WorldWideScience

Sample records for polar mixed layer

  1. Interfacial mixing in as-deposited Si/Ni/Si layers analyzed by x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debarati, E-mail: debarati@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Basu, Saibal; Singh, Surendra [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, Sumalay; Dev, Bhupendra Nath [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Room temperature diffusion in Si/Ni/Si trilayer detected through complementary x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyses of XPNR data generated the construction of the layered structure in terms of physical parameters along with alloy layers created by diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattering length density information from XPNR provided quantitative assessment of the stoichiometry of alloys formed at the Si/Ni and Ni/Si interfaces. - Abstract: Interdiffusion occurring across the interfaces in a Si/Ni/Si layered system during deposition at room temperature was probed using x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). Exploiting the complementarity of these techniques, both structural and magnetic characterization with nanometer depth resolution could be achieved. Suitable model fitting of the reflectivity profiles identified the formation of Ni-Si mixed alloy layers at the Si/Ni and Ni/Si interfaces. The physical parameters of the layered structure, including quantitative assessment of the stoichiometry of interfacial alloys, were obtained from the analyses of XRR and PNR patterns. In addition, PNR provided magnetic moment density profile as a function of depth in the stratified medium.

  2. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  3. Polarized Moessbauer transitions in mixed hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.; Tarina, D.

    1975-01-01

    A contribution to the theory of elliptical polarization in the Moessbauer effect for transitions between mixed nuclear states is reported. A relation between the two-dimensional complex vector parameterization and the photon polarization density matrix was used in describing changes in the polarization of the gamma-ray involved. (A.K.)

  4. Mixing in straight shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed in a liquid plane mixing layer to extract the probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction of a passive scalar across the layer. Three Reynolds number (Re) cases were studied, 10,000, 33,000 and 90,000, with Re based on velocity difference and visual thickness. The results show that a non-marching pdf (central hump invariant from edge to edge of the layer) exists for Re = 10,000 but that a marching type pdf characterizes the Re = 33,000 and Re = 90,000 cases. For all cases, a broad range of mixture fraction values is found at each location across the layer. Streamwise and spanwise ramps across the layer, and structure-to-structure variation were observed and are believed to be responsible for the above behavior of the composition field. Tripping the boundary layer on the high-speed side of the splitter plate for each of the above three cases resulted in increased three-dimensionality and a change in the composition field. Average and average mixed fluid compositions are reported for all cases.

  5. Layer-by-layer magnetometry of polarizing supermirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Ruecker, U; Toperverg, B; Brueckel, T; Ott, F

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the remagnetization behaviour of remanent polarizing supermirrors by polarized neutron reflectometry. Such a mirror can be remagnetized in a magnetic field of 30 mT. It is shown, that at lower fields, the mirror is not completely remagnetized, but the magnetization of the thinner layers can be flipped more easily than the magnetization of the thicker layers. With polarized neutron reflectometry, we are able to find out exactly how many layers are magnetized parallel and how many are magnetized antiparallel to the external field. Furthermore, information about structural and magnetic imperfections (roughness, domain formation) is available. (orig.)

  6. Hybrid fluorescent layer emitting polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadimasoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanorods have anisotropic absorption and emission properties. In this work a hybrid luminescent layer is produced based on a mixture of CdSe/CdS nanorods dispersed in a liquid crystal that is aligned by an electric field and polymerized by UV illumination. The film emits light with polarization ratio 0.6 (polarization contrast 4:1. Clusters of nanorods in liquid crystal can be avoided by applying an AC electric field with sufficient amplitude. This method can be made compatible with large-scale processing on flexible transparent substrates. Thin polarized light emitters can be used in LCD backlights or solar concentrators to increase the efficiency.

  7. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 3. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model - An example from Arabian Sea and equatorial Pacific. S Nakamoto S Prasanna Kumar J M Oberhuber H Saito K Muneyama R Frouin.

  8. Martian Mixed Layer during Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G. M.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.

    2008-09-01

    In situ measurements of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (MPBL) encompass only the sur- face layer. Therefore, in order to fully address the MPBL, it becomes necessary to simulate somehow the behaviour of the martian mixed layer. The small-scale processes that happen in the MPBL cause GCM's ([1], [2]) to describe only partially the turbulent statistics, height, convective scales, etc, of the surface layer and the mixed layer. For this reason, 2D and 3D martian mesoscale models ([4], [5]), and large eddy simulations ([4], [6], [7], [8]) have been designed in the last years. Although they are expected to simulate more accurately the MPBL, they take an extremely expensive compu- tational time. Alternatively, we have derived the main turbu- lent characteristics of the martian mixed layer by using surface layer and mixed layer similarity ([9], [10]). From in situ temperature and wind speed measurements, together with quality-tested simu- lated ground temperature [11], we have character- ized the martian mixed layer during the convective hours of Pathfinder mission Sol 25. Mean mixed layer turbulent statistics like tem- perature variance , horizontal wind speed variance , vertical wind speed variance , viscous dissipation rate , and turbu- lent kinetic energy have been calculated, as well as the mixed layer height zi, and the convective scales of wind w? and temperature θ?. Our values, obtained with negligible time cost, match quite well with some previously obtained results via LES's ([4] and [8]). A comparisson between the above obtained mar- tian values and the typical Earth values are shown in Table 1. Convective velocity scale w doubles its counterpart terrestrial typical value, as it does the mean wind speed variances and . On the other hand, the temperature scale θ? and the mean temperature variance are virtually around one order higher on Mars. The limitations of these results concern the va- lidity of the convective mixed layer similarity. This theory

  9. Polarization volume holograms in layers of polymethylmethacrylate with phenanthrenequinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmysh, D. N.; Mahilny, U. V.

    2013-11-01

    Polarization volume holograms are recorded in the polymethylmethacrylate layers that contain phenanthrenequinone at a molar content of 2.5-3%. The effect of the polarization of recording beams on the kinetics of diffraction efficiency and properties of holograms is analyzed. Polarization hologram recording in the polymethylmethacrylate layers with phenanthrenequinone and a relatively high optical stability of the holograms are demonstrated.

  10. Ultra-thin, single-layer polarization rotator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, T. V.; Truong, V. V., E-mail: Truong.Vo-Van@Concordia.Ca [Department of Physics, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, H4B 1R6 (Canada); Do, P. A.; Haché, A. [Département de Physique et d’Astronomie, Université de Moncton, Moncton, New Brunswick, E1A 3E9 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate light polarization control over a broad spectral range by a uniform layer of vanadium dioxide as it undergoes a phase transition from insulator to metal. Changes in refractive indices create unequal phase shifts on s- and p-polarization components of incident light, and rotation of linear polarization shows intensity modulation by a factor of 10{sup 3} when transmitted through polarizers. This makes possible polarization rotation devices as thin as 50 nm that would be activated thermally, optically or electrically.

  11. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  12. Ultra-thin, single-layer polarization rotator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Son

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate light polarization control over a broad spectral range by a uniform layer of vanadium dioxide as it undergoes a phase transition from insulator to metal. Changes in refractive indices create unequal phase shifts on s- and p-polarization components of incident light, and rotation of linear polarization shows intensity modulation by a factor of 103 when transmitted through polarizers. This makes possible polarization rotation devices as thin as 50 nm that would be activated thermally, optically or electrically.

  13. Mixed convection in fluid superposed porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, John M

    2017-01-01

    This Brief describes and analyzes flow and heat transport over a liquid-saturated porous bed. The porous bed is saturated by a liquid layer and heating takes place from a section of the bottom. The effect on flow patterns of heating from the bottom is shown by calculation, and when the heating is sufficiently strong, the flow is affected through the porous and upper liquid layers. Measurements of the heat transfer rate from the heated section confirm calculations. General heat transfer laws are developed for varying porous bed depths for applications to process industry needs, environmental sciences, and materials processing. Addressing a topic of considerable interest to the research community, the brief features an up-to-date literature review of mixed convection energy transport in fluid superposed porous layers.

  14. Layered magnets: polarized neutron reflection studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel, H.; Schreyer, A. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik/Festkoerperphysik, Bochum (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectivity measurements from extended surfaces, thin films and superlattices provide information on the chemical profile parallel to the film normal, including film thicknesses, average composition and interfacial roughness parameters. Reflectivity measurements with polarized neutrons are particularly powerful for analyzing the magnetic density profiles in thin films and superlattices in addition to chemical profiles. The basic theory of polarized neutron reflectivity is provided, followed by some examples and more recent applications concerning polarized neutron reflectivity studies from exchange coupled Fe/Cr superlattices. (author) 5 figs., 13 refs.

  15. Parsing polarization squeezing into Fock layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Christian R.; Madsen, Lars Skovgaard; Klimov, Andrei B.

    2016-01-01

    photon number do the methods coincide; when the photon number is indefinite, we parse the state in Fock layers, finding that substantially higher squeezing can be observed in some of the single layers. By capitalizing on the properties of the Husimi Q function, we map this notion onto the Poincare space......, providing a full account of the measured squeezing....

  16. Linear stability analysis of interactions between mixing layer and boundary layer flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjun LIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The linear instabilities of incompressible confluent mixing layer and boundary layer were analyzed. The mixing layers include wake, shear layer and their combination. The mean velocity profile of confluent flow is taken as a superposition of a hyperbolic and exponential function to model a mixing layer and the Blasius similarity solution for a flat plate boundary layer. The stability equation of confluent flow was solved by using the global numerical method. The unstable modes associated with both the mixing and boundary layers were identified. They are the boundary layer mode, mixing layer mode 1 (nearly symmetrical mode and mode 2 (nearly anti-symmetrical mode. The interactions between the mixing layer stability and the boundary layer stability were examined. As the mixing layer approaches the boundary layer, the neutral curves of the boundary layer mode move to the upper left, the resulting critical Reynolds number decreases, and the growth rate of the most unstable mode increases. The wall tends to stabilize the mixing layer modes at low frequency. In addition, the mode switching behavior of the relative level of the spatial growth rate between the mixing layer mode 1 and mode 2 with the velocity ratio is found to occur at low frequency.

  17. Effects of Thermobaricity on Coupled Ice-Mixed Layer Thermodynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roth, Mathias

    2003-01-01

    .... This density structure often leads to entrainment and affects both the mixed layer depth and the ice thickness, Thermobaricity, the combined dependence of seawater thermal expansion on temperature...

  18. Photo-polarimetric sensitivities to layering and mixing of absorbing aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kalashnikova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate to what extent multi-angle polarimetric measurements are sensitive to vertical mixing/layering of absorbing aerosols, adopting calibration uncertainty of 1.5% in intensity and 0.5% in the degree of linear polarization of Multiangle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager (MSPI. Employing both deterministic and Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes with polarization, we conduct modeling experiments to determine how the measured Stokes vector elements are affected at UV and short visible wavelengths by the vertical distribution, mixing and layering of smoke and dust aerosols for variety of microphysical parameters. We find that multi-angular polarimetry holds the potential to infer dust-layer heights and thicknesses at blue visible channel due to its lesser sensitivity to changes in dust coarse mode optical properties, but higher sensitivity to the dust vertical profiles. Our studies quantify requirements for obtaining simultaneous information on aerosol layer height and absorption under MSPI measurement uncertainties.

  19. Variability of the Mixed-Layer Height Over Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Franco, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Bezanilla, A.; Ruiz-Angulo, A.; Grutter, M.

    2018-02-01

    The diurnal and seasonal variability of the mixed-layer height in urban areas has implications for ground-level air pollution and the meteorological conditions. Measurements of the backscatter of light pulses with a commercial lidar system were performed for a continuous period of almost six years between 2011 and 2016 in the southern part of Mexico City. The profiles were temporally and vertically smoothed, clouds were filtered out, and the mixed-layer height was determined with an ad hoc treatment of both the filtered and unfiltered profiles. The results are in agreement when compared with values of mixed-layer height reconstructed from, (i) radiosonde data, and (ii) surface and vertical column densities of a trace gas. The daily maxima of the mean mixed-layer height reach values > 3 km above ground level in the months of March-April, and are clearly lower (pollution episodes and the height of the mixed layer. The growth rate of the convective mixed-layer height has a seasonal behaviour, which is characterized together with the mixed-layer-height anomalies. A clear residual layer is evident from the backscattered signals recorded in days with specific atmospheric conditions, but also from the cloud-filtered mean diurnal profiles. The occasional presence of a residual layer results in an overestimation of the reported mixed-layer height during the night and early morning hours.

  20. Applied model for the growth of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1991-01-01

    A slab model is proposed for developing the height of the mixed layer capped by stable air aloft. The model equations are closed by relating the consumption of energy (potential and kinetic) at the top of the mixed layer to the production of convective and mechanical turbulent kinetic energy with...

  1. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyren, K.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    A method to construct a nomogram of the daytime mixed-layer-height evolution is presented. The nomogram will be specific for a given location and land surface type and is intended to be an easy tool to achieve a general understanding of mixed-layer behaviour. Also it is a pedagogical graphical on...

  2. Numerical modelling of the atmospheric mixing-layer diurnal evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnary, L. de.

    1990-03-01

    This paper introduce a numeric procedure to determine the temporal evolution of the height, potential temperature and mixing ratio in the atmospheric mixing layer. The time and spatial derivatives were evaluated via forward in time scheme to predict the local evolution of the mixing-layer parameters, and a forward in time, upstream in space scheme to predict the evolution of the mixing-layer over a flat region with a one-dimensional advection component. The surface turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat were expressed using a simple sine wave that is function of the hour day and kind of the surface (water or country). (author) [pt

  3. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    ing solar radiation is trapped due to phytoplankton at upper layers (from surface to 35m), while the lower layers (from 65m to 80m) does not receive the same solar energy as before the chlorophyll blooming in the previous month. In the equatorial Pacific where horizontal advec- tion effect is important, the effect of chlorophyll.

  4. Temperature Versus Salinity Gradients Below the Ocean Mixed Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    13] The effects of density compensated gradients below the mixed layer are not limited to ocean circulation and cli- mate. Since sound speed and...The Impact of Spice on Ocean circulation . The second is the 6.2 program element 62435N Full Column Mixing for Numerical Ocean Models. The authors would...and F. Paparella (2003), Compensation and alignment of thermohaline gradients in the ocean mixed layer, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 33, 2214–2223, doi

  5. Sound generation in coflow and counterflow mixing layers

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ge; Gloerfelt, Xavier; Robinet, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    National audience; In this study, nonlinear disturbance equations are solved in two and three dimensions to investigate the sound generated by compressible plane mixing layers. Two flow regimes are distinguished : coflow and counterflow mixing layers. The simulations of coflow shear layers has been carried out in two- and threedimensions. In both cases, the main radiation is attributed to the pairing events leading to a quadrupolar signature. The convective nature of the flow is conform with ...

  6. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are fewer,

  7. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are

  8. PIV measurement of turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives was experimentally investigated by PIV in present paper. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number for pure water case based on the velocity differences of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges from 14667∼73333. Flow field and turbulent quantities of turbulent mixing layer with 200ppm polymer additives were measured and compared with pure water mixing layer flow. It is shown that the dynamic development of mixing layer is greatly influenced by polymer addictives. The smaller vortices are eliminated and the coherent structure is much clearer. Similar with pure water case, Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central part of mixing layer and the width will increase with the Reynolds number increasing. However, compared with pure water case, the coniform width of polymer additives case is larger, which means the polymer additives will lead to the diffusion of coherent structure. The peak value of vorticity in different cross section will decrease with the development of mixing layer. Compared with pure water case, the vorticity is larger at the beginning of the mixing layer but decreases faster in the case with polymer additives.

  9. The salinity effect in a mixed layer ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A model of the thermally mixed layer in the upper ocean as developed by Kraus and Turner and extended by Denman is further extended to investigate the effects of salinity. In the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean rapid increases in salinity occur at the bottom of a uniformly mixed surface layer. The most significant effects produced by the inclusion of salinity are the reduction of the deepening rate and the corresponding change in the heating characteristics of the mixed layer. If the net surface heating is positive, but small, salinity effects must be included to determine whether the mixed layer temperature will increase or decrease. Precipitation over tropical oceans leads to the development of a shallow stable layer accompanied by a decrease in the temperature and salinity at the sea surface.

  10. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are fewer, and seldom systematic. The aim of this investigation is to contribute to a deeper understanding of the subject, in order to explore opportunities to apply the acquired knowledge to the fabrication...

  11. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyren, K. [Ericsson EriSoft AB, Umeaa (Sweden); Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We present a nomogram that provide information about the general behaviour of the mixed layer at a given location. The nomogram is meant to be a practical and easy to use tool to determine the height of the mixed layer for i.e. weather forecaster, air pollution studies and planning of meteorological experiments. Use of the nomogram is restricted to flat, relatively homogeneous terrain. Inhomogeneous terrain with patch scales of 10 km or more might create organised circulation like i.e. lake breezes. The data represented in the nomogram is computed using a meteorological preprocessor and climatological temperature data for the location. The nomogram is simplified but retain main physical processes that control the evolution of the mixed layer and can be easily constructed for any chosen location on land. Nomogram of the mixed layer behavior at the location of Cabauw, the Netherlands is shown and discussed. (au)

  12. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi / h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increases. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggests that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional h

  13. Constitutive behaviour of mixed mode loaded adhesive layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, J.L.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Stigh, U.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed mode testing of adhesive layer is performed with the Mixed mode double Cantilever Bean? specimen. During the experiments, the specimens are loaded by transversal and/or shear forces; seven different mode mixities are tested. The J-integral is used to evaluate the energy dissipation...... in the failure process zone. The constitutive behaviour of the adhesive layer is obtained by a so called inverse method and fitting an existing mixed mode cohesive model, which uses a coupled formulation to describe a mode dependent constitutive behaviour. The cohesive parameters are determined by optimizing...

  14. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM.

  15. Electrically Rotatable Polarizer Using One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Nematic Liquid Crystal Defect Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryotaro Ozaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarization characteristics of defect mode peaks in a one-dimensional (1D photonic crystal (PC with a nematic liquid crystal (NLC defect layer have been investigated. Two different polarized defect modes are observed in a stop band. One group of defect modes is polarized along the long molecular axis of the NLC, whereas another group is polarized along its short axis. Polarizations of the defect modes can be tuned by field-induced in-plane reorientation of the NLC in the defect layer. The polarization properties of the 1D PC with the NLC defect layer is also investigated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation.

  16. Discovery of araneiforms outside of the South Polar Layered Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Aye, K.-Michael; Portyankina, Ganna; Hansen, Candice; Lintott, Chris J.; Allen, Campbell; Allen, Sarah; Calef, Fred J.; Duca, Simone; McMaster, Adam; R. M Miller, Grant

    2017-10-01

    Mars' south polar region is sculpted by the seasonal cycle of freezing and thawing of exposed carbon dioxide (CO2) ice. In the Southern Spring, CO2 jets loft dust and dirt through cracks in the sublimating CO2 ice sheet to the surface where winds blow the material into the hundreds of thousands of dark fans observed from orbit. During this seasonal process, it is thought that the CO2 gas also exploits weaknesses in the surface below the ice sheet to carve dendritic channels known as araneiforms. Planet Four: Terrains (http://terrains.planetfour.org) is a citizen science project enlisting the general public to review ~6 m/pixel resolution Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) subimages to identify: (1) araneiforms (including features with a central pit and radiating channels known as ‘spiders’) (2) erosional depressions, troughs, mesas, ridges, and quasi-circular pits characteristic of the South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) which we collectively refer to as ‘Swiss cheese terrain’, and (3) craters.We provide an overview of Planet Four: Terrains and discuss the distributions of our high confidence classic spider araneiforms and Swiss cheese terrain identifications in CTX images covering 11% of the South polar regions at latitudes ≤ -75 degrees N. Previously spiders were reported as being confined to the South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLD). We present the first identification of araneiforms at locations outside of the SPLD and discuss the implications for the CO2 jet hypothesis.Acknowledgements: This work uses data generated via the Zooniverse.org platform, development of which was supported by a Global Impact Award from Google, and by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. We also thank the HIRSE and MRO Teams for their help in scheduling and acquiring our requested observations.

  17. Layered mixing on the New England Shelf in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Greenan, Blair J. W.; Lu, Youyu; Oakey, Neil S.; Shaw, William J.

    2014-09-01

    The layered structure of stratification and mixing on the New England Shelf (NES) in summer is examined by analyzing a comprehensive set of observations of hydrography, currents and turbulence. A clear distinction in mixing characteristics between the midcolumn water (consisting of subsurface stratification, middepth weak stratification and lower-layer stratification) and a well-mixed bottom boundary layer (BBL) is revealed. The combination of subtidal Ekman onshore bottom transport and cross-shore density gradient created a lower-layer stratification that inhibited the upward extension of the BBL turbulence. The BBL mixing was related to strong shear generated by bottom stress, and the magnitude and periodic variation of BBL mixing was determined by both the tidal and subtidal flows. Mixing in the midcolumn water occurred under stably stratified conditions and showed correspondence with the occurrence of near-inertial and semidiurnal internal waves. Positive correlations between buoyancy frequency squared (N2) and shear variance (S2), S2 and dissipation rate (ɛ), N2 and ɛ are established in the midcolumn, but not in the BBL. The midcolumn ɛ was reasonably described by a slightly modified MacKinnon-Gregg (MG) model.

  18. Nonlinear Stability and Structure of Compressible Reacting Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M. J.; Mansour, N. N.; Reynolds, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used to investigate issues of nonlinear flow development and mixing in compressible reacting shear layers. Particular interest is placed on investigating the change in flow structure that occurs when compressibility and heat release are added to the flow. These conditions allow the 'outer' instability modes- one associated with each of the fast and slow streams-to dominate over the 'central', Kelvin-Helmholtz mode that unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting mixing layers. Analysis of scalar probability density functions in flows with dominant outer modes demonstrates the ineffective, one-sided nature of mixing that accompany these flow structures. Colayer conditions, where two modes have equal growth rate and the mixing layer is formed by two sets of vortices, offer some opportunity for mixing enhancement. Their extent, however, is found to be limited in the mixing layer's parameter space. Extensive validation of the PSE technique also provides a unique perspective on central- mode vortex pairing, further supporting the view that pairing is primarily governed perspective sheds insight on how linear stability theory is able to provide such an accurate prediction of experimentally-observed, fully nonlinear flow phenomenon.

  19. Instability and mixing in interacting stratified shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, W. T.; Caulfield, C. P.

    2003-11-01

    Often in geophysical fluid flows, a stratified shear flow undergoes a transition to turbulence, leading to markedly enhanced mixing of the fluid parcels, and deceleration of the forcing shear flow. Such mixing events generically lead to the development of a layered density distribution, with deep layers of relatively well-mixed fluid separated by relatively thin interfaces of strong density gradient. There are certain circumstances in which re-intensification of the shear by the external forcing is initially localized in the vicinity of the strong density gradient interfaces. We consider numerically the behaviour of a simple example of such flows, where a relatively deep well-mixed layer is bordered by two thin interfaces of stronger density gradient, each of which is subject to a localized velocity shear. We find that the stability and subsequent behaviour of such flows are qualitatively and quantitatively dependent on the overall stratification. Sufficiently strongly stratified flows lead to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and associated mixing events which remain localized in the vicinity of the interfaces, while weaker stratification allows for intense interaction across the interior well-mixed layer.

  20. Velocity fields in mixing-enhanced compressible shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeya; Mungal, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Planar velocity fields of mixing-enhanced compressible planar shear layers are measured via particle image velocimetry (PIV) in order to investigate the mechanism of mixing enhancement by sub-boundary-layer triangular disturbances. The measurements are conducted at convective Mach numbers, M_{{c}}, of 0.62 and 0.24 to examine compressibility effects on effectiveness of the mixing enhancement technique. Instantaneous side- and plan-view vector maps of the shear layers are obtained, and turbulence statistical quantities are derived from the instantaneous velocity data. Schlieren and planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS) techniques are also used to measure the shear-layer thickness and growth rate as well as surveying the qualitative flow fields. The velocity fields for several disturbance configurations with different shape, size, or thickness are compared in terms of the shear-layer thickness and growth rate in order to investigate the effects of the configuration variation on the mixing enhancement strategy. Configuration parameters include thickness, the semi-vertex angle of the triangular disturbance, and the streamwise offset of the disturbance from the splitter tip. The measured transverse profile of the mean streamwise velocity shows a characteristic shape with triple inflection points for the effective mixing-enhanced cases at the two different compressibility conditions, while periodic inflection points are observed in the spanwise direction. A pair of stationary counter-rotating streamwise vortices introduced by the subboundary-layer disturbances are also observed, even in the fully developed region of the shear layers. At M_{{c}} {=} 0.62, it is found that in successfully enhanced cases, regardless of the disturbance configurations, the present mixing-enhancement strategy has the effect of increasing the turbulence intensity and Reynolds stress, and suppressing the turbulence anisotropy increase with increasing compressibility, i.e. alleviating the

  1. Transition and mixing in layered stratified shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, C. P.

    2001-11-01

    Flows with step-wise density distributions, i.e. well-mixed layers of fluid separated by narrow regions of high density gradient, are common in geophysics. We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at a moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that the flow may be unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these "Taylor waves" at finite amplitude through 3D nonlinear numerical simulations. We follow the development of primary and secondary instabilities which contribute to the eventual breakdown of the layered flow. In particular, we are interested in the mixing properties of the flow as it undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  2. Thin TaC layer produced by ion mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barna, Árpád; Kotis, László; Pécz, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Ion-beam mixing in C/Ta layered systems was investigated. C 8nm/Ta 12nm and C 20nm/Ta 19nm/C 20nm layer systems were irradiated by Ga+ ions of energy in the range of 2–30keV. In case of the 8nm and 20nm thick C cover layers applying 5–8keV and 20–30keV Ga+ ion energy, respectively resulted...... in strongly asymmetric ion mixing; the carbon was readily transported to the Ta layer, while the reverse process was much weaker. Because of the asymmetrical transport the C/TaC interface remained sharp independently from the applied fluence. The carbon transported to the Ta layer formed Ta......Cx. The stoichiometry of the carbide produced varied along the depth. The TaCx layer contained implanted Ga, the concentration of which decreased with increasing depth. The thickness of the TaCx layer could be tailored by the ion fluence and energy making possible to produce coating layer of desired thickness....

