulnerable to the action of water and develop, in many situations, early degradation. The Huambo Province is located in central Angola, has 36 km2 area and approximately 2 million inhabitants. This work aims to evaluate, by conducting in-situ tests, physical and mechanical properties of adobe blocks typically used in the construction of those buildings. The methodology is based on field campaigns where in-situ expeditious tests were performed in soils (smell test, color, touch, brightness, sedimentation, ball, hardness, etc.) and tests on adobes blocks made with traditional procedures, particularly in terms of durability and erodibility (erosion test at Geelong method; evaluation test of wet / dry cycle, applying the New Zealand standards 4297: 1998; 4297: 1998 and 4297: 1999). The results will contribute to the characterization of the geomaterials and methods used in construction with earth in Huambo Province, contributing to the improvement of these sustainable solutions, with a strong presence in this region. The results of this study will also contribute to the proposal of constructive solutions with improved performance characteristics, comfort, safety and durability.

  12. Financing the construction of transport infrastructure as the basis for sustainable development of the regional economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidziy, Elena

    2017-10-01

    Dependence of the regional economic development from efficiency of financing of the construction of transport infrastructure is analyzed and proved in this article. Effective mechanism for infrastructure projects financing, public and private partnership, is revealed and its concrete forms are formulated. Here is proposed an optimal scenario for financing for the transport infrastructure, which can lead to positive transformations in the economy. Paper considers the advantages and risks of public and private partnership for subjects of contractual relations. At that, components for the assessment of economic effect of the implementation of infrastructure projects were proposed simultaneously with formulation of conditions for minimization risks. Results of the research could be used for solution of persistent problems in the development of transport infrastructure, issues of financial assurance of construction of infrastructure projects at the regional level.

  13. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. (New York State Psychiatric Institute, NY (United States)); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Production of positive pions from polarized protons by linearly polarized photons in the energy region 300--420 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Get' man, V.A.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Grushin, V.F.; Derkach, A.Y.; Zhebrovskii, Y.V.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kolesnikov, L.Y.; Luchanin, A.A.; Rubashkin, A.L.; Sanin, V.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporov, E.A.; Telegin, Y.N.; Shalatskii, S.V.

    1980-10-01

    A technique for measurement of the polarization observables ..sigma.., P, and T for the reaction ..gamma..p..-->..n..pi../sup +/ in a doubly polarized experiment (polarized proton target + linearly polarized photon beam) is described. Measurements of the angular distributions of these observables in the range of pion emission angles 30--150/sup 0/ are presented for four photon energies from 300 to 420 MeV. Inclusion of the new experimental data in an energy-independent multipole analysis of photoproduction from protons permits a more reliable selection of solutions to be made.

  15. Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Harbor Deepening Project, Jacksonville, FL Palm Valley Bridge Project, Jacksonville, FL Rotary Club of San Juan, San Juan, PR Tren Urbano Subway...David. What is nanotechnology? What are its implications for construction?, Foresight/CRISP Workshop on Nanotechnology, Royal Society of Arts

  16. The Great Solar Active Region NOAA 12192: Helicity Transport, Filament Formation, and Impact on the Polar Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMaken, Tyler C. [National Solar Observatory REU Program, 3665 Discovery Drive, 3rd Floor, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Petrie, Gordon J. D., E-mail: tmcmaken@gmail.com, E-mail: gpetrie@noao.edu [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, 3rd Floor, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    The solar active region (AR), NOAA 12192, appeared in 2014 October as the largest AR in 24 years. Here we examine the counterintuitive nature of two diffusion-driven processes in the region: the role of helicity buildup in the formation of a major filament, and the relationship between the effects of supergranular diffusion and meridional flow on the AR and on the polar field. Quantitatively, calculations of current helicity and magnetic twist from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms indicate that, though AR 12192 emerged with negative helicity, positive helicity from subsequent flux emergence, consistent with the hemispheric sign-preference of helicity, increased over time within large-scale, weak-field regions such as those near the polarity inversion line (PIL). Morphologically, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of filament barbs, sigmoidal patterns, and bases of Fe xii stalks initially exhibited signatures of negative helicity, and the long filament that subsequently formed had a strong positive helicity consistent with the helicity buildup along the PIL. We find from full-disk HMI magnetograms that AR 12192's leading positive flux was initially closer to the equator but, owing either to the region’s magnetic surroundings or to its asymmetric flux density distribution, was transported poleward more quickly on average than its trailing negative flux, contrary to the canonical pattern of bipole flux transport. This behavior caused the AR to have a smaller effect on the polar fields than expected and enabled the formation of the very long neutral line where the filament formed.

  17. Distribution of the K-corona over the polar regions of the solar disk: 1965-1983. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.; Seagraves, P.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this technical note is to present a set of synoptic observations from the Mauna Loa series of K-coronameters in polar projection format. The initial motivation for the production of these plots was the desire to present data that would be useful in the study of the evolution of high-latitude coronal streamers over the solar cycles 20 and 21. It now seems likely that there will be other uses for these data. Possibly the variation of coronal hole area over sunspot cycle can be extracted from the data presented below, and it is anticipated that the POLES plots of the north and south polar regions will provide an interesting adjunct data set for the upcoming ISPM mission, now scheduled for the minimum of the present sunspot cycle. Only east limb data have been used for this project. This choice was dictated by the amount of disk space available at Mauna Loa for the Mk-I and Mk-II data. A synoptic record of both limbs is presently kept for Mk-III data, and the routine used for the polar plot may be applied to either the east limb or west limb data from this current version of the instrument

  18. Solar Lyman-Alpha Polarization Observation of the Chromosphere and Transition Region by the Sounding Rocket Experiment CLASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Hara, Hiroshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Giono, Gabriel; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman a line (Ly(alpha) line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly(alpha) lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approx. 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly(alpha) line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly(alpha) line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (> 50%) in Lya line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (<5%) (cold mirror coating) was applied to the primary mirror. On the other hand, the efficiency of the polarization analyzer required chromospheric magnetic field measurement (the amount of light) Conventional (magnesium fluoride has long been known as a material for vacuum ultraviolet (MgF2) manufactured ellipsometer; Rs = 22%) about increased to 2.5 times were high efficiency reflective polarizing element analysis. This device, Bridou et al. (2011) is proposed "that is

  19. Natural circular dichroism of amino acid films observed in soft X-ray and VUV region using polarizing undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Kaneko, F.; Ohta, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Kitada, T.; Agui, A.; Fujii, F.; Yokoya, A.; Yagi-Watanabe, K.; Yamada, T.

    2005-01-01

    We observed the natural circular dichroism NCD of amino acid films in the soft X-ray region for the first time [M. Tanaka, K. Nakagawa, A. Agui, K. Fujii, A. Yokoya, Physica Scripta, in press]. Based on the success, a new generation of detection system is now under preparation. Vacuum ultraviolet NCD of amino acid films was measured successfully using a polarizing undulator [H. Onuki, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 246 (1986) 94] installed at the TERAS electron storage ring at AIST, Tsukuba, Japan. A result of NCD measurement for alanine films is described in detail

  20. Photoproduction of positive pions from polarized protons in the region of the first resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Get' man, V.A.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Derkach, A.Y.; Zhebrovskii, Y.V.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kolesnikov, L.Y.; Kuz' menko, V.S.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Ranyuk, Y.N.; Rubashkin, A.L.; Sanin, V.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporov, E.A.; Telegin, Y.N.; Shalatskii, S.V.; Grushin, V.F.

    1980-04-01

    A technique for measuring the T asymmetry for the process ..gamma..p ..-->.. n..pi../sup +/ using a polarized proton target and a quasimonochromatic beam of photons is described. The results of measuring T in the range of pion-emission angles theta(/sub ..pi../ = 3 to 150/sup 0/ at a photon energy of 340 MeV are presented and discussed. It is shown that the results obtained allow a more reliable selection of the solutions of the energy-independent multipole analysis.

  1. Rapid climate variability during warm and cold periods in polar regions and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Landais, A.; Combourieu-Nebout, N.

    2005-01-01

    Typical rapid climate events punctuating the last glacial period in Greenland, Europe and Antarctica are compared to two rapid events occurring under warmer conditions: (i) Dansgaard-Oeschger event 25, the first abrupt warming occurring during last glacial inception; (ii) 8.2 ka BP event, the only...... rapid cooling recorded during the Holocene in Greenland ice cores and in Ammersee, Germany. The rate of warming during previous warmer interglacial periods is estimated from polar ice cores to 1.5 °C per millennium, without abrupt changes. Climate change expected for the 21st century should however...

  2. Innovative optical spectrometers for ice core sciences and atmospheric monitoring at polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Roberto; Alemany, Olivier; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Desbois, Thibault; Faïn, Xavier; Kassi, Samir; Kerstel, Erik; Legrand, Michel; Marrocco, Nicola; Méjean, Guillaume; Preunkert, Suzanne; Romanini, Daniele; Triest, Jack; Ventrillard, Irene

    2015-04-01

    In this talk recent developments accomplished from a collaboration between the Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPhy) and the Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement (LGGE) both in Grenoble (France), are discussed, covering atmospheric chemistry of high reactive species in polar regions and employing optical spectrometers for both in situ and laboratory measurements of glacial archives. In the framework of an ANR project, a transportable spectrometer based on the injection of a broadband frequency comb laser into a high-finesse optical cavity for the detection of IO, BrO, NO2 and H2CO has been realized.[1] The robust spectrometer provides shot-noise limited measurements for as long as 10 minutes, reaching detection limits of 0.04, 2, 10 and 200 ppt (2σ) for the four species, respectively. During the austral summer of 2011/12 the instrument has been used for monitoring, for the first time, NO2, IO and BrO at Dumont d'Urville Station at East of Antarctica. The measurements highlighted a different chemistry between East and West coast, with the halogen chemistry being promoted to the West and the OH and NOx chemistry on the East.[2] In the framework of a SUBGLACIOR project, an innovative drilling probe has been realized. The instrument is capable of retrieving in situ real-time vertical profiles of CH4 and δD of H2O trapped inside the ice sheet down to more than 3 km of depth within a single Antarctic season. The drilling probe containing an embedded OFCEAS (optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy) spectrometer will be extremely useful for (i) identify potential sites for investigating the oldest ice (aiming 1.5 Myrs BP records for resolving a major climate reorganization called the Mid-Pleistocene transition occurred around 1 Myrs ago) and (ii) providing direct access to past temperatures and climate cycles thanks to the vertical distribution of two key climatic signatures.[3] The spectrometer provides detection

  3. Polarized radio emission of an intense active region on the Sun in July 1974 at wavelengths of 1.9; 2.5 and 3.5 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachurin, A.F.; Dvoryashin, A.S.; Eryushev, N.N.; Tsvetkov, L.I.

    1980-01-01

    The circularly polarized radio emission of an intense active region on the Sun (spot group N 96, McMath regions 13043) was considered at the begining of July 1974. The observations were performed with the 22-m radio telescope of the Crimean astrophysical observatory at wavelengths of 1.9; 2.5 and 3.5 cm simultaneously. Main results are: 1. The spectrum of degree of polarization of a local source of radio emission in the 1.9-3.5 cm wavelength range varies appreciably with time. Spectral maximum of degree of polarization displaces towards shorter wavelengths when activity of the sunspot group increases. 2. The degree of polarization of radio emission of the local source varies considerably at wavelengths of 1.9 and 2.5 cm from day to day. At the 3.5 cm wavelength these changes were not observed. Appreciable variations of the degree of polarization can be observed during a time interval of 10-20 min even if radio bursts are not recorded. 3. The sense of polarization of radio emission for comparatively strong bursts, in most cases, coincides with that for a local source. 4. The change of sense of polarization for a burst depending on wavelength is observed on different wavelengths in the 1.9-3.5 cm range. At a fixed wavelength of the range under review, one sense of polarization can change during the burst to the other in a few seconds

  4. CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY OF UKRAINIAN NATIONAL HOUSING (PRYDNIPROVSK REGION IS AS AN EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EYVSEYEVA G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. Nowadays it is difficult to see a typical, old peasant house, or different types of national confident buildings. It will take a little time and some monuments of national architecture will be difficult to find. Meanwhile, rural housing was the most massive object of traditional construction. It embodies the best achievements and experience of national architects; it is of great value for the history of Ukrainian culture, history of Ukrainian art, architecture and ethnography, sustainable construction. National art of peasant house construction of Prydniprovsk region of Ukraine, is multidimensional space and time in an array of hand-made Ukrainian art is a national architecture, its decoration, clothing filling of the interior of the house and estate, as well as plastic and spatial formation, determining loci ritual of family life of Ukrainian village since the ancient times to the present. Analysis of publications. The first publications about the Ukrainian national housing, was made in the late nineteenth - early twentieth century. These were the works of ethnographers and historians M.Sumtsova [17] and D. Bagalіya [1-4], G.Lukomskogo a little [12]. B. Kharuzin’s work is interesting in the context of our study .[19]. The interesting materials were found by us in the series of publications that have appeared in the end of XIX and beginning of XX centures and are associated with vital trend to build fire-resistant housing, and ukrainian peasant house was such kind of housing. "Nowadays such kind of peasant houses and storages are put because they cheap, strong and good and the most important is to be resistant to fire. Houses with brick and stone trying to be built by reach people, and houses with the clay and saman are built by poor people,they are elegant, strong, cheap long-existed and non-flammable " that is stated in the foreword to a small edition by I. Ulashivsky "Saman building" [18]. A small booklet" Valkovi

  5. A changing world: Using nuclear techniques to investigate the impact of climate change on polar and mountainous regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear techniques are being used in polar and mountainous regions to study climate change and its impact on the quality of land, water and ecosystems in order to better conserve and manage these resources. Researchers from around the world will be using data from 13 benchmark sites to draw conclusions about the effects of the rapidly changing climate on the Arctic, mountains and the western part of Antarctica, which have alarmed communities, environmentalists, scientists and policy makers. Between July 2015 and July 2016 they will be using isotopic and nuclear techniques, as well as geochemical and biological analytical methods from other scientific disciplines. This will enable them to track soil and water, to monitor the movement of soil and sediment and to assess the effects of melting permafrost on the atmosphere, as well as on the land, water and fragile ecosystems of mountainous and polar regions. The measurements follow numerous on-site tests carried out since November 2014 to perfect the sampling technique.

  6. Constructing regional climate networks in the Amazonia during recent drought events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Heng; Ramos, Antônio M T; Macau, Elbert E N; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    Climate networks are powerful approaches to disclose tele-connections in climate systems and to predict severe climate events. Here we construct regional climate networks from precipitation data in the Amazonian region and focus on network properties under the recent drought events in 2005 and 2010. Both the networks of the entire Amazon region and the extreme networks resulted from locations severely affected by drought events suggest that network characteristics show slight difference between the two drought events. Based on network degrees of extreme drought events and that without drought conditions, we identify regions of interest that are correlated to longer expected drought period length. Moreover, we show that the spatial correlation length to the regions of interest decayed much faster in 2010 than in 2005, which is because of the dual roles played by both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The results suggest that hub nodes in the regional climate network of Amazonia have fewer long-range connections when more severe drought conditions appeared in 2010 than that in 2005.

  7. Photofission of NAT Pt by monochromatic and polarized photons in the quasi-deuteron region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Eduardo de.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of the Nat Pt photofission yield at 69 MeV of effective average energy of the incident photon is made using a polarized and monochromatic photon beam from the LADON system of the National Laboratory of Frascati, Italy, produced by inverse Compton scattering of laser light by high energy electrons of the ADONE Accelerator and using as fission track solid detector the Makrofol, being the developing made by usual procedure. The experimental value of the nuclear fissionability is compared to a theoretical value obtained following a model at two stages: in the first, the photon energy is absorbed by a neutron-proton pair inducing to the nucleus excitation, and in the second the nucleus de-excites due to the competition between nucleon evaporation and fission. The effect of fast nucleon emission during the first stage and the successive evaporation of neutrons in the second stage are considered. 40 refs, 12 figs, 9 tabs

  8. Seasonal Changes in the Martian North Polar Region from CRISM, MARCI and CTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Pocock, J. M.; Seelos, F. P.; Lee, S. W.; James, P. B.; Thomas, P. C.; Murchie, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Significant mobility and spatial variation in high albedo patches are noted in the summer northern ice cap. These patches are shown to be fine-grained water frost and their motions may provide information on winds or local accumulation and ablation occurring both on seasonal and inter-annual timeframes in the permanent ice deposits. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter instruments provide complementary views of the processes involved. MARCI covers the entire northern residual ice and surrounding Polar Layered Deposits (PLD) multiple times per day at spatial resolutions of a few kilometers. CTX has been targeted on one of the largest bright deposits with repeated coverage in the first northern summer. The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) observes the polar deposits in the wavelength range where multiple, diagnostic features can separate H2O and CO2 ices and allow the determination of effective grain size of ice and level of dust contamination. Several full-resolution and approximately 80 multi-spectral observations were targeted during the first northern summer on a known sustained bright anomaly. Previous work by the OMEGA team has demonstrated the evolution of water frost grain size over the summer season and suggests that the late northern seasonal frost is dominated by water rather than CO2 ice. This late water ice lag in the seasonal cap may also drive the appearance and mobility of residual fine grained ice patches. Spectral properties in exposed layers are more complicated, and even dark lanes within the reentrant troughs still show features associated with water ice. However, within the larger PLD areas that appear as transparent ice to MARSIS and SHARAD have no infrared spectral absorption features of ice. The modern view shows that both seasonal and permanent ice deposits are highly active with complex temporal patterns and understanding these dynamic phenomena are critical to understanding martian climate history. We will report the

  9. Pion elastic scattering from polarized 13C in the energy region of the P33 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yifen, Yen

    1992-08-01

    Asymmetries (A y ) and differential cross sections (dσ/dΩ) were measured for π + and π - elastic scattering using polarized and unpolarized 13 C targets. The experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility with the pion beam from the Low Energy Pion channel. The scattered pions were detected with the Large Acceptance Spectrometer. The 13 C nuclei in 13 C-enriched 1-butanol were polarized by the dynamic nuclear polarilization method. Angular distributions of both A y and dσ/dΩ were measured below the P 33 resonance at the incident energy of 130 MeV for π + and π - , and above the resonance at 223 MeV for π + and at 226 MeV for π - . In addition, A y and dσ/dΩ were measured in a range of momentum transfers, 1.75 ≤ q ≤ 2.05 fm - , at several energies. At 130 MeV, the values of A y are significantly different from zero for π - scattering. For π + at 130 MeV and for both π - and π + at all other energies, the A y are mostly consistent with zero. Theoretical analyses were done using different nuclear structure models. The data were not reproduced by the presently available nuclear wave functions. It was found that the asymmetry is strongly sensitive to the quadrupole spin flip part of the transition. The data of this thesis complement measurements of the magnetic form factor from electron scattering. In attempts to fit both the asymmetry and the magnetic form factor, it was found that the pion asymmetry data are not reproduced by the wavefunctions which fit the magnetic form factor at low momentum transfers

  10. Influence of terrain and highway construction on thermokarst distribution, North Slave region, NWT, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Peter; Wolfe, Stephen; McWade, Taylor

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost degradation has been observed throughout the north and is expected to have broad reaching effects on the land and its people. Nevertheless, for much of Northern Canada little quantified information about thermokarst exists. For example, in the southern North Slave region, NWT, thermokarst distribution has never been assessed though permafrost is in thermal disequilibrium and modelling suggests permafrost extent will decline. Additionally, differential subsidence has been observed in the subarctic city of Yellowknife and along highway infrastructure connecting it to the south. To better understand present and future permafrost conditions, we mapped the location and size of thermokarst ponding (a change from forest cover to water) in the study area by comparing historic and modern remotely sensed data sets available from 1945, 1961, and 2005. These data were used to evaluate the dominant terrain controls on the distribution of thermokarst in the region, and the potential influence that highway construction may have had on thermokarst development. Historically, discontinuous permafrost developed in a time-transgressive manner during the Holocene as lake-level receded from glacial Lake McConnell to present-day Great Slave Lake (5 mmṡa-1 over the last 8000 years). As a consequence of inundation the upland areas are characterized by extensive wave-washed bedrock outcrops with glaciolacustrine (GL) sediments and glaciofluvial materials occurring between them, whereas the lowland areas feature prominent GL deposits that cover nearly 70 % of the exposed surface. Throughout much of the region ground ice accumulation likely accompanied permafrost aggradation into fine-grained sediments, as is evident by lithalsa growth in particular. Highway 3, constructed during the mid-1960s, was preferentially aligned to crossed terrain underlain by fine-grained sediments to avoid bedrock and waterbodies. Local silt and clay used for highway embankment construction was sourced

  11. Extended high circular polarization in the Orion massive star forming region: implications for the origin of homochirality in the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Tsubasa; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hough, James H; Bailey, Jeremy; Whittet, Douglas C B; Lucas, Philip W; Nakajima, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Jun

    2010-06-01

    We present a wide-field (approximately 6' x 6') and deep near-infrared (K(s) band: 2.14 mum) circular polarization image in the Orion nebula, where massive stars and many low-mass stars are forming. Our results reveal that a high circular polarization region is spatially extended (approximately 0.4 pc) around the massive star-forming region, the BN/KL nebula. However, other regions, including the linearly polarized Orion bar, show no significant circular polarization. Most of the low-mass young stars do not show detectable extended structure in either linear or circular polarization, in contrast to the BN/KL nebula. If our solar system formed in a massive star-forming region and was irradiated by net circularly polarized radiation, then enantiomeric excesses could have been induced, through asymmetric photochemistry, in the parent bodies of the meteorites and subsequently delivered to Earth. These could then have played a role in the development of biological homochirality on Earth.

  12. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  13. A technique for accurately determining the cusp-region polar cap boundary using SuperDARN HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    Full Text Available Accurately measuring the location and motion of the polar cap boundary (PCB in the high-latitude ionosphere can be crucial for studies concerned with the dynamics of the polar cap, e.g. the measurement of reconnection rates. The Doppler spectral width characteristics of backscatter received by the SuperDARN HF radars have been previously used for locating and tracking the PCB in the cusp region. The boundary is generally observed in meridional beams of the SuperDARN radars and appears as a distinct change between low spectral width values observed equatorward of the cusp region, and high, but variable spectral width values observed within the cusp region. To identify the spectral width boundary (SWB between these two regions, a simple algorithm employing a spectral width threshold has often been applied to the data. However, there is not, as yet, a standard algorithm, or spectral width threshold, which is universally applied. Nor has there been any rigorous assessment of the accuracy of this method of boundary determination. This study applies a series of threshold algorithms to a simulated cusp-region spectral width data set, to assess the accuracy of different algorithms. This shows that simple threshold algorithms correctly identify the boundary location in, at the most, 50% of the cases and that the average boundary error is at least ~ 1–2 range gates (~ 1° latitude. It transpires that spatial and temporal smoothing of the spectral width data (e.g. by median filtering, before application of a threshold algorithm can increase the boundary determination accuracy to over 95% and the average boundary error to much less than a range gate. However, this is sometimes at the cost of temporal resolution in the motion of the boundary location. The algorithms are also applied to a year’s worth of spectral width data from the cusp ionosphere, measured by the Halley SuperDARN radar in Antarctica. This analysis highlights the increased accuracy of

  14. A technique for accurately determining the cusp-region polar cap boundary using SuperDARN HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurately measuring the location and motion of the polar cap boundary (PCB in the high-latitude ionosphere can be crucial for studies concerned with the dynamics of the polar cap, e.g. the measurement of reconnection rates. The Doppler spectral width characteristics of backscatter received by the SuperDARN HF radars have been previously used for locating and tracking the PCB in the cusp region. The boundary is generally observed in meridional beams of the SuperDARN radars and appears as a distinct change between low spectral width values observed equatorward of the cusp region, and high, but variable spectral width values observed within the cusp region. To identify the spectral width boundary (SWB between these two regions, a simple algorithm employing a spectral width threshold has often been applied to the data. However, there is not, as yet, a standard algorithm, or spectral width threshold, which is universally applied. Nor has there been any rigorous assessment of the accuracy of this method of boundary determination. This study applies a series of threshold algorithms to a simulated cusp-region spectral width data set, to assess the accuracy of different algorithms. This shows that simple threshold algorithms correctly identify the boundary location in, at the most, 50% of the cases and that the average boundary error is at least ~ 1–2 range gates (~ 1° latitude. It transpires that spatial and temporal smoothing of the spectral width data (e.g. by median filtering, before application of a threshold algorithm can increase the boundary determination accuracy to over 95% and the average boundary error to much less than a range gate. However, this is sometimes at the cost of temporal resolution in the motion of the boundary location. The algorithms are also applied to a year’s worth of spectral width data from the cusp ionosphere, measured by the Halley SuperDARN radar in Antarctica. This analysis highlights the increased accuracy of

  15. Construction of Fine Particles Source Spectrum Bank in Typical Region and Empirical Research of Matching Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Sun, Wenliang; Guo, Min; Li, Minjiao; Li, Wan

    2018-01-01

    The research object of this paper is fine particles in typical region. The construction of component spectrum bank is based on the technology of online source apportionment, then the result of the apportionment is utilized to verify the effectiveness of fine particles component spectrum bank and which also act as the matching basis of online source apportionment receptor sample. On the next, the particle source of air pollution is carried through the matching diagnosis empirical research by utilizing online source apportionment technology, to provide technical support for the cause analysis and treatment of heavy pollution weather.

  16. High Resolution Topography of Polar Regions from Commercial Satellite Imagery, Petascale Computing and Open Source Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Paul; Porter, Claire; Cloutier, Michael; Howat, Ian; Noh, Myoung-Jong; Willis, Michael; Kramer, WIlliam; Bauer, Greg; Bates, Brian; Williamson, Cathleen

    2017-04-01

    Surface topography is among the most fundamental data sets for geosciences, essential for disciplines ranging from glaciology to geodynamics. Two new projects are using sub-meter, commercial imagery licensed by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and open source photogrammetry software to produce a time-tagged 2m posting elevation model of the Arctic and an 8m posting reference elevation model for the Antarctic. When complete, this publically available data will be at higher resolution than any elevation models that cover the entirety of the Western United States. These two polar projects are made possible due to three equally important factors: 1) open-source photogrammetry software, 2) petascale computing, and 3) sub-meter imagery licensed to the United States Government. Our talk will detail the technical challenges of using automated photogrammetry software; the rapid workflow evolution to allow DEM production; the task of deploying the workflow on one of the world's largest supercomputers; the trials of moving massive amounts of data, and the management strategies the team needed to solve in order to meet deadlines. Finally, we will discuss the implications of this type of collaboration for future multi-team use of leadership-class systems such as Blue Waters, and for further elevation mapping.

  17. The Global Implications and Grand Challenge of Neutral-Ion Interactions in the Polar Regions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    That the smallest of interactions occurring between neutrals and ions in the polar thermosphere can impact the largest of scales in thermosphere response is a testament to the primary importance of the Joule heating rate as an energy source for the thermosphere. Yet, our understanding/quantification of this primary energy source is woefully represented by numerical models and poorly sampled by measurement. For numerical models, the Joule heating rate requires parameterizations to account for the presumed “missing” energy in the simulations, while, for measurements, numerous approximations abound. In addition to being a primary thermosphere energy source, the Joule heating rate also represents a collective of neutral and ion interactions that result from solar wind and solar processes and exchange processes among the thermosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere. Thus, to properly simulate the Joule heating rate requires a system perspective. Furthermore, to properly observe the Joule heating rate requires measurements of the ionosphere-thermosphere system at high temporal and spatial scales. This remains a very difficult task. The estimation and modeling of the Joule heating rate represents a grand challenge that involves the entire sun-earth system. This talk will put into perspective the current state in addressing the challenge of capturing this illusive source of energy.

  18. Influence of tides and gravity waves on layering processes in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hoffmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE have been studied at Andenes (69° N, 16° E, Norway, using VHF radar observations since 1994. One remarkable feature of these observations is the fact that {during 50% of the time,} the radar echoes occur in the form of two or more distinct layers. In the case of multiple PMSE layers, statistical analysis shows that the lower layer occurs at a mean height of ~83.4 km, which is almost identical to the mean height of noctilucent clouds (NLC derived from observation with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the same site. To investigate the layering processes microphysical model simulations under the influence of tidal and gravity waves were performed. In the presence of long period gravity waves, these model investigations predict an enhanced formation of multiple PMSE layer structures, where the lower layer is a consequence of the occurrence of the largest particles at the bottom of the ice cloud. This explains the coincidence of the lowermost PMSE layers and NLC. During periods with enhanced amplitudes of the semidiurnal tide, the observed NLC and PMSE show pronounced tidal structures comparable to the results of corresponding microphysical simulations. At periods with short period gravity waves there is a tendency for a decreasing occurrence of NLC and for variable weak PMSE structures.

  19. Proceedings of International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change Held in Fairbanks, Alaska on 11-15 June 1990. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    such as decapod crustaceans, echinoids, bivalves, gastropods and brachiopods. It is even possible, at least within the marine realm, that the polar...buccinacean gastropods , certain echinoderms and notothenioid fish) seem to be the product of extensive Cenozoic adaptive radiations. The polar regions may yet...Soc. Geol. Ital., 33, 171-193, 1989. Dayton, P. K., G. A. Robilliard, and R. T. Paine , Benthic Baroni, C., B. Stenni, and A. Longinelli, Isotopic

  20. Liquid crystal chiroptical polarization rotators for the near-UV region: theory, materials, and device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, D.; Taylor, B.; Marshall, K. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Jacobs, S. D.

    2013-09-01

    The helical structure of a chiral-nematic liquid crystal (CLC) material produces a number of interesting optical properties, including selective reflection and optical rotatory power. To take advantage of the high optical rotation near the selective reflection peak for applications in the UV, either large concentrations of chiral components or those possessing very large helical twisting powers (HTP's) are necessary. It is difficult to find chiral twisting agents with high HTP that do not degrade the UV transmission. We report what we believe to be the first experimental observation of extraordinarily high optical rotation (<30°/μm) in the near UV for a long-pitch (13.8-μm) CLC mixture composed of the low-birefringence nematic host ZLI-1646 doped with a low concentration (e.g., 1 wt%) of the chiral dopant CB 15. This experimental finding is verified theoretically using a mathematical model developed by Belyakov, which improves on de Vries' original model for optical rotation far from the selective reflection peak by taking into account the nonlinearity of optical rotatory power as a function of liquid crystal (LC) layer thickness. Using this model, the optical rotation at λ = 355 nm for the 1% CB 15/ZLI-1646 mixture is determined computationally, with the results in agreement with experimental data obtained by evaluating a series of wedged cells using an areal mapping, Hinds Exicor 450XT Mueller Matrix Polarimeter. This finding now opens a path to novel LC optics for numerous near-UV applications. One such envisioned application for this class of materials would be UV distributed polarization rotators (UV-DPR's) for largeaperture, high-peak-power lasers.

  1. VHF radar observations of turbulent structures in the polar mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Czechowsky

    Full Text Available The mobile SOUSY VHF Radar was operated in the summer of 1987 during the MAC/SINE campaign in northern Norway to study the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. Measurements of the spectral width indicate that two types of structures occur. In general mesospheric layers are bifurcated exhibiting a narrow spectral width and a well-defined aspect sensitivity. However, for about 10% of the observation time cells of enhanced turbulence characterized by extremely broad spectral widths appear predominantly in the upper sublayer above 86 km. Identification and separation of beam and shear broadening allows a determination of the turbulence-induced component of the spectral width. This case study reveals that during several events these cloud-like structures of enhanced turbulence move with an apparent velocity of several tens of meters per second which is almost identical with the phase trace velocity of simultaneously observed waves. Since, at that time, the Richardson number was less than a quarter, it was concluded that these turbulent cells were generated by a Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The horizontal extent of these structures was calculated to be less than 40 km. A general relation between spectral width and echo power was not detected. The turbulent component of the spectral width was used to calculate typical values of the energy dissipation rate at times where narrow spectral width dominates and during periods of enhanced turbulence. In addition, the outer scale of the inertial subrange (buoyancy scale was estimated. For the first time the occurrence and motion of this type of structures of enhanced spectral width is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  2. VHF radar observations of turbulent structures in the polar mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Czechowsky

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The mobile SOUSY VHF Radar was operated in the summer of 1987 during the MAC/SINE campaign in northern Norway to study the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. Measurements of the spectral width indicate that two types of structures occur. In general mesospheric layers are bifurcated exhibiting a narrow spectral width and a well-defined aspect sensitivity. However, for about 10% of the observation time cells of enhanced turbulence characterized by extremely broad spectral widths appear predominantly in the upper sublayer above 86 km. Identification and separation of beam and shear broadening allows a determination of the turbulence-induced component of the spectral width. This case study reveals that during several events these cloud-like structures of enhanced turbulence move with an apparent velocity of several tens of meters per second which is almost identical with the phase trace velocity of simultaneously observed waves. Since, at that time, the Richardson number was less than a quarter, it was concluded that these turbulent cells were generated by a Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The horizontal extent of these structures was calculated to be less than 40 km. A general relation between spectral width and echo power was not detected. The turbulent component of the spectral width was used to calculate typical values of the energy dissipation rate at times where narrow spectral width dominates and during periods of enhanced turbulence. In addition, the outer scale of the inertial subrange (buoyancy scale was estimated. For the first time the occurrence and motion of this type of structures of enhanced spectral width is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  3. Evaluating Aggregate Terrestrial Impacts of Road Construction Projects for Advanced Regional Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, James H.; Girvetz, Evan H.; McCoy, Michael C.

    2009-05-01

    This study presents a GIS-based database framework used to assess aggregate terrestrial habitat impacts from multiple highway construction projects in California, USA. Transportation planners need such impact assessment tools to effectively address additive biological mitigation obligations. Such assessments can reduce costly delays due to protracted environmental review. This project incorporated the best available statewide natural resource data into early project planning and preliminary environmental assessments for single and multiple highway construction projects, and provides an assessment of the 10-year state-wide mitigation obligations for the California Department of Transportation. Incorporation of these assessments will facilitate early and more strategic identification of mitigation opportunities, for single-project and regional mitigation efforts. The data architecture format uses eight spatial scales: six nested watersheds, counties, and transportation planning districts, which were intersected. This resulted in 8058 map planning units statewide, which were used to summarize all subsequent analyses. Range maps and georeferenced locations of federally and state-listed plants and animals and a 55-class landcover map were spatially intersected with the planning units and the buffered spatial footprint of 967 funded projects. Projected impacts were summarized and output to the database. Queries written in the database can sum expected impacts and provide summaries by individual construction project, or by watershed, county, transportation district or highway. The data architecture allows easy incorporation of new information and results in a tool usable without GIS by a wide variety of agency biologists and planners. The data architecture format would be useful for other types of regional planning.

