WorldWideScience

Sample records for polar radiation environments

  1. Deterministic and stochastic methods of calculation of polarization characteristics of radiation in natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelkov, S. A.; Sushkevich, T. A.; Maksakova, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    We are talking about russian achievements of the world level in the theory of radiation transfer, taking into account its polarization in natural media and the current scientific potential developing in Russia, which adequately provides the methodological basis for theoretically-calculated research of radiation processes and radiation fields in natural media using supercomputers and mass parallelism. A new version of the matrix transfer operator is proposed for solving problems of polarized radiation transfer in heterogeneous media by the method of influence functions, when deterministic and stochastic methods can be combined.

  2. Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Shohreh

    Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

  3. Ionizing radiation in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandl, J.; Petr, I.

    1988-01-01

    The basic terms are explained such as the atom, radioactivity, nuclear reaction, interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, etc. The basic dosimetric variables and units and properties of radionuclides and ionizing radiation are given. Natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation are discussed with regard to the environment and the propagation and migration of radionuclides is described in the environment to man. The impact is explained of ionizing radiation on the cell and the somatic and genetic effects of radiation on man are outlined. Attention is devoted to protection against ionizing radiation and to radiation limits, also to the detection, dosimetry and monitoring of ionizing radiation in the environment. (M.D.). 92 figs., 40 tabs. 74 refs

  4. Natural radiation environment III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity

  5. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280-320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  6. Radiation environment at Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, M.A.R.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear facilities located at Kalpakkam in Tamil Nadu State of India include at present nuclear power reactors, a fast breeder reactor, a nuclear research centre and a waste management facility. Active wastes generated at the site are collected, treated and safely disposed. High-level wastes are stored underground in RCC trenches and tile hole and low-level wastes in the from of liquid effluents are discharged into the sea. Off-gases are dispersed through stacks in the atmosphere. Environmental survey laboratory established at the site in 1974 carries out radiation surveillance of the environment, evaluates radiological impacts on environment and public, and assesses radiation exposure of the population. It is observed that even after five years of operation of the nuclear power station, radioactivity and radiation levels in the environment have virtually remained at the pre-operational levels. (M.G.B.). 14 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Natural radiation environment III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 57 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978 at Houston, Texas. This symposium provided a common forum for scientists in several disciplines that deal with natural radiation because there is an increasing interest in the environment as it pertains to human health and the competition for scarce energy and material resources

  8. Radiation Environment of Phobos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Clark, John H.; Sturner, Steven J.; Stubbs, Timothy; Wang, Yongli; Glenar, David A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Joyce, Colin J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Farrell, William M.

    2017-10-01

    The innermost Martian moon Phobos is a potential way station for the human exploration of Mars and the solar system beyond the orbit of Mars. It has a similar radiation environment to that at 1 AU for hot plasma and more energetic particles from solar, heliospheric and galactic sources. In the past two decades there have been many spacecraft measurements at 1 AU, and occasionally in the Mars orbital region around the Sun, that can be used to define a reference model for the time-averaged and time-variable radiation environments at Mars and Phobos. Yearly to hourly variance comes from the eleven-year solar activity cycle and its impact on solar energetic, heliospheric, and solar-modulated galactic cosmic ray particles. We report progress on compilation of the reference model from U.S. and international spacecraft data sources of the NASA Space Physics Data Facility and the Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO), and from tissue-equivalent dosage rate measurements by the CRaTER instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Observer spacecraft now in lunar orbit. Similar dosage rate data are also available from the Mars surface via the NASA Planetary Data System archive from the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. The sub-Mars surface hemisphere of Phobos is slightly blocked from energetic particle irradiation by the body of Mars but there is a greater global variance of interplanetary radiation exposure as we have calculated from the known topography of this irregularly shaped moon. Phobos receives a relatively small flux of secondary radiation from galactic cosmic ray interactions with the Mars surface and atmosphere, and at plasma energies from pickup ions escaping out of the Mars atmosphere. The greater secondary radiation source is from cosmic ray interactions with the moon surface, which we have simulated with the GEANT radiation transport code for various cases of the surface regolith

  9. Radiation Environment Inside Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Patrick O'Neill, NASA Johnson Space Center, will present a detailed description of the radiation environment inside spacecraft. The free space (outside) solar and galactic cosmic ray and trapped Van Allen belt proton spectra are significantly modified as these ions propagate through various thicknesses of spacecraft structure and shielding material. In addition to energy loss, secondary ions are created as the ions interact with the structure materials. Nuclear interaction codes (FLUKA, GEANT4, HZTRAN, MCNPX, CEM03, and PHITS) transport free space spectra through different thicknesses of various materials. These "inside" energy spectra are then converted to Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra and dose rate - that's what's needed by electronics systems designers. Model predictions are compared to radiation measurements made by instruments such as the Intra-Vehicular Charged Particle Directional Spectrometer (IV-CPDS) used inside the Space Station, Orion, and Space Shuttle.

  10. Polarization of the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubin, P.M.

    1980-03-01

    The results and technique of a measurement of the linear polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation are discussed. The ground-based experiment utilizes a single horn (7 0 beam width) Dicke-type microwave polarimeter operating at 33 GHz (9.1 mm). Data taken between May 1978 and February 1980 from both the northern hemisphere (Berkeley Lat. = 38 0 N) and the southern hemisphere (Lima Lat. = 12 0 S) show the radiation to be essentially unpolarized over all areas surveyed. For the 38 0 declination data the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component is 0.3 mK for the average and 12 and 24 hour periods. Fitting all data gives the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component of 0.3 mK for spherical harmonics through third order. Constraints on various cosmological models are discussed in light of these limits

  11. Radiation in living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, R.

    1991-01-01

    Aside from the atomic bomb attacks in 1945, the experience of radioactive contamination of human environment was the exposure of a tuna fishing boat to the radioactive fallout of a hydrogen bomb test explosion at Bikini atoll in March, 1954. Thereafter, radioactivity was frequently detected in fishes in central Pacific Ocean. Radioactivity was also detected in rain, which resulted in the contamination of agricultural products. Due to the great concern of general public for the radioactivity in food materials, the government initiated the national program of radioactivity surveillance. Since then, the fallout radioactivity due to nuclear test explosions was the main object surveillance in 1950s and 1960s, but the program was gradually expanded to include natural radiation, the artificial radioactivity due to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and other special programs. The history of the radioactive contamination of environment, natural radiation, medical exposure, the radioactive fallout due to nuclear tests, nuclear power generation and the Chernobyl accident are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Pulsar radiation as polarized shot noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar radiation can be resonably modeled as amplitude-modulated shot noise for which the amplitude modulations correspond to the subpulses and micropulses that comprise the structure of single pulses. The shot noise fluctuates on nanosecond time scales and therefore has a bandwidth typical of pulsars, namely, 1-10 GHz. If curvature radiation from bunches of coherently radiating particles is the relevant radiation mechanism, then the radiation from a single bunch corresponds to a shot pulse; such a physical interpretation is not crucial to the validity of the shot noise model, however. We calculate some statistics of the corresponding signal in a narrow-band receiver system, an informative one being the intensity modulation index of the narrow-band noise from which it can be determined whether or not the noise has Gaussian statistics. Departures from Gaussian statistics can occur if intensity variations are due primarily to changes in the number of particles radiating coherently at any instant. If the temporal density of shot pulses is sufficiently high, however, only Gaussian statistics will be observed, meaning that extensive incoherent addition occurs in the generation and the propagation of the radiation.The first and second moments of the Stokes parameters of narrow-band signals are derived for both time-independent and time-variable polarization. It is shown how the polarization properties of short time scale structure can be determined from the autocorrelation functions of the Stokes parameters

  13. Remote sensing of aerosol and marine parameters in coastal environments: Exploring the advantage of using polarized radiative transfer simulations of the coupled atmosphere-water system to analyze ocean color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamnes, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface properties by means of inverse techniques based on a coupled atmosphere-surface radiative transfer model (CRTM) and optimal estimation can yield a considerable improvement in retrieval accuracy based on radiances measured by MERIS, MODIS, and similar instruments compared with traditional methods. There are uniqueness problems associated with photometric remote sensing measurements (like MERIS/MODIS) that ignore polarization effects, and rely on measuring only the radiance. Use of polarization measurements is particularly important for absorbing aerosols over coastal waters as well as over bright targets such as snow-covered and bare sea ice, where it has proved difficult to retrieve aerosol single-scattering albedo from radiance-only spectrometers such as MERIS and MODIS. We use a vector radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere-surface system in conjunction with an optimal estimation/Levenberg-Marquardt method to quantify how polarization measurements can be used to overcome the uniqueness problems associated with radiance-only retrieval of aerosol parameters. However, this study also indicates that even for existing instruments like MERIS and MODIS and future instrument like OLCI, that measure radiance-only, use of a polarized CRTM as a forward model in the optimal estimation can lead to significant enhancement of retrieval capabilities, and facilitate simultaneous retrieval of absorbing aerosols and marine parameters in turbid coastal environments.

  14. Polarized radiation in magnetic white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosi, L.A.; Zimmerman, R.L.; Kemp, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    A model for magnetic white dwarfs is proposed which attributes the partially polarized light to synchrotron radiation. The source of the radiation is relativistic electrons trapped in the magnetosphere of a white dwarf. The white dwarf's magnetic field is assumed to be dipolar. The Stokes parameters for the synchrotron radiation are tabulated as a function of frequency, observer's orientation, and energy and spatial distribution of the relativistic electrons. The results of the synchrotron calculations are applied to the polarization observations of Grw+70degree8247 and DQ Herculis. This model can account for the major features of the polarized radiation coming from these two magnetic white dwarfs. The calculations predict for Grw+70degree8247 that the surface magnetic field is B/sub s/approximately-less-than4 x 10 6 gauss, that the incident viewing angle is 45degreeapproximately-less-thantheta 0 approximately-less-than75degree, and that the electrons are trapped with nearly an isotropic distribution about the white dwarf. For DQ Herculis the surface magnetic field is B/sub s/approximately-less-than7 x 10 6 gauss and the trapped electrons are confined to a dislike region about the white dwarf. For both cases the density of electrons in the magnetosphere falls in the range of 10 5 approximately-less-thannapproximately-less-than10 7 cm -3 with energies of about 4--35 MeV

  15. Space Flight Ionizing Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The space-flight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth's surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.

  16. Natural radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The speaker discusses natural radiation in the environment. He outlines the external sources of exposure (cosmic and terrestrial), as well as the internal sources (ingestion and inhalation). He states that a clear understanding of these sources and their impacts is necessary in order to properly evaluate both the environment and human radiation exposure

  17. The Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission

    CERN Document Server

    André, Philippe; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J.A.P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford; Cabrera, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM

  18. Coherent scattering of electromagnetic radiation by a polarized particle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agre, M.Ya.; Rapoport, L.P.

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of the theory of coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves by a polarized atom or molecular system. Peculiarities of the angular distribution and polarization peculiarities of scattered radiation are discussed

  19. Radiation, people and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.

    2004-02-01

    Radiation is a fact of life. We live in a world in which radiation is naturally present everywhere. Light and heat from nuclear reactions in the Sun are essential to our existence. Radioactive materials occur naturally throughout the environment, and our bodies contain radioactive materials such as carbon-14, potassium-40 and polonium-210 quite naturally. All life on Earth has evolved in the presence of this radiation. Since the discovery of X rays and radioactivity more than 100 years ago, we have found ways of producing radiation and radioactive materials artificially. The first use of X rays was in medical diagnosis, within six months of their discovery in 1895. So a benefit from the use of radiation was established very early on, but equally some of the potential dangers of radiation became apparent in the doctors and surgeons who unwittingly overexposed themselves to X rays in the early 1900s. Since then, many different applications of radiation and radioactive materials have been developed. We can classify radiation according to the effects it produces on matter, into ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation includes cosmic rays, X rays and the radiation from radioactive materials. Non-ionizing radiation includes ultraviolet light, radiant heat, radio waves and microwaves. This book deals with ionizing radiation, a term, which for simplicity, is often shortened to just radiation. It has been prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom) as a broad overview of the subject of ionizing radiation, its effects and uses, as well as the measures in place to use it safely. As the United Nations agency for nuclear science and its peaceful applications, the IAEA offers a broad spectrum of expertise and programmes to foster the safe use of radiation internationally

  20. Spin polarization in quantum dots by radiation field with circular polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgakov, E N

    2001-01-01

    For circular quantum dot (QD) with account of the Razhba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) an exact energy spectrum is obtained. For the small SOI constant the Eigen functions of the QD are found. It is shown that application of radiation field with circular polarization lifts the Kramers degeneracy of the Eigen states of the QD. Effective spin polarization of transmitted electrons through the QD by radiation field with circular polarization is demonstrated

  1. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, F.

    1998-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activities is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally ''clean'' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed: i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  2. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    1999-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activity is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally 'clean' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed. (i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. (ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  3. Cleaner Environment Through Radiation Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radioisotopes and radiation based technologies are widely used in a huge variety of industries to improve efficiency, enhance quality, optimize processes, achieve high performance materials, increase safety, for trouble shooting and so on. Many such applications are not known even to professionals with scientific background. This presentation is aimed at outlining some of these technologies which influence our daily life and contribute to better quality of life. In particular, the role of radiation based techniques in providing better environment through mitigation pollutants in industrial effluents as well as being a clean technology will be highlighted. (author)

  4. Polarization of photoelectrons produced from atoms by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, V.W.; Lu, D.C.; Huang, K.N.

    1981-01-01

    The polarization of photoelectrons from stoms has proved to be an important tool for studying correlation effects in atoms, as well as relativistic effects such as the spin-orbit interaction. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies have been made of the Fano effect, which is the production of polarized electrons by photoionization of unpolarized atoms by circularly polarized light. The experiments have dealt mostly with alkali atoms and with photon energies slightly above the ionization thresholds. Measurements that could be made to utilize polarized radiation are discussed

  5. Frequency and Polarization Diversity Jamming of Communications in Urban Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ulama, Tuncay

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate how to exploit frequency and polarization techniques in reducing the effects of jamming against UAV relay communication links in an urban warfare environment...

  6. Radiation effects in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  7. Proceeding of Radiation Safety and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Scientific Presentation of Radiation Safety and Environment was held on 20-21 august 1996 at Center of Research Atomic Energy Pasar Jum'at, Jakarta, Indonesia. Have presented 50 papers about Radiation Safety, dosimetry and standardization, environment protection and radiation effect

  8. The Martian Energetic Radiation Environment Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Patrícia; Keating, Ana; Truscott, Pete; Lei, Fan; Desorgher, Laurent; Heynderickx, Daniel; Crosby, Norma Bock; Nieminen, Petteri; Santin, Giovanni

    The Martian Energetic Radiation Environment Models The high energy ionising radiation environment in the solar system consists of three main sources: the planetary radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles. Future Mars missions potentially carry significant risk from long-term exposure to ionising radiation. The Martian Energetic Radiation Environment Models, MEREM, were developed in order to simulate the Martian radiation environment. The models, eMEREM and dMEREM, respec-tively engineering and detailed Martian Energetic Radiation Environment Models, are based on the Geant4 and FLUKA radiation transport programs, combined with Mars Climate Database model for the atmosphere. MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data and gamma-ray spec-trometer data have been used to define surface topology and surface composition (including presence of water), respectively. Although the models are capable of operating on standalone mode, a SPENVIS (space envi-ronment information system) compatible, web-based user interface was developed to provide an integrated environment to predict the Martian radiation and greatly simplify the operation of the software by non-experts and by future mission developers. Results of the Mars Energetic Radiation Environment Models concerning the estimate of effec-tive doses and ambient dose equivalents for potential Martian landing sites having regard to the combined incidence, under solar minimum and solar maximum conditions, of flare related particle radiation and background galactic cosmic ray radiation are presented.

  9. Radiative capture of polarized neutrons by aluminium and manganese nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This investigation treats the angular dependence of the intensity and of the circular polarization of gamma-radiation, that is emitted after capture of polarized neutrons by polarized and unpolarized targets. Interference effects between the (n,γ)-reaction amplitudes with different channel spin are discussed and angular distribution coefficients are calculated in case mixing of dipole and quadrupole radiation occurs. It is indicated how the influence of p-wave capture may be taken into account. The nuclear orientation experiments on aluminium yield the values of the angular distribution coefficients of primary and secondary gamma-ray transitions and by a chi 2 -analysis five spin values are assigned uniquely and several α-values are determined. The nuclear orientation experiments on manganese lead to α-values and unique spin assigments for thirteen nuclear states in 56 Mn. (Auth.)

  10. Monolithic Superconducting Emitter of Tunable Circularly Polarized Terahertz Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elarabi, A.; Yoshioka, Y.; Tsujimoto, M.; Kakeya, I.

    2017-12-01

    We propose an approach to controlling the polarization of terahertz (THz) radiation from intrinsic Josephson-junction stacks in a single crystalline high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 . Monolithic control of the surface high-frequency current distributions in the truncated square mesa structure allows us to modulate the polarization of the emitted terahertz wave as a result of two orthogonal fundamental modes excited inside the mesa. Highly polarized circular terahertz waves with a degree of circular polarization of more than 99% can be generated using an electrically controlled method. The intuitive results obtained from the numerical simulation based on the conventional antenna theory are consistent with the observed emission characteristics.

  11. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. III. Stiffness and Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janett, Gioele; Paganini, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Efficient numerical approximation of the polarized radiative transfer equation is challenging because this system of ordinary differential equations exhibits stiff behavior, which potentially results in numerical instability. This negatively impacts the accuracy of formal solvers, and small step-sizes are often necessary to retrieve physical solutions. This work presents stability analyses of formal solvers for the radiative transfer equation of polarized light, identifies instability issues, and suggests practical remedies. In particular, the assumptions and the limitations of the stability analysis of Runge–Kutta methods play a crucial role. On this basis, a suitable and pragmatic formal solver is outlined and tested. An insightful comparison to the scalar radiative transfer equation is also presented.

  12. Using of ionizing radiation in environment protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, there is given the review of application of the radiation chemistry techniques in the environment protection . Using of sources of ionization radiation in underground water, drinking water and waste waters as well as in exhaust gases radiation processing and treatment are reviewed [sk

  13. Spin-polarized free electron beam interaction with radiation and superradiant spin-flip radiative emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of spin-polarized free-electron beam interaction with electromagnetic wave at electron-spin resonance conditions in a magnetic field and of superradiant spin-flip radiative emission are analyzed in the framework of a comprehensive classical model. The spontaneous emission of spin-flip radiation from electron beams is very weak. We show that the detectivity of electron spin resonant spin-flip and combined spin-flip/cyclotron-resonance-emission radiation can be substantially enhanced by operating with ultrashort spin-polarized electron beam bunches under conditions of superradiant (coherent emission. The proposed radiative spin-state modulation and the spin-flip radiative emission schemes can be used for control and noninvasive diagnostics of polarized electron/positron beams. Such schemes are of relevance in important scattering experiments off nucleons in nuclear physics and off magnetic targets in condensed matter physics.

  14. Radiation pollution of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benalashhar, Hanan Ali

    2006-01-01

    This paper interested in the topic of environmental pollution by radioactive materials due to several human activities. The meaning of human activities are nuclear tests and extraction of raw uranium, waste and reactor accidents, nuclear fuel and radon gas, and the peaceful uses of radiation. This paper points out the effects of environmental pollution by radiation and the means of reduction, and also illustrate the radiation pollution in the Arab region. (author)

  15. Polarized Uniform Linear Array System: Beam Radiation Pattern, Beamforming Diversity Order, and Channel Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many studies regarding antenna polarization; however, there have been few publications on the analysis of the channel capacity for polarized antenna systems using the beamforming technique. According to Chung et al., the channel capacity is determined by the density of scatterers and the transmission power, which is obtained based on the assumption that scatterers are uniformly distributed on a 3D spherical scattering model. However, it contradicts the practical scenario, where scatterers may not be uniformly distributed under outdoor environment, and lacks the consideration of fading channel gain. In this study, we derive the channel capacity of polarized uniform linear array (PULA systems using the beamforming technique in a practical scattering environment. The results show that, for PULA systems, the channel capacity, which is boosted by beamforming diversity, can be determined using the channel gain, beam radiation pattern, and beamforming diversity order (BDO, where the BDO is dependent on the antenna characteristics and array configurations.

  16. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. The author presents a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which has been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, the author is able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs

  17. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-03-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. I present a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which as been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, I am able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs

  18. IPOLE - semi-analytic scheme for relativistic polarized radiative transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mościbrodzka, M.; Gammie, C. F.

    2018-03-01

    We describe IPOLE, a new public ray-tracing code for covariant, polarized radiative transport. The code extends the IBOTHROS scheme for covariant, unpolarized transport using two representations of the polarized radiation field: In the coordinate frame, it parallel transports the coherency tensor; in the frame of the plasma it evolves the Stokes parameters under emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion. The transport step is implemented to be as spacetime- and coordinate- independent as possible. The emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion step is implemented using an analytic solution to the polarized transport equation with constant coefficients. As a result, IPOLE is stable, efficient, and produces a physically reasonable solution even for a step with high optical depth and Faraday depth. We show that the code matches analytic results in flat space, and that it produces results that converge to those produced by Dexter's GRTRANS polarized transport code on a complicated model problem. We expect IPOLE will mainly find applications in modelling Event Horizon Telescope sources, but it may also be useful in other relativistic transport problems such as modelling for the IXPE mission.

  19. [Effect of decimeter polarized electromagnetic radiation on germinating capacity of seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polevik, N D

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a polarization structure of electromagnetic radiation on the germinating capacity of seeds of such weeds as Green foxtail (Setaria viridis) and Green amaranth (Amaranthus retroflexus) has been studied. Seeds have been exposed to impulse electromagnetic radiation in a frequency of 896 MHz with linear, elliptical right-handed and elliptical left-handed polarizations at different power flux density levels. It is determined that the effect of the right-handed polarized electromagnetic radiation increases and the influence of the left-handed polarized one reduces the germinating capacity of seeds compared to the effect of the linearly polarized electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the seeds have an amplitude polarization selectivity as evinced by the major effect of the right-handed polarized radiation on seeds. An electrodynamic model as the right-handed elliptically polarized antenna with the given quantity of the ellipticity of polarization is suggested to use in description of this selectivity.

  20. Polarization characteristics of radiation in both 'light' and conventional undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strokov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    As a rule, an intensity spectrum of undulator radiation (UR) is calculated by using the classical approach, even for electron energy higher than 10 GeV. Such a spectrum is determined by an electron trajectory in an undulator while neglecting radiation loss. Using Planck's law, the UR photon spectrum can be calculated from the obtained intensity spectrum, for both linear and nonlinear regimes. The electron radiation process in a field of strong electromagnetic waves is considered within the quantum electrodynamics framework, using the Compton scattering process or radiation in a 'light' undulator. A comparison was made of the results from using these two approaches, for UR spectra generated by 250-GeV electrons in an undulator with a 11.5-mm period; this comparison shows that they coincide with high accuracy. The characteristics of the collimated UR beam (i.e. spectrum and circular polarization) were simulated while taking into account the discrete process of photon emission along an electron trajectory in both undulator types. Both spectral photon distributions and polarization dependence on photon energy are 'smoothed', in comparison to that expected for a long undulator-the latter of which considers the ILC positron source (ILC Technical Design Report).

  1. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  2. Psychrophilic and Psychrotolerant Microbial Extremophiles in Polar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial extremophiles that inhabit the polar regions of our planet are of tremendous significance. The psychrophilic and psychrotolerant microorganisms, which inhabit all of the cold environments on Earth have important applications to Bioremediation, Medicine, Pharmaceuticals, and many other areas of Biotechnology. Until recently, most of the research on polar microorganisms was confined to studies of polar diatoms, yeast, fungi and cyanobacteria. However, within the past three decades, extensive studies have been conducted to understand the bacteria and archaea that inhabit the Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice, glaciers, ice sheets, permafrost and the cryptoendolithic, cryoconite and ice-bubble environments. These investigations have resulted in the discovery of many new genera and species of anaerobic and aerobic microbial extremophiles. Exotic enzymes, cold-shock proteins and pigments produced by some of the extremophiles from polar environments have the potential to be of great benefit to Mankind. Knowledge about microbial life in the polar regions is crucial to understanding the limitations and biodiversity of life on Earth and may provide valuable clues to the Origin of Life on Earth. The discovery of viable microorganisms in ancient ice from the Fox Tunnel, Alaska and the deep Vostok Ice has shown that microorganisms can remain alive while cryopreserved in ancient ice. The psychrophilic lithoautotrophic homoacetogen isolated from the deep anoxic trough of Lake Untersee is an ideal candidate for life that might inhabit comets or the polar caps of Mars. The spontaneous release of gas from within the Anuchin Glacier above Lake Untersee may provide clues to the ice geysers that erupt from the tiger stripe regions of Saturn s moon Enceladus. The methane productivity in the lower regimes of Lake Untersee may also provide insights into possible mechanisms for the recently discovered methane releases on Mars. Since most of the other water bearing bodies of our

  3. Development of environment radiation database management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jong Gyu; Chung, Chang Hwa; Ryu, Chan Ho; Lee, Jin Yeong; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Hun Sun [Daeduk College, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    In this development, we constructed a database for efficient data processing and operating of radiation-environment related data. Se developed the source documents retrieval system and the current status printing system that supports a radiation environment dta collection, pre-processing and analysis. And, we designed and implemented the user interfaces and DB access routines based on WWW service policies on KINS Intranet. It is expected that the developed system, which organizes the information related to environmental radiation data systematically can be utilize for the accurate interpretation, analysis and evaluation.

  4. Development of environment radiation database management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jong Gyu; Chung, Chang Hwa; Ryu, Chan Ho; Lee, Jin Yeong; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Hun Sun

    1999-03-01

    In this development, we constructed a database for efficient data processing and operating of radiation-environment related data. Se developed the source documents retrieval system and the current status printing system that supports a radiation environment dta collection, pre-processing and analysis. And, we designed and implemented the user interfaces and DB access routines based on WWW service policies on KINS Intranet. It is expected that the developed system, which organizes the information related to environmental radiation data systematically can be utilize for the accurate interpretation, analysis and evaluation

  5. The Ionizing Radiation Environment on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The ionizing radiation environment on the moon that contributes to the radiation hazard for astronauts consists of galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles and albedo particles from the lunar surface. We will present calculations of the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent to various organs in this environment during quiet times and during large solar particle events. We will evaluate the contribution of solar particles other than protons and the contributions of the various forms of albedo. We will use the results to determine which particle fluxes must be known in order to estimate the radiation hazard.

  6. Radiation environment of fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Seiji; Seki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Next step device (experimental reactor), which is planned to succeed the large plasma experimental devices such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, generates radiation (neutron + gamma ray) during its operation. Radiation (neutronic) properties of the material are basis for the study on neutron utilization (energy recovery and tritium breeding), material selection (irradiation damage and lifetime evaluation) and radiation safety (personnel exposure and radiation waste). It is necessary, therefore, to predict radiation behaviour in the reactor correctly for the engineering design of the reactor. This report describes the outline of the radiation environment of the reactor based on the information obtained by the neutronic and shielding design calculation of the fusion experimental reactor (FER). (author)

  7. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. I. The DELO Family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janett, Gioele; Carlin, Edgar S.; Steiner, Oskar; Belluzzi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The discussion regarding the numerical integration of the polarized radiative transfer equation is still open and the comparison between the different numerical schemes proposed by different authors in the past is not fully clear. Aiming at facilitating the comprehension of the advantages and drawbacks of the different formal solvers, this work presents a reference paradigm for their characterization based on the concepts of order of accuracy , stability , and computational cost . Special attention is paid to understand the numerical methods belonging to the Diagonal Element Lambda Operator family, in an attempt to highlight their specificities.

  8. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. I. The DELO Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janett, Gioele; Carlin, Edgar S.; Steiner, Oskar; Belluzzi, Luca

    2017-05-01

    The discussion regarding the numerical integration of the polarized radiative transfer equation is still open and the comparison between the different numerical schemes proposed by different authors in the past is not fully clear. Aiming at facilitating the comprehension of the advantages and drawbacks of the different formal solvers, this work presents a reference paradigm for their characterization based on the concepts of order of accuracy, stability, and computational cost. Special attention is paid to understand the numerical methods belonging to the Diagonal Element Lambda Operator family, in an attempt to highlight their specificities.

  9. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. I. The DELO Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janett, Gioele; Carlin, Edgar S.; Steiner, Oskar; Belluzzi, Luca, E-mail: gioele.janett@irsol.ch [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno (IRSOL), 6605 Locarno-Monti (Switzerland)

    2017-05-10

    The discussion regarding the numerical integration of the polarized radiative transfer equation is still open and the comparison between the different numerical schemes proposed by different authors in the past is not fully clear. Aiming at facilitating the comprehension of the advantages and drawbacks of the different formal solvers, this work presents a reference paradigm for their characterization based on the concepts of order of accuracy , stability , and computational cost . Special attention is paid to understand the numerical methods belonging to the Diagonal Element Lambda Operator family, in an attempt to highlight their specificities.

  10. Polarized bow shocks reveal features of the winds and environments of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Manisha

    2018-01-01

    Massive stars strongly affect their surroundings through their energetic stellar winds and deaths as supernovae. The bow shock structures created by fast-moving massive stars contain important information about the winds and ultimate fates of these stars as well as their local interstellar medium (ISM). Since bow shocks are aspherical, the light scattered in the dense shock material becomes polarized. Analyzing this polarization reveals details of the bow shock geometry as well as the composition, velocity, density, and albedo of the scattering material. With these quantities, we can constrain the properties of the stellar wind and thus the evolutionary state of the star, as well as the dust composition of the local ISM.In my dissertation research, I use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that I optimized to simulate the polarization signatures produced by both resolved and unresolved stellar wind bow shocks (SWBS) illuminated by a central star and by shock emission. I derive bow shock shapes and densities from published analytical calculations and smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) models. In the case of the analytical SWBS and electron scattering, I find that higher optical depths produce higher polarization and position angle rotations at specific viewing angles compared to theoretical predictions for low optical depths. This is due to the geometrical properties of the bow shock combined with multiple scattering effects. For dust scattering, the polarization signature is strongly affected by wavelength, dust grain properties, and viewing angle. The behavior of the polarization as a function of wavelength in these cases can distinguish among different dust models for the local ISM. In the case of SPH density structures, I investigate how the polarization changes as a function of the evolutionary phase of the SWBS. My dissertation compares these simulations with polarization data from Betelgeuse and other massive stars with bow shocks. I discuss the

  11. Linear Polarization, Circular Polarization, and Depolarization of Gamma-ray Bursts: A Simple Case of Jitter Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng, E-mail: jirongmao@mail.ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 650011 Kunming, Yunnan Province (China)

    2017-04-01

    Linear and circular polarizations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected recently. We adopt a simplified model to investigate GRB polarization characteristics in this paper. A compressed two-dimensional turbulent slab containing stochastic magnetic fields is considered, and jitter radiation can produce the linear polarization under this special magnetic field topology. Turbulent Faraday rotation measure (RM) of this slab makes strong wavelength-dependent depolarization. The jitter photons can also scatter with those magnetic clumps inside the turbulent slab, and a nonzero variance of the Stokes parameter V can be generated. Furthermore, the linearly and circularly polarized photons in the optical and radio bands may suffer heavy absorptions from the slab. Thus we consider the polarized jitter radiation transfer processes. Finally, we compare our model results with the optical detections of GRB 091018, GRB 121024A, and GRB 131030A. We suggest simultaneous observations of GRB multi-wavelength polarization in the future.

  12. A survey of synchrotron radiation devices producing circular or variable polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the properties and operating principles of the new types of synchrotron radiation devices that produce circular polarization, or polarization that can be modulated in arbitrary fashion

  13. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  14. [UV-radiation--sources, wavelength, environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzle, Erhard; Hönigsmann, Herbert

    2005-09-01

    The UV-radiation in our environment is part of the electromagnetic radiation, which emanates from the sun. It is designated as optical radiation and reaches from 290-4,000 nm on the earth's surface. According to international definitions UV irradiation is divided into short-wave UVC (200-280 nm), medium-wave UVB (280-320 nm), and long-wave UVA (320-400 nm). Solar radiation which reaches the surface of the globe at a defined geographical site and a defined time point is called global radiation. It is modified quantitatively and qualitatively while penetrating the atmosphere. Besides atmospheric conditions, like ozone layer and air pollution, geographic latitude, elevation, time of the season, time of the day, cloudiness and the influence of indirect radiation resulting from stray effects in the atmosphere and reflection from the underground play a role in modifying global radiation, which finally represents the biologically effective radiation. The radiation's distribution on the body surface varies according to sun angle and body posture. The cumulative UV exposure is mainly influenced by outdoor profession and recreational activities. The use of sun beds and phototherapeutic measures additionally may contribute to the cumulative UV dose.

  15. Ionizing radiations and dosimetry in space environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doke, Tadayoshi

    1990-01-01

    Recently, plans have been developed for the construction of bases on the moon and launch of manned spacecraft to Mars. In the present report, the level of radiations in space, possible exposure of astronauts to radiations, appropriate levels of permissible exposure to such radiations, and available techniques to measure the dose equivalent are discussed in relation to long stays of astronauts in space outside the magnetosphere. Specifically, the report first outlines major features of radiations in the space environment focusing on electron and proton beams caught by the terrestrial magnitism, radiations released by the sun and galactic cosmic rays, and then presents estimations of possible exposure dose in space focusing on the contributions of electron and proton beams caught by the terrestrial magnetism, radiations released by the sun and galactic cosmic rays. The report also addresses guidelines for protection from radiations in space, techniques for measuring the intensity of radiations in space. It is pointed out that more studies should be made to permit accurate measurement of radiation doses in a mixed field containing high-energy heavy particles. (N.K.)

  16. The natural radiation environment: future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhaeusler, F.

    1992-01-01

    The need to control the exposure of man to the natural radiation environment (NRE) is increasingly recognised. The main NRE sources and exposure situations warranting intensified efforts in the future are: exposure to radiation in space (astronaut: ≤ 1 mSv.d -1 ), technologically enhanced natural radiation (TENR; global impact: 400,000 man.Sv.y -1 ) and populations living in high background radiation areas (resident: ≤ 360 mGy.y -1 ). Data on NRE-TENR-induced biological effects are scarce and inconclusive, such as increased frequency of chromosome aberrations and mental retardation from environmental gamma radiation, but there are contradictory results for thorium and radon exposure induced lung cancer risk. Four coordinated actions are proposed, i.e. international standardisation of methods, coordination of multidisciplinary health effect studies, development of principles for NRE/TENR control, and establishment of an international clearing house for all NRE-related topics. (Author)

  17. The Radiation Environment of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Linsky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exoplanets are born and evolve in the radiation and particle environment created by their host star. The host star’s optical and infrared radiation heats the exoplanet’s lower atmosphere and surface, while the ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet and X-radiation control the photochemistry and mass loss from the exoplanet’s upper atmosphere. Stellar radiation, especially at the shorter wavelengths, changes dramatically as a host star evolves leading to changes in the planet’s atmosphere and habitability. This paper reviews the present state of our knowledge concerning the time-dependent radiation emitted by stars with convective zones, that is stars with spectral types F, G, K, and M, which comprise nearly all of the host stars of detected exoplanets.

  18. Radiative Forcing from Emissivity Response in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.; Feldman, D.; Huang, X.; Flanner, M.; Chen, X.; Yang, P.; Kuo, C.

    2016-12-01

    A detailed assessment of the radiative balance and its controlling factors in polar regions is a critical prerequisite for understanding and predicting the polar amplification of climate change. Accordingly, we investigate the role of infrared surface emissivity in polar regions as a potential feedback mechanism following Feldman et al, 2014. In this work, we investigate the climatic response of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with spectral emissivity values that are implemented in a physically consistent manner for non-vegetated surfaces. In a control model run where 1850 CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr) is fixed, the updated spectral emissivity values are imposed for modified surface boundary conditions in the atmospheric model component. Climatic stability in the emergent globally averaged surface temperature is observed on decadal scales for an unforced (control) run. Analytic kernels representing the change in top of the atmosphere OLR given changes in emissivity are calculated on-line during the model runs, incorporating spatially and temporally varied humidity profiles impactful to transmission. Globally averaged kernels of the sensitivity of OLR to surface emissivity calculated for control and ramped CO2 runs exhibit temporal evolution with statistically significant differences in shape. Additionally, kernel and spectrally-averaged emissivity differences between monthly-averaged maps of control and ramped runs demonstrate a seasonal cycle. Similar to the treatment of cryosphere radiative forcing in Flanner et al, 2011, we define emissivity response as the product of the emissivity kernel and the change in month-to-month emissivity. At the end of 20th century, the 10-year emissivity forcing averaged at latitudes > 60°, is found to be negative (positive) in January (July), due to increasing (decreasing) sea-ice. These findings indicate that differences in surface emissivity between frozen and unfrozen surfaces decrease wintertime and increase summertime

  19. Nuclear medicine and the environment: radiation interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelter, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of radiation interactions on the environment may be considered from the perspective of the purely physical phenomena occurring or from the effects the interactions produce in organized biological systems. The physical processes by which radiation interacts with the environment are quite well defined. Although these processes differ depending upon the nature (either electromagnetic or particulate) of the primary radiation, the ultimate result is the production in the medium of high-speed, secondary charged particles. Some of the energy of these particles is absorbed by the medium, while a portion may be lost as bremsstrahlung. The energy that is absorbed produces excitation and ionization, which can be disruptive to biological systems. The effects produced by ionizing radiations at the biochemical, cellular, and organ level are less well defined. Nevertheless, available data indicate that certain generalizations are possible. For example, given the ubiquitous nature of water in tissues, macromolecules, regardless of their structural types, tend to serve as acceptors of the energy and products of water radiolysis. However, a deeper insight into the consequences of irradiation requires an understanding of the interplay of such parameters as the type and energy of the radiation, and the dose and rate of its application. Furthermore, at the cellular level, the type and age of the irradiated cells, the concentration of oxygen in their environment, and their cell-cycle phase are all important factors in determining the consequences of irradiation. 72 references

  20. Radiation and environment - impact studies awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniface Ekechukwu; Mohd. Zohadie Bardaie

    2005-01-01

    Radiation, which is simply defined as energy, that travels in the form of waves or particles has both positive and negative effects on humans. This has necessitated a careful study on how to create awareness on the 'two-edge sword'. Since radiation cannot be removed from our environment we, however, reduce our risks by controlling our exposure to it through various ways. Understanding radiation and radioactivity will help us make informed decisions about our exposure. Many difference types of radiation have range of energy that form electromagnetic spectrum. Their sources include nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons, and medicine. Others include, microwaves, radar, electrical power lines, cellular phones, and sunlight' and so on. However, the radiation used in nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and medicine has enough energy to break chemical bonds, and is referred to as 'ionizing radiation', which is dangerous to life. Because of this negative effect of radiation there is common fear and myths related to radiation, radioactivity, uranium mining and milling, and the nuclear industry. This radiation education and energy-environmental education attempt to dispel the common fears and myths relating to them in so far as there is perfect protection from harmful exposure and abuse. The design of an integrated unit of study radiation and environmental energy uses arts of language, life skills, skill designs, social studies and mathematical skills in creating understanding and abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry by the students without abuse or danger. The education unit is designed to assess materials for, factual information and appropriate language and identification of potential bias in environmental education materials and evaluate materials in perspective of cultural and ethnic upbringing. (author)

  1. Radiation protection of the environment - new trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P. P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent trends in the radiation protection of the environment focusing on basic changes of the protection philosophy from the egocentric to ecocentric approach are presented and discussed. The globalization of the economy is accompanied by global contamination of the environment that requires changes in the attitude of the protection of the total environment, i.e. protection of humans, fauna and flora, all ecosystems and the Earth in general, as well as the cosmic space. This complex approach is illustrated on the radiation protection of the environment that has always been in the forefront in developing protection philosophy, methodology and standards, which later has also been applied to the protection of the environment caused by non-radioactive contaminants, such as heavy metals and organic compounds. High radiation doses delivered to biota are illustrated on shellfish and fish collected in the Mururoa and Fangataufa lagoons (affected by series of nuclear weapons tests), and on fish in Novaya Zemlya bays (affected by dumping of nuclear reactors and radioactive wastes). On the methodological site an example is discussed focusing on the in situ sea-bed radionuclide mapping and seawater monitoring using submersible gamma-ray spectrometers operating with NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors which has proved to be important pre-requisite for estimation of the spatial distribution of radionuclides in the water column and on the sea floor, as well as for optimisation of sediment sampling for studying the radionuclide distribution with depth

  2. United States Naval Academy Polar Science Program; Undergraduate Research and Outreach in Polar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    two undergraduate courses on the Polar Environment and Global Climate change that over 100 students take annually. Diverse approaches of communicating the recent changes in the Polar Regions are key to reaching the broadest audience using the limited resources at hand. Through collaborative efforts with other colleges, high schools, and STEM programs we can maximize opportunities in the field, use creative teaching opportunities, and get as many students involved to ensure that we compound our impact felt at all educational levels.

  3. Polar clouds and radiation in satellite observations, reanalyses, and climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, JTM; Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, S.L.M.; L'Ecuyer, T.S.

    2017-01-01

    Clouds play a pivotal role in the surface energy budget of the polar regions. Here we use two largely independent data sets of cloud and surface downwelling radiation observations derived by satellite remote sensing (2007–2010) to evaluate simulated clouds and radiation over both polar ice sheets

  4. Parametric plasma surface instabilities with p-polarized radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappaport, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    The authors argue that parametric plasma surface mode excitation is a viable broadband instability mechanism in the microwave regime since the wavelength of incident radiation can be large compared to plasma ion density gradient scale lengths. The authors restrict their attention to plasmas which are uniform in the planes perpendicular to the density gradients. The boundary region is characterized by three parameters: (1) the ion density gradient length; (2) the electron Debye length; and (3) the excursion of boundary electrons as they move in response to monochromatic p-polarized radiation. A thin vacuum plasma transition layer, in which the ion density gradient scale length is large compared with the Debye length and the electron excursion, is included in the analysis of plasma stability. The recently proposed Lagrangian Frame Two-Plasmon Decay mode (LFTPD) is investigated in the regime in which the instability is not resonantly coupled to surface waves propagating along the boundary region. In this case they have found both spatially dependent growth rate profiles and spatially dependent transit layer magnetic fields due to nonlinear surface currents. LFTPD growth rate profiles are displayed as a function of pump amplitude. The results of a time domain simulation of this mode is also shown

  5. The photon polarization in radiative D decays, phenomenologically

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Stefan; Hiller, Gudrun

    2018-03-01

    We work out the phenomenology of untagged time-dependent analysis with radiative D^0-decays into CP eigenstates, which allows to probe the photon polarization by means of the charm mesons' finite width difference. We show that D^0 → φ γ or D^0 → \\bar{K}^{0 *} γ decays, which are SM-dominated, or SM-like, respectively, together with U-spin allow to obtain chirality-predictions for radiative decay amplitudes. The order of magnitude of wrong-chirality contributions in the SM can be cross-checked with an up-down asymmetry in D^0 → \\bar{K}_1^0 (→ \\bar{K} π π ) γ . We explore the sensitivity to new physics in |Δ c|=|Δ u|=1 dipole couplings in the decays D^0 → ρ ^0 γ . We point out the possibility to test the SM with D_s → K_1^+( → K π π ) γ decays.

  6. Optical Fibers in Nuclear Reactor Radiation Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    1992-01-01

    A performance evaluation of fiber optics under radiation conditions similar to those encountered in nuclear power plants is reported. The evaluation was accomplished by the creation of an analytical model for atomic scale radiation damage in silica glass and by the execution of an extensive fiber performance measurement program. The analytic model calculates displacement and electronic damage rates for silica glass subjected to a specified nuclear reactor radiation environment. It accomplishes this by first generating the primary charged particle spectrum produced in silica irradiated in a nuclear reactor. The resultant spectra are then applied to the integral equations describing radiation damage in polyatomic solids. The experimental measurements were selected to span the range of fiber types, radiation environments, temperatures, and light powers expected to be used in nuclear power plants. The basic experimental protocol was to expose the optical fibers to either a nuclear reactor or a ^{60}Co radiation environment while simultaneously monitoring fiber light transmission. Experimental temperatures were either ~23 ^circC or ~100 ^circC and light powers were either -30 dBm or -60 dBm. Measurements were made at each of the three standard communications wavelengths (850 nm, 1300 nm, and 1550 nm). Several conclusions are made based on these performance measurements. First, even near the core of a nuclear reactor the vast majority of the dose to silica glass is due to gamma rays. Even with the much lower doses (factor of roughly 40) neutrons cause much more displacement damage than gamma rays (35 times the oxygen displacement rate and 500 times the silicon displacement rate). Even with neutrons having many times the displacement rate as compared with gamma rays, little if any difference is observed in the transmission losses for gamma only as compared to mixed neutron/gamma transmission losses. Therefore, atomic displacement is not a significant damage mechanism for

  7. Ionizing Radiation Environments and Exposure Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Space radiation environments for historically large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are simulated to characterize exposures to radio-sensitive organs for missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), moon, near-Earth asteroid, and Mars. Primary and secondary particles for SPE and GCR are transported through the respective atmospheres of Earth or Mars, space vehicle, and astronaut's body tissues using NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code. Space radiation protection methods, which are derived largely from ground-based methods recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) or International Commission on Radiological Protections (ICRP), are built on the principles of risk justification, limitation, and ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). However, because of the large uncertainties in high charge and energy (HZE) particle radiobiology and the small population of space crews, NASA develops distinct methods to implement a space radiation protection program. For the fatal cancer risks, which have been considered the dominant risk for GCR, the NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model has been developed from recommendations by NCRP; and undergone external review by the National Research Council (NRC), NCRP, and through peer-review publications. The NSCR model uses GCR environmental models, particle transport codes describing the GCR modification by atomic and nuclear interactions in atmospheric shielding coupled with spacecraft and tissue shielding, and NASA-defined quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates for HZE particles. By implementing the NSCR model, the exposure risks from various heliospheric conditions are assessed for the radiation environments for various-class mission types to understand architectures and strategies of human exploration missions and ultimately to contribute to the optimization of radiation safety and well-being of space crewmembers participating in long-term space missions.

  8. Radiation diagnostics in extremely harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dona, H.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Williams, A.H.; McGurn, J.L.; Veeser, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent Trailmaster experiments have required to use of rather delicate radiation diagnostics in hostile environments. We have developed instrumentation for use high-explosive magnetic flux compression generators and near the noisy environment of high energy capacitor banks. These include some rather unique ''fly-away'' designs for x-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and other optical techniques for plasma temperature and field measurements. We will show some representative data and will also discuss an on-going program for the determination of magnetic field via atomic spectral line splitting and/or broadening

  9. Updating the Jovian Proton Radiation Environment - 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Henry; Martinez-Sierra, Luz Maria; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Since publication in 1983 by N. Divine and H. Garrett, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's plasma and radiation models have been the design standard for NASA's missions to Jupiter. These models consist of representations of the cold plasma and electrons, the warm and auroral electrons and protons, and the radiation environment (electron, proton, and heavy ions). To date, however, the high-energy proton model has been limited to an L-shell of 12. With the requirement to compute the effects of the high energy protons and other heavy ions on the proposed Europa mission, the extension of the high energy proton model from approximately 12 L-shell to approximately 50 L-shell has become necessary. In particular, a model of the proton environment over that range is required to estimate radiation effects on the solar arrays for the mission. This study describes both the steps taken to extend the original Divine proton model out to an approximately 50 L-shell and the resulting model developed to accomplish that goal. In addition to hydrogen, the oxygen, sulfur, and helium heavy ion environments have also been added between approximately 6 L-shell and approximately 50 L-shell. Finally, selected examples of the model's predictions are presented to illustrate the uses of the tool.

  10. The Global Environment Radiation Monitoring Network (GERMON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakheim, B.J.; Goellner, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a group of experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) met in France to discuss and develop the basic principles of a global environmental radiation monitoring network (GERMON). The basic functions of this network were to provide regular reports on environmental radiation levels and to be in a position to provide reliable and accurate radiation measurements on a quick and accurate radiation measurements on a quick turnaround basis in the event of a major radiation release. By 1992, although 58 countries had indicated an interest in becoming a part of the GERMON system, only 16 were providing data on a regular basis. This paper traces the history of GERMON from its inception in 1987 through its activities during 1993-4. It details the objectives of the network, describes functions, lists its participants, and presents obstacles in the current network. The paper examines the data requirements for radiological emergency preparedness and offers suggestions for the current system. The paper also describes the growing need for such a network. To add a domestic perspective, the authors present a summary of the environmental monitoring information system that was used by the NRC in 1986 in its analyses of the Chernobyl incident. Then we will use this 1986 experience to propose a method for the use of GERMON should a similar occasion arise in the future

  11. Use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winokur, P.S.; Lum, G.K.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Scott, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS (Commercially available Off The Shelf) microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. They review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMs increases from 1.4 x 10 8 rad(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7 x 10 9 rad(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design of process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10--15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMs from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMs from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of COTS and radiation-hardened (RH) technology

  12. Climate Response to Negative Greenhouse Gas Radiative Forcing in Polar Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanner, M. G.; Huang, X.; Chen, X.; Krinner, G.