  3. Mixing layers and coherent structures in vegetated aquatic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2002-02-01

    To date, flow through submerged aquatic vegetation has largely been viewed as perturbed boundary layer flow, with vegetative drag treated as an extension of bed drag. However, recent studies of terrestrial canopies demonstrate that the flow structure within and just above an unconfined canopy more strongly resembles a mixing layer than a boundary layer. This paper presents laboratory measurements, obtained from a scaled seagrass model, that demonstrate the applicability of the mixing layer analogy to aquatic systems. Specifically, all vertical profiles of mean velocity contained an inflection point, which makes the flow susceptible to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. This instability leads to the generation of large, coherent vortices within the mixing layer (observed in the model at frequencies between 0.01 and 0.11 Hz), which dominate the vertical transport of momentum through the layer. The downstream advection of these vortices is shown to cause the progressive, coherent waving of aquatic vegetation, known as the monami. When the monami is present, the turbulent vertical transport of momentum is enhanced, with turbulent stresses penetrating an additional 30% of the plant height into the canopy.

  4. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model - An example from Arabian Sea and Equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.

    and supported by quasi-steady upwelling. Remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) are used to investigate the chlorophyll modulation of ocean mixed layer thermodynamics in a bulk mixed-layer model, embedded...

  5. The Total Energy Flux Leaving the Ocean's Mixed Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rimac, Antonija; von Storch, Jin-Song; Eden, Carsten

    The total energy flux leaving the ocean’s spatially and seasonally varying mixed layer is estimated using a global ⅝1/10° ocean general circulation model. From the total wind-power input of 3.33 TW into near-inertial waves (0.35 TW), subinertial fluctuations (0.87 TW), and the time-mean circulation

  6. Mixed-layer carbon cycling at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Cronin, Meghan F.; Sutton, Adrienne J.

    2017-02-01

    Seven years of data from the NOAA Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) surface mooring, located in the North Pacific Ocean carbon sink region, were used to evaluate drivers of mixed-layer carbon cycling. A time-dependent mass balance approach relying on two carbon tracers was used to diagnostically evaluate how surface ocean processes influence mixed-layer carbon concentrations over the annual cycle. Results indicate that the annual physical carbon input is predominantly balanced by biological carbon uptake during the intense spring bloom. Net annual gas exchange that adds carbon to the mixed layer and the opposing influence of net precipitation that dilutes carbon concentrations make up smaller contributions to the annual mixed-layer carbon budget. Decomposing the biological term into annual net community production (aNCP) and calcium carbonate production (aCaCO3) yields 7 ± 3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aNCP and 0.5 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aCaCO3, giving an annually integrated particulate inorganic carbon to particulate organic carbon production ratio of 0.07 ± 0.05, as a lower limit. Although we find that vertical physical processes dominate carbon input to the mixed layer at KEO, it remains unclear how horizontal features, such as eddies, influence carbon production and export by altering nutrient supply as well as the depth of winter ventilation. Further research evaluating linkages between Kuroshio Extension jet instabilities, eddy activity, and nutrient supply mechanisms is needed to adequately characterize the drivers and sensitivities of carbon cycling near KEO.

  7. Density Effects on Incompressible Shear-Driven Mixing Layer Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Jon; Livescu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Our preliminary simulations of shear-driven turbulent mixing layers involving two streams of fluids with different densities have revealed that the growth rates of mixing layer thickness are reduced when the density difference is increased, even in the absence of high-speed effects. To assess a wide range of densities, we have performed a suite of incompressible temporal Direct Numerical Simulations involving two miscible fluids, with Atwood numbers of up to 0.87. Large domains involving up to 6144 x 2048 x 1536 points provide accurate statistics of growth and budgets. For the variable density case, there is no unique definition of the layer thickness (e.g., momentum thickness may defined traditionally or on a per-mass basis). Yet, the thickness definition used can substantially affect the growth rate change due to density effects. We analyze the equations describing the growth rates and relate density effects to asymmetries that develop in the flow with increasing Atwood number. Most importantly, mixing layers are found to grow preferentially towards the lower-density stream, which has significant implications for the momentum balance.

  8. Monolayers and mixed-layers on copper towards corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinapi, F. [Fonds pour la Formation a la Recherche dans l' Industrie et dans l' Agriculture, Rue d' Egmont 5, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Julien, S.; Auguste, D.; Hevesi, L.; Delhalle, J. [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur, FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mekhalif, Z. [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur, FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: zineb.mekhalif@fundp.ac.be

    2008-05-01

    In order to improve the protection abilities of (3-mercaptopropy)trimethoxysilane (MPTS) self-assembled monolayers on copper surfaces, mixed monolayers have been formed successfully by successive immersions in MPTS and in n-dodecanethiol (DT). A newly synthesised molecule, (11-mercaptoundecyl)trimethoxysilane (MUTS), has also been employed to form a thicker organic film on copper surfaces and, thereby, enhance the inhibitory action of the coating. The grafting has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), polarization modulation infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and water contact angle. The protective efficiency of each protective organic film has been evidenced by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and polarization curve measurements (CP). It was shown that the MUTS and unhydrolyzed MPTS/DT films exhibited significant corrosion protection properties.

  9. Polar self-assembly: steric effects leading to polar mixed-ligand coordination cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianyong; Miller, Philip W; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; James, Stuart L

    2006-03-08

    We present a highly unusual example of self-assembly, specifically a polar, mixed-ligand cage which forms in preference to symmetrical homo-ligand products, and which suggests that steric effects can be exploited to obtain novel non-uniform polyhedral cages. In particular, reaction between the bulky tripodal triphosphine 2,4,6-tris(diphenylphosphino)triazine, L1, the non-bulky tripodal trinitrile 2,4,6-tris(cyanomethyl)trimethylbenzene, L2 and silver hexafluoroantimonate, AgSbF6, in a 3:1:4 ratio gives the mixed-ligand aggregate [Ag4(L1)3(L2)(SbF6)]3+, 1-SbF6, instantly as the only product in quantitative yield. The X-ray crystal structure of complex 1-SbF6 is consistent with the suspected solution-state structure. The cage derives from trigonal-pyramidal geometry, the basal vertices of which are defined by three bulky triphosphines, L1, and the apical vertex by the non-bulky trinitrile, L2. There is apical elongation amounting to 19% in comparison to the ideal uniform tetrahedron. The cage also encapsulates an SbF6 anion. 19F NMR spectra in solution for the analogous PF6 complex [Ag4(L1)3(L2)(PF6)]3+, 1-PF6, confirm that one anion is also encapsulated in solution. The synthesis of the analogous CF3SO3(-) complex, [Ag4(L1)3(L2)(OTf)]3+, 1-OTf, in solution is also described, although 1-PF6 and 1-OTf could not be isolated due to slow decomposition in solution. The selective formation of these mixed-ligand cages is discussed in terms of ligand-ligand and ligand-included anion steric repulsions, which we propose prevent the formation of the competing hypothetical homo-ligand tetrahedral structure [Ag4(L1)4(SbF6)]3+, and thus favour the mixed ligand cage. "Cage cone angles" for L1 and L2 are estimated at 115 degrees and 101 degrees, respectively. Variable-temperature 31P NMR spectroscopy shows that complex 1-SbF6 and the related previously reported partial tetrahedral complex [Ag4(L1)3(anion)]3+ undergo dynamic twisting processes in solution between enantiomeric C3

  10. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  11. Aspects of turbulent-shear-layer dynamics and mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slessor, Michael David

    Experiments have been conducted in the GALCIT Supersonic Shear Layer Facility to investigate some aspects of high-Reynolds-number, turbulent, shear-layer flows in both incompressible- and compressible-flow regimes. Experiments designed to address several issues were performed; effects of inflow boundary conditions, freestream conditions (supersonic/subsonic flow), and compressibility, on both large-scale dynamics and small-scale mixing, are described. Chemically-reacting and non-reacting flows were investigated, the former relying on the (Hsb2 + NO)/Fsb2 chemical system, in the fast-kinetic regime, to infer the structure and amount of molecular-scale mixing through use of "flip" experiments. A variety of experimental techniques, including a color-schlieren visualization system developed as part of this work, were used to study the flows. Both inflow conditions and compressibility are found to have significant effects on the flow. In particular, inflow conditions are "remembered" for long distances downstream, a sensitivity similar to that observed in low-dimensionality, non-linear (chaotic) systems. The global flowfields (freestreams coupled by the shear layer) of transonic flows exhibit a sensitivity to imposed boundary conditions, a.e., local area ratios. A previously-proposed mode-selection rule for turbulent-structure convection speeds, based on the presence of a lab-frame subsonic freestream, was experimentally demonstrated to be incorrect. Compressibility, when decoupled from ail other parameters, e.g., Reynolds number, velocity and density ratios, etc., reduces large-scale entrainment and turbulent growth, but slightly enhances small-scale mixing, with an associated change in the structure of the molecularly-mixed fluid. This reduction in shear-layer growth rate is examined and a new parameter that interprets compressibility as an energy-exchange mechanism is proposed. The parameter reconciles and collapses experimentally-observed growth rates.

  12. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model

  13. Polarization-angle dependence of photoluminescence intensity of ordered GaInP{sub 2} layers: observation of polarization memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Brito-Orta, R. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Puebla (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2008-09-15

    We compare measured and calculated polarization-angle dependencies of the intensity of the photoluminescence emission from MOVPE-grown GaInP{sub 2} layers with different ordering parameters. We measured the polarization-angle dependencies of the emission propagating along the [001],[110] and [1 anti 10] directions at room temperature. Symmetry considerations were used to calculate the dependence of the relative intensity of the PL emission which was linearly polarized along different directions and to estimate the value of the valence-band splitting by fitting the measured dependencies with calculated curves. An intriguing influence of the polarization of the exciting beam on the relative amount of the polarized PL emission was observed in the emission from the (110) plane. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Mixing and Formation of Layers by Internal Wave Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossmann, Yvan; Pollet, Florence; Odier, Philippe; Dauxois, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    The energy pathways from propagating internal waves to the scales of irreversible mixing in the ocean are not fully described. In the ocean interior, the triadic resonant instability is an intrinsic destabilization process that may enhance the energy cascade away from topographies. The present study focuses on the integrated impact of mixing processes induced by a propagative normal mode-1 over long-term experiments in an idealized setup. The internal wave dynamics and the evolution of the density profile are followed using the light attenuation technique. Diagnostics of the turbulent diffusivity KT and background potential energy BPE are provided. Mixing effects result in a partially mixed layer colocated with the region of maximum shear induced by the forcing normal mode. The maximum measured turbulent diffusivity is 250 times larger than the molecular value, showing that diapycnal mixing is largely enhanced by small-scale turbulent processes. Intermittency and reversible energy transfers are discussed to bridge the gap between the present diagnostic and the larger values measured in Dossmann et al. (). The mixing efficiency η is assessed by relating the BPE growth to the linearized KE input. One finds a value of Γ=12-19%, larger than the mixing efficiency in the case of breaking interfacial wave. After several hours of forcing, the development of staircases in the density profile is observed. This mechanism has been previously observed in experiments with weak homogeneous turbulence and explained by Phillips (1972) argument. The present experiments suggest that internal wave forcing could also induce the formation of density interfaces in the ocean.

  15. Fluctuations of a passive scalar in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2013-09-19

    The turbulent flow originating downstream of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a mixing layer has great relevance in many applications, ranging from atmospheric physics to combustion in technical devices. The mixing of a substance by the turbulent velocity field is usually involved. In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis of fluctuations of a passive scalar in the fully developed region of a turbulent mixing layer from a direct numerical simulation is presented. Passive scalar spectra show inertial ranges characterized by scaling exponents −4/3 and −3/2 in the streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with a recent theoretical analysis of passive scalar scaling in shear flows [Celani et al., J. Fluid Mech. 523, 99 (2005)]. Scaling exponents of high-order structure functions in the streamwise direction show saturation of intermittency with an asymptotic exponent ζ∞=0.4 at large orders. Saturation of intermittency is confirmed by the self-similarity of the tails of the probability density functions of the scalar increments at different scales r with the scaling factor r−ζ∞ and by the analysis of the cumulative probability of large fluctuations. Conversely, intermittency saturation is not observed for the spanwise increments and the relative scaling exponents agree with recent results for homogeneous isotropic turbulence with mean scalar gradient. Probability density functions of the scalar increments in the three directions are compared to assess anisotropy.

  16. Time-dependent penetrative mixed convection in a porous layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendoubi, S.; Kulacki, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last few decades, heat and mass transfer in porous media have been studied extensively by many investigators. The main motivations behind these studies were the wide range of applications and the interaction of multiple processes. Examples include geothermal energy production, drying of porous media, high level nuclear waste disposal, and energy-related engineering technologies. Here, a general two-dimensional, time-dependent model has been developed to investigate the transfer of heat and mass in a liquid saturated porous layer locally heated from above. Both free and mixed convection are considered. For mixed convection an eternal flow is assumed to enter the two-dimensional domain in the horizontal direction. At a finite segment of the top wall, two types of heat sources are applied: a constant flux heat source and a time varying heat, constant flux source. The latter is a representation of heat released by spent nuclear fuel in a mined repository located above the layer. Both time-dependent and steady solutions of the flow and temperature fields are obtained. For natural convection, the effects of Rayleigh number on the Nusselt number are obtained. For mixed convection, the effects of both Rayleigh and Peclet numbers are studied. In addition, the effects of the aspect ratio, as well as the length of the heated zone are examined

  17. Polarization Insensitive Wavelength Conversion Based on Four-Wave Mixing in a Silicon Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Hu, Hao; Peucheret, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, polarization-insensitive wavelength conversion of a 10 Gb/s NRZ-OOK data signal based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements.......We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, polarization-insensitive wavelength conversion of a 10 Gb/s NRZ-OOK data signal based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire with bit-error rate measurements....

  18. Simulated seasonal and interannual variability of mixed layer heat budget in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Vialard, J.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Durand, F.; Ethe, C.; Madec, G.

    A global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) is used to investigate the mixed layer heat budget of the Northern Indian Ocean (NIO). The model is validated against observations and shows a fairly good agreement with mixed layer depth data...

  19. Linear models for sound from supersonic reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, P. Shivakanth; Samanta, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We perform a linearized reduced-order modeling of the aeroacoustic sound sources in supersonic reacting mixing layers to explore their sensitivities to some of the flow parameters in radiating sound. Specifically, we investigate the role of outer modes as the effective flow compressibility is raised, when some of these are expected to dominate over the traditional Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) -type central mode. Although the outer modes are known to be of lesser importance in the near-field mixing, how these radiate to the far-field is uncertain, on which we focus. On keeping the flow compressibility fixed, the outer modes are realized via biasing the respective mean densities of the fast (oxidizer) or slow (fuel) side. Here the mean flows are laminar solutions of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers with an imposed composite (turbulent) spreading rate, which we show to significantly alter the growth of instability waves by saturating them earlier, similar to in nonlinear calculations, achieved here via solving the linear parabolized stability equations. As the flow parameters are varied, instability of the slow modes is shown to be more sensitive to heat release, potentially exceeding equivalent central modes, as these modes yield relatively compact sound sources with lesser spreading of the mixing layer, when compared to the corresponding fast modes. In contrast, the radiated sound seems to be relatively unaffected when the mixture equivalence ratio is varied, except for a lean mixture which is shown to yield a pronounced effect on the slow mode radiation by reducing its modal growth.

  20. Simulation of the convective mixed layer in Athens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, H.P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    The region of Athens, Greece, has a highly complicated terrain with irregular coastline and mountains next to the sea. This results in complex flow fields. A case study of a simulation of a sea breeze with the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale model KAMM is presented together with remarks on the advection of mixed layer air. The valley of Athens is open to the sea towards the south-west and surrounded by mountains on the other sides. Gaps between the mountains channel the flow into the valley. Simulations were done for 14 September 1994 to compare them with measurements at 6 masts by Risoe during the MEDCAPHOT-TRACE experiment. (au)

  1. Sediment mixed layer as a proxy for benthic ecosystem process and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teal, L.R.; Parker, E.R.; Solan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Faunal mediated particle and porewater mixing (bioturbation) alters the structure of the surface sediment layer, forming a distinct mixed layer, where the majority of organic matter degradation takes place. Current methods of assessing benthic habitat quality often reference this mixed layer as an

  2. Consideration of R2Fe14B layers as targets with polarized electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogduin, JM; van Klinken, J

    Thin layers of R2Fe14B magnets (R = rare earth) can be magnetized perpendicularly to their planes and can be used as targets of polarized electrons with polarization of approximate to 4% to facilitate Moller/Bhabha and Compton polarimetry of electrons/positrons and photons, respectively. (C) 1998

  3. Depth enhancement of multi-layer light field display using polarization dependent internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Na-Young; Lim, Hong-Gi; Lee, Sung-Keun; Kim, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2013-12-02

    A technique to enhance the depth range of the multi-layer light field three-dimensional display is proposed. A set of the optical plates are stacked in front of the conventional multi-layer light field display, creating additional internal reflection for one polarization state. By switching between two orthogonal polarization states in synchronization with the displayed three-dimensional images, the depth range of the display can be doubled. The proposed method is verified experimentally, confirming its feasibility.

  4. TEM studies of GaN layers grown in non-polar direction: Laterally overgrown and pendeo-epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2008-08-01

    The formation of structural defects in GaN grown in non-polar directions is reviewed based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Stacking faults (SFs) formed on c-planes and also on prismatic planes bounded by partial dislocations, in addition to full dislocations, are major defects in these layers. Since c-planes are arranged perpendicular to the substrate, these defects propagate to the sample surface through the active areas of the devices and become detrimental for device applications. An established method to decrease the defect density is lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) and pendeo-epitaxy. The measured density of SFs in the seed areas is ˜1.3×10 6 cm -1and in the 'wing' areas ˜1.2×10 4 cm -1; a decrease of almost of two orders of magnitude. For overgrown samples, two opposite wings grow in opposite polar directions: [0 0 0 1] (Ga-growth polarity) and [0 0 0 1] (N-growth polarity) confirmed by convergent beam electron diffraction. Ga-polar wings are wider and often have different height than those grown with N-polarity, therefore planarity of these layers and cracking at the meeting front of two wings often occur. It is shown that two-step growth using MOCVD leads to satisfactory layer planarity.

  5. Mixing layer height as an indicator for urban air quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiß, Alexander; Wiegner, Matthias; Bonn, Boris; Schäfer, Klaus; Forkel, Renate; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Münkel, Christoph; Chan, Ka Lok; Nothard, Rainer

    2017-08-01

    The mixing layer height (MLH) is a measure for the vertical turbulent exchange within the boundary layer, which is one of the controlling factors for the dilution of pollutants emitted near the ground. Based on continuous MLH measurements with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer and measurements from an air quality network, the relationship between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations has been investigated. In this context the uncertainty of the MLH retrievals and the representativeness of ground-based in situ measurements are crucial. We have investigated this topic by using data from the BAERLIN2014 campaign in Berlin, Germany, conducted from June to August 2014. To derive the MLH, three versions of the proprietary software BL-VIEW and a novel approach COBOLT were compared. It was found that the overall agreement is reasonable if mean diurnal cycles are considered. The main advantage of COBOLT is the continuous detection of the MLH with a temporal resolution of 10 min and a lower number of cases when the residual layer is misinterpreted as mixing layer. We have calculated correlations between MLH as derived from the different retrievals and concentrations of pollutants (PM10, O3 and NOx) for different locations in the metropolitan area of Berlin. It was found that the correlations with PM10 are quite different for different sites without showing a clear pattern, whereas the correlation with NOx seems to depend on the vicinity of emission sources in main roads. In the case of ozone as a secondary pollutant, a clear correlation was found. We conclude that the effects of the heterogeneity of the emission sources, chemical processing and mixing during transport exceed the differences due to different MLH retrievals. Moreover, it seems to be unrealistic to find correlations between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations representative for a city like Berlin (flat terrain), in particular when traffic emissions are dominant. Nevertheless it is worthwhile to use

  6. Mixing layer height as an indicator for urban air quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Geiß

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixing layer height (MLH is a measure for the vertical turbulent exchange within the boundary layer, which is one of the controlling factors for the dilution of pollutants emitted near the ground. Based on continuous MLH measurements with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer and measurements from an air quality network, the relationship between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations has been investigated. In this context the uncertainty of the MLH retrievals and the representativeness of ground-based in situ measurements are crucial. We have investigated this topic by using data from the BAERLIN2014 campaign in Berlin, Germany, conducted from June to August 2014. To derive the MLH, three versions of the proprietary software BL-VIEW and a novel approach COBOLT were compared. It was found that the overall agreement is reasonable if mean diurnal cycles are considered. The main advantage of COBOLT is the continuous detection of the MLH with a temporal resolution of 10 min and a lower number of cases when the residual layer is misinterpreted as mixing layer. We have calculated correlations between MLH as derived from the different retrievals and concentrations of pollutants (PM10, O3 and NOx for different locations in the metropolitan area of Berlin. It was found that the correlations with PM10 are quite different for different sites without showing a clear pattern, whereas the correlation with NOx seems to depend on the vicinity of emission sources in main roads. In the case of ozone as a secondary pollutant, a clear correlation was found. We conclude that the effects of the heterogeneity of the emission sources, chemical processing and mixing during transport exceed the differences due to different MLH retrievals. Moreover, it seems to be unrealistic to find correlations between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations representative for a city like Berlin (flat terrain, in particular when traffic emissions are dominant. Nevertheless it is

  7. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals for linearly-polarized thermal emission and thermophotovoltaic device including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P.

    2016-07-26

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 .mu.m, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 .mu.m. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization.

  8. Local structures around the substituted elements in mixed layered oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akama, Shota; Kobayashi, Wataru; Amaha, Kaoru; Niwa, Hideharu; Nitani, Hiroaki; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2017-03-02

    The chemical substitution of a transition metal (M) is an effective method to improve the functionality of a material, such as its electrochemical, magnetic, and dielectric properties. The substitution, however, causes local lattice distortion because the difference in the ionic radius (r) modifies the local interatomic distances. Here, we systematically investigated the local structures in the pure (x = 0.0) and mixed (x = 0.05 or 0.1) layered oxides, Na(M 1-x M' x )O 2 (M and M' are the majority and minority transition metals, respectively), by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. We found that the local interatomic distance (d M-O ) around the minority element approaches that around the majority element to reduces the local lattice distortion. We further found that the valence of the minority Mn changes so that its ionic radius approaches that of the majority M.

  9. Survey of the mixing-layer experiments WAMIX and NAMIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, B.; Widmer, S.; Dury, T.V.

    1993-01-01

    A survey is given of work in progress in the Thermal-Hydraulics Laboratory on the water and sodium mixing-layer experiments WAMIX and NAMIX, as well as related developments of computational methods. This report describes the test rigs and experimental techniques, states the objectives of the research programme, presents design requirements for NAMIX together with initial results from WAMIX, and discusses questions of sensitivity of experiments and code calculations to external factors, such as inlet and boundary conditions, and noise. The use of visualisation techniques and Ultrasonic Doppler Anemometry in WAMIX has proved to be very helpful for the design of NAMIX. Furthermore, it is shown that the effect of external factors should be carefully analysed in order to obtain optimum performance of experiments and calculations. (author) 5 figs., 26 refs

  10. Flexo- and piezo-electric polarization of smectic layers in ferroelectric and antiferroelectric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczyński, W.; Hoffmann, J.; Dardas, D.; Nowicka, K.; Bielejewska, N.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report on how flexoelectric and piezoelectric polarization components can be determined by a method based on simultaneous studies of dielectric and electrooptic properties of the chiral smectic liquid crystal in the regime of weak electric fields. As a rule, the measurements of spontaneous polarization are performed using switching experiments. The polarization measured in this way is not complete—it contains the piezoelectric component only. However, the knowledge of the entire local polarization of a single smectic layer is of great importance—it is necessary for correct determination of some material parameters, for instance elastic constants. Our experiments performed in a helical smectic mixture demonstrated that flexoelectric contribution to the local spontaneous polarization is significant in both ferroelectric and antiferroelectric phases. In the antiferroelectric phase, the flexoelectric polarization is less due to higher helical pitch.