  4. Numerical Study of an Ultrabroadband, Wide-Angle, Polarization-Insensitivity Metamaterial Absorber in the Visible Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Nguyen Thi Quynh; Tung, Phan Duy; Lam, Phan Huu; Dung, Nguyen Duc; Quang, Nguyen Hong

    2018-02-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an ultrabroadband metamaterial absorber (MA) formed of a periodic array of metallic-dielectric multilayered conical frustums for use in the visible regime. The bandwidth and absorption performance of the proposed absorber can be controlled by varying structural parameters such as the tilt angle and lattice constant. The absorption efficiency of the proposed MA exceeds 80% in a wide bandwidth from 474.4 nm to 784.4 nm and is retained at large angles of incidence up to 65°. Furthermore, perfect polarization insensitivity is also obtained due to its rotationally symmetric structure. This excellent absorber performance makes the proposed MA a promising candidate for applications in the visible region.

  5. Resonant-like structures in pp system in the mass region 2100 to 2800 MeV. [Longitudinal polarization effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1978-01-01

    Proton--proton total cross section data at the intermediate-energy region are shown. The structure of these cross sections is discussed. No structure is observed suggesting the possible existence of a resonance. But when both the incident protons and target protons were longitudinally polarized, totally unexpected structures were found, the most remarkable of which appears around 1.5 GeV/c. The main discussion concerns the existence of at least one diproton resonance and its properties, and three more such candidates are speculated. Differential cross sections are also discussed. It is noted that such a resonance opens a new era in the nucleon--nucleon system and also is crucially important for further development of the quark models that require six quarks in a bag. 28 references. (JFP)

  6. Long-term variations and trends in the polar E-region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjoland, L. M.; Ogawa, Y.; Hall, C.; Rietveld, M.; Løvhaug, U. P.; La Hoz, C.; Miyaoka, H.

    2017-10-01

    As the EISCAT UHF radar system in Northern Scandinavia started its operations in the early 1980s, the collected data cover about three solar cycles. These long time-series provide us the opportunity to study long-term variations and trends of ionospheric parameters in the high latitude region. In the present study we have used the EISCAT Tromsø UHF data to investigate variations of the Hall conductivity and ion temperatures in the E-region around noon. Both the ion temperature and the peak altitude of the Hall conductivity are confirmed to depend strongly on solar zenith angle. However, the dependence on solar activity seems to be weak. In order to search for trends in these parameters, the ion temperature and peak altitude of the Hall conductivity data were adjusted for their seasonal and solar cycle dependence. A very weak descent (∼0.2 km/ decade) was seen in the peak altitude of the Hall conductivity. The ion temperature at 110 km shows a cooling trend (∼10 K/ decade). However, other parameters than solar zenith angle and solar activity seem to affect the ion temperature at this altitude, and a better understanding of these parameters is necessary to derive a conclusive trend. In this paper, we discuss what may cause the characteristics of the variations in the electric conductivities and ion temperatures in the high latitude region.

  7. Chemical cycling and deposition of atmospheric mercury in polar regions: review of recent measurements and comparison with models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Angot

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a worldwide contaminant that can cause adverse health effects to wildlife and humans. While atmospheric modeling traces the link from emissions to deposition of Hg onto environmental surfaces, large uncertainties arise from our incomplete understanding of atmospheric processes (oxidation pathways, deposition, and re-emission. Atmospheric Hg reactivity is exacerbated in high latitudes and there is still much to be learned from polar regions in terms of atmospheric processes. This paper provides a synthesis of the atmospheric Hg monitoring data available in recent years (2011–2015 in the Arctic and in Antarctica along with a comparison of these observations with numerical simulations using four cutting-edge global models. The cycle of atmospheric Hg in the Arctic and in Antarctica presents both similarities and differences. Coastal sites in the two regions are both influenced by springtime atmospheric Hg depletion events and by summertime snowpack re-emission and oceanic evasion of Hg. The cycle of atmospheric Hg differs between the two regions primarily because of their different geography. While Arctic sites are significantly influenced by northern hemispheric Hg emissions especially in winter, coastal Antarctic sites are significantly influenced by the reactivity observed on the East Antarctic ice sheet due to katabatic winds. Based on the comparison of multi-model simulations with observations, this paper discusses whether the processes that affect atmospheric Hg seasonality and interannual variability are appropriately represented in the models and identifies research gaps in our understanding of the atmospheric Hg cycling in high latitudes.

  8. Study on the methods of rational analysis about the area of the Planning of Sea Usage of Regional Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya-Juan, Li; Tian-Yu, Mao; Mingjing-Tian

    2018-03-01

    The Planning of Sea Usage of Regional Construction is a new area, and the rational analysis about the area of which is one of its difficulties. Based on “Urban land classification and land use planning and construction standards”, the land use control index method study the rationality of the sea usage area of the whole region, by accumulating for specific land use indicators for each land type within the planning area. This paper, takeing the project named “caofeidian integrated service area” for example, make a little study on the land use control index method used by the sea usage demonstration of the planning of sea usage of regional construction. The study will be good for improving the technical methods of rational analysis about the area of the planning of sea usage of regional construction.

  9. Hierarchical Fabrication of Engineered Vascularized Bone Biphasic Constructs via Dual 3D Bioprinting: Integrating Regional Bioactive Factors into Architectural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Zhou, Xuan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-01

    A biphasic artificial vascularized bone construct with regional bioactive factors is presented using dual 3D bioprinting platform technique, thereby forming a large functional bone grafts with organized vascular networks. Biocompatible mussel-inspired chemistry and "thiol-ene" click reaction are used to regionally immobilize bioactive factors during construct fabrication for modulating or improving cellular events. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. ICT & innovation: a case of integration in a regional construction firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Brewer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Construction firms in regional areas face considerable challenges to their competitiveness. Logistics, availability of suitable personnel, unfamiliarity with trading partners, and the tyranny of distance conspire to obstruct profitable engagement beyond their local area. Electronic information and communication technology (ICT such as web-based project management applications and other forms of collaborative data sharing have the potential to mitigate many of these obstacles, but have yet to gain widespread acceptance, particularly by smaller regional firms who question their cost effectiveness. The attitudes of decision-makers and the impact of their decisions on intra- and inter-firm culture lie at the heart of ICT-mediated innovation. This paper presents a case study of a specialist subcontractor located in regional New South Wales and its involvement in a New Zealand project, whose competitiveness arose from using ICT to integrate its own supply chain. It also provided additional value by triggering collaboration and integration in the broader project team. The case reveals that these outcomes were symptomatic of the organisational culture of the subcontractor, and were achieved through a combination of leadership, collaboration, flexibility and pragmatism, redolent of dynamic capabilities. 

  11. Radiation hybrids from human chromosome 3: A basis for the construction of region and specific sublibraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, L.; Cosmis, R.L.; Atchison, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are interested in identifying genes on human chromosome involved in disease processes. To date at least 20 different loci on this chromosome are implicated with various disease states. DNA libraries containing clones derived from a small chromosomal subregion implicated in a particular disease would greatly assist these studies. They have utilized the radiation hybrid (RH) technique to generate a series of somatic cell hybrids that contain small segments of human chromosome 3 as the only human genetic material. A Chinese hamster-human cell hybrid (Q314-2) containing only human chromosome 3 was used to prepare radiation hybrids. Cells were lethally X-irradiated with 6,000 rads and fused to Urd(??) Chinese hamster cells by PEG 1000 treatment. The majority of hybrids (>72%) analyzed retained portions of chromosome 3. The amount of chromosome 3 in each hybrid ranged from nearly all of the chromosome to very little. Currently these hybrids are being further characterized with single copy probes of known map location in order to isolate regions of chromosome 3 that contain specific disease locus. These reduced hybrids can then be used for the construction of region specific libraries and for the generation of new DNA probes from the specific region of interest

  12. ICT & innovation: a case of integration in a regional construction firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Brewer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Construction firms in regional areas face considerable challenges to their competitiveness. Logistics, availability of suitable personnel, unfamiliarity with trading partners, and the tyranny of distance conspire to obstruct profitable engagement beyond their local area. Electronic information and communication technology (ICT such as web-based project management applications and other forms of collaborative data sharing have the potential to mitigate many of these obstacles, but have yet to gain widespread acceptance, particularly by smaller regional firms who question their cost effectiveness. The attitudes of decision-makers and the impact of their decisions on intra- and inter-firm culture lie at the heart of ICT-mediated innovation. This paper presents a case study of a specialist subcontractor located in regional New South Wales and its involvement in a New Zealand project, whose competitiveness arose from using ICT to integrate its own supply chain. It also provided additional value by triggering collaboration and integration in the broader project team. The case reveals that these outcomes were symptomatic of the organisational culture of the subcontractor, and were achieved through a combination of leadership, collaboration, flexibility and pragmatism, redolent of dynamic capabilities.

  13. Well-constructed cellulose acetate membranes for forward osmosis: Minimized internal concentration polarization with an ultra-thin selective layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sui

    2010-09-01

    The design and engineering of membrane structure that produces low salt leakage and minimized internal concentration polarization (ICP) in forward osmosis (FO) processes have been explored in this work. The fundamentals of phase inversion of cellulose acetate (CA) regarding the formation of an ultra-thin selective layer at the bottom interface of polymer and casting substrate were investigated by using substrates with different hydrophilicity. An in-depth understanding of membrane structure and pore size distribution has been elucidated with field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FESEM) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). A double dense-layer structure is formed when glass plate is used as the casting substrate and water as the coagulant. The thickness of the ultra-thin bottom layer resulted from hydrophilic-hydrophilic interaction is identified to be around 95nm, while a fully porous, open-cell structure is formed in the middle support layer due to spinodal decomposition. Consequently, the membrane shows low salt leakage with mitigated ICP in the FO process for seawater desalination. The structural parameter (St) of the membrane is analyzed by modeling water flux using the theory that considers both external concentration polarization (ECP) and ICP, and the St value of the double dense-layer membrane is much smaller than those reported in literatures. Furthermore, the effects of an intermediate immersion into a solvent/water mixed bath prior to complete immersion in water on membrane formation have been studied. The resultant membranes may have a single dense layer with an even lower St value. A comparison of fouling behavior in a simple FO-membrane bioreactor (MBR) system is evaluated for these two types of membranes. The double dense-layer membrane shows a less fouling propensity. This study may help pave the way to improve the membrane design for new-generation FO membranes. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  14. PoLAR Voices: Informing Adult Learners about the Science and Story of Climate Change in the Polar Regions Through Audio Podcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinney, A.; Murray, M. S.; Gobroski, K. A.; Topp, R. M.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The resurgence of audio programming with the advent of podcasting in the early 2000s spawned a new medium for communicating advances in science, research, and technology. To capitalize on this informal educational outlet, the Arctic Institute of North America partnered with the International Arctic Research Center, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the UA Museum of the North to develop a podcast series called PoLAR Voices for the Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership. PoLAR Voices is a public education initiative that uses creative storytelling and novel narrative structures to immerse the listener in an auditory depiction of climate change. The programs will feature the science and story of climate change, approaching topics from both the points of view of researchers and Arctic indigenous peoples. This approach will engage the listener in the holistic story of climate change, addressing both scientific and personal perspectives, resulting in a program that is at once educational, entertaining and accessible. Feedback is being collected at each stage of development to ensure the content and format of the program satisfies listener interests and preferences. Once complete, the series will be released on thepolarhub.org and on iTunes. Additionally, blanket distribution of the programs will be accomplished via radio broadcast in urban, rural and remote areas, and in multiple languages to increase distribution and enhance accessibility.

  15. Critical slowing down of polar nano regions ensemble in Gd3+-substituted PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Adityanarayan H.; Gupta, S. M.; Lalla, N. P.; Nigam, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    Investigations on Gd-substituted lead magnesium niobate (Pb1-xGdxMg(1+x)/3Nb(2-x)/3O3; varying x = 0.01-0.1) ceramics have revealed critical slowing down of the polar nano regions (PNRs) ensemble into a "super-dipolar glass state" for higher Gd-substitution x ≥ 0.05. Low temperature electric field induced polarization switching study (P-E) has revealed a sharp decrease in the remanent polarization up to x = 0.03, which strengthen the critical slowing down of polar nano-domains dynamics, suggesting a reduction in the correlation between or within polar nano regions (PNRs) leading to a reduction in its size. Bright field imaging by using transmission electron microscope has also confirmed the reduction of the size of polar nano regions with increasing "x." Selected area electron diffraction pattern along ⟨110⟩ unit axis has revealed enhancement in intensity of the superlattice reflections spot at ½ ½ ½ along ⟨111⟩ unit axis with increasing "x," which is associated with the enhancement of chemical ordered regions and correlate well to enhancement in the degree of diffuseness parameters "δA" determined from fitting of the temperature dependent dielectric constant ɛ(T) plot above the dielectric maximum peak (ɛmax). The enhanced "δA" for x ≥ 0.05 is due to additional disorder created by the Gd-ions substitution at the Mg-site, which is consistent with the phase and microstructural analysis. Fitting of frequency dependent Tm (temperature of ɛmax) to the power law of critical dynamic has revealed realistic pre-factor fitting parameters for x ≥ 0.05 suggesting critical slowing down of the polar nano-domains dynamics ensemble resulting in super-dipolar glass state.

  16. Selection and construction of nuclear and radiation emergency medical center in a region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guojun; He Xu; Liao Li; Gao Dong

    2014-01-01

    Three level of first-class comprehensive hospital is an important force of nuclear and radiation accident rescue, has a very rich experience in response to nuclear and radiation accidents and deal with large quantities of the sick and wounded. With the foundation and the ability of the construction and operation of medical emergency rescue center. This paper according to the median model location theory of emergency center, combined with the specific situation of the nuclear and radiation accident in Hunan Province, reference location, rescue experience, emergency allocation of resources, teaching and research capacity, establish regional medical emergency center of nuclear and radiation accidents based on three level of first-class comprehensive hospital, break the traditional concept that the center must be provincial capital,form a multi-level, three-dimensional, network of emergency hospital rescue system. The main duties of the center are accident emergency response, on-site treatment and technical guidance of accident, psychological grooming. The author propose building measures according to the duties of the center: increase national and provincial financial investment, carry out training, drills and first aid knowledge missionaries regularly, innovative materials management, speed up the construction of information platform, establish and improve the hospital rescue system, improve organization institution and system of plans, reengineering rescue process. (authors)

  17. Molecular Weiss domain polarization in piezoceramics to diaphragm, cantilever and channel construction in low-temperature-cofired ceramics for micro-fluidic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, P.K.; Ahmad, S.; Grimme, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the efforts made to study the process of comminution to Weiss domain polarization and phase transition in piezoceramics together with the versatility of low-temperature-cofired ceramics-based devices and components for their ready adoption for typical applications in the area of micro-fluidics. A conceptual micro-fluidic module has been presented and few unit entities necessary for its realization have been described. The purpose of these entities is to position the sensors and actuators by using piezoelectric materials. Investigations are performed to make useful constructions like diaphragms and cantilevers for laying the sensing elements, cavities for burying the electronic chip devices, and channels for fluid transportation. In order to realize these constructions, the basic step involves machining of circular, straight line, rectangular and square-shaped structure in the green ceramic tapes followed by lamination and firing with post-machining in some cases. The diaphragm and cavity includes one or more un-machined layer stacked together with several machined layers with rectangular or square slits. The cantilever is an extension of the diaphragm creation process with inclusion of a post-machining step. The channel essentially consists of a machined green ceramic layer sandwiched between an un-machined and a partially machined layer. The fabrication for all the above constructions has been exemplified and the details have been discussed

  18. DUST IN THE POLAR REGION AS A MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO THE INFRARED EMISSION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenig, S. F.; Antonucci, R. [Department of Physics, University of California in Santa Barbara, Broida Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 (United States); Kishimoto, M.; Tristram, K. R. W.; Asmus, D.; Weigelt, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Prieto, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gandhi, P. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Burtscher, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrae, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Duschl, W. J., E-mail: shoenig@physics.ucsb.edu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Leibnizstr. 15, D-24098, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-07-10

    Dust around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is distributed over a wide range of spatial scales and can be observed in the infrared (IR). It is generally assumed that the distribution on parsec scales forms a geometrically and optically thick entity in the equatorial plane around the accretion disk and broad-line region-dubbed {sup d}ust torus{sup -}that emits the bulk of the subarcsecond-scale IR emission and gives rise to orientation-dependent obscuration. However, recent IR interferometry studies with unprecedented position angle (P.A.) and baseline coverage on these small scales in two obscured (type 2) AGNs have revealed that the majority of the mid-IR emission in these objects is elongated in the polar direction. These observations are difficult to reconcile with the standard interpretation that most of the parsec-scale mid-IR emission in AGNs originate from the torus and challenges the justification of using simple torus models to model the broadband IR emission. Here, we report detailed interferometry observations of the unobscured (type 1) AGN in NGC 3783 that allow us to constrain the size, elongation, and direction of the mid-IR emission with high accuracy. The mid-IR emission is characterized by a strong elongation toward position angle P.A. -52 Degree-Sign , closely aligned with the polar axis (P.A. -45 Degree-Sign ). We determine half-light radii along the major and minor axes at 12.5 {mu}m of (20.0 {+-} 3.0) mas Multiplication-Sign (6.7 {+-} 1.0) mas or (4.23 {+-} 0.63) pc Multiplication-Sign (1.42 {+-} 0.21) pc, which corresponds to intrinsically scaled sizes of (69.4 {+-} 10.8) r{sub in} Multiplication-Sign (23.3 {+-} 3.5) r{sub in} for the inner dust radius of r{sub in} = 0.061 pc as inferred from near-IR reverberation mapping. This implies an axis ratio of 3:1, with about 60%-90% of the 8-13 {mu}m emission associated with the polar-elongated component. It is quite likely that the hot-dust emission as recently resolved by near-IR interferometry is

  19. An unusual giant spiral arc in the polar cap region during the northward phase of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rosenqvist

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The shock arrival of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME at ~09:50 UT on 22 November 1997 resulted in the development of an intense (Dst<−100 nT geomagnetic storm at Earth. In the early, quiet phase of the storm, in the sheath region of the ICME, an unusual large spiral structure (diameter of ~1000 km was observed at very high latitudes by the Polar UVI instrument. The evolution of this structure started as a polewardly displaced auroral bulge which further developed into the spiral structure spreading across a large part of the polar cap. This study attempts to examine the cause of the chain of events that resulted in the giant auroral spiral. During this period the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF was dominantly northward (Bz>25 nT with a strong duskward component (By>15 nT resulting in a highly twisted tail plasma sheet. Geotail was located at the equatorial dawnside magnetotail flank and observed accelerated plasma flows exceeding the solar wind bulk velocity by almost 60%. These flows are observed on the magnetosheath side of the magnetopause and the acceleration mechanism is proposed to be typical for strongly northward IMF. Identified candidates to the cause of the spiral structure include a By induced twisted magnetotail configuration, the development of magnetopause surface waves due to the enhanced pressure related to the accelerated magnetosheath flows aswell as the formation of additional magnetopause deformations due to external solar wind pressure changes. The uniqeness of the event indicate that most probably a combination of the above effects resulted in a very extreme tail topology. However, the data coverage is insufficient to fully investigate the physical mechanism behind the observations.

  20. STRUCTURALLY-FUNCTIONAL AND SET-THEORETIC MODELS OF THE REGIONAL CONSTRUCTION CLUSTER AS A HETERARCHICAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikul’skaya Ol’ga Mikhaylovna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject: due to the existence of shabby and hazardous dwelling, the housing problem is one of the most relevant problems in the social sphere of the Astrakhan region. The Astrakhan regional construction cluster includes the significant number of the construction organizations, the servicing organizations, which are engaged in the training of personnel for construction, the banks and other credit institutions, which provide the population with mortgage loans, and also regional, municipal authorities and public organizations. The regional construction cluster is the developing social and economic system of heterarchical type. The heterarchy combines both elements of hierarchy and elements of the market relations. Therefore, the task of creation of a common information space of a regional construction cluster on the basis of mathematical, functional and information-logical models is relevant. Research objectives: use functional and mathematical modeling of heterarchical system of a regional construction cluster for development of its information portal. Materials and methods: for creation of structurally-functional model of a regional construction cluster, the methodology of structural analysis in notations of IDEF0, IDEF3, Swimlane was used. As a tool for structurally-functional simulation, we used CASE-tool - AllFusion Process Modeler r7. The mathematical description of logic of regional construction cluster management is based on the theory of sets. Results: the complex of functional models with the set-theoretic description of the system was developed. The business-process model in a notation of IDEF0 well reflects the process hierarchy that best describes the hierarchical communications prevailing in stable functioning of the regulated processes. For its creation the SADT technology was used. When the external disturbances affect the socio-economic system (SES, inertial hierarchical management ceases being effective and the advantage is given

  1. Earth-based construction material field tests characterization in the Alto Douro Wine Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Rui; Pinto, Jorge; Paiva, Anabela; Lanzinha, João Carlos

    2017-12-01

    The Alto Douro Wine Region, located in the northeast of Portugal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, presents an abundant vernacular building heritage. This building technology is based on a timber framed structure filled with a composite earth-based material. A lack of scientific studies related to this technology is evident, furthermore, principally in rural areas, this traditional building stock is highly deteriorated and damaged because of the rareness of conservation and strengthening works, which is partly related to the non-engineered character of this technology and to the knowledge loosed on that technique. Those aspects motivated the writing of this paper, whose main purpose is the physical and chemical characterization of the earth-based material applied in the tabique buildings of that region through field tests. Consequently, experimental work was conducted and the results obtained allowed, among others, the proposal of a series of adequate field tests. At our knowledge, this is the first time field tests are undertaken for tabique technology. This information will provide the means to assess the suitability of a given earth-based material with regards to this technology. The knowledge from this study could also be very useful for the development of future normative documents and as a reference for architects and engineers that work with this technology to guide and regulate future conservation, rehabilitation or construction processes helping to preserve this important legacy.

  2. Earth-based construction material field tests characterization in the Alto Douro Wine Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Rui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Alto Douro Wine Region, located in the northeast of Portugal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, presents an abundant vernacular building heritage. This building technology is based on a timber framed structure filled with a composite earth-based material. A lack of scientific studies related to this technology is evident, furthermore, principally in rural areas, this traditional building stock is highly deteriorated and damaged because of the rareness of conservation and strengthening works, which is partly related to the non-engineered character of this technology and to the knowledge loosed on that technique. Those aspects motivated the writing of this paper, whose main purpose is the physical and chemical characterization of the earth-based material applied in the tabique buildings of that region through field tests. Consequently, experimental work was conducted and the results obtained allowed, among others, the proposal of a series of adequate field tests. At our knowledge, this is the first time field tests are undertaken for tabique technology. This information will provide the means to assess the suitability of a given earth-based material with regards to this technology. The knowledge from this study could also be very useful for the development of future normative documents and as a reference for architects and engineers that work with this technology to guide and regulate future conservation, rehabilitation or construction processes helping to preserve this important legacy.

  3. Journalistic identity and audience perceptions: paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  4. Journalistic identity and audience perceptions: paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  5. Surface temperatures in the polar regions from Nimbus 7 temperature humidity infrared radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    1994-01-01

    Monthly surface temperatures in the Arctic and Antarctic regions have been derived from the 11.5 micrometer thermal infrared channel of the Nimbus 7 temperature humidity infrared radiometer (THIR) for a whole year in 1979 and for a winter and a summer month from 1980 through 1985. The data set shows interannual variability and provides spatial details that allow identification of temperature patterns over sea ice and ice sheet surfaces. For example, the coldest spot in the southern hemisphere is observed to be consistently in the Antarctic plateau in the southern hemisphere, while that in the northern hemisphere is usually located in Greenland, or one of three other general areas: Siberia, the central Arctic, or the Canadian Archipelago. Also, in the southern hemisphere, the amplitude of the seasonal fluctuation of ice sheet temperatures is about 3 times that of sea ice, while in the northern hemisphere, the corresponding fluctuations for the two surfaces are about the same. The main sources of error in the retrieval are cloud and other atmospheric effects. These were minimized by first choosing the highest radiance value from the set of measurements during the day taken within a 30 km by 30 km grid of each daily map. Then the difference of daily maps was taken and where the difference is greater than a certain threshold (which in this case is 12 C), the data element is deleted. Overall, the monthly maps derived from the resulting daily maps are spatially and temporally consistent, are coherent with the topograph y of the Antarctic continent and the location of the sea ice edge, and are in qualitative agreement with climatological data. Quantitatively, THIR data are in good agreement with Antarctic ice sheet surface air temperature station data with a correlation coefficient of 0.997 and a standard deviation of 2.0 C. The absolute values are not as good over the sea ice edges, but a comparison with Russian 2-m drift station temperatures shows very high correlation

  6. Brain region-specific perfluoroalkylated sulfonate (PFSA) and carboxylic acid (PFCA) accumulation and neurochemical biomarker Responses in east Greenland polar Bears (Ursus maritimus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kathrine Eggers; Basu, Niladri; Letcher, Robert

    2015-01-01

    was 88ng/g ww where PFUnDA, PFDoDA and PFTrDA combined accounted for 79%. The highest concentrations of PFASs were measured in brain stem, cerebellum and hippocampus. Correlative analyses were performed both across and within brain regions. Significant positive correlations were found between PFASs...... to bioaccumulate in lipid rich tissues of the brain among other tissues such as liver, and can reach high concentrations in top predators including the polar bear. PFCA and PFSA bioaccummulation in the brain has the potential to pose neurotoxic effects and therefore we conducted a study to investigate...... if variations in neurochemical transmitter systems i.e. the cholinergic, glutaminergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic, could be related to brain-specific bioaccumulation of PFASs in East Greenland polar bears. Nine brain regions from nine polar bears were analyzed for enzyme activity (monoamine oxidase (MAO...

  7. Constructing Perceptions of Climate Change: a case study of regional political decision makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, D.

    2012-12-01

    This case study of climate change communications assesses the salient means of communication and the message adopted by regional political decision makers on the German Baltic coast. Realizing that cultural factors and local values (and not simply knowledge) are significant influences in explaining attitudes towards climate change, this analysis draws from the records of regional weather, from scientists with a specific focus on the region, from the political decision makers for that region, and the media message reaching the decision makers, ensuring all elements of the analysis are drawn from the same socioeconomic, geophysical, political and cultural context. This is important as the social dynamics surrounding the trust in science is of critical importance and, as such, all elements of the case study are specifically contained within a common context. If the utility of climate change knowledge is to prompt well conceived adaptation/mitigation strategies then the political decision process, or at least the perceptions shaping it, can best be understood by locating it within the world view of the decision makers involved in the production process. Using the results of two survey questionnaires, one of regional climate scientists and one of regional political decision makers, ten years of local weather records, and a summary of the message from mass media circulation, the discord in perceptions of regional climate change are quantitatively explored. The conclusions drawn from the analysis include, compared to the scientific assessment: The decision makers' perceptions of recent past differ from actual observations. The decision makers' perceptions of the future differ from scientific assessments. The decision makers tend to over estimate the magnitude of regional climate change and its impacts. The decision makers tend to over estimate the sense of immediacy for adaptation measures. The conclusions drawn suggest that in the regional political realm, it is often a

  8. Assessing the Impact of Climate Change on Land-Water-Ecosystem Quality in Polar and Mountainous Regions: A New Interregional Project (INT5153)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dercon, Gerd; Gerardo-Abaya, Jane; Mavlyudov, Bulat

    2014-01-01

    The INT5153 project aims to improve the understanding of the impact of climate change on fragile polar and mountainous ecosystems on both a local and global scale for their better management and conservation. Seven core and five related benchmark sites have been selected from different global regions for specific assessments of the impact of climate change with the following expected outcomes and outputs: Outcomes: • Improved understanding of the impact of climate change on the cryosphere in polar and mountainous ecosystems and its effects on landwater- ecosystem quality at both local and global scales. • Recommendations for improvement of regional policies for soil and agricultural water management, conservation, and environmental protection in polar and mountainous regions. Outputs: • Specific strategies to minimize the adverse effects of, and adapt to, reduced seasonal snow and glacier covered areas on land-water-ecosystem quality in polar and mountain regions across the world. • Enhanced interregional network of laboratories and institutions competent in the assessment of climate change impacts on the cryosphere and land-water-ecosystem quality, using isotopic and nuclear techniques. • Increased number of young scientists trained in the use of isotope and nuclear techniques to assess the impact of climate change on the cryosphere and land-water-ecosystem quality in polar and mountainous ecosystems. • Platform/database with global access for continuing work and monitoring of impact of climate change on fragile polar and mountainous ecosystems at local and global scales, as well as for communicating findings to policy makers and communities. • Improved understanding of the effects of climate change disseminated through appropriate publications, policy briefs, and through a dedicated internet platform. • Methodologies and protocols for investigations in specific ecosystems and conservation/adaptation measures for agriculture areas

  9. Development of the business area construction and energy of EnergieRegion Nuernberg. Transfer from project management to a regional network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiverth, A.

    2006-01-01

    The association EnergieRegion Nuernberg is a regional authority network, which is employed with the promotion of sustainable handling of the factor energy in the region Nuernberg and with the proliferation of this region as internationally recognized location for energy engineering, energy industry and energy science. The intention is to use the important industrial, service-oriented and scientific potential optimally. For this reason a functional co-ordination and communication platform had to be created for the cross-linking of the appropriate participants from economics, research and public administration. Therefore, the author of the contribution under consideration accompanies the development process of the business field construction and energy of this association in the background of the current trends in the construction and energy sector in the region Nuernberg. Under this aspect, the author reports on the following aspects: (a) Success factors of the project management in a regional network; (b) Operationalisation of the success of the project by means of a model; (c) Analysis of the different aspects of energetic measures; (d) Determination of chances and risks of the range building and energy in the region Nuernberg; (e) Comparison of the success of the model projects with the model for the determination of project success; (f) Determination of strengths and weaknesses of the project management in the business field construction and energy of the energy region Nuernberg

  10. The influence of IMF cone angle on invariant latitudes of polar region footprints of FACs in the magnetotail: Cluster observatio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.; Shi, J.; Zhang, J.; Kistler, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle θ (the angle between the IMF direction and the Sun-Earth line) on the invariant latitudes (ILATs) of the footprints of the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the magnetotail has been investigated. We performed a statistic study of 542 FAC cases observed by the four Cluster spacecraft in the northern hemisphere. The results show that the large FAC (>10 nA/m2) cases occur at the low ILATs (60º, which implies the footprints of the large FACs mainly expand equatorward with large IMF cone angle. The equatorward boundary of the FAC footprints in the polar region decreases with the IMF cone angle especially when IMF Bz is positive. There is almost no correlation or a weak positive correlation of the poleward boundary and IMF cone angle no matter IMF is northward or southward. The equatorward boundary is more responsive to the IMF cone angle. Compared to the equatorward boundary, the center of the FAC projected location changes very little. This is the first time a correlation between FAC projected location and IMF cone angle has been determined.

  11. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars’ southern polar regions: I. Erosion of the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Thomas, N.; Portyankina, G.; McEwen, A.; Becker, T.; Byrne, S.; Herkenhoff, K.; Kieffer, H.; Mellon, M.

    2010-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has imaged the sublimation of Mars' seasonal CO 2 polar cap with unprecedented detail for one complete martian southern spring. In some areas of the surface, beneath the conformal coating of seasonal ice, radially-organized channels are connected in spidery patterns. The process of formation of this terrain, erosion by gas from subliming seasonal ice, has no earthly analog. The new capabilities (high resolution, color, and stereo images) of HiRISE enable detailed study of this enigmatic terrain. Two sites are analyzed in detail, one within an area expected to have translucent seasonal CO 2 ice, and the other site outside that region. Stereo anaglyphs show that some channels grow larger as they go uphill - implicating gas rather than liquid as the erosive agent. Dark fans of material from the substrate are observed draped over the seasonal ice, and this material collects in thin to thick layers in the channels, possibly choking off gas flow in subsequent years, resulting in inactive crisscrossing shallow channels. In some areas there are very dense networks of channels with similar width and depth, and fewer fans emerging later in the season are observed. Subtle variations in topography affect the channel morphology. A new terminology is proposed for the wide variety of erosional features observed.

  12. Long-range mapping and construction of a YAC contig within the cat eye syndrome critical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, H E; McTaggart, K E; Riazi, M A; Hudson, T J; Budarf, M L; Emanuel, B S; Bell, C J

    1996-12-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome derived from human chromosome 22pter to 22q11.2. The region of 22q duplicated in the typical CES marker chromosome extends between the centromere and locus D22S36. We have constructed a long-range restriction map of this region using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and probes to 10 loci (11 probes). The map covers -3.6 Mb. We have also used 15 loci to construct a yeast artificial chromosome contig, which encompasses about half of the region critical to the production of the CES phenotype (centromere to D22S57). Thus, the CES critical region has been mapped and a substantial portion of it cloned in preparation for the isolation of genes in this region.