    2018-02-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) additions to Earth's atmosphere initially reduce global outgoing longwave radiation, thereby warming the planet. In select environments with temperature inversions, however, increased GHG concentrations can actually increase local outgoing longwave radiation. Negative top of atmosphere and effective radiative forcing (ERF) from this situation give the impression that local surface temperatures could cool in response to GHG increases. Here we consider an extreme scenario in which GHG concentrations are increased only within the warmest layers of winter near-surface inversions of the Arctic and Antarctic. We find, using a fully coupled Earth system model, that the underlying surface warms despite the GHG addition exerting negative ERF and cooling the troposphere in the vicinity of the GHG increase. This unique radiative forcing and thermal response is facilitated by the high stability of the polar winter atmosphere, which inhibit thermal mixing and amplify the impact of surface radiative forcing on surface temperature. These findings also suggest that strategies to exploit negative ERF via injections of short-lived GHGs into inversion layers would likely be unsuccessful in cooling the planetary surface.

  13. Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model: DREAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Cunningham, G. S.; Friedel, R. W. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; Koller, J.; Morley, S. K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Zaharia, S.

    2012-03-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed to provide accurate, global specification of the Earth's radiation belts and to better understand the physical processes that control radiation belt structure and dynamics. DREAM is designed using a modular software approach in order to provide a computational framework that makes it easy to change components such as the global magnetic field model, radiation belt dynamics model, boundary conditions, etc. This paper provides a broad overview of the DREAM model and a summary of some of the principal results to date. We describe the structure of the DREAM model, describe the five major components, and illustrate the various options that are available for each component. We discuss how the data assimilation is performed and the data preprocessing and postprocessing that are required for producing the final DREAM outputs. We describe how we apply global magnetic field models for conversion between flux and phase space density and, in particular, the benefits of using a self-consistent, coupled ring current-magnetic field model. We discuss some of the results from DREAM including testing of boundary condition assumptions and effects of adding a source term to radial diffusion models. We also describe some of the testing and validation of DREAM and prospects for future development.

  14. Materials Degradation in the Jovian Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady; Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    The radiation environment of Jupiter represents a significant hazard for Europa Lander deorbit stage components, and presents a significant potential mission risk. The radiolytic degradation of ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidizer in solid propellants may affect its properties and performance. The Monte Carlo code MONSOL was used for modeling of laboratory experiments on the electron irradiation of propellant samples. An approach for flattening dose profiles along the depth of irradiated samples is proposed. Depth-dose distributions produced by Jovian electrons in multi-layer slabs of materials are calculated. It is found that the absorbed dose in a particular slab is significantly affected by backscattered electrons and photons from neighboring slabs. The dose and radiolytic decomposition of AP crystals are investigated and radiation-induced chemical yields and weight percent of radical products are reported.

  15. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-01-01

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space

  16. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  17. Observations of polarization of stellar radiation in R-associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlova, L.A.; Rspaev, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    New observational data have been obtained on BVR polarization parameters of stars in reflection nebulae in the Cas, Per R1, Ser, CMa R1 regions. Several stars are found to show variable polarization. For some of stars intrinsic polarization is derived. The effect of interstellar polarization has been taken into account by means of the Serkovski method. The connection of polarization vector with nebula structure considered. The local magnetic field is detected for CMa R1 region the scale of which is defined by association diameter

  18. Marine diatoms in polar and sub-polar environments and their application to Late Pleistocene paleoclimate reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosta, Xavier, E-mail: x.crosta@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [UMR-CNRS 5805 EPOC, Universite Bordeaux 1, Avenue des Facultes, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2011-05-15

    Diatoms are one of the major phytoplankton groups in polar and sub-polar marine environments along with green algae and chrysophytes. Diatoms are composed of two components, a two-valve test made of amorphous silica and an organic cell encapsulated into the test. Mucilage covering the test and proteins embedded in the silica lattice of the test completes the organic pool of the diatoms. The preservation of these two components into deep-sea sediments allows for a large set of diatom-based proxies to infer past oceanographic and climatic changes in polar and sub-polar marine environments. Most diatom species in polar and sub-polar marine environments exhibit a narrow range of ecological preferences, especially in terms of sea-surface temperature and sea ice conditions. Preserved diatom assemblages in deep-sea sediments mirror the diatom assemblages in the phytoplankton. It is subsequently possible to extrapolate the relationships between diatom assemblages in surface sediments and modern parameters to down-core fossil assemblages to document past changes in sea-surface temperatures and sea ice conditions. Congruent analysis of biogenic silica and organic carbon and stable isotope ratios (O, Si in the silica matrix and C, N in the diatom-intrinsic organic matter) provides information on siliceous productivity, nutrient cycling and water mass circulation. Measurements of diatom biomarkers give complementary information on sea ice conditions and siliceous productivity.

  19. Marine diatoms in polar and sub-polar environments and their application to Late Pleistocene paleoclimate reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosta, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the major phytoplankton groups in polar and sub-polar marine environments along with green algae and chrysophytes. Diatoms are composed of two components, a two-valve test made of amorphous silica and an organic cell encapsulated into the test. Mucilage covering the test and proteins embedded in the silica lattice of the test completes the organic pool of the diatoms. The preservation of these two components into deep-sea sediments allows for a large set of diatom-based proxies to infer past oceanographic and climatic changes in polar and sub-polar marine environments. Most diatom species in polar and sub-polar marine environments exhibit a narrow range of ecological preferences, especially in terms of sea-surface temperature and sea ice conditions. Preserved diatom assemblages in deep-sea sediments mirror the diatom assemblages in the phytoplankton. It is subsequently possible to extrapolate the relationships between diatom assemblages in surface sediments and modern parameters to down-core fossil assemblages to document past changes in sea-surface temperatures and sea ice conditions. Congruent analysis of biogenic silica and organic carbon and stable isotope ratios (O, Si in the silica matrix and C, N in the diatom-intrinsic organic matter) provides information on siliceous productivity, nutrient cycling and water mass circulation. Measurements of diatom biomarkers give complementary information on sea ice conditions and siliceous productivity.

  20. Evolution of full stokes parameters in polarized radiative transfer of electron cyclotron waves on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tsumori, K.; Watari, T.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Takita, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Ohkubo, K.; Sakakibara, S.; Narihara, K.; Yamada, I.; Tanaka, K.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Nakanishi, H.; Ohdachi, S.; Emoto, M.; Matsuoka, K.; Motojima, O.; Fujiwara, M. [LHD Experimental Group, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan); Notake, T. [Nagoya University, Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    To study polarized radiative transfer of electron cyclotron waves, a general equation of polarization evolution that includes the effects of both birefringence and dichroism is dealt with. Full Stokes parameters are used to describe the polarization state and the absorption rate in the equation. The evolution equation on polarization state is able to treat general cases in which two polarization states of Eigenmodes are not necessary to be orthogonal. Using this equation, a single absorption rate in second harmonic electron cyclotron heating is investigated on the Large Helical Device. (authors)

  1. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Three-dimensional test cases (phase B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Wang, Zhen; Labonotte, Laurent C.; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2018-04-01

    Initially unpolarized solar radiation becomes polarized by scattering in the Earth's atmosphere. In particular molecular scattering (Rayleigh scattering) polarizes electromagnetic radiation, but also scattering of radiation at aerosols, cloud droplets (Mie scattering) and ice crystals polarizes. Each atmospheric constituent produces a characteristic polarization signal, thus spectro-polarimetric measurements are frequently employed for remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties. Retrieval algorithms require efficient radiative transfer models. Usually, these apply the plane-parallel approximation (PPA), assuming that the atmosphere consists of horizontally homogeneous layers. This allows to solve the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) efficiently. For remote sensing applications, the radiance is considered constant over the instantaneous field-of-view of the instrument and each sensor element is treated independently in plane-parallel approximation, neglecting horizontal radiation transport between adjacent pixels (Independent Pixel Approximation, IPA). In order to estimate the errors due to the IPA approximation, three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer models are required. So far, only a few such models exist. Therefore, the International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to provide benchmark results for polarized radiative transfer. The group has already performed an intercomparison for one-dimensional (1D) multi-layer test cases [phase A, 1]. This paper presents the continuation of the intercomparison project (phase B) for 2D and 3D test cases: a step cloud, a cubic cloud, and a more realistic scenario including a 3D cloud field generated by a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model and typical background aerosols. The commonly established benchmark results for 3D polarized radiative transfer are available at the IPRT website (http

  2. Utilization of radiation for preservation of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washino, Masamitsu

    1976-01-01

    The utilization of radiation for sludge treatment, waste water treatment and exhaust gas treatment is reviewed. The conversion of sludge into fertilizer is difficult in Japan, because heavy metals that came from industrial waste water are contained in sewage water. If the techniques for treating industrial waste water and the measures for regionally separating waste water are established, the less fertile earth due to excess use of agricultural chemicals and synthetic fertilizers will recover its fertility. Problems of activated sludge treatment are as follows: 1) requirement for wide plant area, 2) difficulty of meeting the wide variation of loads, and 3) existence of agricultural chemicals and detergents which are not decomposable by microorganisms. The irradiation method may be one of the techniques for reusing waste water by high quality treatment. The mechanism of radiation effects is physicochemically explained. The research on the electron beam treatment exhaust gas in heavy oil combustion made by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Ebara Manufacturing Company is illustrated. The experiment revealed that 1) sulfurous acid and nitrogen oxides in exhaust gas can be removed simultaneously; 2) a large quantity of gas can be treated with a large output accelerator in a short time, and 3) reaction products can be separated with electric dust collectors. In future, the research on the utilization of radiation for environment preservation will result in the closed systems because of the prevention of public pollution and the effective utilization of natural resources. (Iwakiri, K.)

  3. Modeling of the Lunar Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Badavi, F.F.; Clem, J.M.; Blattnig, S.R.; Clowdsley, M.S.; Nealy, J.E.; Tripathi, R.K.; Wilson, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    In view of manned missions targeted to the Moon, for which radiation exposure is one of the greatest challenges to be tackled, it is of fundamental importance to have available a tool, which allows the determination of the particle flux and spectra at any time and at any point of the lunar surface. With this goal in mind, a new model of the Moon's radiation environment due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) has been developed. Primary particles reach the lunar surface, and are transported all throughout the subsurface layers, with backscattering patterns taken into account. The surface itself has been modeled as regolith and bedrock, with composition taken from the results of the instruments flown on the Apollo missions. Subsurface environments like lava tubes have been considered in the analysis. Particle transport has been performed with both deterministic and Monte Carlo codes with an adaptation for planetary surface geometry. Results are given in terms of fluxes, doses and LET, for most kinds of particles for various kinds of soil and rock chemical compositions

  4. Polarized scattered light from self-luminous exoplanets : Three-dimensional scattering radiative transfer with ARTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, T.; Min, M.; Stam, D.M.; Mollière, P.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B.F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Direct imaging has paved the way for atmospheric characterization of young and self-luminous gas giants. Scattering in a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere causes the disk-integrated polarization of the thermal radiation to be linearly polarized, possibly detectable with the newest

  5. Development of radiation processes for better environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majali, A.B.; Sabharwal, S.; Deshpande, R.S.; Sarma, K.S.S.; Bhardwaj, Y.K.; Dhanawade, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    The increasing population and industrialization, worldover, is placing escalating demands for the development of newer technologies that are environment friendly and minimize the pollution associated with the development. Radiation technology can be of benefit in reducing the pollution levels associated with many processes. The sulphur vulcanization method for natural rubber latex vulcanization results in the formation of considerable amounts of nitrosoamines, both in the product as well as in the factory environment. Radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex has emerged as a commercially viable alternative to produce sulphur and nitrosoamine free rubber. A Co-60 γ-radiation based pilot plant has been functioning since April 1993 to produce vulcanized natural rubber latex (RVNRL) using acrylate monomers as sensitizer. The role of sensitizer, viz. n-butyl acrylate in the vulcanization process has been elucidated using the pulse radiolysis technique. Emission of toxic sulphur containing gases form an inevitable part of viscose-rayon process and this industry is in search of ways to reduce the associated pollution levels. The irradiation of cellulose results in cellulose activation and reduction in the degree of polymerization (DP). These effects can reduce the solvents required to dissolve the paper pulp. There is a keen interest in utilizing radiation technology in viscose rayon production. We have utilized the electron beam (EB) accelerator for reducing the degree of polymerization (DP) of paper pulp. Laboratory scale tests have been carried out to standardize the conditions for production of pulp having the desired DP by EB irradiation. The use of irradiated paper pulp can result in ∼40% reduction in the consumption of CS 2 in the process that can be beneficial in reducing the pollution associated with the process. PTFE waste can be recycled into a low molecular weight microfine powder by irradiation. An EB based process has been standardized to produce

  6. A Note on the Radiative and Collisional Branching Ratios in Polarized Radiation Transport with Coherent Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the implementation of physically meaningful branching ratios between the CRD and partial redistribution contributions to the emissivity of a polarized multi-term atom in the presence of both inelastic and elastic collisions. Our derivation is based on a recent theoretical formulation of partially coherent scattering, and it relies on a heuristic diagrammatic analysis of the various radiative and collisional processes to determine the proper form of the branching ratios. The expression we obtain for the emissivity is {\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}=[{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1)-{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}{{f}.{{s}}.}(2)]+{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2), where {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1) and {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2) are the emissivity terms for the redistributed and partially coherent radiation, respectively, and where “f.s.” implies that the corresponding term must be evaluated assuming a flat-spectrum average of the incident radiation. This result is shown to be in agreement with prior literature on the subject in the limit of the unpolarized multi-level atom.

  7. Apparent resistivity and spectral induced polarization in the submarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERCULES DE SOUZA

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatively few investigations have employed electrical methods in the submarine environment, which may be promising for mineral deposits or threatened by environmental problems. We have measured the electric field using both disk and bar electrodes in the sea water at three different levels: sea surface, seven meters deep, and sea bottom at a depth of ten meters, employing a 2 m spacing dipole-dipole array with 7 array spacings of investigation, and 13 values of frequencies at steps of (2N hertz, N = -2, -1, 0, 1, 2,.....10. The measurement allowed the analysis of the electric field as a function of frequency and spacing, and of the spectral induced polarization. Modelling and interpretation of the apparent resistivity yielded a good fit with previous drilling data. Analysis of the spectrum of the complex apparent resistivity and the comparison with equivalent circuits, provided information about the grain size, the mineral composition and the major induced polarization phenomenon occurring below the sea. Therefore the result of the present research show the feasibility of measuring the variation of seawater resistivity in situ, as well as the resistivity of sea bottom sediments.Relativamente poucas investigações têm empregado métodos elétricos no ambiente submarino, o qual pode ser promissor para depósitos minerais ou ameaçado por problemas ambientais. Nós medimos o campo elétrico usando eletrodos em forma de disco e de barra na água do mar, em três níveis distintos: superfície, sete metros de profundidade, e fundo do mar a dez metros de profundidade, empregando um dispositivo dipolo-dipolo com 2m de afastamento, 7 níveis de investigação e 13 valores de freqüência a intervalos de (2N hertz, N = -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, ... 10. A medida permitiu a análise do campo elétrico como uma função de freqüência e afastamento, e da polarização induzida espectral. A modelagem e a interpretação da resistividade aparente se ajustaram bem

  8. Cometary dust dynamics and polarization in electromagnetic radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranen, J.; Markkanen, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-09-01

    In our work, we apply a fast solution of electromagnetic scattering to determine the induced spin and movement of a dust particle in a cometary coma. The resulted aligned spinning state is then used to determine the observable polarization of the dust, and compared against the randomly averaged polarization of the same particle. We find that measurable effects arise due to the alignment. In the future, similar methods can be used to model the dynamics and in turn the polarization of the whole coma.

  9. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  10. Observations of the polarization of the radiation of R-association stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlova, L.A.; Rspaev, F.K.

    1987-01-01

    New observations have been made of the polarization parameters of the radiation of stars in the reflection nebulas in the regions of Cas, Per R1, Ser, CMa R1. Some stars with variable polarization have been found. For some stars, the parameters of the intrinsic circumstellar polarization have been calculated with allowance for the interstellar component using Serkowski's method. The connection between the polarization vector and the structure of the nebulas is considered. For the region CMa R1 a local magnetic field with a scale determined by the size of the association is identified

  11. Geant4 applications in the heliospheric radiation environment

    OpenAIRE

    Brogueira, Pedro; Gonçalves, Patrícia; Keating, Ana; Maia, Dalmiro; Pimenta, Mário; Tomé, Bernardo

    2007-01-01

    The high energy ionizing radiation environment in the solar system consists of three main sources: the radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles. Geant4 is a Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolkit, with applications in areas as high energy physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics or medical physics research. In this poster, Geant4 applications to model and study the effects of the heliospheric radiation environment are presented. Specific applications are b...

  12. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  13. Arctic Observing Experiment - An Assessment of Instruments Used to Monitor the Polar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigor, I. G.; Johnson, J.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Woods, J. E.; Valentic, T. A.; Henderson, G. R.; Marshall, C.; Gallage, C.; Zook, J.; Davis, Z.

    2014-12-01

    To understand and predict weather and climate require an accurate observing network that measures the fundamental meteorological parameters: temperature, air pressure, and wind. Measuring these parameters autonomously in the polar regions is especially challenging. To assess the accuracy of polar measurement networks, we established the Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) test site in March 2013 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation and Meteorology (ARM) site in Barrow, Alaska. We deployed a myriad of data loggers and autonomous buoys, which represent most of the instruments that are commonly deployed by the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) to measure temperature, air pressure and wind. Estimates of temperature over this area have also been analyzed from satellites (e.g., using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ice-surface temperature (IST)) product, and can complement data from in-situ sensors and provide consistent measurements under clear-sky conditions. Preliminary results reveal that some of the buoys are susceptible to solar heating, icing can block barometers for short periods, and frosting may insulate air temperature sensors and freeze-lock anemometers. Some of these issues may be addressed by simply painting the buoys white to reduce solar heating of the buoys, and using better temperature shields and barometer ports. Nevertheless, frosting of ultrasonic and mechanical anemometers remains a significant challenge. These results will be useful to initiate a protocol to obtain accurate and consistent measurements from the IABP, the Arctic Observing Network (AON), the International Program for Antarctic Buoys, and the Southern Ocean Observing System to monitor polar environments.

  14. High Radiation Environment Nuclear Fragment Separator Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Stephen [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramesh [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-31

    Superconducting coils wound with HTS conductor can be used in magnets located in a high radiation environment. NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors must operate at 4.5 K or below where removal of heat is less efficient. The HTS conductor can carry significant current at higher temperatures where the Carnot efficiency is significantly more favorable and where the coolant heat capacity is much larger. Using the HTS conductor the magnet can be operated at 40 K. This project examines the use of HTS conductor for the Michigan State University Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) fragment separator dipole magnet which bends the beam by 30° and is located in a high radiation region that will not be easily accessible. Two of these magnets are needed to select the chosen isotope. There are a number of technical challenges to be addressed in the design of this magnet. The separator dipole is 2 m long and subtends a large angle. The magnet should keep a constant transverse field profile along its beam reference path. Winding coils with a curved inner segment is difficult as the conductor will tend to unwind during the process. In the Phase I project two approaches to winding the conductor were examined. The first was to wind the coils with curved sections on the inner and outer segments with the inner segment wound with negative curvature. The alternate approach was to use a straight segment on the inner segment to avoid negative curvature. In Phase I coils with a limited number of turns were successfully wound and tested at 77 K for both coil configurations. The Phase II program concentrated on the design, coil winding procedures, structural analysis, prototyping and testing of an HTS curved dipole coil at 40 K with a heat load representative of the radiation environment. One of the key criteria of the design of this magnet is to avoid the use of organic materials that would degrade rapidly in radiation. The Lorentz forces expected from the coils interacting with the

  15. Reliability of computer memories in radiation environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fetahović Irfan S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is examining a radiation hardness of the magnetic (Toshiba MK4007 GAL and semiconductor (AT 27C010 EPROM and AT 28C010 EEPROM computer memories in the field of radiation. Magnetic memories have been examined in the field of neutron radiation, and semiconductor memories in the field of gamma radiation. The obtained results have shown a high radiation hardness of magnetic memories. On the other side, it has been shown that semiconductor memories are significantly more sensitive and a radiation can lead to an important damage of their functionality. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171007

  16. A discrete spherical harmonics method for radiative transfer analysis in inhomogeneous polarized planar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapimo, Romuald; Tagne Kamdem, Hervé Thierry; Yemele, David

    2018-03-01

    A discrete spherical harmonics method is developed for the radiative transfer problem in inhomogeneous polarized planar atmosphere illuminated at the top by a collimated sunlight while the bottom reflects the radiation. The method expands both the Stokes vector and the phase matrix in a finite series of generalized spherical functions and the resulting vector radiative transfer equation is expressed in a set of polar directions. Hence, the polarized characteristics of the radiance within the atmosphere at any polar direction and azimuthal angle can be determined without linearization and/or interpolations. The spatial dependent of the problem is solved using the spectral Chebyshev method. The emergent and transmitted radiative intensity and the degree of polarization are predicted for both Rayleigh and Mie scattering. The discrete spherical harmonics method predictions for optical thin atmosphere using 36 streams are found in good agreement with benchmark literature results. The maximum deviation between the proposed method and literature results and for polar directions \\vert μ \\vert ≥0.1 is less than 0.5% and 0.9% for the Rayleigh and Mie scattering, respectively. These deviations for directions close to zero are about 3% and 10% for Rayleigh and Mie scattering, respectively.

  17. Coastal sea radiation environment and biodiversity protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Senming; Shang Zhaorong

    2009-01-01

    This paper characterizes the types, trend and the potential of radiation contamination in the sea against the development of nuclear power stations. Combined with the present status of radioactive contamination and marine biodiversity in China seas, it is pointed out that non-human radiation protection should be considered on the bases of marine biodiversity protection. Besides, the reference species for marine radiation protection and some viewpoints on the work of marine radiation protection in China are pro- posed. (authors)

  18. 3D printed polarizing grids for IR-THz synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Meguya; Linklater, Denver; Hart, William; Balčytis, Armandas; Skliutas, Edvinas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Appadoo, Dominique; Tan, Yaw-Ren Eugene; Ivanova, Elena P.; Morikawa, Junko; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2018-03-01

    Grid polarisers 3D-printed out of commercial acrilic resin were tested for the polariser function and showed spectral regions where the dichroic ratio {D}R> 1 and molecular and/or stress induced anisotropy. Metal-coated 3D-printed THz optical elements can find a range of applications in intensity and polarization control of IR-THz beams. The used 3D printing method allows for fabrication of an arbitrary high aspect ratio grid polarisers. Polarization analysis of synchrotron THz radiation was carried out with a standard stretched polyethylene polariser and revealed that the linearly polarized (horizontal) component contributes up to 22% ± 5% to the circular polarized synchrotron emission extracted by a gold-coated mirror with a horizontal slit inserted near the bending magnet edge. Comparison with theoretical predictions shows a qualitative match with dominance of the edge radiation.

  19. Radiation monitoring in the NPP environment, control of radioactivity in NPP-environment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Problems of radiation monitoring and control of the NPP-environment system (NPPES) are considered. Radiation control system at the NPP and in the environment provides for the control of the NPP, considered as the source of radioactive releases in the environment and for the environmental radiation climate control. It is shown, that the radiation control of the NPP-environment system must be based on the ecological normalization principles of the NPP environmental impacts. Ecological normalization should be individual for the NPP region of each ecosystem. The necessity to organize and conduct radiation ecological monitoring in the NPP regions is pointed out. Radiation ecological monitoring will provide for both environmental current radiation control and information for mathematical models, used in the NPPES radiation control

  20. Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.M.; Tan, J.Y.; Liu, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Light transfer in gradient-index media generally follows curved ray trajectories, which will cause light beam to converge or diverge during transfer and induce the rotation of polarization ellipse even when the medium is transparent. Furthermore, the combined process of scattering and transfer along curved ray path makes the problem more complex. In this paper, a Monte Carlo method is presented to simulate polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media that only support planar ray trajectories. The ray equation is solved to the second order to address the effect induced by curved ray trajectories. Three types of test cases are presented to verify the performance of the method, which include transparent medium, Mie scattering medium with assumed gradient index distribution, and Rayleigh scattering with realistic atmosphere refractive index profile. It is demonstrated that the atmospheric refraction has significant effect for long distance polarized light transfer. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient index media. • Effect of curved ray paths on polarized radiative transfer is considered. • Importance of atmospheric refraction for polarized light transfer is demonstrated

  1. Convergence of environment polarization effects in multiscale modeling of excitation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerepoot, Maarten; Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    of polarization interactions for chromophores in different chemical environments. We find that the rate of convergence of excitation energies with respect to polarization cut-off is much slower for chromophores in an ordered environment such as a protein than for chromophores in a homogeneous medium......We present a systematic investigation of the influence of polarization effects from a surrounding medium on the excitation energies of a chromophore. We use a combined molecular dynamics and polarizable embedding time-dependent density functional theory (PE-TD-DFT) approach for chromophores....... By varying the subset of sites in the environment for which atomic polarizabilities are included, we investigate to what distance from the quantum region explicit polarization effects need to be taken into account in order to provide converged excitation energies. Our study gives new insight into the range...

  2. Development of advanced silicon radiation detectors for harsh radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Groenlund, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of advanced silicon radiation detectors and their characterization by simulations, used in the work for searching elementary particles in the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN. Silicon particle detectors will face extremely harsh radiation in the proposed upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider, the future high-energy physics experiment Super-LHC. The increase in the maximal fluence and the beam luminosity up to 1016 neq / cm2 and 1035 cm-2s-1 will require detectors with a dramatic improvement in radiation hardness, when such a fluence will be far beyond the operational limits of the present silicon detectors. The main goals of detector development concentrate on minimizing the radiation degradation. This study contributes mainly to the device engineering technology for developing more radiation hard particle detectors with better characteristics. Also the defect engineering technology is discussed. In the nearest region of the beam in Super-LHC, the only dete...

  3. Investigation of resonant polarization radiation of relativistic electrons in gratings at small angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleinik, A.N.; Chefonov, O.V.; Kalinin, B.N.; Naumenko, G.A.; Potylitsyn, A.P.; Saruev, G.A.; Sharafutdinov, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    The resonant optical polarization radiation (ROPR) in the Smith-Purcell geometry and the one from the inclined grating at the Tomsk synchrotron and 6-MeV microtron have been investigated. The polarization radiation was observed at 4.2 deg. from the 200 MeV electron beam and at 5 deg. from the 6.2 MeV electron beam. Two methods of measurement of ROPR maxima in these two cases have been used. In the first case (the experiment on synchrotron) we have fixed the wavelength of radiation using an optical filter; the orientation dependence of this radiation was measured. In this dependence we have observed two peaks of radiation from electrons in gold foil grating of 0.1 mm period. The first large peak is a zeroth order peak in direction of specular reflection, and the second one is the first-order peak of resonant polarization radiation. In the experiment on microtron the spectra of ROPR from aluminum foil strip grating of 0.2 mm period in the Smith-Purcell geometry were measured, and the peak of the first-order Smith-Purcell radiation in these spectra was observed. The comparison of data obtained with the simulation results has been performed

  4. Space Radiation Measurement on the Polar Route onboard the Korean Commercial Flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junga Hwang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed by the policy research project of Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs, which title is “Developing safety standards and management of space radiation on the polar route”. In this research, total six experiments were performed using Korean commercial flights (B747. Three of those are on the polar route and the other three are on the north pacific route. Space radiation exposure measured on the polar route is the average 84.7 uSv. The simulation result using CARI-6M program gives 84.9 uSv, which is very similar to measured value. For the departure flight using the north pacific route, the measured space radiation is the average 74.4 uSv. It seems that is not so different to use the polar route or not for the return flight because the higher latitude effect causing the increase of space radiation is compensated by the shortened flight time effect causing decreasing space radiation exposure.

  5. Evaluation of the Radiation Environment of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341385; Corti, Gloria

    The unprecedented radiation levels of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during high-energy proton-proton collisions will have an impact on the operation of its experiments’ detectors and electronics. LHCb, one of the 4 major LHC experiments, has started operation in 2009 and from 2011 onward it has been collecting data at and above its design luminosity. Detectors and associated detector electronics are prone to damage if the radiation levels exceed the expected values. It is essential to monitor the radiation environment of the experimental area and compare it with predictions obtained from simulation studies in order to assess the situation and take corrective action in case of need. Understanding the existing radiation environment will also provide important input to the planning of maintenance and for operation at upgrade luminosity. A set of radiation detectors has been installed in the LHCb experimental area to measure different aspects of its radiation environment. Passive dosimeters including Thermo-L...

  6. Radiation and global environment. Consideration for the influence on ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Doi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2003-09-01

    This book is based on presentations at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) symposium of the same title held by the NIRS Research Center for Radiation Safety in December, 2002, is edited with somehow enlightening intention as well, and is composed from 6 parts of; 1. Reasons for concern for influence on ecosystems, 2. Behavior of substances in ecosystems, 3. Changes of global environments and life, 4. Various environmental stresses and living/eco-systems, 5. New development of evaluation studies on radiation effects, and 6. For the radiation protection of environments. The 1st part involves 3 chapters concerning studies on effects on ecosystems and radiation protection of environments; 2nd part, 4 chapters concerning behavior of radioactive and/or stable cesium and iodine in forest and environmental microorganisms, and behavior and effects of acidic substances; 3rd part, 2 chapters concerning terrestrial history and evolution/adaptation of livings; 4th part, 5 chapters concerning radiation stress, active oxygen, radiodurance/radio-resistant microorganisms, ultraviolet, and environmental hormones; 5th part, 6 chapters concerning effects on cells of environmental toxic substance and radiation, environmental stress evaluation by DNA micro-array, effects on taxis, use of microcosm, simulation of computational model ecosystem, and aquatic ecosystems; 6th part, 5 chapters concerning environmental radioecology, safety measures in high-level radioactive waste disposal under the ground, radiation protection of environments from radiation biology aspect, effects of chemicals, and aspect and strategy for radiation effects on environments. (N.I.)

  7. Multisectional gas counter for measuring ultrasoft x radiation spatial distribution, polarization and spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolov, G.D.; Peskov, V.D.

    1981-01-01

    Hodoscope of multithread counters for detecting small intensity fluxes of ultrasoft roentgen (USR) photons with 0.2x0.2 mm space resolution is described. When detecting primary photoelectron track by the counter USR photon polarization is determined. It is managed to evaluate the shape of USR radiation spectrum from the measurement of radiation attenuation unside the counter volume. Techniques for measuring coordinates of USR photons and determination of their polarization as well as a technique for measuring spectral distribution of radiation in USR range of the spectrum based on a method for evaluating photon absorption in a gas were considered. Results of experimental test of the suggested techniques for investigating USR radiation ( with approximately 100 eV energy) of superhigh frequency plasma filament of high pressure with an intensity of several pulses per a minute are given. Analysis of the results obtained shows that the effective energy resolution of the counter ΔW [ru

  8. Electric motors for use in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, T.U.D.; Mahmood, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    Requirements of electric motors for a nuclear plant and the effect of nuclear radiations on different parts of the motors are discussed. Feasibility of using locally-fabricated motors is also considered. (author)

  9. Overview of Radiation Environments and Human Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposures to ionizing radiation have been vastly altered by developing technology in the last century. This has been most obvious in the development of radiation generating devices and the utilization of nuclear energy. But even air travel has had its impact on human exposure. Human exposure increases with advancing aircraft technology as a result of the higher operating altitudes reducing the protective cover provided by the Earth s atmosphere from extraterrestrial radiations. This increase in operating altitudes is taken to a limit by human operations in space. Less obvious is the changing character of the radiations at higher altitudes. The associated health risks are less understood with increasing altitude due to the increasing complexity and new field components found in high altitude and space operations.

  10. Construction and performance of BL28 of the Photon Factory for circularly polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagoshima, Y.; Muto, S.; Miyahara, T.; Koide, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Kitamura, H.

    1992-01-01

    A branch beamline, BL28A, has been constructed for the application of circularly polarized vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The radiation can be obtained in the helical undulator operation mode of an insertion device, EMPW number-sign 28, which is also cut for elliptically polarized hard x-ray radiation. T first harmonic of the helical undulator radiation can be tuned from 40 to 350 eV with its corresponding K value from 3 to 0.2. A monochromator working basically with constant deviation optics was installed, and has started its operation. A circularly polarized flux of ∼10 10 photons/s has been achieved with energy resolution of around 500--1000 at the first harmonic peak. The circular polarization after the monochromator was estimated to be higher than 70% by comparing theory and experiment on the magnetic circular dichroism of nickel films in the 3p-3d excitation region. The design philosophy of the beamline and recent results on the performance tests are presented

  11. Harmonic radiation emission from periodic lattices irradiated by short-pulse elliptically polarized laser light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondarza-Rovira, R; Boyd, T J

    2001-10-01

    Radiated emission at high-order harmonic numbers is observed from thin crystalline layers irradiated by short femtosecond elliptically polarized laser light. The applied external radiation field drives the free electrons in the material to large oscillation amplitudes and harmonics are generated by the electronic response to the periodic lattice potential. A model was modified by introducing a more general expression for the lattice force that by sharpening or by smoothing the potential in turn allows the strength of the electronic perturbation to be varied. The electron motion is computed numerically by solving the electromagnetic force equation and by regarding the lattice potential as a perturbative source. For linearly polarized laser light the radiation spectra are characterized by emission lines forming a flat plateau in the region of low harmonic orders with a sharp cutoff for higher numbers. For circular polarization strong emission is found for two harmonic numbers, the first in the low-harmonic region and the second around the cutoff. By solving analytically the electron motion in an elliptically polarized laser field, an exact expression for the electron displacement in all three spatial directions is found. The amplitude of the oscillations sets the analytic form for calculating the peak harmonic numbers emitted from the laser-lattice interaction. The radiation effect studied here, if detected, might hold some potential as a diagnostic and could be used, in principle, as a method for determining the lattice parameter in crystalline structures.

  12. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoît, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations

  13. First Experimental Study of Photon Polarization in Radiative B-s(0) Decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, I.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suarez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frei, C.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Grunberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lefevre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative B-s(0) decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the B-s(0) ->phi

  14. Behaviour of organic materials in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Ilie, S.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive radiation damage test program has been carried out in CERN for decades and many results have yet been published. Over the years, EPR/EPDM-based rubbers and polyolefin-based compounds used for cable insulation have been tested. Polyolefin-based compounds usually present an important dose-rate effect. This is related to the presence of oxygen, it may be combined with a temperature effect. On the other hand, it appears from many results that the degradation of cable insulations does not depend on the radiation type. Tests of insulating and structural materials after irradiation at cryogenic temperature have shown that there is no significant influence of the irradiation temperature on the radiation degradation of thermo-sets and composites, while the degradation of plastic films is even less severe as they are protected against oxidation. Some experiments about the synergy between irradiation and mechanical stress have shown that rubbers and composites under stress are more sensitive to radiation and degrade faster. Very strong synergetic effects between radiation and other parameters are observed in organic optical materials such as scintillators and optical fibres. For fluorocarbon cooling fluids, a special care must be paid to alkanes and hydro-fluoro-alkanes, which are usually present as impurities, and of which the C-H bonds content opens the way to the reactive hydrofluoric acid evolution during the radiolytic process

  15. Polar clouds and radiation in satellite observations, reanalyses, and climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2017-04-01

    Clouds play a pivotal role in the surface energy budget of the polar regions. Here we use two largely independent data sets of cloud and surface downwelling radiation observations derived by satellite remote sensing (2007-2010) to evaluate simulated clouds and radiation over both polar ice sheets and oceans in state-of-the-art atmospheric reanalyses (ERA-Interim and Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications-2) and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) climate model ensemble. First, we show that, compared to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System-Energy Balanced and Filled, CloudSat-CALIPSO better represents cloud liquid and ice water path over high latitudes, owing to its recent explicit determination of cloud phase that will be part of its new R05 release. The reanalyses and climate models disagree widely on the amount of cloud liquid and ice in the polar regions. Compared to the observations, we find significant but inconsistent biases in the model simulations of cloud liquid and ice water, as well as in the downwelling radiation components. The CMIP5 models display a wide range of cloud characteristics of the polar regions, especially with regard to cloud liquid water, limiting the representativeness of the multimodel mean. A few CMIP5 models (CNRM, GISS, GFDL, and IPSL_CM5b) clearly outperform the others, which enhances credibility in their projected future cloud and radiation changes over high latitudes. Given the rapid changes in polar regions and global feedbacks involved, future climate model developments should target improved representation of polar clouds. To that end, remote sensing observations are crucial, in spite of large remaining observational uncertainties, which is evidenced by the substantial differences between the two data sets.

  16. Observation of radiative spin-polarization at 60.6 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Hildreth, M D; Matheson, J; Mugnai, G; Placidi, Massimo; Roncarolo, F; Torrence, E; Sonnemann, F; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J; Blondel, A

    1999-01-01

    Radiative spin-polarization has been used extensively at LEP to accurately measure the beam energy around the Z resonance. As the LEP physics has moved on to the W boson the calibration based on polarization must be extended towards higher beam energies. This is difficult as the depolarizing effects of spin resonances grow rapidly with beam energy. At LEP it has been possible for the first time to measure transverse beam polarization at 60.6 GeV. To allow a build-up of polarization the tunes and the energy were chosen accurately. A low phase advance optics was used and careful orbit correction was carried out using dynamic beam based alignment data. Harmonic spin matching was applied both in a deterministic and a novel semi- empirical way. (11 refs).

  17. The Los Alamos dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM) for space weather specification and forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  18. Circular polarization of γ-quanta radiated in the capture of polarized neutrons by protons and the quark compound bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grach, I.L.; Shmatkov, M.Zh.

    1983-01-01

    The circular polarization Psub(γ) of γ-quanta radiated in the capture of polarized neutrons by protons is calculated The contribution of the M1 and E2 radiation of nucleons to Psub(γ) is found using the accurate wave functions of the continuous spectrum. The contribution of the six-quark bag to the polarization Psub(γ) is determined. The value of Psub(γ) is related to the admixture of the 6q-bag in the deuteron. Experimental value of Psub(γ) corresponds to small (< or approximately 0.7%) admixture of the bag

  19. Techniques for predicting environment electromagnetic radiation at satellite ground station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Peiji

    1987-01-01

    The measurement theories, techniques, and calculation methods on public exposure level of electromagnetic radiation at satellite ground station are described for the purpose of enviroment protection and research of EM compatibility. According to the results of the measurement and calculation, it is possible to predict the effects of electromagnetic radiation to environment at satellite ground station

  20. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-01-01

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions

  1. The case against protecting the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the (rarely heard) argument in favour of retention of the present system of radiation protection of the environment. There has been a recent trend in the radioecological and radiation protection community towards greater regulation of the effects of ionising radiations on biota. In particular, the often quoted International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) hypothesis that: If humans are protected from the effects of ionising radiation, then flora and fauna are also adequately protected has been criticised as being too anthropocentric and not adequate for protection of the environment. In this paper I will challenge this view, arguing firstly that this statement is almost always quoted out of its proper context, and secondly that the ICRP hypothesis does adequately protect the environment from the effects of ionising radiations. In view of the relatively insignificant effect of regulated releases of ionising radiation on the environment, the economic cost of further regulation will not result in a significant environmental benefit. Whilst empirical research to test the ICRP hypothesis should continue, until there is clear evidence against it, this simple and cost-effective approach should be retained. This would benefit the environment by directing scarce resources to more urgent environmental problems. (author)

  2. Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

    1998-05-01

    The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

  3. Radiation Environments and their Impact at the CERN's Injector Chain

    CERN Document Server

    De Carvalho Saraiva, Joao Pedro; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    Mixed particle and energy radiation fields present at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its Injector Chain are responsible for failures on electronic devices located in the vicinity of the accelerator beam lines. These radiation effects on electronics and, more generally, the overall radiation damage issues have a direct impact on component and system lifetimes, as well as on maintenance requirements and radiation exposure to personnel who have to intervene and fix the faults. This note describes the different radiation environments present along the CERN’s Injector Chain and the expected evolution over the next years with the ongoing LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. The available dosimetry and beam monitoring systems used to assess radiation levels are presented, outlining their respective pros and cons. The interplay between Monte Carlo simulations and the available radiation monitoring in the Injectors is also presented.

  4. Arctic (and Antarctic) Observing Experiment - an Assessment of Methods to Measure Temperature over Polar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigor, I. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Woods, J. E.; Henderson, G. R.; Zook, J.; Marshall, C.; Gallage, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic environment has been undergoing profound changes; the most visible is the dramatic decrease in Arctic sea ice extent (SIE). These changes pose a challenge to our ability to measure surface temperature across the Polar Regions. Traditionally, the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) and International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB) have measured surface air temperature (SAT) at 2-m height, which minimizes the ambiguity of measurements near of the surface. Specifically, is the temperature sensor measuring open water, snow, sea ice, or air? But now, with the dramatic decrease in Arctic SIE, increase in open water during summer, and the frailty of the younger sea ice pack, the IABP has had to deploy and develop new instruments to measure temperature. These instruments include Surface Velocity Program (SVP) buoys, which are commonly deployed on the world's ice-free oceans and typically measure sea surface temperature (SST), and the new robust Airborne eXpendable Ice Beacons (AXIB), which measure both SST and SAT. "Best Practice" requires that these instruments are inter-compared, and early results showing differences in collocated temperature measurements of over 2°C prompted the establishment of the IABP Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) buoy test site at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Barrow, Alaska. Preliminary results showed that the color of the hull of SVP buoys introduces a bias due to solar heating of the buoy. Since then, we have recommended that buoys should be painted white to reduce biases in temperature measurements due to different colors of the buoys deployed in different regions of the Arctic or the Antarctic. Measurements of SAT are more robust, but some of the temperature shields are susceptible to frosting. During our presentation we will provide an intercomparison of the temperature measurements at the AOX test site (i.e. high quality DOE/ARM observations compared with

  5. Effects of differently polarized microwave radiation on the microscopic structure of the nuclei in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shckorbatov, Yuriy G; Pasiuga, Vladimir N; Goncharuk, Elena I; Petrenko, Tatiana Ph; Grabina, Valentin A; Kolchigin, Nicolay N; Ivanchenko, Dmitry D; Bykov, Victor N; Dumin, Oleksandr M

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the influence of microwave radiation on the human fibroblast nuclei, the effects of three variants of electromagnetic wave polarization, linear and left-handed and right-handed elliptically polarized, were examined. Experimental conditions were: frequency (f) 36.65 GHz, power density (P) at the surface of exposed object 1, 10, 30, and 100 µW/cm(2), exposure time 10 s. Human fibroblasts growing in a monolayer on a cover slide were exposed to microwave electromagnetic radiation. The layer of medium that covered cells during microwave exposure was about 1 mm thick. Cells were stained immediately after irradiation by 2% (w/v) orcein solution in 45% (w/v) acetic acid. Experiments were made at room temperature (25 °C), and control cell samples were processed in the same conditions. We assessed heterochromatin granule quantity (HGQ) at 600× magnification. Microwave irradiation at the intensity of 1 µW/cm(2) produced no effect, and irradiation at the intensities of 10 and 100 µW/cm(2) induced an increase in HGQ. More intense irradiation induced more chromatin condensation. The right-handed elliptically polarized radiation revealed more biological activity than the left-handed polarized one.

  6. Jeans instability in collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma with radiative condensation and polarization force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapati, R. P., E-mail: prajapati-iter@yahoo.co.in; Bhakta, S. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Central University, Bilaspur-495009 (C.G.) (India); Chhajlani, R. K. [Retired from School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain-456010 (M.P.) (India)

    2016-05-15

    The influence of dust-neutral collisions, polarization force, and electron radiative condensation is analysed on the Jeans (gravitational) instability of partially ionized strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) using linear perturbation (normal mode) analysis. The Boltzmann distributed ions, dynamics of inertialess electrons, charged dust and neutral particles are considered. Using the plane wave solutions, a general dispersion relation is derived which is modified due to the presence of dust-neutral collisions, strong coupling effect, polarization force, electron radiative condensation, and Jeans dust/neutral frequencies. In the long wavelength perturbations, the Jeans instability criterion depends upon strong coupling effect, polarization interaction parameter, and thermal loss, but it is independent of dust-neutral collision frequency. The stability of the considered configuration is analysed using the Routh–Hurwitz criterion. The growth rates of Jeans instability are illustrated, and stabilizing influence of viscoelasticity and dust-neutral collision frequency while destabilizing effect of electron radiative condensation, polarization force, and Jeans dust-neutral frequency ratio is observed. This work is applied to understand the gravitational collapse of SCDP with dust-neutral collisions.

  7. Modeling and parameterization of photoelectrons emitted in condensed matter by linearly polarized synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, A.

    2018-01-01

    Growing availability of synchrotron facilities stimulates an interest in quantitative applications of hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) using linearly polarized radiation. An advantage of this approach is the possibility of continuous variation of radiation energy that makes it possible to control the sampling depth for a measurement. Quantitative applications are based on accurate and reliable theory relating the measured spectral features to needed characteristics of the surface region of solids. A major complication in the case of polarized radiation is an involved structure of the photoemission cross-section for hard X-rays. In the present work, details of the relevant formalism are described and algorithms implementing this formalism for different experimental configurations are proposed. The photoelectron signal intensity may be considerably affected by variation in the positioning of the polarization vector with respect to the surface plane. This information is critical for any quantitative application of HAXPES by polarized X-rays. Different quantitative applications based on photoelectrons with energies up to 10 keV are considered here: (i) determination of surface composition, (ii) estimation of sampling depth, and (iii) measurements of an overlayer thickness. Parameters facilitating these applications (mean escape depths, information depths, effective attenuation lengths) were calculated for a number of photoelectron lines in four elemental solids (Si, Cu, Ag and Au) in different experimental configurations and locations of the polarization vector. One of the considered configurations, with polarization vector located in a plane perpendicular to the surface, was recommended for quantitative applications of HAXPES. In this configurations, it was found that the considered parameters vary weakly in the range of photoelectron emission angles from normal emission to about 50° with respect to the surface normal. The averaged values of the mean

  8. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Shvets, G

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  9. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation

  10. Integration of optical fibers in radiative environments: Advantages and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A.; Marcandella, C.; Bisutti, J.; Baggio, J.; Meunier, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We review the advantages and limitations for the integration of optical fibers in radiative environments. Optical fibers present numerous advantages for applications in harsh environments such as their electromagnetic immunity. This explains the increasing interest of the radiation effects community to evaluate their vulnerability for future facilities. However, it is also well-known that optical fibers suffer from a degradation of their macroscopic properties under irradiation. We illustrate the major mechanisms and parameters that govern the degradation mechanism, mainly the radiation-induced attenuation phenomena. We focus on the fiber transient radiation responses when exposed to the pulsed and mixed environment associated with the Megajoule class lasers devoted to the fusion by inertial confinement study. (authors)

  11. Origin of Cold-Air Outbreaks: Polar Air Mass Formation from a Radiation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliankinshtein, N.; Huang, Y.; Gyakum, J. R.; Atallah, E.

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that arctic processes have significant impacts on mid-latitude weather systems. As a general representation of these processes, one can imagine the polar vortex, which is a large upper-level low-pressure system above the North Pole with cold and dense air masses underneath, and surrounded by a jet stream. This jet stream is essentially a large amplitude Rossby wave propagating eastward. When it makes a cyclonic loop, it encloses a region of the vortex that may extend far to the south causing a cold wave, cold spell or a cold-air outbreak. Cold-air outbreaks event can be associated not only with anomalously low temperatures but also with extreme precipitation and persistent weather regimes occurring at mid-latitude sites, so forecasting of these events is challenging. This study focuses on the formation of the air masses trapped in these regions, from a radiation perspective. We consider both observational and modeling approaches to the phenomenon. A common way to consider cold air mass formation is to implement a single-column radiative-convective equilibrium model and to run it under the conditions of polar night. Thus one can simulate a transition of a warm maritime air mass to a cold continental one as a result of longwave radiative cooling without energy supply in the form of solar radiation. The lack of solar heating is relevant not only for the absolute darkness of polar night, but also when the sun shines just above the horizon, because of a large solar zenith angle and a high albedo. In this study we use reanalysis data to identify the events of cold-air formation over Canada's North and construct a radiative-convective model based on the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model and parameterized convective schemes. We analyze and simulate the evolution of the air masses in a Lagrangian framework and quantify the radiative contribution to these processes.

  12. Designing equipment for use in gamma radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergriff, K.U.

    1990-05-01

    High levels of gamma radiation are known to cause degradation in a variety of materials and components. When designing systems to operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions and procedures should be followed. This report (1) outlines steps that should be followed in designing equipment and (2) explains the general effects of radiation on various engineering materials and components. Much information exists in the literature on radiation effects upon materials. However, very little information is available to give the designer a step-by-step process for designing systems that will be subject to high levels of gamma radiation, such as those found in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In this report, many radiation effect references are relied upon to aid in the design of components and systems. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  13. Designing Equipment for Use in Gamma Radiation Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandergriff, K.U.