  11. Real-Gas Effects on Binary Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of real-gas effects on the mean flow and temporal stability of heptane/nitrogen and oxygen/hydrogen mixing layers at supercritical pressures. These layers consist of two counterflowing free streams of different composition, temperature, and density. As in related prior studies reported in NASA Tech Briefs, the governing conservation equations were the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible flow plus equations for the conservation of total energy and of chemical- species masses. In these equations, the expressions for heat fluxes and chemical-species mass fluxes were derived from fluctuation-dissipation theory and incorporate Soret and Dufour effects. Similarity equations for the streamwise velocity, temperature, and mass fractions were derived as approximations to the governing equations. Similarity profiles showed important real-gas, non-ideal-mixture effects, particularly for temperature, in departing from the error-function profile, which is the similarity solution for incompressible flow. The temperature behavior was attributed to real-gas thermodynamics and variations in Schmidt and Prandtl numbers. Temporal linear inviscid stability analyses were performed using the similarity and error-function profiles as the mean flow. For the similarity profiles, the growth rates were found to be larger and the wavelengths of highest instability shorter, relative to those of the errorfunction profiles and to those obtained from incompressible-flow stability analysis. The range of unstable wavelengths was found to be larger for the similarity profiles than for the error-function profiles

  12. Estimation of Atmospheric Mixing Layer Height from radiosonde data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Mixing layer is the lowest layer of the troposphere where surface turbulence can reach during the daytime. Mixing layer height (MLH) is an important parameter for understanding the transport process, air pollution, weather and climate change. MLH can be determined from the radiosonde profiles of relative humidity (RH), specific humidity (q), potential temperature (θ) and atmospheric refractivity (N) by searching for the strongest gradients of these parameters within a specific height above the surface. However, substantially different MLHs have been found from different parameters. The occurrence of cloud impacts on MLHs derived in two ways: (1) clouds impact the measurements of θ and RH, resulting in spurious MLHs derived by θ and RH, (2) clouds may amplify or depress turbulence, that is MLH can be at cloud top or cloud base when it occurs. However, MLHs determined by existing methods can generally be at cloud top. To solve these problems, we propose a method to estimate MLH by integrating the information of θ, RH, q, N and discriminating different cloud impacts on MLH. We apply this method to high vertical resolution (~30 m) radiosonde data collected at the 79 stations over North America during the period of 1998 to 2008 released by the Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate Data Center. The results show good agreement with those from N as the information of temperature and humidity contained in N, however the impact of clouds including in the new method has increased the reliability of MLH. The new results show good agreement with independent MLH determined from Lidar observations. MLH over the North America is 1647×323 meter with a strong east-west gradient, higher MLH (generally greater than 1800 m) over the Midwest America and lower MLH (less than 1300 m) over Alaska and west coast of America. The scatter plot of climatological MLHnew with MLHθ, MLHRH, MLHq, MLHN and MLHint for the period of 1998 to 2008. Pattern of climatological MLH of our

  13. Tests of Parameterized Langmuir Circulation Mixing in the Oceans Surface Mixed Layer II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-11

    zero in deep mixed layers below the influence of the surface waves. When the SDC is zero, the GV and GS functions ((29) and (30)) will be zero, and...current and do not include the SDC. With the inclusion of the SDC in the Coriolis term in the momentum equations, the net transport of u is not zero, but...balances the net transport of the SDC us, so that the combined net downwind transport of the Eulerian current plus the SDC is zero. Hence, since the

  14. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundar...

  15. Pathfinder : Applying graph theory for consistent tracking of daytime mixed layer height with backscatter lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruine, M.; Apituley, Arnoud; Donovan, Dave; Klein Baltink, Henk; de Haij, Marijn

    2017-01-01

    The height of the atmospheric boundary layer or mixing layer is an important parameter for understanding the dynamics of the atmosphere and the dispersion of trace gases and air pollution. The height of the mixing layer (MLH) can be retrieved, among other methods, from lidar or ceilometer

  16. Well-constructed cellulose acetate membranes for forward osmosis: Minimized internal concentration polarization with an ultra-thin selective layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sui

    2010-09-01

    The design and engineering of membrane structure that produces low salt leakage and minimized internal concentration polarization (ICP) in forward osmosis (FO) processes have been explored in this work. The fundamentals of phase inversion of cellulose acetate (CA) regarding the formation of an ultra-thin selective layer at the bottom interface of polymer and casting substrate were investigated by using substrates with different hydrophilicity. An in-depth understanding of membrane structure and pore size distribution has been elucidated with field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FESEM) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). A double dense-layer structure is formed when glass plate is used as the casting substrate and water as the coagulant. The thickness of the ultra-thin bottom layer resulted from hydrophilic-hydrophilic interaction is identified to be around 95nm, while a fully porous, open-cell structure is formed in the middle support layer due to spinodal decomposition. Consequently, the membrane shows low salt leakage with mitigated ICP in the FO process for seawater desalination. The structural parameter (St) of the membrane is analyzed by modeling water flux using the theory that considers both external concentration polarization (ECP) and ICP, and the St value of the double dense-layer membrane is much smaller than those reported in literatures. Furthermore, the effects of an intermediate immersion into a solvent/water mixed bath prior to complete immersion in water on membrane formation have been studied. The resultant membranes may have a single dense layer with an even lower St value. A comparison of fouling behavior in a simple FO-membrane bioreactor (MBR) system is evaluated for these two types of membranes. The double dense-layer membrane shows a less fouling propensity. This study may help pave the way to improve the membrane design for new-generation FO membranes. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Layered and Laterally Constrained 2D Inversion of Time Domain Induced Polarization Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Ramm, James; Auken, Esben

    transform of a complex resistivity forward response and the inversion extracts the spectral information of the time domain measures in terms of the Cole-Cole parameters. The developed forward code and inversion algorithm use the full time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate...... algorithm retrieves consistent values for both the Cole-Cole parameters and the layer thicknesses and is a promising tool for identifying formation boundaries, e.g. in for discriminating sand and clay layers or pollution fans, due to the chargeability of these layers.......In a sedimentary environment, quasi-layered models often represent the actual geology more accurately than smooth minimum-structure models. We have developed a new layered and laterally constrained inversion algorithm for time domain induced polarization data. The algorithm is based on the time...

  18. Broadband infrared reflective surfaces using doped and stacked polar dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janipour, Mohsen; Sendur, Kursat

    2018-02-01

    Polar dielectrics, such as SiC, are excellent candidates for operation in extreme environments due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. In addition, they can achieve good IR reflection in the Reststrahlen band. However, these materials have relatively narrow spectral bandwidth for reflection, especially considering that the broadband illumination sources in extreme environments. In this study, we investigated the broadband reflection properties of polar dielectrics by engineering the Reststrahlen band through doping and stacked layers. Our results indicate that by doping polar dielectrics, spectral reflection bandwidth can be significantly broadened. In addition, we demonstrate that by stacking different polar dielectric layers, the reflection spectrum of different materials can be overlapped, and thereby, significantly broader spectrum is obtained.

  19. Valley polarization in magnetically doped single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate that valley polarization can be induced and controlled in semiconducting single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides by magnetic doping, which is important for spintronics, valleytronics, and photonics devices. As an example, we investigate Mn-doped MoS2 by first-principles calculations. We study how the valley polarization depends on the strength of the spin orbit coupling and the exchange interaction and discuss how it can be controlled by magnetic doping. Valley polarization by magnetic doping is also expected for other honeycomb materials with strong spin orbit coupling and the absence of inversion symmetry.

  20. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  1. Internal stratigraphy of the South Polar Layered Deposits, Mars from SHARAD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, J. L.; Campbell, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    The South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLD) are one of the largest deposits of water ice on Mars, composed of alternating layers of ice and dust. The accumulation of the layers is driven by orbital forcings (e.g., obliquity) and both the cadence and structure of these layers preserve a record of the past martian climate. Image of very limited exposed layering suggest several distinct sequences, demarcated by erosional hiatuses, with a gently domical shape. Here we use the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) sounder dataset to investigate the internal stratigraphy of the SPLD in order to further constrain the south polar climate record. We identify four distinct units based in part on their degree of vertical sharpness (focus) in the SHARAD data: (1) upper focused layer packets, (2) focused layer packets, (3) blurred layer packets, and (4) reflection free zones (RFZs). A diffuse echo pattern related to uncertain aspects of composition or layer roughness is termed fog. The upper focused layer packets are concentrated in the area between 270° to 90°E, close to the residual polar cap. The focused and blurred layer packets cover a large portion of the SPLD and are subdivided into two different units, those with an average reflecting-interface brightness and those with substantially brighter reflectors. The brighter radar reflectors have a coherent spatial distribution and only comprise a small portion of the entire unit. The diffuse echoes are separated into a fog that is present throughout the entire vertical column of the SPLD and a fog that begins at the surface and traverses only the uppermost layers. Depending on the geometry of individual SHARAD tracks, reflectors can be traced for hundreds of kilometers, but the fog obscures much of the internal layering, and is related to the focusing distortion that prevents individual reflectors from being traced across the entire SPLD. We identify a major deviation from a gently domical SPLD shape in a 200 km dome. Its presence suggests

  2. The polar layered deposits on Mars: Inference from thermal inertia modeling and geologic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    It is widely believed that the Martian polar layered deposits record climate variations over at least the last 10 to 100 m.y., but the details of the processes involved and their relative roles in layer formation and evolution remain obscure. Weathering of the Martian layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the thermal inertias, water vapor abundances, and geologic relationships observed in the Martian polar regions. The nonvolatile components of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particles upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. This scenario for the origin and evolution of the dark material within the polar layered deposits is consistent with the available imaging and thermal data. Further experimental measurements of the thermophysical properties of magnetite and maghemite under Martian conditions are needed to better test this hypothesis.

  3. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  4. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  5. In situ laser sensing of mixed layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Fraser; Hou, Weilin; Vuorenkoski, Anni; Nootz, Gero; Ouyang, Bing

    2013-06-01

    This paper will discuss and compare some recent oceanic test results from the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX) cruise, where vertical profiling was conducted with both time-resolved laser backscatter measurements being acquired via a subsurface light detection and ranging (lidar) profiling instrument, and laser beam forward deflection measurements were acquired from a matrix of continuous wave (cw) laser beams (i.e. structured lighting) being imaged in the forward direction with a high speed camera over a one-way path, with both transmitter and camera firmly fixed on a rigid frame. From the latter, it was observed that when within a natural turbulent layer, the laser beams were being deflected from their still water location at the image plane, which was 8.8 meters distance from the laser dot matrix transmitter. As well as suggesting that the turbulent structures being encountered were predominately larger than the beam diameter, the magnitude of the deflection has been confirmed to correlate with the temperature dissipation rate. The profiling lidar measurements which were conducted in similar conditions, also used a narrow collimated laser beam in order to resolve small-scale spatial structure, but with the added attribute that sub-nanosecond short pulse temporal profile could potentially resolve small-scale vertical structure. In the clear waters of the Tongue of the Ocean in the Bahamas, it was hypothesized that the backscatter anomalies due to the effect of refractive index discontinuities (i.e. mixed layer turbulence) would be observable. The processed lidar data presented herein indicates that higher backscatter levels were observed in the regions of the water column which corresponded to higher turbulent mixing which occurs at the first and second themoclines. At the same test stations that the laser beam matrix and lidar measurements were conducted, turbulence measurements were made with two non-optical instruments, the Vertical Microstructure

  6. Hall effect on MHD flow of visco-elastic micro-polar fluid layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MHD flow of visco-elastic (Rivlin-Ericksen type) micro-polar fluid layer heated from below on porous medium and the nature of the components like medium permeability, heat ...... porous medium over a stretching sheet with chemical reaction,” Journal of Applied Mathematics, Vol. 1, pp. 446-455. Sen G., 1978 International ...

  7. How many molecular layers of polar solvent molecules control chemistry? The concept of compensating dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhals, Heinz; Braun, Patricia; Dietl, Christian; Mayer, Peter

    2013-09-27

    The extension of the solvent influence of the shell into the volume of a polar medium was examined by means of anti-collinear dipoles on the basis of the E(T)(30) solvent polarity scale (i.e., the molar energy of excitation of a pyridinium-N-phenolatebetaine dye; generally: E(T) =28,591 nm kcal mol(-1)/λmax) where no compensation effects were found. As a consequence, solvent polarity effects are concentrated to a very thin layer of a few thousand picometres around the solute where extensions into the bulk solvent become unimportant. A parallelism to the thin surface layer of water to the gas phase is discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. An applied model for the height of the daytime mixed layer and the entrainment zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for the height of the mixed layer and the depth of the entrainment zone under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. It is based on the zero-order mixed layer height model of Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) and the parameterization of the entrainment zone depth prop...

  9. Efficient charge balance in blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes by two types of mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyung Jin; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Song Eun; Sun, Yong; Hwang, Kyo Min; Yoo, Han Kyu; Lee, Sung Kyu [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Young, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kwan, E-mail: kimyk@hongik.ac.kr [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The authors have demonstrated a highly efficient and long-lifetime blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (PHOLED) that uses two types of mixed layers. The mixed layers play the role of carrier injection control and exciton generation zone extension. One of the layers is applied for mixing the hole transport layer (HTL) and host material at the HTL side for carrier injection control. The other works as a mixed electron transporting layer (ETL) and host material at the ETL side. The optimized blue PHOLED has been shown to achieve high performance owing to the mixed layer effects. It gave a maximum luminous efficiency of 25.55 cd/A, maximum external quantum efficiency of 13.05%, and lifetime of 7.24 h under 500 cd/m{sup 2}. These results indicate that applying mixed layers is a simple and efficient method that does not require significant structural change. - Highlights: • Highly efficient blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PHOLEDs) • Hole transporting layer consists with mixed layer for delayed hole injection • The blue PHOLEDs with long lifetime due to suppression of quenching process.

  10. A snapshot of the polar ionosphere. [satellite observation of F layer and topside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitteker, J. H.; Brace, L. H.; Maier, E. J.; Burrows, J. R.; Dodson, W. H.; Winningham, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a picture of the north polar F layer and topside ionosphere obtained primarily from three satellites (Alouette 2, ISIS 1, ISIS 2) that passed over the region within a time interval of about 50 min on a magnetically quiet day. The horizontal distribution of electron densities at the peak of the F layer is found to be similar to synoptic results from the IGY. Energetic-particle and ionospheric-plasma data are also presented, and the F-layer data are discussed in terms of these measurements as well as in terms of electric-field and neutral N2 density measurements made by other satellites on other occasions. The major feature observed is a tongue of F-region ionization extending from the dayside across the polar cap, which is accounted for by antisunward drift due to magnetospheric convection. In the F layer and topside ionosphere, the main effect of auroral precipitation appears to be heating and expansion of the topside. A region of low F-layer density appears on the morning side of the polar cap, which may be due to convection and possibly also to enhanced N2 densities.

  11. Pellet fusion gain calculations modified by electrostatic double layers and by spin polarized nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, H.; Cicchitelli, L.; Elijah, J.S.; Ghatak, A.K.; Goldsworthy, M.T.; Lalousis, P.; Eliezer, S.

    1984-01-01

    All preceding hydrodynamic computations of plasmas are wrong if the thermal conductivity is essential because electronic thermal conductivity is decreased in plasma inhomogeneities due to electrostatic double layers. In the worst case, ionic conductivity remains. We compare this with a possible electronic conductivity by the fast tail of the energy distribution. Using the volume ignition for fusion gain computations, we study the increase of gain by spin-polarization of nuclei for the DT reaction especially in non-linear ranges. Gain can increase by a factor 3.1. Contents are the following: electrostatic fields and double layers in inhomogeneous plasma, change of thermal conduction by double layers, consequences for pellet fusion, gain calculation with spin polarized nuclei. (Mori, K.)

  12. Transport-driven formation of a polar ozone layer on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmessin, Franck; Lefèvre, Franck

    2013-11-01

    Since the seasonal and spatial distribution of ozone on Mars was detected by the ultraviolet spectrometer onboard the spacecraft Mariner 7, our understanding has evolved considerably thanks to parallel efforts in observations and modelling. At low-to-mid latitudes, martian ozone is distributed vertically in two main layers, a near-surface layer and a layer at an altitude between 30 and 60km (ref. ). Here we report evidence from the SPICAM UV spectrometer onboard the Mars Express orbiter for the existence of a previously overlooked ozone layer that emerges in the southern polar night at 40-60km in altitude, with no counterpart observed at the north pole. Comparisons with global climate simulations for Mars indicate that this layer forms as a result of the large-scale transport of oxygen-rich air from sunlit latitudes to the poles, where the oxygen atoms recombine to form ozone during the polar night. However, transport-driven ozone formation is counteracted in our simulations by the destruction of ozone by reactions with hydrogen radicals, whose concentrations vary seasonally on Mars, reflecting seasonal variations of water vapour. We conclude that the observed dichotomy between the ozone layers of the two poles, with a significantly richer layer in the southern hemisphere, can be explained by the interplay of these mechanisms.

  13. Mechanisms of impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the atmosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the impact of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O on the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular on its expected recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circu-lation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the North to South Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar strato-spheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abun-dance of the greenhouse gases on the long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2, essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weak-ness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification be-gins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard

  14. Polarization properties of optical phase conjugation by two-photon resonant degenerate four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauranen, Martti; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Malcuit, Michelle S.; Boyd, Robert W.

    1989-08-01

    We develop a semiclassical theory of the polarization properties of phase conjugation by two-photon resonant degenerate four-wave mixing. The theory includes the effects of saturation by the pump waves. We solve the density-matrix equations of motion in steady state for a nonlinear medium consisting of stationary atoms with a ground and excited state connected by two-photon transitions. As an illustration of the general results, we consider an S0-->S0 two-photon transition, which is known to lead to perfect polarization conjugation in the limit of third-order theory. We show that the fidelity of the polarization-conjugation process is degraded for excessively large pump intensities. The degradation can occur both due to transfer of population to the excited state and due to nonresonant Stark shifts. Theoretical results are compared to those of a recent experiment [Malcuit, Gauthier, and Boyd, Opt. Lett. 13, 663 (1988)].

  15. Electric field Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation in multi-layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chizhu; Tan, Zuojun; Zhang, Shuhui; Chen, Siyu

    2017-10-01

    Electric field Monte Carlo (EMC) simulation is capable of modeling the polarization and coherence phenomena of light. Previous EMC program treat the turbid media as an infinite slab. An electric field Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation in multi-layered media (EMCML) is presented in this paper. The complex electric field vectors are traced during the scattering and the reflection (or refraction) events. In order to improve the computational efficiency, our EMCML program is implemented in parallel in the GPU. The validity of EMCML is demonstrated by comparison between simulation results obtained by EMCML and previously reported programs.

  16. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  17. Ordered mixed-layer structures in the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix has revealed the presence of a new mixed layer structure material. This mixed-layer material consists of an ordered arrangement of serpentine-type (S) and brucite-type (B) layers in the sequence SBBSBB. Electron diffraction and imaging techniques show that the basal periodicity is approximately 17 A. Discrete crystals of SBB-type material are typically curved, of small size (less than 1 micron) and show structural variations similar to the serpentine group minerals. Mixed-layer material also occurs in association with planar serpentine. Characteristics of SBB-type material are not consistent with known terrestrial mixed-layer clay minerals. Evidence for formation by a condensation event or by subsequent alteration of pre-existing material is not yet apparent.

  18. Solar Coronal Loops Associated with Small-scale Mixed Polarity Surface Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Noort, M. van; Rodríguez, J. Blanco; Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco; Schmidt, W.; Pillet, V. Martínez; Knölker, M.

    2017-01-01

    How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca ii H images obtained from the Sunrise Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.

  19. Solar Coronal Loops Associated with Small-scale Mixed Polarity Surface Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Noort, M. van [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rodríguez, J. Blanco [Grupo de Astronomía y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Knölker, M., E-mail: chitta@mps.mpg.de [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca ii H images obtained from the Sunrise Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.

  20. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: History of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric water cycle at the present epoch involves summertime sublimation of water from the north polar cap, transport of water through the atmosphere, and condensation on one or both winter CO2 caps. Exchange with the regolith is important seasonally, but the water content of the atmosphere appears to be controlled by the polar caps. The net annual transport through the atmosphere, integrated over long timescales, must be the driving force behind the long-term evolution of the polar caps; clearly, this feeds back into the evolution of the layered terrain. We have investigated the behavior of the seasonal water cycle and the net integrated behavior at the pole for the last 10 exp 7 years. Our model of the water cycle includes the solar input, CO2 condensation and sublimation, and summertime water sublimation through the seasonal cycles, and incorporates the long-term variations in the orbital elements describing the Martian orbit.

  1. A One-Dimensional Model Study of the Occurrence and the Termination of Polar Boundary-Layer Ozone Depletion Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Le; Gutheil, Eva

    2015-04-01

    The tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs) in polar spring have attracted increased attention in the last thirty years. A dramatic decline of the surface ozone mixing ratio from tens of parts per billion (ppb) to less than one ppb within a few days is observed in various observation sites in polar regions. Previous studies suggest that the halogen species, especially bromine, acts as a catalyst in a chemical reaction cycle, which causes the destruction of ozone in the polar boundary layer. Moreover, a group of heterogeneous reactions with the involvement of HOBr occur on the surface of different substrates such as suspended aerosols and sea ice, leading to the activation of bromide from these substrates, and a following enhancement of the total bromine amount in the boundary layer occurs. This phenomenon is widely known as the 'bromine explosion' mechanism. However, the initiation and the termination steps of the ODEs are still not well understood. In the present study, a one-dimensional model, KINAL-T, is developed with the aim of investigating the role of the boundary layer in the occurrence and the termination of the ODEs. The 1-D model is an extension of the previous box model study1, explicitly including the vertical convection of gas. The parameterization of the vertical profile of the turbulent diffusivity from Pielke and Mahrer (1975)2 is adopted. Moreover, in the 1-D model, a bromine-related reaction scheme taken from Cao et al. (2014)1 is used, in which not only the gas phase but also the heterogeneous reactions are implemented. The simulation results show that the tropospheric ozone depletion event in a 200 m boundary layer starts after 12 days under the condition of a potential temperature gradient of 0.7 K km-1 and a wind speed of 5 m s-1. The whole depletion process of ozone takes approximately 2.5 days. The vertical profiles of ozone and bromine-containing compounds at different days are also captured. Instead of preventing the ozone from the

  2. Double-layer structure in polar mesospheric clouds observed from SOFIE/AIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Double-layer structures in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs are observed by using Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE data between 2007 and 2014. We find 816 and 301 events of double-layer structure with percentages of 10.32 and 7.25 % compared to total PMC events, and the mean distances between two peaks are 3.06 and 2.73 km for the Northern Hemisphere (NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH respectively. Double-layer PMCs almost always have less mean ice water content (IWC than daily IWC during the core of the season, but they are close to each other at the beginning and the end. The result by averaging over all events shows that the particle concentration has obvious double peaks, while the particle radius exhibits an unexpected monotonic increase with decreasing altitude. By further analysis of the background temperature and water vapour residual profiles, we conclude that the lower layer is a reproduced one formed at the bottom of the upper layer. 56.00 and 47.51 % of all double-layer events for the NH and SH respectively have temperature enhancements larger than 2 K locating between their double peaks. The longitudinal anti-correlation between the gravity waves' (GWs' potential energies and occurrence frequencies of double-layer PMCs suggests that the double-layer PMCs tend to form in an environment where the GWs have weaker intensities.

  3. Computations of Nonlinear Propagation of Sound Emitted from High Speed Mixing Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Punekar, J.; Avital, E. J.; Musafir, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    Non-linear sound propagation is investigated computationally by simulating compressible time-developing mixing layers using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach and solving the viscous Burgers Equation. The mixing layers are of convective Mach numbers of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2. The LES results agree qualitatively with known flow behavior. Mach waves are observed in the near sound field of the supersonic mixing layer computed by the LES. These waves show steepening typical to non-linear propagat...