  13. Brain regions involved in ingestive behavior and related psychological constructs in people undergoing calorie restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahathuduwa, Chanaka N; Boyd, Lori A; Davis, Tyler; O'Boyle, Michael; Binks, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Human food intake is regulated by physiological energy homeostatic mechanisms and hedonic mechanisms. These are affected by both very short-term and longer-term calorie restriction (CR). To date, there are parallel discussions in the literature that fail to integrate across these disciplines and topics. First, much of the available neuroimaging research focusses on specific functional paradigms (e.g. reward, energy homeostasis). These paradigms often fail to consider more complex and inclusive models that examine how potential brain regions of interest interact to influence ingestion. Second, the paradigms used focus primarily on short-term CR (fasting) which has limited generalizability to clinical application. Finally, the behavioral literature, while frequently examining longer-term CR and related psychological constructs in the context of weight management (e.g. hedonic restraint, 'liking', 'wanting' and food craving), fails to adequately tie these phenomena to underlying neural mechanisms. The result is a less than complete picture of the brain's role in the complexity of the human experience of ingestion. This disconnect highlights a major limitation in the CR literature, where attempts are persistently made to exert behavioral control over ingestion, without fully understanding the complex bio behavioral systems involved. In this review we attempt to summarize all potential brain regions important for human ingestion, present a broad conceptual overview of the brain's multifaceted role in ingestive behavior, the human (psychological) experiences related to ingestion and to examine how these factors differ according to three forms of CR. These include short-term fasting, extended CR, and restrained eating. We aim to bring together the neuroimaging literature with the behavioral literature within a conceptual framework that may inform future translational research. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  15. Experimental and theoretical studies of the wall boundary region 'heavy liquid-metal coolant - constructional material'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhov, Kirill; Iarmonov, Mikhail; Bokova, Tatiana; Beznosov, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    The wall boundary layer is an inalienable part of the contours with heavy liquid metal coolants (HLMC) that are used in the fourth generation nuclear reactors. The properties of the wall boundary layer determine a reactor's efficiency and influence hydraulic characterises and heat exchange. Characteristics of the wall boundary layer 'HLMC - constructional material' have been studied by various techniques and methods at the Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University (NNSTU). The study included: ultrasonic analysis; determination of the contact thermal resistance; study of the influence of the wall boundary region characteristics on the MHD resistance of the HLMC flow. Due to the results of this research the modern model of the wall boundary layer in the medium of heavy metal coolants was built. The following characteristics were experimentally found in the wide range of parameters: the magnitude of the contact thermal resistance of the wall boundary layer in the Peclet number range from Pe=260 to Pe=1430 with the oxygen concentration varied in the range from 10 -7 to 10 0 ; the dependences of the hydraulic loss coefficients on the Stuart criterion in the magnetic field. (author)

  16. Evaluating Function of a Constructed Fen in Alberta's Oil Sands Region Using Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentration and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, M.; Khadka, B.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands, mainly fens, account for close to 65% of the landscape in the oil sands region near Fort McMurray, Alberta. Since mine closure plans require landscape reclamation, methods for fen construction are being investigated. As reclamation goals include the return of ecosystem function, criteria for evaluation must be developed. In this study we compare soil concentrations and spectrophometric properties of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from a constructed fen during its first growing season with that collected from three diverse, undisturbed reference fens in the region. The constructed fen had lower DOC concentration than all the reference fens. Based on E2/E3, E4/E6 and specific UV absorbance of the DOC, the constructed fen had DOC with significantly greater humic content, aromatic nature, and larger molecular size than the reference fens. Results from laboratory DOC production studies indicate that these patterns are likely due to the limited DOC contribution from the newly planted vegetation at the constructed fen, resulting in DOC largely derived from humified peat placed during construction. These preliminary results suggest that DOC concentration and chemistry provide information about the ecological development of the constructed system that could be useful for evaluating reclamation success through time.

  17. The algorithms for constructing the boundaries of the stability regions of linear hamiltonian systems by using MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat G. Yumagulov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main stages of the algorithm for constructing the stability regions of dynamical systems described by a linear Hamiltonian system of the form . The algorithm is based on the methods of the theory of nonlinear oscillations of stability studies of stationary solutions of linear differential equations with periodic coefficients depending on a small parameter. The algorithm is implemented by using Matlab CAS. As an application, we have solved the problem of constructing the stability region of libration points of a flat elliptic restricted three-body problem is analyzed in detail.

  18. About the Territorial Potential of the Construction of Battery-Charging Stations for Autonomous Electric Motor Vehicles in the Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilova Lyubov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main current trends in the development of electric motor vehicles with "zero emission" as well as the battery-charging stations concerned. The study is based on a preliminary comparative analysis of the RF regions with respect to five indices (average per capita income, number of private cars in the region, air pollution level, provision of the region with power supply and the potential use of local renewable energy resources, and it gives some recommendations on the prospects of possible construction of battery-charging stations in the regions.

  19. Convergence Among the Submarkets in Australian Regional Building and Construction Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiao Liu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on market convergence are well considered in the literature. However, the majority of the previous research focused on housing markets and few studies have concentrated on construction markets. Owing to a simultaneously dramatic increase in the construction prices of the sub-markets in the building construction sector in Australia, this paper aims to identify the convergence among these markets, involving house construction market, other-residential building construction market, and non-residential building construction market. To achieve it the Granger causality test and generalized response function depending on the vector error correction model with the quarterly data of Australia’s eight states from 1998 to 2010 will be applied. Based upon the econometric tests, the price diffusion patterns among these construction markets have been identified. Research on the convergences of construction markets not only helps construction firms perform well in business operations and arbitrage activities, but also provides policy makers with useful information for enacting effective construction policies for national perspectives and approaches to infrastructure planning.

  20. Water reduction by constructed wetlands treating waste landfill leachate in a tropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yuka; Ishigaki, Tomonori; Ebie, Yoshitaka; Sutthasil, Noppharit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Yamada, Masato

    2015-10-01

    One of the key challenges in landfill leachate management is the prevention of environmental pollution by the overflow of untreated leachate. To evaluate the feasibility of constructed wetlands (CWs) for the treatment of waste landfill leachate in tropical regions, water reduction and pollutant removal by a CW subjected to different flow patterns (i.e., horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) and free water surface (FWS)) were examined in both rainy and dry seasons in Thailand. A pilot-scale CW planted with cattail was installed at a landfill site in Thailand. With HSSF, the CW substantially removed pollutants from the landfill leachate without the need to harvest plants, whereas with FWS, it only slightly removed pollutants. Under both flow patterns, the CW significantly reduced the leachate volume to a greater extent than surface evaporation, which is regarded as an effect of the storage pond. Additionally, water reduction occurred regardless of season and precipitation, within the range 0-9 mm d(-1). In the case of low feeding frequency, water reduction by the CW with HSSF was lower than that with FWS. However, high feeding frequency improved water reduction by the CW with HSSF and resulted in a similar reduction to that observed with FWS, which exhibited maximum evapotranspiration. In terms of water reduction, with both HSSF in conjunction with high frequency feeding and FWS, the CW provided a high degree of evapotranspiration. However, pollutant removal efficiencies with HSSF were higher than for FWS. The present study suggested that CWs with HSSF and high frequency feeding could be useful for the prevention of uncontrollable dispersion of polluted leachate in the tropical climate zone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for surface water ice in the lunar polar regions using reflectance measurements from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and temperature measurements from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Lucey, Paul G.; Lemelin, Myriam; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Aharonson, Oded; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Hayne, Paul O.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Paige, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-08-01

    We find that the reflectance of the lunar surface within 5° of latitude of the South Pole increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, near ∼110 K, behavior consistent with the presence of surface water ice. The North polar region does not show this behavior, nor do South polar surfaces at latitudes more than 5° from the pole. This South pole reflectance anomaly persists when analysis is limited to surfaces with slopes less than 10° to eliminate false detection due to the brightening effect of mass wasting, and also when the very bright south polar crater Shackleton is excluded from the analysis. We also find that south polar regions of permanent shadow that have been reported to be generally brighter at 1064 nm do not show anomalous reflectance when their annual maximum surface temperatures are too high to preserve water ice. This distinction is not observed at the North Pole. The reflectance excursion on surfaces with maximum temperatures below 110 K is superimposed on a general trend of increasing reflectance with decreasing maximum temperature that is present throughout the polar regions in the north and south; we attribute this trend to a temperature or illumination-dependent space weathering effect (e.g. Hemingway et al., 2015). We also find a sudden increase in reflectance with decreasing temperature superimposed on the general trend at 200 K and possibly at 300 K. This may indicate the presence of other volatiles such as sulfur or organics. We identified and mapped surfaces with reflectances so high as to be unlikely to be part of an ice-free population. In this south we find a similar distribution found by Hayne et al. (2015) based on UV properties. In the north a cluster of pixels near that pole may represent a limited frost exposure.

  2. Geologic studies on the Rio Una region (Iguape - Sao Paulo County), Brazil, for the construction of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassano, S.; Mueller, M.; Stein, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The main objective of the project was the geological and seismological characterization of 230 Km 2 along the coastal region between the Barro Branco and Jureia massifs in order to pinpoint one or more local areas showing adequate geological, morphological and geotechnical conditions suitable for construction of nuclear power plants. Results of the investigations, as well as the methodology used for determination of main interesting areas are presented. The best areas for construction are believed to be situated along the coast where Precambrian basement rocks crop out close to the shoreline. The Tertiary-Quaternary sedimentary cover reaches a thickness of 50 or more meters and the character of the sediments does not allow direct emplacement of foundations for heavy-weight constructions. Historical analysis of seismic activity of the region, as well as the study of faults and fracture zones identified in the area demonstrate the absence of active faults such as defined by internationally accepted safety criteria. (Author) [pt

  3. What role does the real estate–construction sector play in China's regional economy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Honghao; Folmer, Henk; van der Vlist, Arno J.

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization, industrialization and real estate reform have led to a vast growth of the real estate–construction sector in China. Using the 2002 and 2007 provincial input–output tables, this paper examines the importance of the real estate–construction sector in the Chinese economy by applying the

  4. Scheme of fault tectonic and tectonic activity manifestation in the region of the Crimea nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasynkov, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    Characteristic of fault tectonics and tectonic activity manifestation in the region of the Crimea nuclear power plant construction is presented. Mosaic-block structure of the area, predetermined by the development of diagonal systems of activated tectonic dislocations with different displacement amplitudes and different stratigraphic ranges of manifestation, was established. Strained-stressed state of the region is determined by the presence of the South-Azov zone of deep fault and Krasnogorsk-Samarlinks fault system. The presented scheme can be used as tectonic basis of seismogenic activity of the region

  5. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  6. Competing Visions, Shifting Boundaries: The Construction of Latin America as a World Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Marie D.; Cooper, Catherine W.

    2007-01-01

    Latin America is a popularly accepted world region. A systematic review of geographic interpretations of Latin America reveals that the origin of the term goes back to the mid-nineteenth century and that the region's boundaries have shifted over time. This article argues that four basic principles operate in the formation of world regions such as…

  7. Polarization effects in the reaction e++e-→ρ++ρ- and determination of the ρ-meson form factors in the time-like region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamuscin, C.; Gakh, G. I.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    2007-01-01

    The electron positron annihilation reaction into four-pion production has been studied, through the channel e + +e - →ρ+ρ. The differential (and total) cross sections and various polarization observables for this reaction have been calculated in terms of the electromagnetic form factors of the corresponding γ*ρρ current. The elements of the spin-density matrix of the ρ meson were also calculated. Numerical estimations have been done, with the help of phenomenological form factors obtained in the spacelike region of the momentum transfer squared and analytically extended to the timelike region

  8. Comparing lightning polarity and cloud microphysical properties over regions of high ground flash density in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simpson, LA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find a correlation between lightning polarity and microphysical properties of a storm cloud, for events where large amounts of lightning damage have occured and/or there has been a reported lightning-related fatality....

  9. Jurassic–Cretaceous low paleolatitudes from the circum-Black Sea region Crimea and Pontides) due to True Polar Wander

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, M.J.M.; Langereis, C.G.; van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.; Kaymakcl, N.; Stephenson, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent study, paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental data from Adria (as part of the African plate) suggest a trend toward much lower (~15°) latitudes from Early Jurassic to Earliest Cretaceous at the position of Adria than suggested by the apparent polar wander (APW) paths. The smoothing of

  10. Spin-Polarization in Quasi-Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng-Wei; Li, Ling

    2017-05-01

    Spin polarization in ferromagnetic metal/insulator/spin-filter barrier/nonmagnetic metal, referred to as quasi-magnetic tunnel junctions, is studied within the free-electron model. Our results show that large positive or negative spin-polarization can be obtained at high bias in quasi-magnetic tunnel junctions, and within large bias variation regions, the degree of spin-polarization can be linearly tuned by bias. These linear variation regions of spin-polarization with bias are influenced by the barrier thicknesses, barrier heights and molecular fields in the spin-filter (SF) layer. Among them, the variations of thickness and heights of the insulating and SF barrier layers have influence on the value of spin-polarization and the linear variation regions of spin-polarization with bias. However, the variations of molecular field in the SF layer only have influence on the values of the spin-polarization and the influences on the linear variation regions of spin-polarization with bias are slight. Supported by the Key Natural Science Fund of Sichuan Province Education Department under Grant Nos 13ZA0149 and 16ZA0047, and the Construction Plan for Scientific Research Innovation Team of Universities in Sichuan Province under Grant No 12TD008.

  11. The economic situation and construction-sector developments in the UNECE region, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2012-01-01

    The US housing market continues to struggle from overbuilding, the housing crash, and the Great Recession. It is still in a correction that began in 2008, with new housing starts and sales at their lowest levels since modern records began being kept in 1963. Spending on housing construction is at record lows; however, the remodelling and multi-family subsectors'...

  12. Characterization of the natural radioactivity of materials used in civil construction or the Curitiba, Parana state, Brazil, metropolitan region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, Allan F.N.; Martins, Patricia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Claro, Flavia Del; Rocha, Zildete; Santos, Talita O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper performs an analysis of the natural radioactivity of construction materials (mainly the 222 Rn) which are present in human environment. The main objective of the study is to characterize different building materials which come from the metropolitan region of the Curitiba related to the exhalation of 222 Rn. The applied methodology analyse the samples of ceramic brick, plaster mortar, and fine lime from the concentration measurements of radon using CR-39 type detectors, and gamma spectrometry analysis

  13. Uniformed Diplomacy: Reviewing the Army Leader Development Strategy in Light of the Regional Alignment of Forces Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    unified action, this research focuses on the social, political, and psychological dynamics involved with key leader, cross-cultural, and civil-military...Going forward, the QDDR seeks to develop entrepreneurship so that DOS and USAID personnel can “find creative ways to continue to develop new...UNIFORMED DIPLOMACY: REVIEWING THE ARMY LEADER DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY IN LIGHT OF THE REGIONAL ALIGNMENT OF FORCES CONSTRUCT

  14. Investigations of subsurface flow constructed wetlands and associated geomaterial resources in the Akumal and Reforma regions, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekeler, Mark P. S.; Probst, Pete; Samsonov, Misha; Tselepis, Cynthia M.; Bates, William; Kearns, Lance E.; Maynard, J. Barry

    2007-12-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands in the village of Akumal, Quintana Roo, Mexico were surveyed to determine the general status of the wetland systems and provide baseline information for long term monitoring and further study. Twenty subsurface flow wetlands were surveyed and common problems observed in the systems were overloading, poor plant cover, odor, and no secondary containment. Bulk mineral composition of aggregate from two subsurface flow constructed wetlands was determined to consist solely of calcite using bulk powder X-ray diffraction. Some soil structure is developed in the aggregate and aggregate levels in wetlands drop at an estimated rate between 3 and 10 cm/year for overloaded wetlands owing to dissolution. Mineral composition from fresh aggregate samples commonly is a mixture of calcite and aragonite. Trace amounts of Pb, Zn, Co, and Cr were observed in fresh aggregate. Coefficients of permeability ( k) varied from 0.006 to 0.027 cm/s with an average values being 0.016 cm/s. Grain size analysis of fresh aggregate samples indicates there are unimodal and multimodal size distributions in the samples with modes in the coarse and fine sand being common. Investigations of other geologic media from the Reforma region indicate that a dolomite with minor amounts of Fe-oxide and palygorskite is abundant and may be a better aggregate source that the current materials used. A Ca-montmorillonite bed was identified in the Reforma region as well and this unit is suitable to serve as a clay liner to prevent leaks for new and existing wetland systems. These newly discovered geologic resources should aid in the improvement of subsurface flow constructed wetlands in the region. Although problems do exist in these wetlands with respect to design, these systems represent a successful implementation of constructed wetlands at a community level in developing regions.

  15. ALGORITHM FOR CONSTRUCTION OF REGIONAL AGRARIAN-INDUSTRIAL CLUSTERS IN THE MODERNIZED ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Vazhenina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Necessity and timeliness of regional agrarian-industrial cluster generation has been substantiated in the present paper. A program algorithm concerned with regional agrarian-industrial cluster generation has been developed. Possible results of the given programme implementation have been demonstrated.

  16. Development of the business area construction and energy of EnergieRegion Nuernberg. Transfer from project management to a regional network; Entwicklung des Geschaeftsfeldes Bau und Energie der EnergieRegion Nuernberg. Umsetzung von Projektmanagement in einem regionalen Netzwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiverth, A.

    2006-07-01

    The association EnergieRegion Nuernberg is a regional authority network, which is employed with the promotion of sustainable handling of the factor energy in the region Nuernberg and with the proliferation of this region as internationally recognized location for energy engineering, energy industry and energy science. The intention is to use the important industrial, service-oriented and scientific potential optimally. For this reason a functional co-ordination and communication platform had to be created for the cross-linking of the appropriate participants from economics, research and public administration. Therefore, the author of the contribution under consideration accompanies the development process of the business field construction and energy of this association in the background of the current trends in the construction and energy sector in the region Nuernberg. Under this aspect, the author reports on the following aspects: (a) Success factors of the project management in a regional network; (b) Operationalisation of the success of the project by means of a model; (c) Analysis of the different aspects of energetic measures; (d) Determination of chances and risks of the range building and energy in the region Nuernberg; (e) Comparison of the success of the model projects with the model for the determination of project success; (f) Determination of strengths and weaknesses of the project management in the business field construction and energy of the energy region Nuernberg.

  17. Derivation of the horizontal wind field in the polar mesopause region by using successive images of noctilucent clouds observed by a color digital camera in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Yamashita, R.

    2017-12-01

    It is important to quantify amplitude of turbulent motion to understand the energy and momentum budgets and distribution of minor constituents in the upper mesosphere. In particular, to know the eddy diffusion coefficient of minor constituents which are locally and impulsively produced by energetic particle precipitations in the polar mesopause is one of the most important subjects in the upper atmospheric science. One of the straight methods to know the amplitude of the eddy motion is to measure the wind field with both spatial and temporal domain. However, observation technique satisfying such requirements is limited in this region. In this study, derivation of the horizontal wind field in the polar mesopause region by tracking the motion of noctilucent clouds (NLCs) is performed. NLC is the highest cloud in the Earth which appears in a mesopause region during summer season in both polar regions. Since the vertical structure of the NLC is sufficiently thin ( within several hundred meters in typical), the apparent horizontal motion observed from ground can be regarded as the result of transportation by the horizontal winds at a single altitude. In this presentation, initial results of wind field derivation by tracking a motion of noctilucent clouds (NLC) observed by a ground-based color digital camera in Iceland is reported. The procedure for wind field estimation consists with 3 steps; (1) projects raw images to a geographical map (2) enhances NLC structures by using FFT method (3) determines horizontal velocity vectors by applying template matching method to two sequential images. In this talk, a result of the wind derivation by using successive images of NLC with 3 minutes interval and 1.5h duration observed on the night of Aug 1st, 2013 will be reported as a case study.

  18. Correlation of CCV Between In-Cylinder Swirl Ratio and Polar Velocity Profile in Valve Seat Region Using LES Under Motored Engine Condition★

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of Transparent Combustion Chamber (TCC3 engine Large-Eddy Simulation (LES result was carried out to investigate Cycle-to-Cycle Variation (CCV correlation between in-cylinder swirl ratio and flow in the valve seat region of the intake port to address a challenging question on “What causes CCV of in-cylinder flow”. Polar Velocity (PV profile, mean velocities normal to a ring-shaped cutting surface in the valve seat region, is calculated to depict intake port flow. A Net Polar Velocity (NPV can be defined by performing the vector sum of the polar velocity around the intake valve. A standard deviation of PV is also calculated from azimuthal distribution of PV magnitudes relative to its mean value. The analysis of 18 LES cycles of TCC3 engine with a two-valve, pancake-shaped combustion chamber shows that similar CCV of in-cylinder swirl ratio patterns are observed at different crank angles from Intake Valve Opening (IVO to Exhaust Valve Opening (EVO. Further analysis shows clear correlations of CCV between in-cylinder swirl ratio and NPV magnitude and the standard deviation of PV at selected crank angles from IVO to EVO. The correlations get significantly better with the ring-shaped cutting surface moves from up-stream to downstream of the valve-seat region. This study reveals that the CCV of in-cylinder swirl ratio is built up gradually from upstream to downstream in the intake port and valve-seat region. Further evaluation of the analysis method is planned for a four-valve engine as an evaluation metric for better engine intake port design and combustion chamber optimization.

  19. Non-price competition in the regional high-rise construction market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganebnykh, Elena; Burtseva, Tatyana; Gurova, Ekaterina; Polyakova, Irina

    2018-03-01

    The article analyzes the market of high-rise residential construction in the city of Kirov (Russia). A minimal significance of price factors has been revealed in the process of the market analysis. This suggests that a lower price does not guarantee an increase in consumer demand. Thus, factors of non-price competition are of great importance in the market in question. The expert survey has identified the factors of non-price competition which influence consumer perceptions. A perceptual map has been constructed on the basis of the identified factors by means of the factor analysis to determine the positioning of each high-rise building relative to the consumer requirements. None of the high-rise residential buildings in the market in question meets the consumers' expectations of an "ideal facility".

  20. The Contribution of Water Ice Clouds to the Water Cycle in the North Polar Region of Mars: Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    While it has long been known that Mars' north residual polar cap and the Martian regolith are significant sources of atmospheric water vapor, the amount of water vapor observed in the northern spring season by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector instrument (MAWD) cannot be attributed to cap and regolith sources alone. Kahn suggested that ice hazes may be the mechanism by which additional water is supplied to the Martian atmosphere. Additionally, a significant decrease in atmospheric water vapor was observed in the late northern summer that could not be correlated with the return of the cold seasonal C02 ice. While the detection of water ice clouds on Mars indicate that water exists in Mars' atmosphere in several different phases, the extent to which water ice clouds play a role in moving water through the Martian atmosphere remains uncertain. Work by Bass et. al. suggested that the time dependence of water ice cap seasonal variability and the increase in atmospheric water vapor depended on the polar cap center reaching 200K, the night time saturation temperature. Additionally, they demonstrated that a decrease in atmospheric water vapor may be attributed to deposition of water ice onto the surface of the polar cap; temperatures were still too warm at this time in the summer for the deposition of carbon dioxide. However, whether water ice clouds contribute significantly to this variability is unknown. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  1. A multi-regional structural path analysis of the energy supply chain in China's construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jingke; Shen, Qiping; Xue, Fan

    2016-01-01

    The construction industry in China exerts significant environmental impacts and uses considerable resources because of rapid urbanization. This study conducted a structural path analysis (SPA) based on the multi-regional input–output table to quantify environmental impact transmission in the entire supply chain. Results indicated that the direct resource input (the first stage) along with on-site construction (the zeroth stage) consumed the highest amount of energy in the supply chain and accounted for approximately 50% of total energy consumption. Regional analysis showed that energy consumption in the construction industry at the provincial level was self-sufficient. Sectoral analysis demonstrated that the direct inputs from the sectors of “manufacture of non-metallic mineral products” and “smelting and pressing of metals” generated the most important energy flows, whereas the sectors of “production and distribution of electric power and heat power” and “extraction of petroleum and natural gas” significantly but indirectly influenced energy use. Sensitivity analysis exhibited that the system boundary of SPA could be narrowed down into the first two upstream stages that contained nearly 50% of energy flow information or expanded toward the first five upstream stages that represented 80% of total energy consumption. - Highlights: •We designed an optimized algorithm for multi-regional SPA. •We extracted energy-intensive paths throughout the upstream supply chain. •We explored self-sufficiency characteristic for provincial construction industries. •We identified energy-intensive sectors hidden in higher-order supply chain. •We developed an effective strategy for narrowing down the system boundary of SPA.

  2. Constructing Consistent Multiscale Scenarios by Transdisciplinary Processes: the Case of Mountain Regions Facing Global Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fridolin Simon. Brand

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alpine regions in Europe, in particular, face demanding local challenges, e.g., the decline in the agriculture and timber industries, and are also prone to global changes, such as in climate, with potentially severe impacts on tourism. We focus on the Visp region in the Upper Valais, Switzerland, and ask how the process of stakeholder involvement in research practice can contribute to a better understanding of the specific challenges and future development of mountainous regions under global change. Based on a coupled human-environment system (HES perspective, we carried out a formative scenario analysis to develop a set of scenarios for the future directions of the Visp region. In addition, we linked these regional scenarios to context scenarios developed at the global and Swiss levels via an external consistency analysis. This method allows the coupling of both the scenario building process and the scenarios as such. We used a functional-dynamic approach to theory-practice cooperation, i.e., the involvement of key stakeholders from, for example, tourism, forestry, and administration, differed in type and intensity during the steps of the research process. In our study, we experienced strong problem awareness among the stakeholders concerning the impacts of global change and local challenges. The guiding research question was commonly defined and problem ownership was more or less balanced. We arrived at six multiscale scenarios that open up future trajectories for the Visp region, and present generic strategies to cope with global and local challenges. The results show that local identity, spatial planning, community budget, and demographic development are important steering elements in the region's future development. We suggest that method-guided transdisciplinary processes result in a richer picture and a more systemic understanding, which enable a discussion of critical and surprising issues.

  3. Detailed EXOSAT and optical observations of the intermediate polar 3A0729+103: discovery of two medium energy X-ray emission regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHardy, I.M.; Pye, J.P.; Fairall, A.P.; Menzies, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    EXOSAT observations of the intermediate polar cataclysmic variable 3A0729+103 reveal a strong orbital modulation, with the 2-4KeV X-rays being significantly more modulated than the 4-6keV X-rays, indicative of photoelectric absorption. The 913 second modulation which is very prominent in the optical light curve, is weakly detected in the medium-energy X-ray light curve, confirming that it represents the white dwarf spin period. These observations are well explained by a combination of two sources of medium-energy X-ray emission. The presence of two emission regions is also clearly seen in the optical spectroscopy, particularly in the intensity of the He II4686 line which has two peaks during the orbit. The authors identify the two optical emission regions with the two X-ray emission regions. (author)

  4. In vivo and in vitro changes in neurochemical parameters related to mercury concentrations from specific brain regions of polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Anke; Kwan, Michael; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) has been detected in polar bear brain tissue, but its biological effects are not well known. Relationships between Hg concentrations and neurochemical enzyme activities and receptor binding were assessed in the cerebellum, frontal lobes, and occipital lobes of 24 polar bears collected from Nunavik (Northern Quebec), Canada. The concentration-response relationship was further studied with in vitro experiments using pooled brain homogenate of 12 randomly chosen bears. In environmentally exposed brain samples, there was no correlative relationship between Hg concentration and cholinesterase (ChE) activity or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) binding in any of the 3 brain regions. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the occipital lobe showed a negative correlative relationship with total Hg concentration. In vitro experiments, however, demonstrated that Hg (mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride) can inhibit ChE and MAO activities and muscarinic mAChR binding. These results show that Hg can alter neurobiochemical parameters but the current environmental Hg exposure level does have an effect on the neurochemistry of polar bears from northern Canada. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Exploration of polar lipid accumulation profiles in Euglena gracilis using LipidBlast, an MS/MS spectral library constructed in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takumi; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Okazawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Rai; Nakazawa, Masami; Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Arita, Masanori; Ohta, Daisaku

    2014-01-01

    A rapid protocol for polar lipid profiling was applied to Euglena gracilis lipid metabolism by LipidBlast, an MS/MS spectral similarity search tool. The similarity search results suggested anoxia-induced polar lipid metabolism in Euglena characterized by the accumulation of differential lipid classes, carbon chain lengths, and unsaturated bond numbers. The informatics-supported MS spectral search provides an alternative option for global lipid profiling studies.

  6. Long-range mapping and construction of a YAC contig within the cat eye syndrome critical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riazi, M.A.; Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E. [Univ. of Alberta (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome is characterized cytogenetically by the presence of a supernumerary marker chromosome derived from duplicated regions of 22pter-22q11.2. In order to study this syndrome, we have mapped and cloned within the CES critical region (CESCR) in 22q11.2. A long-range map was constructed using probes previously mapped to the CESCR by somatic cell hybrids. The map spans from probes LN63 to D22S36 and covers approximately 3 Mb. Probes within the region were used to isolate YACs, producing a contig of approximately 1.5 Mb (cLN63-D22S57). DNA studies of a cat eye patient with an unusual marker chromosome refined the minimal critical region proximal to D22S57, indicating that most of the CESCR is now cloned. The physical map will allow us to further delineate the CESCR and isolate genes in the region. Towards this end, we have performed {open_quotes}exon-trapping{close_quotes}on a cosmid, CN63, in this region. A 250 bp exon was isolated which maps to the CESCR and has no homology in GenBank. Further characterization of the gene containing this exon is in progress.

  7. Measurement of the vector np → dπ{sup 0}π{sup 0} reaction with polarized beam in the region of the d*(2380) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adlarson, P.; Calen, H.; Fransson, K.; Gullstroem, C.O.; Heijkenskjoeld, L.; Johansson, T.; Marciniewski, P.; Wolke, M.; Zlomanczuk, J. [Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Augustyniak, W.; Marianski, B.; Morsch, H.P.; Trzcinski, A.; Zupranski, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Department of Nuclear Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Bardan, W.; Ciepal, I.; Czerwinski, E.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Khatri, G.; Kistryn, S.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Rudy, Z.; Rundel, O.; Schaetti-Ozerianska, I.; Skurzok, M.; Smyrski, J.; Wronska, A.; Zielinski, M.J. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Bashkanov, M. [University of Edinburgh, James Clerk Maxwell Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Bergmann, F.S.; Demmich, K.; Huesken, N.; Khoukaz, A.; Sitterberg, K.; Taeschner, A. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Department, Warsaw (Poland); Bhatt, H.; Varma, R. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Physics, Powai, Maharashtra (India); Bondar, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Buescher, M.; Engels, R.; Goldenbaum, F.; Hejny, V.; Khan, F.A.; Lersch, D.; Lorentz, B.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Stassen, R.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockhorst, H.; Zurek, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Clement, H. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro- and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Erven, A.; Erven, W.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Wuestner, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Engineering, Elektronik und Analytik, Juelich (Germany); Eyrich, W.; Zink, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Fedorets, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Foehl, K. [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Goswami, A.; Roy, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Department of Physics, Indore, Madhya Pradesh (India); Grigoryev, K. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, High Energy Physics Division, Gatchina, Leningrad district (Russian Federation); Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Physics, Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energiy Physics, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Klos, B.; Stephan, E. [University of Silesia, August Chelkowski Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Kulessa, P.; Pysz, K.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A. [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Kupsc, A.; Pszczel, D. [Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); National Centre for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Department, Warsaw (Poland); Lalwani, K. [Malaviya National Institute of Technology Jaipur, JLN Marg, Department of Physics, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Maier, R.; Stroeher, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA-FAME, Juelich Aachen Research Alliance, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany); Perez del Rio, E. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Pyszniak, A. [Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Krakow (PL); Ritman, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (DE); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA-FAME, Juelich Aachen Research Alliance, Juelich (DE); RWTH Aachen, Aachen (DE); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Bochum (DE); Sawant, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Physics, Powai, Maharashtra (IN); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (DE); Skorodko, T. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (DE); University of Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro- and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (DE); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (RU); Sopov, V. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Yamamoto, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (JP); Zabierowski, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Department of Astrophysics, Lodz (PL); Collaboration: WASA-at-COSY Collaboration

    2016-05-15

    We report on a high-statistics measurement of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction vector np→dπ{sup 0}π{sup 0} over the energy region of the d*(2380) resonance by use of a polarized deuteron beam and observing the double fusion reaction in the quasifree scattering mode. The measurements were performed with the WASA detector setup at COSY. The data reveal substantial analyzing powers and confirm conclusions about the d* resonance obtained from unpolarized measurements. We also confirm the previous unpolarized data obtained under complementary kinematic conditions. (orig.)

  8. The economic situation and construction sector developments in the UNECE region, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman; Robert. Shelburne

    2011-01-01

    The speed of the global recovery from the worst economic crisis since the 1930s varies significantly by region; growth is much faster in the emerging economies than in the advanced economies. Economic growth in the coming year is likely to remain weak in North America and western Europe, as austerity is implemented to address increasing sovereign debt levels. Given...

  9. Radiation conditions is the region of Rovenskaya nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, Yu.O.; Teplykh, A.A.; Kataev, V.T.; Dikaya, E.Ya.; Lisachenko, Eh.P.; Ponikarov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    With a view to optimizing the monitoring of radiation conditions in the vicinity of NPP, an area extending 15-20 km around the construction site of the Rovenskaya atomic energy plant was surveyed. The level of natural gamma-radiation, contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in environmental objects, and doses of radiation received by the population from incorporated 137 Cs was studied. It was found that while the average natural gamma-radiation background was relatively low, local levels of the gamma background varied strongly with the type of soil and the pattern of housing systems in the human settlements concerned. The contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs were also found to fluctuate considerably with the sampling site. 137 Cs was relatively high in cow's milk and in members of the community. The results obtained will be taken into account in the radiation monitoring program

  10. Political and Territorial Construction of Regional and National Identities in Spain since 1978

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humlebæk, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the Statute-related parliamentary debates of the Catalan and Valencian autonomous regions and analyses the conceptions of the political communities defended by the political parties, both of Spain, Valencia and Catalonia and the relationship between them. The goal is to anal......This study focuses on the Statute-related parliamentary debates of the Catalan and Valencian autonomous regions and analyses the conceptions of the political communities defended by the political parties, both of Spain, Valencia and Catalonia and the relationship between them. The goal...... is reflected in many ways, but it also shows indications of conflict or of highly sensitive areas with conflict potential as early as 1979. Furthermore there are significant differences in the ways the political parties act in Valencia and Catalonia, respectively. The results suggest that the decentralisation...... of the state did not decrease the conflict potential around the territorial organisation of Spain....