    1990-01-01

    High levels of gamma radiation are known to cause degradation in a variety of materials and components. When designing systems to operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions and procedures should be followed. This report (1) outlines steps that should be followed in designing equipment and (2) explains the general effects of radiation on various engineering materials and components. Much information exists in the literature on radiation effects upon materials. However, very little information is available to give the designer a step-by-step process for designing systems that will be subject to high levels of gamma radiation, such as those found in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In this report, many radiation effect references are relied upon to aid in the design of components and systems.

  14. Research on environment monitoring of radiation emergency

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y; Otani, N

    2003-01-01

    In a case of a nuclear accident at nuclear facilities, strong radiation such as g-rays and neutrons might radiate at a burst in the initial stage. For the establishment of dose estimation system for such accidents, the experiments were done using the He sup + sup 2 beam accelerated by Tandem in the W-MAST. The following results were obtained. 1) Neutron measurements using a rem counter yielded that dose equivalent was about 9.4 mSv/h at a position 100 cm from the Be target when the beam current of 15 MeV He sup 2 sup + was 0.8 mu A. Neutron measurement by means of Au and In foil activation method and by use of TLD element revealed that dose equivalents were to be 16-27 mu Sv/h for thermal neutron, and 30-41 mu Sv/h for sub-fast neutron (20 keV). Therefore, it was concluded that neutron field was mainly composed by fast neutron. 2) Linearity of the rem-counter out put vs neutron flux was valid under the condition that the count rate of the rem-counter was less than 10 kcps. 3) Computer simulation using NRESP c...

  15. Research on environment monitoring of radiation emergency

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y

    2002-01-01

    In a case of a nuclear accident at nuclear facilities, radiation such as gamma-rays and neutrons might radiate at a burst in the initial stage. For the establishment of dose estimation system for such accidents, the experiments were carried out using the Tandem/Synchrotron accelerator. The following results were obtained: (1) Measurements of the gamma-ray emission using the NaI detector together with pile up rejection system revealed that the good signals without the pile up phenomena could be obtained in case of count rate less than 7 kc/s. On assumption that energy distribution function of the gamma-rays was proportional to be E exp(- E/T sub e sub f sub f), the effective temperature T sub e sub f sub f was estimated to be 0.8 - 0.9 MeV by use of non-linear least squares. (2) Doses of gamma-rays were measured using the TLD elements shielded by Pb sheets with various widths. The effective temperature T sub e sub f sub f estimated under the same experimental conditions described in (1) was 0.6-3 MeV. In an ac...

  16. Effect of radiation environment on radiation use efficiency and growth of sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bange, M.P.; Hammer, G.L.; Rickert, K.G.

    1997-01-01

    The level of incident radiation and the proportion of radiation that is diffuse affects radiation use efficiency (RUE) in crops. However, the degree of this effect, and its importance to growth and yield of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) have not been established. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of radiation environment on RUE, growth, and yield of sunflower. A fully irrigated crop was sown on an alluvial-prairie soil (Fluventic Haplustoll) and was exposed to three distinct radiation environments. In two treatments, the level of incident radiation was reduced by 14 and 20% by suspending two different types of polyethylene plastic films well above the crop. In addition to the reductions in incident radiation, the proportion of radiation that was diffuse was increased by about 14% in these treatments. Lower incident radiation and increased proportion of diffuse radiation had no effect on total biomass, phenology, leaf area, and the canopy light extinction coefficient (k = 0.89). However, yield was reduced in shaded treatments due to smaller grain size and lower harvest index. Although crop RUE measured over the entire crop cycle (1.25 g/MJ) did not differ significantly among treatments, there was a trend where RUE compensated for less intercepted incident radiation. Theoretical derivations of the response of RUE to different levels of incident radiation supported this finding. Shaded sunflower crops have the ability to produce biomass similar to unshaded crops by increasing RUE, but have lower harvest indices

  17. The development of advanced robotics technology in high radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jaiwan; Lee, Nam Ho; Choi, Young Soo; Park, Soon Yong; Lee, Jong Min; Park, Jin Suk; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Moon, Byung Soo.

    1997-07-01

    In the tele-operation technology using tele-presence in high radiation environment, stereo vision target tracking by centroid method, vergence control of stereo camera by moving vector method, stereo observing system by correlation method, horizontal moving axis stereo camera, and 3 dimensional information acquisition by stereo image is developed. Also, gesture image acquisition by computer vision and construction of virtual environment for remote work in nuclear power plant. In the development of intelligent control and monitoring technology for tele-robot in hazardous environment, the characteristics and principle of robot operation. And, robot end-effector tracking algorithm by centroid method and neural network method are developed for the observation and survey in hazardous environment. 3-dimensional information acquisition algorithm by structured light is developed. In the development of radiation hardened sensor technology, radiation-hardened camera module is designed and tested. And radiation characteristics of electric components is robot system is evaluated. Also 2-dimensional radiation monitoring system is developed. These advanced critical robot technology and telepresence techniques developed in this project can be applied to nozzle-dam installation /removal robot system, can be used to realize unmanned remotelization of nozzle-dam installation / removal task in steam generator of nuclear power plant, which can be contributed for people involved in extremely hazardous high radioactivity area to eliminate their exposure to radiation, enhance their task safety, and raise their working efficiency. (author). 75 refs., 21 tabs., 15 figs

  18. Environment radiation protection - Synthesis and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    This document presents the principal progresses in the area of risk evaluation to environment in relation with radionuclides during the last five years. It is based on a comparison between the methods that exist for chemical products and this one in progress for radioactive products. The enlightened point concerns the methodologies developed at European scale. The basic concepts of the environmental risk assessment are presented and also its principal components. The knowledge relative to the criteria of environmental protection is presented. The differences between the chemical products and the radioactive products are taken into account. Finally, this document shows the feasibility of methods of risk assessment to ecosystems associated to the presence or release of radioactive substances i environment. (N.C.)

  19. Research in radiation biology, in the environment, and in radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.; Myers, D.K.; Ophel, I.L.; Cowper, G.; Newcombe, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    Research in radiation biology at CRNL is concerned with: evaluation of the effects of low doses of radiation upon humans and other living organisms; the development of new methods for detecting the effects of radiation exposure in large populations; the continued development of improved methods by which radiation levels can be measured accurately and reliably; and evaluation of the effects of nuclear power use upon the environment. The present report summarizes our background knowledge of radiation hazards and describes current research activities in Biology and Health Physics Division at CRNL. (author)

  20. Polarization and Radiation Pattern Reconfigurability of a Planar Monopole-Fed Loop Antenna for GPS Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Fakharian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reconfigurable loop antenna with monopole-fed using embedded RF PIN switches based shorted parasitic elements for GPS applications. The antenna can independently reconfiguring multiple polarizations with switchable radiation pattern. Four switched metallic patches are used as parasitic elements to provide a reconfiguration capability to antenna acting as a driven monopole-fed loop. The edge of the parasitic elements is shorted by posts. The parasitic patches are connected/disconnected by using switching, therewith changing the configuration of monopole, to turn changes the current distribution over the loop surface. The antenna is designed to work on the GPS L1 frequency band. The antenna simultaneously changes the radiation beam in E- and H-planes, and switches among three polarizations (LP, LHCP, and RHCP in the various modes. The antenna maximum gain among the different modes is tuned between 1.5 and 4.2 dBi.

  1. Multiple scattering of polarized light: comparison of Maxwell theory and radiative transfer theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Florian; Hohmann, Ansgar; Schäfer, Jan; Kienle, Alwin

    2012-04-01

    For many research areas in biomedical optics, information about scattering of polarized light in turbid media is of increasing importance. Scattering simulations within this field are mainly performed on the basis of radiative transfer theory. In this study a polarization sensitive Monte Carlo solution of radiative transfer theory is compared to exact Maxwell solutions for all elements of the scattering Müller matrix. Different scatterer volume concentrations are modeled as a multitude of monodisperse nonabsorbing spheres randomly positioned in a cubic simulation volume which is irradiated with monochromatic incident light. For all Müller matrix elements effects due to dependent scattering and multiple scattering are analysed. The results are in overall good agreement between the two methods with deviations related to dependent scattering being prominent for high volume concentrations and high scattering angles.

  2. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. II. High-order Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janett, Gioele; Steiner, Oskar; Belluzzi, Luca, E-mail: gioele.janett@irsol.ch [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno (IRSOL), 6605 Locarno-Monti (Switzerland)

    2017-08-20

    When integrating the radiative transfer equation for polarized light, the necessity of high-order numerical methods is well known. In fact, well-performing high-order formal solvers enable higher accuracy and the use of coarser spatial grids. Aiming to provide a clear comparison between formal solvers, this work presents different high-order numerical schemes and applies the systematic analysis proposed by Janett et al., emphasizing their advantages and drawbacks in terms of order of accuracy, stability, and computational cost.

  3. Possible sources of radiation in indoor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djukanovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    More locations and building material will be needed to solve the housing needs, actually the future quantities will equal the total of all the previous building. And presently one quarter of the world population is already homeless. The development of human civilization in the new technological era goes on extremely quickly. In the search for new spaces, in the last decade of the 20th century, in town renovation planning the application of subterranean civil engineering is very popular. Below ground level, the new towns are built with many stories, with exclusively artificial light and artificial climate. There is not the slightest possibility of natural ventilation. These spaces have not been investigated as regards the contents of radon. Man is not adapted to spend most of the time in under artificial conditions. It is still to be discovered how it will affect humans and what is the degree of exposure to ionizing radiation in such conditions. It might be better to abandon underground construction before the adverse effects are proved. Previous mistakes in building must be overcome and new technologies applied as well as sustainable development in the future. (author)

  4. Rao and Wald tests for adaptive detection in partially homogeneous environment with a diversely polarized antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaozhu; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Chengyuan

    2013-01-01

    This study considers Rao test and Wald test for adaptive detection based on a diversely polarized antenna (DPA) in partially homogeneous environment. The theoretical expressions for the probability of false alarm and detection are derived, and constant false alarm rate (CFAR) behaviour is remarked on. Furthermore, the monotonicities of detection probability of the two detectors are proved, and a polarization optimization detection algorithm to enhance the detection performance is proposed. The numerical simulations are conducted to attest to the validity of the above theoretical analysis and illustrate the improvement in the detection performance of the proposed optimization algorithm.

  5. Rao and Wald Tests for Adaptive Detection in Partially Homogeneous Environment with a Diversely Polarized Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaozhu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study considers Rao test and Wald test for adaptive detection based on a diversely polarized antenna (DPA in partially homogeneous environment. The theoretical expressions for the probability of false alarm and detection are derived, and constant false alarm rate (CFAR behaviour is remarked on. Furthermore, the monotonicities of detection probability of the two detectors are proved, and a polarization optimization detection algorithm to enhance the detection performance is proposed. The numerical simulations are conducted to attest to the validity of the above theoretical analysis and illustrate the improvement in the detection performance of the proposed optimization algorithm.

  6. Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Radiators for Lunar and Martian Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William G.; Ellis, Michael C.; Walker, Kara L.

    2009-03-01

    Long-term Lunar and Martian surface systems present challenges to thermal system design, including changes in thermal load, and large changes in the thermal environment between Lunar (or Martian) day and night. For example, the heat sink temperature at the Lunar equator can vary from 210 to 315 K. The radiator must be sized to reject the design power at the maximum temperature, but must also be able to accommodate both the changing heat sink temperature, as well as changes in power. Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) radiators were examined for the main reactor of a fission surface power system, as well as the cavity cooling radiator. A VCHP radiator was designed for Lunar Equator that is capable of maintaining a 16 K temperature drop with a 4% addition to overall mass. Without the VCHP the radiator would experience a 43 K drop in temperature. This design is also capable of handling turndown on the power without an effect to the outlet temperature. At Shackleton Crater, the temperature drop for a conventional heat pipe radiator is small enough that a VCHP is not beneficial at constant power. However, a VCHP will allow turndown ratios of 5:1 or more. A conventional radiator can not be turned down more than 2:1, without valves to bypass part of the radiator. VCHPs are also easier to start than conventional radiators, since the gas-loading prevents sublimation from the evaporator when the condenser is frozen.

  7. Radiation exposure of airline crew members to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, G. E-mail: gianni.deangelis@iol.it; Caldora, M.; Santaquilani, M.; Scipione, R.; Verdecchia, A

    2001-06-01

    A study of radiation exposures in the ionizing radiation environment of the atmosphere is currently in progress for the Italian civil aviation flight personnel. After a description of the considered data sources/ the philosophy of the study is presented/ and an overview is given of the data processing with regard to flight routes/ the computational techniques for radiation dose evaluation along the flight paths and for the exposure matrix building/ along with an indication of the results that the study should provide.

  8. Utilization of SRNL-developed radiation-resistant polymer in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibo, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-27

    The radiation-resistant polymer developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory is adaptable for multiple applications to enhance polymer endurance and effectiveness in radiation environments. SRNL offers to collaborate with TEPCO in evaluation, testing, and utilization of SRNL’s radiation-resistant polymer in the D&D of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Refinement of the scope and associated costs will be conducted in consultation with TECPO.

  9. Memory behaviour in a radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucker, G.J.; Thurlow, L.

    1979-01-01

    Memory devices are often required for storage of data which must not be altered during a nuclear burst. If the properties of non-alterability and low power consumption during a standby mode of operation are combined, then the choice is narrowed down to static C-MOS bulk or silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) memories. Previous investigations have indicated that the SOS devices will achieve the maximum non-scrambling dose rate. However, it is interesting to determine the limitations of bulk as well as SOS devices for those programs where circumvention and refreshing of the memory is allowed. This article will present the results of an investigation of the characteristics of these memory types in a transient environment. (author)

  10. Gerald: a general environment for radiation analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, Ch.; Oliveira, P.I.E. de; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Adams, M.L.; Galan, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper describes the status of the GERALD interactive workbench for the analysis of radiation transport problems. GERALD basically guides the user through the various steps that are necessary to solve a radiation transport problem, and is aimed at education, research and industry. The advantages of such workbench are many: quality assurance of problem setup, interaction of the user with problem solution, preservation of theory and legacy research codes, and rapid proto-typing and testing of new methods. The environment is of general applicability catering for analytical, deterministic and stochastic analysis of the radiation problem and is not tied to one specific solution method or code. However, GERALD is being developed as a portable, modular, open source framework which renders itself quite naturally to the coupling of existing computational tools through specifically developed plug-ins. By offering a common route for setting up, solving and analyzing radiation transport problems GERALD offers the possibility of methods intercomparison and validation. Such flexible radiation transport environment will also facilitate the coupling of radiation physics methods to other physical phenomena and their application to other areas of application such as medical physics and the environment. (authors)

  11. Response of structural materials to radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1997-12-01

    An evaluation of proton and neutron damage to aluminum, stainless steel, nickel alloys, and various aluminum alloys has been performed. The proton studies were conducted at energies of 200 MeV, 800 MeV, and 23.5 GeV. The proton studies consisted of evaluation and characterization of proton-irradiated window/target materials from accelerators and comparison to nonirradiated archival materials. The materials evaluated for the proton irradiations included 99.9999 wt% aluminum, 1100 aluminum, 5052 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, and inconel 718. The neutron damage research centered on 6061 T-6 aluminum which was obtained from a control-rod follower from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). This material had received thermal neutron fluence up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}. The possible effects of thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios are discussed. The increases in tensile strength in the proton-irradiated materials is shown to be the result of atomic displacements. These displacements cause interstitials and vacancies which aggregate into defect clusters which result in radiation hardening of the materials. Production of gas (helium) in the grain boundaries of proton irradiated 99.9999 wt% aluminum is also discussed. The major factor contributing to the mechanical-property changes in the neutron-irradiated 6061 T-6 aluminum is the production of transmutation products formed by interactions of the aluminum with thermal neutrons. The metallurgical and mechanical-property evaluations for the research consisted of electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission), tensile testing, and microhardness testing.

  12. Role of natural radiation environment in earth sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, K.G.

    1980-01-01

    Natural ionizing radiations play an important role in a wide spectrum of earth sciences, including meteorology, geophysics, hydrology, atmospheric physics, and atmospheric chemistry. The nature and distribution of ionizing radiation sources and natural radionuclides in the atmospheric environment are summarized. The present status of the use of natural radioactive tracers for atmospheric studies is discussed. The effect of ionization produced by natural radiation sources on atmospheric electricity, the relationship of electrical and meteorological variables, and the possible effects of man-made releases of 85 Kr are considered. Experimental evidence is presented for the production of condensation nuclei by the combined effects of radon and sulfur dioxide

  13. Interactive intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.fabry@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Vanherpe, Liesbeth [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Baudin, Mathieu [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); LCPI, ENSAM ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l' Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Theis, Chris [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Braesch, Christian [SYMME, Université de Savoie, Polytech Annecy-Chambry, 5 chemin de Bellevue, 74944 Annecy le Vieux (France); Feral, Bruno [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland)

    2013-04-21

    A core issue during the planning of a maintenance intervention in a facility with ionizing radiation is the minimization of the integrated equivalent dose contracted by the maintenance workers during the intervention. In this work, we lay down the concepts for intervention planning in an irradiated environment and present a new software program for intervention planning, which provides interactive visualization of facilities and radiation levels, as well as tools for interactive trajectory planning. The software includes automatic calculation of the expected integrated equivalent radiation dose contracted during an intervention.

  14. Interactive intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas; Baudin, Mathieu; Theis, Chris; Braesch, Christian; Feral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    A core issue during the planning of a maintenance intervention in a facility with ionizing radiation is the minimization of the integrated equivalent dose contracted by the maintenance workers during the intervention. In this work, we lay down the concepts for intervention planning in an irradiated environment and present a new software program for intervention planning, which provides interactive visualization of facilities and radiation levels, as well as tools for interactive trajectory planning. The software includes automatic calculation of the expected integrated equivalent radiation dose contracted during an intervention.

  15. Do we need radiation protection for the living environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefner, A.; Voelkle, H.

    2003-01-01

    The protection of the living environment, i.e. non human species or non human organisms, is a condition for the long term human survival. This certainly is true also for radioactivity and ionizing radiation. The ICRP statement that fauna und flora are sufficiently protected if man is protected is valid in many cases but not in every one. The article gives some reflections on this subject from the point of view of practical radiation protection and some suggestions on how, if necessary, protection of the living environment could be put into practice. (orig.) [de

  16. Fifth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porstendoerfer, J.; Swedjemark, G.A.; Baeverstam, U.; Lowder, W.M.; Miller, K.M.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1993-01-01

    The fifth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment organized a series of tutorial sessions. One of the five major fields concerned with the radon issue. The tutorials dealt with important issues of the radon problem and covered the following aspects: Cosmic and Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Measurement, Properties and Behaviour of Radon and Thoron and Their Decay Products in the Air, Radon and Radon Daughters Metrology: Basic Aspects Long Lived Radionuclides in the Environment, in Food and in Human Beings, Design and Analysis of Radon Surveys with Epidemiological Utility

  17. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-15

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety.

  18. Contribution to developing the environment radiation protection methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A. [Institute of Atomic Power Engineering NRNU MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alexakhin, R.; Dubynina, M. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The environment sustainable development and biota protection, including the environment radiation protection are issues of nowadays interest in the society. An activity is ongoing on the development of a system of radiation protection for non-human biota. Anthropocentric and eco-centric principles are widely discussed. ICRP Publications 103, 108, 114 and many other reports and articles refer to the topic of environmental protection, reference animals and plants set, corresponding transfer parameters, dose models and derived consideration reference levels. There is still an open field for discussion of methods and approaches to get well-established procedure to assess environmental risks of radiation impacts to different organisms, populations and ecosystems. A huge work has been done by the ICRP and other organizations and research groups to develop and systematize approaches for this difficult subject. This activity, however, is not everywhere well-known and perceived, and more efforts are needed to bring ideas of eco-centric strategy in the environment radiation protection not only to public but to specialists in many countries as well. One of the main points of interest is an assessment of critical doses and doses rates for flora and fauna species. Some aspects of a possible procedure to find their estimates are studied in this work, including criteria for datasets of good quality, models of dose dependence, sensitivity of different umbrella endpoints and methods of original massive datasets treatment. Estimates are done based on information gathered in a database on radiation-induced effects in plants. Data on biological effects in plants (umbrella endpoints of reproductive potential, survival, morbidity, morphological, biochemical, and genetic effects) in dependence on dose and dose rates of ionizing radiation have been collected from reviewed publications and maintained in MS Access format. The database now contains about 7000 datasets and 25000 records

  19. Polarization Statistics on 0.01 Hz Waves in the Lunar Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. K.; Halekas, J. S.; Harada, Y.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    One generating mechanism for waves in the lunar plasma environment is through the process of resonant interactions with non-solar wind ions. In particular, this mechanism is believed to be a main generator of waves that lie near the ion cyclotron frequency; around 0.01 Hz. Both left-handed and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame has been observed for waves in this frequency range. Due to the effects of Doppler shift from the solar wind, the intrinsic polarization of the waves is not necessarily the same as their polarization in the spacecraft frame. A significant source of non-solar wind ions is incoming solar wind protons that are reflected by localized crustal magnetic fields on the lunar surface. Previous statistical studies have looked at the distribution of non-solar wind ions and 0.01 Hz waves around the Moon, and how they are influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. Here we investigate the polarization statistics of 0.01 Hz waves around the Moon using ARTEMIS data from August 2011 through December 2016. Initial statistics on observation rates and location indicate that waves that appear left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame are more common and have a broader spatial distribution around the Moon; waves that appear right-hand polarized are less frequently observed and are more centralized to the dawn side of the Moon. We further investigate how the distributions are related to IMF direction and lunar phase, and we make comparisons between non-solar wind ion distributions and polarization distributions. Additionally, we use a combination of wave analysis and ion tracing simulations to examine the intrinsic properties of these waves.

  20. Standardization of ionizing radiation in industry and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    In this account a new standardization system is described. This system is intended for the protection of environment, people and employees against the harmful consequences of ionizing radiation. This new system is based upon the actual knowledge of the harmful effects of ionizing radiation and joins to the starting points and objectives of the environment- and industry-protectional policies and is explained for both policies separately. The starting points and objectives are presented of the actual environment- and industry-protectional policies and of the radiation-protection policy pursued up till now. The harmful effects of radiation, the importance of the of the most recent scientific developments and the results of the investigation performed in the framework of this account, are described. Conclusions about these harmful affects are given. The systematics of the standardization are described. Subsequently are considered the radiation sources, their classification, the risk limits for regular situations and for large accidents, the justification principle and the ALARA-principle, emission- and product requirements, objectives for environment quality, standards for combat of the consequences of accidents, the policy with regard to 'building and dwelling' and finally standards for protection of employees. The consequences of the systematics of standardization, which are described in this account, are indicated for environment- as well as industry-protectional policy. Per radiation-source category the corresponding risks are indicated and at which term which continuation activities are necessary. The consequences for the set of instruments and some international aspects are considered. Finally the activity list gives a survey of the continuation activities and the terms at which these have to be carried out. (H.W.). 4 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Assessment of radiation awareness training in immersive virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisker, Vaughn E., III

    The prospect of new nuclear power plant orders in the near future and the graying of the current workforce create a need to train new personnel faster and better. Immersive virtual reality (VR) may offer a solution to the training challenge. VR technology presented in a CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) provides a high-fidelity, one-to-one scale environment where areas of the power plant can be recreated and virtual radiation environments can be simulated, making it possible to safely expose workers to virtual radiation in the context of the actual work environment. The use of virtual reality for training is supported by many educational theories; constructivism and discovery learning, in particular. Educational theory describes the importance of matching the training to the task. Plant access training and radiation worker training, common forms of training in the nuclear industry, rely on computer-based training methods in most cases, which effectively transfer declarative knowledge, but are poor at transferring skills. If an activity were to be added, the training would provide personnel with the opportunity to develop skills and apply their knowledge so they could be more effective when working in the radiation environment. An experiment was developed to test immersive virtual reality's suitability for training radiation awareness. Using a mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative measures, the subjects' performances before and after training were assessed. First, subjects completed a pre-test to measure their knowledge prior to completing any training. Next they completed unsupervised computer-based training, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation and a PDF document. After completing a brief orientation activity in the virtual environment, one group of participants received supplemental radiation awareness training in a simulated radiation environment presented in the CAVE, while a second group, the control group, moved directly to the

  2. General impact of robotics and automation in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meghdari, A.; Salehi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Robotics and automation systems in nuclear environments require special design considerations. This paper presents an overview of selected robotic systems already designed and developed for use in nuclear applications at some U.S. laboratories. It will further emphasize on tasks identification, operational constraints, special considerations in materials selection, and a general guideline for robotic systems design in radiation environments. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs

  3. Optimization of radiation monitoring methods of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarkov, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    corresponding concentration radionuclides in the environment, and significantly reduce economic costs. The method of intra vital measurement of 90Sr in small animals opens up fundamentally new opportunities for researchers in radioecology and radiobiology

  4. Galileo Measurements of the Jovian Electron Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    The Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) has been used to map Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii (1 jovian radius = 71,400 km). The electron count rates from the instrument were averaged into 10-minute intervals over the energy range 0.2 MeV to 11 MeV to form an extensive database of observations of the jovian radiation belts between Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) in 1995 and end of mission in 2003. These data were then used to provide differential flux estimates in the jovian equatorial plane as a function of radial distance (organized by magnetic L-shell position). These estimates provide the basis for an omni-directional, equatorial model of the jovian electron radiation environment. The comparison of these results with the original Divine model of jovian electron radiation and their implications for missions to Jupiter will be discussed. In particular, it was found that the electron dose predictions for a representative mission to Europa were about a factor of 2 lower than the Divine model estimates over the range of 100 to 1000 mils (2.54 to 25.4 mm) of aluminum shielding, but exceeded the Divine model by about 50% for thicker shielding for the assumed Europa orbiter trajectories. The findings are a significant step forward in understanding jovian electron radiation and represent a valuable tool for estimating the radiation environment to which jovian science and engineering hardware will be exposed.

  5. Proceedings of the sixth circumpolar symposium on remote sensing of polar environments. CD-ROM ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.

    2000-09-01

    This international conference focused on the application of remote sensing to monitor morphological and environmental changes in polar environments to better understand the impacts of climatic change. Remote sensing included the use of satellite image mapping, LANDSAT imagery, and digitized aerial photography. The conference was divided into several sessions entitled: (1) techniques, (2) wildlife habitat, (3) regional mapping, (4) environment and climate, (5) geographical information systems (GIS) modeling, (6) geology and geomorphology, (7) snow and ice, and (8) monitoring. The work presented at this conference indicates that remote sensing, photogrammetry, GIS and cartography are cost-effective means to monitor hard to reach polar regions. A total of 27 papers were presented at this conference. Four have been processed separately for inclusion on the database. refs., tabs,. figs

  6. Wireless Communication Enhancement Methods for Mobile Robots in Radiation Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nattanmai Parasuraman, Ramviyas; Ferre, Manuel

    In hostile environments such as in scientific facilities where ionising radiation is a dominant hazard, reducing human interventions by increasing robotic operations are desirable. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has around 50 km of underground scientific facilities, where wireless mobile robots could help in the operation of the accelerator complex, e.g. in conducting remote inspections and radiation surveys in different areas. The main challenges to be considered here are not only that the robots should be able to go over long distances and operate for relatively long periods, but also the underground tunnel environment, the possible presence of electromagnetic fields, radiation effects, and the fact that the robots shall in no way interrupt the operation of the accelerators. Having a reliable and robust wireless communication system is essential for successful execution of such robotic missions and to avoid situations of manual recovery of the robots in the event that the robot runs ...

  7. Effects of radiation environment on reusable nuclear shuttle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Parametric tradeoff analyses of a wide spectrum of alternate tank configurations to minimize both primary and secondary, direct and scattered radiation sources emanating from the NERVA are reported. The analytical approach utilizing point kernel techniques is described and detailed data are presented on the magnitude of neutron/gamma doses for different locations. Single-tank configurations utilizing smaller cone angles and end cap radii were found to minimize integral radiation levels, hence, stage shielding-weight penalties for shuttle missions. Hybrid configurations employing an upper tank with a reduced cone angle and end cap radius result in low integral payload doses primarily due to the increased separation distance caused by the elongation of the larger capacity upper tank. A preliminary radiation damage assessment is discussed of possible reusable nuclear shuttle materials, components, and subsystems, and the possible effects of the radiation environment on various phases of RNS mission operations.

  8. A MULTIPLE SCATTERING POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODEL: APPLICATION TO HD 189733b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Natraj, Vijay; Swain, Mark R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhang, Xi [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Wiktorowicz, Sloane J., E-mail: pkk@gps.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We present a multiple scattering vector radiative transfer model that produces disk integrated, full phase polarized light curves for reflected light from an exoplanetary atmosphere. We validate our model against results from published analytical and computational models and discuss a small number of cases relevant to the existing and possible near-future observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b. HD 189733b is arguably the most well observed exoplanet to date and the only exoplanet to be observed in polarized light, yet it is debated if the planet’s atmosphere is cloudy or clear. We model reflected light from clear atmospheres with Rayleigh scattering, and cloudy or hazy atmospheres with Mie and fractal aggregate particles. We show that clear and cloudy atmospheres have large differences in polarized light as compared to simple flux measurements, though existing observations are insufficient to make this distinction. Futhermore, we show that atmospheres that are spatially inhomogeneous, such as being partially covered by clouds or hazes, exhibit larger contrasts in polarized light when compared to clear atmospheres. This effect can potentially be used to identify patchy clouds in exoplanets. Given a set of full phase polarimetric measurements, this model can constrain the geometric albedo, properties of scattering particles in the atmosphere, and the longitude of the ascending node of the orbit. The model is used to interpret new polarimetric observations of HD 189733b in a companion paper.

  9. Radiation parameters of the X-ray binary A 0535+26=HDE 245770 from the polarization and photometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larionov, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of Shakhovskay et al's observations of the X-ray binary A 0535+26=HDE 245770 made it possible to distinguish in its radiation the two components connected with the visible star (O9 III) and the accretion disc around the neutron star. The interstellar polarization parameters are in accordance with Serkowski's formula and the observations of the field stars. The IR and optical variability can be explained in terms of variable accretion disc radiation. The intrinsic polarization parameters obtained can be used to predict, in the model proposed, the directions of the polarization vectors in the IR and X-ray bands

  10. Adaptation of radiation shielding code to space environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Koichi; Hara, Akihisa

    1992-01-01

    Recently, the trend to the development of space has heightened. To the development of space, many problems are related, and as one of them, there is the protection from cosmic ray. The cosmic ray is the radiation having ultrahigh energy, and there was not the radiation shielding design code that copes with cosmic ray so far. Therefore, the high energy radiation shielding design code for accelerators was improved so as to cope with the peculiarity that cosmic ray possesses. Moreover, the calculation of the radiation dose equivalent rate in the moon base to which the countermeasures against cosmic ray were taken was simulated by using the improved code. As the important countermeasures for the safety protection from radiation, the covering with regolith is carried out, and the effect of regolith was confirmed by using the improved code. Galactic cosmic ray, solar flare particles, radiation belt, the adaptation of the radiation shielding code HERMES to space environment, the improvement of the three-dimensional hadron cascade code HETCKFA-2 and the electromagnetic cascade code EGS 4-KFA, and the cosmic ray simulation are reported. (K.I.)

  11. High-Performance, Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.; Frazier, Donald O.; Adams, James H.; Johnson, Michael A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project endeavors to advance the current state-of-the-art in high-performance, radiation-hardened electronics and processors, ensuring successful performance of space systems required to operate within extreme radiation and temperature environments. Because RHESE is a project within the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), RHESE's primary customers will be the human and robotic missions being developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) in partial fulfillment of the Vision for Space Exploration. Benefits are also anticipated for NASA's science missions to planetary and deep-space destinations. As a technology development effort, RHESE provides a broad-scoped, full spectrum of approaches to environmentally harden space electronics, including new materials, advanced design processes, reconfigurable hardware techniques, and software modeling of the radiation environment. The RHESE sub-project tasks are: SelfReconfigurable Electronics for Extreme Environments, Radiation Effects Predictive Modeling, Radiation Hardened Memory, Single Event Effects (SEE) Immune Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) (SIRF), Radiation Hardening by Software, Radiation Hardened High Performance Processors (HPP), Reconfigurable Computing, Low Temperature Tolerant MEMS by Design, and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Integrated Electronics for Extreme Environments. These nine sub-project tasks are managed by technical leads as located across five different NASA field centers, including Ames Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. The overall RHESE integrated project management responsibility resides with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Initial technology development emphasis within RHESE focuses on the hardening of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)s and Field Programmable Analog

  12. Selective Solvent-Induced Stabilization of Polar Oxide Surfaces in an Electrochemical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Su-Hyun; Todorova, Mira; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2018-02-01

    The impact of an electrochemical environment on the thermodynamic stability of polar oxide surfaces is investigated for the example of ZnO(0001) surfaces immersed in water using density functional theory calculations. We show that solvation effects are highly selective: They have little effect on surfaces showing a metallic character, but largely stabilize semiconducting structures, particularly those that have a high electrostatic penalty in vacuum. The high selectivity is shown to have direct consequences for the surface phase diagram and explains, e.g., why certain surface structures could be observed only in an electrochemical environment.

  13. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance fo participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors

  14. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance for participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Angular correlation and polarization studies for radiative electron capture into high-Z ions

    CERN Document Server

    Stöhlker, T; Fritzsche, S; Gumberidze, A; Kozhuharov, C; Ma, X; Orsic-Muthig, A; Spillmann, U; Sierpowski, D; Surzhykov, A; Tachenov, S; Warczak, A

    2004-01-01

    Recent photon correlation studies for Radiative Electron Capture into high-Z projectiles are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the investigation of polarization phenomena which are now accessible due to recent developments in position sensitive solid-states detectors. It is shown, that REC may provide a tool for the diagnostics and detection of the spinâ€"polarization of particles involved in atomic collisions. Also the impact of REC studies for atomic structure studies is outlined. Here the strong alignment of excited states induced by REC allowed us to observe an interference between competing decay branches for the case of the Lyman-α1 transition in hydrogen-like ions.

  16. First experimental study of photon polarization in radiative $B^{0}_{s}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-09

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative $B^{0}_{s}$ decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3fb$^{-1}$ at center-of-mass energies of $7$ and $8$TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the $B^{0}_{s} \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay rate is conducted to determine the parameter ${\\mathcal{A}}^\\Delta$, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarization amplitudes in $b \\to s \\gamma$ transitions. A value of ${\\mathcal{A}}^\\Delta=-0.98^{\\,+0.46\\,+0.23}_{\\,-0.52\\,-0.20}$ is measured. This result is consistent with the Standard Model prediction within two standard deviations.

  17. High-flux normal incidence monochromator for circularly polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefers, F.; Peatman, W.; Eyers, A.; Heckenkamp, C.; Schoenhense, G.; Heinzmann, U.

    1986-01-01

    A 6.5-m normal incidence monochromator installed at the storage ring BESSY, which is optimized for a high throughput of circularly polarized off-plane radiation at moderate resolution is described. The monochromator employs two exit slits and is specially designed and used for low-signal experiments such as spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on solids, adsorbates, free atoms, and molecules. The Monk--Gillieson mounting (plane grating in a convergent light beam) allows for large apertures with relatively little astigmatism. With two gratings, a flux of more than 10 11 photons s -1 bandwidth -1 (0.2--0.5 nm) with a circular polarization of more than 90% in the wavelength range from 35 to 675 nm is achieved

  18. The Role of Quasi-Transverse Propagation in Observed Polarization of Flare Loop Microwave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, A. V.; Melnikov, V. F.; Morgachev, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    The ordinary mode of gyrosynchrotron radiation was identified to be predominant in some segments of flare loops in solar flares of July 19, 2012, and October 22, 2014. These events were studied by investigation of the quasi-transverse propagation effect on the observed polarization. The analysis involved reconstruction of the magnetic field topology at the linear force-free approximation based on the data of the SDO HMI space telescope and the subsequent simulation of radio emission of flare loops with the GX Simulator software package. The quasi-transverse propagation effect was established to be characteristic for both events, but its influence on the radio emission polarization at a frequency of 17 GHz was observed only in the October 22, 2014 flare.

  19. Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: “Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks?” The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic “How important is ATM?” The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

  20. The radiation environment in Sweden; Straalmiljoen i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Paal; Carlsson, Monica; Falk, Rolf; Hubbard, Lynn; Leitz, Wolfram; Mjoenes, Lars; Moere, Hans; Nyblom, Leif; Soederman, Ann-Louise; Yuen Lasson, Katarina; Aakerblom, Gustav; Oehlen, Elisabeth

    2007-01-15

    The report describes, and reports data from, the monitoring of the radiation environment which has been conducted in Sweden since the 1950s. Average doses to the general public as well as to special groups of the public are also reported. Environmental monitoring concerning radiation has to a great extent focused on deposition and occurrence of radioactive elements originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. The average dose from {sup 137}Cs is very low, although it is somewhat higher in the group 'reindeer herders'. Surveys of naturally occurring radioactive elements in soil, drinking water and indoor air show that radiation from soil and building materials constitutes, besides medical use of radiation, the main part of the average total dose to the population. The dose from drinking water from drilled wells or from radon in indoor air may dominate the total dose in certain cases. Smoking increases the risk of radon considerably. UV-radiation has increased with 10 percent over the last 22 years at the location of the monitoring station. This is mainly explained by a decreased cloudiness. The exposure for UV is however more dependent on behaviour, and approximately 25 percent of the total exposure takes place abroad. Presently there are no time series concerning electromagnetic fields in the outdoor environment. However, measurements indicate levels well below the reference values.

  1. Modeling of the Martian environment for radiation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Wilson, J.W.; Clowdsley, M.S.; Qualls, G.D.; Singleterry, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    A model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) has been developed. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for conditions at Mars are transported through the Martian atmosphere down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g. CO 2 and H 2 O ices) along with its time variations throughout the Martian year. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center. This site has been developed to provide the scientific and engineering communities with an interactive site containing a variety of environmental models, shield evaluation codes, and radiation response models to allow a thorough assessment of ionizing radiation risk for current and future space missions

  2. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects in the natural space radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwank, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Four general topics are covered in respect to the natural space radiation environment: (1) particles trapped by the earth`s magnetic field, (2) cosmic rays, (3) radiation environment inside a spacecraft, (4) laboratory radiation sources. The interaction of radiation with materials is described by ionization effects and displacement effects. Total-dose effects on MOS devices is discussed with respect to: measurement techniques, electron-hole yield, hole transport, oxide traps, interface traps, border traps, device properties, case studies and special concerns for commercial devices. Other device types considered for total-dose effects are SOI devices and nitrided oxide devices. Lastly, single event phenomena are discussed with respect to charge collection mechanisms and hard errors. (GHH)

  3. Ionizing Radiation Measurement Solution in a Hospital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio-Javier Garcia-Sanchez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is one of the main risks affecting healthcare workers and patients worldwide. Special attention has to be paid to medical staff in the vicinity of radiological equipment or patients undergoing radioisotope procedures. To measure radiation values, traditional area meters are strategically placed in hospitals and personal dosimeters are worn by workers. However, important drawbacks inherent to these systems in terms of cost, detection precision, real time data processing, flexibility, and so on, have been detected and carefully detailed. To overcome these inconveniences, a low cost, open-source, portable radiation measurement system is proposed. The goal is to deploy devices integrating a commercial Geiger-Muller (GM detector to capture radiation doses in real time and to wirelessly dispatch them to a remote database where the radiation values are stored. Medical staff will be able to check the accumulated doses first hand, as well as other statistics related to radiation by means of a smartphone application. Finally, the device is certified by an accredited calibration center, to later validate the entire system in a hospital environment.

  4. Combined injury syndrome in space-related radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dons, R. F.; Fohlmeister, U.

    The risk of combined injury (CI) to space travelers is a function of exposure to anomalously large surges of a broad spectrum of particulate and photon radiations, conventional trauma (T), and effects of weightlessness including decreased intravascular fluid volume, and myocardial deconditioning. CI may occur even at relatively low doses of radiation which can synergistically enhance morbidity and mortality from T. Without effective countermeasures, prolonged residence in space is expected to predispose most individuals to bone fractures as a result of calcium loss in the microgravity environment. Immune dysfunction may occur from residence in space independent of radiation exposure. Thus, wound healing would be compromised if infection were to occur. Survival of the space traveler with CI would be significantly compromised if there were delays in wound closure or in the application of simple supportive medical or surgical therapies. Particulate radiation has the potential for causing greater gastrointestinal injury than photon radiation, but bone healing should not be compromised at the expected doses of either type of radiation in space.

  5. A Low-Profile and Compact Split-Ring Antenna with Horizontally Polarized Omnidirectional Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittima Lertsakwimarn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-profile and compact printed antenna having an omnidirectional radiation pattern with horizontal polarization to the ground. The proposed antenna consists of an inner small fed ring, an outer coupled split ring, and a ground plane. The overall dimension of the proposed antenna is 45 mm × 50.5 mm × 11.6 mm (0.138λ0 × 0.155λ0 × 0.036λ0. The −10-dB S11 of the antenna covers the 920-MHz RFID band, and the gain is about 1.45 dBi in the parallel direction to the ground plane. The measured results show good agreements with the simulated results. Furthermore, the reasons for the low-profile structure and the omnidirectional radiation pattern are also discussed.

  6. RADIATION ENVIRONMENT, ORGANIZATION AND PROVIDING OF POPULATION RADIATION PROTECTION CONTROL IN ST. PETBURG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Rakitin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of radiation environment and work experience of Rospotrebnadzor Administration in St. Petersburg in the field of organizing of population radiation protection control and interaction with the local government executive bodies. It shows the level and structure of the city population collective doses from the main dose forming ionizing irradiation sources. It emphasizes the integrated method of solving the population exposure limitation issues based on the results of radiation-hygienic passport system and on the data from Uniform State System for Doses Control and Registration. The evaluation of the work being carried out is given.

  7. Astrobiological Effects of Stellar Radiation in Circumstellar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; Guinan, Edward F.; Kurucz, Robert L.

    2006-10-01

    The centerpiece of all life on Earth is carbon-based biochemistry. Previous scientific research has suggested that biochemistry based on carbon may also play a decisive role in extraterrestrial life forms, i.e., alien life outside of Earth, if existent. In the following, we explore if carbon-based macromolecules (such as DNA) in the environments of stars other than the Sun are able to survive the effects of energetic stellar radiation, such as UV-C in the wavelength band between 200 and 290 nm. We focus on main-sequence stars akin to the Sun, but of hotter (F-type stars) and cooler (K- and M-type stars) surface temperature. Emphasis is placed on investigating the radiative environment in stellar habitable zones (HZs). Stellar habitable zones have an important relevance in astrobiology because they constitute circumstellar regions in which a planet of suitable size can have surface temperatures for water to exist in liquid form.

  8. SPACE RADIATION ENVIRONMENT MONITORED BY KITSAT-1 AND KITSAT-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Shin

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of space radiation experiments carried out on board the first two Korean technology demonstration microsatellites are presented in this paper. The first satellite, KITSAT-1, launched in August 1992, carries a radiation monitoring payload called cosmic ray experiment(CRE for characterizing the low-earth orbit(LEO radiation environment. The CRE consists of two sub-systems: the cosmic particle experiment (CPE and the total dose experiment(TDE. In addition, single event upset(SEUrates of the program memory and the RAM disk are also monitored. The second satellite, KITSAT-2, launched in September 1993, carries a newly developed 32-bit on-board computer(OBC, KASCOM(KAIST satellite computer in addition to OBC186. SEUs ocurred in the KASCOM, as well as in the program memory and RAM disk memory, have been monitored since the beginning of the satellite operation. These two satellites, which are very similar in structures but different in orbits, provide a unique opportunity to study the effects of the radiation environment characterized by the orbit.

  9. A virtual environment for medical radiation collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Pete; Trapp, Jamie V; Kastanis, Lazaros; Pack, Darren; Parker, Jacqui C

    2015-06-01

    A software-based environment was developed to provide practical training in medical radiation principles and safety. The Virtual Radiation Laboratory application allowed students to conduct virtual experiments using simulated diagnostic and radiotherapy X-ray generators. The experiments were designed to teach students about the inverse square law, half value layer and radiation protection measures and utilised genuine clinical and experimental data. Evaluation of the application was conducted in order to ascertain the impact of the software on students' understanding, satisfaction and collaborative learning skills and also to determine potential further improvements to the software and guidelines for its continued use. Feedback was gathered via an anonymous online survey consisting of a mixture of Likert-style questions and short answer open questions. Student feedback was highly positive with 80 % of students reporting increased understanding of radiation protection principles. Furthermore 72 % enjoyed using the software and 87 % of students felt that the project facilitated collaboration within small groups. The main themes arising in the qualitative feedback comments related to efficiency and effectiveness of teaching, safety of environment, collaboration and realism. Staff and students both report gains in efficiency and effectiveness associated with the virtual experiments. In addition students particularly value the visualisation of "invisible" physical principles and increased opportunity for experimentation and collaborative problem-based learning. Similar ventures will benefit from adopting an approach that allows for individual experimentation while visualizing challenging concepts.

  10. Classical radiation effects on relativistic electrons in ultraintense laser fields with circular polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Theodor; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.

    2012-07-01

    The propagation of a relativistic electron with initial energy ≳100 MeV in a number of simple one-dimensional laser field configurations with circular polarization is studied by solving the relativistic equation of motion in the Landau-Lifschitz approach to account for the radiation friction force. The radiation back-reaction on the electron dynamics becomes visible at dimensionless field amplitudes a ≳ 10 at these high particle energies. Analytical expressions are derived for the energy and the longitudinal momentum of the electron, the frequency shift of the light scattered by the electron and the particle trajectories. These findings are compared with the numerical solutions of the basic equations. A strong radiation damping effect results in reduced light scattering, forming at the same time a broad quasi-continuous spectrum. In addition, the electron dynamics in the strong field of a quasistationary laser piston is investigated. Analytical solutions for the electron trajectories in this complex field pattern are obtained and compared with the numerical solutions. The radiation friction force may stop a relativistic electron after propagation over several laser wavelengths at high laser field strengths, which supports the formation of a stable piston.

  11. Predicted radiation environment of the Saturn baseline diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Lee, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport was used to predict the radiation environment of the Saturn accelerator for the baseline diode design. The x-ray output has been calculated, as well as energy deposition in CaF 2 thermoluminescent dosimetry and silicon. It is found that the design criteria for the radiation environment will be met and that approximately 10 kJ of x rays will be available for simulation experiments, if the diode provides a nominal beam of 2.0-MeV electrons for 20 ns with a peak current of 12.5 MA. The penalty in dose and x-ray output for operating below the nominal energy in order to obtain a softer spectrum is quantified. The penalty for using excessive electron equilibration in the standard packaging of the thermoluminescent dosimeters is shown to be negligible. An intrinsic lack of electron equilibration for silicon elements of components and subsystems is verified for Saturn environments, demonstrating the ambiguity of design criteria based on silicon deposition. Validation of an efficient next-event-estimator method for predicting energy deposition in equilibrated detectors/dosimetry is confirmed. Finally, direct-electron depositions in excess of 1 kJ/g are shown to be easily achievable. 34 refs., 30 figs

  12. The radiation environment in underground workplaces of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Theis, C; Kindl, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Active dose-monitoring of workplaces is crucial in order to operate a high-energy particle accelerator safely. As the mixed radiation fields that are expected in the environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very different from standard use-cases like in nuclear power plants, it is of highest importance to characterize and calibrate radiation monitoring equipment appropriately for their use in high energy mixed radiation fields. Due to their sensitivity to different particle types over a larger energy range high-pressure ionization chambers have already been used at CERN and they are foreseen to be included within the radiation monitoring system of the LHC. In the framework of this thesis a new method was developed which allows for appropriate field-specific calibration of these detectors using Monte Carlo simulations. Therefore, the application of common 238Pu-Be source based calibration in mixed radiation fields was studied and compared to more accurate field specific calibration based on FLUKA Mon...

  13. Background radiation dose of dumpsites in Ota and Environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usikalu, M. R.; Ola, O. O.; Achuka, J. A.; Babarimisa, I. O.; Ayara, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    In-situ measurement of background radiation dose from selected dumpsites in Ota and its environs was done using Radialert Nuclear Radiation Monitor (Digilert 200). Ten measurements were taken from each dumpsite. The measured background radiation range between 0.015 mRhr-1 for AOD and 0.028 mRhr-1 for SUS dumpsites. The calculated annual equivalent doses vary between 1.31 mSvyr-1 for AOD and 2.28 mSv/yr for SUS dumpsites. The air absorbed dose calculated ranged from 150 nGyhr-1 to 280 nGy/hr for AOD and SUS dumpsites respectively with an average value of 217 nGyhr-1 for all the locations. All the estimated parameters were higher than permissible limit set for background radiation for the general public. Conclusively, the associated challenge and radiation burden posed by the wastes on the studied locations and scavengers is high. Therefore, there is need by the regulatory authorities to look into the way and how waste can be properly managed so as to alleviate the effects on the populace leaving and working in the dumpsites vicinity.