  4. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model - An example from Arabian Sea and equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    is influenced not only by local vertical mixing but also by horizontal con- vergence of mass and heat, a mixed layer model must consider both full dynamics due to the use of primitive equations and a parameterization for the vertical mass transfer and related... is dynamically determined without such a con- straint. Instantaneous atmospheric elds are inter- polated from the monthly means. Monthly mean climatology of chlorophyll pigment concentrations were obtained from the Coastal Zone Color Scan- ner (CZCS) from...

  5. Influence of tides and gravity waves on layering processes in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hoffmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE have been studied at Andenes (69° N, 16° E, Norway, using VHF radar observations since 1994. One remarkable feature of these observations is the fact that {during 50% of the time,} the radar echoes occur in the form of two or more distinct layers. In the case of multiple PMSE layers, statistical analysis shows that the lower layer occurs at a mean height of ~83.4 km, which is almost identical to the mean height of noctilucent clouds (NLC derived from observation with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the same site. To investigate the layering processes microphysical model simulations under the influence of tidal and gravity waves were performed. In the presence of long period gravity waves, these model investigations predict an enhanced formation of multiple PMSE layer structures, where the lower layer is a consequence of the occurrence of the largest particles at the bottom of the ice cloud. This explains the coincidence of the lowermost PMSE layers and NLC. During periods with enhanced amplitudes of the semidiurnal tide, the observed NLC and PMSE show pronounced tidal structures comparable to the results of corresponding microphysical simulations. At periods with short period gravity waves there is a tendency for a decreasing occurrence of NLC and for variable weak PMSE structures.

  6. Mechanisms of Turbulent Mixing in the Continental Shelf Bottom Boundary Layer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaw, William

    2000-01-01

    .... In this thesis, the problem of turbulent mixing in the coastal bottom boundary layer is investigated with a unique set of field measurements of velocity and sound speed that span a significant...

  7. Chalk-Ex: Transport of Optically Active Particles from the Surface Mixed Layer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plueddemann, Albert J

    2005-01-01

    ... (from Cretaceous chalk) were injected into the mixed layer to create a "chalk patch". Experiments were performed at two stations, one mesotrophic and one eutrophic, during two times of the year, June and November...

  8. Reactive Shear Layer Mixing and Growth Rate Effects on Afterburning Properties for Axisymetric Rocket Engine Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hartsfield, Carl R

    2006-01-01

    .... The model is based on two characteristic distances, the distance required for turbulent mixing to generate a combustible mixture with the reactive film layer and the distance traveled during the ignition delay...

  9. Study on the layered dusty plasma structures in the summer polar mesopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional hydrodynamic equations are adopted to build a one-dimensional theoretical model to study the effect of gravity wave on layered dusty plasma structures formation and evolution near the polar summer mesospause region associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism gives consideration to the charged ice particle motion by the gravity wave modulation, making a significant contribution to the vertical transport of heavy ice particles and convergence into thin layers. And numerical results show that the pattern of the multi-layer structure depends on the ration of the initial ice particles density distribution to the vertical wavelength of the gravity waves, the ice particle size and the wind velocity caused by gravity wave. Also, the variation of ion density distribution under the influence of gravity wave has also been examined. Finally, the electron density depletions (bite-outs layers has been simulated according to the charge conservation laws, and the results are compared to the ECT02 rocket sounding data, which agree well with the measuring.

  10. Southern Ocean Mixed-Layer Seasonal and Interannual Variations From Combined Satellite and In Situ Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, B.; Guinehut, S.; Verbrugge, N.; Cotroneo, Y.; Zambianchi, E.; Iudicone, D.

    2017-12-01

    The depth of the upper ocean mixed layer provides fundamental information on the amount of seawater that directly interacts with the atmosphere. Its space-time variability modulates water mass formation and carbon sequestration processes related to both the physical and biological pumps. These processes are particularly relevant in the Southern Ocean, where surface mixed-layer depth estimates are generally obtained either as climatological fields derived from in situ observations or through numerical simulations. Here we demonstrate that weekly observation-based reconstructions can be used to describe the variations of the mixed-layer depth in the upper ocean over a range of space and time scales. We compare and validate four different products obtained by combining satellite measurements of the sea surface temperature, salinity, and dynamic topography and in situ Argo profiles. We also compute an ensemble mean and use the corresponding spread to estimate mixed-layer depth uncertainties and to identify the more reliable products. The analysis points out the advantage of synergistic approaches that include in input the sea surface salinity observations obtained through a multivariate optimal interpolation. Corresponding data allow to assess mixed-layer depth seasonal and interannual variability. Specifically, the maximum correlations between mixed-layer anomalies and the Southern Annular Mode are found at different time lags, related to distinct summer/winter responses in the Antarctic Intermediate Water and Sub-Antarctic Mode Waters main formation areas.

  11. Four-wave mixing using polarization grating induced thermal grating in liquids exhibiting circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, J.A.; Tong, W.G. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chandler, D.W.; Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

    1995-04-01

    A novel four-wave mixing technique for the detection of circular dichroism in optically active liquid samples is demonstrated. When two cross-polarized laser beams are crossed at a small angle in a circular dichroic liquid a weak thermal grating is produced with a phase depending on the sign of the circular dichroism. The authors show that the polarization of one of the beams can be modified to allow coherent interference with an intensity-grating induced thermal grating. A probe beam scattering from the composite grating results in a signal that reveals the sign and magnitude of the circular dichroism. The use of this technique to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of scattered light and laser intensity noise is discussed.

  12. Using dissolved oxygen concentrations to determine mixed layer depths in the Bellingshausen Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Castro-Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of oxygen (O2 and other dissolved gases in the oceanic mixed layer are often used to calculate air-sea gas exchange fluxes. The mixed layer depth (zmix may be defined using criteria based on temperature or density differences to a reference depth near the ocean surface. However, temperature criteria fail in regions with strong haloclines such as the Southern Ocean where heat, freshwater and momentum fluxes interact to establish mixed layers. Moreover, the time scales of air-sea exchange differ for gases and heat, so that zmix defined using oxygen may be different than zmix defined using temperature or density. Here, we propose to define an O2-based mixed layer depth, zmix(O2, as the depth where the relative difference between the O2 concentration and a reference value at a depth equivalent to 10 dbar equals 0.5 %. This definition was established by analysis of O2 profiles from the Bellingshausen Sea (west of the Antarctic Peninsula and corroborated by visual inspection. Comparisons of zmix(O2 with zmix based on potential temperature differences, i.e., zmix(0.2 °C and zmix(0.5 °C, and potential density differences, i.e., zmix(0.03 kg m−3 and zmix(0.125 kg m−3, showed that zmix(O2 closely follows zmix(0.03 kg m−3. Further comparisons with published zmix climatologies and zmix derived from World Ocean Atlas 2005 data were also performed. To establish zmix for use with biological production estimates in the absence of O2 profiles, we suggest using zmix(0.03 kg m−3, which is also the basis for the climatology by

  13. Vortex-Transport Element Simulation of a Confined Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Vol. 125, pp. 397-410. Browand, F. E., and Ho, C.-M. (1983) Journal de Mecanique theorique et Aunliauee Numero Special, pp. 99-120. Chorin, A. J...layers was initiated by Givi and Jou (1988) using a hybrid pseudo-spectral second order finite difference scheme. In all cases, the Reynolds number was...confinement. Therefore, they can provide accurate simulations for high Reynolds number, spatially growing flows. Moreover, vortex methods optimize the

  14. Degenerate four-wave mixing and polarization spectroscopy in NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dominicis, Luigi; Fantoni, Roberta; Giorgi, Mariano

    2002-05-01

    Degenerate Four Wave Mixing (DFWM) and polarization spectroscopy (PS) have been used to detect traces of nitric dioxide in a static cell at room temperature and in a small flame from a laboratory Bunsen burner. The high resolution spectrum of the Douglas-Huber band has been recorded with both techniques. The role played by population and thermal gratings in the DFWM case has been investigated under various experimental conditions. PS measurements performed with 'orientation' and 'alignment' configurations allowed to resolve NO2 composite spectral features.

  15. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujade, O.; Lardjane, N.; Peybernes, M.; Boulet, M.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerations in actual Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are often variable. This article focuses on a particular class of variable accelerations where g(t) ∝ t n . A reference database is built from high resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulations. The successful comparison with a simple OD analytical model and the statistical 2SFK (2-Structure, 2-Fluid, 2-Turbulence) turbulence model is provided. Moreover, we show the difference between the mechanism at play in the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing zone and Kolmogorov's in the self similar developed turbulent regime. (authors)

  16. Kinetics of polar mesospheric plasma layers: Comparison of theoretical results with observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M. S.; Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.; Dixit, Amrit

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for the physical understanding of the charge distribution on ice dust particles in plasma layers of polar mesospheric clouds PMCs (Noctilucent clouds and polar mesospheric summer echoes). For the case of pure ice dust (with high work function), the charging of the particles occurs only because of the accretion of electronic and ionic species on the surface of ice grains. The analysis is based on the number and energy balance of constituents and allows the charge to be only an integral multiple (positive or negative) of the electronic charge. Amongst other interesting results, the theory explains the observed charge distribution on pure ice particles and corresponding reduction of electron density (viz., Bite out) in the PMCs.

  17. PIV measurement of turbulent bubbly mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Based on experimental investigation of single-phase turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives, bubbly mixing layer was experimentally investigated by PIV. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number based on the velocity difference of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges is 73333. Gas bubbles with about 0.5% gas fraction were injected into pure water mixing layer with/without polymer additives from three different parts at the end of the splitter plate. The comparison between single phase and bubbly mixing layer shows clearly that the dynamic development of mixing layer is great influenced by the bubble injection. Similar with single phase, the Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central mixing flow field part and the width will increase with increasing the Reynolds number. Mean Reynolds stress will decrease with bubble injection in high Reynolds numbers and the decreasing of Reynolds stress with polymer additives is much more than pure water case.

  18. Substantial energy input to the mesopelagic ecosystem from the seasonal mixed-layer pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olmo, Giorgio; Dingle, James; Polimene, Luca; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Claustre, Hervé

    2016-11-01

    The ocean region known as the mesopelagic zone, which is at depths of about 100-1,000 m, harbours one of the largest ecosystems and fish stocks on the planet. Life in this region is believed to rely on particulate organic carbon supplied by the biological carbon pump. Yet this supply appears insufficient to meet mesopelagic metabolic demands. An additional organic carbon source to the mesopelagic zone could be provided by the seasonal entrainment of surface waters in deeper layers, a process known as the mixed-layer pump. Little is known about the magnitude and spatial distribution of this process globally or its potential to transport carbon to the mesopelagic zone. Here we combine mixed-layer depth data from Argo floats with satellite estimates of particulate organic carbon concentrations to show that the mixed-layer pump supplies an important seasonal flux of organic carbon to the mesopelagic zone. We estimate that this process is responsible for a global flux of 0.1-0.5 Pg C yr-1. In high-latitude regions where the mixed layer is usually deep, this flux amounts on average to 23% of the carbon supplied by fast sinking particles, but it can be greater than 100%. We conclude that the seasonal mixed-layer pump is an important source of organic carbon for the mesopelagic zone.

  19. Electrical properties of surface and interface layers of the N- and In-polar undoped and Mg-doped InN layers grown by PA MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarova, T. A.; Kampert, E.; Law, J.; Jmerik, V. N.; Paturi, P.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    Electrical properties of N-polar undoped and Mg-doped InN layers and In-polar undoped InN layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA MBE) were studied. Transport parameters of the surface and interface layers were determined from the measurements of the Hall coefficient and resistivity as well as the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at magnetic fields up to 60 T. Contributions of the 2D surface, 3D near-interface, and 2D interface layers to the total conductivity of the InN films were defined and discussed to be dependent on InN surface polarity, Mg doping, and PA MBE growth conditions.

  20. A method to estimate the height of temperature inversion layer and the effective mixing depht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, D.

    1978-05-01

    A review of the concept PBL or turbulent boundary layer is made as it is understood in meteorology. Some features of the PBL parameterization are also discussed, as well as the methods used to estimate the temperature inversion heights during morning and afternoon hours. The study bases on the assumption of the dry adiabatic lapse rate in the mixing layer that is, water vapor and airborne material are supposed to be homogeneously mixed below the inversion layer or in the effective mixing depth. The mean mixing heights over Rio de Janeiro area respectively about 500m and 1000m at morning and afternoon hours. For Sao Paulo these values are respectively 400m and 1300m at morning and afternoon hours [pt

  1. Mixing and non-equilibrium chemical reaction in a compressible mixing layer. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compressibility, chemical reaction exothermicity, and non-equilibrium chemical modeling in a reacting plane mixing layer were investigated by means of two dimensional direct numerical simulations. The chemical reaction was irreversible and second order of the type A + B yields Products + Heat. The general governing fluid equations of a compressible reacting flow field were solved by means of high order finite difference methods. Physical effects were then determined by examining the response of the mixing layer to variation of the relevant non-dimensionalized parameters. The simulations show that increased compressibility generally results in a suppressed mixing, and consequently a reduced chemical reaction conversion rate. Reaction heat release was found to enhance mixing at the initial stages of the layer growth, but had a stabilizing effect at later times. The increased stability manifested itself in the suppression or delay of the formation of large coherent structures within the flow. Calculations were performed for a constant rate chemical kinetics model and an Arrhenius type kinetic prototype. The choice of the model was shown to have an effect on the development of the flow. The Arrhenius model caused a greater temperature increase due to reaction than the constant kinetic model. This had the same effect as increasing the exothermicity of the reaction. Localized flame quenching was also observed when the Zeldovich number was relatively large.

  2. Bacterial Tubulins A and B Exhibit Polarized Growth, Mixed-Polarity Bundling, and Destabilization by GTP Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Celis, César; Risca, Viviana I; Hurtado, Felipe; Polka, Jessica K; Hansen, Scott D; Maturana, Daniel; Lagos, Rosalba; Mullins, R Dyche; Monasterio, Octavio

    2017-10-01

    Bacteria of the genus Prosthecobacter express homologs of eukaryotic α- and β-tubulin, called BtubA and BtubB (BtubA/B), that have been observed to assemble into filaments in the presence of GTP. BtubA/B polymers are proposed to be composed in vitro by two to six protofilaments in contrast to that in vivo , where they have been reported to form 5-protofilament tubes named bacterial microtubules (bMTs). The btubAB genes likely entered the Prosthecobacter lineage via horizontal gene transfer and may be derived from an early ancestor of the modern eukaryotic microtubule (MT). Previous biochemical studies revealed that BtubA/B polymerization is reversible and that BtubA/B folding does not require chaperones. To better understand BtubA/B filament behavior and gain insight into the evolution of microtubule dynamics, we characterized in vitro BtubA/B assembly using a combination of polymerization kinetics assays and microscopy. Like eukaryotic microtubules, BtubA/B filaments exhibit polarized growth with different assembly rates at each end. GTP hydrolysis stimulated by BtubA/B polymerization drives a stochastic mechanism of filament disassembly that occurs via polymer breakage and/or fast continuous depolymerization. We also observed treadmilling (continuous addition and loss of subunits at opposite ends) of BtubA/B filament fragments. Unlike MTs, polymerization of BtubA/B requires KCl, which reduces the critical concentration for BtubA/B assembly and induces it to form stable mixed-orientation bundles in the absence of any additional BtubA/B-binding proteins. The complex dynamics that we observe in stabilized and unstabilized BtubA/B filaments may reflect common properties of an ancestral eukaryotic tubulin polymer. IMPORTANCE Microtubules are polymers within all eukaryotic cells that perform critical functions; they segregate chromosomes, organize intracellular transport, and support the flagella. These functions rely on the remarkable range of tunable dynamic

  3. Bistable states of TM polarized non-linear waves guided by symmetric layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, D.

    1985-04-01

    Dispersion relations for TM polarized non-linear waves propagating in a symmetric single film optical waveguide are derived. The system consists of a layer of thickness d with dielectric constant epsilon 1 bounded at two sides by a non-linear medium characterized by the diagonal dielectric tensor epsilon 11 =epsilon 22 =epsilon 0 , epsilon 33 =epsilon 0 +α|E 3 | 2 , where E 3 is the normal electric field component. For sufficiently large d/lambda (lambda is the wavelength) we predict bistable states of both symmetric and antisymmetric modes provided that the power flow is the control parameter. (author)

  4. Surface and crystal structure of nitridated sapphire substrates and their effect on polar InN layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuridina, D.; Dinh, D.V.; Pristovsek, M.; Lacroix, B.; Chauvat, M.-P.; Ruterana, P.; Kneissl, M.; Vogt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the surface and crystal properties has been performed at clean c-plane sapphire substrates, sapphire layers after nitridation, and subsequently grown InN layers deposited by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. The (1 × 1) surface of clean sapphire reconstructs into a (√(31) × √(31))R ± 9° structure after annealing at 1050 °C, which was performed prior to the nitridation process. The formation of crystalline AlN was observed for nitridation above 800 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy performed on the nitridated layers shows that N-Al chemical bonds dominate this structure, while the number of N-O bonds is negligibly small. Amorphous AlN x O y layers form during nitridation below 800 °C, where N-O bonds dominate. All layers formed by nitridation show defects associated with N bonds. The morphology of the nitridated layers affects the surface and crystal quality of the subsequently grown polar InN layers. N-polar InN layers with a smooth surface and single crystalline structure were grown on the AlN nitridated layers, while In-polar InN layers with a rough surface and a polycrystalline structure were grown on the amorphous nitridated layers.

  5. Plasma and magnetic field characteristics of the distant polar cusp near local noon: The entry layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sckopke, N.; Rosenbauer, H.; Hedgecock, P.C.

    1976-01-01

    Heos 2 plasma and magnetic field measurements in the distant polar cusp region reveal the existence of a plasma layer on day side field lines just inside the magnetopause. Density and temperature in this layer are nearly the same as they are in the adjacent magnetosheath, but the flow lacks the order existing both in the magnetosheath and in the plasma mantle. Flow directions toward and away from the sun but, in general, parallel to the field lines have been found. The magnetopause (as defined by a sudden rotation of the magnetic field vector) mostly coincides with the transition to ordered magnetosheath flow. The inner boundary of the layer is located just within the outer boundary of the hot ring current plasma. In the region of overlap the hot electrons have the signature of trapped particles, though often at reduced intensity. The magnetic field is strongly fluctuating in magnitude, while its orientation is more stable, consistent with a connection to the earth, but is systematically distorted out of the meridian plane. The layer is thought to be a consequence of the entry of magnetosheath plasma, which does not appear to be unobstructed, as has been claimed in the concept of a magnetospheric cleft. The magnetopause has a cusplike indentation which is elongated in local time. The existence of field-aligned currents (total strength approx. =10 6 A) and their location of flow in the inner part of the entry layer (into the ionosphere before noon and out of it after noon) are inferred from the systematic bending of field lines. It is proposed that the dynamo of the related current system is provided by the transfer of perpendicular momentum resulting from the plasma entry into the layer. The essential features of the entry layer might be compatible with the model of plasma flow through the magnetopause of Levy et al. (1964) if a 'dam' effect caused by the cusp geometry were added

  6. Determination of regional heat fluxes from the growth of the mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Batchvarova, E. [National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-10-01

    The distribution of surface sensible heat flux is a critical factor in producing and modifying the mesoscale atmospheric flows, turbulence and evaporation. Parameterizations that assume homogeneous land characteristics are inappropriate to represent the spatial variability often found in nature. One possibility to overcome this problem is to increase the resolution of the model grid which demands unrealistic computing resources and data for model initialization. Area averaged fluxes can be obtained from aircraft measurements. It is essential that the flights are performed at a height where the individual surface features are not felt. A large number of flights and appropriate pattern to meet the task are needed in order to achieve a fair statistics. The mixed layer grows in response to the regional turbulent fluxes including the aggregation and small scale processes. The region of influence in upwind direction is typically 20 times the height of the mixed layer for convective and 100 times the height of the mixed layer for atmospheric near neutral conditions. In this study we determine the regional integrated sensible heat flux from information on the evolution of the mixed layer over the area. The required information to use the method can be derived from wind speed and temperature profiles obtained by radio-soundings when performed frequently enough to provide a reasonably detailed structure of the development of the mixed-layer. The method is applied to estimate the regional heat flux over the NOPEX experimental area for three days during the campaign in 1994. (au)

  7. Mixed-gender groups: coping strategies and factors of psychological adaptation in a polar environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnet, Elisabeth; Jurion, Sylvie; Cazes, Geneviève; Bachelard, Claude

    2004-07-01

    The polar environment is often seen as a good analog for long-term space missions in terms of isolation and confinement. This paper focuses on the psychological adaptation of both the men and women in mixed-gender groups in the French polar station Dumont d'Urville. The first 49 expeditions to this station were composed of men only in groups of 25-30. In 2000, two women were included in the first mixed-gender wintering group, followed by five women in 2001. This study on coping strategies and psychological adaptation was included in an end-of-mission debriefing performed by a psychologist. Data were collected using a few quantitative tools and a semi-structured interview, and focused on adaptation to wintering, coping strategies, and information on interpersonal relationships. Including women in a wintering group seems to have had positive effects on the general climate of the group by reducing men's rude behavior, but it also seems to be an important stressor for both men and women when the females' average age is close to the males' because seduction behaviors appear and rivalry, frustration, and sexual harassment frequently result. The use of problem-oriented strategies helps women to adapt. There are strong arguments indicating that living in an isolated and confined environment magnifies the usual difficulties that arise in mixed-gender relationships. Difficulties may be magnified in space since the group size is smaller and the confinement more extreme. This implies the need for rigorous select-in criteria for both men and women, especially for relational criteria, and for group training after selection.

  8. A compact fluorescence polarization analyzer with high-transmittance liquid crystal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Osamu; Satou, Ken; Nakamura, Ayano; Sumiyoshi, Ken; Shirokawa, Masanori; Mizokuchi, Chikaaki; Shiota, Kunihiro; Maeki, Masatoshi; Ishida, Akihiko; Tani, Hirofumi; Shigemura, Koji; Hibara, Akihide; Tokeshi, Manabu

    2018-02-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) offers easy operation and rapid processing, making it implementable in molecular interaction analysis. Previously we have developed a unique FP measurement system using a liquid crystal (LC) layer and an image sensor. The system is based on a principle of synchronized detection between the switching rate of the LC layer and the sampling rate of the CCD. The FP system realized simultaneous multiple sample detection; however, the measurement precision was lower than that of the conventional FP apparatus. The main drawbacks were low light transmittance of the LC layer and insufficient synchronization between the LC layer and CCD. In this paper, we developed a new FP analyzer based on LC-CCD synchronization detection. By using a newly designed LC with high transmittance and improving synchronization, the performance of the system has been dramatically improved. Additionally, we reduced the cost by using an inexpensive CCD and an LED as the excitation source. Simultaneous FP immunoassay of multiple samples of prostaglandin E2 was performed. The error rate of the FP system is reduced from 16.9% to 3.9%, as comparable to the commercial conventional FP system.

  9. 3D Modeling of South Polar Layered Deposits on Mars with SHARAD radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, W.; Grima, C.; Mouginot, J.; Herique, A.; Seu, R.; Biccari, D.; Orosei, R.

    2007-08-01

    The SHAllow RADar (SHARAD) is a subsurface sounding instrument aboard the NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft. The routine science observations started in November 2006 has already provided a huge amount of data promising an unprecedented insight into the Martian subsurface. The main SHARAD scientific objectives are to map the underground distribution of water over the planet as well as to seek buried geological structures in order to understand the formation of the superficial Martian landscape. SHARAD is working at a 20 MHz central frequency with a 10 MHz bandwidth. The operating parameters allow a 10 m vertical free space resolution and a penetration depth in the range of 0.1 to 1 km. Horizontally, the cross-track and along-track foot print range are respectively 3-7 km and 0.3-1 km. Assuming a low impurities water ice the depth range of the radar should be 1 km with about 7 m of theoretical vertical resolution. This makes possible to sound the internal polar caps structures like never before. We report some observations made in Planum Australe over a 36.000 km2 area. 24 orbits crossing it have been selected. Each shows clear radar echoes with linear shape reaching the radar later than the surface echo. After comparison with simulations able to highlight any potential clutter signals, they have been interpreted as being polar layers. From this set of data a 3D modeling of the subsurface layering was undertaken. We show the results and discuss the method employed. A comparison between the layers behaviour determined in this study, the MOLA topography and the basal mapping made by MARSIS recently, allows initiating geomorphologic discussions.

  10. SCALE INTERACTION IN A MIXING LAYER. THE ROLE OF THE LARGE-SCALE GRADIENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, Daniele

    2015-08-23

    The interaction between scales is investigated in a turbulent mixing layer. The large-scale amplitude modulation of the small scales already observed in other works depends on the crosswise location. Large-scale positive fluctuations correlate with a stronger activity of the small scales on the low speed-side of the mixing layer, and a reduced activity on the high speed-side. However, from physical considerations we would expect the scales to interact in a qualitatively similar way within the flow and across different turbulent flows. Therefore, instead of the large-scale fluctuations, the large-scale gradients modulation of the small scales has been additionally investigated.