  11. A GIS analysis of suitability for construction aggregate recycling sites using regional transportation network and population density features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G.R.; Kapo, K.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aggregate is used in road and building construction to provide bulk, strength, support, and wear resistance. Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and reclaimed Portland cement concrete (RPCC) are abundant and available sources of recycled aggregate. In this paper, current aggregate production operations in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia are used to develop spatial association models for the recycled aggregate industry with regional transportation network and population density features. The cost of construction aggregate to the end user is strongly influenced by the cost of transporting processed aggregate from the production site to the construction site. More than 60% of operations recycling aggregate in the mid-Atlantic study area are located within 4.8 km (3 miles) of an interstate highway. Transportation corridors provide both sites of likely road construction where aggregate is used and an efficient means to move both materials and on-site processing equipment back and forth from various work sites to the recycling operations. Urban and developing areas provide a high market demand for aggregate and a ready source of construction debris that may be processed into recycled aggregate. Most aggregate recycling operators in the study area are sited in counties with population densities exceeding 77 people/km2 (200 people/mile 2). No aggregate recycling operations are sited in counties with less than 19 people/km2 (50 people/mile2), reflecting the lack of sufficient long-term sources of construction debris to be used as an aggregate source, as well as the lack of a sufficient market demand for aggregate in most rural areas to locate a recycling operation there or justify the required investment in the equipment to process and produce recycled aggregate. Weights of evidence analyses (WofE), measuring correlation on an area-normalized basis, and weighted logistic regression (WLR), are used to model the distribution of RAP and RPCC operations relative

  12. Brain region-specific perfluoroalkylated sulfonate (PFSA) and carboxylic acid (PFCA) accumulation and neurochemical biomarker responses in east Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers Pedersen, Kathrine; Basu, Niladri; Letcher, Robert; Greaves, Alana K; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) is a growing class of contaminants in the Arctic environment, and include the established perfluorinated sulfonates (PFSAs; especially perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)) and carboxylic acids (PFCAs). PFSAs and PFCAs of varying chain length have been reported to bioaccumulate in lipid rich tissues of the brain among other tissues such as liver, and can reach high concentrations in top predators including the polar bear. PFCA and PFSA bioaccummulation in the brain has the potential to pose neurotoxic effects and therefore we conducted a study to investigate if variations in neurochemical transmitter systems i.e. the cholinergic, glutaminergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic, could be related to brain-specific bioaccumulation of PFASs in East Greenland polar bears. Nine brain regions from nine polar bears were analyzed for enzyme activity (monoamine oxidase (MAO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutamine synthetase (GS)) and receptor density (dopamine-2 (D2), muscarinic cholinergic (mAChR) and gamma-butyric acid type A (GABA-A)) along with PFSA and PFCA concentrations. Average brain ∑PFSA concentration was 25ng/g ww where PFOS accounted for 91%. Average ∑PFCA concentration was 88ng/g ww where PFUnDA, PFDoDA and PFTrDA combined accounted for 79%. The highest concentrations of PFASs were measured in brain stem, cerebellum and hippocampus. Correlative analyses were performed both across and within brain regions. Significant positive correlations were found between PFASs and MAO activity in occipital lobe (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=0.83, p=0.041, n=6) and across brain regions (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=0.47, p=0.001, ∑PFSA; rp=0.44, p>0.001; n=50). GABA-A receptor density was positively correlated with two PFASs across brain regions (PFOS; rp=0.33, p=0.02 and PFDoDA; rp=0.34, p=0.014; n=52). Significant negative correlations were found between mAChR density and PFASs in cerebellum (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=-0.95, p=0.013, n=5) and across brain regions (e.g.

  13. Cloud Classification in Polar and Desert Regions and Smoke Classification from Biomass Burning Using a Hierarchical Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, June; Corwin, Edward; Lloyd, David; Logar, Antonette; Welch, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    This research focuses on a new neural network scene classification technique. The task is to identify scene elements in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometry (AVHRR) data from three scene types: polar, desert and smoke from biomass burning in South America (smoke). The ultimate goal of this research is to design and implement a computer system which will identify the clouds present on a whole-Earth satellite view as a means of tracking global climate changes. Previous research has reported results for rule-based systems (Tovinkere et at 1992, 1993) for standard back propagation (Watters et at. 1993) and for a hierarchical approach (Corwin et al 1994) for polar data. This research uses a hierarchical neural network with don't care conditions and applies this technique to complex scenes. A hierarchical neural network consists of a switching network and a collection of leaf networks. The idea of the hierarchical neural network is that it is a simpler task to classify a certain pattern from a subset of patterns than it is to classify a pattern from the entire set. Therefore, the first task is to cluster the classes into groups. The switching, or decision network, performs an initial classification by selecting a leaf network. The leaf networks contain a reduced set of similar classes, and it is in the various leaf networks that the actual classification takes place. The grouping of classes in the various leaf networks is determined by applying an iterative clustering algorithm. Several clustering algorithms were investigated, but due to the size of the data sets, the exhaustive search algorithms were eliminated. A heuristic approach using a confusion matrix from a lightly trained neural network provided the basis for the clustering algorithm. Once the clusters have been identified, the hierarchical network can be trained. The approach of using don't care nodes results from the difficulty in generating extremely complex surfaces in order to separate one class from

  14. Construction of Optimal-Path Maps for Homogeneous-Cost-Region Path-Planning Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    problem of somewhat smaller scope first, with the intention of expanding the scope in the future to incorporate non-convex regions. The next step will be...the model, the algorithm has produced amodel sub-optimal path. Such asolution may occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Some algorithns...other side of the road fronm S to point Q. Now IPcgQI = 1PEPxlsin(0b), so the cost oftravelling front S to Pc and along the road to Px is Cb(ISPII

  15. Analyzing power measurement of pp elastic scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region with the 200-GeV/c polarized-proton beam at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, N.; Langland, J.; Onel, Y.; Bonner, B.E.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cranshaw, J.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Nguyen, C.; Roberts, J.B.; Skeens, J.; White, J.L.; Bravar, A.; Giacomich, R.; Penzo, A.; Schiavon, P.; Zanetti, A.; Bystricky, J.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; van Rossum, L.; Cossairt, J.D.; Read, A.L.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Meschanin, A.P.; Nurushev, S.B.; Patalakha, D.I.; Rykov, V.L.; Solovyanov, V.L.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Grosnick, D.P.; Hill, D.A.; Laghai, M.; Lopiano, D.; Ohashi, Y.; Shima, T.; Spinka, H.; Stanek, R.W.; Underwood, D.G.; Yokosawa, A.; Funahashi, H.; Goto, Y.; Imai, K.; Itow, Y.; Makino, S.; Masaike, A.; Miyake, K.; Nagamine, T.; Saito, N.; Yamashita, S.; Iwatani, K.; Kuroda, K.; Michalowicz, A.; Luehring, F.C.; Miller, D.H.; Maki, T.; Pauletta, G.; Rappazzo, G.F.; Salvato, G.; Takashima, R.

    1993-01-01

    The analyzing power A N of proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region has been measured using the 200-GeV/c Fermilab polarized proton beam. A theoretically predicted interference between the hadronic non-spin-flip amplitude and the electromagnetic spin-flip amplitude is shown for the first time to be present at high energies in the region of 1.5x10 -3 to 5.0x10 -2 (GeV/c) 2 four-momentum transfer squared, and our results are analyzed in connection with theoretical calculations. In addition, the role of possible contributions of the hadronic spin-flip amplitude is discussed

  16. Factors influencing use of analgesics among construction workers in the Ga-Eastmunicipality of the Greater Accra region, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badzi, Caroline D; Ackumey, Mercy M

    2017-12-01

    Analgesics also known as painkillers are widely used for pain relief. There are severe health implications associated with excessive use of analgesics. This paper examines factors influencing the use of analgesics among construction workers in the Ga-East Municipality (GEM) of the Greater Accra region of Ghana. This is a cross-sectional study involving 206 construction workers randomly sampled from 7 construction sites in the GEM. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit responses on knowledge of analgesics, types of analgesics used and factors influencing the use of analgesics. Chi-square test analysis was used to examine factors influencing analgesic use. The majority of workers were aged between 15 to 44 years (89.8%) and 51.9 percent of respondents had completed Junior high school. Many respondents (68.0%) used Brand 1 a locally manufactured analgesic with paracetamol, aspirin and caffeine as the active ingredients and 31.6 percent of respondents had no knowledge of possible side effects of continuous use of analgesics. Chi square analysis showed that age was significantly associated with use of analgesics (p0.05). Television and radio advertisements influenced use of analgesics (padvertisements for analgesics in the media. None declared.

  17. Optimal construction and combined wind and diesel power production in a regional power purchase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautala, P.; Antila, H.; Raekkoelaeinen, J.; Heikkilae, H. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Automation and Control Inst.

    1998-12-31

    A weak electricity transmission and distribution network and a wind generator were modelled by a non-linear dynamic model. Energy purchase of a small utility was modelled as a linear mixed integer optimisation problem. The dynamic model was used to simulate the effects of distance between the wind generator and a regional power grid and the effects of changes in the production of the wind generator. The optimisation model was used to investigate the effect of the combined diesel and wind production. In this case the results show that if the distance between the generator and the network grid is more than 70 km, then voltage fluctuations exceed acceptable levels. The optimisation provides the value of the combined diesel and wind production. (orig.)

  18. EVN observations of 6.7 GHz methanol maser polarization in massive star-forming regions. III. The flux-limited sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surcis, G.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Hutawarakorn Kramer, B.; Bartkiewicz, A.; Blasi, M. G.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Theoretical simulations and observations at different angular resolutions have shown that magnetic fields have a central role in massive star formation. Like in low-mass star formation, the magnetic field in massive young stellar objects can either be oriented along the outflow axis or randomly. Aims: Measuring the magnetic field at milliarcsecond resolution (10-100 au) around a substantial number of massive young stellar objects permits determining with a high statistical significance whether the direction of the magnetic field is correlated with the orientation of the outflow axis or not. Methods: In late 2012, we started a large VLBI campaign with the European VLBI Network to measure the linearly and circularly polarized emission of 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers around a sample of massive star-forming regions. This paper focuses on the first seven observed sources, G24.78+0.08, G25.65+1.05, G29.86-0.04, G35.03+0.35, G37.43+1.51, G174.20-0.08, and G213.70-12.6. For all these sources, molecular outflows have been detected in the past. Results: We detected a total of 176 CH3OH masing cloudlets toward the seven massive star-forming regions, 19% of which show linearly polarized emission. The CH3OH masers around the massive young stellar object MM1 in G174.20-0.08 show neither linearly nor circularly polarized emission. The linear polarization vectors are well ordered in all the other massive young stellar objects. We measured significant Zeeman splitting toward both A1 and A2 in G24.78+0.08, and toward G29.86-0.04 and G213.70-12.6. Conclusions: By considering all the 19 massive young stellar objects reported in the literature for which both the orientation of the magnetic field at milliarcsecond resolution and the orientation of outflow axes are known, we find evidence that the magnetic field (on scales 10-100 au) is preferentially oriented along the outflow axes. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Some human actions in the destruction and construction of culture and nature – the Merafong region as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elize S. van Eeden

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available For at least the past 180 years the Merafong Municipal region in the Gauteng Province of South Africa, (of which the Wonderfontein Catchment forms a part has strongly relied on the primary sector for its economic existence and development. In the process some human actions, also related to serious water contamination/pollution, have resulted in phases of constructions1 as well as economic and health destructions. Differences over whose environment and whose nature it is spontaneously developed, with sometimes less friendly outcomes. The ‘end result’ up to 2006 is a complicated scenario experience, similar to that of many other regions or local areas, but also very unique and somewhat frightening. The long term focus of this article is to exchange knowledge2 on the region with the objective to contribute towards creating a sustainable nvironment by ensuring closer co-operation between the various economic active cultures operating or functioning in the Merafong municipal region. In this article four aspects are covered.

  20. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hui-Juan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1 PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2 DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3 restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a

  1. Constructing regions of attainable sizes and achieving target size distribution in a batch cooling sonocrystallization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoi, Stutee; Sarkar, Debasis

    2018-04-01

    The application of ultrasound to a crystallization process has several interesting benefits. The temperature of the crystallizer increases during ultrasonication and this makes it difficult for the temperature controller of the crystallizer to track a set temperature trajectory precisely. It is thus necessary to model this temperature rise and the temperature-trajectory tracking ability of the crystallizer controller to perform model-based dynamic optimization for a given cooling sonocrystallization set-up. In our previous study, we reported a mathematical model based on population balance framework for a batch cooling sonocrystallization of l-asparagine monohydrate (LAM). Here we extend the previous model by including energy balance equations and a Generic Model Control algorithm to simulate the temperature controller of the crystallizer that tracks a cooling profile during crystallization. The improved model yields very good closed-loop prediction and is conveniently used for studies related to particle engineering by optimization. First, the model is used to determine the regions of attainable particle sizes for LAM batch cooling sonocrystallization process by solving appropriate dynamic optimization problems. Then the model is used to determine optimal operating conditions for achieving a target crystal size distribution. The experimental evidence clearly demonstrates the efficiency of the particle engineering approach by optimization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Damping Grid Strapdown Inertial Navigation System Based on a Kalman Filter for Ships in Polar Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiquan; Fang, Tao; Luo, Li; Zhao, Lin; Che, Fengzhu

    2017-07-03

    The grid strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) used in polar navigation also includes three kinds of periodic oscillation errors as common SINS are based on a geographic coordinate system. Aiming ships which have the external information to conduct a system reset regularly, suppressing the Schuler periodic oscillation is an effective way to enhance navigation accuracy. The Kalman filter based on the grid SINS error model which applies to the ship is established in this paper. The errors of grid-level attitude angles can be accurately estimated when the external velocity contains constant error, and then correcting the errors of the grid-level attitude angles through feedback correction can effectively dampen the Schuler periodic oscillation. The simulation results show that with the aid of external reference velocity, the proposed external level damping algorithm based on the Kalman filter can suppress the Schuler periodic oscillation effectively. Compared with the traditional external level damping algorithm based on the damping network, the algorithm proposed in this paper can reduce the overshoot errors when the state of grid SINS is switched from the non-damping state to the damping state, and this effectively improves the navigation accuracy of the system.

  3. Specificity of high-rise construction and real estate markets in the regional economy: an analysis of Russian practice (example of St. Petersburg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilken, Viktoriya; Kalinina, Olga; Dubgorn, Alissa

    2018-03-01

    In paper features of the regional markets of construction the commercial and residential real estate on the example of St. Petersburg are defined. The current situation is analysed, the specific features of branch are revealed. The major factors influencing investors making decisions on construction of various types of objects are defined. The main methods of advance of real estate objects are considered.

  4. Snow nitrate photolysis in polar regions and the mid-latitudes: Impact on boundary layer chemistry and implications for ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatko, Maria C.

    The formation and recycling of nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO 2) associated with snow nitrate photolysis has important implications for air quality and the preservation of nitrate in ice core records. This dissertation examines snow nitrate photolysis in polar and mid-latitude regions using field and laboratory based observations combined with snow chemistry column models and a global chemical transport model to explore the impacts of snow nitrate photolysis on boundary layer chemistry and the preservation of nitrate in polar ice cores. Chapter 1 describes how a global chemical transport model is used to calculate the photolysis-driven flux and redistribution of nitrogen across Antarctica, and Chapter 2 presents similar work for Greenland. Snow-sourced NOx is most dependent on the quantum yield for nitrate photolysis as well as the concentration of photolabile nitrate and light-absorbing impurities (e.g., black carbon, dust, organics) in snow. Model-calculated fluxes of snow-sourced NOx are similar in magnitude in Antarctica (0.5--7.8x108 molec cm-2 s -1) and Greenland (0.1--6.4x108 molec cm-2 s-1) because both nitrate and light-absorbing impurity concentrations in snow are higher (by factors of 2 and 10, respectively) in Greenland. Snow nitrate photolysis influences boundary layer chemistry and ice-core nitrate preservation less in Greenland compared to Antarctica largely due to Greenland's proximity to NOx-source regions. Chapter 3 describes how a snow chemistry column model combined with chemistry and optical measurements from the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2014 is used to calculate snow-sourced NOx in eastern Utah. Daily-averaged fluxes of snow-sourced NOx (2.9x10 7--1.3x108 molec cm-2 s-1) are similar in magnitude to polar snow-sourced NO x fluxes, but are only minor components of the Uintah Basin boundary layer NOx budget and can be neglected when developing ozone reduction strategies for the region. Chapter 4 presents chemical and optical

  5. Construction of BAC libraries from two apomictic grasses to study the microcolinearity of their apospory-specific genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, D.; Conner, A.; Budiman, A.; Frisch, D.; Wing, R.; Hanna, W.; Ozias-Akins, P.

    2002-04-01

    We have constructed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries from two grass species that reproduce by apospory, a form of gametophytic apomixis. The library of an apomictic polyhaploid genotype (line MS228-20, with a 2C genome size of approximately 4,500 Mbp) derived from a cross between the obligate apomict, Pennisetum squamulatum, and pearl millet ( P. glaucum) comprises 118,272 clones with an average insert size of 82 kb. The library of buffelgrass ( Cenchrus ciliaris, apomictic line B-12-9, with a 2C genome size of approximately 3,000 Mbp) contains 68,736 clones with an average insert size of 109 kb. Based on the genome sizes of these two lines and correcting for the number for false-positive and organellar clones, library coverages were found to be 3.7 and 4.8 haploid genome equivalents for MS 228-20 and B12-9, respectively. Both libraries were screened by hybridization with six SCARs (sequence-characterized amplified regions), whose tight linkage in a single apospory-specific genomic region had been previously demonstrated in both species. Analysis of these BAC clones indicated that some of the SCAR markers are actually amplifying duplicated regions linked in coupling in both genomes and that restriction enzyme mapping will be necessary to sort out the duplications.

  6. Influence of Solar and Lunar Tides on the Mesopause Region as Observed in Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Pertsev, N.; Perminov, V.

    2017-10-01

    Long-term observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) from 2002 to 2012 are investigated with the aim to statistically study the effects of solar thermal migrating and lunar gravitational tides on aerosol layers and their environment at altitudes 80-90 km. The solar and lunar tidal periodicities are clearly present in PMSE data. For the first time, both amplitudes and phases of solar and lunar tides are estimated using PMSE data from the ESRAD radar located at Esrange (Sweden). The diurnal, semidiurnal, and terdiurnal solar migrating tides show pronounced periodicities in the PMSE strength and wind velocity components. Lunar tides demonstrate clear oscillations in the PMSE strength and wind velocities as well. "canonical" lunar gravitational tides, corresponding to the lunar gravitational potential, produce rather large amplitudes and are comparable to the solar thermal tides, whereas "noncanonical" lunar oscillations have minor effects on PMSE layers, but are still statistically significant. The influence of diurnal/semidiurnal tides and monthly/semimonthly tidal components is studied separately. Our estimations of solar thermal and lunar tidal amplitudes are in good agreement with those of previous model and experimental studies. A new mechanism of quadratic demodulation of the solar semidiurnal and lunar semidiurnal tides is shown to be valid at the summer mesopause and can explain periodical PMSE oscillations due to the lunar synodic semimonthly tide with period of 14.77 days. Two harmonics with periods of 27.0 and 13.5 days supposedly representing the solar rotation cycle are also clearly present in PMSE data.

  7. Constraining the Depth of Polar Ice Deposits and Evolution of Cold Traps on Mercury with Small Craters in Permanently Shadowed Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ariel N.; Head, James W.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    Earth-based radar observations revealed highly reflective deposits at the poles of Mercury [e.g., 1], which collocate with permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) detected from both imagery and altimetry by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft [e.g., 2]. MESSENGER also measured higher hydrogen concentrations at the north polar region, consistent with models for these deposits to be composed primarily of water ice [3]. Enigmatic to the characterization of ice deposits on Mercury is the thickness of these radar-bright features. A current minimum bound of several meters exists from the radar measurements, which show no drop in the radar cross section between 13- and 70-cm wavelength observations [4, 5]. A maximum thickness of 300 m is based on the lack of any statistically significant difference between the height of craters that host radar-bright deposits and those that do not [6]. More recently, this upper limit on the depth of a typical ice deposit has been lowered to approximately 150 m, in a study that found a mean excess thickness of 50 +/- 35 m of radar-bright deposits for 6 craters [7]. Refining such a constraint permits the derivation of a volumetric estimate of the total polar ice on Mercury, thus providing insight into possible sources of water ice on the planet. Here, we take a different approach to constrain the thickness of water-ice deposits. Permanently shadowed surfaces have been resolved in images acquired with the broadband filter on MESSENGER's wide-angle camera (WAC) using low levels of light scattered by crater walls and other topography [8]. These surfaces are not featureless and often host small craters (less than a few km in diameter). Here we utilize the presence of these small simple craters to constrain the thickness of the radar-bright ice deposits on Mercury. Specifically, we compare estimated depths made from depth-to-diameter ratios and depths from individual Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA

  8. The use of local natural stone in construction of St. Petersburg region and south-east Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luodes, Hannu; Härmä, Paavo; Panova, Elena; Pirinen, Heikki; Selonen, Olavi

    2013-04-01

    A three-year project, started in 2012, "Efficient use of natural stone in the Leningrad region and South-East Finland", studies the use and durability of natural stone in the city environments in the Nordic climate and especially along the Eastern Baltic Sea coastline between Helsinki and St. Petersburg. The project is lead by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) and the partners in the project are Saimaa University of Applied Sciences from Finland and Federal State Unitary Enterprise "Petersburg Complex Geological Expedition" Russian together with Saint-Petersburg State University from the Russian Federation. As associates in this project are also natural stone companies from Finland, Ylämaa Group Oy and Palin Granit Oy. The project is co-funded by the European Union, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Finland through the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (ENPI). A great potential of natural stone that can be used in construction is located in the border zone between South-East Finland and the Leningrad region. Rapakivi granite from that area has been utilized for several important buildings worldwide since 18th century and the area holds still potential for future economic growth. The use of the stone particularly from this area is based on its visual expression and good properties with high durability and long life cycle that can be used as arguments in the future development. Strengthening of the knowledge of the material reserves in the area gives a long term basement for economic development. Special aim of the project is to promote the use of natural stone in the city construction, especially the use of left-over stone generated in the production. In the project the use of natural stone in larger cities from the 18th century until today including the towns St. Petersburg, Vyborg, Helsinki, Kuopio and Kotka will be reported. Also an analysis of the near future needs of natural stone (qualities and quantities) in reconstruction and

  9. The Political Economy of "Open Regionalism" and Education in Small (and Micro) States: The Construction of the Caribbean Educational Policy Space in CARICOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Tavis D.

    2014-01-01

    In this era of amplified regionalisation, the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean's (ECLAC) conceptualisation of 'open regionalism' is pertinent to examine the role of regional governance mechanisms in constructing what I call the "Caribbean Educational Policy Space." With the aid of a latent content analysis of…

  10. Construction of a forensic soil database of the Hokkaido region in Japan by synchrotron radiation X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirota, Yusuke; Hirao, Masataka; Abe, Yoshinari; Nakai, Izumi; Osaka, Keiichi; Itou, Masayoshi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to construct a nation-wide forensic soil database, which allows for the identification of soil evidence based on heavy element and heavy mineral signatures determined by two synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray techniques, i.e., a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis and a synchrotron-radiation X-ray powder diffraction analysis, respectively. The heavy element and heavy mineral compositions of the stream sediments collected at 3024 points located all over Japan were measured by the two SR X-ray techniques. The present paper focuses on a regional characterization of the sediments collected from the Hokkaido areas. The concentrations of heavy elements and heavy minerals in the Hokkaido areas were visualized as maps that enable us to compare the heavy element and heavy mineral compositions with the geological context of the samples. Based on a hierarchical cluster analysis using the semi-quantitative compositions of the heavy minerals, we could successfully classify the sediments into six groups corresponding to their background geologies. A Bonferroni multiple comparison demonstrated that these six groups also have significant differences in the heavy element composition. From these examinations, we could demonstrate that detailed regional identification of unknown samples is possible by analyzing both heavy element and heavy mineral compositions of each sample. (author)

  11. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  12. Construction of joint confidence regions for the optimal true class fractions of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) surfaces and manifolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantis, Leonidas E; Nakas, Christos T; Reiser, Benjamin; Myall, Daniel; Dalrymple-Alford, John C

    2017-06-01

    The three-class approach is used for progressive disorders when clinicians and researchers want to diagnose or classify subjects as members of one of three ordered categories based on a continuous diagnostic marker. The decision thresholds or optimal cut-off points required for this classification are often chosen to maximize the generalized Youden index (Nakas et al., Stat Med 2013; 32: 995-1003). The effectiveness of these chosen cut-off points can be evaluated by estimating their corresponding true class fractions and their associated confidence regions. Recently, in the two-class case, parametric and non-parametric methods were investigated for the construction of confidence regions for the pair of the Youden-index-based optimal sensitivity and specificity fractions that can take into account the correlation introduced between sensitivity and specificity when the optimal cut-off point is estimated from the data (Bantis et al., Biomet 2014; 70: 212-223). A parametric approach based on the Box-Cox transformation to normality often works well while for markers having more complex distributions a non-parametric procedure using logspline density estimation can be used instead. The true class fractions that correspond to the optimal cut-off points estimated by the generalized Youden index are correlated similarly to the two-class case. In this article, we generalize these methods to the three- and to the general k-class case which involves the classification of subjects into three or more ordered categories, where ROC surface or ROC manifold methodology, respectively, is typically employed for the evaluation of the discriminatory capacity of a diagnostic marker. We obtain three- and multi-dimensional joint confidence regions for the optimal true class fractions. We illustrate this with an application to the Trail Making Test Part A that has been used to characterize cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  13. Effects of atmospheric oscillations on the field-aligned ion motions in the polar F-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oyama

    Full Text Available The field-aligned neutral oscillations in the F-region (altitudes between 165 and 275 km were compared using data obtained simultaneously with two independent instruments: the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT UHF radar and a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI. During the night of February 8, 1997, simultaneous observations with these instruments were conducted at Tromsø, Norway. Theoretically, the field-aligned neutral wind velocity can be obtained from the field-aligned ion velocity and by diffusion and ambipolar diffusion velocities. We thus derived field-aligned neutral wind velocities from the plasma velocities in EISCAT radar data. They were compared with those observed with the FPI (λ=630.0 nm, which are assumed to be weighted height averages of the actual neutral wind. The weighting function is the normalized height dependent emission rate. We used two model weighting functions to derive the neutral wind from EISCAT data. One was that the neutral wind velocity observed with the FPI is velocity integrated over the entire emission layer and multiplied by the theoretical normalized emission rate. The other was that the neutral wind velocity observed with the FPI corresponds to the velocity only around an altitude where the emission rate has a peak. Differences between the two methods were identified, but not completely clarified. However, the neutral wind velocities from both instruments had peak-to-peak correspondences at oscillation periods of about 10–40 min, shorter than that for the momentum transfer from ions to neutrals, but longer than from neutrals to ions. The synchronizing motions in the neutral wind velocities suggest that the momentum transfer from neutrals to ions was thought to be dominant for the observed field-aligned oscillations rather than the transfer from ions to neutrals. It is concluded that during the observation, the plasma oscillations observed with the EISCAT radar at different altitudes

  14. Long-periodic strong radar echoes in the summer polar D region correlated with oscillations of high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    2013-08-01

    We report long-periodic oscillations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) as observed between 1 June and 8 August in the solar minimum years 2006 and 2008. PMSEs (80-90 km altitudes) were observed by 52 MHz VHF radar measurements at Esrange, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Correlations between PMSE volume reflectivity/counts, HSSs, and AE index are primarily found at 7-day, 9-day, and 13-day periodicities as well as 9-day and 13.5-day periodicities in 2006 and 2008, respectively. The observations show that the effects of HSSs appear in PMSEs. During corotating interaction region (CIR)-induced HSSs, the long-lasting enhancement of PMSEs, geomagnetic disturbances, and D-region ionization suggests that a favorable condition in generating PMSEs can be provided by the precipitating energetic electrons (>30 keV), which are frequently multiplied in the magnetosphere during HSSs.

  15. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  16. The effect of sea-water intrusion due to the large scale construction in a coastal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, S.; Jin, S.; Woo, N. C.; Lee, J.; Lee, H.; Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    This study was carried out for estimating the seawater intrusion at the disturbed aquifer by a large scale construction when building a power plant in a coastal region, located in southeastern part of the Korean peninsula. Groundwater sampling and vertical profiling of electrical conductivity(EC) for 8 monitoring wells were carried. EC profiling results shows that maximum EC for PW-5, 6 and 7 is over 40 mS/cm, for PZ-1, 3, 4 and 8 is 18.76, 4.46, 26.16, 21.42 mS/cm and for PZ-2 is 0.79 mS/cm,respectively. Chemical composition of water samples shows that water types of Na-Cl for PZ-5, 6, and 7 (excavated and backfilled area), Na-Cl-SO4 for PZ-4 and PZ-8, Na-Ca-Mg-Cl for PZ-1, Ca-Na-SO4-Cl for PZ-2, and Mg-Ca-Na-SO4 for PZ-3. In addition, the bivariate plot of SO4/Cl(meq ratios) and SO4(mmol/L) indicates that PZ-4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 appear to be seawater, PZ-1 is located at mixing zone between freshwater and seawater, and PZ-2 is freshwater. However, based on the high SO42- level and (HCO3-/Sum anions} ratio less than 0.8, groundwater at PZ-3 seems to show the gypsum dissolution. The gypsum dissolution was attributed to the effect of sea-water intrusion on ageing of lean concrete that was used for backfill around the PZ-3. Key words : large scale construction, EC profiling, hydrochemistry, sea-water intrusion, concrete ageing Acknowledgement This study has been carried out under the Nuclear R&D Program [No. 2010-0001070] supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Republic of Korea.

  17. Microbial and viral-like rhodopsins present in coastal marine sediments from four polar and subpolar regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, José L.; Golemba, Marcelo; Hernández, Edgardo; Lozada, Mariana; Dionisi, Hebe; Jansson, Janet K.; Carroll, Jolynn; Lundgren, Leif; Sjöling, Sara; Mac Cormack, Walter P.; Sobecky, Patricia

    2016-11-03

    Rhodopsins are broadly distributed. In this work, we analyzed 23 metagenomes corresponding to marine sediment samples from four regions that share cold climate conditions (Norway; Sweden; Argentina and Antarctica). In order to investigate the genes evolution of viral rhodopsins, an initial set of 6224 bacterial rhodopsin sequences according to COG5524 were retrieved from the 23 metagenomes. After selection by the presence of transmembrane domains and alignment, 123 viral (51) and non-viral (72) sequences (>50 amino acids) were finally included in further analysis. Viral rhodopsin genes were homologs of Phaeocystis globosa virus and Organic lake Phycodnavirus. Non-viral microbial rhodopsin genes were ascribed to Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus and Cryptophyta and Fungi. A rescreening using Blastp, using as queries the viral sequences previously described, retrieved 30 sequences (>100 amino acids). Phylogeographic analysis revealed a geographical clustering of the sequences affiliated to the viral group. This clustering was not observed for the microbial non-viral sequences. The phylogenetic reconstruction allowed us to propose the existence of a putative ancestor of viral rhodopsin genes related to Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi. This is the first report about the existence of a phylogeographic association of the viral rhodopsin sequences from marine sediments.

  18. Productive structure and production relations between polarized region by Londrina and the rest of Paraná in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Moretto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article had as objective estimate the sector linkages and the overflowing of the production multiplier between the North of Parana and the Rest of Parana, using the interregional input-output matrix for 1995. The main results showed that a agriculture and food processing sectors stood out in the productive structure of North of Parana State, comparing to the Rest of Parana State, as disseminators of inter-sector relations b the industrial structure of the Rest of Parana presented more diversification as compared to the North Region, showing less dependence on agriculture and food processing sectors for its dynamic; c the overflowing effect of the production multiplier in the direction Rest of Parana-North of Parana was 4,9%, whereas in the direction North of Parana-Rest of Parana it was 12%, revealing a greater dependency of the productive process of the North of Parana vis-a-vis the Rest of Parana; d the Rest of Parana, although more diversified in its productive structure, showed more dependence on the North of Parana as for the answer to the input requirements of the food processing sectors when facing growth in its final demand.

  19. Polarization light curve modelling of corotating interaction regions in the wind of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Louis, N.; Tremblay, Patrick; Ignace, Richard

    2018-02-01

    The intriguing WN4b star WR 6 has been known to display epoch-dependent spectroscopic, photometric and polarimetric variability for several decades. In this paper, we set out to verify if a simplified analytical model in which corotating interaction regions (CIRs) threading an otherwise spherical wind is able to reproduce the many broad-band continuum light curves from the literature with a reasonable set of parameters. We modified the optically thin model developed by Ignace, St-Louis & Proulx-Giraldeau to approximately account for multiple scattering and used it to fit 13 separate data sets of this star. By including two CIRs in the wind, we obtained reasonable fits for all data sets with coherent values for the inclination of the rotation axis (i0 = 166°) and for its orientation in the plane of the sky, although in the latter case we obtained two equally acceptable values (ψ = 63° and 152°) from the polarimetry. Additional line profile variation simulations using the Sobolev approximation for the line transfer allowed us to eliminate the ψ = 152° solution. With the adopted configuration (i0 = 166° and ψ = 63°), we were able to reproduce all data sets relatively well with two CIRs located near the stellar equator and always separated by ˜90° in longitude. The epoch dependence comes from the fact that these CIRs migrate along the surface of the star. Density contrasts smaller than a factor of 2 and large opening angles for the CIR (β ⪆ 35°) were found to best reproduce the type of spectroscopic variability reported in the literature.

  20. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  1. Application of polarization ellipse technique for analysis of ULF magnetic fields from two distant stations in Koyna-Warna seismoactive region, West India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dudkin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is developed to find the source azimuth of the ultra low frequency (ULF electromagnetic (EM signals believed to be emanating from well defined seismic zone. The method is test applied on magnetic data procured from the seismoactive region of Koyna-Warna, known for prolonged reservoir triggered seismicity. Extremely low-noise, high-sensitivity LEMI-30 search coil magnetometers were used to measure simultaneously the vector magnetic field in the frequency range 0.001–32 Hz at two stations, the one located within and another ~100 km away from the seismic active zone. During the observation campaign extending from 15 March to 30 June 2006 two earthquakes (EQs of magnitude (ML>4 occurred, which are searched for the presence of precursory EM signals.

    Comparison of polarization ellipses (PE parameters formed by the magnetic field components at the measurement stations, in select frequency bands, allows discrimination of seismo-EM signals from the natural background ULF signals of magnetospheric/ionospheric origin. The magnetic field components corresponding to spectral bands dominated by seismo-EM fields define the PE plane which at any instant contains the source of the EM fields. Intersection lines of such defined PE planes for distant observation stations clutter in to the source region. Approximating the magnetic-dipole configuration for the source, the magnetic field components along the intersection lines suggest that azimuth of the EM source align in the NNW-SSE direction. This direction well coincides with the orientation of nodal plane of normal fault plane mechanism for the two largest EQs recorded during the campaign. More significantly the correspondence of this direction with the tectonic controlled trend in local seismicity, it has been surmised that high pressure fluid flow along the fault that facilitate EQs in the region may also be the source mechanism for EM fields by electrokinetic effect.