  14. Radiation exposure of airline crew members to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, G. De; Ballard, T.; Lagorio, S.; Verdecchia, A.

    2000-01-01

    All risk assessment techniques for possible health effects from low dose rate radiation exposure should combine knowledge both of the radiation environment and of the biological response, whose effects (e.g. carcinogenesis) are usually evaluated through mathematical models and/or animal and cell experiments. Data on human exposure to low dose rate radiation exposure and its effects are not readily available, especially with regards to stochastic effects, related to carcinogenesis and therefore to cancer risks, for which the event probability increases with increasing radiation exposure. The largest source of such data might be airline flight personnel, if enrolled for studies on health effects induced by the cosmic-ray generated atmospheric ionizing radiation, whose total dose, increasing over the years, might cause delayed radiation-induced health effects, with the high-LET and highly ionizing neutron component typical of atmospheric radiation. In 1990 flight personnel has been given the status of 'occupationally exposed to radiation' by the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP), with a received radiation dose that is at least twice larger than that of the general population. The studies performed until now were limited in scope and cohort size, and moreover no information whatsoever on radiation occupational exposure (e.g. dose, flight hours, route haul, etc.) was used in the analysis, so no correlation has been until now possible between atmospheric ionizing radiation and (possibly radiation-induced) observed health effects. Our study addresses the issues, by considering all Italian civilian airline flight personnel, both cockpit and cabin crew members, with about 10,000 people selected, whose records on work history and actual flights (route, aircraft type, date, etc. for each individual flight for each person where possible) are considered. Data on actual flight routes and profiles have been obtained for the whole time frame. The actual dose

  15. Analysis of China's radiation environment monitoring standard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiwei; Yue Huiguo; Yuan Zhilun; Yu Zhengwei; Huang Donghui; Wu Yongle

    2014-01-01

    In order to establish and improve the radiation environment monitoring standard system, to provide technical support for the radiation environment monitoring system, this work first retrieve the radiation environment monitoring standards, and clear the domestic status of the radiation environment monitoring standards. According to the Environmental Protection issued by the Ministry of the radiation environment monitoring technology specification '(HJ/T 61-2001), the radiation environment monitoring program (Provisional)' (Central Office (2003) No.56), and the radiation environment monitoring capacity assessment program (Environmental Protection management Division of the Department of nuclear safety, January 2011), environmental Protection Department of the relevant documents and other relevant information, the radiation environment monitoring standards and methods have been accessed, to find the missing items and issues proposed revision of the system requirements. Summarizing radiation environment monitoring national standards, standards of environmental protection industry, the nuclear industry standard, there are 28 standard missing items need to the health industry standards, inspection and quarantine industry standards, a total of 145 of these standards of environmental radiation monitoring, radiation monitoring of pollution sources, emergency response and early warning and monitoring from a management and technology meet the basic needs of the radiation environment monitoring. Research found that the standards in the revised 57 and in the formulation of 47, develop. After the revision of China's standards system will be further improved. The radiation environment monitoring work will be further strengthened. (authors)

  16. Application of circularly polarized laser radiation for sensing of crystal clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, Yurii; Kaul, Bruno; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Winker, David

    2009-04-13

    The application of circularly polarized laser radiation and measurement of the fourth Stokes parameter of scattered radiation considerably reduce the probability of obtaining ambiguous results for radiation depolarization in laser sensing of crystal clouds. The uncertainty arises when cloud particles appear partially oriented by their large diameters along a certain azimuth direction. Approximately in 30% of all cases, the measured depolarization depends noticeably on the orientation of the lidar reference plane with respect to the particle orientation direction. In this case, the corridor of the most probable depolarization values is about 0.1-0.15, but in individual cases, it can be noticeably wider. The present article considers theoretical aspects of this phenomenon and configuration of a lidar capable of measuring the fourth Stokes parameter together with an algorithm of lidar signal processing in the presence of optically thin cloudiness when molecular scattering cannot be neglected. It is demonstrated that the element ?44 of the normalized backscattering phase matrix (BSPM) can be measured. Results of measurements are independent of the presence or absence of azimuthal particle orientation. For sensing in the zenith or nadir, this element characterizes the degree of horizontal orientation of long particle diameters under the action of aerodynamic forces arising during free fall of particles.

  17. The Los Alamos.confEic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) for Space Weather Specification and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, G.; Freidel, R.; Chen, Y.; Koller, J.; Henderson, M.

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos.confEnal Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  18. Photolysis of frozen iodate salts as a source of active iodine in the polar environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ó. Gálvez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reactive halogens play a key role in the oxidation capacity of the polar troposphere. However, sources and mechanisms, particularly those involving active iodine, are still poorly understood. In this paper, the photolysis of an atmospherically relevant frozen iodate salt has been experimentally studied using infrared (IR spectroscopy. The samples were generated at low temperatures in the presence of different amounts of water. The IR spectra have confirmed that, under near-ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis radiation, iodate is efficiently photolysed. The integrated IR absorption coefficient of the iodate anion on the band at 750 cm−1 has been measured to be A  =  9.8 ± 0.5  ×  10−17 cm molecule−1. The photolysis rate of the ammonium iodate salt was measured by monitoring the decay of ammonium or iodate IR bands (1430 and 750 cm−1 respectively in the presence of a solar simulator. The absorption cross section of the liquid solutions of ammonium iodate at wavelengths relevant for the troposphere (250 to 400 nm has been obtained and used to estimate the photolytic quantum yield for the frozen salt. Finally, using an atmospheric model, constrained with the experimental data, we suggest that the photolysis of iodate in frozen salt can potentially provide a pathway for the release of active iodine to the polar atmosphere.

  19. Composite seals for liquid hydrogen and nuclear radiation environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Auken, R. L.; Chase, V. A.

    1971-01-01

    Description of plastic composite seals for service in a liquid-hydrogen and nuclear-radiation environment. The radiation-resistant aromatic heterocyclic class of polymers, including polyimide, polybenzimidazole, and polyquinoxaline, were evaluated for this application. The seal developed is based on a design involving a resin-starved laminate consisting of alternating layers of woven glass fabric and polymer film. This design imparts a mechanical spring characteristic to the seal, resulting in essentially complete elastic recovery when unloaded, and eliminates cold flow. Encapsulating techniques employing the polyquinoxaline polymer were developed which rendered the seal impervious to liquid hydrogen. The seals were tested before and after gamma irradiation up to 10 to the 10th ergs/g. Load/deflection and leakage tests were performed over a temperature range from -423 through +500 F.

  20. Optical fibres in the radiation environment of CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermain, E.

    2017-11-01

    kGy). Nevertheless, the conventional optical fibres must be carefully qualified as a spread in RIA of factor 10 is observed among optical fibres of different types and dopants. In higher radiation areas, special radiation resistant optical fibres are installed. For total dose above 1 kGy, the RIA of these special optical fibres is at least 10 times lower than the conventional optical fibres RIA at same irradiation conditions. 2400 km of these special radiation resistant optical fibres were recently procured at CERN. As part of this procurement process, a quality assurance plan including the irradiation testing of all 65 produced batches was set up. This presentation will review the selection process of the appropriate optical fibre types to be installed in the radiation environment of CERN. The methodology for choosing the irradiation parameters for the laboratory tests will be discussed together with an overview of the RIA of different optical fibre types under several irradiation conditions.

  1. Radiation Hardened Electronics Destined For Severe Nuclear Reactor Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbert, Keith E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Clark, Lawrence T. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Post nuclear accident conditions represent a harsh environment for electronics. The full station blackout experience at Fukushima shows the necessity for emergency sensing capabilities in a radiation-enhanced environment. This NEET (Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies) research project developed radiation hardened by design (RHBD) electronics using commercially available technology that employs commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) devices and present generation circuit fabrication techniques to improve the total ionizing dose (TID) hardness of electronics. Such technology not only has applicability to severe accident conditions but also to facilities throughout the nuclear fuel cycle in which radiation tolerance is required. For example, with TID tolerance to megarads of dose, electronics could be deployed for long-term monitoring, inspection and decontamination missions. The present work has taken a two-pronged approach, specifically, development of both board and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) level RHBD techniques. The former path has focused on TID testing of representative microcontroller ICs with embedded flash (eFlash) memory, as well as standalone flash devices that utilize the same fabrication technologies. The standalone flash devices are less complicated, allowing better understanding of the TID response of the crucial circuits. Our TID experiments utilize biased components that are in-situ tested, and in full operation during irradiation. A potential pitfall in the qualification of memory circuits is the lack of rigorous testing of the possible memory states. For this reason, we employ test patterns that include all ones, all zeros, a checkerboard of zeros and ones, an inverse checkerboard, and random data. With experimental evidence of improved radiation response for unbiased versus biased conditions, a demonstration-level board using the COTS devices was constructed. Through a combination of redundancy and power gating, the demonstration

  2. Mars Surface Ionizing Radiation Environment: Need for Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, R. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Suggs, R.

    1999-01-01

    Protection against the hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation remains an unresolved issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise [1]. The major uncertainty is the lack of data on biological response to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures but even a full understanding of the physical interaction of GCR with shielding and body tissues is not yet available and has a potentially large impact on mission costs. "The general opinion is that the initial flights should be short-stay missions performed as fast as possible (so-called 'Sprint' missions) to minimize crew exposure to the zero-g and space radiation environment, to ease requirements on system reliability, and to enhance the probability of mission success." The short-stay missions tend to have long transit times and may not be the best option due to the relatively long exposure to zero-g and ionizing radiation. On the other hand the short-transit missions tend to have long stays on the surface requiring an adequate knowledge of the surface radiation environment to estimate risks and to design shield configurations. Our knowledge of the surface environment is theoretically based and suffers from an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions of GCR with the Martian atmosphere, Martian surface, and intervening shield materials. An important component of Mars surface robotic exploration is the opportunity to test our understanding of the Mars surface environment. The Mars surface environment is generated by the interaction of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPEs) with the Mars atmosphere and Mars surface materials. In these interactions, multiple charged ions are reduced in size and secondary particles are generated, including neutrons. Upon impact with the Martian surface, the character of the interactions changes as a result of the differing nuclear constituents of the surface materials. Among the surface environment are many neutrons diffusing from

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on the waste package environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, D.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)

    1991-05-01

    The radiolytic production of nitrogen oxides, nitrogen acids and ammonia are discussed in relation to the expected environment in a high-level waste repository that may be constructed at the Yucca Mountain site if it is found to be suitable. Both literature data and repository-relevant data are summarized for air-water vapor systems. The limiting cases of a dry air and a pure water vapor gas phase are also discussed. Design guidelines and recommendations, based solely on the potential consequence of radiation enhancement of corrosion, are given. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Manganite based memristors: Influence of the electroforming polarity on the electrical behavior and radiation hardness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubi, D., E-mail: diego.rubi@gmail.com [GIyA and INN, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, UNSAM, Campus Miguelete, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kalstein, A.; Román, W.S.; Ghenzi, N.; Quinteros, C. [GIyA and INN, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Mangano, E.; Granell, P. [INTI, CMNB, Av. Gral Paz 5445 (B1650KNA), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Golmar, F. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, UNSAM, Campus Miguelete, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); INTI, CMNB, Av. Gral Paz 5445 (B1650KNA), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marlasca, F.G. [GIyA and INN, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Suarez, S.; Bernardi, G. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Centro Atómico Bariloche (CNEA), Av. E. Bustillo km 9500 (8400), S. C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Albornoz, C. [GIyA and INN, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2015-05-29

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} manganite-based memristive devices. Polycrystalline manganite thin films were grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition, while metallic electrodes were deposited by sputtering. We show that, depending on the polarity of the initial electroforming, both clockwise and anti-clockwise current-voltage curves can be obtained. We attribute this behavior to the coexistence of different resistive switching mechanisms. We finally evaluate the electrical behavior of our devices after irradiation with high energy oxygen ions. We find no significant difference in the dielectric breakdown voltages between irradiated and non-irradiated devices, indicating that they may present radiation hardness and could be therefore appropriate for space or nuclear applications. - Highlights: • n-Si/LCMO/metal memristive devices were fabricated and characterized. • Electroforming polarity controls the activation of different switching mechanisms. • The soft breakdown voltages are not modified after irradiation with oxygen ions.

  5. Circularly Polarized Low-Profile Antenna for Radiating Parallel to Ground Plane for RFID Reader Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittima Lertsakwimarn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-profile printed antenna with double U-shaped arms radiating circular polarization for the UHF RFID readers. The proposed antenna consists of double U-shaped strip structures and a capacitive feeding line to generate circular polarization. A part of the U-shaped arms is bent by 90° to direct the main beam parallel to the ground plane. From the results, -10 dB |S11| and 3 dB axial ratio of the antenna cover a typical UHF RFID band from 920 MHz to 925 MHz. The bidirectional beam is obtained with the maximum gain of 1.8 dBic in the parallel direction to the ground plane at the 925 MHz. The overall size of the proposed antenna including ground plane is 107 mm × 57 mm × 12.8 mm (0.33λ0 × 0.17λ0 × 0.04λ0.

  6. RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF THE ENIGMATIC SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN THE SOLAR Na i D{sub 1} LINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belluzzi, Luca [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland); Bueno, Javier Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Degl’Innocenti, Egidio Landi [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    The modeling of the peculiar scattering polarization signals observed in some diagnostically important solar resonance lines requires the consideration of the detailed spectral structure of the incident radiation field as well as the possibility of ground level polarization, along with the atom's hyperfine structure and quantum interference between hyperfine F-levels pertaining either to the same fine structure J-level, or to different J-levels of the same term. Here we present a theoretical and numerical approach suitable for solving this complex non-LTE radiative transfer problem. This approach is based on the density-matrix metalevel theory (where each level is viewed as a continuous distribution of sublevels) and on accurate formal solvers of the transfer equations and efficient iterative methods. We show an application to the D-lines of Na i, with emphasis on the enigmatic D{sub 1} line, pointing out the observable signatures of the various physical mechanisms considered. We demonstrate that the linear polarization observed in the core of the D{sub 1} line may be explained by the effect that one gets when the detailed spectral structure of the anisotropic radiation responsible for the optical pumping is taken into account. This physical ingredient is capable of introducing significant scattering polarization in the core of the Na i D{sub 1} line without the need for ground-level polarization.

  7. Australian and Canadian perspectives and regulations for protecting the polar marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, Donald R.

    1997-12-31

    The report compares Australian and Canadian responses for protecting polar marine environments. Vast areas of the polar seas fall within their potential combined EEZ/continental shelf jurisdiction. The Antarctic Treaty provisions, doubts on the status of the Northwest Passage waters and the capacity to enforce legislative initiatives against foreign vessels have been constraints. Australia`s enactment of legislation prohibiting mining within the AAT continental shelf and whaling within the AAT EEZ has tested the Antarctic Treaty. Canada`s reaction to the Manhattan and the enactment of the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act is an example of unilateral action. While the countries have made noteworthy initiatives to enhance the protection of their polar marine environments, doubts remain in some instances on their capacity to give effect to the initiatives. However, sovereignty remains at the heart of their response. Failure to address Antarctic marine environmental issues will rebound on the environment and reflect poorly upon Australia`s sovereignty claim to the AAT. For Canada it is a sovereignty issue and has directly impact upon its citizens inhabiting the islands and coastal areas of the Canadian Arctic. The Madrid Protocol provides the strongest legal basis for the Antarctic Treaty parties to enact laws and regulations in Antarctica. Conservation measures adopted under the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources focuses increasingly on environmental concerns. The most significant regional initiative adopted by Arctic states is the AEPS which does not have a legal foundation. It`s co-operative programs provide basis for co-operation in dealing with environmental problems. It clearly recognises that only co-operative responses will achieve significant outcomes. The 1990s have posed new challenges for marine environmental protection such as ship-based tourism in Antarctica and the growing pressure to use the Northwest Passage on a

  8. Australian and Canadian perspectives and regulations for protecting the polar marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    The report compares Australian and Canadian responses for protecting polar marine environments. Vast areas of the polar seas fall within their potential combined EEZ/continental shelf jurisdiction. The Antarctic Treaty provisions, doubts on the status of the Northwest Passage waters and the capacity to enforce legislative initiatives against foreign vessels have been constraints. Australia's enactment of legislation prohibiting mining within the AAT continental shelf and whaling within the AAT EEZ has tested the Antarctic Treaty. Canada's reaction to the Manhattan and the enactment of the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act is an example of unilateral action. While the countries have made noteworthy initiatives to enhance the protection of their polar marine environments, doubts remain in some instances on their capacity to give effect to the initiatives. However, sovereignty remains at the heart of their response. Failure to address Antarctic marine environmental issues will rebound on the environment and reflect poorly upon Australia's sovereignty claim to the AAT. For Canada it is a sovereignty issue and has directly impact upon its citizens inhabiting the islands and coastal areas of the Canadian Arctic. The Madrid Protocol provides the strongest legal basis for the Antarctic Treaty parties to enact laws and regulations in Antarctica. Conservation measures adopted under the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources focuses increasingly on environmental concerns. The most significant regional initiative adopted by Arctic states is the AEPS which does not have a legal foundation. It's co-operative programs provide basis for co-operation in dealing with environmental problems. It clearly recognises that only co-operative responses will achieve significant outcomes. The 1990s have posed new challenges for marine environmental protection such as ship-based tourism in Antarctica and the growing pressure to use the

  9. Radiation exposure of man in the indoor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhaeusler, F.; Pohl, E.

    1982-01-01

    Indoor exposure of man represents the major component of the dose from the natural radiation environment (NRE). The different sources of the NRE and their complex superposition are discussed. Due to the use of radiologically disadvantageous material in or near the building, radon-rich tap water, specific architectural styles and decreased ventilation rates NRE-levels indoors have been found to even exceed the upper limit for professional exposure. The inadequacy of the existing international regulatory framework and specific local problems resulted in the establishment of national exposure limits. In general, no remedial action is recommended at levels below 50 μR/h for external gamma radiation, 10 mWL for internal radon daughter exposure. Several technical countermeasures reducing indoor gamma dose rates and radon levels have been developed for existing buildings. However, the use of some of the techniques is limited due to low cost-effectiveness or lack of long-term stability. Different techniques in order to achieve low indoor exposures for new buildings and financial aspects associated the application of radiation protection concepts are discussed

  10. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bielewicz, Pawel; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; , Università degli studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ''G. Galilei, Università degli studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy))" >Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bonaldi, Anna; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The data obtained will allow us to precisely measure the absolute sky brightness and polarization of all the components of the sky emission in the observed frequency range, separating the primordial and extragalactic components cleanly from the galactic and zodiacal light emissions. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM, which include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, detecting approximately 10 6 clusters extending to large redshift, including a characterization of the gas temperature of the brightest ones (through the relativistic corrections to the classic SZ template) as well as a peculiar velocity survey using the kinetic SZ effect that comprises our entire Hubble volume; (2) a detailed characterization of the properties and evolution of dusty galaxies, where the most of the star formation in the universe took place, the faintest population of which constitute the diffuse CIB (Cosmic Infrared Background); (3) a characterization of the B modes from primordial gravity waves generated during inflation

  11. ORIENTATION EFFECTS IN THE K-ABSORPTION OF LINEARLY POLARIZED SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN A GALLIUM SINGLE-CRYSTAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEBER, WM; STAPEL, C

    K-absorption spectra of a gallium single crystal were measured with highly polarized synchrotron radiation for two orientations of the electric vector in the absorber: along the crystallographic a and b axes, respectively. The spectra, and small, anisotropic alterations in shape, positions, and

  12. Leveraging scientific credibility about Arctic sea ice trends in a polarized political environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Kathleen Hall; Hardy, Bruce W

    2014-09-16

    This work argues that, in a polarized environment, scientists can minimize the likelihood that the audience's biased processing will lead to rejection of their message if they not only eschew advocacy but also, convey that they are sharers of knowledge faithful to science's way of knowing and respectful of the audience's intelligence; the sources on which they rely are well-regarded by both conservatives and liberals; and the message explains how the scientist arrived at the offered conclusion, is conveyed in a visual form that involves the audience in drawing its own conclusions, and capsulizes key inferences in an illustrative analogy. A pilot experiment raises the possibility that such a leveraging-involving-visualizing-analogizing message structure can increase acceptance of the scientific claims about the downward cross-decade trend in Arctic sea ice extent and elicit inferences consistent with the scientific consensus on climate change among conservatives exposed to misleadingly selective data in a partisan news source.

  13. Mixed-gender groups: coping strategies and factors of psychological adaptation in a polar environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnet, Elisabeth; Jurion, Sylvie; Cazes, Geneviève; Bachelard, Claude

    2004-07-01

    The polar environment is often seen as a good analog for long-term space missions in terms of isolation and confinement. This paper focuses on the psychological adaptation of both the men and women in mixed-gender groups in the French polar station Dumont d'Urville. The first 49 expeditions to this station were composed of men only in groups of 25-30. In 2000, two women were included in the first mixed-gender wintering group, followed by five women in 2001. This study on coping strategies and psychological adaptation was included in an end-of-mission debriefing performed by a psychologist. Data were collected using a few quantitative tools and a semi-structured interview, and focused on adaptation to wintering, coping strategies, and information on interpersonal relationships. Including women in a wintering group seems to have had positive effects on the general climate of the group by reducing men's rude behavior, but it also seems to be an important stressor for both men and women when the females' average age is close to the males' because seduction behaviors appear and rivalry, frustration, and sexual harassment frequently result. The use of problem-oriented strategies helps women to adapt. There are strong arguments indicating that living in an isolated and confined environment magnifies the usual difficulties that arise in mixed-gender relationships. Difficulties may be magnified in space since the group size is smaller and the confinement more extreme. This implies the need for rigorous select-in criteria for both men and women, especially for relational criteria, and for group training after selection.

  14. The Effect of Thermal Radiation on Entropy Generation Due to Micro-Polar Fluid Flow Along a Wavy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Hao Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of thermal radiation on micro-polar fluid flow over a wavy surface is studied. The optically thick limit approximation for the radiation flux is assumed. Prandtl’s transposition theorem is used to stretch the ordinary coordinate system in certain directions. The wavy surface can be transferred into a calculable plane coordinate system. The governing equations of micro-polar fluid along a wavy surface are derived from the complete Navier-Stokes equations. A simple transformation is proposed to transform the governing equations into boundary layer equations so they can be solved numerically by the cubic spline collocation method. A modified form for the entropy generation equation is derived. Effects of thermal radiation on the temperature and the vortex viscosity parameter and the effects of the wavy surface on the velocity are all included in the modified entropy generation equation.

  15. Radiation environment impact assessment of field radionuclide migration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zede; Han Jingyin; Wang Zhiming; Han Bianlian; Jin Xiaojuan; Yan Yukui

    2000-01-01

    A field radionuclide migration test was carried out under natural and sprinkling conditions at CIRP's Field Test Site. Environment monitoring results indicated that the test did not cause any change of radiation environment quality in and around the test area. After test, contaminated soil in each test pits was retrieved and transported back in CIRP for other research work. All recovery rates of 60 Co, 134 Cs in each test pits is more than 99.99%. After recovery, residual 3 H in former natural test pits is kept in shallow soil and subjected to be evaporated into atmosphere; residual 3 H in other test pits after stopping sprinkling is kept in deep position of aerated zone and can not reach aqueous layer before fully decay. Since its short half life, 85 Sr had nearly fully decayed when the test was finished. Retrieving contaminated soil eliminates possibility of any incidents in future. It is concluded from the point of both total amount and concentrations, that residual radionuclides at the field test site can not cause any unacceptable effect on human and the environment

  16. Radiation protection for humans and environment. 50 years competence in the professional association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, Benno; Wilhelm, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The conference proceedings of the IRPA (International radiation protection association) annual meeting 2016 contain the contribution of invited referents, other contributions and poster contributions concerning radiation protection in nuclear facilities, radiation protection of the public and environment, radioactive waste management, uranium mining, environmental monitoring, natural radioactivity, and radiation protection laws and regulations.

  17. Coherent and radiative couplings through two-dimensional structured environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, F.; Zambrini, R.

    2018-03-01

    We study coherent and radiative interactions induced among two or more quantum units by coupling them to two-dimensional (2D) lattices acting as structured environments. This model can be representative of atoms trapped near photonic crystal slabs, trapped ions in Coulomb crystals, or to surface acoustic waves on piezoelectric materials, cold atoms on state-dependent optical lattices, or even circuit QED architectures, to name a few. We compare coherent and radiative contributions for the isotropic and directional regimes of emission into the lattice, for infinite and finite lattices, highlighting their differences and existing pitfalls, e.g., related to long-time or large-lattice limits. We relate the phenomenon of directionality of emission with linear-shaped isofrequency manifolds in the dispersion relation, showing a simple way to disrupt it. For finite lattices, we study further details such as the scaling of resonant number of lattice modes for the isotropic and directional regimes, and relate this behavior with known van Hove singularities in the infinite lattice limit. Furthermore, we export the understanding of emission dynamics with the decay of entanglement for two quantum, atomic or bosonic, units coupled to the 2D lattice. We analyze in some detail completely subradiant configurations of more than two atoms, which can occur in the finite lattice scenario, in contrast with the infinite lattice case. Finally, we demonstrate that induced coherent interactions for dark states are zero for the finite lattice.

  18. Fibre optics compatibility with radiative environment inside PWR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuze, G.; Jucker, P.; Serre, J.

    1993-01-01

    Fibre optic links operating with multiplexed sensors data are potentially attractive for nuclear power plant applications. It hence became essential to test for radiation vulnerability not only transmission support -fibres- but also fibre-end electro-optical components which could be exposed to hostile environment, perhaps in worse conditions than fibres. Present paper gives results of multimode silica-based fibre behaviour during long-term steady-state low dose-rate gamma ray exposure - one year under 0.1 to 0.2 Gy/h. Studies concerned radiation-induced loss (ΔL) measurement of eight different commercially available fibres and bit error-rate (BER) recording of four 1 100 m length data links operating with a 100 m part exposed to gamma-rays. Main result is the good behaviour of pure silica-core fibres, especially a step-index polymer-clad fibre transmitting 850 nm light but also a graded-index fluorine-clad fibre for 1 300 nm window. Mean ΔL values are respectively 3 dB/km and 4.5 dB/km at the exposure end. Complementary result is no influence of gamma-ray exposure upon data link initial 10 -9 BER. (authors). 9 figs., 7 tabs., 26 refs

  19. IOCCG Report Number 16, 2015 Ocean Colour Remote Sensing in Polar Seas . Chapter 2; The Polar Environment: Sun, Clouds, and Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Perovich, Don; Stamnes, Knut; Stuart, Venetia (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    The polar regions are places of extremes. There are months when the regions are enveloped in unending darkness, and months when they are in continuous daylight. During the daylight months the sun is low on the horizon and often obscured by clouds. In the dark winter months temperatures are brutally cold, and high winds and blowing snow are common. Even in summer, temperatures seldom rise above 0degC. The cold winter temperatures cause the ocean to freeze, forming sea ice. This sea ice cover acts as a barrier limiting the transfer of heat, moisture, and momentum between the atmosphere and the ocean. It also greatly complicates the optical signature of the surface. Taken together, these factors make the polar regions a highly challenging environment for optical remote sensing of the ocean.

  20. Measurement of the radiative decay of polarized muons in the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A.M.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Nicolo, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tenchini, F. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa Univ. (Italy); Bao, Y.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Baracchini, E. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Biasotti, M.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G. [INFN, Sezione di Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa Univ. (Italy); Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P.W.; De Bari, A.; Rossella, M. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cavoto, G.; Graziosi, A.; Piredda, G.; Ripiccini, E.; Voena, C. [INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' ' Sapienza' ' Univ. Rome (Italy); Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Tassielli, G.F. [INFN, Sezione di Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Salento Univ. Lecce (Italy); Fujii, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Grigoriev, D.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Haruyama, T.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ieki, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kang, Tae Im; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Renga, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' ' Sapienza' ' Univ. Rome (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa Univ. (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Collaboration: The MEG Collaboration

    2016-03-15

    We studied the radiative muon decay μ{sup +} → e{sup +}νanti νγ by using for the first time an almost fully polarized muon source. We identified a large sample (∝13,000) of these decays in a total sample of 1.8 x 10{sup 14} positive muon decays collected in the MEG experiment in the years 2009-2010 and measured the branching ratio B(μ{sup +} → eνanti νγ) = (6.03 ± 0.14(stat.) ± 0.53(sys.)) x 10{sup -8} for E{sub e} > 45 MeV and E{sub γ} > 40 MeV, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The precise measurement of this decay mode provides a basic tool for the timing calibration, a normalization channel, and a strong quality check of the complete MEG experiment in the search for μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ process. (orig.)

  1. Fifth international symposium on the natural radiation environment (NRE - V). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Most of the 219 contributions Are on radon (to a much lesser extent: thoron) and its daughter products in dwellings and in the environment; on corresponding measuring instruments and - methods; on measurements done; and on radiation doses to professional workers and to the public. The section heading give a fairly good account of the subject matters treated. Measurement Techniques and Metrology (Nrs 1-33); Exposure to Natural Radiation in Non-Domestic Environments (34-56); Natural Radionuclides and Transfer Pathways (57-107); Radioactivity and Radiation in the Human Environment (108-183); Health Effects of Natural Radiation (184-205); Industrially Modified Levels of Radiation Exposure (206-219). (Quittner)

  2. Observations of MeV electrons in Jupiter's innermost radiation belts and polar regions by the Juno radiation monitoring investigation: Perijoves 1 and 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Santos-Costa, Daniel; Jørgensen, John Leif

    2017-01-01

    Juno's “Perijove 1” (27 August 2016) and “Perijove 3” (11 December 2016) flybys through the innermost region of Jupiter's magnetosphere (radial distances Jovian radii, 1.06 RJ at closest approach) provided the first in situ look at this region's radiation environment. Juno's Radiation Monitoring...

  3. Polarization-based enhancement of ocean color signal for estimating suspended particulate matter: radiative transfer simulations and laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; He, Xianqiang; Liu, Jiahang; Bai, Yan; Wang, Difeng; Chen, Tieqiao; Wang, Yihao; Zhu, Feng

    2017-04-17

    Absorption and scattering by molecules, aerosols and hydrosols, and the reflection and transmission over the sea surface can modify the original polarization state of sunlight. However, water-leaving radiance polarization, containing embedded water constituent information, has largely been neglected. Here, the efficiency of the parallel polarization radiance (PPR) for enhancing ocean color signal of suspended particulate matter is examined via vector radiative transfer simulations and laboratory experiments. The simulation results demonstrate that the PPR has a slightly higher ocean color signal at the top-of-atmosphere as compared with that of the total radiance. Moreover, both the simulations and laboratory measurements reveal that, compared with total radiance, PPR can effectively enhance the normalized ocean color signal for a large range of observation geometries, wavelengths, and suspended particle concentrations. Thus, PPR has great potential for improving the ocean color signal detection from satellite.

  4. Radiation parameters of the x-ray binary A 0535 + 26 = HDE 245770 based on polarization and photometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larionov, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the observations of Shakhovskaya et al. has led to the identification in the radiation of the x-ray binary system A 0535 + 26 = HDE 245770 of two components associated with an optical 09 III star and an accretion disk around a neutron star. The parameters of the interstellar polarization agree with Serkowski's formula and the observations of neighboring stars. The variability of the brightness of the system observed in the optical and infrared ranges can be explained by changes in the contribution of the accretion disk to the total emission of the system. The values obtained for the parameters of the intrinsic polarization, interpreted in the framework of the proposed model, suggest directions of the polarization vectors in the infrared and x-ray range

  5. Polarized radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere accounting for rotational Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Luca; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the phenomenological derivation of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) accounting for first-order source terms of rotational Raman scattering (RRS), which is responsible for the in-filling of Fraunhofer and telluric lines by inelastic scattered photons. The implementation of the solution of the VRTE within the framework of the forward-adjoint method is given. For the Ca II and the oxygen A-band (O2 A) spectral windows, values of reflectance, degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and in-filling, in zenith and nadir geometry, are compared with results given in literature. Moreover, the dependence of these quantities on the columnar loading and vertical layering of non-spherical dust aerosols is investigated, together with their changes as function of two habits of ice crystals, modeled as regular icosahedra and severely rough aggregated columns. Bi-directional effects of an underlying polarizing surface are accounted for. The forward simulations are performed for one selected wavelength in the continuum and one in the strong absorption of the O2 A, as their combination can be exploited for the spaceborne retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties. For this reason, we also mimic seasonal maps of reflectance, DOLP and in-filling, that are prototypical measurements of the Ultraviolet-Visible-Near Infrared (UVN) sensor, at a nominal spectral resolution of 0.12 nm. UVN is the core payload of the upcoming European Sentinel-4 mission, that will observe Europe in geostationary orbit for air quality monitoring purposes. In general, in the core of O2 A, depending on the optical thickness and altitude of the scatterers, we find RRS-induced in-filling values ranging from 1.3% to 1.8%, while DOLP decreases by 1%. Conversely, while negligible differences of RRS in-filling are calculated with different ice crystal habits, the severely rough aggregated column model can reduce DOLP by a factor up to 10%. The UVN maps of in-filling show values varying

  6. Polar Bears Exhibit Genome-Wide Signatures of Bioenergetic Adaptation to Life in the Arctic Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, Andreanna J.; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C.; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Miller, Webb; Rode, Karyn D.; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) face extremely cold temperatures and periods of fasting, which might result in more severe energetic challenges than those experienced by their sister species, the brown bear (U. arctos). We have examined the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of polar and brown bears to investigate whether polar bears demonstrate lineage-specific signals of molecular adaptation in genes associated with cellular respiration/energy production. We observed increased evolutionary rat...

  7. Leveraging scientific credibility about Arctic sea ice trends in a polarized political environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Jamieson, Kathleen; Hardy, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    This work argues that, in a polarized environment, scientists can minimize the likelihood that the audience’s biased processing will lead to rejection of their message if they not only eschew advocacy but also, convey that they are sharers of knowledge faithful to science’s way of knowing and respectful of the audience’s intelligence; the sources on which they rely are well-regarded by both conservatives and liberals; and the message explains how the scientist arrived at the offered conclusion, is conveyed in a visual form that involves the audience in drawing its own conclusions, and capsulizes key inferences in an illustrative analogy. A pilot experiment raises the possibility that such a leveraging–involving–visualizing–analogizing message structure can increase acceptance of the scientific claims about the downward cross-decade trend in Arctic sea ice extent and elicit inferences consistent with the scientific consensus on climate change among conservatives exposed to misleadingly selective data in a partisan news source. PMID:25225380

  8. Growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains from polar, temperate and tropical freshwater environments under temperature stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kok-Keong; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Poong, Sze-Wan; Wong, Chiew-Yen; Phang, Siew-Moi; Beardall, John

    2017-09-01

    Elevated temperatures as a consequence of global warming have significant impacts on the adaptation and survival of microalgae which are important primary producers in many ecosystems. The impact of temperature on the photosynthesis of microalgae is of great interest as the primary production of algal biomass is strongly dependent on the photosynthetic rates in a dynamic environment. Here, we examine the effects of elevated temperature on Chlorella strains originating from different latitudes, namely Antarctic, Arctic, temperate and tropical regions. Chlorophyll fluorescence was used to assess the photosynthetic responses of the microalgae. Rapid light curves (RLCs) and maximum quantum yield (F v/F m) were recorded. The results showed that Chlorella originating from different latitudes portrayed different growth trends and photosynthetic performance. The Chlorella genus is eurythermal, with a broad temperature tolerance range, but with strain-specific characteristics. However, there was a large overlap between the tolerance range of the four strains due to their "eurythermal adaptivity". Changes in the photosynthetic parameters indicated temperature stress. The ability of the four strains to reactivate photosynthesis after inhibition of photosynthesis under high temperatures was also studied. The Chlorella strains were shown to recover in terms of photosynthesis and growth (measured as Chl a) when they were returned to their ambient temperatures. Polar strains showed faster recovery in their optimal temperature compared to that under the ambient temperature from which they were isolated.

  9. Polar lessons learned: long-term management based on shared threats in Arctic and Antarctic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, J.R.; Shaw, J.D.; Terauds, A.; Smol, J.P.; Aerts, R.; Bergstrom, D.M.; Blais, J.M.; Cheung, W.W.L.; Chown, S.L.; Lea, M.-A.; Nielsen, U.N.; Pauly, D.; Reimer, K.J.; Riddle, M.J.; Snape, I.; Stark, J.S.; Tulloch, V.J.; Possingham, H.P.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic and Antarctic polar regions are subject to multiple environmental threats, arising from both local and ex-situ human activities. We review the major threats to polar ecosystems including the principal stressor, climate change, which interacts with and exacerbates other threats such as

  10. Inclusion of Radiation Environment Variability in Total Dose Hardness Assurance Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Stauffer, C.; Phan, A.; McClure, S. S.; Ladbury, R. L.; Pellish, J. A.; Campola, M. J.; LaBel, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Variability of the space radiation environment is investigated with regard to parts categorization for total dose hardness assurance methods. It is shown that it can have a significant impact. A modified approach is developed that uses current environment models more consistently and replaces the radiation design margin concept with one of failure probability during a mission.

  11. ABOUT INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT SCHEMES IMPACT RADIATION ENVIRONMENTS AND LOADS ON REINFORCED LAMELLAR STRUCTURAL MEMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafail B. Garibov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the model of deformation of fiber-reinforced concrete rectangular plate under the influence of radiation environments. In the calculation of the plate was considered different schemes impact of the applied external loads and radiation environments.

  12. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Sisworo, E.L.; Maha, M.; Ismachin, M.; Hilmy, N.; Sumatra, M.; Mugiono; Wandowo; Soebianto, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  13. Polar bears exhibit genome-wide signatures of bioenergetic adaptation to life in the arctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Andreanna J; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Miller, Webb; Rode, Karyn D; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2014-02-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) face extremely cold temperatures and periods of fasting, which might result in more severe energetic challenges than those experienced by their sister species, the brown bear (U. arctos). We have examined the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of polar and brown bears to investigate whether polar bears demonstrate lineage-specific signals of molecular adaptation in genes associated with cellular respiration/energy production. We observed increased evolutionary rates in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene in polar but not brown bears. An amino acid substitution occurred near the interaction site with a nuclear-encoded subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex and was predicted to lead to a functional change, although the significance of this remains unclear. The nuclear genomes of brown and polar bears demonstrate different adaptations related to cellular respiration. Analyses of the genomes of brown bears exhibited substitutions that may alter the function of proteins that regulate glucose uptake, which could be beneficial when feeding on carbohydrate-dominated diets during hyperphagia, followed by fasting during hibernation. In polar bears, genes demonstrating signatures of functional divergence and those potentially under positive selection were enriched in functions related to production of nitric oxide (NO), which can regulate energy production in several different ways. This suggests that polar bears may be able to fine-tune intracellular levels of NO as an adaptive response to control trade-offs between energy production in the form of adenosine triphosphate versus generation of heat (thermogenesis).

  14. Polar bears exhibit genome-wide signatures of bioenergetic adaptation to life in the Arctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Andreanna J.; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C.; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Miller, Webb; Rode, Karyn D.; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) face extremely cold temperatures and periods of fasting, which might result in more severe energetic challenges than those experienced by their sister species, the brown bear (U. arctos). We have examined the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of polar and brown bears to investigate if polar bears demonstrate lineage-specific signals of molecular adaptation in genes associated with cellular respiration/energy production. We observed increased evolutionary rates in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene in polar but not brown bears. An amino acid substitution occurred near the interaction site with a nuclear-encoded subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, and was predicted to lead to a functional change, although the significance of this remains unclear. The nuclear genomes of brown and polar bears demonstrate different adaptations related to cellular respiration. Analyses of the genomes of brown bears exhibited substitutions that may alter the function of proteins that regulate glucose uptake, which could be beneficial when feeding on carbohydrate-dominated diets during hyperphagia, followed by fasting during hibernation. In polar bears, genes demonstrating signatures of functional divergence and those potentially under positive selection were enriched in functions related to production of nitric oxide, which can regulate energy production in several different ways. This suggests that polar bears may be able to fine-tune intracellular levels of nitric oxide as an adaptive response to control trade-offs between energy production in the form of ATP versus generation of heat (thermogenesis).

  15. The Evidence of Radio Polarization Induced by the Radiative Grain Alignment and Self-scattering of Dust Grains in a Protoplanetary Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Pohl, Adriana; Muto, Takayuki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Stephens, Ian W.; Tomisaka, Kohji; Momose, Munetake

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms causing millimeter-wave polarization in protoplanetary disks are under debate. To disentangle the polarization mechanisms, we observe the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau at 3.1 mm with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), which had the polarization detected with CARMA at 1.3 mm. We successfully detect the ring-like azimuthal polarized emission at 3.1 mm. This indicates that dust grains are aligned with the major axis being in the azimuthal direction, which is consistent with the theory of radiative alignment of elongated dust grains, where the major axis of dust grains is perpendicular to the radiation flux. Furthermore, the morphology of the polarization vectors at 3.1 mm is completely different from those at 1.3 mm. We interpret the polarization at 3.1 mm to be dominated by the grain alignment with the radiative flux producing azimuthal polarization vectors, while the self-scattering dominates at 1.3 mm and produces the polarization vectors parallel to the minor axis of the disk. By modeling the total polarization fraction with a single grain population model, the maximum grain size is constrained to be 100 μ {{m}}, which is smaller than the previous predictions based on the spectral index between ALMA at 3 mm and the Very Large Array at 7 mm.

  16. Radiation and its Role for Health, Environment and Industrial Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers the applications of radioactive and nuclear materials in industry, medicine and biology, nuclear power and research. Applications of radiation in industry include non invasive measurement of density, thickness, moisture and levels of liquids and solid materials. Also covered are the applications of radiation in waste water treatment and its use in medicine for diagnosis, therapy, tracer studies and sterilization of medical dressings.In industry radiation is used in non destructive testing of metal and steel structures.

  17. Radiation in controlled environments: influence of lamp type and filter material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, D. L.; Bugbee, B.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation in controlled environments was characterized using fluorescent and various high-intensity-discharge (HID) lamps, including metal halide, low-pressure sodium, and high-pressure sodium as the radiation source. The effects of water, glass, or Plexiglas filters on radiation were determined. Photosynthetic photon flux (PPF, 400 to 700 nm), spectra (400 to 1000 nm), shortwave radiation (285-2800 nm), and total radiation (300 to 100,000 nm) were measured, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) and longwave radiation (2800 to 100,000 nm) were calculated. Measurement of PPF alone was not an adequate characterization of the radiation environment. Total radiant flux varied among lamp types at equal PPF. HID lamps provided a lower percentage of longwave radiation than fluorescent lamps, but, when HID lamps provided PPF levels greater than that possible with fluorescent lamps, the amount of longwave radiation was high. Water was the most effective longwave radiation filter. Glass and Plexiglas similarly filtered longwave more than shortwave radiation, but transmission of nonphotosynthetic shortwave radiation was less with Plexiglas than glass. The filter materials tested would not be expected to influence photomorphogenesis because radiation in the action spectrum of phytochrome was not altered, but this may not be the only pigment involved.

  18. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  19. Radiation, waves, fields. Causes and effects on environment and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    1990-01-01

    The book discusses static electricity, alternating electric fields, magnetostatic fields, alternating magnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, optical and ionizing radiation and their hazards and health effects. Each chapter presents basic physical and biological concepts and describes the common radiation sources and their biological effects. Each chapter also contains hints for everyday behaviour as well as in-depth information an specific scientific approaches for assessing biological effects; the latter are addressed to all expert readers working in these fields. There is a special chapter on the problem of so-called 'terrestrial radiation'. (orig.) With 88 figs., 31 tabs [de

  20. RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AT AVIATION ALTITUDES AND IN SPACE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sihver, L.; Ploc, Ondřej; Puchalska, M.; Ambrožová, Iva; Kubančák, Ján; Kyselová, Dagmar; Shurshakov, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2015), s. 477-483 ISSN 0144-8420 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cosmic radiation * radiation field * on-board spacecraft Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  1. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  2. A lesson from science in polar extreme environments: ethics and social values for primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Longa, Federica; Crescimbene, Massimo; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Romano, Vincenzo; Cesaroni, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    One of the relevant objectives of the researchers should be filling the gap between the scientific research and the school. Such objective should be pursued methodically, through commitment, foresight and cooperation. In this frame the idea to communicate and to share the experience of the scientific research in Antarctica with the public and with the school is a challenge that a team of INGV researchers, engaged for many years in scientific missions in Antarctica, carries on with great enthusiasm within the several outreach activities of the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research (PNRA). The outreach activities, aiming to disseminate the knowledge and the culture of the polar regions, have been mainly addressed to a public of adults and students of the secondary school (11-19 years). Recently, the researchers matured the need to realize outreach paths addressed to pupils of the primary school (8-10 years), taking the advantage of the multidisciplinary themes offered by the Antarctic research. The present work reports the experience of the outreach laboratory "On a mission to the South Pole", realized in the frame of events organized by INGV (ScienzAperta 2012 e 2014) and dedicated to the primary school. The educational themes developed within the laboratory concern the research in Antarctica, with particular focus on the human aspects, the geophysics and the progress of new technologies. The innovative aspect of the laboratory stands in the strategy to deal with Antarctica with an educational aim, proposing Antarctica as a natural laboratory, not only from a scientific point of view, but also as a laboratory of shared human experiences. The didactic path, based on interactive methodology that uses the role-paly and the experiential activities, enable the children to acquire the knowledge on Antarctica (knowledge); to explore the Antarctic characteristics as a natural laboratory and to experiment an emotional education through individual and team

  3. Development of clean environment conservation technology by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myunjoo; Kim, Tak Hyun; Jung, In Ha

    2012-04-01

    This report is aim to develop the technology for environmental conservation by radiation. It is consisted of two research parts. One is development of wastewater disinfection technology by radiation and the other is development of livestock waste treatment technology by radiation. For the development of wastewater disinfection technology disinfect ion process, technology for treatment of toxic organic chemicals and assessment of ecological toxicity, technology for treatment of endocrine disrupting chemicals and assessment of genetic safety were developed. For the development of livestock waste treatment technology, process for simultaneous removal of nutrients, technology for disinfection and quality enhancement of livestock waste compost, technology for reduction of composting periods, monitoring of toxic organic compounds, pretreatment technology for organic toxic chemicals and enhancement of biological treatment efficiencies were developed. Based on basic research, advanced livestock wastewater treatment process using radiation was established

  4. Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

  5. Environment and health: 3. Ozone depletion and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Gruijl, F.R.; Van der Leun, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is responsible for a variety of familiar photochemical reactions, including photochemical smog, bleaching of paints and decay of plastics. Conjugated bonds in organic molecules such as proteins and DNA absorb the UV radiation, which can damage these molecules. By a fortunate evolutionary event, the oxygen produced by photosynthesis forms a filter in the outer reaches of our atmosphere that absorbs the most energetic and harmful UV radiation, with wavelengths below 240 nm (in the UVC band [wavelength 100-280 nm]). In the process, the oxygen molecules split up and recombine to form ozone (Fig. 1). This ratified ozone layer (spread out between 10 and 50 Ion in the stratosphere but only 3 mm thick were it compressed at ground level) in turn efficiently absorbs UV radiation of higher wavelengths (tip to about 310 nm). A part of the UV radiation in the UVB band (wavelength 280-315 nm) still reaches ground level and is absorbed in sufficient amounts to have deleterious effects on cells. The less energetic radiation in the UVA band (wavelength 315-400 nm, bordering the visible band [wavelength 400-800 nm]) is not absorbed by ozone and reaches ground level without much attenuation through a clear atmosphere (i.e., no clouds, no air pollution). Although not completely innocuous, the UVA radiation in sunlight is much less photochemically active and therefore generally less harmful than UVB radiation. Life on earth has adapted itself to the UV stress, particularly UVB stress, fbr example by forming protective UV-absorbing surface layers, by repairing cell damage or by replacing damaged cells entirely. Human skin shows all of these adaptive features. Our eyes are less well adapted, but dicy, are shielded by the brows and by squinting. (author)

  6. Enabling surface nuclear magnetic resonance at high-noise environments using a pre-polarization pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Yang, Yujing; Teng, Fei; Müller-Petke, Mike

    2018-02-01

    The technique of surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) has been widely used for hydrological investigations in recent years. Unfortunately, the detected SNMR signals are limited to tens of nanovolts and are thus susceptible to environmental noise. While pre-polarization pulses to enhance the detected signal amplitudes are common in laboratory applications, SNMR field testing has only utilized excitation pulses until now. In conducting measurements in China, we demonstrate that adding a pre-polarization field to the SNMR pulse sequence is feasible and allows for the reliable detection of SNMR signals in noisy scenarios that otherwise prohibit signal detection. We introduce a forward modelling for pre-polarization using SNMR and present a three-layer model obtained from inverse modelling that satisfies the observed data from the field experiment. We expect this development to open up new applications for SNMR technology, especially in high-noise level places, such as active mines.