  11. Tropical Cyclone Footprint in the Ocean Mixed Layer Observed by Argo in the Northwest Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-25

    RESEARCH ARTICLE 10.1002/2014JC010316 Tropical cyclone footprint in the ocean mixed layer observed by Argo in the Northwest Pacific HongLi Fu1...using available Argo profiles during the period of 1998–2011 in the northwest Pacific. Results reveal that iso- thermal layer (IL) deepening and...and TC, subsurface measurements following TC are impor- tant. The Array for Real-time Geostrophic Oceanography ( Argo ) floats measure the global ocean

  12. Melanoma exosomes promote mixed M1 and M2 macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Gina T; Smith, Mary Ann; Hood, Joshua L

    2018-05-01

    Macrophages are key participants in melanoma growth and survival. In general, macrophages can be classified as M1 or M2 activation phenotypes. Increasing evidence demonstrates that melanoma exosomes also facilitate tumor survival and metastasis. However, the role of melanoma exosomes in directly influencing macrophage function is poorly understood. Herein, we investigated the hypothesis that natural melanoma exosomes might directly influence macrophage polarization. To explore this hypothesis, ELISA, RT-qPCR, and macrophage functional studies were performed in vitro using an established source of melanoma exosomes (B16-F10). ELISA results for melanoma exosome induction of common M1 and M2 cytokines in RAW 264.7 macrophages, revealed that melanoma exosomes do not polarize macrophages exclusively in the M1 or M2 direction. Melanoma exosomes induced the M1 and M2 representative cytokines TNF-α and IL-10 respectively. Further assessment, using an RT-qPCR array with RAW 264.7 and primary macrophages, confirmed and extended the ELISA findings. Upregulation of markers common to both M1 and M2 polarization phenotypes included CCL22, IL-12B, IL-1β, IL-6, i-NOS, and TNF-α. The M2 cytokine TGF-β was upregulated in primary but not RAW 264.7 macrophages. Pro-tumor functions have been attributed to each of these markers. Macrophage functional assays demonstrated a trend toward increased i-NOS (M1) to arginase (M2) activity. Collectively, the results provide the first evidence that melanoma exosomes can induce a mixed M1 and M2 pro-tumor macrophage activation phenotype. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Anisotropic hybrid excitation modes in monolayer and double-layer phosphorene on polar substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi-Pouya, S.; Vazifehshenas, T.; Salavati-fard, T.; Farmanbar, M.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the anisotropic hybrid surface optical (SO) phonon-plasmon dispersion relations in monolayer and double-layer phosphorene systems located on the polar substrates, such as SiO2, h -BN, and Al2O3 . We calculate these hybrid modes by using the dynamical dielectric function in the random phase approximation in which the electron-electron interaction and long-range electric field generated by the substrate SO phonons via Fröhlich interaction are taken into account. In the long-wavelength limit, we obtain some analytical expressions for the hybrid SO phonon-plasmon dispersion relations which agree with those obtained from the loss function. Our results indicate a strong anisotropy in SO phonon-plasmon modes, which are stronger along the light-mass direction in our heterostructures. Furthermore, we find that the type of substrate has a significant effect on the dispersion relations of the coupled modes. Importantly, the hybrid excitations are apparently sensitive to the misalignment and separation between layers in double-layer phosphorene.

  14. Unsteady mixed convection flow of a micro-polar fluid near the stagnation point on a vertical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lok, Y.Y. [Center for Academic Services, Kolej Universiti Teknikal Kebangsaan Malaysia, 75450 Ayer Keroh, Melaka (Malaysia); Amin, N. [Department of Mathematics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Pop, I. [Faculty of Mathematics, University of Cluj, R-3400 Cluj, CP 253 (Romania)

    2006-12-15

    The unsteady mixed convection boundary-layer flow of a micro-polar fluid near the region of the stagnation point on a double-infinite vertical flat plate is studied. It is assumed that the unsteadiness is caused by the impulsive motion of the free stream velocity and by sudden increase or sudden decrease in the surface temperature from the uniform ambient temperature. The problem is reduced to a system of non-dimensional partial differential equations, which is solved numerically using the Keller-box method. This method may present well-behaved solutions for the transient (small time) solution and those of the steady-state flow (large time) solution. It was found that there is a smooth transition from the small-time solution (initial unsteady-state flow) to the large-time solution (final steady-state flow). Further, it is shown that for both assisting and opposing cases and a fixed value of the Prandtl number, the reduced steady-state skin friction and the steady-state heat transfer from the wall (or Nusselt number) decrease with the increase of the material parameter. On the other hand, it is shown that with the increase of the Prandtl number and a fixed value of the material parameter, the reduced steady-state skin friction decreases when the flow is assisting and it increases when the flow is opposing. (author)

  15. A Hybrid Numerical Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modern day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The method configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. Closure for the RANS equations was obtained using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The wall-function approach enabled a continuous computational grid from the RANS regions to the LES region. The LES equations were closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. The hybrid RANS-LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Vortex shedding from the base region of a splitter plate separating the upstream flows was observed to eventually transition to turbulence. The location of the transition, however, was much further downstream than indicated by experiments. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, also indicated vortex shedding, but the transition to turbulence was found to occur much closer to the beginning of the mixing section. which is in agreement with experimental observations. These calculations demonstrated that LES simulations must be performed in three dimensions. Comparisons of time-averaged axial velocities and turbulence intensities indicated reasonable agreement with experimental

  16. A revised surface age for the North Polar Layered Deposits of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Margaret E.; Byrne, Shane; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Dundas, Colin M.

    2016-01-01

    The North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) of Mars contain a complex stratigraphy that has been suggested to retain a record of past eccentricity- and obliquity-forced climate changes. The surface accumulation rate in the current climate can be constrained by the crater retention age. We scale NPLD crater diameters to account for icy target strength and compare surface age using a new production function for recent small impacts on Mars to the previously used model of Hartmann (2005). Our results indicate that ice is accumulating in these craters several times faster than previously thought, with a 100 m diameter crater being completely infilled within centuries. Craters appear to have a diameter-dependent lifetime, but the data also permit a complete resurfacing of the NPLD at ~1.5 ka.

  17. Massive CO2 Ice Deposits Sequestered in the South Polar Layered Deposits of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Davis, Brian J.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Byrne, Shane; Mellon, Michael T.; Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Haberle, Robert M.; Kahre, Melinda A.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Carter, Lynn M.; Smith, Isaac B.; Holt, John W.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Nunes, Daniel C.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Egan, Anthony F.; Titus, Timothy N.; Seu, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Shallow Radar soundings from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal a buried deposit of carbon dioxide (CO2) ice within the south polar layered deposits of Mars with a volume of 9500 to 12,500 cubic kilometers, about 30 times that previously estimated for the south pole residual cap. The deposit occurs within a stratigraphic unit that is uniquely marked by collapse features and other evidence of interior CO2 volatile release. If released into the atmosphere at times of high obliquity, the CO2 reservoir would increase the atmospheric mass by up to 80%, leading to more frequent and intense dust storms and to more regions where liquid water could persist without boiling.

  18. Polarized dependence of nonlinear susceptibility in a single layer graphene system in infrared region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solookinejad, G., E-mail: ghsolooki@gmail.com

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of a single-layer graphene nanostructure driven by a weak probe light and an elliptical polarized coupling field is discussed theoretically. The Landau levels of graphene can be separated in infrared or terahertz regions under the strong magnetic field. Therefore, by using the density matrix formalism in quantum optic, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of the medium can be derived. It is demonstrated that by adjusting the elliptical parameter, one can manipulate the linear and nonlinear absorption as well as Kerr nonlinearity of the medium. It is realized that the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be possible with zero linear absorption and nonlinear amplification at some values of elliptical parameter. Our results may be having potential applications in quantum information science based on Nano scales devices.

  19. Structure of the oceanic mixed layer in western Bay of Bengal during MONEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A.F.; Somayajulu, Y.K.

    Based on the hourly BT and six hourly CSTD data, collected from two stations in the western Bay of Bengal during July 1979, the diurnal variations of temperature in the oceanic mixed layer (OML) were analysed as a function of the prevailing surface...

  20. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Shear Layers and Relation to Mixing Reaction and Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    dimensional motion in the turbulent mixing layer. Corcos, G.M. 1983, Journal de Mecanique theorique et appliquee, Numero Special, p. 147-167. The Role of... Reynolds numbers, it is found that such vortices are unstable in shear end are transformed into smaller vortices. The nonlinear evolution of these

  1. Numerical simulation of a plane turbulent mixing layer, with applications to isothermal, rapid reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Pratt, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for the numerical prediction of turbulent mixing in a spatially-developing, free shear layer. Most significantly, the computation incorporates the effects of large-scale structures, Schmidt number and Reynolds number on mixing, which have been overlooked in the past. In flow field prediction, large-eddy simulation was conducted by a modified 2-D vortex method with subgrid-scale modeling. The predicted mean velocities, shear layer growth rates, Reynolds stresses, and the RMS of longitudinal velocity fluctuations were found to be in good agreement with experiments, although the lateral velocity fluctuations were overpredicted. In scalar transport, the Monte Carlo method was extended to the simulation of the time-dependent pdf transport equation. For the first time, the mixing frequency in Curl's coalescence/dispersion model was estimated by using Broadwell and Breidenthal's theory of micromixing, which involves Schmidt number, Reynolds number and the local vorticity. Numerical tests were performed for a gaseous case and an aqueous case. Evidence that pure freestream fluids are entrained into the layer by large-scale motions was found in the predicted pdf. Mean concentration profiles were found to be insensitive to Schmidt number, while the unmixedness was higher for higher Schmidt number. Applications were made to mixing layers with isothermal, fast reactions. The predicted difference in product thickness of the two cases was in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  2. Regional heat flux over the NOPEX area estimated from the evolution of the mixed-layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.

    1999-01-01

    of forest, agricultural fields, mires and lakes within the boreal zone, was determined for 3 days of the campaign in 1994. It was found to be lower than the heat flux over forest and higher than the heat Aux over agricultural fields. The regional heat flux estimated by the mixed-layer evolution method...

  3. Polar layered deposits on Mars: Inner structure and relation to the climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, M.; Head, J.

    Martian polar layered deposits (PLD) have long been thought to contain a record of the past climate. Roles of deposition, ablation and flow in PLD are a subject of discussion and controversy. Understanding of these roles is critical for reading the climate record. We show that simple mechanism including latitude-dependent deposition and ablation, albedo feedback and role of slopes explains many essential features of the PLD. We consider the present-day PLD is a result of a history of H2O ice deposition and sublimation during some recent period of the geological history. The deposition - ablation balance is a function of latitude. Typically, net deposition occurs in the polar area inside some boundary latitude of zero balance, and net ablation occurs outside. This dividing latitude shifts back and forth due to climate change caused by (1) the change of the spin/orbit parameters ("astronomical forcing"), (2) availability of the water vapor source at lower latitudes (tropical mountain glaciers, high-latitude icy mantles, the opposite polar cap, groundwater discharge events), (3) internal climate instabilities. The outermost position of the ablation/deposition boundary was well outside the present margins of the PLD; in the opposite extremes, the area of the positive balance disappeared, and the whole polar cap underwent ablation. Through time such oscillations produced a dome-shaped stack of deposits with a possible thin layer of deposits outside the dome and with a number of unconformities inside. These unconformities will have an east-west oriented strike and a very shallow dip. There is a positive feedback between the deposition/ablation balance and albedo: high albedo favors deposition, and fresh deposits have high albedo. With this feedback, when the climate system goes through oscillations, the boundary latitude between positive and negative balance will stay for some periods of time at its outermost and innermost positions. This will result in steps in the

  4. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  5. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2012-03-21

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  6. Simulation and Visualization of Flows Laden with Cylindrical Nanoparticles in a Mixing Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqian Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of cylindrical particles in a mixing layer is studied using the pseudospectral method and discrete particle model. The effect of the Stokes number and particle aspect ratio on the mixing and orientation distribution of cylindrical particles is analyzed. The results show that the rollup of mixing layer drives the particles to the edge of the vortex by centrifugal force. The cylindrical particles with the small Stokes number almost follow fluid streamlines and are mixed thoroughly, while those with the large Stokes number, centrifugalized and accumulated at the edge of the vortex, are poorly mixed. The mixing degree of particles becomes worse as the particle aspect ratio increases. The cylindrical particles would change their orientation under two torques and rotate around their axis of revolution aligned to the vorticity direction when the shear rate is low, while aligning on the flow-gradient plane beyond a critical shear rate value. More particles are oriented with the flow direction, and this phenomenon becomes more obvious with the decrease of the Stokes number and particle aspect ratio.

  7. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The Martian polar caps and layered terrain presumably evolves by the deposition and removal of small amounts of water and dust each year, the current cap attributes therefore represent the incremental transport during a single year as integrated over long periods of time. The role was studied of condensation and sublimation of water ice in this process by examining the seasonal water cycle during the last 10(exp 7) yr. In the model, axial obliquity, eccentricity, and L sub s of perihelion vary according to dynamical models. At each epoch, the seasonal variations in temperature are calculated at the two poles, keeping track of the seasonal CO2 cap and the summertime sublimation of water vapor into the atmosphere; net exchange of water between the two caps is calculated based on the difference in the summertime sublimation between the two caps (or on the sublimation from one cap if the other is covered with CO2 frost all year). Results from the model can help to explain (1) the apparent inconsistency between the timescales inferred for layer formation and the much older crater retention age of the cap and (2) the difference in sizes of the two residual caps, with the south being smaller than the north.

  8. The influence of the mixed host emitting layer based on the TCTA and TPBi in blue phosphorescent OLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Lin; Tian, Wei; Kou, Zhi-Qi; Cheng, Shuang; Li, Yi-Hang

    2016-08-01

    The performance of the blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) can be improved by changing the proportion and structure of the host materials in the emitting layer. A series of devices with the mixed host (TCTAx: TPBi1-x) single emitting layer is fabricated and the best performance appears when x is 1/2. Then, the highest luminance and power efficiency reach 7189 (cd/m2) at 10.5 V and 41.7 lm/W at 2.75 V respectively after changing the position of the single host (TCTA or TPBi) emitting layer and the mixed host (TCTA1/2: TPBi1/2) emitting layer in the multiple emitting layers device. The power efficiency is almost 37% improved in device with the optimized mixed host multiple emitting layers than that of device with the mixed host single emitting layer, the former device shows great potential to realize the high efficiency blue PHOLEDs.

  9. Mixing and trapping of dissolved CO2 in deep geologic formations with shale layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Elif; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-07-01

    For dissolution trapping, the spatial variability of the geologic properties of naturally complex storage formations can significantly impact flow patterns and storage mechanisms of dissolved CO2. The significance of diffusive mixing that occurs in low permeability layers embedded between relatively higher permeability materials was highlighted by Agartan et al. (2015) using a highly controlled laboratory experimental study on trapping of dissolved CO2 in multilayered systems. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling study on the impacts of low permeability layers on flow and storage of dissolved CO2 in realistic field-scale settings. The simulator of variable-density flow used in this study was first verified using the experimental data in Agartan et al. (2015) to capture the observed processes. The simulator was then applied to a synthetic, field-scale multilayered system, with 19 sensitivity cases having variable permeability and thickness of the shale layers as well as the source strength and geometry of the source zone of dissolved CO2. Simulation results showed that the presence of continuous shale layers in the storage system disrupts the convective mixing by enhancing lateral spreading of dissolved CO2 in sandstone layers and retarding the vertical mixing of dissolved CO2. The effectiveness of trapping of dissolved CO2 depends on the physical properties of the shale layers and configurations of the source zone. The comparison to homogeneous cases with effective vertical permeability shows that it is important to capture these continuous thin shale layers in a storage formation and include them in the models to enhance dissolution trapping.

  10. Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Balin, Yurii; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Penner, Iogannes; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2014-10-06

    Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds are observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar. These layers of thickness of several hundred meters are identified by three attributes: the backscatter reveals a sharp ridge while the depolarization ratio and color ratio become deep minima. These attributes have been justified by theoretical calculations of these quantities within the framework of the physical-optics approximation.

  11. Physical Models of Layered Polar Firn Brightness Temperatures from 0.5 to 2 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shurun; Aksoy, Mustafa; Brogioni, Marco; Macelloni, Giovanni; Durand, Michael; Jezek, Kenneth C.; Wang, Tian-Lin; Tsang, Leung; Johnson, Joel T.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We investigate physical effects influencing 0.5-2 GHz brightness temperatures of layered polar firn to support the Ultra Wide Band Software Defined Radiometer (UWBRAD) experiment to be conducted in Greenland and in Antarctica. We find that because ice particle grain sizes are very small compared to the 0.5-2 GHz wavelengths, volume scattering effects are small. Variations in firn density over cm- to m-length scales, however, cause significant effects. Both incoherent and coherent models are used to examine these effects. Incoherent models include a 'cloud model' that neglects any reflections internal to the ice sheet, and the DMRT-ML and MEMLS radiative transfer codes that are publicly available. The coherent model is based on the layered medium implementation of the fluctuation dissipation theorem for thermal microwave radiation from a medium having a nonuniform temperature. Density profiles are modeled using a stochastic approach, and model predictions are averaged over a large number of realizations to take into account an averaging over the radiometer footprint. Density profiles are described by combining a smooth average density profile with a spatially correlated random process to model density fluctuations. It is shown that coherent model results after ensemble averaging depend on the correlation lengths of the vertical density fluctuations. If the correlation length is moderate or long compared with the wavelength (approximately 0.6x longer or greater for Gaussian correlation function without regard for layer thinning due to compaction), coherent and incoherent model results are similar (within approximately 1 K). However, when the correlation length is short compared to the wavelength, coherent model results are significantly different from the incoherent model by several tens of kelvins. For a 10-cm correlation length, the differences are significant between 0.5 and 1.1 GHz, and less for 1.1-2 GHz. Model results are shown to be able to match the v

  12. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  13. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  14. A model study of mixing and entrainment in the horizontally evolving atmospheric convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorovich, E.; Kaiser, R. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    We present results from a parallel wind-tunnel/large-eddy simulation (LES) model study of mixing and entrainment in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) longitudinally developing over a heated surface. The advection-type entrainment of warmer air from upper turbulence-free layers into the growing CBL has been investigated. Most of numerical and laboratory model studies of the CBL carried out so far dealt with another type of entrainment, namely the non-steady one, regarding the CBL growth as a non-stationary process. In the atmosphere, both types of the CBL development can take place, often being superimposed. (au)

  15. The Ultrathin Limit and Dead-layer Effects in Local Polarization Switching of BiFeO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro [ORNL; Huijben, Mark [University of Twente, Netherlands; Pan, Minghu [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Balke, Nina [ORNL; Chang, Hye Jung [ORNL; Borisevich, Albina Y [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL; Rijnders, Guus [MESA+ University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands; Blank, Dave H. A. [University of Twente, Netherlands; Ramesh, R. [University of California, Berkeley; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Using piezoresponse force microscopy in ultra-high vacuum, polarization switching has been detected and quantified in epitaxial BiFeO3 films from 200 down to ~ 4 unit cells. Local remnant piezoresponse was used to infer the applied electric field inside the ferroelectric volume, and account for the elusive effect of dead-layers in ultrathin films. The dead-layer manifested itself in the slower than anticipated decrease of the switching bias with film thickness, yielding apparent Kay-Dunn scaling of the switching field, while the statistical analysis of hysteresis loops revealed lateral variation of the dead-layer with sub-10 nm resolution.

  16. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  17. Sodar measurements of the mixed-layer depth over a large city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurygin, E.A. [Russia Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    The results of synchronous sodar`s measurements on a territory of city and suburban area have shown: (a) The types of stratification over centre of the city and periphery considerably differ, and these distinctions are more often displayed in morning and evening transition period. The agreement between types of stratification in the centre and on the periphery was observed in 40% of cases; (b) At equal temperature stratification the mixed-layer depth in centre of the city is about 50-150 m higher at inversions in comparison with a periphery, at advanced convection - these depths are identical; (c) At different stratification between the city and periphery the distinction in the mixed-layer depth can reach 200. (au)

  18. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  19. Mixed-layered bismuth--oxygen--iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2015-01-06

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  20. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  1. Mixing height over water and its role on the correlation between temperature and humidity fluctuations in the unstable surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of the mixing height over inner Danish waters carried out from September 1990 to October 1992, are discussed. The statistical analysis of the mixed-layer height (z(i)) over the sea does not exhibit the daily variation that is characteristic of the mixed ...

  2. Seasonal variability of the mixed layer in the central Bay of Bengal and associated changes in nutrients and chlorophyll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    greater wind-driven mixing, while the intrusion of high-salinity waters erodes the halocline and weakens the upper-layer stratification of the water column and aids in vertical mixing. The deep MLD in the south during winter was driven by wind-mixing when...

  3. The relation of mixed-layer net community production to phytoplankton community composition in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Nicolas; Wright, Simon W.; Thomson, Paul G.; Trull, Thomas W.; Westwood, Karen J.; de Salas, Miguel; Davidson, Andrew; Pearce, Imojen; Davies, Diana M.; Matear, Richard J.

    2015-04-01

    Surface ocean productivity mediates the transfer of carbon to the deep ocean and in the process regulates atmospheric CO2 levels. A common axiom in oceanography is that large phytoplankton contribute disproportionally to the transfer of carbon to the deep ocean because of their greater ability to escape grazing pressure, build biomass, and sink. In the present study, we assessed the relationship of net community production to phytoplankton assemblages and plankton size distribution in the Sub-Antarctic Zone and northern reaches of the Polar Frontal Zone in the Australian sector of the Southern Ocean. We reanalyzed and synthesized previously published estimates of O2/Ar net community oxygen production (NCP) and triple-O2 isotopes gross primary oxygen production (GPP) along with microscopic and pigment analyses of the microbial community. Overall, we found that the axiom that large phytoplankton drive carbon export was not supported in this region. Mixed-layer-depth-integrated NCP was correlated to particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration in the mixed layer. While lower NCP/GPP and NCP/POC values were generally associated with communities dominated by smaller plankton size (as would be expected), these communities did not preclude high values for both properties. Vigorous NCP in some regions occurred in the virtual absence of large phytoplankton (and specifically diatoms) and in communities dominated by nanoplankton and picoplankton. We also observed a positive correlation between NCP and the proportion of the phytoplankton community grazed by microheterotrophs, supporting the mediating role of grazers in carbon export. The novel combination of techniques allowed us to determine how NCP relates to upper ocean ecosystem characteristics and may lead to improved models of carbon export.

  4. On the Pairing Process in an Excited, Plane, Turbulent Mixing Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    1984). 17. Browand, F.K.; Ho, C.M.: The mixing layer: an example of quasi two- dimensional turbulence. J. de Mcanique Th~orique et Appliqu~e, Numero ...completed when the disturbance becomes neutrally stable to its local environment. Browand and Weidman [13] observed that the Reynolds stress generated...this process. This can be-explained by the- fact that the- Reynolds -! stress produced by large coherent structures vanishes when the pairing process

  5. Investigation of the mixing layer of underexpanded supersonic jets by particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, Benoît; Castelain, Thomas; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Particle image velocimetry is applied to slightly underexpanded supersonic jets. • The jet shock-cell structure and turbulence are investigated in detail. • An influence of the former on the latter is visible at higher Mach numbers. • The estimates of the wideband intrinsic length scales of turbulence are of the order of the shock-cell length. - Abstract: The present experimental study focuses on some properties of the turbulence and the shock-cell structure in underexpanded supersonic jets, which are of practical relevance in air transport. Choked jets at fully expanded Mach numbers M j = 1.10, 1.15, 1.35 and 1.50 are investigated using particle image velocimetry. The strength of the shock-cell structure is studied from mean velocity profiles, both in the jet core and in the mixing layer. The general geometry of the latter and its location relatively to the mean shock-cell structure are established. Furthermore, detailed accounts of mixing layer thickness, turbulence levels, spatial correlations and intrinsic turbulence length scales are given. While the mean velocity variations related to the shock-cell structure extend up to the subsonic part of the studied jets, their mixing layer is found to be mostly located in the subsonic region. Some of the observed turbulence properties, like the mixing layer thickness and turbulence levels, are close to what is found for subsonic jets. The effect of the shock-cell structure on turbulence is however visible for M j ⩾1.35. The spatial correlations of turbulence are used to estimate intrinsic turbulence length scales and these are found to be of the order of the shock-cell length. These data are used to make some comments upon the generation mechanism of shock-associated noise, a noise component produced by imperfectly expanded supersonic jets

  6. Heterogeneities in illite/smectite mixed/layers clays: some comments and recollections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    A review of some studies of heterogeneities, structure and surface in illite/smectite mixed-layer clays of Vienna Basin using X-ray diffraction, high resolution-transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy, laser microprobe mass analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is given. The models of hexyl ammonium ion configuration complexed between silica sheets is discussed. 1 tab., 10 figs., 6 refs

  7. Magnetic behavior of Mg-Al-Zn-Fe mixed oxides from precursors layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, M.I., E-mail: marcosivanoliva@gmail.com [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); IFFAM AF (CONICET - FaMAF UNC), M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Heredia, A. [CITeQ - Facultad R. Cordoba, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Maestro Lopez esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, CP 5016 Cordoba (Argentina); Zandalazini, C.I. [Centro Laser de Ciencias Moleculares. INFIQC-FCQ-Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales-FaMAF-Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, CP5000 Cordoba, Argentina CONICET (Argentina); Crivello, M. [CITeQ - Facultad R. Cordoba, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Maestro Lopez esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, CP 5016 Cordoba (Argentina); Corchero, E. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    Mixed oxides of Mg-Al-Zn-Fe were obtained by calcination of layered double hydroxides (LDH) prepared by coprecipitation reaction with hydrothermal treatment. The structural characterization of precursors and oxides was carried out by X rays diffraction, showing increases of ZnO phase with the increase of the zinc content. Magnetic behavior was studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) showing both paramagnetic and super paramagnetic behavior depending on both particles size and composition.