  2. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3 genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimstad Espen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonid alphavirus (SAV causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE. Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  3. Construction of a Novel Liver-Targeting Fusion Interferon by Incorporation of a Plasmodium Region I-Plus Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFN α exerts a multiplicity of biological actions including antiviral, immunomodulatory, and antiproliferative effects. Administration of IFN α is the current treatment for chronic hepatitis B; however, therapy outcome has not been completely satisfactory. The systemic effects of IFN α may account for its low in vivo biological activity and multiple adverse events. The purpose of this study was to design a novel liver-targeting fusion interferon (IFN-CSP by fusing IFN α2b with a Plasmodium region I-plus peptide, thus targeting the drug specifically to the liver. The DNA sequence encoding IFN-CSP was constructed using improved splicing by overlapping extension-PCR method, and then cloned into the pET-21b vector for protein expression in E. coli BL21 (DE3. The recombinant protein was expressed as a His-tagged protein and purified using a combination of Ni affinity and HiTrap affinity chromatography at a purity of over 95%. The final yield of biologically active IFN-CSP was up to 270 mg/L culture. The purified recombinant protein showed anti-HBV activity and liver-targeting potentiality in vitro. These data suggests that the novel fusion interferon IFN-CSP may be an excellent candidate as a liver-targeting anti-HBV agent.

  4. Success and failure factors in the regional health information system design process--results from a constructive evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, P; Karimaa, E

    2006-01-01

    To identify success and failure factors in the design process of a regional health information system. A constructive evaluation study including interviews, observations, usability study and document analysis. Modelling was found to be a key element for the successful implementation of a health information system. The developed service chain model helped to define use cases and to implement seamless service chains. User participation in the design process was a success factor resulting in good user acceptance and signs of positive impacts on work practices. Evaluation study also helped system developers to guide the system's further development. An important failure factor identified was the lack of semantic interoperability of the system components. The results emphasize the socio-technical nature of health information systems. The starting point for development should be thorough insight into the health care work practices where the information systems are to be used. Successful system design should start from modelling of work processes, data and information flows and definition of concepts and their relations. Health informatics as a scientific discipline provides theories and models for the design and development process.

  5. Environmental impact of irrigation with greywater treated by recirculating vertical flow constructed wetlands in two climatic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Amit; Alfiya, Yuval; Sklarz, Menachem; Maimon, Adi; Friedler, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Reuse of greywater (GW) has raised environmental and public health concerns. Specifically, these concerns relate to onsite treatment operated by non-professionals; systems must therefore be reliable, simple to use and also economically feasible if they are to be widely used. The aims of this study were to: (a) investigate GW treatment efficiency using 20 full-scale recirculating vertical flow constructed wetlands (RVFCWs) operated in households in arid and Mediterranean regions; and (b) study the long-term effects of irrigation with treated GW on soil properties. RVFCW systems were installed and monitored routinely over 3 years. Raw, treated and disinfected treated GW samples were analyzed for various physicochemical and microbial parameters. Native soil plots and nearby freshwater (FW) and treated GW irrigated soil plots were sampled twice a year - at the end of the winter and at the end of the summer. Soil samples were analyzed for various physicochemical and microbial parameters. Overall, the RVFCW proved to be a robust and reliable GW treatment system. The treated GW quality met strict Israeli regulations for urban irrigation. Results also suggest that irrigation with sufficiently treated GW has no adverse effects on soil properties. Yet, continued monitoring to follow longer term trends is recommended.

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  7. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  8. Trends and Variability of North Pacific Polar Lows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 6-hourly 1948–2010 NCEP 1 reanalyses have been dynamically downscaled for the region of the North Pacific. With a detecting-and-tracking algorithm, the climatology of North Pacific Polar Lows has been constructed. This derived climatology is consistent with the limited observational evidence in terms of frequency and spatial distribution. The climatology exhibits strong year-to-year variability but weak decadal variability and a small positive trend. A canonical correlation analysis describes the conditioning of the formation of Polar Lows by characteristic seasonal mean flow regimes, which favor, or limit, cold air outbreaks and upper air troughs.

  9. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  10. Demonstration That Calibration of the Instrument Response to Polarizations Parallel and Perpendicular to the Object Space Projected Slit of an Imaging Spectrometer Enable Measurement of the Atmospheric Absorption Spectrum in Region of the Weak CO2 Band for the Case of Arbitrary Polarization: Implication for the Geocarb Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Polonsky, I. N.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (TIMS) unit rebuilt to operate in a narrow spectral region, approximately 1603 to 1615 nm, of the weak CO2 band as described by Kumer et al. (2013, Proc. SPIE 8867, doi:10.1117/12.2022668) was used to conduct the demonstration. An integrating sphere (IS), linear polarizers and quarter wave plate were used to confirm that the instrument's spectral response to unpolarized light, to 45° linearly polarized light and to circular polarized light are identical. In all these cases the intensity components Ip = Is where Ip is the component parallel to the object space projected slit and Is is perpendicular to the slit. In the circular polarized case Ip = Is in the time averaged sense. The polarizer and IS were used to characterize the ratio Rθ of the instrument response to linearly polarized light at the angle θ relative to parallel from the slit, for increments of θ from 0 to 90°, to that of the unpolarized case. Spectra of diffusely reflected sunlight passed through the polarizer in increments of θ, and divided by the respective Rθ showed identical results, within the noise limit, for solar spectrum multiplied by the atmospheric transmission and convolved by the Instrument Line Shape (ILS). These measurements demonstrate that unknown polarization in the diffusely reflected sunlight on this small spectral range affect only the slow change across the narrow band in spectral response relative to that of unpolarized light and NOT the finely structured / high contrast spectral structure of the CO2 atmospheric absorption that is used to retrieve the atmospheric content of CO2. The latter is one of the geoCARB mission objectives (Kumer et al, 2013). The situation is similar for the other three narrow geoCARB bands; O2 A band 757.9 to 768.6 nm; strong CO2 band 2045.0 to 2085.0 nm; CH4 and CO region 2300.6 to 2345.6 nm. Polonsky et al have repeated the mission simulation study doi:10.5194/amt-7-959-2014 assuming no use of a geo

  11. Polarized Structure Function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for $p({\\vec e},e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Raue, Brian; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Carman, Daniel; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anciant, Eric; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asavapibhop, Burin; Asryan, Gegham; Audit, Gerard; Auger, Thierry; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Casey, Liam; Cetina, Catalina; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dragovitsch, Peter; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girard, Pascal; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gothe, Ralf; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hu, Jicun; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Manak, Joseph; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Peterson, Gerald; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Sayre, Donald; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Shafi, Aziz; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Simionatto, Sebastio; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Taylor, Shawn; Tedeschi, David; Thoma, Ulrike; Thompson, Richard; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Wang,

    2008-06-01

    The first measurements of the polarized structure function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for the reaction $p(\\vec e,e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the nucleon resonance region are reported. Measurements are included from threshold up to $W$=2.05 GeV for central values of $Q^2$ of 0.65 and 1.00 GeV$^2$, and nearly the entire kaon center-of-mass angular range. $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is the imaginary part of the longitudinal-transverse response and is expected to be sensitive to interferences between competing intermediate s-channel resonances, as well as resonant and non-resonant processes. The results for $\\sigma_{LT'}$ are comparable in magnitude to previously reported results from CLAS for $\\sigma_{LT}$, the real part of the same response. An intriguing sign change in $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is observed in the high $Q^2$ data at $W\\approx 1.9$ GeV. Comparisons to several existing model predictions are shown.

  12. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km.

    The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  13. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km. The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  14. Changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere in the polar regions of the Earth after solar proton flares (3d modeling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.; Vyushkova, T. Yu.; Mironova, I. A.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical photochemical simulations of the impact of the most powerful solar proton flares during the 23rd solar cycle on the ozonosphere in the polar regions of the Earth. A global 3D photochemical model, CHARM, developed at Central Aerological Observatory (CAO) was used in the simulations. The model introduces an additional source of nitrogen atoms and OH radicals. These components are formed due to the ionization effect of solar protons in the Earth's atmosphere. The ionization rate was determined from data on proton fluxes measured by GOES satellites. The production rate of additional NO x and HO x molecules per ion pair was based on published theoretical studies. It is shown that the most intense flares in the 23rd solar cycle (2000, 2001, and 2003) destroyed ozone in the mesosphere to a great extent (sometimes completely, for example, during the July 14, 2000, event). It is found that the response of ozone to solar proton events follows a seasonal pattern. For the first time, the long-term effect of solar proton events is identified; it is approximately one year.

  15. Polar summer mesospheric extreme horizontal drift speeds during interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and high-speed solar wind streams: Coupling between the solar wind and the mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shepherd, Gordon G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the observation of echo extreme horizontal drift speed (EEHS, ≥ 300 m s-1) during polar mesospheric (80-90 km) summer echoes (PMSEs) by the VHF (52 MHz) radar at Esrange, Sweden, in years of 2006 and 2008. The EEHS occur in PMSEs as correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs), observed at least once in 12-17% of all hours of observation for the two summers. The EEHS rate peaks occur either during high solar wind speed in the early part of the PMSE season or during the arrival of interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) followed by peaks in PMSE occurrence rate after 1-4 days, in the latter part of the 2006 summer. The cause of EEHS rate peaks is likely under the competition between the interval of the CIR and HSS passage over the magnetosphere. A candidate process in producing EEHS is suggested to be localized strong electric field, which is caused by solar wind energy transfer from the interaction of CIR and HSS with the magnetosphere in a sequential manner. We suggest that EEHS are created by strong electric field, estimated as > 10-30 V m-1 at 85 km altitude, exceeding the mesospheric breakdown threshold field.

  16. Constraining the thickness of polar ice deposits on Mercury using the Mercury Laser Altimeter and small craters in permanently shadowed regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ariel N.; Head, James W.; Chabot, Nancy L.; Neumann, Gregory A.

    2018-05-01

    Radar-bright deposits at the poles of Mercury are located in permanently shadowed regions, which provide thermally stable environments for hosting and retaining water ice on the surface or in the near subsurface for geologic timescales. While the areal distribution of these radar-bright deposits is well characterized, their thickness, and thus their total mass and volume, remain poorly constrained. Here we derive thickness estimates for selected water-ice deposits using small, simple craters visible within the permanently shadowed, radar-bright deposits. We examine two endmember scenarios: in Case I, these craters predate the emplacement of the ice, and in Case II, these craters postdate the emplacement of the ice. In Case I, we find the difference between estimated depths of the original unfilled craters and the measured depths of the craters to find the estimated infill of material. The average estimated infilled material for 9 craters assumed to be overlain with water ice is ∼ 41-14+30 m, where 1-σ standard error of the mean is reported as uncertainty. Reported uncertainties are for statistical errors only. Additional systematic uncertainty may stem from georeferencing the images and topographic datasets, from the radial accuracy of the altimeter measurements, or from assumptions in our models including (1) ice is flat in the bowl-shaped crater and (2) there is negligible ice at the crater rims. In Case II, we derive crater excavation depths to investigate the thickness of the ice layer that may have been penetrated by the impact. While the absence of excavated regolith associated with the small craters observed suggests that impacts generally do not penetrate through the ice deposit, the spatial resolution and complex illumination geometry of images may limit the observations. Therefore, it is not possible to conclude whether the small craters in this study penetrate through the ice deposit, and thus Case II does not provide a constraint on the ice thickness

  17. Nitrogen nutrition of the sedge Cyperus laevigatus-A candidate species for use in constructed wetlands in hot and dry regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piwpuan, Narumol; Brix, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Polluted waters and waste water often contain elevated levels of salt in hot and dry regions because of the inherent high evapotranspiration rates. Constructed wetlands must therefore be planted with species that tolerate saline water. The perennial sedge, Cyperus laevigatus L., is predominantly...... be expected based on the species’ natural distribution on alkaline and mineral-rich soils. A preference for NO3- over NH4+ would suggest that the species is less suitable for use in constructed wetland systems because the predominant form of nitrogen in waste water is NH4+. The growth, N-uptake kinetics...... growing in brackish wetlands and on wet alkaline and mineral-rich soils. Hence, this species may be a candidate species for use in constructed wetland systems in hot and dry regions. We studied the nitrogen nutrition of C. laevigatus in order to determine if the plant prefers NO3- over NH4+, which could...

  18. A lunar polar expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-09-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  19. Polarization parameters. sigma. , T, and P for the reaction. gamma. p. -->. p. pi. /sup 0/ in the region of the first resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, A.A.; Get' man, V.A.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Gushchin, V.A.; Derkach, A.Y.; Zhebrovskii, Y.V.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kolesnikov, L.Y.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Rubashkin, A.L.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporov, E.A.; Telegin, Y.N.

    1982-03-01

    We report an experimental study of the ..sigma.., T, and P parameters of the cross section for the reaction ..gamma..p..-->..p..pi../sup 0/ for photon energies 300, 320, 350, 380, 400, 420 MeV in the range of pion emission angles 60--135/sup 0/ c.m.s. The technique of a double polarization experiment with use of linearly polarized photons and a polarized proton target is described. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of theoretical analyses.

  20. Spatial Econometric Research on the Relationship between Highway Construction and Regional Economic Growth in China: Evidence from the Nationwide Panel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, N. J.; Li, W. J.; Li, Y.; Bai, Y. F.

    2017-12-01

    Based on spatial panel data from 2010 to 2016 in China, this paper makes an empirical analysis on the relationship between highway construction and regional economic growth by means of spatial econometric model. The results show that there is positive spatial correlation on regional economic growth in China, and strong spatial dependences between some provinces and cities appear, specifically, Hebei, Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Zhejiang and other eastern coastal areas show high-high agglomeration trend, the Pearl River Delta region presents high-low agglomeration trend; In terms of nationwide provinces and municipalities, a province’s highway construction investment for their own province and the neighboring provinces has pulling effect on economic growth to a certain extent, and the direct effect is more obvious.

  1. Polar Biomedical Research - An Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    to grow more crops in subpolar Alaska. The severity of the polar conditions in Antarctica allow no practical method for providing volumes of plant food...for an expanded population. Any experiments in polar regions in food production involving geothermal heat, solar energy, hydroponics , or aquaculture

  2. Notification: EPA Region 10 Management Controls Over Allowing Substantial Public Funds to Construct the Spokane County Wastewater Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    January 20, 2012. This EPA's OIG is initiating a review from an OIG hotline complaint regarding whether federal funds were properly used to construct the new Spokane County wastewater treatment facility in accordance with 40 CFR 35, Subpart K.

  3. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  4. The polar mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  5. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  6. Coherent states with elliptical polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Colavita, E.; Hacyan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Coherent states of the two dimensional harmonic oscillator are constructed as superpositions of energy and angular momentum eigenstates. It is shown that these states are Gaussian wave-packets moving along a classical trajectory, with a well defined elliptical polarization. They are coherent correlated states with respect to the usual cartesian position and momentum operators. A set of creation and annihilation operators is defined in polar coordinates, and it is shown that these same states ...

  7. A new model approach for the near-critical point region: 1. Construction of the generalized van der Waals equation of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sukbae; Jeon, Joonhyeon; Kim, Wonsoo; Chair, Tong-Seek

    2008-12-11

    To date, it has been considered that all classical equations of state (EOS) have failed to describe the properties of fluids near the critical region, where the density fluctuations have a significant influence on fluid properties. In this paper, we suggest a newly constructed equation for fluid states, the generalized van der Waals (GvdW) EOS with the highly simplified Dieterici's form P = [RT/(V - b)] - a(b/V)c by a new model potential construction describing intermolecular interactions. On the basis of the model potential construction, it is shown that the a, b, and c parameters have physical interpretations as an internal pressure, a void volume, and a dimensionless value that represents an inharmonic intermolecular cell potential, respectively. As an illustration of our model approach, we initially apply it to near the critical point (cp) region, where all classical EOS descriptions have been incorporated with experimental thermodynamic data, and we obtain a table of three parameters for 12 pure normal fluids, which precisely describes thermodynamic critical values. On the basis of the basic relations between pressure and volume at the critical point, we express the corresponding EOS in terms of the c parameter, and by this means, we also obtain a theoretical vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) line, which closely coincides with the experimental data for several pure normal fluids near the critical region. As a result, we show that thermodynamic properties near the critical region can be described analytically by only three parameters. In addition, to validate our EOS for the temperature-differential derivatives, we show that the calculated isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of saturated argon closely coincides with the experimental data. Moreover, the possibility of a precise description with respect to the entire fluid region is also argued, in terms of the physical cases from the triple point to the ideal gas region.

  8. Construction of rat cell lines that contain potential morphologically transforming regions of the herpes simplex virus type 2 genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, F. M.; van Amstel, P. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid recombinant plasmids were constructed; they were composed of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2) thymidine kinase (tk) gene and DNA sequences of HSV2 that have been reported to induce morphological and/or oncogenic transformation of rodent cells in culture. Several plasmids were made in

  9. Accounting practitioners perception over the impact of IFRS implementation on the performance of entities in the construction sector from the western region of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Oana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Through this paper, we want to identify the correlations between the benefits and costs of adopting IFRS standards in construction entities in the Western Region of Romania and their performance, using the Pearson correlation coefficient, which measures and describes the direction, degree and form of the association between two variables, thus obtaining high, reasonable, weak and very weak links between the benefits / costs and the performance of the entity.

  10. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  11. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  12. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  13. Polar low monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  14. The social construction of bath in two communities temazcal of the mixteca region: Santiago Yolomecatl and San Andres Chicahuaxtla

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Valdés Cobos; Anayelit Cruz Galicia

    2013-01-01

    The bathroom of temazcal is a knowledge of pre-Hispanic roots still practiced in rural and indigenous communities in our country. Studies on the temazcal have focused on its forms of construction and operation, however, the many therapeutic benefits temazcal bath attached to the human body, and women in particular, not have been sufficiently documented. In this case, two communities of the Oaxacan mixteca were studied: Santiago Yolomecatl and San Andrés Chicahuaxtla. In this study, a question...

  15. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  16. Three-dimensional Radiative Transfer Simulations of the Scattering Polarization of the Hydrogen Lyalpha Line in a Magnetohydrodynamic Model of the Chromosphere-Corona Transition Region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 803, č. 2 (2015), 65/1-65/15 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP209/12/P741 Grant - others:EU(XE) COST action MP1104 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : polarization * radiative transfer * scattering Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.909, year: 2015

  17. Features of the low-frequency polarization response in the region of the ferroelectric phase transition in multiferroic TbMnO.sub.3./sub.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trepakov, Vladimír; Kvyatkovskii, O.E.; Savinov, Maxim; Dejneka, Alexandr; Wang, X.; Cheong, S.W.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 10 (2016), s. 2021-2026 ISSN 1063-7834 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : low-frequency * polarization response * ferroelectric, phase * transition * multiferroic * TbMnO 3 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.860, year: 2016

  18. Pan-Kazakh Centrism and the Construction of a Regional Axis in the ‘Innovated’ Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Chabal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The interest of Kazakhstan for Central Asia is the interest of a ‘constructor’. Since 1991, it has been at the direct or indirect origin of several key initiatives: CICA, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization and even a project of a Union of Central Asia. Theories of regional integrations have been enriching Asia for 20 years, and for 60 years in Europe. The key concept is that of a regional axis: a region is multilateral but needs to build itself around a privileged bilateralism among two neighbors-partners. The definition of such an “axis” is: two countries that have born among themselves the seeds of tension but that decide, voluntarily, to turn the page of history, through a strong and enduring bilateral relationship, sometimes through a founding Treaty, investing in the irreversible, political link with the aim of ‘radiating’ throughout the region.

  19. The peronist incomplete re-construction of border. A study from Nahuel Huapi’s region (1946-1955

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Gabriela Núñez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the economic impact of Peronism in the Nahuel Huapi region and reviews the material and symbolic aspects of this district, which borders Chile and is associated with both the existing national park in the region and the city of Bariloche. To this end, and in dialogue with the material processes of the period, self-recognition and links to other regions were analyzed. The contribution of this manuscript is its recognition that despite Peronism having been experienced as one of the most significant development shifts in the Nahuel Huapi region, and especially in the town of San Carlos de Bariloche, documents both provide evidence of continuity processes and discuss the existing account of a break.

  20. Peak expiratory flow rate in healthy rural school going children (5-16 years) of bellur region for construction of nomogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cb, Manjunath; Sc, Kotinatot; Babu, Manjunatha

    2013-12-01

    Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) recording is an essential measure in the management and evaluation of asthmatic children.It is helpful in monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. The PEFR can be measured by a simple instrument-peak expiratory flow meter. To construct nomogram of PEFR in healthy rural school going children from Mandya district of Karnataka state, India and to use these nomograms for comparison with that of children with obstructive lung diseases for this region. The study was conducted on Healthy rural school going children, both boys and girls between the age group of 5-16 years. For the determination of PEFR we used Mini Wright Peak Flow Meter. At three time measurement, the highest value of PEFR was recorded. Formula for prediction of PEFR was estimated by linear regression analysis after the correlation of PEFR with age and height for both boys and girls. PEFR was measured in 1028 children aged 5 to 16 years by using Wright's mini peak flow meter. Prediction equations were derived for PEFR with height in boys and girls. Normograms were plotted based on the observed values of PEFR in the study population. Significant linear correlation was seen of PEFR with height in boys (paffected by regional, environmental and anthropometric factors. Hence, it is necessary to have regional reference values for children. Among different factors affecting PEFR, height correlates better with PEFR than weight and sex. Hence nomograms constructed can be used for this region.

  1. Polarization Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Noble, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the VUV polarization testing of the NSSTC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being developed for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization properties of the VUV calibration polarizers, the instrumental polarization of the VUV chamber, SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space gratings and the SUMI polarimeter.

  2. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  3. Development, construction and characterization of a variable repetitive spin-polarized electron gun with an inverted-geometry insulator; Entwicklung, Aufbau und Charakterisierung einer variabel repetierenden, spinpolarisierten Elektronenkanone mit invertierter Isolatorgeometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espig, Martin

    2016-02-15

    Within the scope of this thesis a pulsed source of spin polarized electrons Photo-CATCH was designed, constructed, characterized and has been put into operation. This source is based on the photoemission of spin-polarized electrons from GaAs-photocathodes. Both the design of the electron gun, consisting of an ultra-high vacuum chamber and an electrode with Pierce geometry, as well as the properties of the electron beam have been simulated with CST Studio. Results were a maximum electric field of (0.064±0.001) MV/m/kV on the electrode surface and a beam emittance as a function of the radius of the laser spot on the photocathode of element of {sub n,x}=(1.7478(4).10{sup -4}.(r)/(μm)+2.8(18).10{sup -5}) mm mrad at a beam current of 100 μA. Currently Photo-CATCH provides electron beams with an energy of 60 keV, which can be expanded up to 100 keV by upgrading the high-voltage power supply. The electron gun has an inverted-geometry insulator to ensure a compact design of the ultra-high vacuum chamber and a maximum person- and machine-safety from sparkovers. Since the properties of the laser light directly affect the properties of the generated electron beam a pulsed semiconductor laser system has been specially developed and built for Photo-CATCH. This is characterized by a high variability of its operating parameters, in particular its wavelength and repetition rate, in order to fulfill the broad variety of requirements of various nuclear physics experiments. By selecting the wavelength of the used laser diode highly polarized or high-current electron beams can be generated from GaAs-photocathodes. The time profile of the laser has direct influence to the longitudinal profile of the electron bunch. Through the radiofrequency modulation of the pumping current of the impedance-matched semiconductor laser system, consisting of a DC power source and an electrical pulse generator with 881 ps broad pump pulses, Lorentz shaped laser pulses with a minimum FWHM of (43.8±1

  4. The social construction of bath in two communities temazcal of the mixteca region: Santiago Yolomecatl and San Andres Chicahuaxtla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Valdés Cobos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The bathroom of temazcal is a knowledge of pre-Hispanic roots still practiced in rural and indigenous communities in our country. Studies on the temazcal have focused on its forms of construction and operation, however, the many therapeutic benefits temazcal bath attached to the human body, and women in particular, not have been sufficiently documented. In this case, two communities of the Oaxacan mixteca were studied: Santiago Yolomecatl and San Andrés Chicahuaxtla. In this study, a questionnaire was applied to 20 per cent of families in each of the communities, a questionnaire to allopathic doctors and six stories of life at temazcaleras. The results indicate a coincidence between patients and doctors in the study populations on the medicinal uses of the temazcal bath: after childbirth and for muscle aches, however, interviewed temazcaleras indicate diseases that cures this bath are: angina, flu, rheumatism,scars, muscle aches after childbirth and cramping. For its part, doctors support the idea of preserving the temazcal bath because it is a healing means to treat diseases through steam and faster recovery of the body. The constructivist analysis of the responses gathered in questionnaires and life stories shows that the medicinal uses of the temazcal, before being recognised as such go through a process of evaluation, filtration and social construction. This process of acceptance, perception and recognition occurs through rules of knowledge, ideological connotations, rules and socialsymbols.

  5. THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF BATH IN TWO COMMUNITIES TEMAZCAL OF THE MIXTECA REGION: SANTIAGO YOLOMECATL AND SAN ANDRES CHICAHUAXTLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Valdés-Cobos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bathroom of temazcal is a knowledge of pre-Hispanic roots still practiced in rural and indigenous communities in our country. Studies on the temazcal have focused on its forms of construction and operation, however, the many therapeutic benefits temazcal bath attached to the human body, and women in particular, not have been sufficiently documented. In this case, two communities of the Oaxacan mixteca were studied: Santiago Yolomecatl and San Andrés Chicahuaxtla. In this study, a questionnaire was applied to 20 per cent of families in each of the communities, a questionnaire to allopathic doctors and six stories of life at temazcaleras. The results indicate a coincidence between patients and doctors in the study populations on the medicinal uses of the temazcal bath: after childbirth and for muscle aches, however, interviewed temazcaleras indicate diseases that cures this bath are: angina, flu, rheumatism, scars, muscle aches after childbirth and cramping. For its part, doctors support the idea of preserving the temazcal bath because it is a healing means to treat diseases through steam and faster recovery of the body. The constructivist analysis of the responses gathered in questionnaires and life stories shows that the medicinal uses of the temazcal, before being recognised as such go through a process of evaluation, filtration and social construction. This process of acceptance, perception and recognition occurs through rules of knowledge, ideological connotations, rules and social symbols.

  6. The effect of environmental regulation on firms' competitive performance: the case of the building & construction sector in some EU regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Francesco; Iraldo, Fabio; Frey, Marco

    2011-09-01

    There is a considerable debate on the effects of environmental regulation on competitive performance. Based on survey data, this paper analyzes the two main research questions, derived from literature, on the links between environmental regulation and competitiveness, by focusing on firms operating in the building and construction sector, i.e.: 1) whether environmental policy stringency affects the competitive performance of firms in the building and construction sector 2) and how a specific form of environmental regulation (direct regulation, economic instruments and soft instruments) affects this performance? By applying a regression analysis, we find that a more stringent environmental regulation, measured by inspection frequency, provides a positive impulse for increasing investments in advanced technological equipment and innovative products and on business performance. Moreover, a well-designed "direct regulation" appears to be the most effective policy instrument for prompting the positive impact of environmental policies on innovation and intangible performance while economic instruments do negatively affect business performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Construction of the European Neighborhood Policy. From a Regional Policy to a Local Approach: EUBAM to Moldova and Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Alexianu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to present the institutional dynamics of an international unique instrument which is the European Neighborhood Policy. This research is important in the field of European Construction because it studies the intercourse between the aims of this institution and it’s practical accomplishments. Unlike other similar research, this paper wants to bring a deeper approach regarding the activity of the European Union Border Assistance Mission to Moldova and Ukraine. The method used was a case study of the ENP towards the Republic of Moldova. Through the systematization and interpretation of previous empirical studies and numerous press articles this work offers a clear image of the activity and results of the EUBAM to Moldova and Ukraine. This paper may elicit a more analytical interest for research groups interested in the efficiency of some entities that define the European construction but it can also be useful to European or local political decisional factors. The key contribution of this paper consists of emphasizing the interdependence between solving a specific neighboring policy in the East and ensuring energy needs of the EU, largely dependent on the Russian Federation.

  8. The role of underground construction for the mobility, quality of life and economic and social sustainability of urban regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Luís Tender

    Full Text Available Abstract Tunnelling has been used for several purposes for thousands of years. In the coming years the world's population will increase in the urban areas. So, the urban centres will have to adapt, in order to guarantee that their future population will have the necessary and sustainable growth. Due to the constraints for surface construction, also connected to environmental issues, this population growth will imply a greater use of the underground. With this optimal growth, the population of the cities will have better mobility, quality of life, and economic and social sustainability. In a first phase, this report will present a historic approach to tunnelling and its foreseeable future. Afterwards, we will present some considerations on the three factors which tunnelling impacts: mobility, quality of life and social sustainability. As a case study, we will analyse the 2nd phase of the construction of the Marão Tunnel (TDM - the longest ever built in the Iberian Peninsula- and describe the options made regarding each of those factors. In this case study, the options implemented made it possible to successfully execute the works. For the industry, this work is important because it describes a successful management of the aspects under analysis.

  9. Hyperon polarization: An experimental overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, J.

    1992-12-01

    The fact that inclusively produced hyperons are produced with significant polarization was first discovered at Fermilab about seventeen years ago. This and subsequent experiments showed that Λ degree were produced polarized while bar Λ degree had no polarization in the same kinematical region. This set the stage for many experiments which showed that most hyperons are produced polarized. Recent Fermilab experiments have showed that this phenomena is even more complex than previously thought and theoretical understanding is still lacking. Nevertheless polarized hyperon beams have been an extremely useful experimental tool in measuring hyperon magnetic moments and hyperon β-decay. Recently, hyperon radiative decays have been studied and magnetic moment precession of channeled particles in bent crystals has been observed

  10. Weekly gridded Aquarius L-band radiometer/scatterometer observations and salinity retrievals over the polar regions - Part 2: Initial product analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, L.; Dinnat, E. P.; Koenig, L. S.

    2014-05-01

    Following the development and availability of Aquarius weekly polar-gridded products, this study presents the spatial and temporal radiometer and scatterometer observations at L band (frequency ~1.4 GHz) over the cryosphere including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, sea ice in both hemispheres, and over sub-Arctic land for monitoring the soil freeze/thaw state. We provide multiple examples of scientific applications for the L-band data over the cryosphere. For example, we show that over the Greenland Ice Sheet, the unusual 2012 melt event lead to an L-band brightness temperature (TB) sustained decrease of ~5 K at horizontal polarization. Over the Antarctic ice sheet, normalized radar cross section (NRCS) observations recorded during ascending and descending orbits are significantly different, highlighting the anisotropy of the ice cover. Over sub-Arctic land, both passive and active observations show distinct values depending on the soil physical state (freeze/thaw). Aquarius sea surface salinity (SSS) retrievals in the polar waters are also presented. SSS variations could serve as an indicator of fresh water input to the ocean from the cryosphere, however the presence of sea ice often contaminates the SSS retrievals, hindering the analysis. The weekly grided Aquarius L-band products used are distributed by the US Snow and Ice Data Center at blank"> http://nsidc.org/data/aquarius/index.html , and show potential for cryospheric studies.

  11. Promoting Diversity Through Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (Polar ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J. D.; Hotaling, L. A.; Garza, C.; Van Dyk, P. B.; Hunter-thomson, K. I.; Middendorf, J.; Daniel, A.; Matsumoto, G. I.; Schofield, O.

    2017-12-01

    Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) is an education and outreach program designed to provide public access to the Antarctic and Arctic regions through polar data and interactions with the scientists. The program provides multi-faceted science communication training for early career scientists that consist of a face-to face workshop and opportunities to apply these skills. The key components of the scientist training workshop include cultural competency training, deconstructing/decoding science for non-expert audiences, the art of telling science stories, and networking with members of the education and outreach community and reflecting on communication skills. Scientists partner with educators to provide professional development for K-12 educators and support for student research symposia. Polar ICE has initiated a Polar Literacy initiative that provides both a grounding in big ideas in polar science and science communication training designed to underscore the importance of the Polar Regions to the public while promoting interdisciplinary collaborations between scientists and educators. Our ultimate objective is to promote STEM identity through professional development of scientists and educators while developing career awareness of STEM pathways in Polar science.

  12. Design considerations in coiled-coil fusion constructs for the structural determination of a problematic region of the human cardiac myosin rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Michael P.; Ajay, Gautam; Gellings, Jaclyn A.; Rayment, Ivan (UW)

    2017-12-01

    X-ray structural determination of segments of the myosin rod has proved difficult because of the strong salt-dependent aggregation properties and repeating pattern of charges on the surface of the coiled-coil that lead to the formation of paracrystals. This problem has been resolved in part through the use of globular assembly domains that improve protein folding and prevent aggregation. The primary consideration now in designing coiled-coil fusion constructs for myosin is deciding where to truncate the coiled-coil and which amino acid residues to include from the folding domain. This is especially important for myosin that contains numerous regions of low predicted coiled-coil propensity. Here we describe the strategy adopted to determine the structure of the region that extends from Arg1677 – Leu1797 that included two areas that do not show a strong sequence signature of a conventional left-handed coiled coil or canonical heptad repeat. This demonstrates again that, with careful choice of fusion constructs, overlapping structures exhibit very similar conformations for the myosin rod fragments in the canonical regions. However, conformational variability is seen around Leu1706 which is a hot spot for cardiomyopathy mutations suggesting that this might be important for function.