  7. Experimental checking results of mathematical modeling of the radiation environment sensor based on diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladchenkov, E V; Kolyubin, V A; Nedosekin, P G; Zaharchenko, K V; Ibragimov, R F; Kadilin, V V; Tyurin, E M

    2017-01-01

    Were conducted a series of experiments, the purpose of which had to verify the mathematical model of the radiation environment sensor. Theoretical values of the beta particles count rate from 90 Sr - 90 Y source registered by radiation environment sensor was compared with the experimental one. Theoretical (calculated) count rate of beta particles was found with using the developed mathematical model of the radiation environment sensor. Deviation of the calculated values of the beta particle count rate does not exceed 10% from the experimental. (paper)

  8. Rectangular microstrip antenna with corrugation like defects at radiating edge: A new approach to reduce cross polarization radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, U. A.; Mondal, D.; Nagaraju, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Singh, L. L. K.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, single layer, simple and compact RMA, with corrugation like defects at the radiating edge, is studied thoroughly to reduce XP radiation from the patch. Unlike the earlier works reported on defected ground structure integrated patches and defect patch structures, in this work, corrugation like linear defects have been placed at the radiating edges of the patch to reduce cross polarisation radiation. Around 30-40 dB of CP-XP isolation is observed in H-plane with 7% impedance bandwidth and in E-plane also, more than 55 dB CP-XP isolation is found. The proposed structure is very simple to design and easy to fabricate.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice after seed ground simulated radiation and spaceflight explains the radiation effects of space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Jinming; Liang, Shujian; Lei, Huang; Shenyi, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing

    In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed space-flights with ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and found that the protein expression profiles were changed after seed space environment exposures. Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved. Rice seed is in the process of dormant of plant development, showing high resistance against stresses, so the highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to seeds. To further investigate the radiation effects of space environment, we performed on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and compared between the proteomes of seed irra-diated plants and seed spaceflight (20th recoverable satellite) plants from the same rice variety. Space ionization shows low-dose but high energy particle effects, for searching the particle effects, ground radiations with the same low-dose (2mGy) but different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3KeV/µm-C, 30KeV/µm-C, 31KeV/µm-Ne, 62.2KeV/µm-C, 500Kev/µm-Fe) were performed; using 2-D DIGE coupled with clustering and principle component analysis (PCA) for data process and comparison, we found that the holistic protein expression patterns of plants irradiated by LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles were most similar to spaceflight. In addition, although space environment presents a low-dose radiation (0.177 mGy/day on the satellite), the equivalent simulated radiation dose effects should still be evaluated: radiations of LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles with different cumulative doses (2mGy, 20mGy, 200mGy, 2000mGy) were further carried out and resulted that the 2mGy radiation still shared most similar proteomic profiles with spaceflight, confirming the low-dose effects of space radiation. Therefore, in the protein expression level

  10. Determining the molecular origin of radiation damage/enhancement in electro-optic polymeric materials through polarized light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Moreno, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies on the radiation effects upon polymer and polymer-based photonic materials suggest that the radiation resistance of the material is heavily dependent on the choice of polymer-host and guest-chromophore. The best results to date have been achieved with electro optic polymeric materials based on CLD1 doped in APC, which has resulted in improved performance at the device level upon gamma-ray irradiation at moderate doses. Still, our understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the enhancement of the performance is unclear. In this paper, we discuss how polarized light microscopy could be used as a means to quantify the effect of the different physical parameters that influence the optical response of electro-optic polymeric thin film samples.

  11. Some technologically enhanced exposures to natural radiation environment in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalit, B.Y.; Shukla, V.K.; Ramachandran, T.V.; Mishra, U.C.

    1982-01-01

    A summary of results of gamma spectrometric measurements of natural radioactivity in a number of coal and flyash samples from thermal power plants and phosphatic fertilizer samples collected from various fertilizer plants in India are presented. These constitute the sources of technologically enhanced exposures to natural radiation. A brief description of sampling and measurement procedures is given. The radiation doses to the population from coal burning for electricity generation have been calculated using the method outlined in UNSCEAR report of 1979 with corrections for local population density. The external radiation dose to the farmers has been calculated on the basis of usage of phosphatic fertilizers for rice, wheat, millets and sugarcane crops for the normal agricultural practices

  12. Measurement of gamma radiation doses in nuclear power plant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochvar, I.A.; Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Sergeeva, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the problems of measuring gamma radiation dose values and the dose distribution in the nuclear power plant area with the aim of estimating the extent of their effect on the population. Presented are the dosimeters applied, their distribution throughout the controlled area, time of measurement. The distribution of gamma radiation doses over the controlled area and the dose alteration with the increase of the distance from the release source are shown. The results of measurements are investigated. The conclusion is made that operating nuclear power plants do not cause any increase in the gamma radiation dose over the area. Recommendations for clarifying the techniques for using dose-meters and decreasing measurement errors are given [ru

  13. Uranium mining and processing: their radiation impact into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostapczuk, Peter; Zoriy, Petro; Dederichs, Herbert; Lennartz, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Based on Thorium and Uranium determination in soil and plants samples collected in the region of Aktau, Kazakhstan the distribution pattern of environmental pollution by these elements was correlated with the radiation dose. The main radiation source was the waste deposit of the equipment used by the uranium processing (dose higher than 5 μSv/h). The mining area and also the transportation way from mine to the uranium factory has also an radiation impact which is difficult to estimate. Based on the data found by plants and soil samples all the area under study has a higher pollution level by Thorium and Uranium than the control area (about 0.1μSv/h). Due to observed strong wind blowing in different directions it is possible that the particle of uranium ore has been transported for long distance and polluted the plants and upper soil layer. The further investigations should get more information about this supposition. (author)

  14. PREFACE: Ocean and climate changes in polar and sub-polar environments: proceedings from the 2010 IODP-Canada/ECORD summer school

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Guillaume; Veiga-Pires, Cristina; Solignac, Sandrine

    2011-05-01

    IODP logoECORD logo The European Consortium for Ocean Drilling Program (ECORD), the Canadian Consortium for Ocean Drilling (CCOD), the Network of the Universités du Québec (UQ), the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and GEOTOP sponsored, in 2010, a summer school entitled 'Ocean and climate changes in polar and sub-polar environments'. This summer school took place from 27 June to 12 July in Rimouski, Québec city and Montréal (Quebec, Canada) and was attended by nineteen students and postdoctoral fellows from seven countries: Canada, France, Germany, UK, Serbia, Portugal and the USA. Lectures, hands-on laboratory exercises and laboratory visits were conducted at the Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski (ISMER), Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Centre Eau Terre Environnement (INRS-ETE) and UQAM, in addition to two field trips and a short geological and geophysical cruise on board the R/V Coriolis II in the St Lawrence Estuary and Saguenay Fjord. During the summer school, more than twenty researchers gave lectures on the use of several paleoceanographic and geophysical techniques to reconstruct ocean and climate changes in polar and sub-polar environments. Some of these lectures are presented as short review papers in this volume. They are intended to portray a brief, but state-of-the-art overview of an array of techniques applied to Arctic and sub-Arctic environments, as well as the geological background information needed by the summer school participants to put the scientific expedition and fieldwork into context. The volume begins with a view on the great challenges and key issues to be addressed in the Arctic Ocean (Stein) in the forthcoming years and is followed by a review (O'Regan) on Late Cenozoic paleoceanography of the Central Arctic. The two subsequent papers (St-Onge et al and de Vernal et al) deal with the oceanographic, paleoceanographic and geological context of the Saguenay Fjord, and St Lawrence Estuary and Gulf

  15. Applications of isotopes and radiation in conservation of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to review present knowledge of the applications of radiation, radioisotopes and nuclear methods of analysis in the monitoring and control of environmental pollution and in reducing emissions of environmentally toxic substances. The scientific programme covered a wide range of different applications of nuclear technology, such as flue gas purification, radiation processing of liquid and solid wastes, radiotracer studies and nuclear analytical techniques and their applications. The symposium was attended by 92 participants representing 31 IAEA Member States. Separate abstracts were prepared for 46 of the papers in this volume. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. LHCb: Evaluation of the Radiation Environment of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Karacson, M

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of all aspects of the radiation field of the LHCb experiment is needed to understand the impact of the unprecedented radiation levels to which its detector and electronics are exposed to. The methodology on how this is done is described. Analysis of the measurements of active and passive sensors of various types which are distributed in and around the detector will be carried out. Appropriate cross calibrations will be applied and comparisons between them will be performed. Critical comparisons with simulation results obtained with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code are also an essential element of the study.

  17. The Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported.

  18. Proceedings. Protection of the natural environment. International symposium on ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.; Johansson, Gunnar; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Luening, M.

    1996-01-01

    The symposium was organised jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute and the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada. The programme was organised around six major topics: Biological effects of ionising radiation; Ecological effects of ionising radiation; Behaviour and transport of radionuclides in the natural environment; Criteria for environmental protection; Assessment methodology; and Social and economic aspects. All 86 contributions (excluding the opening addresses) have been separately indexed

  19. Chirality Emergence in Thin Solid Films of Amino Acids by Polarized Light from Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashahiro Adachi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bioorganic compounds is that a kind of “chiral impulse” as an asymmetric excitation source induced asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such materials such as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life (Cosmic Scenario. To experimentally introduce chiral structure into racemic films of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, isovaline, etc., we irradiated them with linearly polarized light (LPL from synchrotron radiation and circularly polarized light (CPL from a free electron laser. After the irradiation, we evaluated optical anisotropy by measuring the circular dichroism (CD spectra and verified that new Cotton peaks appeared at almost the same peak position as those of the corresponding non-racemic amino acid films. With LPL irradiation, two-dimensional anisotropic structure expressed as linear dichroism and/or linear birefringence was introduced into the racemic films. With CPL irradiation, the signs of the Cotton peaks exhibit symmetrical structure corresponding to the direction of CPL rotation. This indicates that some kinds of chiral structure were introduced into the racemic film. The CD spectra after CPL irradiation suggest the chiral structure should be derived from not only preferential photolysis but also from photolysis-induced molecular structural change. These results suggest that circularly polarized light sources in space could be associated with the origin of terrestrial homochirality; that is, they would be effective asymmetric exciting sources introducing chiral structures into bio-organic molecules or complex organic compounds.

  20. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  1. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  2. Chirality Emergence in Thin Solid Films of Amino Acids by Polarized Light from Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Shinojima, Hiroyuki; Seyama, Michiko; Ueno, Yuko; Kaneko, Takeo; Kobayashi, Kensei; Mita, Hajime; Adachi, Mashahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bioorganic compounds is that a kind of “chiral impulse” as an asymmetric excitation source induced asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such materials such as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life (Cosmic Scenario). To experimentally introduce chiral structure into racemic films of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, isovaline, etc.), we irradiated them with linearly polarized light (LPL) from synchrotron radiation and circularly polarized light (CPL) from a free electron laser. After the irradiation, we evaluated optical anisotropy by measuring the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and verified that new Cotton peaks appeared at almost the same peak position as those of the corresponding non-racemic amino acid films. With LPL irradiation, two-dimensional anisotropic structure expressed as linear dichroism and/or linear birefringence was introduced into the racemic films. With CPL irradiation, the signs of the Cotton peaks exhibit symmetrical structure corresponding to the direction of CPL rotation. This indicates that some kinds of chiral structure were introduced into the racemic film. The CD spectra after CPL irradiation suggest the chiral structure should be derived from not only preferential photolysis but also from photolysis-induced molecular structural change. These results suggest that circularly polarized light sources in space could be associated with the origin of terrestrial homochirality; that is, they would be effective asymmetric exciting sources introducing chiral structures into bio-organic molecules or complex organic compounds. PMID:19742124

  3. A Polarized Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model for Calculations of Spectra of the Stokes Parameters of Shortwave Radiation Based on the Line-by-Line and Monte Carlo Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Fomin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new version of radiative transfer model called the Fast Line-by-Line Model (FLBLM, which is based on the Line-by-Line (LbL and Monte Carlo (MC methods and rigorously treats particulate and molecular scattering alongside absorption. The advantage of this model consists in the use of the line-by-line model that allows for the computing of high-resolution spectra quite quickly. We have developed the model by taking into account the polarization state of light and carried out some validations by comparison against benchmark results. FLBLM calculates the Stokes parameters spectra of shortwave radiation in vertically inhomogeneous atmospheres. This update makes the model applicable for the assessment of cloud and aerosol influence on radiances as measured by the SW high-resolution polarization spectrometers. In sample results we demonstrate that the high-resolution spectra of the Stokes parameters contain more detailed information about clouds and aerosols than the medium- and low-resolution spectra wherein lines are not resolved. The presented model is rapid enough for many practical applications (e.g., validations and might be useful especially for the remote sensing. FLBLM is suitable for development of the reliable technique for retrieval of optical and microphysical properties of clouds and aerosols from high-resolution satellites data.

  4. Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation by Apertures: II. Oblique Incidence on the Slotted Plane for Parallel Polarization,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report is the second in a series of investigations into the diffraction of electromagnetic radiation by apertures in conducting screens. Herein...is presented a technique for obtaining the fields everywhere for plane electromagnetic radiation incident obliquely on a slotted conducting plane. The

  5. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292012217

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose

  6. Radiation tolerant passive and active optical fiber products for use in space environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mark; Hankey, Judith; Gray, Rebecca

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports the radiation performance results of several new product types designed for high radiation environments. The products tested include radiation hardened highly birefringent (HiBi) passive products for polarised applications and radiation tolerant active erbium doped fiber products for amplifiers. Radiation hardened, short beatlength HiBi fiber products have been developed for high accuracy polarisation maintaining (PM) gyros and sensors at both 1310nm and 1550nm operation in the space environment. The fibers have been tested up to 5kGy (500krad) - levels which could be expected in extreme, extra-terrestrial space environments. Results show a consistently low Radiation Induced Attenuation (RIA) of fibers are intended for use in multichannel amplifiers in optical intersatellite communications. The structure of the fibers have been designed to deliver an accelerated recovery of radiation damage through photo-annealing using only the residual energy already available in an amplifier using a 980nm pumping regime. These products have been tested up to 200Gy (20krad) - levels which can be expected in Earth orbit environments over a 20-30 mission lifetime. Results show up to 100% recovery under continuous use for dose rates of 0.11rad/hr. It has also been demonstrated through analysis of the optical spectral output that this effect reverses the gain tilt, or spectral narrowing, induced by radiation damage through the C and L band. These combined fiber characteristics allow performance stability of the amplifier over the lifetime of the space mission.

  7. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braicovich, L., E-mail: lucio.braicovich@polimi.it; Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, Milano I-20133 (Italy); Le Tacon, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38043 (France); Supruangnet, R. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  8. Comparison of discrete ordinate and Monte Carlo simulations of polarized radiative transfer in two coupled slabs with different refractive indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D; Stamnes, S; Tanikawa, T; Sommersten, E R; Stamnes, J J; Lotsberg, J K; Stamnes, K

    2013-04-22

    A comparison is presented of two different methods for polarized radiative transfer in coupled media consisting of two adjacent slabs with different refractive indices, each slab being a stratified medium with no change in optical properties except in the direction of stratification. One of the methods is based on solving the integro-differential radiative transfer equation for the two coupled slabs using the discrete ordinate approximation. The other method is based on probabilistic and statistical concepts and simulates the propagation of polarized light using the Monte Carlo approach. The emphasis is on non-Rayleigh scattering for particles in the Mie regime. Comparisons with benchmark results available for a slab with constant refractive index show that both methods reproduce these benchmark results when the refractive index is set to be the same in the two slabs. Computed results for test cases with coupling (different refractive indices in the two slabs) show that the two methods produce essentially identical results for identical input in terms of absorption and scattering coefficients and scattering phase matrices.

  9. Isotopes and radiations in agriculture and environment research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, M.S.; Sachdev, P.; Deb, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    The use of isotope and radiation techniques in agriculture and environmental research has considerably helped in meeting the challenges of increasing crop and animal production. The present compilation presents the state of the art on the use of these techniques particularly in the context of current research and development programmes in this field. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. Using a Commercial Ethernet PHY Device in a Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jeremy; Arani, Michael; Arroyo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This work involved placing a commercial Ethernet PHY on its own power boundary, with limited current supply, and providing detection methods to determine when the device is not operating and when it needs either a reset or power-cycle. The device must be radiation-tested and free of destructive latchup errors. The commercial Ethernet PHY's own power boundary must be supplied by a current-limited power regulator that must have an enable (for power cycling), and its maximum power output must not exceed the PHY's input requirements, thus preventing damage to the device. A regulator with configurable output limits and short-circuit protection (such as the RHFL4913, rad hard positive voltage regulator family) is ideal. This will prevent a catastrophic failure due to radiation (such as a short between the commercial device's power and ground) from taking down the board's main power. Logic provided on the board will detect errors in the PHY. An FPGA (field-programmable gate array) with embedded Ethernet MAC (Media Access Control) will work well. The error detection includes monitoring the PHY's interrupt line, and the status of the Ethernet's switched power. When the PHY is determined to be non-functional, the logic device resets the PHY, which will often clear radiation induced errors. If this doesn't work, the logic device power-cycles the FPGA by toggling the regulator's enable input. This should clear almost all radiation induced errors provided the device is not latched up.

  11. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  12. Time-dependent effects on CMOS total-dose response in accelerator radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.; Winokur, P.; Shaw, D.; Barnes, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time-dependent charge buildup and annealing processes cause the ionizing radiation response of CMOS devices and circuits in an accelerator radiation environment to depend strongly on the dose rate of the exposure. Oxide-trap charge annealing and interface-trap buildup in nMOS transistors can lead to positive threshold voltage shifts in a low-dose-rate radiation environment, while negative threshold-voltage shifts are commonly observed after irradiations at typical laboratory dose rates [50-300 rad(Si)/s]. Thus, devices that pass laboratory testing can fail at the low dose rates encountered in a high-energy particle-accelerator radiation environment due to positive nMOS transistor threshold-voltage shifts above preirradiation values, i.e., open-quotes rebound.close quotes The authors discuss how this issue can be addressed in total-dose hardness assurance test methods for accelerator environments. An example is the revised US military-standard ionizing-radiation-effects test method (MIL-STD 883D, Test Method 1019.4). Finally, it is noted that the 1/f noise of radiation-hardened MOS electronics should be significantly lower than that of commercial electronics both in and outside of a radiation environment

  13. Discovery of Scattering Polarization in the Hydrogen Ly α Line of the Solar Disk Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Giono, G.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife, E-38205 (Spain); Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K. [Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris Sud, Batiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Tsuneta, S. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ichimoto, K. [Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Goto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Belluzzi, L., E-mail: ryouhei.kano@nao.ac.jp [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-10

    There is a thin transition region (TR) in the solar atmosphere where the temperature rises from 10,000 K in the chromosphere to millions of degrees in the corona. Little is known about the mechanisms that dominate this enigmatic region other than the magnetic field plays a key role. The magnetism of the TR can only be detected by polarimetric measurements of a few ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines, the Ly α line of neutral hydrogen at 121.6 nm (the strongest line of the solar UV spectrum) being of particular interest given its sensitivity to the Hanle effect (the magnetic-field-induced modification of the scattering line polarization). We report the discovery of linear polarization produced by scattering processes in the Ly α line, obtained with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) rocket experiment. The Stokes profiles observed by CLASP in quiet regions of the solar disk show that the Q / I and U / I linear polarization signals are of the order of 0.1% in the line core and up to a few percent in the nearby wings, and that both have conspicuous spatial variations with scales of ∼10 arcsec. These observations help constrain theoretical models of the chromosphere–corona TR and extrapolations of the magnetic field from photospheric magnetograms. In fact, the observed spatial variation from disk to limb of polarization at the line core and wings already challenge the predictions from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical models of the upper solar chromosphere.

  14. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  15. The radiation performance standard. A presentation model for ionizing radiation in the living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaap, L.E.J.J.; Bosmans, G.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Hendriks, Ch.F.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the so-called radiation performance standard (SPN, abbreviated in Dutch) the total radioactivity from building constructions which contributes to the indoor radiation dose can be calculated. The SPN is implemented with related boundary values and is part of the Building Decree ('Bouwbesluit') in the Netherlands. The model, presented in this book, forms the basis of a new Dutch radiation protection standard, to be published by the Dutch Institute for Standardization NEN (formerly NNI). 14 refs

  16. VCHP Radiators for Lunar and Martian Environments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-term Lunar and Martian systems present challenges to thermal control systems, including changes in thermal load, and large changes in the thermal environment...

  17. VCHP Radiators for Lunar and Martian Environments, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-term Lunar and Martian systems present challenges to thermal systems, including changes in thermal load, and large changes in the thermal environment between...

  18. A study of Latchup phenomenon induced in integrated circuits subject to an radiation field environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merabtine, Nadjim; Sadaoui, Djaouida; Benslama, Malek

    2007-01-01

    [Text of English abstract is entered here]. The electronic equipment operated in hostile environment can undergo beside failures due to the normal component aging, degradation due to the environmental conditions of functioning. The interaction of the particles composing a radiation environment with materials within an integrated circuit can induce failures perturbing its functioning or eventually its destruction. The study of the radiation effects on integrated circuits particularly of the Latchup effect aims at evaluating the reliability of electronic systems subject to radiation. The objective of this work will be focused especially upon the Latchup phenomenon induced in the implied components. (authors) [fr

  19. MARS15 Simulation of Radiation Environment at the ESS Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Eidelman, Yu. I. [Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Rakhno, I. L. [Fermilab; Tchelidze, L. [ESS, Lund; Tropin, I. S. [Fermilab

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive studies with the MARS15(2016) Monte-Carlo code are described on evaluation of prompt and residual radiation levels induced by nominal and accidental beam losses in the 5-MW, 2-GeV European Spallation Source (ESS) Linac. These are to provide a basis for radiation shielding design verification through the accelerator complex. The calculation model is based on the latest engineering design and includes a sophisticated algorithm for particle tracking in the machine RF cavities as well as a well-established model of the beam loss. Substantial efforts were put in solving the deep-penetration problem for the thick shielding around the tunnel with numerous complex penetrations. It allowed us to study in detail not only the prompt dose, but also component and air activation, radiation loads on the soil outside the tunnel, and skyshine studies for the complicated 3-D surface above the machine. Among the other things, the newest features in MARS15 (2016), such as a ROOT-based beamline builder and a TENDL-based event generator for nuclear interactions below 100 MeV, were very useful in this challenging application

  20. Radiation damage response of ceramics in extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    Oxide-based and inter-metallic compounds have great potential as new materials for clean and renewable energy production. Many of these materials, especially those designed for operation in Generation IV fission reactors or in fusion reactors, must exhibit robust performance under extreme conditions of temperature, irradiation, and chemical attack. Others, such as nuclear waste forms, may be required to retain radioactive elements for long periods of time in geological repositories. The mechanisms of radiation damage production and recovery in these materials may vary considerably as a function of the damage source, e.g., energetic neutrons in reactor systems versus alpha decay in nuclear waste forms. Furthermore, the kinetics of damage recovery are complicated by multiply activated processes and in certain cases, longer-term diffusion may modify the structural state left by irradiation in the short term. Here, we review some basic concepts regarding the mechanisms of radiation damage in selected ceramic materials, including mathematical models, fluence-temperature relationships, and predictive methodologies. A major consideration for materials performance is the ability of a given compound to resist amorphization. Historically, there are a number of general criteria for radiation resistance, including those involving melting point (thermodynamics), structural freedom, bonding, and energetics of defect formation. These are discussed using specific examples. (Author)

  1. Micro-environment and intracellular metabolism modulation of adipose tissue macrophage polarization in relation to chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Tu, Yixuan; Chen, Hainan; Jackson, Ampadu O; Patel, Vaibhav; Yin, Kai

    2018-02-23

    The accumulation and pro-inflammatory polarization of immune cells, mainly macrophages, in adipose tissue (AT) are considered crucial factors for obesity-induced chronic inflammatory diseases. In this review, we highlighted the role of adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) polarization on AT function in the obese state and the effect of the micro-environment and intracellular metabolism on the dynamic switch of ATMs into their pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes, which may have distinct influences on obesity-related chronic inflammatory diseases. Obesity-associated metabolic dysfunctions, including those of glucose, fatty acid, cholesterol, and other nutrient substrates such as vitamin D and iron in AT, promote the pro-inflammatory polarization of ATMs and AT inflammation via regulating the interaction between ATMs and adipocytes and intracellular metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and reverse cholesterol transportation. Focusing on the regulation of ATM metabolism will provide a novel target for the treatment of obesity-related chronic inflammatory diseases, including insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Measurement of the photon polarization in radiative $B^0_s$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The photon polarization is studied for the first time in $B_s^0$ decays, using an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton data recorded by the LHCb experiment. An untagged time-dependent analysis of $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma$ decays allows to measure the CPV parameter $\\mathcal{A}^{\\Delta}$, which is sensitive to the left- and right-handed helicity amplitudes. The measured value $\\mathcal{A}^{\\Delta} = -0.98 \\; ^{+0.46}_{-0.52}\\text{(stat.)} ^{+0.23}_{-0.20}\\text{(syst.)}$ is consistent with the Standard Model prediction within two standard deviations. This value can put constraints on the Wilson coefficients $\\mathcal{C}_7$ and $\\mathcal{C}_7^{'}$. With a tagged analysis of the same decay the parameter $S_{\\phi\\gamma}$, also sensitive to the photon polarization, could be measured.

  3. Application to the conservation of RF tags in the radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraura, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kunio; Takahashi, Naoki; Sakurai, Kouichi

    2011-01-01

    RF tags that are implemented RFID technology as tag has been used in various fields. Tags have been developed, such as resistance to chemicals and high temperature resistant RF tags are also used in specialized fields. The RF tag apply to the existing nuclear field, had been concerned about the effects of radiation to the RF tags. Now, since the RF tag with a goal to develop radiation-proof, we have examined, such as applying for maintenance of nuclear facilities under radiation environment. We report the results and RF tags to be radiation resistant. (author)

  4. Collection of radiation resistant characteristics reports for instruments and materials in high dose rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Joichi

    2008-03-01

    This document presents the collected official reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials to be used in high dose rate environment as J-PARC facility. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. (author)

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068566; Bayshev, I.; Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M.; Kurochkin, I.; Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton-proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarised, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  6. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm 2 ).

  7. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach

  8. Bullying among radiation therapists: effects on job performance and work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Megan; Johnson, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    To identify the effects of workplace bullying in the radiation therapy department on job performance and explore the environment and morale of individuals who work with a bully. A quantitative research study was designed to assess the prevalence and effects of bullying in the radiation therapy workplace. A total of 308 radiation therapists participated in the study for a return rate of 46%. Of those, 194 indicated that workplace bullying was present either in their current workplace or in a previous radiation therapy environment and that it negatively affected job performance and satisfaction. Findings of this study indicate a need for evaluation of the radiation therapy workplace, education on how to identify and prevent bullying behavior, and better communication among members of the radiation therapy environment. Participants indicated that working in a hostile environment led to forgetfulness, ineffective communication, and perceived discrepancies in promotion and treatment by management. Any bullying behavior contributes to an overall toxic work environment, which is unhealthy and unsafe for patients and therapists. Those who manage therapists should promote a culture of safety and embrace their staff's independence.

  9. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  10. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  11. Radiation environment assessment, measurement and its impact on health and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Panwar, Brijandra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Present paper deals with Radiation Environment Assessment, Measurement and its Impact on Health, its meaning and in particular with sustainable development perspective. Health and Environment appears to be different subjects and concepts, but in reality they are interrelated and interdependent. One cannot exist without the other. For good health hygienic environment is a sine qua non. Article 3 of Universal Declaration of Human Right 1948 incorporates the right to life. It has been interpreted by the international court that the word life does not means simply to live but it means to live with dignity and in well and pollution and radiation free environment which is a gift of nature on this universe. There is no doubt about the nuclear revolution that has taken place and has made life of human beings worth living on this earth with comfort. It is growing development of the nation. But in the process the development that has been done at the cost of human life, public health and environment which will prove fatal in the long run. So there is a need for Sustainable Development of the human and environment of the world. Precisely and concisely, the sustainable development is a process that meets the needs of the present without compromising ability of future generations to meet their own needs. A hygienic and redaction free environment will ensure the better Health of the people. Environment and nuclear power plant can coexist. The harmonization of the two needs has led to the concept of Radiation Environment Assessment and sustainable development, so much so that it has become the most significant and focal point of environmental legislation relating to the same. Sustainable development, simply put, is a process in which development can be sustained over generations effects of radiation on humans and on the environment. Finally, this paper deals with the impact of radiation on environment and the need of sustainable development for achieving a better human. (author)

  12. Radiation Safety Management Guidelines for PET-CT: Focus on Behavior and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Wook; Han, Eun Ok

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose is to specify behavior and environmental factors aimed at reducing the exposed dosage caused by PET-CT and to develop radiation safety management guidelines adequate for domestic circumstances. We have used a multistep-multimethod as the methodological approach to design and to carry out the research both in quality and quantity, including an analysis on previous studies, professional consultations and a survey. The survey includes responses from 139 practitioners in charged of 109 PET-CTs installed throughout Korea(reported by the Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2010). The research use 156 questions using Cronbach's α (alpha) coefficients which were: 0.818 for 'the necessity of setting and installing the radiation protective environment'; 0.916 for 'the necessity of radiation protection', 'setting and installing the radiation protective environment'; and 0.885 for 'radiation protection'. The check list, derived from the radiation safety management guidelines focused on behavior and environment, was composed of 20 items for the radiation protective environment: including 5 items for the patient; 4 items for the guardian; 3 items for the radiologist; and 8 items applied to everyone involved; for a total of 26 items for the radiation protective behavior including: 12 items for the patient; 1 item for the guardian, 7 items for the radiologist; and 6 items applied to everyone involved. The specific check list is shown in (Table 5-6). Since our country has no safety management guidelines of its own to reduce the exposed dosage caused by PET-CTs, we believe the guidelines developed through this study means great deal to the field as it is not only appropriate for domestic circumstances, but also contains specific check lists for each target who may be exposed to radiation in regards to behavior and environment.

  13. A Novel Method for Performance Analysis of OFDM Polarization Diversity System in Ricean Fading Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic-Delibasic, M.; Pejanovic-Djurisic, M.; Prasad, R.

    2012-01-01

    OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) is proven to be a very effective modulation and multiple access technique that enables high data rate transmission. Due to its good performance it is already implemented in several standardized technologies, and it is very promising technique...... conditions. In order to calculate BER (Bit Error Rate) for the considered OFDM polarization diversity system with a certain level of the received signals correlation, we propose a novel analytical method. The obtained results are compared with the ones attained by simulation....

  14. Background radiation, people and the environment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, T.V.

    2007-01-01

    All living organisms are exposed to ionizing radiation, which always existed naturally. Important sources are cosmic rays which comes from outer space and from the surface of the sun, terrestrial radionuclides which occurs in the earth's crust, in building materials and in air, water and foods and in the human body itself. Some of the exposures are fairly constant and uniform for all individuals everywhere, for example, the dose from ingestion of potassium-40 in food. Other exposures vary depending on location. Cosmic rays, for example are, more intense at higher altitudes, and the concentrations of uranium and thorium in soils are elevated in localized areas. Exposures can also vary as a result of human activities and practices. In particular, the building materials of houses and the design and ventilation systems strongly influences the indoor levels of the radioactive gas radon and its decay products, which contributes significantly to doses through inhalation. Component of the sources of exposures to Indian population has been assessed based on the data generated. Total contribution to the natural sources to the Indian population works out to 2.3 mSv/y as against the global value of 2.4 mSv/y. Estimated modified source which includes mining of heavy metals, coal fired power plants, mining of phosphate rocks and its use as fertilizers, production of natural gas, production of gas mantles and luminescent dial and air travel contribution to the background radiation to the Indian population works out to be 1.2 x 10 -3 mSv/y; while atmospheric weapon tests contributes about 0.045 mSv/y, medical exposure contributes about 0.048 mSv/y and exposure due to nuclear power production contributes about 5.0 x 10 -5 mSv/y to the background radiation. Brief review and comparison of the dose rates arising from natural and man made sources to the Indian population is given. (author)

  15. Predictions of energetic particle radiation in the close Martian environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan M. P.; Dryer, M.; Fry, C. D.; Sun, W.; Lario, D.; Deehr, C. S.; Sanahuja, B.; Afonin, V. A.; Verigin, M. I.; Kotova, G. A.

    2005-03-01

    Intense, prolonged solar flare activity during March 1989 was used to provide a retrospective scenario for predictions of associated interplanetary shocks and accompanying particle radiation at planet Mars. Shocks from five major flares were simulated to hit both the Earth and Mars during the interval 9-23 March 1989. The simulated scenario was provided by the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry version 2 (HAFv.2) solar wind model. Since part of the generally required inputs for the model (specifically metric radio Type II coronal shock speeds) were not available, the shock speeds were iteratively determined via a "calibration" that uses limited IMP 8 particle and sudden storm commencement (SSC) data as proxies for shock arrival at the Earth. The shocks from four major solar flares were, thereby, found to arrive at Mars at times that are appropriate to explain solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events recorded in situ by the particle radiation detector experiments Solar Low Energy Detector (SLED) and Low Energy Telescope (LET) aboard Phobos-2. Supporting measurements were provided by the magnetometer (MAGMA) and plasma spectrometer (TAUS) experiments. A gap in the spacecraft records occurred at the simulated time of arrival of the fifth flare-associated shock. There were some uncertainties attending the selection of certain of the events deemed to be "parent" flares. Such uncertainty can be expected in view of the incomplete set of energetic particle, plasma, and magnetic field measurements made at relevant times at both the Earth and Mars (the latter planet was then located at a distance of 1.6 AU, at about 78° east of the Sun-Earth line). Use of the HAFv.2 solar wind model affords a 4-day lead time between predicted and measured space weather events at Mars, with an error of approximately ±12 hours. Solar radiation events of the magnitude studied occur often enough to warrant consideration in the design of both manned and unmanned expeditions to

  16. Computational efficient unsupervised coastline detection from single-polarization 1-look SAR images of complex coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzelli, Andrea; Zoppetti, Claudia; Pinelli, Gianpaolo

    2017-10-01

    Coastline detection in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is crucial in many application fields, from coastal erosion monitoring to navigation, from damage assessment to security planning for port facilities. The backscattering difference between land and sea is not always documented in SAR imagery, due to the severe speckle noise, especially in 1-look data with high spatial resolution, high sea state, or complex coastal environments. This paper presents an unsupervised, computationally efficient solution to extract the coastline acquired by only one single-polarization 1-look SAR image. Extensive tests on Spotlight COSMO-SkyMed images of complex coastal environments and objective assessment demonstrate the validity of the proposed procedure which is compared to state-of-the-art methods through visual results and with an objective evaluation of the distance between the detected and the true coastline provided by regional authorities.

  17. Measurement and simulation of the radiation environment in the lower atmosphere for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pioch, Christian Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Flying personnel is occupationally exposed to rather high radiation levels due to secondary cosmic radiation. Therefore, the radiation environment induced in the lower atmosphere by galactic and solar cosmic radiation was characterized by means of particle transport calculations using GEANT4. These calculations were validated with continuous measurements of the energy spectra of secondary neutrons with Bonner sphere spectrometers at the Zugspitze mountain and near the North Pole. The response of these instruments was determined with GEANT4 and for the first time experimentally verified at high neutron energies (244 and 387 MeV). Route doses for aircrews along typical long-haul flights were determined for galactic and solar cosmic radiation using most recent data on the magnetospheric field and primary cosmic radiation.

  18. Polar Microalgae: New Approaches towards Understanding Adaptations to an Extreme and Changing Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara R. Lyon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar Regions are unique and highly prolific ecosystems characterized by extreme environmental gradients. Photosynthetic autotrophs, the base of the food web, have had to adapt physiological mechanisms to maintain growth, reproduction and metabolic activity despite environmental conditions that would shut-down cellular processes in most organisms. High latitudes are characterized by temperatures below the freezing point, complete darkness in winter and continuous light and high UV in the summer. Additionally, sea-ice, an ecological niche exploited by microbes during the long winter seasons when the ocean and land freezes over, is characterized by large salinity fluctuations, limited gas exchange, and highly oxic conditions. The last decade has been an exciting period of insights into the molecular mechanisms behind adaptation of microalgae to the cryosphere facilitated by the advancement of new scientific tools, particularly “omics” techniques. We review recent insights derived from genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics studies. Genes, proteins and pathways identified from these highly adaptable polar microbes have far-reaching biotechnological applications. Furthermore, they may provide insights into life outside this planet, as well as glimpses into the past. High latitude regions also have disproportionately large inputs into global biogeochemical cycles and are the region most sensitive to climate change.

  19. Three-dimensional inhomogeneous rain fields: implications for the distribution of intensity and polarization of the microwave thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, Yaroslaw; Kutuza, Boris

    Observations and mapping of the upwelling thermal radiation of the Earth is the very promising remote sensing technique for the global monitoring of the weather and precipitations. For reliable interpretation of the observation data, numerical model of the microwave radiative transfer in the precipitating atmosphere is necessary. In the present work, numerical simulations of thermal microwave radiation in the rain have been performed at three wavelengths (3, 8 and 22 mm). Radiative properties of the rain have been simulated using public accessible T-matrix codes (Mishchenko, Moroz) for non-spherical particles of fixed orientation and realistic raindrop size distributions (Marshall-Palmer) within the range of rain intensity 1-100 mm/h. Thermal radiation of infinite flat slab medium and isolated rain cell of kilometer size has been simulated with finite difference scheme for the vectorial radiative transfer equation (VRTE) in dichroic scattering medium. Principal role of cell structure of the rain field in the formation of angular and spatial distribution of the intensity and polarization of the upwelling thermal radiation has been established. Possible approaches to interpretation of satellite data are also discussed. It is necessary that spatial resolution of microwave radiometers be less than rain cell size. At the present time the resolution is approximately 15 km. It can be considerably improved, for example by two-dimensional synthetic aperture millimeter-wave radiometric interferometer for measuring full-component Stokes vector of emission from hydrometeors. The estimates show that in millimeter band it is possible to develop such equipment with spatial resolution of the order of 1-2 km, which is significantly less than the size of rain cell, with sensitivity 0.3-0.5 K. Under this condition the second Stokes parameter may by successfully measured and may be used for investigation of precipitation regions. Y-shaped phased array antenna is the most promising to

  20. Prediction of LDEF exposure to the ionizing radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, J. W.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Predictions of the LDEF mission's trapped proton and electron and galactic cosmic ray proton exposures have been made using the currently accepted models with improved resolution near mission end and better modeling of solar cycle effects. An extension of previous calculations, to provide a more definitive description of the LDEF exposure to ionizing radiation, is represented by trapped proton and electron flux as a function of mission time, presented considering altitude and solar activity variation during the mission and the change in galactic cosmic ray proton flux over the mission. Modifications of the AP8MAX and AP8MIN fluence led to a reduction of fluence by 20%. A modified interpolation model developed by Daly and Evans resulted in 30% higher dose and activation levels, which better agreed with measured values than results predicted using the Vette model.

  1. Radiation Environment Model of Protons and Heavier Ions at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Luz Maria Martinez; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    We performed an in depth study of the methods used to review the geometric factors (GF) and sensitivity to charge particles of the Energetic Particle Detector instrument on board the Galileo Spacecraft. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the interactions of electrons and ions (i. e., protons and alphas) with the sensitive regions of the instrument. The DC0 and B0 channels were studied with the intention of using them to update the jovian proton radiation model. The results proved that the B0 is a clean proton chanel without any concerns for contamination by heavier ions and electrons. In contrast, DC0 was found to be contaminated by electrons. Furthermore, we also found out that the B2 channel is a clean alpha particle channel (in other words, no contamination by electrons and/or protons).

  2. Measurement of radionuclides in the environment via Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author has developed an alternate approach to the measurement of some beta-emitting nuclides that utilizes the luminescence generated by the Cherenkov process. The luminescence, now known as Cherenkov radiation, was shown to be generated when a charged particle passes through a transparent medium at a speed that exceeds the phase velocity of light in the same medium. Cherenkov emission is different from most other luminescence processes in that it is a purely physical phenomenon. One consequence of this is that Cherenkov systems are free of chemical quenching effects. Conventional methods of analysis for environmental levels of beta-emitting radionuclides are often tedious, time-consuming, and expensive. The Cherenkov method is fast, requires very little operator attention, and is much less expensive to perform

  3. Polarization effects in coherent and incoherent photon scattering: survey of measurements and theory relevant to radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    This report reviews available information on polarization effects arising when photons in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy regime undergo coherent (Rayleigh) scattering and incoherent (Compton) scattering by atomic electrons. In addition to descriptions and discussions of these effects, including estimates of their magnitudes as they apply to radiation transport calculations, an annotated bibliography of 102 selected works covering the period 1905-1991 is provided, with particularly relevant works for the purpose of this report flagged with asterisks (*). A major resource for this report is a 1948 unpublished informal report by L.V. Spencer which has been quoted here almost in its entirety, since, of all the works cited in the annotated bibliography, it appears to be the only one which explicitly and directly addresses the purpose of this report. Hence this valuable material should be re-introduced into the available and current literature. (author). 119 refs., 7 figs

  4. Environmental gamma radiation monitoring in the environs of Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP), Tamil Nadu, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takale, R.A.; Shetty, P.G.; Swarnkar, M.; Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.

    2011-01-01

    In the recent years continuous monitoring of natural background radiation has become a major concern. Protection of the environment against radiation is given top priority in the development of Indian nuclear power programme. Thermoluminescent Dosimeters(TLD) usage is an important factor in this type of activity as it gives integrated dose over a period of time and do not require constant manual attendance or other infrastructural facilities like electricity. Keeping this in view pre-operational background gamma radiation survey around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP) was initiated in 2003 using TLDs. Thirty five environmental TLDs are placed in and around different directions at various distances from the plant on a quarterly basis. These quarterly dose values are converted into annual values and the analysis has been carried out. This paper summarizes the background natural radiation levels in the KKNPP environs during the periods 2003-2010 in order to have knowledge on the increase if any, of the environmental radiation levels when the plant will be in operation. It was observed that the natural background gamma radiation levels in and around Kudankulam varied between 0.67-2.94 mGy/a. In general, the background gamma radiation levels at a given location are steady, typically within 20%, although there is a large location to location variation in the background gamma radiation levels owing to the fact that the region shows varying primordial radioactivity concentration particularly thorium. (author)

  5. Hazards of ionizing radiations for human beings and environment with respect to nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, Felix; Jung, Jennifer Jana; Schultmann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, nuclear fission is used to produce electricity. On the one hand, the low emission of CO 2 is often mentioned as an advantage of this technology. On the other hand, warnings about the dangers of nuclear fission are mentioned. Consequently, an overview about the dangers of ionizing radiation to human beings as well as animals and the environment is important. However, the focus will be on possible health effects for humans with regards to nuclear power plants. In nuclear power plants, both natural types of radiation and artificially produced radiation occur. During normal operation, it is possible that small quantities of this ionizing radiation are released to the environment. In case of nuclear disasters or faults during decommissioning and dismantling processes the consequences of thereby emitted quantities can be even more severe. Reference nuclides vary by reactor type, operating stage and respective incident. At the beginning, different types of radiation and their characteristics and effects on the affected organism are explained. Sensitive organs are emphasized in this context. The individual risk is determined by numerous factors and therefore cannot be predicted. Based on scientific studies and medical publications the hazards of ionizing radiation are compiled. Effects of high exposure of ionizing radiation are well-investigated. Scientists are still divided over the connection between several diseases and the exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. For this reason, the positions of different international organizations are critically contrasted in this study.

  6. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage after laser irradiation of dentin using polarized light microscopy and synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Rosa, Alfredo; Sarma, Anupama V.; Le, Charles Q.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    It is necessary to minimize peripheral thermal damage during laser irradiation, since thermal damage to collagen and mineral compromises the bond strength to restorative materials in dentin and inhibits healing and osteointegration in bone. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lasers resonant to the specific absorption of water, collagen, and hydroxyapatite with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation times at each respective laser wavelength will efficiently remove dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Precise incisions were produced in 3 x 3 mm2 blocks of human dentin using CO2 (9.6 μm), Er:YSGG (2.79 μm), and Nd:YAG (355 nm) lasers with and without a computer controlled water spray. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography was used to obtain optical cross-sections of each incision to determine the rate and efficiency of ablation. The peripheral thermal damage zone around each incision was analyzed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Synchrotron-Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR). Thermally induced chemical changes to both mineral and the collagen matrix was observed with SR-FTIR with a 10-μm spatial resolution and those changes were correlated with optical changes observed with PLM. Minimal (alveolar bone.

  7. Imaging the response of individual carbon nanotubes to polarized light in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bryant; Brintlinger, Todd; Fuhrer, Michael S.; Cumings, John; Hobbie, Erik

    2007-03-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes are grown using chemical vapor deposition (methane-ethylene carrier gas and iron nitrate catalyst), freely suspended in an aqueous solution using a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate), and imaged in an optical microscope using either fluorescent dye (PKH67 and PKH23) or intrinsic near-infrared fluorescence. Freely suspended, individual carbon nanotubes of length 1-8 micrometers show an increasing response to illuminating light as the polarization becomes parallel to tube axis. More intriguingly, some of the carbon nanotubes are found to collapse and fold under 10-30 seconds of illumination, with increasing tube length showing longer time-to-collapse. Unperturbed persistence lengths in these nanotubes are estimated to be 200-300 micrometers.

  8. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O'Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h -1 (1 rad d -1 ). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h -1 to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h -1 will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted

  9. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  10. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...

  11. Organization and operation of the Sixth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment (NRE VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogenic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in the dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits and harm the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied to the situation

  12. RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment

  13. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hausrath, Elisabeth [Uniiversity of Nevada, Las Vegas; Haber, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Adcock, Christopher [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  14. Discrete ordinate solution of the radiative transfer equation in the 'polarization normal wave representation'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, A.

    1991-01-01

    The transfer equations for normal waves in finite, inhomogeneous and plane-parallel magnetoactive media are solved using the discrete ordinate method. The physical process of absorption, emission, and multiple scattering are accounted for, and the medium may be forced both at the top and bottom boundary by anisotropic radiation as well as by internal anisotropic sources. The computational procedure is numerically stable for arbitrarily large optical depths, and the computer time is independent of optical thickness.

  15. Polar PWI and CEPPAD observations of chorus emissions and radiation belt electron acceleration: Four case studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sigsbee, K.; Menietti, J. D.; Santolík, Ondřej; Blake, J. B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 14 (2008), s. 1774-1788 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA301120601 Grant - others: NASA (US) NNG05GM52G; NSF(US) 0307319 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : chorus * outer radiation belt Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.667, year: 2008

  16. Radiation Protection of Environment under the Light of the New Concept of Radiation Protection of Non-Human Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansruedi Voelkle [Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Environmental Radioactivity Section, c/o Physics Department, University of Fribourg Chemin du Musee 3, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the question of whether radiation protection should be extended to plants and animals. Until now the recommendations of ICRP have been focused exclusively on the protection of man from ionizing radiation. It was assumed that, if man is protected, the quality of the living environment is not impaired. In recent years adequate principles, recommendations and laws have become necessary in order to protect the environment from man made toxins. These recommendations aimed to conserve plants and animals, to maintain the diversity of species, the health and status of natural habitats and the natural resources of our planet, to warrant natural evolution and selection processes in order to transmit a healthy world to future generations. Reflections have been made as to whether particular protection of fauna and flora from ionizing radiation should be included. This article presents some considerations from the point of view of operational radiation protection and some comments to the work already done by ICRP committee 5. The final purpose is to invite the audience to make its own reflections and to communicate any criticisms, comments or suggestions to committee 5 of ICRP. (author)

  17. Radiation Protection of Environment under the Light of the New Concept of Radiation Protection of Non-Human Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansruedi Voelkle

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the question of whether radiation protection should be extended to plants and animals. Until now the recommendations of ICRP have been focused exclusively on the protection of man from ionizing radiation. It was assumed that, if man is protected, the quality of the living environment is not impaired. In recent years adequate principles, recommendations and laws have become necessary in order to protect the environment from man made toxins. These recommendations aimed to conserve plants and animals, to maintain the diversity of species, the health and status of natural habitats and the natural resources of our planet, to warrant natural evolution and selection processes in order to transmit a healthy world to future generations. Reflections have been made as to whether particular protection of fauna and flora from ionizing radiation should be included. This article presents some considerations from the point of view of operational radiation protection and some comments to the work already done by ICRP committee 5. The final purpose is to invite the audience to make its own reflections and to communicate any criticisms, comments or suggestions to committee 5 of ICRP. (author)

  18. Evaluation of Planck mean coefficients for particle radiative properties in combustion environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofgren, Henrik; Sundén, Bengt

    2015-04-01

    Thermal radiation is the dominating form of heat transfer in several combustion technologies that combust solid fuels, such as pulverized coal combustion and fixed bed combustion. The thermal radiation originates from the hot combustion gases and particles. For accurate modelling of thermal radiation in these environments the selection of the radiative transport model and radiative property model is important. Radiative property models for gases have received huge attention and several well documented models exist. For particles, soot has received considerable attention whereas other particles have not to a similar extent. The Planck mean coefficients are most commonly used to describe the radiative properties of the particles. For gases the Planck mean absorption coefficient is known to give large deviations from recognised exact models in predicting the radiative heat transfer. In this study the use of Planck mean coefficients for particles are investigated and compared to spectral models. Two particle mass size distributions of fly ash are used, representing biomass and coal combustion. The evaluation is conducted in several combustion-like test cases with both gases and particles. The evaluation shows that using Planck mean coefficients for particles, in combustion-like situations, can give large errors in predicting the radiative heat flux and especially the source term. A new weighted sum of grey gas approach is tested and evaluated. It includes both the particles and gases to better account for the non-greyness of the fly ash absorption coefficient.