  8. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez González, Sergio; Alastuey Urós, José Andrés; Alonso Pérez, Silvia; Querol, X.; Cuevas, Emilio; Abreu Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pandolfi, M.; Rosa Díaz, Jesús de la

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izana Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the d...

  9. Effect of shock interactions on mixing layer between co-flowing supersonic flows in a confined duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S. M. V.; Asano, S.; Imani, I.; Saito, T.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments are conducted to observe the effect of shock interactions on a mixing layer generated between two supersonic streams of Mach number M _{1} = 1.76 and M _{2} = 1.36 in a confined duct. The development of this mixing layer within the duct is observed using high-speed schlieren and static pressure measurements. Two-dimensional, compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the k-ω SST turbulence model in Fluent. Further, adverse pressure gradients are imposed by placing inserts of small ( boundary layer thickness) thickness on the walls of the test section. The unmatched pressures cause the mixing layer to bend and lead to the formation of shock structures that interact with the mixing layer. The mixing layer growth rate is found to increase after the shock interaction (nearly doubles). The strongest shock is observed when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow. This shock interacts with the mixing layer exciting flow modes that produce sinusoidal flapping structures which enhance the mixing layer growth rate to the maximum (by 1.75 times). Shock fluctuations are characterized, and it is observed that the maximum amplitude occurs when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow.

  10. Tipping Point for Expansion of Layered Aluminosilicates in Weakly Polar Solvents: Supercritical CO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Loganathan, Narasimhan [College; Bowers, Geoffrey M. [Department; Kirkpatrick, R. James [College; Yazaydin, A. Ozgur [College; Department; Burton, Sarah D. [William; Hoyt, David W. [William; Thanthiriwatte, K. Sahan [Department; Dixon, David A. [Department; McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Ilton, Eugene S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Loring, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States

    2017-10-11

    Layered aluminosilicates play a dominant role in the mechanical and gas storage properties of the subsurface, are used in diverse industrial applications, and serve as model materials for understanding solvent-ion-support systems. Although expansion in the presence of H2O is well known to be systematically correlated with the hydration free energy of the interlayer cation, in environments dominated by non-polar solvents (i.e. CO2), uptake into the interlayer is not well-understood. Using novel high pressure capabilities, we investigated the interaction of super-critical CO2 with Na+-, NH4+-, and Cs+-saturated montmorillonite, comparing results with predictions from molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the known trend in H2O, and that cation solvation energies in CO2 suggest a stronger interaction with Na+, both the NH4+- and Cs+-clays readily absorbed CO2 and expanded while the Na+-clay did not. The apparent inertness of the Na+-clay was not due to kinetics, as experiments seeking a stable expanded state showed that none exists. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a large endothermicity to CO2 intercalation in the Na+-clay, but little or no energy barrier for the NH4+- and Cs+-clays. Consequently, we have shown for the first time that in the presence of a low dielectric constant gas swelling depends more on the strength of the interaction between interlayer cation and aluminosilicate sheets and less on that with solvent. The finding suggests a distinct regime in layered aluminosilicates swelling behavior triggered by low solvent polarizability, with important implications in geomechanics, storage and retention of volatile gases, and across industrial uses in gelling, decoloring, heterogeneous catalysis, and semi-permeable reactive barriers.

  11. Mixing processes at the subsurface layer in the Amundsen Sea shelf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, J.; Djoumna, G.; Francis, D. K.; Holland, D.

    2017-12-01

    In the Amundsen Sea shelf region, mixing processes promote an upward transport of diapycnal fluxes of heat and salt from the subsurface to the surface mixing layer. Here we estimate the diapycnal mixing rates on the Amundsen shelf from a multi-year mooring cluster and five research cruises. By applying fine-scale parameterizations, the mixing rates obtained were higher near the southern end of Pine Island glacier front and exceeded 10-2 m2s-1. The eddy diffusivity increased near the critical latitude (74o 28' S) for semi-diurnal M2 tides, which coincided with near-critical topography on the shelf. This condition favored the generation of internal waves of M2 frequency. The semi-diurnal dynamic enhanced the mixing that potentially affected the heat budget and the circulation of the modified Circumpolar Deep Water. This can be observed in the characteristics of water exchange both below the ice shelves and between the continental shelf and the ice shelf cavities. The location of the critical latitude and critical topography provided favorable conditions for the generation of internal waves. KEYWORDS: Mixing processes, diapycnal fluxes, critical latitude, Circumpolar Deep Water.

  12. Noncondensable gas effect on film condensation of boundary layer flow in the entire mixed convection regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y.; Guentay, S.

    2009-01-01

    The mixed convection regime for film condensation is enveloped by free convection at one end and forced convection at the other. At both ends, the noncondensable gas effect on film condensation was established in the pioneering work by Sparrow and Minkowycz. But most practical flows are in the mixed convection regime, where it was observed in recent experiments that the pioneering work could not be applied satisfactorily. The current work tries to bridge the gap by presenting a generic boundary layer formulation of the noncondensable gas effect in the entire mixed convection regime. The current formulation is reduced to two specific cases which mathematically coincide with the pioneering work at two ends. In between, the current work fills the gap by presenting solution for the full spectrum of the mixed convection regime. The presented mixed convection solution intermediates between Minkowycz's prediction on the free convection flow and Sparrow's prediction on the forced convection flow, and is in fair agreement with the recent experiments performed in the mixed convection regime. It is found that although a slight vapor flow imposed on free convection has little effect on film condensation in the absence of noncondensable gases, a slight gas flow imposed on condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases can drastically affect the mass transfer boundary and reduce the accumulation of gas at the interface due to a strong coupling between hydrodynamics and convective mass diffusion. (author)

  13. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  14. Influence of Subgrade and Unbound Granular Layers Stiffness on Fatigue Life of Hot Mix Asphalts - HMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Rondón-Quintana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The mainly factors studied to predict fatigue life of hot mix asphalt-HMA in flexible pavements are the loading effect, type of test, compaction methods, design parameters of HMA (e.g., particle size and size distribution curve, fine content, type of bitumen and the variables associated with the environment (mainly moisture, temperature, aging. This study evaluated through a computer simulation, the influence of the granular layers and subgrade on the fatigue life of asphalt layers in flexible pavement structures. Mechanics parameters of granular layers of subgrade, base and subbase were obtained using the mathematical equations currently used for this purpose in the world. The emphasis of the study was the city of Bogotá, where the average annual temperature is 14°C and soils predominantly clay, generally experience CBR magnitudes between 1% and 4%. General conclusion: stiffness of the granular layers and subgrade significantly affect the fatigue resistance of HMA mixtures. Likewise, the use of different equations reported in reference literature in order to characterize granular layers may vary the fatigue life between 4.6 and 48.5 times, varying the thickness of the pavement layers in the design.

  15. Halogens and their role in polar boundary-layer ozone depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Simpson

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available During springtime in the polar regions, unique photochemistry converts inert halide salt ions (e.g. Br into reactive halogen species (e.g. Br atoms and BrO that deplete ozone in the boundary layer to near zero levels. Since their discovery in the late 1980s, research on ozone depletion events (ODEs has made great advances; however many key processes remain poorly understood. In this article we review the history, chemistry, dependence on environmental conditions, and impacts of ODEs. This research has shown the central role of bromine photochemistry, but how salts are transported from the ocean and are oxidized to become reactive halogen species in the air is still not fully understood. Halogens other than bromine (chlorine and iodine are also activated through incompletely understood mechanisms that are probably coupled to bromine chemistry. The main consequence of halogen activation is chemical destruction of ozone, which removes the primary precursor of atmospheric oxidation, and generation of reactive halogen atoms/oxides that become the primary oxidizing species. The different reactivity of halogens as compared to OH and ozone has broad impacts on atmospheric chemistry, including near complete removal and deposition of mercury, alteration of oxidation fates for organic gases, and export of bromine into the free troposphere. Recent changes in the climate of the Arctic and state of the Arctic sea ice cover are likely to have strong effects on halogen activation and ODEs; however, more research is needed to make meaningful predictions of these changes.

  16. The Density of the North Polar Layered Deposit from Gravity and Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, L.; Lewis, K. W.

    2017-12-01

    The North Polar Layered Deposit (NPLD) of Mars is a vast reservoir of water ice with a volume of 1.14 million km3. Radar data indicates that the ice in the NPLD is extremely pure with dust content between 5 % to 10 %, however the radar data has not been able to put a direct constraint on the density of the NPLD. Here, we localize the gravity and topography signature of the NPLD and place a direct constraint on its density. We performed a grid search by generating admittance spectrum at each latitude and longitude between 75° N to 90° N and 0° E to 360° E, using a spherical cap of angular radius () of 7°, and a harmonic-bandwidth of the localization window Lwin of 37°. A region between Gemina Lingula and Planum Boreum was found to possesss an adequate correlation between gravity and topography. The estimated admittance spectra were compared with synthetic admittance spectra to constrain the load-density and the elastic thickness of the lithosphere. We constructed forward models by assuming that the lithosphere is a thin shell that deforms elastically in response to surface loads. We find that the bulk density of the NPLD ranges between 1000 to 1100 kg.m-3. Assuming a grain density of 3000 kg.m-3 for dust, the NPLD region within our localized window can contain dust content between 3 - 8 %, which is in an excellent agreement with the radar data.

  17. Polarization-selective infrared bandpass filter based on a two-layer subwavelength metallic grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohne, Andrew J.; Moon, Benjamin; Baumbauer, Carol L.; Gray, Tristan; Dilts, James; Shaw, Joseph A.; Dickensheets, David L.; Nakagawa, Wataru

    2017-08-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a polarization-selective infrared bandpass filter based on a two-layer subwavelength metallic grating for use in polarimetric imaging. Gold nanowires were deposited via physical vapor deposition (PVD) onto a silicon surface relief grating that was patterned using electron beam lithography (EBL) and fabricated using standard silicon processing techniques. Optical characterization with a broad-spectrum tungsten halogen light source and a grating spectrometer showed normalized peak TM transmission of 53% with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 122 nm, which was consistent with rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) simulations. Simulation results suggested that device operation relied on suppression of the TM transmission caused by surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation at the gold-silicon interface and an increase in TM transmission caused by a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonance in the cavity between the gratings. TE rejection occurred at the initial air/gold interface. We also present simulation results of an improved design based on a two-dielectric grating where two different SPP resonances allowed us to improve the shape of the passband by suppressing the side lobes. This newer design resulted in improved side-band performance and increased peak TM transmission.

  18. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Caryn L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  19. Polar boundary layer bromine explosion and ozone depletion events in the chemistry-climate model EMAC v2.52: implementation and evaluation of AirSnow algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Stefanie; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin

    2018-03-01

    Ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the polar boundary layer have been observed frequently during springtime. They are related to events of boundary layer enhancement of bromine. Consequently, increased amounts of boundary layer volume mixing ratio (VMR) and vertical column densities (VCDs) of BrO have been observed by in situ observation, ground-based as well as airborne remote sensing, and from satellites. These so-called bromine explosion (BE) events have been discussed serving as a source of tropospheric BrO at high latitudes, which has been underestimated in global models so far. We have implemented a treatment of bromine release and recycling on sea-ice- and snow-covered surfaces in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) based on the scheme of Toyota et al. (2011). In this scheme, dry deposition fluxes of HBr, HOBr, and BrNO3 over ice- and snow-covered surfaces are recycled into Br2 fluxes. In addition, dry deposition of O3, dependent on temperature and sunlight, triggers a Br2 release from surfaces associated with first-year sea ice. Many aspects of observed bromine enhancements and associated episodes of near-complete depletion of boundary layer ozone, both in the Arctic and in the Antarctic, are reproduced by this relatively simple approach. We present first results from our global model studies extending over a full annual cycle, including comparisons with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite BrO VCDs and surface ozone observations.

  20. Magnetic materials. Tilt engineering of spontaneous polarization and magnetization above 300 K in a bulk layered perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Michael J; Mandal, Pranab; Dyer, Matthew S; Alaria, Jonathan; Borisov, Pavel; Niu, Hongjun; Claridge, John B; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2015-01-23

    Crystalline materials that combine electrical polarization and magnetization could be advantageous in applications such as information storage, but these properties are usually considered to have incompatible chemical bonding and electronic requirements. Recent theoretical work on perovskite materials suggested a route for combining both properties. We used crystal chemistry to engineer specific atomic displacements in a layered perovskite, (Ca(y)Sr(1- y))(1.15)Tb(1.85)Fe2O7, that change its symmetry and simultaneously generate electrical polarization and magnetization above room temperature. The two resulting properties are magnetoelectrically coupled as they arise from the same displacements. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Comparison of Four Mixed Layer Mesoscale Parameterizations and the Equation for an Arbitrary Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two issues, the inter-comparison of four mixed layer mesoscale parameterizations and the search for the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer. It must be stressed that our analysis is limited to mixed layer mesoscales since we do not treat sub-mesoscales and small turbulent mixing. As for the first item, since three of the four parameterizations are expressed in terms of a stream function and a residual flux of the RMT formalism (residual mean theory), while the fourth is expressed in terms of vertical and horizontal fluxes, we needed a formalism to connect the two formulations. The standard RMT representation developed for the deep ocean cannot be extended to the mixed layer since its stream function does not vanish at the ocean's surface. We develop a new RMT representation that satisfies the surface boundary condition. As for the general form of the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer, thus far, it has been assumed that there is only the one that originates from the curl of the stream function. This is because it was assumed that the tracer residual flux is purely diffusive. On the other hand, we show that in the case of an arbitrary tracer, the residual flux has also a skew component that gives rise to an additional bolus velocity. Therefore, instead of only one bolus velocity, there are now two, one coming from the curl of the stream function and other from the skew part of the residual flux. In the buoyancy case, only one bolus velocity contributes to the mean buoyancy equation since the residual flux is indeed only diffusive.

  2. Tailoring the Dielectric Layer Structure for Enhanced Performance of Organic Field-Effect Transistors: The Use of a Sandwiched Polar Dielectric Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shijiao; Yang, Xin; Zhuang, Xinming; Yu, Junsheng; Li, Lu

    2016-07-07

    To investigate the origins of hydroxyl groups in a polymeric dielectric and its applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), a polar polymer layer was inserted between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) dielectric layers, and its effect on the performance as an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) was studied. The OFETs with a sandwiched dielectric layer of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) or poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) containing hydroxyl groups had shown enhanced characteristics compared to those with only PMMA layers. The field-effect mobility had been raised more than 10 times in n -type devices (three times in the p -type one), and the threshold voltage had been lowered almost eight times in p -type devices (two times in the n -type). The on-off ratio of two kinds of devices had been enhanced by almost two orders of magnitude. This was attributed to the orientation of hydroxyl groups from disordered to perpendicular to the substrate under gate-applied voltage bias, and additional charges would be induced by this polarization at the interface between the semiconductor and dielectrics, contributing to the accumulation of charge transfer.

  3. Tailoring the Dielectric Layer Structure for Enhanced Performance of Organic Field-Effect Transistors: The Use of a Sandwiched Polar Dielectric Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijiao Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the origins of hydroxyl groups in a polymeric dielectric and its applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs, a polar polymer layer was inserted between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA dielectric layers, and its effect on the performance as an organic field-effect transistor (OFET was studied. The OFETs with a sandwiched dielectric layer of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA or poly(4-vinylphenol (PVP containing hydroxyl groups had shown enhanced characteristics compared to those with only PMMA layers. The field-effect mobility had been raised more than 10 times in n-type devices (three times in the p-type one, and the threshold voltage had been lowered almost eight times in p-type devices (two times in the n-type. The on-off ratio of two kinds of devices had been enhanced by almost two orders of magnitude. This was attributed to the orientation of hydroxyl groups from disordered to perpendicular to the substrate under gate-applied voltage bias, and additional charges would be induced by this polarization at the interface between the semiconductor and dielectrics, contributing to the accumulation of charge transfer.

  4. Detailed experimental investigations on flow behaviors and velocity field properties of a supersonic mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Hao; Hou, Juwei

    2018-03-01

    The flow behaviors and mixing characteristics of a supersonic mixing layer with a convective Mach number of 0.2 have been experimentally investigated utilizing nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering and particle image velocimetry techniques. The full development and evolution process, including the formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, breakdown of large-scale structures and establishment of self-similar turbulence, is exhibited clearly in the experiments, which can give a qualitative graphically comparing for the DNS and LES results. The shocklets are first captured at this low convective Mach number, and their generation mechanisms are elaborated and analyzed. The convective velocity derived from two images with space-time correlations is well consistent with the theoretical result. The pairing and merging process of large-scale vortices in transition region is clearly revealed in the velocity vector field. The analysis of turbulent statistics indicates that in weakly compressible mixing layers, with the increase of convective Mach number, the peak values of streamwise turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stress experience a sharp decrease, while the anisotropy ratio seems to keep quasi unchanged. The normalized growth rate of the present experiments shows a well agreement with former experimental and DNS data. The validation of present experimental results is important for that in the future the present work can be a reference for assessing the accuracy of numerical data.

  5. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinin, O; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S

    2016-01-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface. (paper)

  6. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier.

  7. Spatial variation in soil active-layer geochemistry across hydrologic margins in polar desert ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Barrett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar deserts are characterized by severe spatial-temporal limitations of liquid water. In soil active layers of the Antarctic Dry Valleys, liquid water is infrequently available over most of the arid terrestrial landscape. However, soils on the margins of glacial melt-water streams and lakes are visibly wet during the brief Austral summer when temperatures permit the existence of liquid water. We examined the role of these hydrologic margins as preferential zones for the transformation and transport of nutrient elements and solutes in an environment where geochemical weathering and biological activity is strictly limited by the dearth of liquid water. We report on hydropedological investigations of aquatic-terrestrial transition zones adjacent to 11 stream and lake systems in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Our results show that wetted zones extended 1–11 m from the edges of lotic and lentic systems. While capillary demand and surface evaporation drive a one-way flux of water through these zones, the scale of these transition zones is determined by the topography and physical characteristics of the surrounding soils. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes appear to be influenced by both the hydrology and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes. Salt concentrations are enriched near the distal boundary of the wetted fronts due to evapo-concentration of pore water in lake margin soils, while organic matter, ammonium and phosphate concentrations are highest in stream channel sediments where potential for biological activity is greatest. Thus, in the Antarctic Dry Valleys, intermittently wet soils on the margins of streams and lakes are important zones of both geochemical cycling and biological activity.

  8. Interface characterization of atomic layer deposited high-k on non-polar GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ye; Zeng, Ke; Singisetti, Uttam

    2017-10-01

    The interface properties between dielectrics and semiconductors are crucial for electronic devices. In this work, we report the electrical characterization of the interface properties between atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on non-polar a-plane ( 11 2 ¯ 0 ) and m-plane ( 1 1 ¯ 00 ) GaN grown by hybrid vapor phase epitaxy. A metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) structure was used to evaluate the interface properties. The impact of annealing on the interface properties was also investigated. The border trap in the oxide, characterized by the capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis loop, was low. The interface state density (Dit), extracted using the ac conductance method, is in the range of 0.5 × 1012/cm2 eV to 7.5 × 1011/cm2 eV within an energy range from 0.2 eV to 0.5 eV below the conduction band minimum. The m-plane GaN MOSCAPs exhibited better interface properties than the a-plane GaN MOSCAPs after annealing. Without annealing, Al2O3 dielectrics had higher border trap density and interface state density compared to HfO2 dielectrics. However, the annealing had different impacts on Al2O3 dielectrics as compared to HfO2. Our results showed that the annealing degraded the quality of the interface in HfO2, but it improved the quality of the interface in Al2O3 devices. The annealing also reduced the positive trapped oxide charge, resulting in a shift of C-V curves towards the positive bias region.

  9. Assessment of mixed-layer height estimation from single-wavelength ceilometer profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepp, Travis N.; Szykman, James J.; Long, Russell; Duvall, Rachelle M.; Krug, Jonathan; Beaver, Melinda; Cavender, Kevin; Kronmiller, Keith; Wheeler, Michael; Delgado, Ruben; Hoff, Raymond; Berkoff, Timothy; Olson, Erik; Clark, Richard; Wolfe, Daniel; Van Gilst, David; Neil, Doreen

    2017-10-01

    Differing boundary/mixed-layer height measurement methods were assessed in moderately polluted and clean environments, with a focus on the Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. This intercomparison was performed as part of ongoing measurements at the Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE) site in Hampton, Virginia and during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign that took place in and around Denver, Colorado. We analyzed CL51 data that were collected via two different methods (BLView software, which applied correction factors, and simple terminal emulation logging) to determine the impact of data collection methodology. Further, we evaluated the STRucture of the ATmosphere (STRAT) algorithm as an open-source alternative to BLView (note that the current work presents an evaluation of the BLView and STRAT algorithms and does not intend to act as a validation of either). Filtering criteria were defined according to the change in mixed-layer height (MLH) distributions for each instrument and algorithm and were applied throughout the analysis to remove high-frequency fluctuations from the MLH retrievals. Of primary interest was determining how the different data-collection methodologies and algorithms compare to each other and to radiosonde-derived boundary-layer heights when deployed as part of a larger instrument network. We determined that data-collection methodology is not as important as the processing algorithm and that much of the algorithm differences might be driven by impacts of local meteorology and precipitation events that pose algorithm difficulties. The results of this study show that a common processing algorithm is necessary for light detection and ranging (lidar)-based MLH intercomparisons and ceilometer-network operation, and that sonde-derived boundary layer heights are higher (10-15 % at midday) than lidar

  10. Assessment of mixed-layer height estimation from single-wavelength ceilometer profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Knepp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Differing boundary/mixed-layer height measurement methods were assessed in moderately polluted and clean environments, with a focus on the Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. This intercomparison was performed as part of ongoing measurements at the Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE site in Hampton, Virginia and during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ field campaign that took place in and around Denver, Colorado. We analyzed CL51 data that were collected via two different methods (BLView software, which applied correction factors, and simple terminal emulation logging to determine the impact of data collection methodology. Further, we evaluated the STRucture of the ATmosphere (STRAT algorithm as an open-source alternative to BLView (note that the current work presents an evaluation of the BLView and STRAT algorithms and does not intend to act as a validation of either. Filtering criteria were defined according to the change in mixed-layer height (MLH distributions for each instrument and algorithm and were applied throughout the analysis to remove high-frequency fluctuations from the MLH retrievals. Of primary interest was determining how the different data-collection methodologies and algorithms compare to each other and to radiosonde-derived boundary-layer heights when deployed as part of a larger instrument network. We determined that data-collection methodology is not as important as the processing algorithm and that much of the algorithm differences might be driven by impacts of local meteorology and precipitation events that pose algorithm difficulties. The results of this study show that a common processing algorithm is necessary for light detection and ranging (lidar-based MLH intercomparisons and ceilometer-network operation, and that sonde-derived boundary layer heights are higher (10–15 % at

  11. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. A time-lapse DC-IP monitoring system has been acquiring at least six datasets per day on a 42-electrode profile with 0.5. m electrode spacing since July 2013. Remote control of the data acquisition system enables interactive adaptation...