  13. Design considerations in coiled-coil fusion constructs for the structural determination of a problematic region of the human cardiac myosin rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Michael P; Ajay, Gautam; Gellings, Jaclyn A; Rayment, Ivan

    2017-12-01

    X-ray structural determination of segments of the myosin rod has proved difficult because of the strong salt-dependent aggregation properties and repeating pattern of charges on the surface of the coiled-coil that lead to the formation of paracrystals. This problem has been resolved in part through the use of globular assembly domains that improve protein folding and prevent aggregation. The primary consideration now in designing coiled-coil fusion constructs for myosin is deciding where to truncate the coiled-coil and which amino acid residues to include from the folding domain. This is especially important for myosin that contains numerous regions of low predicted coiled-coil propensity. Here we describe the strategy adopted to determine the structure of the region that extends from Arg1677 - Leu1797 that included two areas that do not show a strong sequence signature of a conventional left-handed coiled coil or canonical heptad repeat. This demonstrates again that, with careful choice of fusion constructs, overlapping structures exhibit very similar conformations for the myosin rod fragments in the canonical regions. However, conformational variability is seen around Leu1706 which is a hot spot for cardiomyopathy mutations suggesting that this might be important for function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Employee care, a vital antecedent to customer care in the health care industry: an exploratory investigation of the employee satisfaction construct at North East Alabama Regional Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The paper reports on the conceptualization and measurement of the employee satisfaction construct at North East Alabama Regional Medical Center (RMC), Anniston, Alabama. The study sought to take a global attitudinal measure of employee satisfaction. The employee satisfaction construct was evaluated through the use of an amended Brayfield-Rothe Index (BRI). The Index, in its original form, comprises an 18-item five-point Likert scale with items listed in both positive and negative format. The amended instrument comprised an additional 12 items addressing such issues as organizational culture and satisfaction with existing orientation, human resource policy and practice. The sample was drawn from all employees of the North East Alabama Regional Medical Center, Anniston, Alabama over a two-week period in November 2003. The results have proved beneficial in revealing those core dimensions that comprise the employee satisfaction construct, at least as defined through the use of BRI at RMC. The Center has been able to identify those areas where performance should be maintained at present levels and those where improvement is needed. The research is limited by the fact that it was cross-sectional in nature and in order to track real change/improvement over time, it should be repeated annually. It should also be stressed that the BRI was used to provide a global attitudinal measure of employee satisfaction only. When used as such, the author would recommend a certain amount of qualitative follow-up with willing participants in a focus group forum. This should allow for a richer interpretation of the results. The results have proved beneficial in revealing those core dimensions that comprise the employee satisfaction construct, at least as defined through the use of BRI at RMC. The Center has been better placed to identify those areas where performance should be maintained at present levels and those where improvement is needed. The research demonstrates the value and

  15. Construcción de un Esquema Organizacional: Red Regional de Emprendimiento del Huila Construction of a Collaborative Organizational Scheme: Regional Entrepreneurship Network of the Huila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovanny Perdomo Charry

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo sobre el fomento de la cultura del emprendimiento constituye un producto secuencial de tres años de trabajo entre las iniciativas del Gobierno Departamental anterior “Huila Unido 2004-2007” y actual “Huila Naturaleza Productiva 2008- 2011”, la Incubadora de Empresas de Innovación y Base Tecnológica del Huila -Incubarhuila- y la Universidad Surcolombiana, desarrollado en tres fases. La primera abordó el proceso de investigación de los actores sociales regionales que desarrollan actividades de emprendimiento y empresarismo con la pretensión de un estado del arte del emprendimiento a nivel departamental; la segunda se orientó a la estructuración y configuración de la red regional de emprendimiento; y la tercera y última hace alusión a la implementación de la estructura de la red de gestión del conocimiento en emprendimiento y empresarismo y la elaboración y puesta en marcha del plan estratégico de la misma. Es decir, el propósito esencial de este artículo es mostrar los resultados generales de la investigación, la estructuración e implementación de la red; haciendo evidente el aporte de la misma, en términos de trabajo interinstitucional y acople de los esfuerzos políticos, económicos y sociales en el campo del emprendimiento a nivel departamental.This paper about the entrepreneur culture promotion will be developed in three phases and constitutes a sequential product of three years of public and private work at Huila State in Colombia. Therefore, includes the initiatives of the previous Departmental Government with the slogan Huila Unido 2004-2007, and the current administration from Huila Naturaleza Productiva 2008-2011, the Huila’s Innovative and Technological Base Companies Incubator - Incubarhuila and Universidad Surcolombiana. The first part of the article approaches the research process of the regional social actors who develop entrepreneur and entrepreneurship activities with the aim of a

  16. AUXILIARY DECISION-MAKING PLATFORM OF ALTAI REGION AND ECOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AND CONSTRUCTION OF ECO CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the lack of information sharing and multidisciplinary cooperation platform in Altai region, we will carry out the research on auxiliary decision-making platform, based on the sustainable development and the circular economy theory. So that we can finish the information management, query and decision analysis support of landform, climate, resources, nature reserves, cultural heritage and natural heritage, cattle ranches base and industrial park, etc.

  17. Polarization at LEP. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.; Altarelli, G.; Blondel, A.; Coignet, G.; Keil, E.; Plane, D.E.; Treille, D.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains a collection of papers covering the most important part of studies carried out by five study groups in view of a programme of experiments with polarized beams at LEP, the Large Electron-Positron collider under construction at CERN. The emphasis is on precision measurements at the Z peak. Such measurements are shown to be of considerable theoretical interest as well as very clean from the point of view of theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The measurement of the beam polarization can certainly be performed with sufficient accuracy, thanks to the availability of both e + and e - beam polarization. The normalization of the data taken with different beam helicities poses certain constraints that are described. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the possibility of providing longitudinally polarized beams in the LEP machine: The design of new wigglers and spin rotators, the study of correction procedures and results of numerical simulations are presented. (orig.)

  18. RHIC polarized proton performance in run-8.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag,C.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Barton, D.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Helical spin rotators at these two interaction regions were used to control the spin orientation of both beams at the collision points. Physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8.

  19. DISCOVERY OF POLARIZATION REVERBERATION IN NGC 4151

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskell, C. Martin; Shoji, Masatoshi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Goosmann, Rene W. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Merkulova, Nelly I.; Shakhovskoy, Nikolay M., E-mail: martin.gaskell@uv.cl, E-mail: mshoji@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: rene.goosmann@astro.unistra.fr [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Nauchny, Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)

    2012-04-20

    Observations of the optical polarization of NGC 4151 in 1997-2003 show variations of an order of magnitude in the polarized flux while the polarization position angle remains constant. The amplitude of variability of the polarized flux is comparable to the amplitude of variability of the total U-band flux, except that the polarized flux follows the total flux with a lag of 8 {+-} 3 days. The time lag and the constancy of the position angle strongly favor a scattering origin for the variable polarization rather than a non-thermal synchrotron origin. The orientation of the position angle of the polarized flux (parallel to the radio axis) and the size of the lag imply that the polarization arises from electron scattering in a flattened region within the low-ionization component of the broad-line region. Polarization from dust scattering in the equatorial torus is ruled out as the source of the lag in polarized flux because it would produce a larger lag and, unless the half-opening angle of the torus is >53 Degree-Sign , the polarization would be perpendicular to the radio axis. We note a long-term change in the percentage of polarization at similar total flux levels, and this could be due either to changing non-axisymmetry in the optical continuum emission or a change in the number of scatterers on a timescale of years.

  20. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Building America Case Study: Construction Guidelines for High R-Value Walls without Exterior Rigid Insulation, Cold Climate Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    High-R wall assemblies (R-40 and above) are gaining popularity in the market due to programs like the DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program, Passive House (PH), Net Zero Energy Home (NZEH) challenges in several states, and highly incentivized retrofit programs. In response to this demand, several builders have successfully used 'double wall' systems to more practically achieve higher R-values in thicker, framed walls. To builders of conventional stick-framed homes, often one of the most appealing features of double wall systems is that there are very few new exterior details. Exterior sheathing, structural bracing, house wrap or building paper, window and door flashing, and siding attachment are usually identical to good details in conventional framed wall systems. The information presented in this guide is intended to reduce the risk of failure in these types of assemblies, increase durability, and result in a reduction of material brought to landfills due to failures and resulting decay. While this document focuses on double wall framing techniques, the majority of the information on how to properly construct and finish high R-value assemblies is applicable to all wall assemblies that do not have foam insulation installed on the exterior of the structural sheathing. The techniques presented have been shown through field studies to reduce the likelihood of mold growth and moisture related damage and are intended for builders, framing contractors, architects, and consultants involved in designing and building super insulated homes.

  2. Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority regional waste management center at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a landfill and technology center for regionally-generated municipal solid waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The facility would serve the municipal solid waste disposal needs for SRS and at least nine of the surrounding counties who currently comprise the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority (TRSWA). Additional counties could become included in the proposed action at some future date. Current Federal and state requirements do not afford individual counties and municipalities within the region encompassing SRS the ability to efficiently or economically operate modern waste management facilities. In addition, consolidation of regional municipal solid waste at one location would have the benefit of reducing the duplicity of environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of county-level facilities. The option to seek a combined disposal and technology development facility based on a regionally-cooperative effort was selected as a viable alternative to the existing individual SRS or county disposal activities. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Part 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact or prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS)

  3. Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority regional waste management center at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a landfill and technology center for regionally-generated municipal solid waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The facility would serve the municipal solid waste disposal needs for SRS and at least nine of the surrounding counties who currently comprise the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority (TRSWA). Additional counties could become included in the proposed action at some future date. Current Federal and state requirements do not afford individual counties and municipalities within the region encompassing SRS the ability to efficiently or economically operate modern waste management facilities. In addition, consolidation of regional municipal solid waste at one location would have the benefit of reducing the duplicity of environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of county-level facilities. The option to seek a combined disposal and technology development facility based on a regionally-cooperative effort was selected as a viable alternative to the existing individual SRS or county disposal activities. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Part 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact or prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS).

  4. Superconducting polarizing magnet for a movable polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishchenko, N.G.; Bartenev, V.D.; Blinov, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    The superconducting polarizing magnet was constructed for the JINR (Dubna) movable polarized target (MPT) with working volume 200 mm long and 30 mm in diameter. The magnet provides a polarizing magnetic field up to 6 T in the centre with the uniformity of 4.5 x 10 -4 in the working volume of the target. The magnet contains a main solenoidal winding 558 mm long and 206/144 mm in diameters, and compensating and correcting winding placed at its ends. The windings are made of a NbTi wire, impregnated with the epoxy resin and placed in the horizontal cryostat. The diameter of the 'warm' aperture of the magnet cryostat is 96 mm. The design and technology of the magnet winding are described. Results of the magnetic field map measurements, using a NMR-magnetometer are given. A similar magnet constructed at DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay (France), represented a model for the present development. The MPT array is installed in the beam line of polarized neutrons produced by break-up of polarized deuterons extracted from the synchrophasotron of the Laboratory of High Energies (LHE), JINR (Dubna)

  5. PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE OF REGIONAL PEOPLE'S CONTROL AUTHORITIES OF MOSCOW IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY AIMED AT THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE MUNICIPAL ECONOMY IN THE 1980ies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byzov Aleksey Yur'evich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the author has proven that state control authorities had an important function in the organizational structure of the government authorities of our country. The author also drives attention to the fact that, in the Soviet period, government leaders implemented the idea of a system of controlling authorities that were to a substantial extent composed of blue collars. An extensive network of controlling authorities operating on location was active in the 80ies of the 20th century. The historical experience of regional controlling authorities is considered in article, and Moscow controlling authorities are taken as an example. The author demonstrates that the Moscow City Committee, regional committees, groups and posts of people's control organized at enterprises and other organizations drove particular attention to the issues of construction, the building industry as a whole and to the accomplishments of the municipal economy; they also supervised over the implementation of ecological and nature protection actions, monitored the condition and repairs of public health service buildings; they resolved the issues of education, culture, available housing, housing preparation for the winter season, etc. Actions taken in the aftermath of inspections held by people's control authorities were aimed at the improvement of the ecological condition of Moscow, and they resolved the problems of urban construction. Multiple assignments performed by people's control authorities made it possible to substantially improve the quality of their inspections and to combine the controlling efforts within the framework of the municipal economy. Coordination of combined inspections promoted reduction in the overall number of inspections. The present-day building sector of the Russian capital can benefit from the experience of Moscow people's control authorities, their well-coordinated controlling activities within the construction industry and the prior

  6. Perlites from East Mediterranean region: a comparative study of perlite quality characteristics and their utilization in the construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasatou, Marianthi; Stamatakis, Michael; Ipsilanti, Elena

    2014-05-01

    A comparative study of perlite deposits of the East Mediterranean Region is performed, in order to identify the factors that control their expansion capacity, and hence their suitability for certain industrial and environmental applications. Perlite deposits are methodically studied worldwide because of the unique characteristics each particular deposit has and the impact that perlite has to the global economy of industrial minerals. More than 100 perlite-based products exist in the Market. Perlite is a volcanic glass-rich rock, mainly used in its expanded state. It is characterized as a lightweight aggregate with significant thermal and acoustic insulation properties. For the purposes of our study, perlite bulk samples originated from quarries in Milos Island, Greece, Sardinia Island, Italy, Kardjali region, Bulgaria, and Bergama region, Turkey were characterized and tested. The geological age of the deposits varies from Oligocene (Kardjali and Bergama) through Plio-Pleistocene (Milos). From the locations above, fourteen representative bulk samples of 10kg each were studied: Mineralogically by light microscopy [LM], XRD and SEM analysis, and TG/DTA analysis. Chemically (major and trace elements analysis) by XRF and ICP-MS methods. In addition, moisture, Loss on Ignition [LOI], pH and soluble substances (Na, K, Cl) were measured. The XRD analysis revealed that the main phase in all samples is the volcanic glass, distinguished by the broad hump at 19-26 degrees in the XRD pattern. However, some glasses contain embryonic opal-CT phase. Other mineral phases identified are feldspars, quartz and mafic minerals. LM studies revealed that the Kardjali perlite has de-vitrification texture, whereas Milos perlite is almost fresh. Milos samples are richer in Si, Ca, Na, Li and poorer in Th, U, K, Rb and LOI than the other samples. Furthermore, Sardinia samples are richer in REE than the rest of the samples. Tests on the expansion capacity of perlite grains 0.5-1.2mm in size

  7. The Optimization of Distributed Photovoltaic Comprehensive Efficiency Based on the Construction of Regional Integrated Energy Management System in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the context of energy crisis, environmental pollution, and energy abandoning in the large-scale centralized clean energy generation, distributed energy has become an inevitable trend in the development of China’s energy system. Distributed photovoltaic boasts great potential for development in China due to resource advantages and policy support. However, we need improve the efficiency of photovoltaic generation, which is restricted by technology and dislocation of supply and demand. With a view to optimizing the efficiency of distributed photovoltaic, based on the concept of comprehensive efficiency, this paper discusses the influencing factors and chooses the optimization direction according to system dynamics (SD. The optimizing content is further clarified on the basis of energy management system. From the perspective of technology, this paper puts forward optimization methods from resource side, energy conversion and demand side, and the simulation results of applying the three methods verify the feasibility of the method. Comprehensive efficiency would be improved as the result of regional integrated energy management system and policy mechanisms. The conclusions of this paper will provide theoretical basis and optimized reference for the improvement of distributed photovoltaic comprehensive utilization in China.

  8. A polarized target for the CLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, C D; Battaglieri, M; Bosted, P; Branford, D; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Comer, S A; Crabb, D G; De Vita, R; Dodge, G; Fatemi, R; Kashy, D; Kuhn, S E; Prok, Y; Ripani, M; Seely, M L; Taiuti, M; Witherspoon, S

    2003-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of a polarized solid target for use in electron scattering experiments with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Protons and deuterons are continuously polarized by microwave-induced spin-flip transitions at 1 K and 5 T. The target operated successfully during two cycles in 1998 and 2000, providing proton and deuteron polarizations as high as 96% and 46%, respectively. The unique features of the target which permit its use inside a 4 pi spectrometer are stressed. Comparison is made between the target polarization measured by the traditional method of NMR and by electron elastic scattering.

  9. Experience in using a multilevel model of the boundary layer for estimating changes in microclimatic characteristics in the region of construction of the Adychan and middle Enisei hydroelectric stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, T.P.; Shklyarevich, O.B.

    1993-01-01

    The results of estimating the impact of artificial water bodies in regions of construction of hydroelectric stations on the micro- and mesoclimatic characteristics of the surrounding territory are given

  10. Observations of MeV electrons in Jupiter's innermost radiation belts and polar regions by the Juno radiation monitoring investigation: Perijoves 1 and 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Santos-Costa, Daniel; Jørgensen, John Leif

    2017-01-01

    Juno's “Perijove 1” (27 August 2016) and “Perijove 3” (11 December 2016) flybys through the innermost region of Jupiter's magnetosphere (radial distances Jovian radii, 1.06 RJ at closest approach) provided the first in situ look at this region's radiation environment. Juno's Radiation Monitoring...

  11. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  12. Polarization of Coronal Forbidden Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao; Qu, Zhongquan [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio, E-mail: sayahoro@ynao.ac.cn [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2017-03-20

    Since the magnetic field is responsible for most manifestations of solar activity, one of the most challenging problems in solar physics is the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields, particularly in the outer atmosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools to interpret polarimetric observations in suitable spectral lines. This paper is devoted to analyzing the diagnostic content of linear polarization imaging observations in coronal forbidden lines. Although this technique is restricted to off-limb observations, it represents a significant tool to diagnose the magnetic field structure in the solar corona, where the magnetic field is intrinsically weak and still poorly known. We adopt the quantum theory of polarized line formation developed in the framework of the density matrix formalism, and synthesize images of the emergent linear polarization signal in coronal forbidden lines using potential-field source-surface magnetic field models. The influence of electronic collisions, active regions, and Thomson scattering on the linear polarization of coronal forbidden lines is also examined. It is found that active regions and Thomson scattering are capable of conspicuously influencing the orientation of the linear polarization. These effects have to be carefully taken into account to increase the accuracy of the field diagnostics. We also found that linear polarization observation in suitable lines can give valuable information on the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the solar corona.

  13. Spin Asymmetries $A_1$ of the Proton and the Deuteron in the Low $x$ and Low $Q^2$ Region from Polarized High Energy Muon Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Willumeit, R; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of the spin asymmetries $A_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the kinematic region extending down to $x=6\\cdot 10^{-5}$ and $Q^2=0.01$ GeV$^2$. The data were taken with a dedicated low $x$ trigger, which required hadron detection in addition to the scattered muon, so as to reduce the background at low $x$. The results complement our previous measurements and the two sets are consistent in the overlap region. No sig\\-ni\\-fi\\-cant spin effects are found in the newly explored region.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING HELICAL SNAKE MAGNETS: CONSTRUCTION AND MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, W.W.; Anerella, M.; Courant, E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to collide polarized protons, the RHIC project will have two snakes in each ring and four rotators around each of two interaction regions. Two snakes on opposite sides of each ring can minimize depolarization during acceleration by keeping the spin tune at a half. Since the spin direction is normally along the vertical direction in a flat ring, spin rotators must be used around an interaction point to have longitudinal polarization in a collider experiment. Each snake or rotator will be composed of four helical dipoles to provide the required rotation of spin with minimal transverse orbit excursions in a compact length of 10m. The basic helical dipole is a superconducting magnet producing a transverse dipole field which is twisted about the magnet axis through 360 o in a length of 2.4 m. The design and construction of the magnets is described in this paper

  15. 10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

  16. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor

  17. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

  18. Polarization Observations of the Fermi blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Bindu; S. Jorstad, A. P. Marscher (BU, USA), K. Sokolovsky (IAASARS, Greece), I. Agudo (CSIC, Spain)

    2018-01-01

    Ever since the revolutionary discovery by the Fermi mission that active galactic nuclei (AGN) produce copious amounts of high-energy emission, its origin has remained elusive. Using high-frequency radio interferometry (VLBI) polarization imaging, we could probe the magnetic field topology of the compact high-energy emission regions in blazars. A case study for blazar 3C 279 reveals presence of multiple gamma-ray emission regions. The observed anti-correlation between gamma-ray flux and percentage polarization at optical bands challenges the current high-energy emission models. In addition to the turbulent component responsible for gamma-ray flares, our analysis suggests the presence of a steady polarized component having with its polarization direction aligned along the jet axis. The steady polarized component could possibly be the toroidal component of the helical magnetic field. To better understand the acceleration processes in jets, high-energy polarization missions are of great importance.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of Temperature Control Parameters and Study of the Simultaneous Cooling Zone during Dam Construction in High-Altitude Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are unprecedented difficulties in building concrete gravity dams in the high altitude province Tibet with problems induced by lack of experience and technologies and unique weather conditions, as well as the adoption of construction materials that are disadvantageous to temperature control and crack prevention. Based on the understandings of the mentioned problems and leveraging the need of building gravity dam in Tibet, 3D finite element method is used to study the temperature control and crack prevention of the dam during construction. The calculation under recommend temperature control measures and standards shows that the height and number of simultaneous cooling zone have the more obvious influencers on concrete stress; therefore, it is suggested to increase the height of simultaneous cooling zone to decrease the stress caused by temperature gradient of adjoin layers so as to raise the safety level of the whole project. The research methods and ideas used on this project have significant values and can be taken as references in similar projects in high altitude regions.

  20. The influence of managed versus natural hydrologic regimes on the hydrochemical patterns in a constructed wetland in the Athabasca oil sands region, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, K.; Oswald, C.; Nicholls, E.; Carey, S.

    2017-12-01

    Bitumen extraction via surface mining in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) results in permanent alteration of the landscape once rich in boreal forest and wetlands. As part of their legal requirements, oil companies must reclaim disturbed landscapes into functioning ecosystems, and to date only two pilot wetland-peatland systems have been constructed. Peatland reclamation is challenging as they must be completely reconstructed with few guidelines or previous work in this region. Furthermore, the variable sub-humid climate and salinity of waste-materials are obstacles to the success of peatland creation. In 2012, Syncrude Canada Ltd. constructed a 52 ha upland-wetland system, the Sandhill Fen Watershed (SFW), which was designed with a pump and underdrain system to provide freshwater and enhance drainage to limit salinization from underlying waste materials that have elevated electrical conductivity (EC) and Na+. The objective of this research is to understand the hydrochemical response of a constructed wetland to variations in hydrological management with respect to sources, flow pathways and major chemical transformations of water in the three years following commissioning. EC, major ions and stable isotopes were collected using a combination of high frequency and discrete water sampling from 2013-2015. Results indicate that high activity of both inflow and outflow pumps in 2013 kept the EC relatively low, with most wetland sites 1000 µS/cm in 2014 and >2000 µS/cm in 2015. Most wetland sites remained Ca+2 dominant where Ca+2 and Na+ averaged 200 and 130 mg/L, respectively. However, the most notable change in 2014 and 2015 was the emergence of several Na+ "hotspots" in the margins where Na+ concentrations averaged 450 mg/L while Ca+2 averaged 250 mg/L. Stable isotope data confirm that the "hotspots" match the underlying waste water and provide evidence of its upward transport and seepage under a natural hydrologic regime. Minimizing salinization is critical

  1. PolarTREC-Celebrating the Legacy of the IPY Through Researcher-Educator Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, K.; Warburton, J.; Larson, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Polar TREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a three-year (2007-2009) NSF-funded program, has matched over 40 teachers with polar researchers working in multiple scientific disciplines for 2-8 week Teacher Research Experiences (TRE) in the Arctic and Antarctica during the IPY. PolarTREC contributes to the legacy of the IPY through the creation and dissemination of polar education resources, prolonged teacher-researcher relationships, and contributions to scholarly knowledge on the impacts of TRE's. Products developed during PolarTREC are helping to sustain the widespread interest and enthusiasm in the polar regions generated during the IPY. During their expeditions, participating teachers brought science and information about profound changes at the poles to school, community, and professional audiences through web-based communications, journals, discussion forums, multimedia, and live events. PolarTREC teachers constructed nearly 100 classroom lesson plans and activities as products of their experiences. Live events from the field attracted over 11,000 participants, primarily K-12 students. Although the field experience is central to the PolarTREC TRE Model, many participants cite the relationship they built with their teacher/researcher as one of the best outcomes. Through personal communications, presentations at professional conferences, and continued support of each other’s work through classroom visits or joint proposal development, teachers and researchers have maintained the mutually beneficial relationships established during the IPY. Participating scientists gained access to professional educators with expertise in translating research approaches and results into programs. The need for researchers to explain their research and “boil it down to the raw essence” helped many see how their work fits into a bigger picture, often helping them communicate outside their scientific discipline and to diverse public audiences. Teachers, on

  2. Report of the polarization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.; Kondo, K.; Martin, F.; Manning, G.; Miller, D.; Prescott, C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of longitudinal polarization in the reaction e + e - → μ + μ - was studied. Modifications of the magnetic insertion which could reduce synchrotron radiation by two or more were considered. In addition, a specific design is suggested which incorporates the optimized magnetic configuration; it is assumed that no particle detection is necessary near the interaction vertex and the synchrotron radiation is ''dumped'' up - and downstream. Also considered were vacuum chambers in which the synchrotron radiation is absorbed locally so that shielded regions are provided for detectors near the interaction vertex. A scheme for rotating the polarization outside the experiment areas is detailed; in this way the design of experiments is greatly simplified. Local intense ionization of residual gas in the interaction region due to synchrotron radiation at the insertion was studied. Finally, some general considerations in the production and measurement of beam polarization are summarized. 2 figures

  3. FINANCIAL STABILITY TRANSFORMATION ON THE TERRITORIES DURING THE PROJECT "URAL INDUSTRIAL –URAL POLAR"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Tatarkin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In article possible ways of financial stability transformation of Ural federal district regions in conditions of project "Urals industrial – Urals Polar" realization are considered. Necessity of use of budgetary funds, and also opportunities on attraction of private investments for financing construction of a transport corridor proves. The scheme of financing under the project, established on the mechanism of Public Private Partnership is certain.

  4. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning at least 10 cM in 1q41, the critical region of Usher II gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.Y.; Zhen, D.K.; Li, B.F. [Univ. of Nebraska, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder causing congenital hearing loss, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction. The Usher syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. At least three genetic types of Usher syndrome are know to exist. The Usher II (USH2) syndrome has originally been linked to 1q41 between D1S70 and D1S81. more recently its location was refined and placed between D1S217 and D1S229. We have constructed a YAC contig containing 23 clones and a minimum of 10 Mbp of human DNA. A total of three NotI linking clones, fourteen polymorphic microsatelite markers, eight YAC end clones and twenty lambda and cosmid subclones have been used to order the YACs and assess their integrity. The YAC subclones were used to reassess the location of the USH2 gene. Seven CpG islands have already been identified in the region. Several potential exons have been identified by exon amplification in the cosmid subclones. This map of overlapping clones, the set of densely spaced physical markers and potential exons will promote our understanding of the 1q1 region, its associated genes and eventually the gene mutated in Usher syndrome type II.

  5. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in Xenopus eggs: Regional differences related to animal/vegetal polarity become extreme upon fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluemink, J.G.; Dictus, W.J.A.G.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Tetteroo, P.A.T.; Tertoolen, L.G.J.; Laat, S.W. de

    1984-01-01

    Regional differences in the lateral mobility properties of plasma membrane lipids have been studied in unfertilized and fertilizedxaqpus eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements. Out of a variety of commonly used lipid probes only the aminofluorescein-labeled fatty acids

  6. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  7. Measurement of the polarized neutron—polarized 3He total cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, C. D.; Gould, C. R.; Haase, D. G.; Seely, M. L.; Huffman, P. R.; Roberson, N. R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W. S.

    1995-05-01

    The first measurements of polarized neutron-polarized 3He scattering in the few MeV energy region are reported. The total cross section difference ΔσT for transversely polarized target and beam has been measured for neutron energies between 1.9 and 7.5 MeV. Comparison is made to predictions of ΔσT using various descriptions of the 4He continuum. A brute-force polarized target of solid 3He has been developed for these measurements. The target is 4.3×1022 atoms/cm2 thick and is polarized to 38% at 7 Telsa and 12 mK.

  8. Energy conversion evolution at lunar polar sites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described the motions of the Moon, including the orientation and precession of its spin axis rela- tive to its orbit and the plane of the ecliptic. The Moon's polar axis is inclined only about one- and-a-half degrees from the ecliptic pole, with the result that sunlight is nearly continuous and always horizontal in lunar polar regions.

  9. Polar and Alpine Microbiology - Earth's Cryobiosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elster, Josef; Margesin, R.; Wagner, D.; Häggblom, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-4, č. článku fiw221. ISSN 0168-6496 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : diversity * Polar regions * Polar Microbiology Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2016

  10. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    OpenAIRE

    He Ji-Huan; Wang Qing-Li; Sun Jie

    2011-01-01

    A polar bear (Ursus maritimus) has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  11. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ji-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A polar bear (Ursus maritimus has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  12. 1998 Construction Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the third annual survey of college and university construction in the United States. Finds that almost $5.8 billion worth of construction was completed in 1997, and $6.3 billion will be finished in 1998. Offers information on regional construction activity, profiles of new buildings on campuses, residence hall amenities, and other data.…

  13. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  14. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  15. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  16. Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process where photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allow the production of greater than 10 18 polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed

  17. Operation of a fast polarization-switching source at the Photon Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kimichika; Shioya, Tatsuro; Aoto, Tomohiro; Harada, Kentaro; Obina, Takashi; Sakamaki, Masako; Amemiya, Kenta

    2013-03-01

    We have been developing a fast polarization-switching source for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray region at the B15-16 straight section of the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory (PF) storage ring. The source consists of two tandem APPLE-II-type elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), namely, U#16-1 and U#16-2, and a fast kicker system. The target frequency of polarization switching is 10 Hz. As the first step, we installed U#16-1 and five identical bump kickers in the PF ring in March 2008. Then, we constructed U#16-2 and installed it in August 2010. The orbit switching operation at 10 Hz, for user experiments, started in January 2012. We describe the details of the operation status of two EPUs and the fast local bump system in this report.

  18. Top-of-Atmosphere Shortwave Broadband Observed Radiance and Estimated Irradiance over Polar Regions from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Instruments on Terra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.

    2004-01-01

    Empirical angular distribution models for estimating top-of-atmosphere shortwave irradiances from radiance measurements over permanent snow, fresh snow and sea ice are developed using CERES measurements on Terra. Permanent snow angular distribution models depend on cloud fraction, cloud optical thickness, and snow brightness. Fresh snow and sea ice angular distribution models depend on snow and sea ice fraction, cloud fraction, cloud optical thickness, and snow and ice brightness. These classifications lead to 10 scene types for permanent snow and 25 scene types for fresh snow and sea ice. The average radiance over clear-sky permanent snow is more isotropic with satellite viewing geometry than that over overcast permanent snow. On average, the albedo of clear-sky permanent snow varies from 0.65 to 0.68 for solar zenith angles between 60$logical and\\circ$ and 80 deg, while the corresponding albedo of overcast scenes varies from 0.70 to 0.73. Clear-sky permanent snow albedos over Antarctica estimated from two independent angular distribution models are consistent to within 0.6%, on average. Despite significant variability in sea ice optical properties with season, the estimated mean relative albedo error is -1 % for very dark sea ice and 0.1% for very bright sea ice when albedos derived from different viewing angles are averaged. The estimated regional root-mean-square (RMS) relative albedo error is 5.6% and 2.6% when the sea ice angular distribution models are applied to a region that contains very dark and very bright sea ice, respectively. Similarly, the estimated relative albedo bias error for fresh snow is -0.1% for very dark snow.

  19. Exploitability of construction materials in the calcareous dorsal of the Haouz Mountain range in the region of Tangier-Tetouan, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellero, Hatim; El Kharim, Younes

    2017-05-01

    This study constitutes a geospatial approach to determining the exploitability of the carbonate formations of the Haouz Mountain range in the Tangier-Tetouan region of northern Morocco, for the purpose of the production of construction material, using geographic information system (GIS) tools. The method employed in this study starts by outlining the limits of the study area, based on the geological character of the exploitable deposits. Then, we proceeded to identify the environmental and land use factors that would normally constrict the quarrying activity. The idea is to create multiple "constraint maps", one for each related group of element that can hinder that type of activity, with various degrees of impact for each map. Finally we opted to weigh these constraint maps and combine them in order to produce one simplistic "exploitability map" for the aggregate exploration industries in the area. The resulting map can be utilised in the future as base for the creation of a management plan for the mining industries in the sector of the Haouz Mountains.

  20. Multi-Mission Cross-Calibration of Satellite Altimeters: Constructing a Long-Term Data Record for Global and Regional Sea Level Change Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Bosch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate studies require long data records extending the lifetime of a single remote sensing satellite mission. Precise satellite altimetry exploring global and regional evolution of the sea level has now completed a two decade data record. A consistent long-term data record has to be constructed from a sequence of different, partly overlapping altimeter systems which have to be carefully cross-calibrated. This cross-calibration is realized globally by adjusting an extremely large set of single- and dual-satellite crossover differences performed between all contemporaneous altimeter systems. The total set of crossover differences creates a highly redundant network and enables a robust estimate of radial errors with a dense and rather complete sampling for all altimeter systems analyzed. An iterative variance component estimation is applied to obtain an objective relative weighting between altimeter systems with different performance. The final time series of radial errors is taken to estimate (for each of the altimeter systems an empirical auto-covariance function. Moreover, the radial errors capture relative range biases and indicate systematic variations in the geo-centering of altimeter satellite orbits. The procedure has the potential to estimate for all altimeter systems the geographically correlated mean errors which is not at all visible in single-satellite crossover differences but maps directly to estimates of the mean sea surface.

  1. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas Construction Plan in Segoroyoso Village Yogyakarta Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesmana, Surya Budi; Putra, Sri Atmaja [Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. To achieve the CASINDO objective seven Technical Working Groups have been established with the aim to conduct the technical activities under the various work packages and to produce the agreed deliverables. This report presents results from Technical Working Group IV on Renewable Energy project development. Its main aims were: To identify suitable non-hydro RE projects that can be developed in the province; To conduct an energy needs assessment in a selected location; To develop a business plan for a proposed solution to the identified main energy problem of the target community; To identify potential investors; To construct the project.

  2. Optically pumped electron spin polarized targets for use in the production of polarized ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    The production of relatively dense electron spin polarized alkali metal vapor targets by optical pumping with intense cw dye lasers is discussed. The target density and electron spin polarization depend on the dye laser intensity and bandwidth, the magnetic field at the target, and the electron spin depolarization time. For example in a magnetic field of 1.5 x 10 3 G, and using 1 W dye laser with a bandwidth of 10 10 Hz one can construct an electron spin polarized Na vapor target with a target thickness of 1.6 x 10 13 atoms/cm 2 and an average electron spin polarization of about 90% even though the Na atoms are completely depolarized at every wall collision. Possible uses of the electron spin polarized targets for the production of intense beams of polarized H - or 3 He - ions are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Projective geometry for polarization in geometric quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.; Dodson, C.T.J.

    1976-12-01

    It is important to know the extent to which the procedure of geometric quantization depends on a choice of polarization of the symplectic manifold that is the classical phase space. Published results have so far been restricted to real and transversal polarizations. Here we also consider these cases by presenting a formulation in terms of projective geometry. It turns out that there is a natural characterization of real transversal polarizations and maps among them using projective concepts. We give explicit constructions for Rsup(2n)

  4. Coherent population trapping with polarization modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Peter, E-mail: enxue.yun@obspm.fr; Guérandel, Stéphane; Clercq, Emeric de [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2016-06-28

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) is extensively studied for future vapor cell clocks of high frequency stability. In the constructive polarization modulation CPT scheme, a bichromatic laser field with polarization and phase synchronously modulated is applied on an atomic medium. A high contrast CPT signal is observed in this so-called double-modulation configuration, due to the fact that the atomic population does not leak to the extreme Zeeman states, and that the two CPT dark states, which are produced successively by the alternate polarizations, add constructively. Here, we experimentally investigate CPT signal dynamics first in the usual configuration, a single circular polarization. The double-modulation scheme is then addressed in both cases: one pulse Rabi interaction and two pulses Ramsey interaction. The impact and the optimization of the experimental parameters involved in the time sequence are reviewed. We show that a simple seven-level model explains the experimental observations. The double-modulation scheme yields a high contrast similar to the one of other high contrast configurations like push-pull optical pumping or crossed linear polarization scheme, with a setup allowing a higher compactness. The constructive polarization modulation is attractive for atomic clock, atomic magnetometer, and high precision spectroscopy applications.