  19. 3D Polarized Radiative Transfer for Solar System Applications Using the public-domain HYPERION Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, M. J.; Robitaille, T.; Whitney, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a public-domain radiative transfer tool that will allow researchers to examine a wide-range of interesting solar system applications. Hyperion is a new three-dimensional continuum Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is designed to be as general as possible, allowing radiative transfer to be computed through a variety of three-dimensional grids (Robitaille, 2011, Astronomy & Astrophysics 536 A79). The main part of the code is problem-independent, and only requires the user to define the three-dimensional density structure, and the opacity and the illumination properties (as well as a few parameters that control execution and output of the code). Hyperion is written in Fortran 90 and parallelized using the MPI-2 standard. It is bundled with Python libraries that enable very flexible pre- and post-processing options (arbitrary shapes, multiple aerosol components, etc.). These routines are very amenable to user-extensibility. The package is currently distributed at www.hyperion-rt.org. Our presentation will feature 1) a brief overview of the code, including a description of the solar system-specific modifications that we have made beyond the capabilities in the original release; 2) Several solar system applications (i.e., Deep Impact Plume, Martian atmosphere, etc.); 3) discussion of availability and distribution of code components via www.hyperion-rt.org.

  20. Interactive Visual Intervention Planning: Interactive Visualization for Intervention Planning in Particle Accelerator Environments with Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas; Feral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Intervention planning is crucial for maintenance operations in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation, during which the radiation dose contracted by maintenance workers should be reduced to a minimum. In this context, we discuss the visualization aspects of a new software tool, which integrates interactive exploration of a scene depicting an accelerator facility augmented with residual radiation level simulations, with the visualization of intervention data such as the followed trajectory and maintenance tasks. The visualization of each of these aspects has its effect on the final predicted contracted radiation dose. In this context, we explore the possible benefits of a user study, with the goal of enhancing the visual conditions in which the intervention planner using the software tool is minimizing the radiation dose.

  1. Are biological effects of space radiation really altered under the microgravity environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatagai, Fumio; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2014-10-01

    Two major factors of space environment are space radiation and microgravity. It is generally considered that a high level of ionizing radiation (IR) in space has an influence on living organisms including humans; therefore, the possible alteration of space-radiation influences by the microgravity environment is of great concern. In fact, examination of such a possibility has been extensively conducted since the early days of space experiments, suggesting a possible synergistic effect of radiation and microgravity in some experiments but a negative observation in others. Because these complicated results remain not well understood, we propose a solution to this problem. Gene expression analysis is one of the solutions to the problem. In fact, gene expression may be changed by microgravity, and further modification may be possible through IR. This result could reveal an interactive effect of both factors on the cellular responses, which could in turn reveal whether the human-health abnormalities expected under the microgravity environment can be altered by space radiation. We believe that this is a new aspect in the study of the interactive effect of radiation and microgravity. However, further improvements in space experimental technologies are required for future studies.

  2. Reliability evaluation of ACP components under a radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Yoon, Kwang Ho; Lim, Kwang Mook; Park, Byung Suk; Yoon, Ji Sup

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with the irradiation effects on some selected components which are being used in an Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). Irradiation test components have a higher priority from the aspect of their reliability because their degradation or failure is able to critically affect the performance of an ACP equipment. Components that we chose for the irradiation tests were the AC servo motor, potentiometer, thermocouples, accelerometer and CCD camera. ACP facility has a number of AC servo motors to move the joints of a manipulator and to operate process equipment. Potentiometers are used for a measurement of several joint angles in a manipulator. Thermocouples are used for a temperature measurement in an electrolytic reduction reactor, a voloxidation reactor and a molten salt transfer line. An accelerometer is installed in a slitting machine to forecast an incipient failure during a slitting process. A small CCD camera is used for an in-situ vision monitoring between ACP campaigns. We made use of a gamma-irradiation facility with cobalt-60 source for an irradiation test on the above components because gamma rays from among various radioactive rays are the most significant for electric, electronic and robotic components. Irradiation tests were carried our for enough long time for total doses to be over expected threshold values. Other components except the CCD camera showed a very high radiation hardening characteristic. Characteristic changes at different total doses were investigated and threshold values to warrant at least their performance without a deterioration were evaluated as a result of the irradiation tests

  3. Three-dimensional Radiative Transfer Simulations of the Scattering Polarization of the Hydrogen Lyalpha Line in a Magnetohydrodynamic Model of the Chromosphere-Corona Transition Region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 803, č. 2 (2015), 65/1-65/15 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP209/12/P741 Grant - others:EU(XE) COST action MP1104 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : polarization * radiative transfer * scattering Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.909, year: 2015

  4. The origin and fate of intact polar lipids in the marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, J.

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms, such as bacteria, archaea and algae, are the most abundant organisms on Earth and they contain the bulk of the biosphere’s carbon, nitrogen and phosphor.They are also the main drivers of the biogeochemical cycles, and therefore the study of microbes in their environment (microbial

  5. Estimating the solar radiation environment on the soil surface between rows using crop canopy architectural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuge, K.; Haraguchi, T.; Nakano, Y.; Kuroda, M.; Funakoshi, T.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is quantification of the solar radiation in the farmland located in the hilly and mountainous areas, considering the effect of the shelter adjacent to the field, such as the forest (This effect is called as the edge-effect in this study.). To evaluate the edge-effect on the solar radiation environment in the farmland, solar radiations are measured at the center and edge of the study site adjacent to the forest. The simulation model is composed, coupling with the fish-eye projection method and procedure for the separating direct and diffuse solar radiations. Using this model, the diurnal solar radiations are simulated at the center and edge of the study site. The simulation result showed good agreement with the observation. The spatial distribution of the solar radiation in an observational field is quantified by this method, considering the edge-effect. The simulation result indicated that the solar radiation environment on the field surface is affected by the shelter adjacent to the field and the field direction. (author)

  6. Thermodynamic stability of hydrogen-bonded systems in polar and nonpolar environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalić, Hasan; Aquino, Adélia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Georg, Herbert C; Moraes, Tatiane F; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio; Lischka, Hans

    2010-07-30

    The thermodynamic properties of a selected set of benchmark hydrogen-bonded systems (acetic acid dimer and the complexes of acetic acid with acetamide and methanol) was studied with the goal of obtaining detailed information on solvent effects on the hydrogen-bonded interactions using water, chloroform, and n-heptane as representatives for a wide range in the dielectric constant. Solvent effects were investigated using both explicit and implicit solvation models. For the explicit description of the solvent, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations in the isothermal-isobaric (NpT) ensemble combined with the free energy perturbation technique were performed to determine solvation free energies. Within the implicit solvation approach, the polarizable continuum model and the conductor-like screening model were applied. Combination of gas phase results with the results obtained from the different solvation models through an appropriate thermodynamic cycle allows estimation of complexation free energies, enthalpies, and the respective entropic contributions in solution. Owing to the strong solvation effects of water the cyclic acetic acid dimer is not stable in aqueous solution. In less polar solvents the double hydrogen bond structure of the acetic acid dimer remains stable. This finding is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. A similar trend as for the acetic acid dimer is also observed for the acetamide complex. The methanol complex was found to be thermodynamically unstable in gas phase as well as in any of the three solvents. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chemical signals of past climate and environment from polar ice cores and firn air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Eric W

    2012-10-07

    Chemical and isotopic records obtained from polar ice cores have provided some of the most iconic datasets in Earth system science. Here, I discuss how the different records are formed in the ice sheets, emphasising in particular the contrast between chemistry held in the snow/ice phase, and that which is trapped in air bubbles. Air diffusing slowly through the upper firn layers of the ice sheet can also be sampled in large volumes to give more recent historical information on atmospheric composition. The chemical and geophysical issues that have to be solved to interpret ice core data in terms of atmospheric composition and emission changes are also highlighted. Ice cores and firn air have provided particularly strong evidence about recent changes (last few decades to centuries), including otherwise inaccessible data on increases in compounds that are active as greenhouse gases or as agents of stratospheric depletion. On longer timescales (up to 800,000 years in Antarctica), ice cores reveal major changes in biogeochemical cycling, which acted as feedbacks on the very major changes in climate between glacial and interglacial periods.

  8. Passive sampling of selected pesticides in aquatic environment using polar organic chemical integrative samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomatou, Alphanna-Akrivi; Zacharias, Ierotheos; Hela, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2011-08-01

    Polar chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were examined for their sampling efficiency of 12 pesticides and one metabolite commonly detected in surface waters. Laboratory-based calibration experiments of POCISs were conducted. The determined passive sampling rates were applied for the monitoring of pesticides levels in Lake Amvrakia, Western Greece. Spot sampling was also performed for comparison purposes. Calibration experiments were performed on the basis of static renewal exposure of POCIS under stirred conditions for different time periods of up to 28 days. The analytical procedures were based on the coupling of POCIS and solid phase extraction by Oasis HLB cartridges with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The recovery of the target pesticides from the POCIS was generally >79% with relative standard deviation (RSD) monitoring campaign using both passive and spot sampling whereas higher concentrations were measured by spot sampling in most cases. Passive sampling by POCIS provides a useful tool for the monitoring of pesticides in aquatic systems since integrative sampling at rates sufficient for analytical quantitation of ambient levels was observed. Calibration data are in demand for a greater number of compounds in order to extend the use in environmental monitoring.

  9. Radiation-Induced Damage and Recovery of Ultra-Nanocrystalline Diamond: Toward Applications in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Aiden A; Filevich, Jorge; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Botman, Aurélien; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2017-11-15

    Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) is increasingly being used in the fabrication of devices and coatings due to its excellent tribological properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Here, we study its response to irradiation with kiloelectronvolt electrons as a controlled model for extreme ionizing environments. Real time Raman spectroscopy reveals that the radiation-damage mechanism entails dehydrogenation of UNCD grain boundaries, and we show that the damage can be recovered by annealing at 883 K. Our results have significant practical implications for the implementation of UNCD in extreme environment applications, and indicate that the films can be used as radiation sensors.

  10. The Ultraviolet Radiation Environment around M Dwarf Exoplanet Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Stocke, John T.; Tian, Feng; Bushinsky, Rachel; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Mauas, Pablo; hide

    2013-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No "UV-quiet" M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Lyman-alpha emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Lyman-alpha line fluxes comprise approximately 37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; approximately greater than 10(exp3) times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Lyman-alpha and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Lyman-alpha. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Lyman-alpha)/F(Mg II) = 10(exp3). The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, is shown to be approximately 0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, greather than 10(exp3) times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%.500% on 10(exp2)-10(exp3) s timescales. This effect should be taken

  11. The radiation monitoring of environment around place of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovina, E.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Large success was attained in the field of radiation protection of research nuclear center, but it is necessary to carry out works in this way around place of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes too. Moreover, for protection of environment it is necessary to control radiation condition of system (radioactive wastes of nuclear center - environment). There is large amount of natural and man-made radionuclides in environment and it is important to solve problem to control individual radionuclides, polluting natural environment. Also, it is necessary to control concentrations of specific radionuclides, which are marks of definite radioactive source. The radionuclides 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 60 Co, 141 Ce, 144 Ce, 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 131 I and natural radionuclides of uranium, thorium and their products of decay are basic radionuclides. The 57 Co, 35 S, 32 P are considered also basic radionuclides taking into consideration specialization of our Institute. The basic problems of control of environment are following: observation of radioactive pollution level of environment objects; estimation of radioactive pollution level with the purpose of warning of possible negative consequences; investigation of dynamics of radioactivity and prognosis of radioactive pollution of environment objects; influence on sources of radioactive pollution. There is large volume information, characterizing radiation condition of environment around research nuclear center and around place of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes. The bank of environment object analysis result date was build for investigation of information. The system of protection around location of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes and around nuclear center consists of control of radioactive wastes, superficial and underground water, soil, plants, atmospheric precipitation. There are analysis of total β- activity, α-activity and γ-spectrometry. This control includes estimation of throw down values

  12. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that t he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... . In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved

  13. The Ultraviolet Radiation Environment around M dwarf Exoplanet Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Stocke, John T.; Tian, Feng; Bushinsky, Rachel; Désert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-02-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No "UV-quiet" M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Lyα emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Lyα line fluxes comprise ~37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 Å flux from most M dwarfs; gsim103 times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Lyα and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Lyα. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Lyα)/F(Mg II) = 10 ± 3. The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, is shown to be ~0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, >103 times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%-500% on 102-103 s timescales. This effect should be taken into account in future UV transiting planet studies, including searches for O3 on Earth-like planets. Finally, we

  14. Existing condition assessment of radiation environment quality in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiaang; Li Fusheng; Chen Yingmin; Zhu Jianguo; Lu Feng; Song Gang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the radiactivity levels of Jinan dwellings and the indoor environment quality. Methods: Using the self made Measurement Cups of Indoor Environmental Radioactivity Evaluation (MCIERE) (ZL 200620082698.7) to measure the gamma ray dose rate, 222 Rn activity concentration, 220 Rn activity concentration and EECTn. Results: The geometric mean of 222 Rn activity concentrations that showed a clear lognoxmal distribution tendency in 411 rooms of Jinan was 45 Bq ·m -3 , the range which was from 18 to 203 Bq·m -3 . The geometric mean of 220 Rn activity concentration that was also nearly lognormal distribution in 203 rooms of Jinan was 16 Bq·m -3 and the range of the activity coneentratons was from 1 to 167 Bq· m -3 . The geometric mean of EECT, that was nearly lognormal distribution in 204 rooms of Jinan was 1.082 Bq ·m -3 , the range was from 0.015 to 10.230 Bq·m -3 . The arithmetic mean of the gamma ray dose rate that was nearly Gaussian distribution in 412 rooms of Jinan was 0.106 μSv·h -1 , the concentration range from 0.041 to 0.167 μSv·h -1 . Conclusion: The internal irradiation annual effective dose caused by 222 Rn and its progeny, 220 Rn and its progeny and of Jinan inhabitant was 1.189 mSv, the external irradiation annual effective close caused by the gamma ray from the ground and buildings was 0.743 mSv. The mean total annual effective dose was 2.187 mSv and the highest annual effective dose level was above 5 mSv. (authors)

  15. Angular Distribution and Linear Polarization of X-ray Radiation Resulting from Electron Impact Excitation of Highly Charged Ions in Debye Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanbin

    2018-05-01

    Plasma-screening effects on the 1s _{1/2} → 2l (l = s , p ) and 1s _{1/2} → 3d _{3/2} electron-impact excitation of highly charged ions are investigated, together with their subsequent radiative decay. The analysis is performed based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Fock method and the fully relativistic distorted-wave method incorporating the Debye-Hückel potential. To explore the nature of the effects, calculations are carried out based on detailed analyses of the integrated total and magnetic sublevel cross sections, the alignment parameters, the linear polarizations, and the angular distribution of the X-ray photoemission, as well as on corresponding data calculated in various Debye lengths/environments, taking the 2p _{3/2}→ 1s _{1/2} and 3d _{3/2}→ 1s _{1/2} characteristic lines of H-like Fe^{25+} ion as an example. The present results are compared with experimental data and other theoretical predictions where available.

  16. Experimental investigation of the radiation shielding of a MCP detector in the radiation environment near Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter; Meyer, Stefan; Lasi, Davide; Lüthi, Matthias; Galli, André; Piazza, Daniele; Desorgher, Laurent; Hajdas, Wojciech; Reggiani, Davide; Karlsson, Stefan; Kalla, Leif

    2016-04-01

    The Neutral Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) is one of the six instruments in the Particle Environmental Package (PEP) designed for the JUICE mission of ESA to the Jupiter system. NIM will conduct detailed measurements of chemical composition of Jovian moon exospheres and is equipped with a sensitive MCP ion detector. To maintain high sensitivity of the NIM instrument, background signals arising from the presence of a large background of penetrating radiation (mostly high-energy electrons and protons) in Jupiter's magnetosphere have to be minimised. We investigate the performance of a layered-Z radiation shield, an Al-Ta-Al sandwich, as a potential shielding against high-energy electrons. The experimental investigations were performed at the PiM1 beam line of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities located at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. The facility delivers a particle beam containing e,  and  with an adjustable momentum ranging from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c. The measurements of the induced radiation background generated during the interaction of primary particles with Al-Ta-Al sandwich were conducted by beam diagnostic methods and a MCP detector. Diagnostic methods provided for the characterisation of the beam parameters (beam geometry, flux and intensity) and identification of individual particles in the primary beam and in the flux of secondary particles. The MCP detector measurements provided information on the effects of radiation and the results of these measurements define the performance of the shielding material in reducing the background arising from penetrating radiation. In parallel, we performed modelling studies using GEANT 4 and GRASS methods to identify products of the interaction and predict their fluxes and particle rates at the MCP detector. Combination of the experiment and modelling studies yields detailed characterisation of the radiation effects produced by the interaction of the incident e- in the

  17. Degradation mechanisms of cable insulation materials during radiation-thermal ageing in radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Tamura, Kiyotoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi; Shimada, Akihiko; Kudoh, Hisaaki

    2011-02-01

    Radiation and thermal degradation of ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) and crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) as cable insulation materials were investigated by evaluating tensile properties, gel-fraction, and swelling ratio, as well as by the infrared (FTIR) analysis. The activation energy of thermal oxidative degradation changed over the range 100-120 °C for both EPR and XLPE. This may be attributed to the fact that the content of an antioxidant used as the stabilizer for polymers decreases by evaporation during thermal ageing at high temperatures. The analysis of antioxidant content and oxidative products in XLPE as a model sample showed that a small amount of antioxidant significantly reduced the extent of thermal oxidation, but was not effective for radiation induced oxidation. The changes in mechanical properties were well reflected by the degree of oxidation. A new model of polymer degradation mechanisms was proposed where the degradation does not take place by chain reaction via peroxy radical and hydro-peroxide. The role of the antioxidant in the polymer is the reduction of free radical formation in the initiation step in thermal oxidation, and it could not stop radical reactions for either radiation or thermal oxidation.

  18. Degradation mechanisms of cable insulation materials during radiation-thermal ageing in radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguchi, Tadao, E-mail: seguchi@aj.wakwak.co [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Tamura, Kiyotoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi; Shimada, Akihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Kudoh, Hisaaki [University of Tokyo, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Radiation and thermal degradation of ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) and crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) as cable insulation materials were investigated by evaluating tensile properties, gel-fraction, and swelling ratio, as well as by the infrared (FTIR) analysis. The activation energy of thermal oxidative degradation changed over the range 100-120 {sup o}C for both EPR and XLPE. This may be attributed to the fact that the content of an antioxidant used as the stabilizer for polymers decreases by evaporation during thermal ageing at high temperatures. The analysis of antioxidant content and oxidative products in XLPE as a model sample showed that a small amount of antioxidant significantly reduced the extent of thermal oxidation, but was not effective for radiation induced oxidation. The changes in mechanical properties were well reflected by the degree of oxidation. A new model of polymer degradation mechanisms was proposed where the degradation does not take place by chain reaction via peroxy radical and hydro-peroxide. The role of the antioxidant in the polymer is the reduction of free radical formation in the initiation step in thermal oxidation, and it could not stop radical reactions for either radiation or thermal oxidation.

  19. Radiation effects on man health, environment, safety, security. Global Chernobyl mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bebeshko, V.; Bazyka, D.; Volovik, S.; Loganovsky, K.; Sushko, V.; Siedow, J.; Cohen, H.; Ginsburg, G.; Chao, N.; Chute, J.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objectives: Ionizing radiation is a primordial terrestrial and extraterrestrial background and archetypal environmental stress-factor for life origin, evolution, and existence. We all live in radiation world inevitably involving nuclear energy production, nuclear weapon, nuclear navy, radioactive waste, pertinent medical diagnostics and treatment, etc with connected certain probability of relevant accidents and terrorist attack, space and jet travels, high natural background radiation, etc - actual and potential sources of radiation exposures and effects. State-of- the art integral fundamental research on radiation effects on man health, environment, safety, and security (REMHESS) is nowadays paramount necessity and challenge. Methods and results: In given generalized conceptual framework unique 20 years Chernobyl multidimensional research and databases for radiation effects on man's all organism systems represent invaluable original basis and resources for mapping Chernobyl data and REMHESS challenge. Granted by DOE brand new Chernobyl Research and Service Project based on 'Sarcophagus-II' (Object 'Shelter') workers only one in radiation history baseline cohort, corresponding biorepository prospective dynamic data, integrated conceptual database system, and 'state of the art' 'omics' (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics) analysis is designed specifically for coherent addressing global REMHESS problems. In this connection 'Sarcophagus-II' is only one unique universal model. Conclusions: The fundamental goals of novel strategic Project and global Chernobyl mapping are to determine specific 'omics' signatures of radiation for man depending of exposure peculiarity to understand ultimate molecular mechanisms of radiation effects, gene environment interactions, etiology of organisms systems disorders and diseases, and to develop new biomarkers and countermeasures to protect man health in the framework of global REMHESS challenge

  20. Development of the Next Generation of Seismological Instrumentation for Polar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberry, J. P.; Anderson, K. R.; Huerta, A. D.; Bernsen, S. P.; Parker, T.; Carpenter, P.; Woodward, R.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Bilek, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Ice covered regions comprise >10% of Earth's continental area; and include regions with poorly understood ice dynamics, ice shelf stability, hydrology, tectonic histories and basic geologic structure both deep and shallow. Scientific investigations of these regions are challenged by extreme weather, limited and expensive logistics, and the physical conditions of the ice environment. We report on the next development of a new NSF MRI-supported community seismic capability for studying ice-covered regions- the Geophysical Earth Observatory for Ice Covered Environments (GEOICE). This project is fundamentally motivated by the need to densify and optimize the collection of high-quality data relevant to key solid Earth and cryosphere science questions. The instrument capability will include a hybrid seismograph pool of broadband and intermediate elements, for observation of both long-period (e.g., long-period surface waves and slow sources) and intermediate-to-short-period (e.g., teleseismic body waves local seismicity, impulsive or extended glaciogenic signals). The GEOICE instrument, and its power and other ancillary systems, will be specifically designed to both withstand conditions associated with icy environments, including cold/wet conditions and high-latitude solar limitations, and to require minimal installation time and logistical load (i.e., size and weight), while maximizing ease-of-use in the field, in data handling, and in telemetry compatibility. Key features will include a design that integrates the seismometer and data logger into a single environmentally and mechanically robust housing, very low power requirements (peer-reviewed community use.

  1. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  2. Experimental Characterization of a Composite Morphing Radiator Prototype in a Relevant Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagne, Christopher L.; Chong, Jorge B.; Whitcomb, John D.; Hartl, Darren J.; Erickson, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    For future long duration space missions, crewed vehicles will require advanced thermal control systems to maintain a desired internal environment temperature in spite of a large range of internal and external heat loads. Current radiators are only able to achieve turndown ratios (i.e. the ratio between the radiator's maximum and minimum heat rejection rates) of approximately 3:1. Upcoming missions will require radiators capable of 12:1 turndown ratios. A radiator with the ability to alter shape could significantly increase turndown capacity. Shape memory alloys (SMAs) offer promising qualities for this endeavor, namely their temperature-dependent phase change and capacity for work. In 2015, the first ever morphing radiator prototype was constructed in which SMA actuators passively altered the radiator shape in response to a thermal load. This work describes a follow-on endeavor to demonstrate a similar concept using highly thermally conductive composite materials. Numerous versions of this new concept were tested in a thermal vacuum environment and successfully demonstrated morphing behavior and variable heat rejection, achieving a turndown ratio of 4.84:1. A summary of these thermal experiments and their results are provided herein.

  3. The Martian surface radiation environment – a comparison of models and MSL/RAD measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL has been measuring the radiation environment on the surface of Mars since August 6th 2012. MSL-RAD is the first instrument to provide detailed information about charged and neutral particle spectra and dose rates on the Martian surface, and one of the primary objectives of the RAD investigation is to help improve and validate current radiation transport models. Aims: Applying different numerical transport models with boundary conditions derived from the MSL-RAD environment the goal of this work was to both provide predictions for the particle spectra and the radiation exposure on the Martian surface complementing the RAD sensitive range and, at the same time, validate the results with the experimental data, where applicable. Such validated models can be used to predict dose rates for future manned missions as well as for performing shield optimization studies. Methods: Several particle transport models (GEANT4, PHITS, HZETRN/OLTARIS were used to predict the particle flux and the corresponding radiation environment caused by galactic cosmic radiation on Mars. From the calculated particle spectra the dose rates on the surface are estimated. Results: Calculations of particle spectra and dose rates induced by galactic cosmic radiation on the Martian surface are presented. Although good agreement is found in many cases for the different transport codes, GEANT4, PHITS, and HZETRN/OLTARIS, some models still show large, sometimes order of magnitude discrepancies in certain particle spectra. We have found that RAD data is helping to make better choices of input parameters and physical models. Elements of these validated models can be applied to more detailed studies on how the radiation environment is influenced by solar modulation, Martian atmosphere and soil, and changes due to the Martian seasonal pressure cycle. By extending the range of the calculated particle

  4. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a polar environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I. [W. M. Keck Research Laboratory in Astrochemistry, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Strazzulla, Giovanni, E-mail: brantmj@hawaii.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-06-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν{sub 3} band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO{sub 2} band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H{sub 2}O)-carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν{sub 3} band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  5. The retention characteristics of nonvolatile SNOS memory transistors in a radiation environment: Experiment and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhorter, P.J.; Miller, S.L.; Dellin, T.A.; Axness, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data and a model to accurately and quantitatively predict the data are presented for retention of SNOS memory devices over a wide range of dose rates. A wide range of SNOS stack geometries are examined. The model is designed to aid in screening nonvolatile memories for use in a radiation environment

  6. International symposium on radiation technology for conservation of the environment. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This document includes extended synopses of 54 presentations given at the International Symposium on Radiation Technology for the conservation of the Environment held in Zakopane near Cracow), Poland, 8-12 September 1997. Each presentation is separately indexed. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audette-Stuart, M.; Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S.

    2011-01-01

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: → Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. → The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. → No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. → Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  8. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  9. Anisotropy and linear polarization of radiative processes in energetic ion-atom collisions; Untersuchung zur Anisotropie und linearen Polarisation radiativer Prozesse in energiereichen Ion-Atom-Stoessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Guenter

    2010-06-16

    In the present thesis the linear polarization of radiation emitted in energetic ion-atom collisions at the ESR storage ring was measured by applying a novel type of position, timing and energy sensitive X-ray detector as a Compton polarimeter. In contrast to previous measurements, that mainly concentrate on studies of the spectral and angular distribution, the new detectors allowed the first polarization study of the Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} radiation (2p{sub 3/2}{yields}1s{sub 1/2}) in U{sup 91+}. Owing to the high precision of the polarimeters applied here, the experimental results indicate a significant depolarization of the Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} radiation caused by the interference of the E1 and M2 transition branches. Moreover, the current investigation shows that measurements of the linear polarization in combination with angular distribution studies provide a model-independent probe for the ratio of the E1 and M2 transition amplitudes and, consequently, of the corresponding transition probabilities. In addition, a first measurement of the linear polarization as well as an angular distribution study of the electron-nucleus Bremsstrahlung arising from ion-atom collisions was performed. The experimental results obtained were compared to exact relativistic calculations and, in case of the Bremsstrahlung, to a semirelativistic treatment. In general, good agreement was found between theoretical predictions and experimental findings. (orig.)

  10. Terrain and Radiation Mapping in Post-Disaster Environments Using an Autonomous Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kochersberger

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent events have highlighted the need for unmanned remote sensing in dangerous areas, particularly where structures have collapsed or explosions have occurred, to limit hazards to first responders and increase their efficiency in planning response operations. In the case of the Fukushima nuclear reactor explosion, an unmanned helicopter capable of obtaining overhead images, gathering radiation measurements, and mapping both the structural and radiation content of the environment would have given the response team invaluable data early in the disaster, thereby allowing them to understand the extent of the damage and areas where dangers to personnel existed. With this motivation, the Unmanned Systems Lab at Virginia Tech has developed a remote sensing system for radiation detection and aerial imaging using a 90 kg autonomous helicopter and sensing payloads for the radiation detection and imaging operations. The radiation payload, which is the sensor of focus in this paper, consists of a scintillating type detector with associated software and novel search algorithms to rapidly and effectively map and locate sources of high radiation intensity. By incorporating this sensing technology into an unmanned aerial vehicle system, crucial situational awareness can be gathered about a post-disaster environment and response efforts can be expedited. This paper details the radiation mapping and localization capabilities of this system as well as the testing of the various search algorithms using simulated radiation data. The various components of the system have been flight tested over a several-year period and a new production flight platform has been built to enhance reliability and maintainability. The new system is based on the Aeroscout B1-100 helicopter platform, which has a one-hour flight endurance and uses a COFDM radio system that gives the helicopter an effective range of 7 km.

  11. Defect-Resistant Radiative Performance of m-Plane Immiscible Al1-xInxN Epitaxial Nanostructures for Deep-Ultraviolet and Visible Polarized Light Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichibu, Shigefusa F; Kojima, Kazunobu; Uedono, Akira; Sato, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-01

    Planar vacuum-fluorescent-display devices emitting polarized UV-C, blue, and green light are demonstrated using immiscible Al 1- x In x N nanostructures grown in nonpolar m-directions. Despite the presence of high concentration of nonradiative recombination centers, the Al 1- x In x N nanostructures emit polarized light with the luminescence lifetimes of 22-32 ps at 300 K. This defect-resistant radiative performance suggests supernormal localized characteristics of electron-hole pairs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effects of chronic exposure to acidic environment on the response of tumor cells to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Ra; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    The influence of short-term exposure to an acidic environment on the radiosensitivity of tumor cells has been extensively explored, but the implication of chronic exposure to an acidic environment for the response of tumor cells to radiation has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic pre- and post-irradiation exposure of tumor cells to an acidic environment on the radiation-induced clonogenic death. Rat gliosarcoma cells were used throughout the in vitro study. Cells were exposed to pH 6.6 medium for varying durations of up to 4 days before and after X-irradiation. Cell viability, apoptosis, clonogenic cell death and cell cycle distribution were observed. Incubation of tumor cells in pH 6.6 medium for 2 or 4 days extended cell cycle, decreased cell viability, and induced apoptotic and clonogenic cell death. The radiation-induced clonogenic death was increased by 2- or 4-day pre-irradiation exposure of tumor cells to pH 6.6 medium, whereas it was reduced by 4-day post-irradiation exposure to an acidic medium. Prolonged exposure to an acidic environment enhanced the sensitivity of tumor cells to subsequent X-irradiation. However, the radiosensitization by pre-irradiation exposure was almost completely nullified by prolonged post-irradiation exposure to an acidic environment.

  13. The Martian and extraterrestrial UV radiation environment--1. Biological and closed-loop ecosystem considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C S; Andrady, A L

    1999-01-01

    The Martian surface is exposed to both UVC radiation (life support systems that use ambient sunlight, must address this problem. Here we examine the UV radiation environment of Mars with respect to biological systems. Action spectra and UV surface fluxes are used to estimate the UV stress that both DNA and chloroplasts would experience. From this vantage point it is possible to consider appropriate measures to address the problem of the Martian UV environment for future long term human exploration and settlement strategies. Some prospects for improving the UV tolerance of organisms are also discussed. Existing artificial ecosystems such as Biosphere 2 can provide some insights into design strategies pertinent to high UV environments. Some prospects for improving the UV tolerance of organisms are also discussed. The data also have implications for the establishment of closed-loop ecosystems using natural sunlight on the lunar surface and elsewhere in the Solar System.

  14. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR

  15. Photoionization of the 4d10 subshell of cadmium: Photoelectron angular distributions and polarization of fluorescence radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosiou, Constantine E.; Starace, Anthony F.; Tambe, B. R.; Manson, Steven T.

    1981-07-01

    Relativistic Dirac-Fock calculations are presented for the photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameter β corresponding to 4d-subshell photoionization in Cd and for the linear polarization PL of the subsequent fluorescence radiation, for photon energies less than 185 eV. Near threshold, our results for β lie lower than previous relativistic Dirac-Slater and nonrelativistic many-body-perturbation-theory (MBPT) calculations. The agreement with very recent measurements by Heinzmann and Schönhense is very good. Our calculations show that PL(2D52-->2P32)=-0.059 and -0.058 at incident photon energies hν=40.2 and 45.6 eV, respectively. These results lie above the nonrelativistic independent-electron theory absolute maximum of -0.061 for PL, but the agreement with recent measurements lying above this maximum is still not very good. Except for this peaking of PL(2D52-->2P32) above the nonrelativistic theory maximum for 40.2Kelly. We also find that PL(2D32-->2P32)=+ 0.134 at hν=21.2 eV, in excellent agreement with the experimental value of + 0.12+/-0.04 of Caldwell and Zare.

  16. International conference on the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    An International Conference on the Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the European Commission (EC) and the International Union of Radioecology (IUR), will be held in Stockholm, Sweden, from 6-10 October 2003. This Conference will be hosted by the Government of Sweden through the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). This publication contains contributed papers submitted on issues within the scope of the conference, which were accepted following a review by the Conference Programme Committee. The primary objective of this Conference is to foster information exchange, with the aim of promoting the development of a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from effects attributable to ionizing radiation. This Conference is one in a series of meetings organized by, or held in co-operation with, the IAEA on this subject. It will include a review of recent developments in this area, and consideration of their implications for future work at national and international levels. The topics on which contributed papers were requested are as follows: Existing environmental protection approaches; Development of an international assessment framework; The scientific basis for environmental radiation assessment; Development of management approaches

  17. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive organisms. DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0.1 mGy h{sup -1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic

  18. Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Andreea (Principal Investigator); Stella, Paul; Kerestes, Christopher; Sharps, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This is the Base Period final report DRAFT for the JPL task 'Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments', under Task Plan 77-16518 TA # 21, for NASA's Extreme Environments Solar Power (EESP) project. This report covers the Base period of performance, 7/18/2016 through 5/2/2017.The goal of this project is to develop an ultra-high efficiency lightweight scalable solar array technology for low irradiance, low temperature and high-radiation (LILT/Rad) environments. The benefit this technology will bring to flight systems is a greater than 20 reduction in solar array surface area, and a six-fold reduction in solar array mass and volume. The EESP project objectives are summarized in the 'NRA Goal' column of Table 1. Throughout this report, low irradiance low temperature (LILT) refers to 5AU -125 C test conditions; beginning of life (BOL) refers to the cell state prior to radiation exposure; and end of life (EOL) refers to the test article condition after exposure to a radiation dose of 4e15 1MeV e(-)/cm(exp 2).

  19. Radiation technology for conservation of the environment. Proceedings of a symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    In September 1997 the IAEA held an International Symposium in Zakopane, Poland, on the applications of radiation technology in conservation of environment. The symposium attended 110 participants representing 38 Member States. The objective was to review the status of current developments and applications of radiation processing in the control of environment pollution and to discuss future developments. The scientific programme covered a wide range of different applications of radiation technology, such as purification of exhaust gases, decontamination of wastewater from industrial and municipal sources, sewage sludge treatment, disinfection and detoxication of solid waste, recycling and the treatment of plastic and solid waste. The document contains full presentations. The symposium (56 papers) was held in 10 sessions as follows: Purification of Exhaust Gases (8 papers); Radiation Chemistry and the Environment (5 papers); Purification and Decontamination of Water (10 papers); Sewage Sludge Treatment (6 papers); Biomedical Applications (5 papers); Recycling and Treatment of Plastic and Solid Wastes (4 papers); Facilities (4 papers); Quality Assurance, Quality Control (4 papers); Transfer of Technology through Technical Co-Operation (5 papers); Curing, Cross-Linking and Grafting (5 papers). A separate abstract and indexing were provided for each paper

  20. Assessing the effects of ultraviolet radiation on the photosynthetic potential in Archean marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alonso, Dailé; Baetens, Jan M.; Cardenas, Rolando; de Baets, Bernard

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the photosynthesis model presented by Avila et al. in 2013 is extended and more scenarios inhabited by ancient cyanobacteria are investigated to quantify the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on their photosynthetic potential in marine environments of the Archean eon. We consider ferrous ions as blockers of UV during the Early Archean, while the absorption spectrum of chlorophyll a is used to quantify the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by photosynthetic organisms. UV could have induced photoinhibition at the water surface, thereby strongly affecting the species with low light use efficiency. A higher photosynthetic potential in early marine environments was shown than in the Late Archean as a consequence of the attenuation of UVC and UVB by iron ions, which probably played an important role in the protection of ancient free-floating bacteria from high-intensity UV radiation. Photosynthetic organisms in Archean coastal and ocean environments were probably abundant in the first 5 and 25 m of the water column, respectively. However, species with a relatively high efficiency in the use of light could have inhabited ocean waters up to a depth of 200 m and show a Deep Chlorophyll Maximum near 60 m depth. We show that the electromagnetic radiation from the Sun, both UV and visible light, could have determined the vertical distribution of Archean marine photosynthetic organisms.

  1. Use of micronucleus test in the assessment of radiation effects in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Edvaldo F. de; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Lima, Pedro A. de S.; Amancio, Francisco F.; Melo, Ana Maria M. de A.; Silva, Edvane B. da; Silva, Ronaldo C. da

    2011-01-01

    The study of the effects of radioactive substances on the environment is accomplished by radioecology. This science has played an important role in combating all forms of pollution. The uncontrolled use of physical and chemical agents has been a concern for environmental regulatory agencies, due to the serious damage to ecosystems. Aquatic organisms are exposed to a variety of pollutants harmful to aquatic systems. The mollusks Biomphalaria glabrata has been featured as a bioindicator to possess characteristics such as short reproductive cycle ease of maintenance in the laboratory and low maintenance cost. The micronucleus assay has been shown to be a great test to identify mutagenic effects caused by physical and chemical agents. In this study the frequency of micronuclei in haemocytes of Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to high doses of 60 Co gamma radiation contributing to a further standardization of this test as an indicator of the presence of radioactive contamination in aquatic environments. The young adult snails of Biomphalaria glabrata were divided into groups and subjected to a dose of 0 (control), 40 and 60 Gy of gamma radiation. The results showed that snails irradiated with 40 Gy showed a smaller number of haemocytes, whereas those exposed to 60 Gy had a greater quantity of these cells compared to control group. It can be concluded that the morphological analysis and the frequency of micronuclei in haemocytes of Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to 60 Co gamma radiation may be used in studies of the action of high doses of radiation in aquatic environments (author)

  2. Radiation Environment in EARTH-MOON Space: Results from Radom Experiment Onboard CHANDRAYAAN-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadawale, S. V.; Goswami, J. N.; Dachev, T. P.; Tomov, B. T.; Girish, V.

    2011-07-01

    The radiation monitor (RADOM) payload is a miniature dosimeter spectrometer onboard Chandrayaan-1 mission for monitoring the local radiation environment in near-Earth space and in lunar space. RADOM measured the total absorbed dose and spectrum of the deposited energy from high-energy particles in near-Earth space, en-route and in lunar orbit. RADOM was the first experiment to be switched on soon after the launch of Chandrayaan-1 and was operational till the end of the mission. This article summarizes the observations carried out by RADOM during the entire life time of the Chandrayaan-1 mission and some of the salient results.

  3. A three-dimensional radiative transfer model for shallow water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, John

    2008-12-22

    A geometric optical model for three-dimensional radiative transfer capable of handling arbitrary arrangements of surfaces within anisotropic scattering media is described. The model operates by discretizing surfaces and volumes into patches and voxels and establishing the radiative transfer relationship between every pair of elements. In a plane-parallel configuration results for directional radiance agree closely with the numerical integration invariant imbedded method. Model accuracy for two examples incorporating surface water waves and complex benthic structures were assessed by conservation of energy, errors were less than 1%. Potential applications in remote sensing or photobiological studies of structurally complex benthos in shallow water environments are illustrated.

  4. Radiation-induced apoptosis in different pH environments in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung-Sik; Park, Heon J.; Lyons, John C.; Griffin, Robert J.; Auger, Elizabeth A.; Song, Chang W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of environmental pH on the radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cells in vitro was investigated. Methods and Materials: Mammary adenocarcinoma cells of A/J mice (SCK cells) were irradiated with γ-rays using a 137 Cs irradiator and incubated in media of different pHs. After incubation at 37 deg. C for 24-120 h the extent of apoptosis was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis, TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, flow cytometry, and release of 3 H from 3 H-thymidine labeled cells. The clonogenicity of the cells irradiated in different pH medium was determined, and the progression of cells through the cell cycle after irradiation in different pHs was also determined with flow cytometry. Results: Irradiation with 2-12 Gy of γ-rays induced apoptosis in SCK cells in pH 7.5 medium within 48 h as judged from the results of four different assays mentioned. Radiation-induced apoptosis declined as the medium pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.4. Specifically, the radiation-induced degradation of DNA including the early DNA breaks, as determined with the TUNEL method, progressively declined as the medium pH was lowered so that little DNA fragmentation occurred 48 h after irradiation with 12 Gy in pH 6.6 medium. When the cells were irradiated and incubated for 48 h in pH 6.6 medium and the medium was replaced with pH 7.5 medium, DNA fragmentation promptly occurred. DNA fragmentation also occurred even in pH 6.6 medium when the cells were irradiated and maintained in pH 7.5 medium for 8 h or longer post-irradiation before incubation in pH 6.6 medium. The radiation-induced G 2 arrest in pH 6.6 medium lasted markedly longer than that in pH 7.5 medium. Conclusion: Radiation-induced apoptosis in SCK cells in vitro is reversibly suppressed in an acidic environment. Taking the results of four different assays together, it was concluded that early step(s) in the apoptotic pathway, probably the DNA break or upstream of DNA break, is

  5. Modern state of the application of ionizing radiation for protection of environment. 1. Ionizing radiation sources. Purification of natural and drinking water (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, AK.

    2000-01-01

    Review of modern state of the application of ionizing radiations for protection of environment and natural and drinking water purification is presented. Building of installations with electron accelerators with summarized power of beam ∼0.6 MW signifies that application of ionizing radiation for ecological needs increase. It is pointed out that extensible application of electron accelerators is explained by their safety and efficiency as compared with gamma-sources. New information about ionizing radiation sources, radiation-chemical purification of polluted natural and drinking water, mechanisms of processes taking place during treatment by ionizing radiations are generalized [ru

  6. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  7. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  8. CONSTRAINING THE RADIATION AND PLASMA ENVIRONMENT OF THE KEPLER CIRCUMBINARY HABITABLE-ZONE PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mason, Paul A. [New Mexico State University—DACC, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A. [FACom—Instituto de Física—FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2016-02-20

    The discovery of many planets using the Kepler telescope includes 10 planets orbiting eight binary stars. Three binaries, Kepler-16, Kepler-47, and Kepler-453, have at least one planet in the circumbinary habitable zone (BHZ). We constrain the level of high-energy radiation and the plasma environment in the BHZ of these systems. With this aim, BHZ limits in these Kepler binaries are calculated as a function of time, and the habitability lifetimes are estimated for hypothetical terrestrial planets and/or moons within the BHZ. With the time-dependent BHZ limits established, a self-consistent model is developed describing the evolution of stellar activity and radiation properties as proxies for stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres. Modeling binary stellar rotation evolution, including the effect of tidal interaction between stars in binaries, is key to establishing the environment around these systems. We find that Kepler-16 and its binary analogs provide a plasma environment favorable for the survival of atmospheres of putative Mars-sized planets and exomoons. Tides have modified the rotation of the stars in Kepler-47, making its radiation environment less harsh in comparison to the solar system. This is a good example of the mechanism first proposed by Mason et al. Kepler-453 has an environment similar to that of the solar system with slightly better than Earth radiation conditions at the inner edge of the BHZ. These results can be reproduced and even reparameterized as stellar evolution and binary tidal models progress, using our online tool http://bhmcalc.net.

  9. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis, E-mail: d.rudolf@fz-juelich.de; Juschkin, Larissa [RWTH Aachen University, Experimental Physics of EUV, Steinbachstraße 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Danylyuk, Serhiy [RWTH Aachen University, Chair for Technology of Optical Systems, JARA-FIT, Steinbachstraße 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bergmann, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Steinbachstrasse 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Grützmacher, Detlev [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV–250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains.

  10. Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of radiation: biological basis of radiation-environment interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined due to ambiguity at low doses caused by limitations in statistical power and information available on interplay with environment. To deal with these problems, a novel non-parametric statistics was developed based on artificial neural networks theorem and applied to cancer and non-cancer risk in A-bomb survivors. The analysis revealed several unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal radiation dose alone. They include (1) threshold that varies with organ, gender and age, including cardiovascular diseases, (2) prevalence of infectious diseases, and (3) suppression of pathogenesis of HTLV1. The threshold is unique as it is manifested as negative excess relative risk, a reduction of spontaneous rate at low doses. The response is consistent with currently emerging laboratory data on DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice and its sustainability as epigenetic memory in accordance with histone code theory. In response to DSB, of radiation or DNA replication arrest origin, distinct and competitively operating repair pathways are instigated. Activation by low doses of restitution-directed canonical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) suppresses both error-prone alternative end-joining (Alt-NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). The latter two present major pathways to mutagenesis at stalled replication folk associated with endogenous and exogenous genotoxin such as tobacco smoke metabolites and AID-associated somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in Ig gene. Suppression of these error-prone pathways by low doses of low LET radiation is consistent with the reduction of cancer occurrence by environmental genotoxin, immunodiversity and stable integration of retrovirus DNA, providing a significant modulator of dose linearity at low doses. Whole picture may bring about a new landscape of cancer and non-cancer molecular epidemiology which

  11. Active Electro-Location of Objects in the Underwater Environment Based on the Mixed Polarization Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lili; Qi, Junwei; Xue, Wei

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a novel active localization method based on the mixed polarization multiple signal classification (MP-MUSIC) algorithm for positioning a metal target or an insulator target in the underwater environment by using a uniform circular antenna (UCA). The boundary element method (BEM) is introduced to analyze the boundary of the target by use of a matrix equation. In this method, an electric dipole source as a part of the locating system is set perpendicularly to the plane of the UCA. As a result, the UCA can only receive the induction field of the target. The potential of each electrode of the UCA is used as spatial-temporal localization data, and it does not need to obtain the field component in each direction compared with the conventional fields-based localization method, which can be easily implemented in practical engineering applications. A simulation model and a physical experiment are constructed. The simulation and the experiment results provide accurate positioning performance, with the help of verifying the effectiveness of the proposed localization method in underwater target locating. PMID:29439495

  12. An overview of RADOM results for earth and moon radiation environment on Chandrayaan-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachev, T. P.; Tomov, B. T.; Matviichuk, Yu. N.; Dimitrov, P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Goswami, J. N.; De Angelis, G.; Girish, V.

    2011-09-01

    The RADiatiOn Monitor (RADOM) is a miniature dosimeter-spectrometer that flew onboard the Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission in order to monitor the local radiation environment. Primary objective of the RADOM experiment was to measure the total absorbed dose, flux of surrounding energetic particles and spectrum of the deposited energy from high energy particles both en-route and in lunar orbit. RADOM was the first experiment to be switched on after the launch of Chandrayaan-1 and was operational until the end of the mission. This paper summarizes the observations carried out by RADOM during the entire life time (22 October 2008-31 August 2009) of the Chandrayaan-1 mission and compares the measurement by RADOM with the radiation belt models such as AP-8, AE-8 and CRRESS.

  13. Effects of solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tamaki, Akira; Watson, Phillip; Maughan, Ronald J

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of variations in solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity and thermoregulatory responses in a hot environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70 % maximum oxygen uptake until exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30 °C and 50 % relative humidity. Volunteers were tested under four solar radiation conditions: 800, 500, 250 and 0 W/m(2). Exercise time to exhaustion was less on the 800 W/m(2) trial (23 ± 4 min) than on all the other trials (500 W/m(2) 30 ± 7 min; P 0.05). Mean skin temperature was higher on the 800 W/m(2) trial than the 250 and 0 W/m(2) trials (P solar radiation increases.

  14. Radiation environment of the LHCb Calorimeters in 2010-2013 (under review)

    CERN Document Server

    Corti, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    A set of passive and active radiation detectors has been installed around and in between the LHCb calorimeter subsystems to measure different aspects of the radiation environment. Cross calibrations between various types of measurements are performed and correlated with the evolving run conditions. Measurements are compared to FLUKA simulation estimates and an evaluation of the reliability of the simulation in different running scenarios is provided. The simulation is based on a detailed geometry of the LHCb experiment and reflects the conditions of Run1 with 7 and 8 TeV CM proton-proton collision energies. A carefully characterised simulation of radiation levels in the LHCb experiment is essential in providing input for technical choices in view of the planned upgrade of the experiment for operation at higher luminosity.