  12. Changes in mixed layer depth under climate change projections in two CGCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Sang-Wook [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea); Yim, Bo Young; Noh, Yign [Yonsei University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences/Global Environmental Laboratory, Seoul (Korea); Dewitte, Boris [Laboratoire d' Etude en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiale, Toulouse (France)

    2009-08-15

    Two coupled general circulation models, i.e., the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) models, were chosen to examine changes in mixed layer depth (MLD) in the equatorial tropical Pacific and its relationship with ENSO under climate change projections. The control experiment used pre-industrial greenhouse gas concentrations whereas the 2 x CO{sub 2} experiment used doubled CO{sub 2} levels. In the control experiment, the MLD simulated in the MRI model was shallower than that in the GFDL model. This resulted in the tropical Pacific's mean sea surface temperature (SST) increasing at different rates under global warming in the two models. The deeper the mean MLD simulated in the control simulation, the lesser the warming rate of the mean SST simulated in the 2 x CO{sub 2} experiment. This demonstrates that the MLD is a key parameter for regulating the response of tropical mean SST to global warming. In particular, in the MRI model, increased stratification associated with global warming amplified wind-driven advection within the mixed layer, leading to greater ENSO variability. On the other hand, in the GFDL model, wind-driven currents were weak, which resulted in mixed-layer dynamics being less sensitive to global warming. The relationship between MLD and ENSO was also examined. Results indicated that the non-linearity between the MLD and ENSO is enhanced from the control run to the 2 x CO{sub 2} run in the MRI model, in contrast, the linear relationship between the MLD index and ENSO is unchanged despite an increase in CO{sub 2} concentrations in the GFDL model. (orig.)

  13. Mechanisms of Mixed-Layer Salinity Seasonal Variability in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia; Serra, Nuno; Bryan, Frank O.; Johnson, Benjamin K.; Stammer, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    Based on a joint analysis of an ensemble mean of satellite sea surface salinity retrievals and the output of a high-resolution numerical ocean circulation simulation, physical processes are identified that control seasonal variations of mixed-layer salinity (MLS) in the Indian Ocean, a basin where salinity changes dominate changes in density. In the northern and near-equatorial Indian Ocean, annual salinity changes are mainly driven by respective changes of the horizontal advection. South of the equatorial region, between 45°E and 90°E, where evaporation minus precipitation has a strong seasonal cycle, surface freshwater fluxes control the seasonal MLS changes. The influence of entrainment on the salinity variance is enhanced in mid-ocean upwelling regions but remains small. The model and observational results reveal that vertical diffusion plays a major role in precipitation and river runoff dominated regions balancing the surface freshwater flux. Vertical diffusion is important as well in regions where the advection of low salinity leads to strong gradients across the mixed-layer base. There, vertical diffusion explains a large percentage of annual MLS variance. The simulation further reveals that (1) high-frequency small-scale eddy processes primarily determine the salinity tendency in coastal regions (in particular in the Bay of Bengal) and (2) shear horizontal advection, brought about by changes in the vertical structure of the mixed layer, acts against mean horizontal advection in the equatorial salinity frontal regions. Observing those latter features with the existing observational components remains a future challenge.

  14. Scale interactions in a mixing layer – the role of the large-scale gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-02-15

    © 2016 Cambridge University Press. The interaction between the large and the small scales of turbulence is investigated in a mixing layer, at a Reynolds number based on the Taylor microscale of , via direct numerical simulations. The analysis is performed in physical space, and the local vorticity root-mean-square (r.m.s.) is taken as a measure of the small-scale activity. It is found that positive large-scale velocity fluctuations correspond to large vorticity r.m.s. on the low-speed side of the mixing layer, whereas, they correspond to low vorticity r.m.s. on the high-speed side. The relationship between large and small scales thus depends on position if the vorticity r.m.s. is correlated with the large-scale velocity fluctuations. On the contrary, the correlation coefficient is nearly constant throughout the mixing layer and close to unity if the vorticity r.m.s. is correlated with the large-scale velocity gradients. Therefore, the small-scale activity appears closely related to large-scale gradients, while the correlation between the small-scale activity and the large-scale velocity fluctuations is shown to reflect a property of the large scales. Furthermore, the vorticity from unfiltered (small scales) and from low pass filtered (large scales) velocity fields tend to be aligned when examined within vortical tubes. These results provide evidence for the so-called \\'scale invariance\\' (Meneveau & Katz, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., vol. 32, 2000, pp. 1-32), and suggest that some of the large-scale characteristics are not lost at the small scales, at least at the Reynolds number achieved in the present simulation.

  15. Comparison of the sampling rates and partitioning behaviour of polar and non-polar contaminants in the polar organic chemical integrative sampler and a monophasic mixed polymer sampler for application as an equilibrium passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoonah; Schäffer, Andreas; Smith, Kilian

    2018-06-15

    In this work, Oasis HLB® beads were embedded in a silicone matrix to make a single phase passive sampler with a higher affinity for polar and ionisable compounds than silicone alone. The applicability of this mixed polymer sampler (MPS) was investigated for 34 aquatic contaminants (log K OW -0.03 to 6.26) in batch experiments. The influence of flow was investigated by comparing uptake under static and stirred conditions. The sampler characteristics of the MPS was assessed in terms of sampling rates (R S ) and sampler-water partition coefficients (K SW ), and these were compared to those of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) as a reference kinetic passive sampler. The MPS was characterized as an equilibrium sampler for both polar and non-polar compounds, with faster uptake rates and a shorter time to reach equilibrium than the POCIS. Water flow rate impacted sampling rates by up to a factor of 12 when comparing static and stirred conditions. In addition, the relative accumulation of compounds in the polyethersulfone (PES) membranes versus the inner Oasis HLB sorbent was compared for the POCIS, and ranged from <1% to 83% depending on the analyte properties. This is indicative of a potentially significant lag-phase for less polar compounds within POCIS. The findings of this study can be used to quantitatively describe the partitioning and kinetic behaviour of MPS and POCIS for a range of aquatic organic contaminants for application in field sampling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Homotopy simulation of axisymmetric laminar mixed convection nanofluid boundary layer flow over a vertical cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freidooni Mehr N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the semi-analytical/numerical technique known as the homotopy analysis method (HAM is employed to derive solutions for the laminar axisymmetric mixed convection boundary-layer nanofluid flow past a vertical cylinder. The similarity solutions are employed to transform the parabolic partial differential conservation equations into system of nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, subject to appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison has been done to verify the obtained results with the purely numerical results of Grosan and Pop (2011 with excellent correlation achieved. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, curvature parameter and mixed convection or buoyancy parameter on the dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions, skin friction and wall temperature gradients are illustrated graphically. HAM is found to demonstrate excellent potential for simulating nanofluid dynamics problems. Applications of the study include materials processing and also thermal enhancement of energy systems.

  17. Defining the ecologically relevant mixed-layer depth for Antarctica's coastal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filipa; Kohut, Josh; Oliver, Matthew J.; Schofield, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Mixed-layer depth (MLD) has been widely linked to phytoplankton dynamics in Antarctica's coastal regions; however, inconsistent definitions have made intercomparisons among region-specific studies difficult. Using a data set with over 20,000 water column profiles corresponding to 32 Slocum glider deployments in three coastal Antarctic regions (Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, and West Antarctic Peninsula), we evaluated the relationship between MLD and phytoplankton vertical distribution. Comparisons of these MLD estimates to an applied definition of phytoplankton bloom depth, as defined by the deepest inflection point in the chlorophyll profile, show that the maximum of buoyancy frequency is a good proxy for an ecologically relevant MLD. A quality index is used to filter profiles where MLD is not determined. Despite the different regional physical settings, we found that the MLD definition based on the maximum of buoyancy frequency best describes the depth to which phytoplankton can be mixed in Antarctica's coastal seas.

  18. Response of the equatorial Pacific to chlorophyll pigment in a mixed layer isopycnal ocean general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Ishizaka, J.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    pigment concentration from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). In the equatorial Pacific heat accumulation due to a higher abundance of chlorophyll pigments in the equatorial Pacific leads to a decrease of the mixed layer thickness. This generates...

  19. Chlorophyll modulation of sea surface temperature in the Arabian Sea in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    Remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) are used to estimate biological heating rate and investigate the biological modulation of the sea surface temperature (SST) in a bulk mixed layer model...

  20. Variability of mixed layer depth in the northern Indian Ocean during 1977 and 1979 summer monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Sadhuram, Y.; RameshBabu, V.

    Influences of wind stress (tau) and wind stress curl (Grad Gamma) on the short term variability of the mixed layer depth at different locations in the northern Indian Ocean during different phases of summer monsoon activity were examined...

  1. Linear and Weakly Nonlinear Instability of Shallow Mixing Layers with Variable Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Eglite

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear and weakly nonlinear instability of shallow mixing layers is analysed in the present paper. It is assumed that the resistance force varies in the transverse direction. Linear stability problem is solved numerically using collocation method. It is shown that the increase in the ratio of the friction coefficients in the main channel to that in the floodplain has a stabilizing influence on the flow. The amplitude evolution equation for the most unstable mode (the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation is derived from the shallow water equations under the rigid-lid assumption. Results of numerical calculations are presented.

  2. An analytical solution for the Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, M. A.; Kimiaeifar, Amin; Rahimpour, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an analytical solution for a Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow is presented. A similarity transform reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved analytically by means of the homotopy analysis method (HAM......). The results obtained in this study are compared with the numerical results released in the literature. A close agreement of the two sets of results indicates the accuracy of the HAM. The method can obtain an expression that is acceptable for all values of effective parameters and is also able to control...

  3. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    OpenAIRE

    S. Rodríguez; A. Alastuey; S. Alonso-Pérez; X. Querol; E. Cuevas; J. Abreu-Afonso; M. Viana; N. Pérez; M. Pandolfi; J. de la Rosa

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the d...

  4. Mixed layer variability and chlorophyll a biomass in the Bay of Bengal.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    ), the winds are weak and from northeasterly direc- tion. These northeast trade winds bring cool and dry con- tinental air mass to the Bay of Bengal. The unique feature Published by Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 3820 J... with sufficient details the role of the mixed layer in regulating the basin-wide variability in chlorophyll biomass and primary productivity. It is in this context that the present paper attempts to understand (1) processes con- trolling basin-wide variability...

  5. The anatomy of the mixing transition in homogeneous and stratified free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Peltier, W. R.

    2000-06-01

    We investigate the detailed nature of the ‘mixing transition’ through which turbulence may develop in both homogeneous and stratified free shear layers. Our focus is upon the fundamental role in transition, and in particular the associated ‘mixing’ (i.e. small-scale motions which lead to an irreversible increase in the total potential energy of the flow) that is played by streamwise vortex streaks, which develop once the primary and typically two-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) billow saturates at finite amplitude.

  6. Polarization properties of real aluminum mirrors; I. Influence of the aluminum oxide layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, G.; Snik, F.; Keller, C.U.

    2009-01-01

    In polarimetry, it is important to characterize the polarization properties of the instrument itself to disentangle real astrophysical signals from instrumental effects. This article deals with the accurate measurement and modeling of the polarization properties of real aluminum mirrors, as used in

  7. Polar orientation of a pendant anionic chromophore in thick layer-by-layer self-assembled polymeric films

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Akhilesh; Davis, Richey M.; Durak, Cemil; Heflin, James R.; Gibson, Harry W.

    2008-01-01

    Multilayer films with up to 600 bilayers and 740 nm thickness were fabricated using the alternating deposition of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly{1-[p-(3'-carboxy-4'-hydroxyphenylazo)benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethand iyl} on glass substrates. Linear relationships for absorbance, thickness, and the square root of the second harmonic intensity versus the number of bilayers demonstrates that the films have long range polar order and optical homogeneity. The deposition conditions (i.e., pH o...

  8. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, Albert; Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform...... of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation...

  9. Soft chemical control of the crystal and magnetic structure of a layered mixed valent manganite oxide sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack N. Blandy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative deintercalation of copper ions from the sulfide layers of the layered mixed-valent manganite oxide sulfide Sr2MnO2Cu1.5S2 results in control of the copper-vacancy modulated superstructure and the ordered arrangement of magnetic moments carried by the manganese ions. This soft chemistry enables control of the structures and properties of these complex materials which complement mixed-valent perovskite and perovskite-related transition metal oxides.

  10. Mixing times of organic molecules within secondary organic aerosol particles: a global planetary boundary layer perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Adrian M.; Butenhoff, Christopher L.; Grayson, James W.; Barsanti, Kelley; Jimenez, Jose L.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2017-11-01

    When simulating the formation and life cycle of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) with chemical transport models, it is often assumed that organic molecules are well mixed within SOA particles on the timescale of 1 h. While this assumption has been debated vigorously in the literature, the issue remains unresolved in part due to a lack of information on the mixing times within SOA particles as a function of both temperature and relative humidity. Using laboratory data, meteorological fields, and a chemical transport model, we estimated how often mixing times are SOA in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), the region of the atmosphere where SOA concentrations are on average the highest. First, a parameterization for viscosity as a function of temperature and RH was developed for α-pinene SOA using room-temperature and low-temperature viscosity data for α-pinene SOA generated in the laboratory using mass concentrations of ˜ 1000 µg m-3. Based on this parameterization, the mixing times within α-pinene SOA are 0.5 µg m-3 at the surface). Next, as a starting point to quantify how often mixing times of organic molecules are SOA generated using low, atmospherically relevant mass concentrations, we developed a temperature-independent parameterization for viscosity using the room-temperature viscosity data for α-pinene SOA generated in the laboratory using a mass concentration of ˜ 70 µg m-3. Based on this temperature-independent parameterization, mixing times within α-pinene SOA are SOA generated using low, atmospherically relevant mass concentrations. Finally, a parameterization for viscosity of anthropogenic SOA as a function of temperature and RH was developed using sucrose-water data. Based on this parameterization, and assuming sucrose is a good proxy for anthropogenic SOA, 70 and 83 % of the mixing times within anthropogenic SOA in the PBL are < 1 h for January and July, respectively, when concentrations are significant. These percentages are likely lower

  11. Mixed layer processes of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool during spring intermonsoon: a study based on observational and satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sabu, P.; Revichandran, C.

    in the mixed layer warming while the advection plays a role in spreading the warm water from the coastal region to the far west. In the southern part of the warm pool, the eddy induced horizontal mixing provides a substantial amount of heat spreading...

  12. A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    Photoluminescence measurements have been made on a set of epitaxially grown strained GaAs photocathode structures. The photocathodes are designed to exhibit a strain-induced enhancement of the electron spin polarization obtainable by optical pumping with circularly polarized radiation of near band gap energy. For the case of non-strained GaAs, the degree of spin polarization is limited to 50% by crystal symmetry. Under an appropriate uniaxial compression or tension, however, the valence band structure near the gap minimum is modified such that a spin polarization of 100% is theoretically possible. A total of nine samples with biaxial compressive strains ranging from zero to ∼0.8% are studied. X-ray diffraction analysis, utilizing Bragg reflections, is used to determine the crystal lattice structure of the samples. Luminescence spectra and luminescence circular polarization data are obtained at room temperature, ∼78 K and ∼12 K. The degree of luminescence circular polarization is used as a relative measure of the photo-excited electron spin polarization. The room temperature luminescence circular polarization data is compared with the measured electron spin polarization when the samples are used as electron photo-emitters with a negative electron affinity surface preparation. The luminescence data is also analyzed in conjunction with the crystal structure data with the goal of understanding the strain dependent valence band structure, optical pumping characteristics and spin depolarization mechanisms of the photocathode structures. A simple model is used to describe the luminescence data, obtained for the set of samples. Within the assumptions of the model, the deformation potentials a, b and d for GaAs are determined. The measured values are a = -10.16±.21 eV, b = -2.00±.05 eV and d = -4.87±.29 eV. Good agreement with published values of the deformation potentials provides support for the model used to describe the data

  13. Layered Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes Observed with the Tri-Static Eiscat VHF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I.; Anyairo, C.; Häggström, I.; Tjulin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are strong radar echoes that are typically observed at 50 to 500 MHz. They are often discussed in the context of dusty plasma studies and linked to e.g. the existence of charged ice particles, neutral atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stratification. The PMSE are observed at mesospheric temperature minimum when ice particles form, though the exact path of formation is still a topic for research. Mesospheric smoke particles that are assumed to form after or during the meteor ablation process possibly contribute to the formation of the ice particles. For understanding the formation of the radar echoes their variation with scattering angle is an important parameter. We analyze PMSE observations with the tri-static EISCAT VHF radar (224 MHz) during one day in June when PMSE were observed almost continuously from 7:00 to 13:00 UT. The radar signal was transmitted and received in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø. The receivers in Kiruna and Sodankylä were pointed at typical PMSE heights above the Tromsø transmitter and detected radar reflections at the same time and altitude as the Tromsø radar. The altitude of the PMSE changed with time and the extension of the echoes in altitude was smaller toward the end of the observation. These observations are among the first tri-static observations of PMSE. The observations suggest that the scattering process underlying the PMSE occurs over a broad range of scattering angles. Based on the observations we will show that the spectral width of the received echoes is most likely determined by the variations within the observed volume rather than by the scattering process. The observed frequency shifts suggest a layer structure and horizontal motions that vary with altitude. UHF (933 MHz) radar observations were carried out in parallel, they display predominantly incoherent scatter and an electron density typical for the altitude. Some other studies, have in

  14. Variable but persistent coexistence of Prochlorococcus ecotypes along temperature gradients in the ocean's surface mixed layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jeremy W; Lin, Yajuan; Gainer, P Jackson; Post, Anton F; Johnson, Zackary I; Zinser, Erik R

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of the phytoplankton communities in surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean are numerically dominated by one of two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus, eMIT9312 or eMED4. In this study, we surveyed large latitudinal transects in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean to determine if these ecotypes discretely partition the surface mixed layer niche, or if populations exist as a continuum along key environmental gradients, particularly temperature. Transitions of dominance occurred at approximately 19-21°C, with the eMED4 ecotype dominating the colder, and eMIT9312 ecotype dominating the warmer regions. Within these zones of regional dominance, however, the minority ecotype was not competed to extinction. Rather, a robust log-linear relationship between ecotype ratio and temperature characterized this stabilized coexistence: for every 2.5°C increase in temperature, the eMIT9312:eMED4 ratio increased by an order of magnitude. This relationship was observed in both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in pyrosequencing assays. Water column stratification also contributed to the ecotype ratio along the basin-scale transects, but to a lesser extent. Finally, instances where the ratio of the eMED4 and eMIT9312 abundances did not correlate well with temperature were identified. Such occurrences are likely due to changes in water temperatures outpacing changes in community structure. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A Method for Deriving the Boundary Layer Mixing Height from MODIS Atmospheric Profile Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Feng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer is the medium of energy, moisture, momentum and pollutant exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. In this paper, a method to derive the boundary layer mixing height (MH was introduced and applied over the Heihe river basin. Atmospheric profiles from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Sepctroradiometer (MODIS instrument onboard the NASA-Aqua satellite were used for the high spatial resolution of this method. A gap-filling method was used to replace missing MODIS data. In situ MH data were also calculated from HIWATER (Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research and WATER (Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research observational radiosonde sounding data from 2008 and 2012 using the Richardson number method combined with a subjective method. The MH occurs where there is an abrupt decrease in the MR (water vapor mixing ratio. The minimum vertical gradient of the MR is used to determine the MH. The method has an average RMSE of 370 m under clear skies and convective conditions. The seasonal variation in the MH at the Gaoya radiosonde station is also presented. The study demonstrates that remote sensing methodologies can successfully estimate the MH without the help of field measurements.

  16. Global and Koopman modes analysis of sound generation in mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.; Robinet, J.-C.; Gloerfelt, X. [Laboratoire DynFluid, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’Hopital, 75013 Paris (France); Alizard, F. [Laboratoire DynFluid, CNAM, 151 Boulevard de l’Hopital, 75013 Paris (France)

    2013-12-15

    It is now well established that linear and nonlinear instability waves play a significant role in the noise generation process for a wide variety of shear flows such as jets or mixing layers. In that context, the problem of acoustic radiation generated by spatially growing instability waves of two-dimensional subsonic and supersonic mixing layers are revisited in a global point of view, i.e., without any assumption about the base flow, in both a linear and a nonlinear framework by using global and Koopman mode decompositions. In that respect, a timestepping technique based on disturbance equations is employed to extract the most dynamically relevant coherent structures for both linear and nonlinear regimes. The present analysis proposes thus a general strategy for analysing the near-field coherent structures which are responsible for the acoustic noise in these configurations. In particular, we illustrate the failure of linear global modes to describe the noise generation mechanism associated with the vortex pairing for the subsonic regime whereas they appropriately explain the Mach wave radiation of instability waves in the supersonic regime. By contrast, the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analysis captures both the near-field dynamics and the far-field acoustics with a few number of modes for both configurations. In addition, the combination of DMD and linear global modes analyses provides new insight about the influence on the radiated noise of nonlinear interactions and saturation of instability waves as well as their interaction with the mean flow.

  17. A new first-order turbulence mixing model for the stable atmospheric boundary-layer: development and testing in large-eddy and single column models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Golaz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of the stably-stratified atmospheric boundary-layer is of crucial importance to different aspects of numerical weather prediction at regional scales and climate modeling at global scales, such as land-surface temperature forecasts, fog and frost prediction, and polar climate. It is well-known that most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing of the stable boundary-layer to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component under strong stability, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. In this study we develop and test a general turbulence mixing model of the stable boundary-layer which works under different stabilities and for steady as well as unsteady conditions. A-priori large-eddy simulation (LES) tests are presented to motivate and verify the new parameterization. Subsequently, an assessment of this model using the GFDL single-column model (SCM) is performed. Idealized test cases including continuously varying stability, as well as stability discontinuity, are used to test the new SCM against LES results. A good match of mean and flux profiles is found when the new parameterization is used, while other traditional first-order turbulence models using the concept of stability function perform poorly. SCM spatial resolution is also found to have little impact on the performance of the new turbulence closure, but temporal resolution is important and a numerical stability criterion based on the model time step is presented.

  18. The Mars water cycle at other epochs - Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model is presented of the integrated role of seasonal water cycle on the evolution of polar deposits on Mars over the last 10 million years. From the model, it is concluded that the only major difference between the polar caps which affects their long-term behavior is ultimately the difference in their elevations. Because of that difference, there is a preference for CO2 frost to stay longer on the northern polar cap. The average difference in sublimation at the caps results in a net south-to-north transport of water ice over long time scales. Superimposed on any long-term behavior is a transfer of water ice between the caps on the 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr time scales. The amount of water exchanged is small compared to the total ice content of the polar deposits.

  19. The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment II: Autonomous Platforms and Mixed Layer Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Perry, M.; Fennel, K.; Gray, A.; Rehm, E.; Briggs, N.; Sackmann, B. S.; Gudmundsson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment (NAB08) employed a system of drifting floats, mobile gliders and ship-based measurements to resolve patch-scale physical and biological variability over the 3- month course of an entire bloom. Although both autonomous and ship-based elements were essential to achieving NAB08 goals, the autonomous system provided a novel perspective by employing long-range gliders to repeatedly survey the volume surrounding a drifting Lagrangian float, thus characterizing patch- scale bloom evolution. Integration of physical and biogeochemical sensors (temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, light transmission, optical backscatter, spectral light, and nitrate) and development of in situ calibration techniques were required to support this new autonomous approach. Energetic, small-scale eddy activity at the experiment site (southeast of Iceland, near the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and Marine Light Mixed Layer sites) produced a swift, heterogeneous velocity field that challenged the gliders" operational abilities and drove refinements to the piloting techniques used to maintain float-following surveys. Although intentionally deployed outside of energetic eddies, floats and gliders were rapidly entrained into these features. Floats circulated within eddies near the start and end of the experiment, drifting generally northwest, across the basin, in-between. An eddy sampled late in the deployment provided particularly interesting signatures, with elevated biological signals manifest consistently in one quadrant. As measurements were collected in a parcel-following Lagrangian frame, this suggests energetic small-scale exchange process (such as vertical or lateral mixing) paired with fast-acting biological processes capable of modifying the newly entrained water as it navigates its path around the eddy. Despite this energetic kilometer-scale heterogeneity, broadly distributed platforms appeared to

  20. Efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes consisting of orange ultrathin and blue mixed host emission layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ren; Zuo, Liangmei; Xue, Kaiwen; Duan, Yu; Chen, Ping; Cheng, Gang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    We have successfully demonstrated highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by inserting an ultrathin non-doped orange layer within blue mixed host emission layer. The key feature of the novel device is the employment of blue mixed host and orange ultrathin layers, resulting in an extended recombination region and more balanced charge carrier. The maximum efficiencies of 33.8 lm W-1 and 32.2 cd A-1 are obtained. Moreover, the resulting white device achieves a slight efficiency roll-off and a high luminance at low operating voltage. Our versatile concept suggests a promising simple method to achieve high performance white OLEDs.

  1. Gravity Wave Dynamics in a Mesospheric Inversion Layer: 2. Instabilities, Turbulence, Fluxes, and Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ling; Laughman, Brian; Lund, Thomas S.; Collins, Richard L.