  5. Brane polarization is no cure for tachyons

    OpenAIRE

    Bena, Iosif; Kuperstein, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Anti-M2 and anti-D3 branes placed in regions with charges dissolved in fluxes have a tachyon in their near-horizon region, which causes these branes to repel each other. If the branes are on the Coulomb branch this tachyon gives rise to a runaway behavior, but when the branes are polarized into five-branes this tachyon only appears to lower the energy of the polarized branes, without affecting its stability. We analyze brane polarization in the presence of a brane-brane-repelling tachyon and ...

  6. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  7. Evaluating the Effect from Constructing Binary Geothermal Power Units Based on Spent Petroleum and Gas Boreholes in the South Regions of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhasov, A. B.; Alkhasova, D. A.

    2018-02-01

    The article substantiates the possibility of efficiently harnessing the geothermal resources available in the North Caucasian region through constructing binary geothermal power plants (GeoTPPs) using idle petroleum and gas wells. The power capacities of GeoTPPs are evaluated, and the basic characteristics of these power plants in case of constructing them in the promising areas are determined. The overall useful GeoTPP capacity equal to approximately 330 MW can be obtained from using the entire fleet of idle wells available in these areas. Diagrams confirming the possibility of reaching the optimal flowrate of geothermal heat carrier circulating in the geothermal circulation system loop are presented. This flowrate corresponds to a binary GeoTPP's maximal useful power output. The article shows, taking the Ternair geothermal field as an example, that it is inefficient to use medium-enthalpy thermal waters for generating energy at a binary GeoTPP involving reinjection of a spent heat carrier. It is shown that good prospects can be expected from applying a hybrid geothermal and combined-cycle technology, by means of which it is possible to use lowenthalpy (80-100°C) thermal waters for generating electricity in a highly efficient manner. In accordance with such technology, geothermal heat is used in the binary GeoTPP cycle for heating low-boiling working fluid to its evaporation temperature. The working fluid is evaporated and superheated by using the heat of exhaust gases from a gas turbine power unit. Owing to combined use of the thermal water heat potential and the heat of exhaust gases from a gas turbine power plant in a hybrid process system, it becomes possible to obtain high power performance indicators of hybrid geothermal and combined-cycle power plants. This conclusion is confirmed by the results from numerical evaluations carried out as applied to the Ternair geothermal field. With the fully harnessed resource potential of the Ternair field, the total

  8. Localization of the human RNA polymerase I transcription factor gene (UBTF) to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 and construction of a long-range restriction map of the region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.A.; Black, D.M.; Griffiths, B.L.; Solomon, E. [Somatic Cell Genetics Lab., London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-10

    Human upstream binding factor (hUBF) is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is essential for the activation of human 18s and 28s rRNA gene transcription. We have isolated and localized the gene (UBTF) encoding hUBF to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 by analyzing a cosmid from the region and carrying out Southern analysis on a previously constructed chromosome 17 somatic cell hybrid mapping panel using a probe from the hUBF cDNA. Confirmation of its location at this region was obtained from the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA using the hUBF cDNA and other probes from the region. These data also enabled the construction of a long-range restriction map of the region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Examination of mercury and organic carbon dynamics from a constructed fen in the Athabasca oil sands region, Alberta, Canada using in situ and laboratory fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, C.; Carey, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    In the Athabasca oil sands region, mined landscapes must be reclaimed to a functioning natural ecosystem as part of the mine closure process. To test wetland construction techniques on oil sands tailings, 55 ha of mined landscape on the Syncrude Canada Ltd. property is being reclaimed to a watershed containing a graminoid fen. The 18 ha constructed fen consists of an approximately 50 cm thick peat-mineral soil layer separated from underlying tailings sand by a thin layer of clay till. The water table in the fen is maintained by pumping water into the fen from a nearby lake and controlling outflow with under-drains. The objective of this study was to assess total mercury (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) concentration dynamics in water exported from the fen in relation to organic carbon quantity and composition. Water quality data from summer 2012 when the fen pumps were first turned on show that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations are on average twice as high in water flowing through the underlying tailings sand aquifer (median: 42.0 mg/L) compared to DOC concentrations in water flowing through the fen peat package (median: 20.3 mg/L). Given these DOC concentrations, filtered THg concentrations are very low (median values are 0.81 ng/L and 0.17 ng/L for water flowing through the fen peat and sand tailings, respectively) compared to concentrations reported for other boreal wetlands. Although a relationship was identified between filtered THg and DOC (r2=0.60), its slope (0.06 ng Hg/mg C) is an order-of-magnitude smaller than the typical range of slopes found at other wetland sites potentially suggesting a small pool of mercury in the peat and/or limited partitioning of mercury into solution. Filtered MeHg concentrations in all water samples are near the limit of detection and suggest that biogeochemical conditions conducive to methylation did not exist in the fen peat or tailings sand at the time of sampling. In addition to these baseline THg and Me

  10. [Construction and transfection of eucaryotic expression recombinant vector containing truncated region of UL83 gene of human cytomegalovirus and it's sheltered effect as DNA vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rong-Bao; Li, Yan-Qiu; Wang, Ming-Li

    2006-06-01

    To construct eucaryotic expression recombinant vector containing vivo truncated region of UL83 gene of human cytomegalovirus, realize its steady expression in Hep-2 cell, and study sheltered effect of the eucaryotic expression recombinant vector as DNA vaccine. A vivo truncated UL83 gene fragment encoding for truncated HCMV pp65 was obtained by PCR from human cytomegalovirus AD169 stock genome. By gene recombinant ways, the truncated UL83 gene fragment was cloned into eucaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C1 with reported gene coding GFP to construct recombinant vector pEGFP-C1-UL83. The recombinant vector pEGFP-C1-UL83 was tested by different methods including PCR, restriction digestion and gene sequencing. Test results showed the recombinant vector was constructed successfully. After pEGFP-C1-UL83 was transfected into Hep-2 cell by lipofectin mediation, expression of GFP and truncated pp65 fusion protein in Hep-2 cell was observed at different time points by fluorescence microscope. Results showed that quantity of fusion protein expression was the highest at 36h point. Then, Hep-2 cell was cultured selectively by RPMI-1640 containing G418 (200 microg/mL) to obtain a new cell stock of expressing truncated UL83 Gene fragment steadily. RT-PCR and Western blot results showed the truncated fragment of UL83 gene could be expressed steadily in Hep-2 cell. The result showed a new cell stock of expressing Tpp65 was established. This cell stock could be useful in some HCMV research fields, for example, it could be a tool in study of pp65 and HCMV infection, and it could provide a platform for the research into the therapy of HCMV infection. Immune sheltered effect of pEGFP-C1-UL83 as DNA vaccine was studied in vivo of HCMV congenital infection mouse model. The mouse model was immunized solely by pEGFP-C1-UL83, and was immunized jointly by pEGFP-C1-UL83 and its expression product. When the mouse was pregnant and brought to bed, differential antibody of anti-HCMV pp65 was

  11. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  12. Observations of polarization of stellar radiation in R-associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlova, L.A.; Rspaev, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    New observational data have been obtained on BVR polarization parameters of stars in reflection nebulae in the Cas, Per R1, Ser, CMa R1 regions. Several stars are found to show variable polarization. For some of stars intrinsic polarization is derived. The effect of interstellar polarization has been taken into account by means of the Serkovski method. The connection of polarization vector with nebula structure considered. The local magnetic field is detected for CMa R1 region the scale of which is defined by association diameter

  13. The Ozark Plateaus Regional Aquifer Study—Documentation of a groundwater-flow model constructed to assess water availability in the Ozark Plateaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian R.; Richards, Joseph M.; Knierim, Katherine J.

    2018-03-30

    Recent short-term drought conditions have emphasized the need to better understand the delicate balance between abundance, sustainability, and scarcity of groundwater in the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system. In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey began construction of a groundwater-flow model as a tool for the assessment of groundwater availability in the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system. The model was developed to benefit concurrent and future investigations involving groundwater-pumping scenarios, optimization, particle transport, and groundwater-monitoring network analysis.The groundwater model simulates 116 years (1900–2015) of hydrologic conditions and the response of the groundwater system to changes in stress including changes in recharge and groundwater pumping for water supply. Semiseasonal stress periods were simulated from the later part of 1991 to 2015 and represent higher demand and lower recharge in the spring and summer months and lower demand and higher recharge in the fall and winter months. Groundwater pumping increases throughout the simulation period with a maximum rate of about 600 million gallons per day (Mgal/d).The process of matching historical hydrologic data for the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system model was accomplished by a combination of manual changes to parameter values and automated calibration methods. Observation data used in the development and evaluation of the model included 19,045 hydraulic-head observations from 6,683 wells within the model area. Observation data also included stream leakage estimates summed to calculate a net gain or net loss value for approximately 81 named streams.The majority (mean of over 95 percent) of the recharge component is discharged through streams simulated in the model. The total simulated discharge to streams fluctuates seasonally between 7,500 and 17,500 Mgal/d with a mean outflow of 11,500 Mgal/d. Much of the remaining balance between modeled recharge inflows and stream outflows is made up by water

  14. Construction and immunological evaluation of truncated hepatitis B core particles carrying HBsAg amino acids 119–152 in the major immunodominant region (MIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao [National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changbai Road 155, Changping District, Beijing 102206 (China); Guo, Minzhuo [Beijing Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Beureau, Tianshuiyuan Lane 6, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100026 (China); Qiu, Feng; Jia, Zhiyuan; Lu, Xuexin; Meng, Qingling [National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changbai Road 155, Changping District, Beijing 102206 (China); Bi, Shengli, E-mail: shengli_bi@163.com [National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changbai Road 155, Changping District, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The conformational HBV neutralization antigen domain was successfully displayed on the surface of truncated HBc particles. •Appropriate dialysis procedures to support the renaturing environment for the protein refolding. •Efficient purification procedures to obtain high purity and icosahedral particles of mosaic HBV antigen. •Strong immune responses not only including neutralization antibody response but also Th1 cell response were induced in mice. -- Abstract: Hepatitis B capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli can reassemble into icosahedral particles, which could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of foreign epitopes, especially those inserted into its major immunodominant region. Herein, we inserted the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant amino acids (aa) 119–152 of HBsAg into the truncated HBc (aa 1–144), between Asp{sup 78} and Pro{sup 79}. Prokaryotic expression showed that the mosaic HBc was mainly in the form of inclusion bodies. After denaturation with urea, it was dialyzed progressively for protein renaturation. We observed that before and after renaturation, mosaic HBc was antigenic as determined by HBsAg ELISA and a lot of viruslike particles were observed after renaturation. Thus, we further purified the mosaic viruslike particles by (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and Sepharose 4FF chromatography. Negative staining electron microscopy demonstrated the morphology of the viruslike particles. Immunization of Balb/c mice with mosaic particles induced the production of anti-HBs antibody and Th1 cell immune response supported by ELISPOT and CD4/CD8 proportions assay. In conclusion, we constructed mosaic hepatitis core particles displaying the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant on the surface and laid a foundation for researching therapeutic hepatits B vaccines.

  15. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  16. Setup and proof of principle of SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), a novel source of polarized H-/D- ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerich, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was the setup and the proof-of-principle of a new type of negative polarized hydrogen or deuterium ion source, which is based on the charge-exchange reaction vectorH 0 +Cs 0 →vectorH - +Cs + , as for instance the Colliding-Beams-Source (CBS) at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Juelich. In contrast to the CBS, the use of a storage cell for the charge-exchange region promises an increase in H - current by at least an order of magnitude without considerable polarization losses. For these purposes, a new laboratory was equipped and both a polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source and an intense neutral cesium-beam source have been build-on. A Lambshift polarimeter, which allows the measurement of the nuclear polarization of the atomic as well as ionic beams, was completed with the construction of a new spin-filter. After commissioning and optimizing each of these sources, a storage cell was developed and installed in the charge-exchange region with a magnetic field. Additionally, components for the extraction, detection and analysis of the negative ion beam were installed. Following the decisive proof of principle, investigation of the properties of the storage cell, especially as to H recombination and depolarisation, was begun. Furthermore, a number of software programs was developed for the control and monitoring of different components of the sources as well as a universal measuring software for the complete installation, including the measurement and calculation of the beam polarization. At the same time, the remote control system of the Cologne source of polarized ions LASCO at the FN tandem accelerator was completely modernized. (orig.)

  17. Constructed Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    these systems can improve water quality, engineers and scientists construct systems that replicate the functions of natural wetlands. Constructed wetlands are treatment systems that use natural processes

  18. Regional stratospheric warmings in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector during winter 2004/2005: implications for temperatures, winds, chemical constituents and the characterization of the Polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The vortex during winter 2004/2005 was interesting for several reasons. It has been described as "cold" stratospherically, with relatively strong westerly winds. Losses of ozone until the final warming in March were considerable, and comparable to the cold 1999–2000 winter. There were also modest warming events, indicated by peaks in 10 hPa zonal mean temperatures at high latitudes, near 1 January and 1 February. Events associated with a significant regional stratospheric warming in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector then began and peaked toward the end of February, providing strong longitudinal variations in dynamical characteristics (Chshyolkova et al., 2007; hereafter C07. The associated disturbed vortex of 25 February was displaced from the pole and either elongated (upper or split into two cyclonic centres (lower.

    Observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on Aura are used here to study the thermal characteristics of the stratosphere in the Canadian-US (253° E and Scandinavian-Europe (16° E sectors. Undisturbed high latitude stratopause (55 km zonal mean temperatures during the mid-winter (December–February reached 270 K, warmer than empirical-models such as CIRA-86, suggesting that seasonal polar warming due to dynamical influences affects the high altitude stratosphere as well as the mesosphere. There were also significant stratopause differences between Scandinavia and Canada during the warming events of 1 January and 1 February, with higher temperatures near 275 K at 16° E. During the 25 February "PWC" event a warming occurred at low and middle stratospheric heights (10–30 km: 220 K at 253° E and the stratopause cooled; while over Scandinavia-Europe the stratosphere below ~30 km was relatively cold at 195 K and the stratopause became even warmer (>295 K and lower (~45 km. The zonal winds followed the associated temperature gradients so that the vertical and latitudinal gradients of the winds differed strongly

  19. Static characteristics and short channel effect in enhancement-mode AlN/GaN/AlN N-polar MISFET with self-aligned source/drain regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bin; Wei Lan; Wen Cai

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to simulate the I–V static characteristic of the enhancement-mode (E-mode) N-polar GaN metal—insulator—semiconductor field effect transistor (MISFET) with self-aligned source/drain regions. Firstly, with SILVACO TCAD device simulation, the drain—source current as a function of the gate—source voltage is calculated and the dependence of the drain—source current on the drain—source voltage in the case of different gate—source voltages for the device with a 0.62 μm gate length is investigated. Secondly, a comparison is made with the experimental report. Lastly, the transfer characteristic with different gate lengths and different buffer layers has been performed. The results show that the simulation is in accord with the experiment at the gate length of 0.62 μm and the short channel effect becomes pronounced as gate length decreases. The E-mode will not be held below a 100 nm gate length unless both transversal scaling and vertical scaling are being carried out simultaneously. (semiconductor devices)

  20. Wien filter for a polarized ions source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez A, P.I.

    1977-01-01

    In order to carry out investigation works about nuclear structure, the Nuclear Center of Mexico has an accelerator Tandem Van de Graff of 12 Mv. Now in this center there is a polarized ions source, in a setting phase, totally constructed in the workshop of the accelerator. This source, supplies an ion beam with a polarization whose propagation direction is not the adequate one for the dispersion and reaction processes wanted to be realized. A filter Wien was used to obtain the correct direction of the polarization vector. The purpose of this work is the study of the filter necessary conditions in order to reach the desirable objective. In the first part some generalities are given about: polarization phenomena, polarized ions source and description of the performance of the Wien filter. In the second part, the problem of the passage of a polarized beam through the filter is tried and solved. Finally, the design and construction of the filter is presented together with the results of the experimentation with the object to justify the suppositions which were taken into consideration in the solution of the filter problem. (author)

  1. Polar Science Weekend: A University / Science Center Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, H. L.; Moritz, R. E.; Lettvin, E.; Schatz, D.; Russell, L.

    2008-12-01

    Polar Science Weekend (PSW) is a four-day event featuring hands-on activities, live demonstrations, and a variety of exhibits about the polar regions and current polar research, presented by scientists from the University of Washington's Polar Science Center, and held at Seattle's Pacific Science Center. PSW was conceived and organized jointly by the Polar Science Center and Pacific Science Center, which is Washington State's most well-attended museum. The first PSW in March 2006 drew over 5000 visitors, and subsequent PSWs in 2007 and 2008 have both surpassed that figure. The success of this university / science center partnership has made PSW an annual event, and has served as a model for Pacific Science Center's Portal to the Public program, in which partnerships with other scientific institutions have been built. Researchers at the Polar Science Center (PSC) study the physical processes controlling high-latitude oceans, atmosphere, sea ice, and ice sheets, and are involved in numerous IPY projects. PSC scientists also engage in many outreach efforts such as classroom visits and public lectures, but PSW stands out as the highlight of the year. The partnership with Pacific Science Center brings access to facilities, publicity, and a large audience that would not otherwise be readily available to PSC. Pacific Science Center, constructed for the 1962 World's Fair in Seattle, serves more than one million visitors per year. Pacific Science Center's mission is to inspire a lifelong interest in science, math and technology by engaging diverse communities through interactive and innovative exhibits and programs. PSW helps to advance this mission by bringing students, teachers, and families face-to-face with scientists who work in some of the most remote and challenging places on earth, to learn first-hand about polar research in a fun and informal setting. This is made possible only by the partnership with PSC. In this talk we will present descriptions and photos of PSW

  2. What causes Mars' annular polar vortices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, A. D.; Waugh, D. W.; Guzewich, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    A distinctive feature of the Martian atmosphere is that the winter polar vortices exhibit annuli of high potential vorticity (PV) with a local minimum near the pole. These annuli are seen in observations, reanalyses, and free-running general circulation model simulations of Mars, but are not generally a feature of Earth's polar vortices, where there is a monotonic increase in magnitude of PV with latitude. The creation and maintenance of the annular polar vortices on Mars are not well understood. Here we use simulations with a Martian general circulation model to the show that annular vortices are related to another distinctive, and possibly unique in the solar system, feature of the Martian atmosphere: the condensation of the predominant atmospheric gas species (CO2) in polar winter regions. The latent heat associated with CO2 condensation leads to destruction of PV in the polar lower atmosphere, inducing the formation of an annular PV structure.

  3. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  4. Polar bears and sea ice habitat change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, George M.; Atwood, Todd C.; Butterworth, Andy

    2017-01-01

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is an obligate apex predator of Arctic sea ice and as such can be affected by climate warming-induced changes in the extent and composition of pack ice and its impacts on their seal prey. Sea ice declines have negatively impacted some polar bear subpopulations through reduced energy input because of loss of hunting habitats, higher energy costs due to greater ice drift, ice fracturing and open water, and ultimately greater challenges to recruit young. Projections made from the output of global climate models suggest that polar bears in peripheral Arctic and sub-Arctic seas will be reduced in numbers or become extirpated by the end of the twenty-first century if the rate of climate warming continues on its present trajectory. The same projections also suggest that polar bears may persist in the high-latitude Arctic where heavy multiyear sea ice that has been typical in that region is being replaced by thinner annual ice. Underlying physical and biological oceanography provides clues as to why polar bear in some regions are negatively impacted, while bears in other regions have shown no apparent changes. However, continued declines in sea ice will eventually challenge the survival of polar bears and efforts to conserve them in all regions of the Arctic.

  5. A sustainable future for the polar regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalal-Clayton, Barry; Wilson, Emma

    2008-04-15

    The spectre of change is galvanising debate about the future of the poles. Climatic shifts look set to affect both profoundly. As the ice melts, new marine transport routes will open up. The exploitation of natural resources could expand significantly. Further risks include marine acidification, the migration of commercial fish species and coastal erosion. In the Arctic, traditional livelihoods could suffer. Meanwhile, national claims of sovereignty over areas of ocean floor are fuelling fears of a new 'cold war' over access to mineral resources in sensitive environments. Clearly, science alone cannot address the challenges facing the poles: a coherent strategy for sustainable development is urgently needed.

  6. Development of optical-pumping polarized deuteron target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamae, Tadaaki; Yokokawa, Tamio; Nishikawa, Itaru; Abe, Kazuhiro; Konno, Osamu; Nakagawa, Itaru; Sugawara, Masumi; Tanaka, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Miyase, Haruhisa; Tsubota, Hiroaki

    1998-01-01

    An optical-pumping system of rubidium atoms for a laser-driven polarized deuteron target was constructed. The density and polarization of the rubidium atoms were measured using Faraday rotation. The rotation angle was determined within an error of 0.01 deg. Our preliminary result showed a polarization of 0.4 at a gas thickness of 4x10 13 atoms/cm 2

  7. Polar heating in Saturn's thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D numerical global circulation model of the Kronian thermosphere has been used to investigate the influence of polar heating. The distributions of temperature and winds resulting from a general heat source in the polar regions are described. We show that both the total energy input and its vertical distribution are important to the resulting thermal structure. We find that the form of the topside heating profile is particularly important in determining exospheric temperatures. We compare our results to exospheric temperatures from Voyager occultation measurements (Smith et al., 1983; Festou and Atreya, 1982 and auroral H3+ temperatures from ground-based spectroscopic observations (e.g. Miller et al., 2000. We find that a polar heat source is consistent with both the Smith et al. determination of T∞~400 K at ~30° N and auroral temperatures. The required heat source is also consistent with recent estimates of the Joule heating rate at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004. However, our results show that a polar heat source can probably not explain the Festou and Atreya determination of T∞~800 K at ~4° N and the auroral temperatures simultaneously. Keywords. Ionosphere (Planetary ionosphere – Magnetospherica physics (Planetary magnetospheres – Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (Thermospheric dynamics

  8. Construction management

    CERN Document Server

    Pellicer, Eugenio; Teixeira, José C; Moura, Helder P; Catalá, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The management of construction projects is a wide ranging and challenging discipline in an increasingly international industry, facing continual challenges and demands for improvements in safety, in quality and cost control, and in the avoidance of contractual disputes. Construction Management grew out of a Leonardo da Vinci project to develop a series of Common Learning Outcomes for European Managers in Construction. Financed by the European Union, the project aimed to develop a library of basic materials for developing construction management skills for use in a pan-European context. Focused exclusively on the management of the construction phase of a building project from the contractor's point of view, Construction Management covers the complete range of topics of which mastery is required by the construction management professional for the effective delivery of new construction projects. With the continued internationalisation of the construction industry, Construction Management will be required rea...

  9. Polymer photovoltaic cells sensitive to the circular polarization of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilot, Jan; Abbel, Robert; Lakhwani, Girish; Meijer, E.W.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Meskers, Stefan C.J. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2010-05-25

    Chiral conjugated polymer is used to construct a photovoltaic cell whose response depends on the circular polarization of the incoming light. The selectivity for left and right polarized light as a function of the thickness of the polymer layer is accounted for by modeling of the optical properties of all layers inside the device. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. PolarTREC—A Model Program for Taking Polar Literacy into the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, J.; Timm, K.; Larson, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Polar TREC—Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, is a three-year (2007-2009) NSF-funded International Polar Year (IPY) teacher professional development program that advances Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education by improving teacher content knowledge and instructional practices through Teacher Research Experiences (TRE) in the Arctic and Antarctic. Leveraging profound changes and fascinating science taking place in the polar regions, PolarTREC broadly disseminates activities and products to students, educators, researchers, and the public, connecting them with the Arctic and Antarctica and sustaining the widespread interest in the polar regions and building on the enthusiasm that was generated through IPY. Central to the PolarTREC Teacher Research Experience Model, over 40 teachers have spent two to eight weeks participating in hands-on research in the polar regions and sharing their experiences with diverse audiences via live events, online multimedia journals, and interactive bulletin boards. The Connecting Arctic/Antarctic Researchers and Educators (CARE) Network unifies learning community members participants, alumni, and others, developing a sustainable association of education professionals networking to share and apply polar STEM content and pedagogical skills. Educator and student feedback from preliminary results of the program evaluation has shown that PolarTREC’s comprehensive program activities have many positive impacts on educators and their ability to teach science concepts and improve their teaching methods. Additionally, K-12 students polled in interest surveys showed significant changes in key areas including amount of time spent in school exploring research activities, importance of understanding science for future work, importance of understanding the polar regions as a person in today’s world, as well as increased self-reported knowledge and interest in numerous science content areas. Building

  11. Spin-polarized 3He nuclear targets and metastable 4He atoms by optical pumping with a tunable, Nd:YAP laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohler, C.L.; Schearer, L.D.; Leduc, M.; Nacher, P.J.; Zachorowski, L.; Milner, R.G.; McKeown, R.D.; Woodward, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Several Nd:YAP lasers were constructed which could be broadly tuned in the 1083-nm region which includes the helium 2 3 S-2 3 P transition, using a Lyot filter and thin, uncoated etalons within the laser cavity. 1 W of power could be extracted at 1083 nm through a 1% transmitting output coupler. This laser beam was used to optically pump metastable 4 He and 3 He 2 3 S helium atoms in a weak discharge cell, spin polarizing the metastable ensemble. In a 3 He cell the polarization is transferred to the nuclear spin system. A 3 He target cell at 0.3 Torr was polarized to 52% in a few minutes. We describe the application of this system to the design of polarized targets for experiments in nuclear physics

  12. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. Study on the thermal structure of the Venusian polar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, M.; Taguchi, M.; Fukuhara, T.; Kouyama, T.; Imamura, T.; Sato, T. M.; Futaguchi, M.; Yamada, T.; Nakamura, M.; Iwagami, N.; Suzuki, M.; Ueno, M.; Sato, M.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Takagi, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Venus atmosphere exhibits characteristic thermal features called `polar dipoles' and `polar collars' in both polar regions. The polar dipole which locates around the center of the polar region is warmer than mid-latitudes and the polar collar surrounding the polar dipole is colder than the other regions at the same altitude. These features were revealed by infrared observations of Venus by the previous missions. The previous observations showed that shapes of the polar dipoles can be characterized by three patterns which are the zonal wave numbers of 0-2, and that they change with time. The rotation periods of polar dipoles were determined to be 2.5 and 2.8-3.2 Earth days for the southern and northern polar regions, respectively. It has not been clear that the difference and variability in the rotation period is due to just a temporal variation, influence of solar activity, or other reasons. Sato et al. compared the appearances of both polar hot regions by a ground-based observation, rotation of the hot regions is synchronized between the northern and southern hemispheres. However, rotation periods of the northern and southern polar dipoles have not yet been directly compared. The Japanese Venus orbiter Akatsuki is a planetary meteorological satellite aiming at understanding the atmosphere dynamics of Venus. The Longwave Infrared Camera (LIR), observes thermal emission from the cloud top ( 65km). Akatsuki is in an equatorial orbit, which is suitable for simultaneous observations of both northern and southern polar regions. Rotation periods of polar vortices were derived using the LIR data by tracking a zonal position of maximum temperature. The rotation periods of polar vortices of southern and northern hemispheres are determined to be 3.0 - 8.2 and 1.6 - 5.5 Earth days, respectively (Fig.1). These rotation periods of southern polar vortex are longer than the values observed in the past. As a next step, we will derive rotation periods of the polar vortices for

  14. Tunable polarization sensitive absorber made of graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Amir; Babaei, Maryam

    2017-02-01

    Theoretically, the absorption properties of a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) slab constructed from graphene-dielectric multilayers are investigated using the transfer matrix method. The effective medium approximation reveals that the graphene-based HMM slab is an anisotropic and homogeneous medium. It is shown that the absorption of the slab depend on the polarization and incidence angle due to the strong anisotropy of the HMMs. The results revealed that the complete absorption is only possible for the TM-polarized waves in a broad region of wavelength. It is found that the region of total absorption can be controlled and tuned using some controlling parameters such as incidence angle, the orientation of the optical axis of the HMM medium and the chemical potential of the graphene monolayers. Finally, the intensity distribution of a TM-polarized Gaussian beam is simulated which verifies the strong absorption of the waves inside the HMM slab. This absorber may have potential applications in the design of tunable filters, polarizers, detectors, photovoltaic devices and so on.

  15. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  16. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  17. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  18. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  19. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments. II. Polarization Leakage Simulations in the Avoidance Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Foster, G.; Grobler, T. L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa); Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Martinot, J. Z. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Thyagarajan, N. [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Dillon, J. S. [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Parsons, A. R., E-mail: cnunhokee@gmail.com [Dept. of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    A critical challenge in the observation of the redshifted 21 cm line is its separation from bright Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds. In particular, the instrumental leakage of polarized foregrounds, which undergo significant Faraday rotation as they propagate through the interstellar medium, may harmfully contaminate the 21 cm power spectrum. We develop a formalism to describe the leakage due to instrumental widefield effects in visibility-based power spectra measured with redundant arrays, extending the delay-spectrum approach presented in Parsons et al. We construct polarized sky models and propagate them through the instrument model to simulate realistic full-sky observations with the Precision Array to Probe the Epoch of Reionization. We find that the leakage due to a population of polarized point sources is expected to be higher than diffuse Galactic polarization at any k mode for a 30 m reference baseline. For the same reference baseline, a foreground-free window at k > 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} can be defined in terms of leakage from diffuse Galactic polarization even under the most pessimistic assumptions. If measurements of polarized foreground power spectra or a model of polarized foregrounds are given, our method is able to predict the polarization leakage in actual 21 cm observations, potentially enabling its statistical subtraction from the measured 21 cm power spectrum.

  20. Implementation of sustainable processes in regional industries: recycling of metallurgical residual as a project to chance masonry used in construction in Bogotá, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Quijano B.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rev.esc.adm.neg This paper shows the analysis of the possibilities to implement a new process, viable from the environmental and economic point of view, which includes two regional industries within the framework of the generation of sustainable solutions for the regional economy. In it, the description of how to use residuals from the steel industry as a source to transform the masonry industry, both located in the region of Bogota.

  1. Construction of the Cauchy problem for solution of the integral equation of transport in a sphere with a central absorbing region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezhov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of the integral equation for neutron transport in a homogeneous isotropically-scattering sphere with an absolutely black central part an initial value problem has been formulated which permits the construction of a numerical scheme to find the neutron flux density

  2. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Trigonaspis spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2015-01-01

    of crystallites that cover the surfaces of both the tower-shaped flagellar pole coccoliths and the disc-shaped body coccoliths are the keystone features of the genus. Circumstantial evidence exists linking species of Trigonaspis with species of Pappomonas in haploid-diploid life cycles.......A group of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions several decades ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported adding to the morphological and biogeographical databases of some of the species. The holococcolithophorid genus...... Trigonaspis is revisited here with the purpose of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history aspects and biogeography. The genus Trigonaspis as currently circumscribed comprises four taxa – two from each polar region. The triangular plates...

  3. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  4. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  5. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  6. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  7. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  8. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  9. Construction practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, J.; Clelland, J.; Rumble, E.; Sandell, L.

    2007-01-01

    One has elaborated a virtual computer model (VRC) of construction of the AP1000 project reactor to demonstrate its viability, to improve the NPP project making it more easy for construction with simultaneous reduction of time, costs and risk of construction. The approach ensured time sequence of the 3-D visualization of NPP at the construction stages. The VRC ensures optimization of scheme implementation time period and specifies the basic costs. The VRC application offers essential advantages when planning construction of a nuclear power facility [ru

  10. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  11. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements. PMID:29503479

  12. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  13. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  14. Classifying spaces of degenerating polarized Hodge structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Kazuya

    2009-01-01

    In 1970, Phillip Griffiths envisioned that points at infinity could be added to the classifying space D of polarized Hodge structures. In this book, Kazuya Kato and Sampei Usui realize this dream by creating a logarithmic Hodge theory. They use the logarithmic structures begun by Fontaine-Illusie to revive nilpotent orbits as a logarithmic Hodge structure. The book focuses on two principal topics. First, Kato and Usui construct the fine moduli space of polarized logarithmic Hodge structures with additional structures. Even for a Hermitian symmetric domain D, the present theory is a refinem

  15. Polar Perspectives on Art and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennermalm, A. K.; Salzman, H.; Gustafson, D.

    2014-12-01

    The rapidly changing climate and environment in polar regions in the 20th and 21st centuries are well documented by scientists. Yet, this understanding is not well disseminated to students and the general public because the language of science is often inaccessible to these groups. To increase participation in science about the changing Polar regions, we organized a series of interdisciplinary events at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in 2013/14 called "Polar Perspectives on Art and Science". This series brought five artist/scholars to Rutgers and reached a broad audience of students, faculty and the general public. Accompanying this series were two high-profile events. First, the Zimmerli Art Museum's academic-year-long exhibit, "Glacial Perspectives," displayed paintings and photographs by Diane Burko documenting rapidly changing glacial, and polar landscapes. Second, the "Let Us Talk About Water" event included a screening of the documentary "Chasing Ice" followed by a panel discussion at the Rutgers Cinema. Financial support was provided by Zimmerli Art Museum's Andrew W. Mellon Endowment Fund, Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrological Sciences, Inc., Rutgers Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs, GAIA, and many other Rutgers institutes and departments. Student feedback on the "Polar Perspectives on Science and Art" suggest that art was effective in enhancing engagement and understanding of contemporary polar change. Furthermore, the many events created a forum for reoccurring and stimulating discussions among people with their academic home in widely different disciplines, including humanities, and physical and social sciences.