  15. Protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The acceptability of practices which involve the release of radionuclides into the environment, and of situations where residual radionuclides from accidents or improperly controlled practices exist in the environment, are generally assessed on the basis of implied radiation doses to humans. This approach is consistent with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which include the statement that 'the standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk'. The general applicability of this statement has been explored in previous IAEA and other publications. These concluded that the statement is generally valid but that reliance upon human based radiological protection criteria may not be adequate for all possible space or time scales. In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is being challenged in some IAEA Member States and proposals are being made for strategies which provide for explicit protection of the environment. The present publication represents a first step towards establishing an internationally accepted philosophy and associated methodology for protecting the environment against ionizing radiations. The report reviews the various related issues and examines possible approaches to establishing criteria. It is intended for use in stimulating discussion on the subject in Member States. For its part, the IAEA intends to continue a programme of work in this area with the long term objective of providing specific recommendations on primary protection criteria and methods for

  16. The external gamma radiation environment from the Kiwi Phoebus, and Pewee reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenfant, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    During the past few years, ground tests of high-powered propulsion-prototype reactors have provided several opportunities to observe the external radiation environment. Reactor tests have been conducted in free air and inside of open well shields. Measurements were taken over distances ranging from contact with the pressure vessel out to greater than 5000' both during operation and after shutdown. Some measurements characteristic of each of the systems are presented and compared with results of calculations.

  17. Frequency dependent polarization in blazars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernsson, C.I.

    1984-10-01

    It is argued that the intrinsic frequency dependent polarization in blazars finds its most straightforward explanations in terms of a single rather than a multicomponent sourcemodel. In order to reproduce the observations, under the assumption that the emission mechanism is optically thin synchrotron radiation, both a well ordered magnetic field and an electron distribution with a sharp break or cuttoff are necessary. Non-uniform pitch angle distribution and/or environments where synchrotron losses are important are both conducive to producing strong frequency dependent polarization. Reasons are put forth as to why such conditions ar expected to occur in blazars. Two specific models are discussed in detail and it is shown that they are both able to produce strong frequency dependent polarization, even when the spectral index changes by a small amount only. (orig.)

  18. Characterization of the radiation environment of the inner heliosphere using LRO/CRaTER and EMMREM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Colin J.

    2016-08-01

    I provide a characterization of the radiation environment of the inner heliosphere from mid-2009 to present using measurements made by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and modelling provided by the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM). In the course of this study, I analyze solar energetic particle (SEP) radiation in the form of four major solar events that occurred during this time range as well as the evolution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) modulation over a period in which relatively calm solar conditions have resulted in the highest GCR fluxes measured in the space age. Using CRaTER measurements taken during three major solar events that occurred in 2012, I demonstrate a validation of the online PREDICCS system (Predictions of radiation from REleASE, EMMREM, and Data Incorporating CRaTER, COSTEP, and other SEP measurements), which uses EMMREM to provide near real-time radiation modelling at the Earth, Moon and Mars, finding PREDICCS to be quite accurate in modelling the peak dose rates and total accumulated doses for major solar events. Having demonstrated the accuracy of PREDICCS/EMMREM in modelling SEP events, EMMREM is used to provide an analysis of the potential radiation hazard of the extreme solar event observed by STEREO A on 23 July 2012, an event which has drawn comparisons to the historic Carrington event due to the exceptional size and record speed of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection associated with it. Such an event might be viewed as something like a worst case scenario in terms of the threat of SEP radiation to astronauts, however the evidence shown here suggests that, with the benefit of heavy protective shielding, astronauts would not have been exposed to levels of radiation that approach NASA's permissible exposure limits. These findings add to a mounting set of evidence which suggests that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the largest radiation

  19. Radiation protection of the environment. State of the art and recommendations by the IRSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Gilbin, R.; Simon-Cornu, M.; Baudry, M.; Deschamps, P.; Gariel, J.C.; Lecomte, J.F.; Paquet, F.; Renaud, P.; Schuler, M.

    2016-01-01

    This report notably aims at helping the GPRADE (Groupe permanent d'experts en radioprotection, pour les applications industrielles et de recherche des rayonnements ionisants, et en environnement - Permanent group of experts in radiation protection for industrial and research applications of ionizing radiations, and in environment) to build up its opinion on the French management of methods and technical regulations for the assessment of the radiological risk for the environment, or for the national transposition of the 2013/59/Euratom European directive. After a brief overview of the international, European and French legal context, the report proposes an overview of the state of the art: history, definitions, principles, regulation of radiation protection of the environment in different countries. It presents the main approaches and compares them: the CIPR approach, the Erica approach (the most used in Europe). It also discusses the compatibility of main approaches to the assessment of the radiological risk for ecosystems. It reports applications and returns on experience at the international level and within the frame of the IRSN commitment in planned, existing or emergency situations. Recommendations are formulated

  20. Use efficiency of photosynthetically active radiation by tomato plants grown in different environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radin, B.; Bergamaschi, H.; Reisser Junior, C.; Barni, N.A.; Matzenauer, R.; Didone, I.A.

    2003-01-01

    Crop biomass production is related to the amount of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted and absorbed by the leaves, as well as to their efficiency of conversion of this radiant energy into chemical energy through photosynthesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the radiation use efficiency by tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown in different environments. Experiments were carried out in plastic-covered greenhouses with and without anti insects screens and at open air plots, in different growth periods (spring-summer and summer-autumn) during the 1999/2000 crop season. Measurements of dry above-ground biomass and leaf area index throughout both crop cycles were performed, and the incident and transmitted radiation fluxes were registered. The greenhouse with anti insects screens had less incident radiation, but resulted in higher use efficiency: 0.44 and 0.60 g dry matter mol -1 during the first and second cycles, respectively. Outside the greenhouses, there was a higher amount of incident radiation, however a lower use efficiency (0.30 and 0.32 g mol -1 for the first and second cycles, respectively), while the greenhouse without anti insects screens had intermediate values (0.45 and 0.53 g mol -1 ). (author) [pt

  1. Particle interaction and displacement damage in silicon devices operated in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Claude; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Silicon is used in radiation detectors and electronic devices. Nowadays, these devices achieving submicron technology are parts of integrated circuits of large to very large scale integration (VLSI). Silicon and silicon-based devices are commonly operated in many fields including particle physics experiments, nuclear medicine and space. Some of these fields present adverse radiation environments that may affect the operation of the devices. The particle energy deposition mechanisms by ionization and non-ionization processes are reviewed as well as the radiation-induced damage and its effect on device parameters evolution, depending on particle type, energy and fluence. The temporary or permanent damage inflicted by a single particle (single event effect) to electronic devices or integrated circuits is treated separately from the total ionizing dose (TID) effect for which the accumulated fluence causes degradation and from the displacement damage induced by the non-ionizing energy-loss (NIEL) deposition. Understanding of radiation effects on silicon devices has an impact on their design and allows the prediction of a specific device behaviour when exposed to a radiation field of interest

  2. Proceedings of the international conference on radiation environment - assessment, measurement and its impact: abstract and souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The international conference on radiation environment-assessment, measurement and its impact is a major step for evolving a consensual perspective on the future course of research in radiation physics and safety aspects in the entire country and global village in wider perspectives. The attempt is to welcome novel ideas and identify the strategies for enhancing safe lives without comprising the immense benefits of radiation sciences. The conference would present progress in radiation physics research. This international conference would strengthen the chain of research activities as well act as a catalyst. In the wake of the disaster at Fukushima, Japan such research activities are the need of the hour. While radiation hazards are immense and one might be quite impulsive in criticizing the so called radiation word, but we have to invite knowledge heads all over to further this science, despite its hazards, so that it may cater to the needs of young generation in present era. The discussion between learned teachers, far sighted scientists and scholars is very relevant and need of the hour. It is expected that a sharing of the current international experiences in radiation physics research through this international exposure will help in enriching understanding of our requirements in a globalised world. We must harness maximum benefit out of this science. It is quite encouraging that the main objective of the seminar is to probe critically the state of the art expertise available and hence deciphering the future prospects available with the field which can be achieved given proper utilization of the available resources. This conference touches many such aspects. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Micro-and nanodosimetry for radiobiological planning in radiotherapy and cancer risk assessment in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Microdosimetry and nanodosimetry can provide unique information for prediction of radiobiological properties of radiation, which is important in radiation therapy for accurate dose planning and in radiation protection for cancer induction risk assessment. This demand measurements of the pattern of energies deposited by ionizing radiation on cellular scale and DNA levels.Silicon microelectronics technology is offering a unique opportunity for replacing gas proportional counters (TEPC) with miniature detectors for regional microdosimetry. Silicon on Insulator (SOI) technology has been used for the development of arrays of micron size sensitive volumes for modelling energy deposited in biological cells. The challenge in silicon microdosimetry is the development of well defined sensitive volume (SV) and full charge collection deposited by ionizing radiation in the SV. First generation SOI microdosimeters were developed at CMRP and investigated in a wide range of radiation fields for proton and neutron therapies and recently on isotopic neutron sources and heavy ions with energy up to lGeV/jj,m which are typical for deep space radiation environment. Microdosimetric spectra were obtained in a phantom that are well matched to TEPC and Monte Carlo simulations. Evidence that radiations with the same LET exhibit different biological effects demand development of new sensors sensitive to the track structure of ions or the type of particle for prediction of radiobiological effect of radiation using radiobiological models. New monolithic Si AE-E telescope of cellular size for simultaneous regional microdosimetry and particle identification will be presented and results will be discussed. The new design of the SOI microdosimeter is based on 3D micron and submicron size of Si SVs. This approach allows improvement in the accuracy of the Si microdosimetry because of full charge collection and the ability to measure low LET as low as 0.01 keV/jjm, which is similar to TEPC

  4. The Radiation Environment on the Martian Surface and during MSL's Cruise to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Martin, Cesar; Boettcher, Stephan; Koehler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Brinza, David E.; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Arik; the MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    An important part of assessing present and past habitability of Mars is to understand and characterize "life limiting factors" on the surface, such as the radiation environment. Radiation exposure is also a major concern for future human missions and characterizing the radiation environment, both on the surface of Mars and inside the spacecraft during the cruise to Mars, provides critical information to aid in the planning for future human exploration of Mars. RAD was the first MSL instrument to start collecting data, beginning its science investigation during cruise (10 days after launch) and making the first ever measurements of the radiation environment on another planet. RAD is an energetic particle analyzer designed to characterize a broad spectrum of energetic particle radiation including galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and secondary neutrons created both in the Mars atmosphere and regolith. RAD observations consist of a time series of periodic (typically hourly) measurements of charged particles from protons (Z=1) up to iron (Z=26) for energies above >10 MeV/nucleon, as well as neutrons from 10 to ~ 100 MeV. These synoptic observations are designed to characterize both the short term variability associated with the onset of solar energetic particle events as well as the long term variability of galactic cosmic rays over the solar cycle. RAD measurements will also be used to quantify the flux of biologically hazardous radiation at the surface of Mars today, and determine how these fluxes vary on diurnal, seasonal, solar cycle and episodic (flare, storm) timescales. These measurements will allow calculations of the depth in rock or soil to which this flux, when integrated over long timescales, provides a lethal dose for known terrestrial organisms. Through such measurements, we can learn how deep below the surface life would have to be, or have been in the past, to be protected. This talk will discuss the results obtained during the ~7 months

  5. BET surface area distributions in polar stream sediments: Implications for silicate weathering in a cold-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    BET surface area values are critical for quantifying the amount of potentially reactive sediments available for chemical weathering and ultimately, prediction of silicate weathering fluxes. BET surface area values of fine-grained (<62.5 μm) sediment from the hyporheic zone of polar glacial streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica (Wright and Taylor Valleys) exhibit a wide range (2.5–70.6 m2/g) of surface area values. Samples from one (Delta Stream, Taylor Valley) of the four sampled stream transects exhibit high values (up to 70.6 m2/g), which greatly exceed surface area values from three temperate proglacial streams (0.3–12.1 m2/g). Only Clark stream in Wright Valley exhibits a robust trend with distance, wherein surface area systematically decreases (and particle size increases) in the mud fraction downstream, interpreted to reflect rapid dissolution processes in the weathering environment. The remaining transects exhibit a range in variability in surface area distributions along the length of the channel, likely related to variations in eolian input to exposed channel beds, adjacent snow drifts, and to glacier surfaces, where dust is trapped and subsequently liberated during summer melting. Additionally, variations in stream discharge rate, which mobilizes sediment in pulses and influences water:rock ratios, the origin and nature of the underlying drift material, and the contribution of organic acids may play significant roles in the production and mobilization of high-surface area sediment. This study highlights the presence of sediments with high surface area in cold-based glacier systems, which influences models of chemical denudation rates and the impact of glacial systems on the global carbon cycle.

  6. Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winokur, P.S.; Lum, G.K.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Scott, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. COTS parts with low radiation tolerance should not be used when they degrade mission critical functions or lead to premature system failure. We review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMS increases from 1.4x10 8 rads(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7x10 9 rads(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design or process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10-15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMS from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMS from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of ''COTS'' and ''radiation-hardened'' technology

  7. Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winokur, P.S.; Lum, G.K.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Scott, L.

    1999-07-07

    This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. COTS parts with low radiation tolerance should not be used when they degrade mission critical functions or lead to premature system failure. We review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMS increases from 1.4x10{sup 8} rads(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7x10{sup 9} rads(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design or process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10-15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMS from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMS from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of ''COTS'' and ''radiation-hardened'' technology.

  8. Radiation Environments and Exposure Considerations for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, William M.; Low, Nora M.; Zillmer, Andrew; Johnson, Gregory A.; Normand, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) is the next generation (RTG) being developed by DOE to provide reliable, long-life electric power for NASA's planetary exploration programs. The MMRTG is being developed by Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne and Teledyne Energy Systems Incorporated (TESI) for use on currently planned and projected flyby, orbital and planet landing missions. This is a significant departure from the design philosophy of the past which was to match specific mission requirements to RTG design capabilities. Undefined mission requirements provide a challenge to system designers by forcing them to put a design envelope around 'all possible missions'. These multi-mission requirements include internal and external radiation sources. Internal sources include the particles ejected by decaying Pu-238 and its daughters plus particles resulting from the interaction of these particles with other MMRTG materials. External sources include the full spectrum of charged particle radiation surrounding planets with magnetic fields and the surfaces of extraterrestrial objects not shielded by magnetic fields. The paper presents the results of investigations into the environments outlined above and the impact of radiation exposure on potential materials to be used on MMRTG and ground support personnel. Mission requirements were also reviewed to evaluate total integrated dose and to project potential shielding requirements for materials. Much of the information on mission shielding requirements was provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The primary result is an ionizing radiation design curve which indicates the limits to which a particular mission can take the MMRTG in terms of ionizing radiation exposure. Estimates of personnel radiation exposure during ground handling are also provided

  9. Radioactivity in food and the environment: calculations of UK radiation doses using integrated methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allott, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Dear Sir: I read with interest the paper by W C Camplin, G P Brownless, G D Round, K Winpenny and G J Hunt from the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) on 'Radioactivity in food and the environment: calculations of UK radiation doses using integrated methods' in the December 2002 issue of this journal (J. Radiol. Prot. 22 371-88). The Environment Agency has a keen interest in the development of a robust methodology for assessing total doses which have been received by members of the public from authorised discharges of radioactive substances to the environment. Total dose in this context means the dose received from all authorised discharges and all exposure pathways (e.g. inhalation, external irradiation from radionuclides in sediment/soil, direct radiation from operations on a nuclear site, consumption of food etc). I chair a 'total retrospective dose assessment' working group with representatives from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), Food Standards Agency (FSA), National Radiological Protection Board, CEFAS and BNFL which began discussing precisely this issue during 2002. This group is a sub-group of the National Dose Assessment Working Group which was set up in April 2002 (J. Radiol. Prot. 22 318-9). The Environment Agency, Food Standards Agency and the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate previously undertook joint research into the most appropriate methodology to use for total dose assessment (J J Hancox, S J Stansby and M C Thorne 2002 The Development of a Methodology to Assess Population Doses from Multiple Source and Exposure Pathways of Radioactivity (Environment Agency R and D Technical Report P3-070/TR). This work came to broadly the same conclusion as the work by CEFAS, that an individual dose method is probably the most appropriate method to use. This research and that undertaken by CEFAS will help the total retrospective dose assessment working group refine a set of principles and a methodology for the

  10. Control of the working environment dosimetry and technical radiation protection at the RA reactor, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, N.; Bjelanovic, J.; Minicic, Z.; Komatina, R.; Raicevic, J.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains data and analysis of the of measured sample results collected during radiation protection control in the working environment of the RA reactor. First part contains basic exposure values and statistical review of the the total number of radiation measurements. It includes contents of radioactive gasses and effluents in the air, as well as the level of surface contamination of clothes and uncovered parts of the personnel bodies. Second part deals with the analysis of personnel doses. It was found that the maximum individual dose from external irradiation amounted to 16.9 mSV during past 10 months. Individual exposures for 9/10 of the personnel were less than 1/10 of the permissible annual exposure. Data are compared to radiation doses for last year and previous five years. Third part of this annex contains basic data about the quantity of collected radioactive waste, total quantity of contaminated and decontaminated surfaces. The last part analyzes accidents occurred at the reactor during 1984. It was found that there have been no accidents that could cause significant contamination of working surfaces and components nor radiation exposure of the personnel

  11. TEPC radiation protection dosimetry in the environment of accelerators and at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkerts, K.H.; Menzel, H.G.; Schuhmacher, H.; Arend, E.

    1988-01-01

    Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) have been used to measure radiation quality and dose equivalent rates in the environment of physical and medical accelerators and at nuclear facilities. The measurements were performed with a 5.9 cm diameter spherical counter simulating a site diameter of 2 μm. A conventional pulse processing system was used. The mean quality factors for the radiation fields investigated were determined by applying different quality functions to the measured dose distributions as a function of lineal energy. The calculated quality factors for the ICRP 21 quality function for y = L yielded values in the range of Q-bar = 1.1 - 4.9, with a mean value of Q-bar = 2.3. Separation of the spectra into the photon and neutron components showed quality factors in the range of Q ph = 1.08 - 1.26 for photons and Q n = 5.2 - 17.8 for neutrons. Significant differences in radiation quality between the measurements at nuclear facilities and at therapy facilities, as well as large variations of radiation quality even within the same facility were demonstrated. (author)

  12. Study on the behavior of resistance strain gages in nuclear radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Katsuaki; Yokoo, Hiroshi; Kitahara, Tanemichi; Kaieda, Keisuke

    1975-08-01

    A series of irradiation experiments were carried out on the behavior of resistance strain gages in nuclear radiation environments. The gages made of bakelite base and advance (nickel-copper alloy) wire were bonded to stainless-steel or aluminium-alloy plates. They were inserted into an in-pile helium loop TLG-1 installed in the JRR-2 reactor, and irradiated at 80 0 C for nearly 300 hours, during which the apparent strain and the leakage current through the base material between the resistance wire and the plate were measured. The results are summarized in the following: (1) The sensitivity change and the insulation-resistance deterioration of the gage are hardly observed. (2) The apparent strain observed can be divided into two components; one dependent on the radiation intensity and the other on the radiation fluence. Both of them indicate the decrease of the gage resistance. (3) The former apparent strain is possibly due to the leakage current through the base material induced by gamma-rays. The latter may be ascribed to the decrease of the wire resistance caused by the radiation damage. (4) Either the half-bridge or full-bridge method makes it possible to compensate the apparent strain and to measure static strain for a few days satisfactorily as well as dynamic strain. (auth.)

  13. Gas-to-particle conversion in the atmospheric environment by radiation-induced and photochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years a fascinating new area of research involving ionizing radiations and photochemistry in gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere has been developing at a rapid pace. Two problems of major interest and concern in which this is of paramount importance are: (1) radiation induced and photochemical aerosol formation in the stratosphere and, (2) role of radiations and photochemistry in smog formation. The peak in cosmic ray intensity and significant solar UV flux in the stratosphere lead to complex variety of reactions involving major and trace constituents in this region of the atmosphere, and some of these reactions are of vital importance in aerosol formation. The problem is of great current interest because the pollutant gases from industrial sources and future SST operations entering the stratosphere could increase the aerosol burden in the stratosphere and affect the solar energy input of the troposphere with consequent ecological and climatic changes. On the other hand, in the nuclear era, the atmospheric releases from reactors and processing plants could lead to changes in the cloud nucleation behaviour of the environment and possible increase in smog formation in the areas with significant levels of radiations and conventional pollutants. A review of the earlier work, current status of the problem, and conventional pollutants. A review of the earlier work, current status of the problem, and some recent results of the experiments conducted in the author's laboratory are presented. The possible mechanisms of gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere have been explained

  14. The Plateau de Bure ASTEP Platform Test in natural radiation environment of electronic components and circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autran, J.L.; Munteanu, D.; Sauze, S.; Roche, Ph.; Gasiot, G.; Borel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Reducing the size of microelectronic devices and increasing the integration density of circuits lead (following the famous Moore's law) to an increased sensitivity of circuits to natural terrestrial radiation environment. - Such sensitivity to atmospheric particles (mainly neutrons) can cause non-destructive (soft-errors) or destructive (latch-up) failures in most electronic circuits, including volatile static memories (SRAM), object of the research work carried out since 2004 on the European Test Platform ASTER. - This paper presents in details the ASTEP platform, its location, the instruments (neutron monitor of the Plateau de Bure) and the experiences (memory tester) currently installed on the Plateau de Bure. In a second part, we also report a synthesis of the key results concerning the natural radiation sensitivity of SRAM fabricated in 130 nm and 65 nm bulk silicon technologies. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of insulation materials and composites for use in a nuclear radiation environment, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, W. A.; Lewis, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    This study has been carried out to evaluate flight-qualified Saturn 5 materials, components, and systems for use, with or without modification, in the radiation environment of the nuclear flight system. The results reported herein are primarily intended to aid designers in their evaluation and selection of off-the-shelf equipments which may meet the stringent requirements and specifications associated with application on a reusable nuclear powered space system, i.e., the reusable nuclear shuttle. One of the factors which must be evaluated in the design of the RNS is the effects of radiation on materials; and it is toward this aspect of the overall effort that this analysis has been directed.

  16. Computer modeling characterization, and applications of Gallium Arsenide Gunn diodes in radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El- Basit, Wafaa Abd; El-Ghanam, Safaa Mohamed; Kamh, Sanaa Abd El-Tawab [Electronics Research Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Women for Arts, Science and Education, Ain-Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Maksood, Ashraf Mosleh; Soliman, Fouad Abd El-Moniem Saad [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-10-15

    The present paper reports on a trial to shed further light on the characterization, applications, and operation of radar speed guns or Gunn diodes on different radiation environments of neutron or γ fields. To this end, theoretical and experimental investigations of microwave oscillating system for outer-space applications were carried out. Radiation effects on the transient parameters and electrical properties of the proposed devices have been studied in detail with the application of computer programming. Also, the oscillation parameters, power characteristics, and bias current were plotted under the influence of different γ and neutron irradiation levels. Finally, shelf or oven annealing processes were shown to be satisfactory techniques to recover the initial characteristics of the irradiated devices.

  17. Overview of the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment monitoring by Bulgarian build instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachev, Tsvetan; Tomov, Borislav; Matviichuk, Yury; Dimitrov, Plamen; Spurny, Frantisek; Ploc, Ondrej; Uchihori, Yukio; Flueckiger, Erwin; Kudela, Karel; Benton, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Humans are exposed to ionizing radiation all the time, and it is known that it can induce a variety of harmful biological effects. Consequently, it is necessary to quantitatively assess the level of exposure to this radiation as the basis for estimating risks for their health. Spacecraft and aircraft crews are exposed to elevated levels of cosmic radiation of galactic and solar origin and to secondary radiation produced in the atmosphere, the vehicle structure and its contents. The aircraft crew monitoring is required by the following recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (ICRP 1990), the European Union (EU) introduced a revised Basic Safety Standards Directive (EC 1997) which, inter alia, included the exposure to cosmic radiation. This approach has been also adopted in other official documents (NCRP 2002). In this overview we present the results of ground based, mountain peaks, aircraft, balloon and rocket radiation environment monitoring by means of a Si-diode energy deposition spectrometer Liulin type developed first in Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BAS) for the purposes of the space radiation monitoring at MIR and International Space Station (ISS). These spectrometers-dosemeters are further developed, calibrated and used by scientific groups in different countries. Calibration procedures of them are performed at different accelerators including runs in the CERN high-energy reference field, simulating the radiation field at 10 km altitude in the atmosphere and with heavy ions in Chiba, Japan HIMAC accelerator were performed also. The long term aircraft data base were accumulated using specially developed battery operated instrument in 2001-2009 years onboard of A310-300 aircrafts of Czech Air Lines, during 24 about 2 months runs with more than 2000 flights and 13500 flight hours on routes over the Atlantic Ocean mainly. The obtained experimental data are compared with computational models like CARI and EPCARD. The

  18. A regional study of the radiation environment of Greenham Common, Newbury District and surrounding areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This study was commissioned by Newbury District Council and Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council in response to public concern following disclosures about events at Greenham Common in the 1950s, and the suspicion that there may have been an accident involving a nuclear weapon leading to off-site contamination at the airbase. The Greenham Common airbase is at an advanced stage of decommissioning with parts of the site already re-developed for industrial and leisure purposes and material being removed for use in construction of the Newbury by-pass. The success of such developments is critically dependent on public confidence in the quality of the environment, both near the site, and more generally throughout the area. For this reason the study was commissioned with the aims of: I. defining the radiation environment of the whole district and parts of its surrounding areas. II. examining whether there is any evidence of radioactive contamination in the vicinity of the Greenham Common airbase. III. assessing the evidence that there may have been a release of nuclear material from the site. The work involved a collaboration between scientists from the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, who conducted gamma ray surveys to define the general radiation environment of the area, and Scientists from the University of Southampton who collected an extensive range of samples for high sensitivity radiochemical analyses. This report presents their findings and main conclusions, together with a discussion of the background to the study and its implications. (Author)

  19. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.

    1999-01-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed [it

  20. Law 19.056. It dictate rules to ensure the protection and radiation safety of people, goods and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this law is to ensure the protection and radiation safety of personnel occupationally exposed, the public in general and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation as well as avoid risks of contamination in radiactive sources, physical facilities and means of transport

  1. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors.

  2. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation’s lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers. IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors. (paper)

  3. Simulation research for mixed radiation environment in target chamber II of BEPC II-LINAC test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xinghua; Li Jiacai; Ke Zunjian; An Guangpeng; Zhang Shaoping; Yang Tao; Xu Jinzhang

    2011-01-01

    In order to get basic physical parameters of radiation environment for detector or sample irradiation experiment and optimal target material choice, Monte Carlo simulation software FLUKA is used to calculate parameters of mixed radiation environment in target chamber II on E2 line of test beam. At last, physical parameters: secondary particles differential fluencies, secondary particles angular differential cross-section, dual differential energy spectrum, dose rate distribution are acquired. (authors)

  4. Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported. Detailed consideration of the effects of both the natural and induced ionizing radiation environment during ISS design, development, and flight operations has produced a safe, efficient manned space platform that is largely immune to deleterious effects of the LEO ionizing radiation environment. The assumption of a small shielding mass for purposes of design and verification has been shown to be a valid worst-case approximation approach to design for reliability, though predicted dependences of single event effect (SEE) effects on latitude, longitude, SEP events, and spacecraft structural shielding mass are not observed. The Figure of Merit (FOM) method over predicts the rate for median shielding masses of about 10g/cm(exp 2) by only a factor of 3, while the Scott Effective Flux Approach (SEFA) method overestimated by about one order of magnitude as expected. The Integral Rectangular Parallelepiped (IRPP), SEFA, and FOM methods for estimating on-orbit (Single Event Upsets) SEU rates all utilize some version of the CREME-96 treatment of energetic particle interaction with structural shielding, which has been shown to underestimate the production of secondary particles in heavily shielded manned spacecraft. The need for more work directed to development of a practical understanding of secondary particle production in massive structural shielding for SEE design and verification is indicated. In contrast, total dose estimates using CAD based shielding mass distributions functions and the Shieldose Code provided a reasonable accurate estimate of accumulated dose in Grays internal to the ISS pressurized elements, albeit as a result of using worst-on-worst case assumptions (500 km altitude x 2) that compensate for ignoring both GCR and secondary particle

  5. Polarized absorption spectra of aromatic radicals in stretched polymer film, 4. Radical ions of 9-substituted anthracenes. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshie; Nakajima, Keihachiro (Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1982-11-01

    Radical ions of some 9-substituted anthracene derivatives have been prepared in polymer film by gamma -irradiation at 77 K. By use of the polarized absorption spectra of these radical ions, the absorption spectra have been resolved into two components (resolved spectra), the transition moments of which are polarized parallel to the molecular long and short axes, respectively. Correlation of the characteristic absorption bands is discussed briefly.

  6. Explanation of changes of stellar radiation polarization by means of an ''active longitudes'' hypothesis with U Mon as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakova, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    The hypothesis explaining the variability of some stars with U Mon as an example resulting from antipodal active regions on their surface is discussed qualitatively. The plane of polarization is determined by average magnetic field of the bipolar active region. The changes of polarization and brightness are assumed to be connected with the star rotation. The rotation period is taken to be twice as much as the period doubling of spectral lines

  7. High school students' understanding of radiation and the environment: Can museums play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ellen K.; Jorde, Doris

    2001-03-01

    In connection with an exhibition on radiation1-related environmental issues at the Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, teaching units including pre- and post-visit activities were developed for visiting students. The units were centered on real-life stories concerning radiation issues that were used by the students as starting points for reflections around these issues. Using the teaching units as an evaluation instrument, students' written responses were analyzed with a dual purpose: 1) to gain insight into the understanding of and attitudes on radiation issues held by students in their final year of compulsory science instruction; and 2) to explore whether the exhibition medium may successfully convey scientific information that students find relevant and helpful in making personal judgments in environmental issues. In the present work, some prominent features of Norwegian 16-year-olds' understanding of radiation issues were identified, and it was noted that these were in many aspects similar to those described for students of other age groups and nationalities. Furthermore, it was found that a visit to the exhibition clearly provided science learning outcome for the majority of the students; however, for students who had strong alternative conceptions about the exhibition's issues, their preconceptions tended to inhibit their correct interpretation of new concepts introduced at the exhibition. We found few examples of students using scientific information from the exhibition in making personal judgments in matters concerning radiation and the environment, and we hypothesize that this may be due to a lack of practice in employing scientific understanding in this way. We believe that the use of museum exhibitions as part of a science education for scientific literacy is worth further exploration and might have increased success if new ways were found of improving the cooperation between museums and schools.

  8. Radon measurements by etched track detectors applications in radiation protection, earth sciences and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Durrani, Saeed A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to radon gas, which is present in the environment naturally, constitutes over half the radiation dose received by the general public annually. At present, the most widely used method of measuring radon concentration levels throughout the world, both in dwellings and in the field, is by etched track detectors - also known as Solid State Nuclear Detectors (SSNTDs). Although this is not only the most widely used method but is also the simplest and the cheapest, yet there is at present no book available on the market globally, devoted exclusively or largely to the methodology of, and deal

  9. LiteBIRD: a small satellite for the study of B-mode polarization and inflation from cosmic background radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazumi, M.; Borrill, J.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M. A.; Fuke, H.; Ghribi, A.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Inoue, Y.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishino, H.; Karatsu, K.; Katayama, N.; Kawano, I.; Kibayashi, A.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, N.; Koga, K.; Komatsu, E.; Lee, A. T.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsumura, T.; Mima, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Morii, H.; Murayama, S.; Nagai, M.; Nagata, R.; Nakamura, S.; Natsume, K.; Nishino, H.; Noda, A.; Noguchi, T.; Ohta, I.; Otani, C.; Richards, P. L.; Sakai, S.; Sato, N.; Sato, Y.; Sekimoto, Y.; Shimizu, A.; Shinozaki, K.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, T.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takagi, Y.; Takei, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Uzawa, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Yamasaki, N.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yotsumoto, K.

    2012-09-01

    LiteBIRD [Lite (Light) satellite for the studies of B-mode polarization and Inflation from cosmic background Radiation Detection] is a small satellite to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation over the full sky at large angular scales with unprecedented precision. Cosmological inflation, which is the leading hypothesis to resolve the problems in the Big Bang theory, predicts that primordial gravitational waves were created during the inflationary era. Measurements of polarization of the CMB radiation are known as the best probe to detect the primordial gravitational waves. The LiteBIRD working group is authorized by the Japanese Steering Committee for Space Science (SCSS) and is supported by JAXA. It has more than 50 members from Japan, USA and Canada. The scientific objective of LiteBIRD is to test all the representative inflation models that satisfy single-field slow-roll conditions and lie in the large-field regime. To this end, the requirement on the precision of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, at LiteBIRD is equal to or less than 0.001. Our baseline design adopts an array of multi-chroic superconducting polarimeters that are read out with high multiplexing factors in the frequency domain for a compact focal plane. The required sensitivity of 1.8μKarcmin is achieved with 2000 TES bolometers at 100mK. The cryogenic system is based on the Stirling/JT technology developed for SPICA, and the continuous ADR system shares the design with future X-ray satellites.

  10. System for detecting neutrons in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, L.W.

    1978-06-01

    Newly developed detectors and procedures allow measurement of neutron yield and energy in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam source. A new photomultiplier tube design and special gating methods provide the basis for novel time-of-flight and total-yield detectors. The technique of activation analysis is expanded to provide a neutron energy spectrometer. There is a demonstrated potential in the use of the integrated system as a valuable diagnostic tool to study particle-beam fusion, intense ion-beam interactions, and pulsed neutron sources for simulating weapons effects. A physical lower limit of 10 8 neutrons into 4π is established for accurate and meaningful measurements in the REB environment

  11. Addressing ecological effects of radiation on populations and ecosystems to improve protection of the environment against radiation: Agreed statements from a Consensus Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchignac, François; Oughton, Deborah; Mays, Claire; Barnthouse, Lawrence; Beasley, James C.; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Bradshaw, Clare; Brown, Justin; Dray, Stéphane; Geras'kin, Stanislav; Glenn, Travis; Higley, Kathy; Ishida, Ken; Kapustka, Lawrence; Kautsky, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the output of a consensus symposium organized by the International Union of Radioecology in November 2015. The symposium gathered an academically diverse group of 30 scientists to consider the still debated ecological impact of radiation on populations and ecosystems. Stimulated by the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters? accidental contamination of the environment, there is increasing interest in developing environmental radiation protection frameworks. Scientific research c...

  12. Application of the Self Calibrating Emissivity and/or Transmissivity Independent Multiwavelength Pyrometer in an Intense Ambient Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    The NASA self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer is a recent addition to the list of pyrometers used in remote temperature measurement in research and development. The older one-color, two-color, and the disappearing filament pyrometers, as well as the multicolor and early multiwavelength pyrometers, all do not operate successfully in situations in which strong ambient radiation coexists with radiation originating from the measured surface. In such situations radiation departing from the target surface arrives at the pyrometer together with radiation coming from another source either directly or through reflection. Unlike the other pyrometers, the self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer can still calibrate itself and measure the temperatures in this adverse environment.

  13. Net radiation and soil heat flux in natural and protected environments cropped with cucumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvani, E.; Escobedo, J.F.; Pereira, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    Net radiation, global solar radiation and heat flux from/to the soil both inside and outside greenhouses with polyethylene cover throughout the fall-winter and spring-summer seasons have been assessed at the research station of the Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus of Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Throughout the cycles of the experiment, both environments scrutinized in the current study were cultivated with cucumber crop - Aoday, Hokuroo - a variety of undetermined growth habit. The results indicated that the greenhouse with polyethylene cover tended to decrease the intensity of solar radiation incidence per unity of area throughout the diurnal period, as well as losses from emission during the nighttime. The transmissivity of polyethylene was altered as a function of the day of the year and exposition time of the material, changing from 70.8% at the winter to 74.9% at the summer seasons. The heat flux from/to the soil during the spring-summer cycle was dependent of the leaf area of the crop [pt

  14. Transfer of Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model; Research to Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K. S. F.; Hwang, J.; Shin, D. K.; Kim, G. J.; Morley, S.; Henderson, M. G.; Friedel, R. H.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (rtDREAM) was developed by LANL for nowcast of energetic electrons' flux at the radiation belt to quantify potential risks from radiation damage at the satellites. Assimilated data are from multiple sources including LANL assets (GEO, GPS). For transfer from research to operation of the rtDREAM code, LANL/KSWC/NOAA makes a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) on the collaboration between three parts. By this MOU, KWSC/RRA provides all the support for transitioning the research version of DREAM to operations. KASI is primarily responsible for providing all the interfaces between the current scientific output formats of the code and useful space weather products that can be used and accessed through the web. In the second phase, KASI will be responsible in performing the work needed to transform the Van Allen Probes beacon data into "DREAM ready" inputs. KASI will also provide the "operational" code framework and additional data preparation, model output, display and web page codes back to LANL and SWPC. KASI is already a NASA partnering ground station for the Van Allen Probes' space weather beacon data and can here show use and utility of these data for comparison between rtDREAM and observations by web. NOAA has offered to take on some of the data processing tasks specific to the GOES data.

  15. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (GERAR/DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Amancio, Francisco F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of {sup 60}Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  16. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Silva, Ronaldo C. da; Amancio, Francisco F.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of 60 Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  17. The selection of radiation tolerant electrical/electronic components for gamma radiation environments in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, D.R.

    1984-09-01

    This report briefly describes the mechanisms, units and effects of 1 MeV range gamma radiation on electrical/electronic components and materials. Information is tabulated on the gamma radiation tolerance of a wide range of components and materials. A radiation testing service, based at Harwell, is described. Lists of interested manufacturers and organisations are given. (author)

  18. Markedly enhanced absorption and direct radiative forcing of black carbon under polluted urban environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Levy Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Glen, Crystal R; Collins, Donald R; Molina, Mario J; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-19

    Black carbon (BC) exerts profound impacts on air quality and climate because of its high absorption cross-section over a broad range of electromagnetic spectra, but the current results on absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging remain conflicting. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China, and Houston, United States, using a novel environmental chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages, i.e., initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a large absorption enhancement. The timescales to achieve complete morphology modification and an absorption amplification factor of 2.4 for BC particles are estimated to be 2.3 h and 4.6 h, respectively, in Beijing, compared with 9 h and 18 h, respectively, in Houston. Our findings indicate that BC under polluted urban environments could play an essential role in pollution development and contribute importantly to large positive radiative forcing. The variation in direct radiative forcing is dependent on the rate and timescale of BC aging, with a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries, i.e., a higher climatic impact in more polluted environments. We suggest that mediation in BC emissions achieves a cobenefit in simultaneously controlling air pollution and protecting climate, especially for developing countries.

  19. Ultra Low Outgassing silicone performance in a simulated space ionizing radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velderrain, M.; Malave, V.; Taylor, E. W.

    2010-09-01

    The improvement of silicone-based materials used in space and aerospace environments has garnered much attention for several decades. Most recently, an Ultra Low Outgassing™ silicone incorporating innovative reinforcing and functional fillers has shown that silicone elastomers with unique and specific properties can be developed to meet applications requiring stringent outgassing requirements. This paper will report on the next crucial step in qualifying these materials for spacecraft applications requiring chemical and physical stability in the presence of ionizing radiation. As a first step in this process, selected materials were irradiated with Co-60 gamma-rays to simulate the total dose received in near- Earth orbits. The paper will present pre-and post-irradiation response data of Ultra Low Outgassing silicone samples exposed under ambient air environment coupled with measurements of collected volatile condensable material (CVCM) and total mass loss (TML) per the standard conditions in ASTM E 595. The data will show an insignificant effect on the CVCMs and TMLs after exposure to various dosages of gamma radiation. This data may favorably impact new applications for these silicone materials for use as an improved sealant for space solar cell systems, space structures, satellite systems and aerospace systems.

  20. Geography, environment and organismal traits in the diversification of a major tropical herbaceous angiosperm radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The generation of plant diversity involves complex interactions between geography, environment and organismal traits. Many macroevolutionary processes and emergent patterns have been identified in different plant groups through the study of spatial data, but rarely in the context of a large radiation of tropical herbaceous angiosperms. A powerful system for testing interrelated biogeographical hypotheses is provided by the terrestrial bromeliads, a Neotropical group of extensive ecological diversity and importance. In this investigation, distributional data for 564 species of terrestrial bromeliads were used to estimate variation in the position and width of species-level hydrological habitat occupancy and test six core hypotheses linking geography, environment and organismal traits. Taxonomic groups and functional types differed in hydrological habitat occupancy, modulated by convergent and divergent trait evolution, and with contrasting interactions with precipitation abundance and seasonality. Plant traits in the Bromeliaceae are intimately associated with bioclimatic differentiation, which is in turn strongly associated with variation in geographical range size and species richness. These results emphasize the ecological relevance of structural-functional innovation in a major plant radiation. PMID:29479409

  1. External radiation monitoring in TAPS and RAPS environs (1980-81) using TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.S.; Nambi, K.S.V.; Sunta, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Results of environmental external radiation monitoring using quarterly integrated TLD measurements are presented for environments of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) and the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) for the two year monitoring period (1980-81). The data fit into the unimodal log-normal distribution except for locations where gaseous radioactivity escaping from the plant makes a significant contribution. The average natural radiation background in TAPS and RAPS environment is estimated to be 59.6 +- 4.7 mR yr -1 and 65.1 +- 9.8 mR yr -1 respectively. Contribution from the plant superimposed over the natural level leads frequently to bi-normal distribution. The effect of stack-released gaseous radioactivity is seen in locations within 1.6 km of TAPS: for example Ghivoli village registered an excess of 9.3 mR yr -1 over the natural background. The quarterly background values indicate minor temporal and spatial variations which can be attributed to changes in natural as well as stack released radioactivity. (author)

  2. Using ecosystem science to improve protection of the environment from radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, C. [Stockholm University (Sweden); Brechignac, F. [IUR / IRSN (France); Barnthouse, L. [LWB Environmental Services Inc. (United States); Brown, J. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Forbes, V. [University of Lincoln (United Kingdom); Kapustka, L. [LC LK Consultancy (Canada); Kautsky, U. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB - SKB (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The ecosystem approach (EA) involves considering the impacts of an anthropogenic stressor at the ecosystem level because this is usually the ultimate goal of environmental protection. As such, EA includes population, community and ecosystem effects, structural and functional effects, indirect effects due to ecological interactions between species, dynamic interactions, positive or negative feedback loops, and potential synergistic or antagonistic effects of multiple stressors (both anthropogenic and natural). All such effects better reflect the reality of the impact of a contamination scenario than if assessments are restricted to considering effects to individual organisms or species. Such effects may be greater or lesser than expected from studies of individual organisms or species, so not considering them may result in under- or overestimation of risk, respectively. EA is a term that is widely used in environmental assessment, management and legislation in a number of regulatory fields (e.g., radiation protection, chemicals legislation, fisheries policy, international biodiversity conventions). However, although its justification is now well established in a wide range of environment protection contexts, its practical use is still unclear due to poorly defined protection goals and assessment endpoints, making its implementation difficult. This paper presents the initial findings of a newly formed follow-up task group of the International Union of Radioecology whose aims are to identify ways to put the EA into practice when considering protection of the environment from radiation. Drawing on knowledge and experience from a range of fields, we summarise the types of ecosystem processes, goods and services that might be included when using this approach, the science that supports the use of the EA, and the methodological challenges that need to be addressed when implementing the EA in the field of radiation protection. Document available in abstract form only

  3. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  4. Role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of astrophysical ices in protostellars environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson Monteiro Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    The astrophysical ices survival is directly related with the temperature and ionizing radiation field in protostellars environments such as disks and envelopes. Computational models has shown that pure volatile molecules like CO and CH _{4} should survive only inside densest regions of molecular clouds or protoplanetary disks On the other hand, solid molecules such as H _{2}O and CH _{3}OH can be placed around 5 - 10 AU from the central protostar. Unlike of the previous models, we investigate the role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of ices in disks and envelopes. Once that a star-forming region is composed by the formation of many protostars, the external radiation field should be an important component to understand the real localization of the ices along the sight line. To address this topic it was employed the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D based on the Monte Carlo method. The code was used to model the spectrum and the near-infrared image of Elias 29. The initial parameters of the disk and envelope was taken from our previous paper (Rocha & Pilling (2015), ApJ 803:18). The opacities of the ices were calculated from the complex refractive index obtained at laboratory experiments perfomed at Grand Accélerateur National d'Íons Lourds (GANIL), by using the NKABS code from Rocha & Pilling (2014), SAA 123:436. The partial conclusions that we have obtained shows that pure CO volatile molecule cannot be placed at disk or envelope of Elias 29, unlike shown in our paper about Elias 29. Once it was observed in Elias 29 spectrum obtained with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 2.5 - 190 μm, this molecule should be placed in foreground molecular clouds or trapped in the water ice matrix. The next calculations will be able to show where are placed the ices such as CH _{3}OH and CH _{3}CHO observed in Elias 29 spectrum.

  5. Europa's surface radiation environment and considerations for in-situ sampling and biosignature detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T.; Paranicas, C.; Hand, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is embedded deep within the Jovian magnetosphere and is thus exposed to bombardment by charged particles, from thermal plasma to more energetic particles at radiation belt energies. In particular, energetic charged particles are capable of affecting the uppermost layer of surface material on Europa, in some cases down to depths of several meters (Johnson et al., 2004; Paranicas et al., 2009, 2002). Examples of radiation-induced surface alteration include sputtering, radiolysis and grain sintering; processes that are capable of significantly altering the physical properties of surface material. Radiolysis of surface ices containing sulfur-bearing contaminants from Io has been invoked as a possible explanation for hydrated sulfuric acid detected on Europa's surface (Carlson et al., 2002, 1999) and radiolytic production of oxidants represents a potential source of energy for life that could reside within Europa's sub-surface ocean (Chyba, 2000; Hand et al., 2007; Johnson et al., 2003; Vance et al., 2016). Accurate knowledge of Europa's surface radiation environment is essential to the interpretation of space and Earth-based observations of Europa's surface and exosphere. Furthermore, future landed missions may seek to sample endogenic material emplaced on Europa's surface to investigate its chemical composition and to search for biosignatures contained within. Such material would likely be sampled from the shallow sub-surface, and thus, it becomes crucial to know to which degree this material is expected to have been radiation processed.Here we will present modeling results of energetic electron and proton bombardment of Europa's surface, including interactions between these particles and surface material. In addition, we will present predictions for biosignature destruction at different geographical locations and burial depths and discuss the implications of these results for surface sampling by future missions to Europa's surface.

  6. Comparison of extraction and work up techniques for analysis of core and intact polar tetraether lipids from sedimentary environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lengger, S.K.; Hopmans, E.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether-based intact polar lipids (IPL GDGTs) are used as biomarkers for living Archaea and are analyzed utilizing a variety of extraction and quantification techniques. Most IPL GDGT studies have used a modified Bligh-Dyer extraction method, but it has been

  7. Theoretical-experimental study of the non-thermal effects of the polarized laser radiation in living tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present research we had as a fundamental objective to analyse the non-thermal effects of the laser polarized light in biological tissues. These effects were performed with low power laser output. The theoretical procedure consisted in looking for a simple model which connects the effect of light polarized with microscopically rough tissues using well established physical concepts. Experimentally, we created artificial wounds on the back of animals using liquid nitrogen (this method was chosen because it does not interfere in the biochemistry of the animal tissue). For the wound irradiation we have utilized a He-Ne attached to an optical system. (author)

  8. Radiation protection measurement techniques and the challenges encountered in industrial and medical environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays everybody is concerned by the use of ionizing radiations for diagnostic and therapy purposes. Radiation protection regulatory requirements are becoming more and more constraining and have an impact on the performance criteria required for measurement systems. The measurement of some radiation protection data requires the use of complex and costly devices, leading to hardly manageable constraints for the users. Do they have to be systematically implemented? How is it possible to reduce, control and optimize the medical exposures using new methodological approaches? During this conference the participants have shed light on some concrete situations and realisations in the environmental, nuclear industry and medical domains. The document brings together 34 presentations (slides) dealing with: 1 - Environmental monitoring and measurement meaning (P.Y. Emidy (EDF)); human radiation protection and measurement meaning (A. Rannou (IRSN)); Eye lens dosimetry, why and how? (J.M. Bordy (CEA)); critical and reasoned approach of the ISO 11929 standard about decision threshold and detection limit (A. Vivier (CEA)); Samples collection and low activities measurement in the environment (D. Claval (IRSN)); Dosemeters calibration, what is new? (J.M. Bordy (CEA)); Appropriateness of measurement means for radiological controls (P. Tranchant (Techman Industrie)); Pulsed fields dosimetric reference for interventional diagnosis (M. Denoziere (CEA)); Pulsed complex fields dosimetry (F. Trompier (IRSN)); DOSEO: a tool for dose optimization in radiological imaging (C. Adrien (CEA)); Eye lens dosimetry (R. Kramar, A. De Vita (AREVA)); Eye lens dosimetry - workers exposure and proper radiation protection practices (I. Clairand (IRSN)); Individual neutrons dosimetry - status of existing standards (F. Queinnec (IRSN)); Complex field neutron spectroscopy: any new tool? (V. Lacoste (IRSN)); Photon mini-beams dosimetry in radiotherapy: stakes and protocols (C. Huet (IRSN)); Reference and

  9. FRET structure with non-radiative acceptor provided by dye-linker-glass surface complex and single-molecule photodynamics by TIRFM-polarized imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Mashimo, Kei; Suzuki, Tetsu; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Oda, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    We present our recent study of microscopic single-molecule imaging on the artificial complex of tetramethylrhodamine linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface, i.e. an asymmetric fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) structure with non-radiative acceptor. In the synthesis of the complex, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers to introduce rather small photodynamic difference among them. This isomeric structure change will provide more or less a distinctive photophysical change in e.g. non-radiative relaxation rate. Our recent observation at room temperatures, so far, shows that such contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the fluorescent spot intensities; broad but distinctive multi-components appear. To identify the isomeric difference as a cause of structures, some configurational assumptions are necessary. One such basic prerequisite is that the transition dipoles of the chromophores should be oriented almost parallel to the glass surface. In order to make clear the modeling, we also provide preliminary experiments on the polarization dependence of the imaging under rotating polarization in epi-illumination

  10. The fur of mammals in exposed environments; do crypsis and thermal needs necessarily conflict? The polar bear and marsupial koala compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Terence J; Webster, Koa N; Maloney, Shane K

    2014-02-01

    The furs of mammals have varied and complex functions. Other than for thermoregulation, fur is involved in physical protection, sensory input, waterproofing and colouration, the latter being important for crypsis or camouflage. Some of these diverse functions potentially conflict. We have investigated how variation in cryptic colouration and thermal features may interact in the coats of mammals and influence potential heat inflows from solar radiation, much of which is outside the visible spectral range. The coats of the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and the marsupial koala (Phascolarctus cinereus) have insulative similarities but, while they feature cryptic colouration, they are of contrasting colour, i.e. whitish and dark grey. The reflectance of solar radiation by coats was measured across the full solar spectrum using a spectroradiometer. The modulation of incident solar radiation and resultant heat flows in these coats were determined at a range of wind speeds by mounting them on a heat flux transducer/temperature-controlled plate apparatus in a wind tunnel. A lamp with a spectral distribution of radiation similar to the solar spectrum was used as a proxy for the sun. Crypsis by colour matching was apparent within the visible spectrum for the two species, U. maritimus being matched against snow and P. cinereus against Eucalyptus forest foliage. While reflectances across the full solar spectrum differed markedly, that of U. maritimus being 66 % as opposed to 10 % for P. cinereus, the heat influxes from solar radiation reaching the skin were similar. For both coats at low wind speed (1 m s(-1)), 19 % of incident solar radiation impacted as heat at the skin surface; at higher wind speed (10 m s(-1)) this decreased to approximately 10 %. Ursus maritimus and P. cinereus have high and comparable levels of fur insulation and although the patterns of reflectance and depths of penetrance of solar radiation differ for the coats, the considerable insulation limited the

  11. Investigation of innovative radiation imaging method and system for radiological environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, H. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joung, J., E-mail: jinhun.joung@nucaremed.com [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nucare, Inc., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nucare, Inc., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a novel imaging method that can be applied to most applications in the field of radiological environment imaging. It resolves either two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) distributions of radioactive sources in applications for homeland security, environmental monitoring, radiation contamination monitoring, baggage inspection, nuclear power plant monitoring, and more. The proposed imaging method uses a simple detector configured as a radiation-counting detector with spectroscopic capabilities. The detector module consists of two components: a flat field-of-view (FOV) collimator with a 30° FOV opening and a typical single-channel radiation detector made of a 2 in.×2 in. NaI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a 2 in photomultiplier tube (PMT). This simple detector module makes it possible to develop a cost-effective imaging system and provide design freedom in extending the system configuration to include one-dimensional (1D) or 2D detector-array shapes to meet the needs of various applications. One of most distinctive features of the new imaging method is that it uses only a pair of 2D projections to obtain a 3D reconstruction. The projections are measured by the proposed detector module at two positions orthogonal to one another; the measured projections are manipulated to enhance the resolution of the reconstructed 3D image. The imaging method comprises several steps performed consecutively: projection measurement, energy re-binning, projection separation, resolution and attenuation recovery, image reconstruction, and image consolidation and quantitative analysis. The resolution and attenuation recovery step provides the most distinctive and important processing by which the poor quality of projection data is enhanced. Such poor quality is mainly due to the use of a simple detector with a wide-opening flat FOV collimator. Simulation and experimental studies have been conducted to validate the proposed method. In this investigation, we

  12. Organization and operation of the sixth international symposium on the natural radiation environment (NRE VI). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogonic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits (medical x-rays and nuclear medicine), and harm (Chernobyl fallout), the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied. To facilitate the exchange of information and the review of uncertainties and scientific research priorities, a series of 5 international meetings on Natural Radiation Environment, 1963, 1987, 1991. This conference (Montreal, 1995) covers the range of natural radiation environments that give rise to human exposure and dose. This document is a program summary

  13. Addressing ecological effects of radiation on populations and ecosystems to improve protection of the environment against radiation: Agreed statements from a Consensus Symposium☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchignac, François; Oughton, Deborah; Mays, Claire; Barnthouse, Lawrence; Beasley, James C.; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Bradshaw, Clare; Brown, Justin; Dray, Stéphane; Geras’kin, Stanislav; Glenn, Travis; Higley, Kathy; Ishida, Ken; Kapustka, Lawrence; Kautsky, Ulrik; Kuhne, Wendy; Lynch, Michael; Mappes, Tapio; Mihok, Steve; Møller, Anders P.; Mothersill, Carmel; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Otaki, Joji M.; Pryakhin, Evgeny; Rhodes, Olin E.; Salbu, Brit; Strand, Per; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the output of a consensus symposium organized by the International Union of Radioecology in November 2015. The symposium gathered an academically diverse group of 30 scientists to consider the still debated ecological impact of radiation on populations and ecosystems. Stimulated by the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters’ accidental contamination of the environment, there is increasing interest in developing environmental radiation protection frameworks. Scientific research conducted in a variety of laboratory and field settings has improved our knowledge of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. However, the results from such studies sometimes appear contradictory and there is disagreement about the implications for risk assessment. The Symposium discussions therefore focused on issues that might lead to different interpretations of the results, such as laboratory versus field approaches, organism versus population and ecosystemic inference strategies, dose estimation approaches and their significance under chronic exposure conditions. The participating scientists, from across the spectrum of disciplines and research areas, extending also beyond the traditional radioecology community, successfully developed a constructive spirit directed at understanding discrepancies. From the discussions, the group has derived seven consensus statements related to environmental protection against radiation, which are supplemented with some recommendations. Each of these statements is contextualized and discussed in view of contributing to the orientation and integration of future research, the results of which should yield better consensus on the ecological impact of radiation and consolidate suitable approaches for efficient radiological protection of the environment. PMID:27058410

  14. Addressing ecological effects of radiation on populations and ecosystems to improve protection of the environment against radiation: Agreed statements from a Consensus Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchignac, François; Oughton, Deborah; Mays, Claire; Barnthouse, Lawrence; Beasley, James C; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Bradshaw, Clare; Brown, Justin; Dray, Stéphane; Geras'kin, Stanislav; Glenn, Travis; Higley, Kathy; Ishida, Ken; Kapustka, Lawrence; Kautsky, Ulrik; Kuhne, Wendy; Lynch, Michael; Mappes, Tapio; Mihok, Steve; Møller, Anders P; Mothersill, Carmel; Mousseau, Timothy A; Otaki, Joji M; Pryakhin, Evgeny; Rhodes, Olin E; Salbu, Brit; Strand, Per; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the output of a consensus symposium organized by the International Union of Radioecology in November 2015. The symposium gathered an academically diverse group of 30 scientists to consider the still debated ecological impact of radiation on populations and ecosystems. Stimulated by the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters' accidental contamination of the environment, there is increasing interest in developing environmental radiation protection frameworks. Scientific research conducted in a variety of laboratory and field settings has improved our knowledge of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. However, the results from such studies sometimes appear contradictory and there is disagreement about the implications for risk assessment. The Symposium discussions therefore focused on issues that might lead to different interpretations of the results, such as laboratory versus field approaches, organism versus population and ecosystemic inference strategies, dose estimation approaches and their significance under chronic exposure conditions. The participating scientists, from across the spectrum of disciplines and research areas, extending also beyond the traditional radioecology community, successfully developed a constructive spirit directed at understanding discrepancies. From the discussions, the group has derived seven consensus statements related to environmental protection against radiation, which are supplemented with some recommendations. Each of these statements is contextualized and discussed in view of contributing to the orientation and integration of future research, the results of which should yield better consensus on the ecological impact of radiation and consolidate suitable approaches for efficient radiological protection of the environment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Population alignment collisional radiative model for helium-like carbon. Polarization of emission lines and anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Takashi; Zhang, Honglin; Kilcrease, David P.; Csanak, George; Berrington, Keith A.

    2003-08-01

    The polarization of emission lines from a plasma carries information about the anisotropic velocity distribution of electrons in the plasma, and thus polarization spectroscopy can give information that is inaccessible by other methods. We have developed a comprehensive population-alignment collisional-radiative (PACR) model code for helium-like carbon CV ions. This code is intended to correlate quantitatively the observed polarization of emission lines from the ions in a plasma with the anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function. Specifically, the longitudinal alignment of CV triplet emission lines for the 1s2s 3 S 1 - 1s2p 3 P 1,2 ) transitions are studied by this PACR model. The predominant process which produces alignment in the 1s2p 3 P 1,2 levels is the alignment production from the ground state, 1s 21 S 1 and from the metastable level, 1s2s 3 S 1 . The alignment-production fluxes from these levels are in the opposite directions in the temperature range of practical interest, depending on the electron density n e . When n e > 10 16 m -3 , the alignment-production flux from the metastable level is larger than that from the ground state. An anisotropic electron velocity distribution function that has higher values in the axial (toroidal) direction than in the radial (poloidal) direction produces negative longitudinal alignment of the emission lines, i.e., higher intensity of the linear polarized component in the radial direction than that in the axial direction. (author)

  16. The Sub-Polar Gyre Index - a community data set for application in fisheries and environment research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berx, Barbara; Payne, Mark R.

    2017-04-01

    Scientific interest in the sub-polar gyre of the North Atlantic Ocean has increased in recent years. The sub-polar gyre has contracted and weakened, and changes in circulation pathways have been linked to changes in marine ecosystem productivity. To aid fisheries and environmental scientists, we present here a time series of the Sub-Polar Gyre Index (SPG-I) based on monthly mean maps of sea surface height. The established definition of the SPG-I is applied, and the first EOF (empirical orthogonal function) and PC (principal component) are presented. Sensitivity to the spatial domain and time series length are explored but found not to be important factors in terms of the SPG-I's interpretation. Our time series compares well with indices presented previously. The SPG-I time series is freely available online (http://dx.doi.org/10.7489/1806-1), and we invite the community to access, apply, and publish studies using this index time series.

  17. Regeneration of Little Ice Age bryophytes emerging from a polar glacier with implications of totipotency in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Farge, Catherine; Williams, Krista H; England, John H

    2013-06-11

    Across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, widespread ice retreat during the 20th century has sharply accelerated since 2004. In Sverdrup Pass, central Ellesmere Island, rapid glacier retreat is exposing intact plant communities whose radiocarbon dates demonstrate entombment during the Little Ice Age (1550-1850 AD). The exhumed bryophyte assemblages have exceptional structural integrity (i.e., setae, stem structures, leaf hair points) and have remarkable species richness (60 of 144 extant taxa in Sverdrup Pass). Although the populations are often discolored (blackened), some have developed green stem apices or lateral branches suggesting in vivo regrowth. To test their biological viability, Little Ice Age populations emerging from the ice margin were collected for in vitro growth experiments. Our results include a unique successful regeneration of subglacial bryophytes following 400 y of ice entombment. This finding demonstrates the totipotent capacity of bryophytes, the ability of a cell to dedifferentiate into a meristematic state (analogous to stem cells) and develop a new plant. In polar ecosystems, regrowth of bryophyte tissue buried by ice for 400 y significantly expands our understanding of their role in recolonization of polar landscapes (past or present). Regeneration of subglacial bryophytes broadens the concept of Ice Age refugia, traditionally confined to survival of land plants to sites above and beyond glacier margins. Our results emphasize the unrecognized resilience of bryophytes, which are commonly overlooked vis-a-vis their contribution to the establishment, colonization, and maintenance of polar terrestrial ecosystems.

  18. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  19. Ionizing radiation sources: very diversified means, multiple applications and a changing regulatory environment. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference organised by the French society of radiation protection about ionizing radiation source means, applications and regulatory environment. Twenty eight presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Overview of sources - some quantitative data from the national inventory of ionizing radiation sources (Yann Billarand, IRSN); 2 - Overview of sources (Jerome Fradin, ASN); 3 - Regulatory framework (Sylvie Rodde, ASN); 4 - Alternatives to Iridium radiography - the case of pressure devices at the manufacturing stage (Henri Walaszek, Cetim; Bruno Kowalski, Welding Institute); 5 - Dosimetric stakes of medical scanner examinations (Jean-Louis Greffe, Charleroi hospital of Medical University); 6 - The removal of ionic smoke detectors (Bruno Charpentier, ASN); 7 - Joint-activity and reciprocal liabilities - Organisation of labour risk prevention in case of companies joint-activity (Paulo Pinto, DGT); 8 - Consideration of gamma-graphic testing in the organization of a unit outage activities (Jean-Gabriel Leonard, EDF); 9 - Radiological risk control at a closed and independent work field (Stephane Sartelet, Areva); 10 - Incidents and accidents status and typology (Pascale Scanff, IRSN); 11 - Regional overview of radiation protection significant events (Philippe Menechal, ASN); 12 - Incident leading to a tritium contamination in and urban area - consequences and experience feedback (Laurence Fusil, CEA); 13 - Experience feedback - loss of sealing of a calibration source (Philippe Mougnard, Areva); 14 - Blocking incident of a 60 Co source (Bruno Delille, Salvarem); 15 - Triggering of gantry's alarm: status of findings (Philippe Prat, Syctom); 16 - Non-medical electric devices: regulatory changes (Sophie Dagois, IRSN; Jerome Fradin, ASN); 17 - Evaluation of the dose equivalent rate in pulsed fields: method proposed by the IRSN and implementation test (Laurent Donadille, IRSN

  20. Addressing ecological effects of radiation on populations and ecosystems to improve protection of the environment against radiation: Agreed statements from a Consensus Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bréchignac, François; Oughton, Deborah; Mays, Claire; Barnthouse, Lawrence; Beasley, James C.; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Bradshaw, Clare; Brown, Justin; Dray, Stéphane; Geras'kin, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the output of a consensus symposium organized by the International Union of Radioecology in November 2015. The symposium gathered an academically diverse group of 30 scientists to consider the still debated ecological impact of radiation on populations and ecosystems. Stimulated by the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters' accidental contamination of the environment, there is increasing interest in developing environmental radiation protection frameworks. Scientific research conducted in a variety of laboratory and field settings has improved our knowledge of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. However, the results from such studies sometimes appear contradictory and there is disagreement about the implications for risk assessment. The Symposium discussions therefore focused on issues that might lead to different interpretations of the results, such as laboratory versus field approaches, organism versus population and ecosystemic inference strategies, dose estimation approaches and their significance under chronic exposure conditions. The participating scientists, from across the spectrum of disciplines and research areas, extending also beyond the traditional radioecology community, successfully developed a constructive spirit directed at understanding discrepancies. From the discussions, the group has derived seven consensus statements related to environmental protection against radiation, which are supplemented with some recommendations. Each of these statements is contextualized and discussed in view of contributing to the orientation and integration of future research, the results of which should yield better consensus on the ecological impact of radiation and consolidate suitable approaches for efficient radiological protection of the environment. - Highlights: • IUR built better scientific consensus on the ecological effects of radiation. • Laboratory versus field approaches have been addressed. • Organism versus

  1. Analysis of radiation and chemical factors which define the ecological situation of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    A new method of large information set statistical analysis is proposed. It permits to define the main directions of work in a given field in the world or in a particular country, to find the most important investigated problems and to evaluate the role each of them quantitatively, as well as to study the dynamics of work development in time, the methods of research used, the centres in which this research is mostly developed, authors of publications etc. Statistical analysis may be supplemented with subject analysis of selected publications. Main factors which influence on different environment components and on public health are presented as an example of this method use, and the role of radiation and chemical factors is evaluated. 18 refs., 6 tab

  2. Lighting considerations in controlled environments for nonphotosynthetic plant responses to blue and ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    This essay will consider both physical and photobiological aspects of controlled environment lighting in the spectral region beginning in the blue and taken to the normal limit of the solar spectrum in the ultraviolet. The primary emphasis is directed to questions of plant response to sunlight. Measurement and computations used in radiation dosimetry in this part of the spectrum are also briefly treated. Because of interest in the ozone depletion problem, there has been some activity in plant UV-B research and there are several recent reviews available. Some aspects of growth chamber lighting as it relates to UV-B research were covered earlier. Apart from work related to the blue/UV-A receptor, less attention has been given to UV-A responses.

  3. Nuclear Radiation Fields on the Mars Surface: Risk Analysis for Long-term Living Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brooke M.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Qualls, Garry D.; Nealy, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Mars, our nearest planet outward from the sun, has been targeted for several decades as a prospective site for expanded human habitation. Background space radiation exposures on Mars are expected to be orders of magnitude higher than on Earth. Recent risk analysis procedures based on detailed dosimetric techniques applicable to sensitive human organs have been developed along with experimental data regarding cell mutation rates resulting from exposures to a broad range of particle types and energy spectra. In this context, simulated exposure and subsequent risk for humans in residence on Mars are examined. A conceptual habitat structure, CAD-modeled with duly considered inherent shielding properties, has been implemented. Body self-shielding is evaluated using NASA standard computerized male and female models. The background environment is taken to consist not only of exposure from incident cosmic ray ions and their secondaries, but also include the contribution from secondary neutron fields produced in the tenuous atmosphere and the underlying regolith.

  4. Lighting considerations in controlled environments for nonphotosynthetic plant responses to blue and ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, M.M.; Flint, S.D. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This essay will consider both physical and photobiological aspects of controlled environment lighting in the spectral region beginning in the blue and taken to the normal limit of the solar spectrum in the ultraviolet. The primary emphasis is directed to questions of plant response to sunlight. Measurement and computations used in radiation dosimetry in this part of the spectrum are also briefly treated. Because of interest in the ozone depletion problem, there has been some activity in plant UV-B research and there are several recent reviews available. Some aspects of growth chamber lighting as it relates to UV-B research were covered earlier. Apart from work related to the blue/UV-A receptor, less attention has been given to UV-A responses.

  5. Habitability in High Radiation Environments: The Case for Gaia at Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    In the paper of Cooper et al. (2001) we concluded, in relation to our work on magnetospheric irradiation of Europa and the other icy galilean moons of Jupiter, that 'icy satellites with significant heat, irradiation, and subsurface water resources may provide common abodes for life throughout the universe'. This expanded the original proposal of Chyba (2000) and his later works that radiolytic production of oxidants and simple hydrocarbons on Europa's icy surface could support evolution and survival of life within a Europan subsurface ocean. In the general case of icy planets and moons the radiation environment does not have to interact directly with the surface but could also provide energy for life through radiation-induced chemistry in thick atmospheres chemically coupled to icy surfaces with hydrocarbon reservoirs as on Titan. The Gaia model for Earth implies that the entire planet operates with atmospheric, geologic, and geochemical processes conducive to life. Essential requirements for Gaia are an oxidizing atmospheric environment at planetary surfaces, where oxidants like molecular oxygen are produced by radiation processes (mediated by photosynthetic chemistry on Earth but more directly produced by radiolysis on Europa), reservoirs of liquid water and hydrocarbons on or below the surface, other reduced materials in the interior, and geologic processes which drive chemical exchange between the chemically oxidized surface and reduced interior environments. At Europa a thin oxygen atmosphere is observed and arises from magnetospheric interaction, and there is much evidence for active resurfacing likely related to solid-state convection and diapiric processes within a thick crust of soft ice overlying a liquid ocean. These processes on Europa are analogous to that of the tectonic conveyer belt that continually recycles carbon, oxygen, and other essential materials for life between the atmosphere, surface, and interior on Earth. The ice crust at Europa could be

  6. DNA Radiation Environments Program: Fall 1989 2-meter box experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    1991-05-01

    This effort, sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency under the Radiation Environments Program, was carried out to obtain measured data for benchmarking MASH, the Monte Carlo Adjoint Code System. MASH was developed to replace the Vehicle Code System, VCS, that has been used by the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors inside armored vehicles and structures from nuclear weapon radiation. Free-field data were obtained at distances of 170- and 400-meters from the APR while in-box measurements were made at 400 meters only. The box, included to obtain neutron and gamma-ray reduction factors, was a 2-meter cube configuration having 0.1016-m-thick steel walls. Calculated data were obtained using MASH by analysts from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Science Applications International Corporation. Calculated (C) results were compared with experimental (E) data in terms of C/E ratios. Free-field and in-box neutron kerma generally agreed within ±20%, although some C/E comparisons fell outside this range depending upon the detector against which the calculated data were compared. For those cases where the C/E ratio is marginal or unacceptable, problems in the detector systems were acknowledged to be principal cause of the discrepancy. Generally poor agreement (∼25-35%) was achieved among the C/E ratios for the free-field gamma-ray kerma at the 170- and 400-m locations while excellent (10%, or better) C/E values were obtained for the in-box conditions. The discrepancy for the free-field comparison was attributed to the failure by the analysts to include a tree line adjacent to the measurement site in the calculational geometry. C/E values for the neutron and gamma-ray reduction factors ranged from 1% to 23% depending on the detector. 4 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs

  7. Beam test results of CMS RPCs at high eta region under high-radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S; Bahk, S Y; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kang, D H; Kang, T I; Kim, T J; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Oh, J K; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward resistivity plate chambers (RPCs) at the high eta region must be operated in presence of a radiation-induced rate as high as 1 kHz/cm**2. It is still unknown if the RPCs coated with linseed oil can be operated under such a high- radiation environment over the lifetime of CMS. Non-oiled RPCs may be one of the options since phenolic or melamine-coated bakelite is chemically stabler than linseed oil. We have constructed oiled and non-oiled RPCs at the high eta region of CMS using phenolic bakelite and tested them in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. While both RPCs show the same characteristics in the efficiency and the strip multiplicity, the non-oiled RPC generates an intrinsic noise rate of 50 Hz/cm**2, compared to only 5 Hz/cm**2 for the oiled RPC, both at 10.0kV which is about 100 V above the 95% knee of the efficiency curve.

  8. Beam test results of CMS RPCs at high eta region under high-radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.; Ahn, S.H.; Bahk, S.Y.; Hong, B.; Hong, S.J.; Kang, D.H.; Kang, T.I.; Kim, T.J.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.U.; Koo, D.G.; Lee, H.W.; Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.J.; Lim, J.K.; Moon, D.H.; Nam, S.K.; Oh, J.K.; Park, W.J.; Rhee, J.T.; Ryu, M.S.; Shim, H.H.; Sim, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward resistivity plate chambers (RPCs) at the high eta region must be operated in presence of a radiation-induced rate as high as 1kHz/cm2. It is still unknown if the RPCs coated with linseed oil can be operated under such a high-radiation environment over the lifetime of CMS. Non-oiled RPCs may be one of the options since phenolic or melamine-coated bakelite is chemically stabler than linseed oil. We have constructed oiled and non-oiled RPCs at the high eta region of CMS using phenolic bakelite and tested them in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. While both RPCs show the same characteristics in the efficiency and the strip multiplicity, the non-oiled RPC generates an intrinsic noise rate of 50Hz/cm2, compared to only 5Hz/cm2 for the oiled RPC, both at 10.0kV which is about 100V above the 95% knee of the efficiency curve

  9. Study of radiation environment at the Chernobyl' APP after the accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teplov, P.V.; Shaposhnikov, B.G.; Groshev, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results of investigation of June-December 1986 radiation environment (RE) in the area of 30-km around the Chernobyl' APP after the accident are analyzed. Long-term sampling locations data presented a picture of the entire contaminated 30-km area including a major part of populated areas, technical areas, water sources and their sediments, air, biosphere etc. During first 20-30 days after the accident RE was contributed by relatively short-lived fission products ( 131 J, 140 La). A month later radiation dose rates were indicated for 75 Zr and 95 Nb. In 1.5-2 years radioactivity and dose intensity became dependent for a while on 134 Cs and 106 Ru, and in 3-4 years the long-lived 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239 Pu will mainly contribute into radioactivity. Such picture is characteristic of the entire 30 km area. However, there are some deviations. Much attention has been paid to the state of air outside and inside the rooms of the reactor blocks scheduled for start-up, as well as the state of ponds intended for reactor cooling. 16 figs., 36 tabs

  10. The cellular environment in computer simulations of radiation-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, V.V.; Hamm, R.N.; Waker, A.J.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA single- and double-strand breaks were modeled for 660 keV photon radiation and scavenger capacity mimicking the cellular environment. Atomistic representation of DNA in B form with a first hydration shell was utilized to model direct and indirect damage. Monte Carlo generated electron tracks were used to model energy deposition in matter and to derive initial spatial distributions of species which appear in the medium following radiolysis. Diffusion of species was followed with time, and their reactions with DNA and each other were modeled in an encounter-controlled manner. Three methods to account for hydroxyl radical diffusion in cellular environment were tested: assumed exponential survival, time-limited modeling and modeling of reactions between hydroxyl radicals and scavengers in an encounter-controlled manner. Although the method based on modeling scavenging in an encounter-controlled manner is more precise, it requires substantially more computer resources than either the exponential or time-limiting method. Scavenger concentrations of 0.5 and 0.15 M were considered using exponential and encounter-controlled methods with reaction rate set at 3x10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s-1. Diffusion length and strand break yields, predicted by these two methods for the same scavenger molarity, were different by 20%-30%. The method based on limiting time of chemistry follow-up to 10 -9 s leads to DNA damage and radical diffusion estimates similar to 0.5 M scavenger concentration in the other two methods. The difference observed in predictions made by the methods considered could be tolerated in computer simulations of DNA damage. (author)

  11. Interactive visual intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas

    Radiation is omnipresent. It has many interesting applications: in medicine, where it allows curing and diagnosing patients; in communication, where modern communication systems make use of electromagnetic radiation; and in science, where it is used to discover the structure of materials; to name a few. Physically, radiation is a process in which particles or waves travel through any kind of material, usually air. Radiation can be very energetic, in which case it can break the atoms of ordinary matter (ionization). If this is the case, radiation is called ionizing. It is known that ionizing radiation can be far more harmful to living beings than non-ionizing radiation. In this dissertation, we are concerned with ionizing radiation. Naturally occurring ionizing radiation in the form of radioactivity is a most natural phenomenon. Almost everything is radioactive: there is radiation emerging from the soil, it is in the air, and the whole planet is constantly undergoing streams of energetic cosmic radiation. Sinc...

  12. Alignment of Ar{sup +} [{sup 3}P]4p{sup 2}P{sup 0}{sub 3/2} satellite state from the polarization analysis of fluorescent radiation after photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yenen, O.; McLaughlin, K.W.; Jaecks, D.H. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The measurement of the polarization of radiation from satellite states of Ar{sup +} formed after the photoionization of Ar provides detailed information about the nature of doubly excited states, magnetic sublevel cross sections and partial wave ratios of the photo-ejected electrons. Since the formation of these satellite states is a weak process, it is necessary to use a high flux beam of incoming photons. In addition, in order to resolve the many narrow doubly excited Ar resonances, the incoming photons must have a high resolution. The characteristics of the beam line 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source fulfill these requirements. The authors determined the polarization of 4765 {Angstrom} fluorescence from the Ar{sup +} [{sup 3}P] 4p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup 0} satellite state formed after photoionization of Ar by photons from the 9.0.1 beam line of ALS in the 35.620-38.261 eV energy range using a resolution of approximately 12,700. This is accomplished by measuring the intensities of the fluorescent light polarized parallel (I{parallel}) and perpendicular (I{perpendicular}) to the polarization axis of the incident synchrotron radiation using a Sterling Optics 105MB polarizing filter. The optical system placed at 90{degrees} with respect to the polarization axis of the incident light had a narrow band interference filter ({delta}{lambda}=0.3 nm) to isolate the fluorescent radiation.

  13. Study of radiosensitivity and antioxidant-oxidant state in workers exposed to ionizing radiation in the hospital environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastià, N.; Rodrigo, R.; Hervás, D.; Olivares-González, L; Óscar Alonso, O.; Marti, L.; Jambrina, E.; Sarrias, A.; Pérez-Calatayud, J.; García, T.; Gras, P.; Villaescusa, J.I.; Soriano, J.M.; León, Z.; Montoro, A.

    2014-01-01

    Prevention and protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation is an objective of particular importance from the occupational health and safety point of view. This study establishes a technique for the evaluation of the individual radiosensibility of workers exposed to ionizing radiation in the Hospital environment using the cytogenetic biomarker known as the G2 –Test. In addition, using various oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant capacity, we evaluate the antioxidant-oxidant state of these workers. Both biomarkers could be established as additional tools in the medical control of workers exposed to ionizing radiation. [es

  14. Review of problems and methods for radiation risk assessment in the environment of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, M.

    1966-01-01

    Radiation impact on the nuclear power plant environment is a very important problem which has to be solved during design and construction. Damage that could be caused by release of radioactive material into the environment should be estimated and the magnitude of nuclear and radiation risk of the power plant should be evaluated. In general the accuracy of estimation is rather poor due to statistical fluctuations of the conditions which influence radioactivity expansion in the environment, especially in the air. Different uncertainties and unresolved problems influence the inaccuracy. Since any real risk should be extremely small compared to potential risk i.e. risk induced by nuclear power plant without any safety measures, even inaccurate estimations are very useful. Method for environmental radiation risk assessment is based on relatively simple models of radiation expansion in the environment and in the air. These models are theoretically solved but they are based on relatively limited number of experimental data. Assessment of the radiation effects on the population health and mortality is an important problem [sl

  15. Radiation resistance of bacterial populations, isolated from the environment of the radiation sterilization plant type JS-6900, Debrecen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazso, L.; Igali, S.; Daroczy, E.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation resistance of bacterial populations isolated from the air of an industrial sterilization plant loaded with an activity of 250000 Ci was investigated before loading and a year after loading with 60 Co. The mean D 10 value of the 23 strains isolated before loading was 73 krad with a maximum of 173 krad. The mean D 10 value of the 26 strains isolated a year after loading was 32 krad with a maximum of 156 krad. It was not possible to detect any increase in radiation resistance of bacterial populations isolated from the irradiation room after one year of running radiation sterilization of disposable medical supplies. (author)

  16. Contribution to the study of the radiation environment in Antananarivo: Assessment of the Exposure of the Public to the Telluric X and Gamma Radiations and the Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelomanantsoa, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    The radioactivity represents among indicators of state of the environment because the man is exposed to ionizing radiations of permanent way. The knowledge of the different components of this natural radioactivity to which the humanity has always been exposed proves out to be necessary. The state of places of this radioactive environment deserves to be made for Antananarivo, the city the populated more of Madagascar. The present thesis on the 'Assessment of the Exposure of the Public to the Telluric X and Gamma Radiations and the Radon to Antananarivo' contributes to the survey of the Radioactive Environment. It is the synthesis of results of all works done in the setting of a research project that lasted three years, works constituted by more of about hundred coming down on land and by the analysis in laboratory of about hundred samples.The radioactive radiation detection, the radioactive substance characterization in the environment and the assessment of dose exposure has been done by the global counting of the X and gamma ambient radiations, of spectrometric measures on land and in laboratory and by alpha, X and gamma dosimetric measures, to the free air and inside of buildings, the day and the night. The gotten results served basis to three communications made to the National Academy of Arts, of Letters and Science, Tsimbazaza, Antananarivo in June 1998, in May 1999 and in December 2000. An evaluation of the contribution of the telluric X and gamma rays and of the radon in the yearly efficient average dose owed to natural radiation sources finishes the state of places that is going to lead to the unpublished values. [fr

  17. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  18. Effect of polarized radiative transfer on the Hanle magnetic field determination in prominences: Analysis of hydrogen H alpha line observations at Pic-du-Midi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommier, V.; Deglinnocenti, E. L.; Leroy, J. L.; Sahal-Brechot, S.

    1985-01-01

    The linear polarization of the Hydrogen H alpha line of prominences has been computed, taking into account the effect of a magnetic field (Hanle effect), of the radiative transfer in the prominence, and of the depolarization due to collisions with the surrounding electrons and protons. The corresponding formalisms are developed in a forthcoming series of papers. In this paper, the main features of the computation method are summarized. The results of computation have been used for interpretation in terms of magnetic field vector measurements from H alpha polarimetric observations in prominences performed at Pic-du-Midi coronagraph-polarimeter. Simultaneous observations in one optically thin line (He I D(3)) and one optically thick line (H alpha) give an opportunity for solving the ambiguity on the field vector determination.

  19. Estimation of Biomass Burning Emissions by Fusing Fire Radiative Power Observed from Polar-orbiting and Geostationary Satellites across the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Zhang, X.; Kondragunta, S.

    2016-12-01

    Trace gases and aerosols released from biomass burning significantly disturb the energy balance of the Earth and also degrade regional air quality. However, biomass burning emissions (BBE) have been poorly estimated using the traditional bottom-up approach because of the substantial uncertainties in the burned area and fuel loads. Recently, Fire Radiative Power (FRP) derived from satellite fire observations enables the estimation of BBE at multiple spatial scales in near real time. Nonetheless, it is very challenging to accurately produce reliable FRP diurnal cycles from either polar-orbiting satellites or geostationary satellites for the calculation of the temporally integrated FRP, Fire Radiative Energy (FRE). Here we reconstruct FRP diurnal cycles by fusing FRP observed from polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites and estimate BBE from 2011 to 2015 across the Continental United States. Specifically, FRP from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) is preprocessed and calibrated using the collocated and concurred observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over Landsat TM burn scars. The climatologically diurnal FRP curves are then calculated from the calibrated GOES FRP for the 25 Bailey's ecoregions. By fitting MODIS FRP and the calibrated GOES FRP to the climatological curves, FRP diurnal cycles are further reconstructed for individual days at a 0.25-degree grid. Both FRE estimated from FRP diurnal cycles and ecoregion specified FRE combustion rates are used to estimate hourly BBE. The estimated BBE is finally evaluated using QFED and GFED4.0 inventories and emissions modeled using Landsat TM 30m burn severities and 30m fuel loading from Fuel Characteristic Classification System. The results show that BBE estimates are greatly improved by using the reconstructed FRP diurnal cycles from high temporal (GOES) and high spatial resolution (MODIS) FRP observations.

  20. Lack of correlation of desiccation and radiation tolerance in microorganisms from diverse extreme environments tested under anoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beblo-Vranesevic, Kristina; Bohmeier, Maria; Perras, Alexandra K; Schwendner, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Cockell, Charles S; Vannier, Pauline; Marteinsson, Viggo T; Monaghan, Euan P; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Garcia-Descalzo, Laura; Gómez, Felipe; Malki, Moustafa; Amils, Ricardo; Gaboyer, Frédéric; Westall, Frances; Cabezas, Patricia; Walter, Nicolas; Rettberg, Petra

    2018-03-01

    Four facultative anaerobic and two obligate anaerobic bacteria were isolated from extreme environments (deep subsurface halite mine, sulfidic anoxic spring, mineral-rich river) in the frame MASE (Mars Analogues for Space Exploration) project. The isolates were investigated under anoxic conditions for their survivability after desiccation up to 6 months and their tolerance to ionizing radiation up to 3000 Gy. The results indicated that tolerances to both stresses are strain-specific features. Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 showed a high desiccation tolerance but its radiation tolerance was very low. The most radiation-tolerant strains were Buttiauxella sp. MASE-IM-9 and Halanaerobium sp. MASE-BB-1. In both cases, cultivable cells were detectable after an exposure to 3 kGy of ionizing radiation, but cells only survived desiccation for 90 and 30 days, respectively. Although a correlation between desiccation and ionizing radiation resistance has been hypothesized for some aerobic microorganisms, our data showed that there was no correlation between tolerance to desiccation and ionizing radiation, suggesting that the physiological basis of both forms of tolerances is not necessarily linked. In addition, these results indicated that facultative and obligate anaerobic organisms living in extreme environments possess varied species-specific tolerances to extremes.

  1. The expression revealing variation trend about radiation resistance of aromatic polymers serving in nuclear environment over absorbed dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuangying; Hu, Huasi; Hu, Guang; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    For polymeric materials applied in nuclear environment, the macroscopic properties usually remain unchanged after irradiation for several years or decades up to a threshold dose at which the deterioration of materials begins to take place. In this paper, the general radiation response of aromatic polymers is firstly reviewed and discussed. Then percolation theory is employed innovatively to elucidate the critical phenomenon over the service life for polymeric materials with high radiation resistance. For a better quantitative evaluation, a novel two-parameter radiation resistance model is proposed by the method of analogy between two nuclear-related phenomena. Six epoxy systems are employed from the published literatures to verify the novel model and the result shows that it is reliable and helpful in not only estimating the radiation damage over the service period but also multi-objective optimum design of polymeric materials.

  2. Preliminary results of the preoperational radiation survey carried out in the environs of Domiasiat, Meghalaya, India, using TL dosimetric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougaonkar, M.P.; Khan, A.H.; Puranik, V.D.; Walling, I.M.; Hoda, S.Q.

    2004-01-01

    Preoperational survey of gamma radiation levels, using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), carried out in the environs of Domiasiat, Meghalaya, where natural uranium deposits have been found, are discussed in this paper. Two gamma radiation surveys, of about two months duration each, were carried out in the region using TLDs. The natural background gamma radiation levels, in the region under survey, at 1 m height from the ground were found to be 0.17 ± 0.07 μGy h -l in the areas where the mining of uranium is proposed while the surrounding areas showed 0.16 ± 0.07 μGy h -l . This data will be useful, after the operations of uranium mining starts, to assess the impact of the operations on the radiation levels in the surrounding areas. (author)

  3. Radiation Beamline Testbeds for the Simulation of Planetary and Spacecraft Environments for Human and Robotic Mission Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas, USA, is establishing an integrated, multi-disciplinary research program on the scientific and engineering challenges faced by NASA and the international space community caused by space radiation. CRESSE focuses on space radiation research directly applicable to astronaut health and safety during future long term, deep space missions, including Martian, lunar, and other planetary body missions beyond low earth orbit. The research approach will consist of experimental and theoretical radiation modeling studies utilizing particle accelerator facilities including: 1. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory; 2. Proton Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center; and 3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically, CRESSE investigators are designing, developing, and building experimental test beds that simulate the lunar and Martian radiation environments for experiments focused on risk assessment for astronauts and instrumentation. The testbeds have been designated the Bioastronautics Experimental Research Testbeds for Environmental Radiation Nostrum Investigations and Education (BERT and ERNIE). The designs of BERT and ERNIE will allow for a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to modify experimental configurations to simulate planetary surface environments, planetary habitats, and spacecraft interiors. In the nominal configuration, BERT and ERIE will consist of a set of experimental zones that will simulate the planetary atmosphere (Solid CO2 in the case of the Martian surface.), the planetary surface, and sub-surface regions. These experimental zones can be used for dosimetry, shielding, biological, and electronic effects radiation studies in support of space exploration missions. BERT and ERNIE are designed to be compatible with the

  4. Radiation beamline testbeds for the simulation of planetary and spacecraft environments for human and robotic mission risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard

    The Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas, USA, is establishing an integrated, multi-disciplinary research program on the scientific and engineering challenges faced by NASA and the inter-national space community caused by space radiation. CRESSE focuses on space radiation research directly applicable to astronaut health and safety during future long term, deep space missions, including Martian, lunar, and other planetary body missions beyond low earth orbit. The research approach will consist of experimental and theoretical radiation modeling studies utilizing particle accelerator facilities including: 1. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory; 2. Proton Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Med-ical Center; and 3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically, CRESSE investigators are designing, developing, and building experimental test beds that simulate the lunar and Martian radiation environments for experiments focused on risk assessment for astronauts and instrumentation. The testbeds have been designated the Bioastronautics Experimental Research Testbeds for Environmental Radiation Nostrum Investigations and Education (BERT and ERNIE). The designs of BERT and ERNIE will allow for a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to modify experimental configurations to simulate planetary surface environments, planetary habitats, and spacecraft interiors. In the nominal configuration, BERT and ERIE will consist of a set of experimental zones that will simulate the planetary atmosphere (Solid CO2 in the case of the Martian surface.), the planetary surface, and sub-surface regions. These experimental zones can be used for dosimetry, shielding, biological, and electronic effects radiation studies in support of space exploration missions. BERT and ERNIE are designed to be compatible with the

  5. OPEN RADIATION: a collaborative project for radioactivity measurement in the environment by the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Allain, E.; Baumont, G.; Berthelot, N.; Clairand, I.; Couvez, C.; Darley, G.; Henry, B.; Jolivet, T.; Laroche, P.; Lebau-Livé, A.; Lejeune, V.; Miss, J.; Monange, W.; Quéinnec, F.; Richet, Y.; Simon, C.; Trompier, F.; Vayron, F.

    2017-09-01

    After the Fukushima accident, initiatives emerged from the public to carry out themselves measurements of the radioactivity in the environment with various devices, among which smartphones, and to share data and experiences through collaborative tools and social networks. Such measurements have two major interests, on the one hand, to enable each individual of the public to assess his own risk regarding the radioactivity and, on the other hand, to provide "real time" data from the field at various locations, especially in the early phase of an emergency situation, which could be very useful for the emergency management. The objective of the OPENRADIATION project is to offer to the public the opportunity to be an actor for measurements of the radioactivity in the environment using connected dosimetric applications on smartphones. The challenge is to operate such a system on a sustainable basis in peaceful time and be useful in case of emergency. In "peaceful situation", this project is based on a collaborative approach with the aim to get complementary data to the existing ones, to consolidate the radiation background, to generate alerts in case of problem and to provide education & training and enhanced pedagogical approaches for a clear understanding of measures for the public. In case of emergency situation, data will be available "spontaneously" from the field in "real time" providing an opportunity for the emergency management and the communication with the public. … The practical objective is i) to develop a website centralising data from various systems/dosimeters, providing dose maps with raw and filtered data and creating dedicated areas for specific initiatives and exchanges of data and ii) to develop a data acquisition protocol and a dosimetric application using a connected dosimeter with a bluetooth connection. This project is conducted within a partnership between organisms' representative of the scientific community and associations to create links

  6. Measurements of Channelling Radiation and its Polarization, X-Ray Excitation, together with Deviations from Landau Distributions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a continuation of the channelling experiments PS164 and WA64. The following points are investigated : \\item a)~Radiation from channelled 1 to 10 GeV/c positrons and electrons. The results clearly show that the region of 1-10 GeV/c is a very important and interesting momentum range where the onset of relativistic effects in connection with the unharmonicity of the channelling potential can give rise to very sharp pea photon spectra which could be used as a radiation source. With a detector opening angle which is large compared to 1/@g, these peaks appear sharp only on the high energy side. If, on the other hand, only forward emitted channelling radiation is detected, nearly symmetric peaks are expected to emerge. This is measured by means of a position sentitive @g-detector, consisting of an CdTe-array. Here each detector is 0.8~x~0.8~x~3~mm|3 and act as an active converter with the final shower absorbed in a large scintillator. Hereby an angular resolution of 1/3~@g around 40~@mrad is obtai...

  7. Research on the Computer System to Monitor the Physiological Parameter under Nuclear Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ji; Xie Shiyi; Ren Xiaoli; Shen Yuli

    2009-01-01

    In view of special monitoring equipment wiring complexity and not checking potential health risks currently. Methods To propose monitoring platform of automatic wearing physiology based on wireless sensor network (WSN), and nodes include multi-physiological parameter intelligent sensors such as respiration, ECG and position, movement, temperature of body. Network gateway completed the data remote transmission accurately by using GPRS communication mode. Researched simulation system developed network gateway by XT5 and nodes used punctate series sensors such as MICA2 and MICA2DOT of Crossbow Company. when experimenter wore the special monitoring the collected information of physiology and location was accurately transmitted to the monitoring point that was 500 kilometers away, thereafter terminal computer visually supervised the transmitted information of volunteers. The system stably operates at operating frequency 2.4 GHz bands, transmit power-5 dB, data rate 40 Kbps or so. The principial result shows: The located monitoring of real-time dynamic physiology was carried out for the system prototype worn on the supervisor's physical corresponding parts. The system is suitable for application in Nuclear Radiation Environment. (authors)

  8. Learning From Nature: Biomimetic Polarimetry for Imaging in Obscuring Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderLaan, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scrymgeour, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kemme, Shanalyn A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index systematically, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement in circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.

  9. Effect of Gamma Radiation to the Content of Nutrition Duck Egg Environment Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutjipto; Yohannes Sardjono

    2007-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation dose of 0.7 kGy to the content of nutrition duck egg environment sample of Turi area, Bantul Yogyakarta has been studied. This research is conducted to determine the effect of gamma radiation 0.7 kGy to the nutrition duck egg which stored during 21 days. The grouped of some fresh duck egg sample to become 2 group. First group with 0 kGy (non irradiation) and the second group with 0.7 kGy dose. The irradiation sample was conducted at Kartini reactor Beamport. After the desired dose reached, the duck egg was lifted. Both irradiated and non irradiated duck egg then stored during 21 days. The research design used is Complete Block Random Device (RABL) with pattern factorial and restating as block. First factor : Dose of Irradiation (D) : D 1 = 0 kGy (non irradiation) and D 2 = 0.7 kGy. Second factors : stored time (P) : P 1 = 0 and day of P 2 = 21 days. The analysis of water content, total protein, dissolve protein, ash and fat was carried out. The research result shows that the gamma irradiation have no significant effect to the water content, total protein, dissolve protein, ash and fat both in white and also duck egg yolk for day of 0 (P> 0.05). For storage during 21 days, gamma radiation have significant effect to the water content, total protein, dissolve protein both in white and also duck egg yolk (P 0.05), because the irradiation process do not influence the availability of mineral in egg yolk and also have no significant effect to fat content (P> 0.05), because at the protein have compound which able to kill bacterium, so-called with lysozyme, besides high protein alkalinity which do not advantage growth of bacterium, so that during storage do not happened protein lipolysis by enzyme of lipase yielded by microbe. The effect of gamma radiation to the duck egg which stored during 21 days shows that the water content at white duck egg rising to 1.02 % wb, the protein total decreasing to 0.99 % db, the dissolve protein decreasing to 0

  10. A preliminary investigation of the polar lipids in recent tropical sediments from aquatic environments at Campos dos Goytacazes, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Débora de A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The polar fractions extracted from sediments of the Imbé, Urubu, and Ururaí rivers and from Lake de Cima were analyzed using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the samples, cholest-5-en-3beta-ol, 24-methylcholest-5-en-3beta-ol, 24-ethylcholest-5-en-3beta-ol, 24-ethylcholesta-5,22-dien-3beta-ol and their 5alpha-counterparts were dominant among the sterols. Sediments of theses water bodies have the C29 sterols as the most abundant, emphasizing a higher plant input. In the Ururaí River, cholest-5-en-3beta-ol predominated, reflecting a major algal contribution. Olean-12-en-3beta-ol (beta-amyrin and friedelan-3-one were prevalent among the triterpenoids in the Imbé and the Urubu sediments, but were not detected at Lake de Cima. Samples of the Imbé and Urubu rivers contained appreciable concentrations of n-alkanols. They ranged from C14 to C32 with a maximum at C16 and with a second maximum in C28. Results of all four sediments point to a mixed contribution of higher plants and algae/zooplankton. Alkanols found in these water bodies indicate a greater contribution of higher plant material, while in sediments from the Ururaí algae/zooplankton were the main sources of the organic matter.

  11. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna, (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed. [Italian] Nel presente rapporto vengono descritte le principali caratteristiche del codice di calcolo PREMAR-2, che esegue la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione elettromagnetica nell'atmosfera, nell'intervallo di frequenza che va dall'infrarosso all'ultravioletto. Rispetto al codice PREMAR precedentemente sviluppato, il codice

  12. Composite and case study analyses of the large-scale environments associated with West Pacific Polar and subtropical vertical jet superposition events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlos, Zachary J.

    Though considerable research attention has been devoted to examination of the Northern Hemispheric polar and subtropical jet streams, relatively little has been directed toward understanding the circumstances that conspire to produce the relatively rare vertical superposition of these usually separate features. This dissertation investigates the structure and evolution of large-scale environments associated with jet superposition events in the northwest Pacific. An objective identification scheme, using NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 data, is employed to identify all jet superpositions in the west Pacific (30-40°N, 135-175°E) for boreal winters (DJF) between 1979/80 - 2009/10. The analysis reveals that environments conducive to west Pacific jet superposition share several large-scale features usually associated with East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) northerly cold surges, including the pre