  16. Semantic-enabled Spatiotemporal Web Portal for Polar Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is essential for Intergovernmental and scientists to study, monitor and analyze the geographic data in polar regions. Polarregions are likely to respond rapidly and more severely to the climate changesthan any other area on the Earth.They also have significant importance for Global warming research. The ocean water around the Antarctic and Arctic is a crucial part of the ocean's thermohaline circulation. The Polar Cyberinfrastructure Program was built to acquire, share, access, analyze the polar data for Arctic and Antarctic communities. The polar data are becoming big and bring challenges for Polar Cyberinfrastructure Program including: 1) it is difficultfor polar data users to discover most relevant data based on the understanding the behavior; 2) the quality of polar data service is essential to use the polar data, however, it varies for users in different locations and different time. The semantic enabled discovery and volunteer computing are used in the Polar Cyberinfrastructurefor tackling these challenges: 1) semantic search and knowledge reasoning to improve the discovery recall and precision of polar data; 2) volunteer computing is used to gather volunteers computing resources around the world to improve the quality evaluationaccuracy of polar data service. Keywords: Polar Science, Cyberinfrastructure, Semantic, Volunteer Computing

  17. Magnetoresistance through spin-polarized p states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2003-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the ballistic magnetoresistance in Ni contacts using first-principles, atomistic, electronic structure calculations. In particular we investigate the role of defects in the contact region with the aim of explaining the recently observed spectacular magnetoresistance ratio. Our results predict that the possible presence of spin-polarized oxygen in the contact region could explain conductance changes by an order of magnitude. Electronic transport essentially occurs through spin-polarized oxygen p states, and this mechanism gives a much higher magnetoresistance than that obtained assuming clean atomically sharp domain walls alone

  18. Measurement of the polarized neutron---polarized {sup 3}He total cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, C.D.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Seely, M.L. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Huffman, P.R.; Roberson, N.R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W.S. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    1995-05-10

    The first measurements of polarized neutron--polarized {sup 3}He scattering in the few MeV energy region are reported. The total cross section difference {Delta}{sigma}{sub {ital T}} for transversely polarized target and beam has been measured for neutron energies between 1.9 and 7.5 MeV. Comparison is made to predictions of {Delta}{sigma}{sub {ital T}} using various descriptions of the {sup 4}He continuum. A brute-force polarized target of solid {sup 3}He has been developed for these measurements. The target is 4.3{times}10{sup 22} atoms/cm{sup 2} thick and is polarized to 38% at 7 Telsa and 12 mK. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. Polarization of submillimetre lines from interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic fields play important roles in many astrophysical processes. However, there is no universal diagnostic for the magnetic fields in the interstellar medium (ISM) and each magnetic tracer has its limitation. Any new detection method is thus valuable. Theoretical studies have shown that submillimetre fine-structure lines are polarized due to atomic alignment by ultraviolet photon-excitation, which opens up a new avenue to probe interstellar magnetic fields. We will, for the first time, perform synthetic observations on the simulated three-dimensional ISM to demonstrate the measurability of the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines. The maximum polarization for different absorption and emission lines expected from various sources, including star-forming regions are provided. Our results demonstrate that the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines is a powerful magnetic tracer and add great value to the observational studies of the submilimetre astronomy.

  20. Videographic Education: Owning the Polar Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, R. W.; Buhr, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    Television and internet-served video is an increasingly important media tool for reaching into society. This talk will present clips from a film designed to educate the public about warming in the polar regions, the socioeconomic and environmental implications of this warming; and the actions we can take to slow down human contributions to climate change. This talk will present a short film Owning the Polar Crisis, which is drawn from footage for Polar Visions, a four segment film available for educational audiences and the public.. The films are unique in that they draw from the perspectives of well-known climate scientists, citizens from all over the planet and natives of the Arctic. The compelling images were taken from numerous locations around the Arctic, including Alaska and Greenland. Owning the Polar Crisis was filmed, directed and produced by Dr. Ryan Vachon, a climate scientist and videographer with an intimate knowledge of the subject matter.

  1. Survey on the construction of realization scenario of large-scale revegetation of arid regions; Daikibo ryokuka no jitsugenka scenario sakusei ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    In order to fix carbon dioxide as a measure to mitigate global warming, research of large-scale revegetation of arid regions has been conducted toward the ultimate goals of systematizing revegetation technologies centered on securing and using water resources, evaluating the feasibility of arid revegetation by extending the viewpoint to examine even rainfall increase by artificial means, and establishing a strategic program for large-scale revegetation. A trial revegetation feasibility map was made for a selected target region in Western Australia, and rough revegetation steps were formulated. Selection of proper region, introduction of technology, and planning were conducted by grasping environment of the target revegetation region. As a result, it was found that growth of plants is vigorous at the catchment areas due to the surface water transfer along the topography of surface in spite of poor rainfall. Obstruction of plant growth is partly caused by the corrosion of soil and accumulation of salt, but mainly caused by the shortage of water. Based on these data, ranking of proper regions was evaluated. When the technology is introduced in the region with A-rank, several times of water can be collected. 60 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs.

  2. Optical polarization: background and camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škerlind, Christina; Hallberg, Tomas; Eriksson, Johan; Kariis, Hans; Bergström, David

    2017-10-01

    Polarimetric imaging sensors in the electro-optical region, already military and commercially available in both the visual and infrared, show enhanced capabilities for advanced target detection and recognition. The capabilities arise due to the ability to discriminate between man-made and natural background surfaces using the polarization information of light. In the development of materials for signature management in the visible and infrared wavelength regions, different criteria need to be met to fulfil the requirements for a good camouflage against modern sensors. In conventional camouflage design, the aimed design of the surface properties of an object is to spectrally match or adapt it to a background and thereby minimizing the contrast given by a specific threat sensor. Examples will be shown from measurements of some relevant materials and how they in different ways affect the polarimetric signature. Dimensioning properties relevant in an optical camouflage from a polarimetric perspective, such as degree of polarization, the viewing or incident angle, and amount of diffuse reflection, mainly in the infrared region, will be discussed.

  3. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  4. A cryogenic optical feedthrough using polarization maintaining fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M J; Collins, C J; Speake, C C

    2016-03-01

    Polarization maintaining optical fibers can be used to transmit linearly polarized light over long distances but their use in cryogenic environments has been limited by their sensitivity to temperature changes and associated mechanical stress. We investigate experimentally how thermal stresses affect the polarization maintaining fibers and model the observations with Jones matrices. We describe the design, construction, and testing of a feedthrough and fiber termination assembly that uses polarization maintaining fiber to transmit light from a 633 nm HeNe laser at room temperature to a homodyne polarization-based interferometer in a cryogenic vacuum. We report on the efficiency of the polarization maintaining properties of the feedthrough assembly. We also report that, at cryogenic temperatures, the interferometer can achieve a sensitivity of 8 × 10(-10) rad/√Hz at 0.05 Hz using this feedthrough.

  5. Polarization at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Studying Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence with Synchrotron Polarization Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Lazarian, Alex; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-07-01

    We test a new technique for studying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence suggested by Lazarian & Pogosyan, using synthetic observations of synchrotron polarization. This paper focuses on a one-point statistics, which is termed polarization frequency analysis, that is characterized by the variance of polarized emission as a function of the square of the wavelength along a single line of sight. We adopt the ratio η of the standard deviation of the line-of-sight turbulent magnetic field to the line-of-sight mean magnetic field to depict the level of turbulence. When this ratio is large (η \\gg 1), which characterizes a region dominated by turbulent field, or small (η ≲ 0.2), which characterizes a region dominated by the mean field, we obtain the polarization variance \\propto {λ }-2 or \\propto {λ }-2-2m, respectively. At small η, I.e., in the region dominated by the mean field, we successfully recover the turbulent spectral index from the polarization variance. We find that our simulations agree well with the theoretical prediction of Lazarian & Pogosyan. With existing and upcoming data cubes from the Low-Frequency Array for Radio Astronomy (LOFAR) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), this new technique can be applied to study the magnetic turbulence in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  7. Transfer of polarization from the initial to the final state in deep inelastic lepton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigi, I.I.Y.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested to look for reactions of the type polarized lepton+nucleon→polarized baryon+anything or lepton+polarized nucleon→polarized baryon+anything in the deep inelastic region. The observation of such a transfer of polarization from the initial to the final (hadronic) state could yield information on the underlying dynamics; it also offers the possibility to find clear signals for the production of ''new'' hadrons like charmed baryons. (author)

  8. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  9. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  10. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  11. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  12. Construction aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  13. FFTF constructibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, S.A.; Hulbert, D.I.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of the design criteria on the constructibility of the Fast Flux Test Facility is described. Specifically, the effects of requirements due to maintenance accessibility, inerting of cells, seismicity, codes, and standards are addressed. The design and construction techniques developed to minimize the impact of the design criteria on cost and schedule are presented with particular emphasis on the cleanliness and humidity controls imposed during construction of the sodium systems. (U.S.)

  14. Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Shohreh

    Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

  15. Polarization measurement in the COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, K; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Le Goff, J M; Magnon, A; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Matsuda, T

    2004-01-01

    Continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to determine the target polarization in the COMPASS experiment. The system is made of the so-called Liverpool Q-meters, Yale-cards, and VME modules for data taking and system controlling. In 2001 the NMR coils were embedded in the target material, while in 2002 and 2003 the coils were mounted on the outer surface of the target cells to increase the packing factor of the material. Though the error of the measurement became larger with the outer coils than with the inner coils, we have performed stable measurements throughout the COMPASS run time for 3 years. The maximum polarization was +57% and -53% as the average in the target cells.

  16. Polar Grid Navigation Algorithm for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheping; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Jiajia; Wang, Man

    2017-07-09

    To solve the unavailability of a traditional strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) for unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) in the polar region, a polar grid navigation algorithm for UUVs is proposed in this paper. Precise navigation is the basis for UUVs to complete missions. The rapid convergence of Earth meridians and the serious polar environment make it difficult to establish the true heading of the UUV at a particular instant. Traditional SINS and traditional representation of position are not suitable in the polar region. Due to the restrictions of the complex underwater conditions in the polar region, a SINS based on the grid frame with the assistance of the OCTANS and the Doppler velocity log (DVL) is chosen for a UUV navigating in the polar region. Data fusion of the integrated navigation system is realized by a modified fuzzy adaptive Kalman filter (MFAKF). By neglecting the negative terms, and using T-S fuzzy logic in the adaptive regulation of the noise covariance, the proposed filter algorithm can improve navigation accuracy. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the polar grid navigation algorithm can effectively navigate a UUV sailing in the polar region.

  17. Validity of the construct of Right-Wing Authoritarianism and its measure in post-socialistic region: A case of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chylíková, Johana; Buchtík, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2016) ISSN 2067-2640 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10320S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015060 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : authoritarianism * RWA Scale * Construct Validity Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography https://docs. google .com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxqcnNwb25lfGd4OjU3YmQ1YmM1MmVjM2RlNTc

  18. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  19. A Research of Construction Mechanism of Vassal State's City Group during Spring and Autumn Period Based on the Analyzation of Geographic Image - Take south region of Shandong as example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Li, B.; Zhou, X.

    2015-08-01

    Spring and Autumn period, the vassal states began to carry out country defense construction actively, brought changes to building the ideological. At that time, the south region of Shandong, as an independent unit of geography, seldom affected by external factors, and had striking cultural characteristics. Vassal states there constructed their capital mainly to defense the neighboring countries and cope with small scale mergers war, not involving the nationwide military deployment. Therefore, the region reflect the construction thought changes during the Spring and Autumn Period, and consistent with the research purpose. Based on this judgment, the author analyzed each capital's location and terrain feature by topographic map. In brief, the Spring and Autumn Period, feudal states acted of one's own free will, the relationship between cities contained the one within and between vassal states. Within vassal state relationships included economic support, entrenching each other and protecting the country together. Meanwhile, strategic defensing, scrambling for resources and geographical location comprised of the competition between vassal states. In the agrarian age, the political centers and agricultural areas were interdependent, giving priority to the development of political cities. Transformation of capitals' space layout was actually the process of carving up farming plains, the powerful states occupy favorable geographical position, and the small countries would be encroached and annexed gradually.

  20. A Research of Construction Mechanism of Vassal State’s City Group during Spring and Autumn Period Based on the Analyzation of Geographic Image – Take south region of Shandong as example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Gao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spring and Autumn period, the vassal states began to carry out country defense construction actively, brought changes to building the ideological. At that time, the south region of Shandong, as an independent unit of geography, seldom affected by external factors, and had striking cultural characteristics. Vassal states there constructed their capital mainly to defense the neighboring countries and cope with small scale mergers war, not involving the nationwide military deployment. Therefore, the region reflect the construction thought changes during the Spring and Autumn Period, and consistent with the research purpose. Based on this judgment, the author analyzed each capital’s location and terrain feature by topographic map. In brief, the Spring and Autumn Period, feudal states acted of one's own free will, the relationship between cities contained the one within and between vassal states. Within vassal state relationships included economic support, entrenching each other and protecting the country together. Meanwhile, strategic defensing, scrambling for resources and geographical location comprised of the competition between vassal states. In the agrarian age, the political centers and agricultural areas were interdependent, giving priority to the development of political cities. Transformation of capitals’ space layout was actually the process of carving up farming plains, the powerful states occupy favorable geographical position, and the small countries would be encroached and annexed gradually.

  1. Using remote sensing data to predict road fill areas and areas affected by fill erosion with planned forest road construction: a case study in Kastamonu Regional Forest Directorate (Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricak, Burak

    2015-07-01

    Forest roads are essential for transport in managed forests, yet road construction causes environmental disturbance, both in the surface area the road covers and in erosion and downslope deposition of road fill material. The factors affecting the deposition distance of eroded road fill are the slope gradient and the density of plant cover. Thus, it is important to take these factors into consideration during road planning to minimize their disturbance. The aim of this study was to use remote sensing and field surveying to predict the locations that would be affected by downslope deposition of eroding road fill and to compile the data into a geographic information system (GIS) database. The construction of 99,500 m of forest roads is proposed for the Kastamonu Regional Forest Directorate in Turkey. Using GeoEye satellite images and a digital elevation model (DEM) for the region, the location and extent of downslope deposition of road fill were determined for the roads as planned. It was found that if the proposed roads were constructed by excavators, the fill material would cover 910,621 m(2) and the affected surface area would be 1,302,740 m(2). Application of the method used here can minimize the adverse effects of forest roads.

  2. Linear polarization observations of some X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhovskoy, N.M.; Efimov, Yu.S.

    1975-01-01

    Multicolour linear polarization of optical radiation of the X-ray sources Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, Cyg X-1 and Her X-1 was measured at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in 1970-1973. These observations indicate that polarization of Sco X-1 in the ultraviolet, blue and red spectral regions appears to be variable. No statistically significant variations of polarization were found for the other three sources observed. (Auth.)

  3. The polarized double cell target of the SMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; Adeva, B.; Arik, E.; Arvidson, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballintijn, M.K.; Bardin, G.; Baum, G.; Berglund, P.; Betev, L.; Bird, I.G.; Birsa, R.; Bjoerkholm, P.; Bonner, B.E.; Botton, N. de; Boutemeur, M.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Bueltmann, S.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Crabb, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar, T.; Torre, S. Dalla; Dantzig, R. van; Derro, B.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Dulya, C.; Dyring, A.; Eichblatt, S.; Faivre, J.C.; Fasching, D.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandez, C.; Forthmann, S.; Frois, B.; Gallas, A.; Garzon, J.A.; Gaussiran, T.; Gilly, H.; Giorgi, M.; Goeler, E. von; Goertz, S.; Gracia, G.; Groot, N. de; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Guelmez, E.; Haft, K.; Harrach, D. von; Hasegawa, T.; Hautle, P.; Hayashi, N.; Heusch, C.A.; Horikawa, N.; Hughes, V.W.; Igo, G.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kabuss, E.M.; Kageya, T.; Karev, A.; Kessler, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; Kiryluk, J.; Kishi, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klostermann, L.; Kraemer, D.; Krivokhijine, V.; Kroeger, W.; Kurek, K.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Lamanna, M.; Landgraf, U.; Layda, T.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lindqvist, T.; Litmaath, M.; Lowe, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marie, F.; Martin, A.; Martino, J.; Matsuda, T.; Mayes, B.; McCarthy, J.S.; Medved, K.; Meyer, W.; Middelkoop, G. van; Miller, D.; Miyachi, Y.; Mori, K.; Moromisato, J.; Nassalski, J.; Naumann, L.; Neganov, B.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Oberski, J.E.J.; Ogawa, A.; Ozben, C.; Parks, D.P.; Pereira, H.; Penzo, A.; Perrot-Kunne, F.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piegaia, R.; Pinsky, L.; Platchkov, S.; Plo, M.; Pose, D.; Postma, H. E-mail: hpostma@dataweb.nl; Pretz, J.; Pussieux, T.; Pyrlik, J.; Raedel, G.; Reyhancan, I.; Reicherz, G.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.; Roberts, J.B.; Rock, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Rondio, E.; Rosado, A.; Roscherr, B.; Sabo, I.; Saborido, J.; Sandacz, A.; Savin, I.; Schiavon, P.; Schiller, A.; Schueler, K.P.; Segel, R.; Seitz, R.; Semertzidis, Y.; Sever, F.; Shanahan, P.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simeoni, F. [and others

    1999-11-11

    The polarized target of the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN was used for deep inelastic muon scattering experiments during 1993-1996 with a polarized muon beam to investigate the spin structure of the nucleon. Most of the experiments were carried out with longitudinal target polarization and 190 GeV muons, and some were done with transverse polarization and 100 GeV muons. Protons as well as deuterons were polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in three kinds of solid materials -- butanol, ammonia, and deuterated butanol -- with maximum degrees of polarization of 94%, 91% and 60%, respectively. Considerable attention was paid to the accuracies of the NMR polarization measurements and their analyses, the accuracies achieved were between 2.0% and 3.2%. The SMC target system with two cells of opposite polarizations, each cell 65 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, constitutes the largest polarized target system ever built and facilitates accurate spin asymmetry measurements. The design considerations, construction and performance of the target are reviewed.

  4. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  5. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  6. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  7. Towards a general scenario for spring sublimation of volatiles in the South Polar Regions of Mars: insights from MRO high-resolution observations by HiRISE and CRISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommerol, Antoine; Portyankina, Ganna; Thomas, Nicolas; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Vincendon, Mathieu; Langevin, Yves

    The sublimation of the seasonal deposits of volatiles during Martian spring results in strong temporal variations of the appearance of the southern Polar Regions terrains. The intense dust and CO2 jet-like activity [1] is the most spectacular manifestation of these processes. The high spatial resolution capabilities of the MRO instruments now offer the possibility of new analyses at an unprecedented level of detail. Results from the analyses of HiRISE images as well as complementary work on the physical modeling of the involved processes have recently been published [2,3,4]. We are now completing this work by extending the number of regions of interest and by including CRISM spectral information in our analyses. We have derived the temporal evolution of albedo during spring in ten different areas from the HiRISE and CRISM datasets. In addition, the evolution of the strengths of the CO2-and H2O-ice spectral features are extracted from the CRISM observations. The color imaging capabilities of HiRISE were extensively used to discriminate the different terrains. Composite color images built from spectra measured by CRISM in the visible spectral range provide the ideal context for the HiRISE images. Together, our observations allow us to propose a plausible scenario for the progressive subli-mation of the volatiles deposits that involves a succession of three steps characterized by the predominance of different processes. This updates and enhances the previous work of [5]. First, an intense and early episode of jet activity results in the deposition of large dust fans accom-panied by the condensation of fined grained CO2 frost. In an apparent contradiction with the "Kieffer model" [5], we do not observe the spectral signature of the hypothetical clean slab of CO2-ice at that time. The clean ice is hidden by a quasi-homogeneous layer that is highly contaminated by mineral dust, as already revealed by the OMEGA instrument [6]. We propose a hypothesis to bypass this

  8. Research on Copy-Move Image Forgery Detection Using Features of Discrete Polar Complex Exponential Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yanfen; Zhong, Junliu

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of sophisticated photo-editing software, such as Photoshop, copy-move image forgery operation has been widely applied and has become a major concern in the field of information security in the modern society. A lot of work on detecting this kind of forgery has gained great achievements, but the detection results of geometrical transformations of copy-move regions are not so satisfactory. In this paper, a new method based on the Polar Complex Exponential Transform is proposed. This method addresses issues in image geometric moment, focusing on constructing rotation invariant moment and extracting features of the rotation invariant moment. In order to reduce rounding errors of the transform from the Polar coordinate system to the Cartesian coordinate system, a new transformation method is presented and discussed in detail at the same time. The new method constructs a 9 × 9 shrunk template to transform the Cartesian coordinate system back to the Polar coordinate system. It can reduce transform errors to a much greater degree. Forgery detection, such as copy-move image forgery detection, is a difficult procedure, but experiments prove our method is a great improvement in detecting and identifying forgery images affected by the rotated transform.

  9. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  10. Construction fraud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, J.J.; Liedekerke, L.; Dubbink, W.; van Liedekerke, L.; van Luijk, H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the actions of a whistleblower The Netherlands was confronted with a massive case of construction fraud involving almost the entire construction sector. Price fixing, prior consulting, duplicate accounts, fictitious invoices and active corruption of civil servants were rampant practices. This

  11. Superstring construction

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    The book includes a selection of papers on the construction of superstring theories, mainly written during the years 1984-1987. It covers ten-dimensional supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric strings, four-dimensional heterotic strings and four-dimensional type-II strings. An introduction to more recent developments in conformal field theory in relation to string construction is provided.

  12. Usability Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Clemmesen, Torkil; Hornbæk, Kasper Anders Søren

    2007-01-01

    frustrating systems are experienced similarly to easy-to-use systems. Looking at the most characteristic construct for each participant we find that Chinese participants use constructs related to security, task types, training, and system issues, whereas Danish and to some extent Indian participants make more...

  13. Hsp Polarization Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    This proposal defines the procedure for determining the instrumental polarization of the polarimetric IDT (IDT#1, POL) on the HSP. 1 of 2 unpolarized standard stars wil be observed using various filter-polarizer combinations. These observations will permit the instrumental polarization to be calibrated. The instrumental polarization must be determined to a high precision in order to vectoriallly remove it from HSP polarization observations to determine the actual astronomical polarization. Final run of proposal will look at one of 2 possible stars previously observed to get another look at the throughput. Revision History: Mark H. Slovak 8/30/88 Translated to V2 proposal instructions (RPSS V6.2) S. Laurent 1/20/89 Updated: Sally Laurent 2/24/89, 3/20/89, 4/13/89, 5/12/89 Modified: P. Stanley 1/15/90 - change to use CTA selected targets only; Fixes for aberration problem - SALM 7/30/90; Based on SV/HSP 1386. New submission changed targets and revised scheduling strategy. Revised: 26 Aug 92 J. Dolan, L. Walter, P. Reppert want to re-run the proposal (3985) one last time to bring down errors.

  14. Multiband Circular Polarizer Based on Fission Transmission of Linearly Polarized Wave for X-Band Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ali Mangi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiband circular polarizer based on fission transmission of linearly polarized wave for x-band application is proposed, which is constructed of 2 × 2 metallic strips array. The linear-to-circular polarization conversion is obtained by decomposing the linearly incident x-polarized wave into two orthogonal vector components of equal amplitude and 90° phase difference between them. The innovative approach of “fission transmission of linear-to-circular polarized wave” is firstly introduced to obtain giant circular dichroism based on decomposition of orthogonal vector components through the structure. It means that the incident linearly polarized wave is converted into two orthogonal components through lower printed metallic strips layer and two transmitted waves impinge on the upper printed strips layer to convert into four orthogonal vector components at the end of structure. This projection and transmission sequence of orthogonal components sustain the chain transmission of electromagnetic wave and can achieve giant circular dichroism. Theoretical analysis and microwave experiments are presented to validate the performance of the structure. The measured results are in good agreement with simulation results. In addition, the proposed circular polarizer exhibits the optimal performance with respect to the normal incidence. The right handed circularly polarized wave is emitted ranging from 10.08 GHz to 10.53 GHz and 10.78 GHz to 11.12 GHz, while the left handed circular polarized wave is excited at 10.54 GHz–10.70 GHz and 11.13 GHz–11.14 GHz, respectively.

  15. Construction and performance study of the new Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors for future upgrades of the CMS muon high rate region at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fallavollita, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We have tested a new type position-sensitive gaseous proportional detector, called the Fast Timing Micropattern (FTM) detector, based on advanced printed circuit board technology, for fast timing applications. The construction feasibility has been demonstrated by building a first working prototype. We expect that this technique can be exploited for applications in high energy physics experiments, particularly for upgrades at LHC where sub nanosecond time resolutions are critical for particle identification and vertex separation. Other applications include X-ray diffraction studies and fast time-resolved measurements offer excellent medical imaging opportunities. In combination with an X-ray convertor and FTM and a visible photocathode shows great promise for use in digital mammography. Other applications include X-ray astronomy by exploiting time resolution of the FTM and selective sensitivity to soft X-rays.

  16. Coherent ρ production from polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.; Sargsian, M.; Sargsian, M.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the coherent leptoproduction of vector mesons from polarized deuterium as a tool to investigate the evolution of small size quark-gluon configurations. Kinematic regions are determined where the final state interaction of the initially produced quark-gluon wave packet contributes dominantly to the production cross section. Two methods for an investigation of color coherence effects are suggested. (author)

  17. Energy conversion evolution at lunar polar sites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cating the use of polar regions, with or without the putative ice resource, as preferred base locations. (Burke 1978, 1995) primarily because of their more favorable thermal environments. Now this prospect. Keywords. Energy generation; solar energy; electric power; lunar environment. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 114, No. 6, December ...

  18. Energy conversion evolution at lunar polar sites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lunar polar environments have many advantages from the standpoint of energy supply to robotic and human surface bases.Sunlight is nearly continuous and always horizontal at peaks of perpetual light,while waste heat rejection is aided by the existence of cold,permanently shadowed regions nearby.In this paper a ...

  19. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Wigwamma spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.; Heldal, Mikal

    2013-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose of provi...... appearance of the coccolith armour of the cell...

  20. Clientalism and polarized voting: empirical evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gërxhani, K.; Schram, A.

    2009-01-01

    One must take country-specific institutional features into account when analyzing former communist countries’ transformation process to new political institutions. We do so for post-communist Albania, where the regional and cultural polarization that has existed for centuries has evolved to

  1. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Everett, M J; Featherstone, J D B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Sathyam, U S.

    1999-01-01

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattering coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions

  2. Analysis of world experience in constructing underground small nuclear power plants and assessment of its potential use in the Russian Arctic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Yu. G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the common ideology and main idea of locating underground nuclear plants. Specific examples in domestic and foreign experience have been analyzed. It has been established that underground small nuclear power plants can be used as an alternative source of electric and thermal energy for solving defense-strategic and social-economic tasks particularly when developing mineral raw material resources in the Russian Arctic regions

  3. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  4. Spin polarization of electrons in a magnetic impurity doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A theoretical model is presented in this paper for degree of spin polarization in a light emitting diode (LED) whose epitaxial region contains quantum dots doped with magnetic impurity. The model is then used to investigate the effect of electron–phonon interaction on degree of spin polarization at different ...

  5. Spin polarization of electrons in a magnetic impurity doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A theoretical model is presented in this paper for degree of spin polarization in alight emitting diode (LED) whose epitaxial region contains quantum dots doped with magnetic impurity. The model is then used to investigate the effect of electron–phonon interaction on degree of spin polarization at different temperatures and ...

  6. Experiment on the melting pressure of spin polarized He3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapellier, M.; Olsen, M.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg

    1981-01-01

    In liquid He in a Pomeranchuk cell, the melting curve has been observed to be suppressed, presumably in regions with a strong local spin polarization. In the temperature range 30-50 mK the observed suppression was 60-80 kPa. The corresponding local polarization is estimated, in a crude model, to ...

  7. US Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat. part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo)

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2000-01-01

    Photo 01 : September 2000 - Mr Bill Richardson, Secretary of Energy, United States of America (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat, part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo); with l. to r. Dr Mildred Dresselhaus, Dr Carlo Wyss, CERN Director General, Profesor Luciano Maiani, Professor Roger Cashmore, Ambassador George Moose, Dr Peter Rosen, Dr John Ellis. Photo 02 : Mr. Bill Richardson (right), Secretary of Energy United States of America with Prof. Luciano Maiani leaning over one of the LHC magnets produced at Fermilab during his visit to CERN on 16th September 2000.

  8. Hybrid Streamers for Polar Seismic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, C. M.; Agah, A.; Tsoflias, G. P.

    2006-12-01

    We propose a new hybrid streamer seismic approach for polar regions that incorporates insertion of spiked geophones, the land streamer method of transportation, and mobile robotics. Current land streamers do not plant the geophone spike at each node location on the streamer(s) nor use robotic control. This approach combines the two methods, and is therefore termed "Hybrid Streamers". Land seismic 3D surveying is costly and time consuming due to manual handling of geophones and cables. Multiple streamers make this process simpler by allowing efficient deployment of large numbers of geophones. Hybrid streamers go further to robotically insert the geophone spike at each node location to achieve higher frequency and better resolution seismic images. For deployment and retrieval, the geophone spikes are drilled into the ground, or inserted using heat. This can be accomplished by modifying the geophone spike to be similar to a threaded screw or similar to a soldering iron for polar environments. Heat could help melt the ice during deployment, which would refreeze around the geophone for firm coupling. Heat could also be used to make polar geophone retrieval easier. By ensuring that the towing robots are robust and effective, the problem of single point of failure can be less of an issue. Polar rovers have proven useful in harsh environments, and could be utilized in polar seismic applications. Towing geophone nodes in a tethered fashion not only provides all nodes with power to operate the onboard equipment, but also gives them a medium to transfer data to the towing rover. Hybrid streamers could be used in several ways. One or more hybrid streamers could be tethered and towed by a single robot. Several robots could be used to form a single grid, working in conjunction to image larger areas in three dimensions. Such an approach could speed up entire missions and make efficient use of seismic source ignitions. The reduction of human involvement by use of mobile robots

  9. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  10. Visualization of polarization state and its application in optics classroom teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bing; Liu, Wei; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wei; Yao, Tianfu; Liu, Shugang

    2017-08-01

    Polarization of light and the related knowledge are key and difficult points in optical teaching, and they are difficult to be understood since they are very abstract concepts. To help students understand the polarization properties of light, some classroom demonstration experiments have been constructed by employing the optical source, polarizers, wave plates optical cage system and polarization axis finder (PAF). The PAF is a polarization indicating device with many linear polarizing components concentric circles, which can visualize the polarization axis's direction of linearly polarized light intuitively. With the help of these demonstration experiment systems, the conversion and difference between the linear polarized light and circularly polarized light have been observed directly by inserting or removing a quarter-wave plate. The rotation phenomenon of linearly polarized light's polarization axis when it propagates through an optical active medium has been observed and studied in experiment, and the strain distribution of some mounted and unmounted lenses have also been demonstrated and observed in experiment conveniently. Furthermore, some typical polarization targets, such as liquid crystal display (LCD), polarized dark glass and skylight, have been observed based on PAF, which is quite suitable to help students understand these targets' polarization properties and the related physical laws. Finally, these demonstration experimental systems have been employed in classroom teaching of our university in physical optics, optoelectronics and photoelectric detection courses, and they are very popular with teachers and students.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  12. CHROMOSPHERIC POLARIZATION IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC SOLAR OXYGEN INFRARED TRIPLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, Tanausú; Trujillo Bueno, Javier [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-07-20

    We present multilevel radiative transfer modeling of the scattering polarization observed in the solar O i infrared triplet around 777 nm. We demonstrate that the scattering polarization pattern observed on the solar disk forms in the chromosphere, far above the photospheric region where the bulk of the emergent intensity profiles originate. We investigate the sensitivity of the polarization pattern to the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere and to the presence of weak magnetic fields (10{sup −2}–100 G) through the Hanle effect, showing that the scattering polarization signals of the oxygen infrared triplet encode information on the magnetism of the solar chromosphere.

  13. Polarization coupling of vector Bessel–Gaussian beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Ryushi; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    We report polarization coupling of radial and azimuthal electric field components of a vector light beam as predicted by the fact that the vector Helmholtz equation is expressed as coupled differential equations in cylindrical coordinates. To clearly observe the polarization variation of a beam as it propagates, higher order transverse modes of a vector Bessel–Gaussian beam were generated by a gain distribution modulation technique, which created a narrow ring-shaped gain region in a Nd:YVO 4 crystal. The polarization coupling was confirmed by the observation that the major polarization component of a vector Bessel–Gaussian beam alternates between radial and azimuthal components along with the propagation. (paper)

  14. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  15. Polarized electrons at Jefferson laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously. Initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented

  16. Assessing the influence of artificially constructed channels in the growth of afforested black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) within an arid coastal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Verdugo, F; Zebadua-Penagos, F; Flores-de-Santiago, F

    2015-09-01

    Hypersaline conditions are common in sub-tropical latitudes where freshwater availability is seasonal. Hence, hydroperiod plays a crucial role in providing a suitable area for the establishment of new mangrove seedlings. The purpose of this study was to assess the function of hydrological change and irradiance in the growth of afforested black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) along the upper saltpan area by creating six channels of 1 m wide by 0.3 deep and 30 m length. All channels were constructed perpendicular to the main coastline of the Urias lagoon, Pacific coast of Mexico. Seedlings of black mangrove were planted along four of the channels. After ten months, the pore-water salinity concentration within the six channels was reduced by half. Results indicate that there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in mangrove survival among the channels. However, the optimal growth of black mangroves was near the channels edge. The growth of mangrove seedlings planted under 50% of solar attenuation was 10 times higher as compared to mangroves under direct sunlight. This study shows the feasibility of using channels to enhance tidal flow and decrease hypersaline conditions for future afforestation endeavors in arid coastlines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Participatory Construction of Agro-Ecological Knowledge As A Soil Conservation Strategy In The Mountain Region of Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Assis Renato Linhares

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture in the mountain region of Rio de Janeiro State is characterized by intensive soil use and input. Such mountainous environments are vulnerable to climate events; thus, the current article presents a report on methods applied to exchange academic and traditional knowledge. The aim is to expand farmers’ perception about the need of implementing agro-ecological practices, mainly soil management practices, which are important for agricultural sustainability in mountainous environments. The study was conducted in a Nova Friburgo family production unit, in the mountain region of Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil. It consisted of implementing three observation and soil organic-matter management units. The idea was to reduce the incidence of clubroot of crucifers disease caused by Plasmidiophora brassicae. The soil fauna was discussed with local farmers, with emphasis on the association between ecological processes and soil management. The present study improved the discussion with farmers and the need of introducing other innovative conservation practices such as no-tillage system and participatory research based on agro-ecological propositions.

  18. Worldwide construction