    2018-01-01

    A companion paper by Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) employed an anelastic numerical model to explore the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) encountering a mesospheric inversion layer (MIL) having a moderate static stability enhancement and a layer of weaker static stability above. That study revealed that MIL responses, including GW transmission, reflection, and instabilities, are sensitive functions of GW parameters. This paper expands on two of the Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) simulations to examine GW instability dynamics and turbulence in the MIL; forcing of the mean wind and stability environments by GW, instability, and turbulence fluxes; and associated heat and momentum transports. These direct numerical simulations resolve turbulence inertial-range scales and yield the following results: GW breaking and turbulence in the MIL occur below where they would otherwise, due to enhancements of GW amplitudes and shears in the MIL. 2-D GW and instability heat and momentum fluxes are 20-30 times larger than 3-D instability and turbulence fluxes. Mean fields are driven largely by 2-D GW and instability dynamics rather than 3-D instabilities and turbulence. 2-D and 3-D heat fluxes in regions of strong turbulence yield small departures from initial T(z) and N2(z) profiles, hence do not yield nearly adiabatic "mixed" layers. Our MIL results are consistent with the relation between the turbulent vertical velocity variance and energy dissipation rate proposed by Weinstock (1981) for the limited intervals evaluated.

  2. Efficient green phosphorescent tandem organic light emitting diodes with solution processable mixed hosts charge generating layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, N.A.; Yeoh, K.H.; Ng, C.Y.B [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); ItraMAS Corporation. Sdn. Bhd., 542A-B Mukim 1, Lorong Perusahaan Baru 2, Kawasan Perindustrian, Perai 13600, Penang (Malaysia); Yap, B.K. [Center of Microelectronic and Nanotechnology Engineering (CeMNE), College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jln. Uniten-Ikram, 4300 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Woon, K.L., E-mail: ph7klw76@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-15

    A novel solution processable charge generating layer (CGL) that consists of 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN{sub 6})/Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK): 1,1-bis-(4-bis(4-tolyl)-aminophenyl) cyclohexene (TAPC) for a tandem green phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (PHOLED) is demonstrated. The use of orthogonal solvent to dissolve HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC is the key to overcome the interface erosion problem for the solution processed CGL. The current efficiency of the 2 wt% TAPC mixed with PVK is the highest at 24.2 cd/A, which is more than three-folds higher than that of the single device at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. - Highlights: • A solution processable tandem OLED is built using a novel charge generating layer. • HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC are shown to be effective charge generating layers. • The turn on voltages for tandem devices are almost similar to single unit. • 2 wt% TAPC blended with PVK exhibits three-folds increase in efficiency.

  3. Selectivity of layered double hydroxides and their derivative mixed metal oxides as sorbents of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mohamed A; Zahid, Waleed M; Abasaeed, Ahmed E

    2013-06-15

    In the context of finding high efficient sorbent materials for removing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from air stream, a screening study was performed to find the best combination of metals for the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derivative mixed metal oxides. Based on selectivity of 998 natural mineral species of sulfur-containing compounds, Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) were selected as divalent metals, and Fe(3+), Al(3+) and Cr(3+) as trivalent metals to synthesis the LDHs sorbents. 10 LDHs materials and their calcined mixed metal oxides, Ni(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.32)Al(0.33), Zn(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.36)Zn(0.32)Al(0.32), Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Fe(0.34), Ni(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Cr(0.34), Zn(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.33)Zn(0.32)Cr(0.35) were synthesized, characterized chemically and physically, and then tested using breakthrough test to determine their sulfur uptake. Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was found to have the best uptake of hydrogen sulfide (136 mg H₂S/g). Regeneration of spent Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was studied using two different mixture solutions, NaCl/NaOH and acetate-buffer/NaCl/NaOH. The latter mixture successfully desorbed the sulfur from the Ni0.64Fe0.36 sorbent for 2 cycles of regeneration/sorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mixing layer heights derived from ceilometers: Useful for air quality studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegner, Matthias; Geiß, Alexander; Schäfer, Klaus; Forkel, Renate; Chan, Ka Lok; Münkel, Christoph; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Gerwig, Holger; Nothard, Rainer; Bonn, Boris

    2017-04-01

    Ceilometers have been used for several meteorological applications, often in the framework of air quality studies. Whereas the particle backscatter coefficient can be retrieved in a quantitative way only recently (with the improvements of the hardware, Wiegner et al., 2014), mixing layer heights (MLH) have been derived for more than two decades. Several approaches are documented in the literature, however, automated procedures are still prone to errors because of difficulties in the recognition and attribution of discontinuities ("steps") in the backscatter profiles. For example, it is often not clear whether a detected change in the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter indicates the residual layer, the stable boundary layer, or an elevated layer. Thus, an assessment of the reliability and accuracy of MLH-retrievals is relevant for air quality studies: on the one hand MLHs are often inversely correlated with ground-based in-situ measurements of particulate matter and gaseous pollutant concentrations, and on the other hand, MLH-retrievals can be used to validate chemistry transport models. To understand the benefit of MLH in the context of air quality, we have compared several retrievals of the MLH from ceilometer measurements during a field-campaign in summer 2014 (Bonn et al., 2016) for background and polluted sites in Berlin. Correlations between the concentrations of several pollutants and MLH are analyzed, and how they are influenced by the uncertainty of the derived MLH. References: Bonn, B. et al.: BAERLIN2014 - the influence of land surface types on and the horizontal heterogeneity of air pollutant levels in Berlin, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7785-7811, doi:10.5194/acp-16-7785-2016, 2016. Wiegner, M. et al. (2014): What is the benefit of ceilometers for aerosol remote sensing? An answer from EARLINET, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 1979-1997, doi:10.5194/amt-7-1979-2014, 2014.

  5. Polar boundary layer bromine explosion and ozone depletion events in the chemistry–climate model EMAC v2.52: implementation and evaluation of AirSnow algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Falk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion events (ODEs in the polar boundary layer have been observed frequently during springtime. They are related to events of boundary layer enhancement of bromine. Consequently, increased amounts of boundary layer volume mixing ratio (VMR and vertical column densities (VCDs of BrO have been observed by in situ observation, ground-based as well as airborne remote sensing, and from satellites. These so-called bromine explosion (BE events have been discussed serving as a source of tropospheric BrO at high latitudes, which has been underestimated in global models so far. We have implemented a treatment of bromine release and recycling on sea-ice- and snow-covered surfaces in the global chemistry–climate model EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry based on the scheme of Toyota et al. (2011. In this scheme, dry deposition fluxes of HBr, HOBr, and BrNO3 over ice- and snow-covered surfaces are recycled into Br2 fluxes. In addition, dry deposition of O3, dependent on temperature and sunlight, triggers a Br2 release from surfaces associated with first-year sea ice. Many aspects of observed bromine enhancements and associated episodes of near-complete depletion of boundary layer ozone, both in the Arctic and in the Antarctic, are reproduced by this relatively simple approach. We present first results from our global model studies extending over a full annual cycle, including comparisons with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite BrO VCDs and surface ozone observations.

  6. Giant bulk photovoltaic effect and spontaneous polarization of single-layer monochalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Tonatiuh; Fregoso, Benjamin M.; Mendoza, Bernardo S.; Morimoto, Takahiro; Moore, Joel E.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    We implement and use a first-principles density functional theory approach to calculate the shift current response of monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides. We find a larger effective three- dimensional effective polarization ( 1.9 C/m2) and shift current ( 200 μA/V2) than have been previously observed in common ferroelectrics. By using a one-dimensional Rice-Mele tight-binding model we investigate the shift-current tensor along the polarization axis, its relation with polarization, and the conditions under which shift-current reaches a maximum. Importantly, our calculations predict that shift current can be largest in the UV visible range, indicating the potential of these materials for optoelectronic applications. BMF and TR share equal contributions. We acknowledge AFOSR MURI, Conacyt, NERSC, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the DOE.

  7. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  8. Flexibl Pavement Analysis Considering Temperature Profile and Anisotropy Behavior in Hot Mix Asphalt Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Joonho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A three Dimensional finite element model (FEM incorporating the anisotropic properties and temperature profile of hot mix asphalt (HMA pavement was developed to predict the structural responses of HMA pavement subject to heavy loads typically encountered in the field. In this study, ABAQUS was adopted to model the stress and strain relationships within the pavement structure. The results of the model were verified using data collected from the Korean Highway Corporation Test Road (KHCTR. The results demonstrated that both the base course and surface course layers follow the anisotropic behavior and the incorporation of the temperature profile throughout the pavement has a substantial effect on the pavement response predictions that impact pavement design. The results also showed that the anisotropy level of HMA and base material can be reduced to as low as 80% and 15% as a result of repeated loading, respectively.

  9. A mechanistic model of an upper bound on oceanic carbon export as a function of mixed layer depth and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Export production reflects the amount of organic matter transferred from the ocean surface to depth through biological processes. This export is in large part controlled by nutrient and light availability, which are conditioned by mixed layer depth (MLD. In this study, building on Sverdrup's critical depth hypothesis, we derive a mechanistic model of an upper bound on carbon export based on the metabolic balance between photosynthesis and respiration as a function of MLD and temperature. We find that the upper bound is a positively skewed bell-shaped function of MLD. Specifically, the upper bound increases with deepening mixed layers down to a critical depth, beyond which a long tail of decreasing carbon export is associated with increasing heterotrophic activity and decreasing light availability. We also show that in cold regions the upper bound on carbon export decreases with increasing temperature when mixed layers are deep, but increases with temperature when mixed layers are shallow. A meta-analysis shows that our model envelopes field estimates of carbon export from the mixed layer. When compared to satellite export production estimates, our model indicates that export production in some regions of the Southern Ocean, particularly the subantarctic zone, is likely limited by light for a significant portion of the growing season.

  10. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S.; Alastuey, A.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Querol, X.; Cuevas, E.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; de La Rosa, J.

    2011-07-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90 % of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions) observed in the SAL may be influenced by soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts) are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2) receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  11. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rodríguez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL. The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL. These emissions are mostly linked to crude oil refineries, phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90 % of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL may be influenced by soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2 receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  12. Mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides as novel catalysts for phenol photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscasu, C. M.; Carja, G.; Mureseanu, M.; Zaharia, C.

    2017-08-01

    The removal of organic pollutants is nowadays a very challenging aspect of the environmental research. There are strong interests to develop novel semiconducting photocatalysts able to efficiently promote advanced oxidation reactions. The development of photocatalysts based on the mixtures of mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides (LDHs) - a family of naturally occurring anionic clays - might offer novel environmental-friendly solutions for the cost effective removal of organic pollutants. This work presents ZnO/ZnAl2O4, ZnO/Zn2TiO4 and ZnO/ZnCr2O4 as novel photocatalytic formulations for phenol degradation under UV irradiation. They were obtained by the controlled thermal treatment of the layered double hydroxides matrices (LDHs), as precursors materials, type ZnM-LDH (M = Al3+, Cr3+ or Ti4+). The LDHs were synthesized by the co-precipitation method at a constant pH. Controlled calcination at 650°C gives rise to solutions of mixed metal oxides. The structural and nanoarchitectonics characteristics of the studied catalysts were described by: XRD, SEM/TEM and TG/DTG techniques. Results show that in the photocatalytic process of the phenol degradation from aqueous solutions, ZnO/ZnCr2O4 and ZnO/ZnAl2O4 showed the best performance degrading ∼98% of phenol after 3.5 hs and 5 hs, respectively; while ZnO/Zn2TiO4 has degraded almost 80 % after 7.5 hs of UV irradiation. These results open new opportunities in the development of new cost effective photoresponsive formulations able to facilitate the photo-degradation of the organic pollution as “green” solution for removal of dangerous pollutants.

  13. Zero-field spin transfer oscillators based on magnetic tunnel junction having perpendicular polarizer and planar free layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally studied spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization oscillations in an asymmetric MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction device consisting of an in-plane magnetized free layer and an out-of-plane magnetized polarizer. A steady auto-oscillation was achieved at zero magnetic field and room temperature, with an oscillation frequency that was strongly dependent on bias currents, with a large frequency tunability of 1.39 GHz/mA. Our results suggest that this new structure has a high potential for new microwave device designs.

  14. Auroral and magnetic variations in the polar cusp and cleft. Signatures of magnetopause boundary layer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandholt, P.E.; Egeland, A.

    1987-10-01

    By combining continous ground-based observations of polar cleft/cusp auroras and local magnetic variations with electromagnetic parameters obtained from satellites in polar orbit (low-altitude cleft/cusp) and in the magnetosheath/interplanetary space, different electrodynamic processes in the polar cleft/cusp have been investigated. One of the more controversial questions in this field is related to the observed shifts in latitude of cleft/cusp auroras and the relationships with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation, local magnetic disturbances (DP2 and DPY modes) and magnetospheric substorms. A new approach which may contribute to clarifying these complicated relationships, simultaneous groundbased observations of the midday and evening-midnight sectors of the auroral oval, is illustrated. A related topic is the spatial relationship between the cleft/cusp auroras and the ionospheric convection currents. A characteristic feature of the polar cusp and cleft regions during negative IMF B z is repeated occurrence of certain short-lived auroral structures moving in accordance with the local convection pattern. Satellite measurements of particle precipitation, magnetic field and ion drift components permit detailed investigations of the electrodynamics of these cusp/cleft structures. Information on electric field components, Birkeland currents, Poynting flux, height-integrated Pedersen conductivity and Joule heat dissipation rate has been derived. These observations are discussed in relation to existing models of temporal plasma injections from the magnetosheath

  15. Role of the boundary layer in the occurrence and termination of the tropospheric ozone depletion events in polar spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Le; Platt, Ulrich; Gutheil, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the polar spring are frequently observed in a stable boundary layer condition, and the end of the events occurs when there is a breakup of the boundary layer. In order to improve the understanding of the role of the boundary layer in the ozone depletion event, a one-dimensional model is developed, focusing on the occurrence and the termination period of the ozone depletion episode. A module accounting for the vertical air transport is added to a previous box model, and a first-order parameterization is used for the estimation of the vertical distribution of the turbulent diffusivity. Simulations are performed for different strengths of temperature inversion as well as for different wind speeds. The simulation results suggest that the reactive bromine species released from the underlying surface into the lowest part of the troposphere initially stay in the boundary layer, leading to an increase of the bromine concentration. This bromine accumulation causes the ozone destruction below the top of the boundary layer. After the ozone is totally depleted, if the temperature inversion intensity decreases or the wind speed increases, the severe ozone depletion event tends to transit into a partial ozone depletion event or it recovers to the normal ozone background level of 30-40 ppb. This recovery process takes about 2 h. Due to the presence of high-level HBr left from the initial occurrence of ODEs, the complete removal of ozone in the boundary layer is achieved a few days after the first termination of ODE. The time required for the recurrence of the ozone depletion in a 1000 m boundary layer is approximately 5 days, while the initial occurrence of the complete ozone consumption takes 15 days. The present model is suitable to clarify the reason for both the start and the termination of the severe ozone depletion as well as the partial ozone depletion in the observations.

  16. The warmer the ocean surface, the shallower the mixed layer. How much of this is true?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, R; González-Pola, C; Fernández-Diaz, J

    2017-09-01

    Ocean surface warming is commonly associated with a more stratified, less productive, and less oxygenated ocean. Such an assertion is mainly based on consistent projections of increased near-surface stratification and shallower mixed layers under global warming scenarios. However, while the observed sea surface temperature (SST) is rising at midlatitudes, the concurrent ocean record shows that stratification is not unequivocally increasing nor is MLD shoaling. We find that while SST increases at three study areas at midlatitudes, stratification both increases and decreases, and MLD deepens with enhanced deepening of winter MLDs at rates over 10 m  decade-1. These results rely on the estimation of several MLD and stratification indexes of different complexity on hydrographic profiles from long-term hydrographic time-series, ocean reanalysis, and Argo floats. Combining this information with estimated MLDs from buoyancy fluxes and the enhanced deepening/attenuation of the winter MLD trends due to changes in the Ekman pumping, MLD variability involves a subtle interplay between circulation and atmospheric forcing at midlatitudes. Besides, it is highlighted that the density difference between the surface and 200 m, the most widely used stratification index, should not be expected to reliably inform about changes in the vertical extent of mixing.

  17. The warmer the ocean surface, the shallower the mixed layer. How much of this is true?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, R.; González-Pola, C.; Fernández-Diaz, J.

    2017-09-01

    Ocean surface warming is commonly associated with a more stratified, less productive, and less oxygenated ocean. Such an assertion is mainly based on consistent projections of increased near-surface stratification and shallower mixed layers under global warming scenarios. However, while the observed sea surface temperature (SST) is rising at midlatitudes, the concurrent ocean record shows that stratification is not unequivocally increasing nor is MLD shoaling. We find that while SST increases at three study areas at midlatitudes, stratification both increases and decreases, and MLD deepens with enhanced deepening of winter MLDs at rates over 10 m decade-1. These results rely on the estimation of several MLD and stratification indexes of different complexity on hydrographic profiles from long-term hydrographic time-series, ocean reanalysis, and Argo floats. Combining this information with estimated MLDs from buoyancy fluxes and the enhanced deepening/attenuation of the winter MLD trends due to changes in the Ekman pumping, MLD variability involves a subtle interplay between circulation and atmospheric forcing at midlatitudes. Besides, it is highlighted that the density difference between the surface and 200 m, the most widely used stratification index, should not be expected to reliably inform about changes in the vertical extent of mixing.

  18. New results on the structure of turbulence in a mixing layer with and without swirl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoust, Samuel; Jacquin, Laurent; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the near field of a round jet at Re ≈ 200,000, with and without swirl. • The dynamics of streamwise vortices inducing mixing is analyzed with TR-PIV. • Vortices of alternate sign are organized as radial arrays, instead of azimuthal. • Swirl acts by tilting this structure, leading to enhanced injections and ejections. • Dynamical scenarios are proposed to explain the origin of this spatial organization. - Abstract: The near field of a 2.14 × 10 5 Reynolds number, low-Mach-number, cylindrical jet with and without swirl has been investigated by high-speed stereo PIV in a transverse plane, two diameters downstream of the jet exit. Using spatiotemporal correlations, we investigate the dynamics of streamwise vorticity in the shear layer, responsible for the mixing properties of the jet, and show how swirl affects this vorticity. A dynamical scenario is proposed, which explains how the mean shear and the azimuthal m = 0 vortices contribute to the spatial organization observed

  19. On the instabilities of supersonic mixing layers - A high-Mach-number asymptotic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of a family of tanh mixing layers is studied at large Mach numbers using perturbation methods. It is found that the eigenfunction develops a multilayered structure, and the eigenvalue is obtained by solving a simplified version of the Rayleigh equation (with homogeneous boundary conditions) in one of these layers which lies in either of the external streams. This analysis leads to a simple hypersonic similarity law which explains how spatial and temporal phase speeds and growth rates scale with Mach number and temperature ratio. Comparisons are made with numerical results, and it is found that this similarity law provides a good qualitative guide for the behavior of the instability at high Mach numbers. In addition to this asymptotic theory, some fully numerical results are also presented (with no limitation on the Mach number) in order to explain the origin of the hypersonic modes (through mode splitting) and to discuss the role of oblique modes over a very wide range of Mach number and temperature ratio.

  20. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (...... non-intrusively and reliably image freezing patterns and their lateral variation on a 10-100 m scale that is difficult to sample by point measurements.......) measurements at high temporal resolution at a heath tundra site on Disko Island on the west coast of Greenland (69°N). Borehole sediment characteristics and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. Data acquired during the freezing period of October 2013 – February 2014 clearly image...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below-freezing...

  1. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H.; Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Su, Yan-Kuin; Wang, Kang L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL

  2. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shyh-Jer, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Su, Yan-Kuin, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, Kun-Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kang L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL.

  3. Impact of light polarization on photoluminescence intensity and quantum efficiency in AlGaN and AlInGaN layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, C.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed emission intensity, quantum efficiency, and emitted light polarization of c-plane AlGaN and AlInGaN layers (λ = 320-350 nm) by temperature dependent photoluminescence. Low indium content in AlInGaN structures causes a significant intensity increase by change of the polarization of the emitted light. Polarization changes from E ⊥ c to E ‖ c with increasing aluminum content. It switches back to E ⊥ c with the incorporation of indium. The polarization degree decreases with temperature. This temperature dependence can corrupt internal quantum efficiency determination by temperature dependent photoluminescence.

  4. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    KAUST Repository

    Calbet, Albert

    2015-06-11

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation.

  5. Highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using a mixed host structure in deep blue emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chang Woo; Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.kr

    2012-05-31

    Highly efficient phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) were developed using a deep blue phosphorescent emitter doped into a mixed host of high triplet energy host materials. The deep blue emitting layer was combined with a red:green emitting layer to fabricate PHWOLEDs. A high quantum efficiency of 19.5% with a color coordinate of (0.29,0.38) and 19.8% with a color coordinate of (0.39,0.46) were achieved in the PHWOLEDs using the mixed host emitting layer doped with a deep blue phosphorescent dopant. In addition, a low optimum doping concentration below 5% in red, green and blue dopants was realized in the PHWOLEDs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High quantum efficiency in phosphorescent white device. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed host structure for high power efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low doping concentration below 5% in phosphorescent white device.

  6. Penggantian Sebagian Ransum Komersial dengan Polar dan Aditif Duck mix terhadap Komposisi Fisik Karkas Itik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Wayan Siti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The substitution a part of commercial feed with pollard and duck mix additive on duck carcass physic composition ABSTRACT. The aim of this experiment was to study pollard optimum levels with additive complex mineral vitamin on the carcass physic composition Balinese male duck age 10 weeks, was carried out at Jl. Binginambe, Kediri village, Tabanan Regency. The design which used in this experiment a completely randomized design Those four treatments were ration contain 100% commercial feed (A; ration with 85% commercial feed + 15% pollard + 0,3% duck mix (B; ration with 70% commercial feed + 30% pollard + 0,3% duck mix (C; ration with 55% commercial feed + 45% pollard + 0,3% duck mix (D, respectively. The variables which measured were carcass weight, carcass percent, and carcass physic composition. The result of this experiment showed that the substitution commercial feed with pollard from 15-45% and duck mix were not significant (P >0.05 decrease carcass percent, carcass bone percent than treatment A. Meat percent on treatment B 1.81% non significant (P>0.05 increase than treatment A, but C and D treatments 2.63% and 4.87% significantly increase than treatment A. Subcutan fat on C and D treatments 6.72% and 6.67% significant lower (P <0.05 than treatment A, and D treatment 4.91% significant lower than treatment B. From the result of this experiment can be concluded that substitution pollard from 15%-45% with additive 0.3% duck mix were decrease carcass percent and bone carcass percent, but substitution pollard 30% and 45% can increase meat carcass percent and decrease fat Balinese male duck age 10 weeks.

  7. Subsidence, Mixing and Denitrification of Polar Vortex Air Measured During Polaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, M.; Salawitch, R.; Toon, G.; Sen, B.; Margitan, J.; Osterman, G.; Blavier, J.; Gao, R.; Del Negro, L.; Donnelly, S.; hide

    1998-01-01

    We use the correlation between CH(sub 4) and N(sub 2)O as measured during the POLARIS campaign in spring 1997 to estimate the degree of mixing between descended air masses from the vortex and air masses from mid-latitudes.

  8. Eulerian and Lagrangian Parameterization of the Oceanic Mixed Layer using Large Eddy Simulation and MPAS-Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Roekel, Luke [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    We have conducted a suite of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to form the basis of a multi-model comparison (left). The results have led to proposed model improvements. We have verified that Eulerian-Lagrangian effective diffusivity estimates of mesoscale mixing are consistent with traditional particle statistics metrics (right). LES and Lagrangian particles will be utilized to better represent the movement of water into and out of the mixed layer.

  9. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  10. Precipitation, Cloud Cover, and Mixing Layer Observations at the Iqaluit Supersite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Z.; Dehghan, A.; Gascon, G.; Joe, P. I.; Burrows, W. R.; Melo, S.

    2016-12-01

    Reliable measurements of light precipitation, cloud cover, and mixing layer height (MLH) are required to quantify the Arctic water cycle and improve parameterization schemes in numerical weather prediction models. Satellite and ground-based observations of light precipitation are frequently underestimated at high latitudes, where 80% of precipitation is light (Canada (ECCC) has recently commissioned a supersite in Iqaluit, NU (64oN, 69oW) to provide automated and continuous observations of altitude-resolved winds, clouds and aerosols, visibility, sensible heat flux, turbulence, and precipitation. New high-resolution cloud and MLH products from a Vaisala CL31 ceilometer are being used to investigate model performance and parameterization schemes. Initial MLH comparisons with the new High Resolution Deterministic Prediction System Arctic domain indicate good agreement, with greater MLH variability observed by the ceilometer. The suite of instruments at Iqaluit can measure the thickness, height, and composition of very light precipitation, as demonstrated during an intensive observation period (January 18 to 22, 2016). Vertical advection of blowing snow up to 450 m a.g.l. was observed by a Doppler Lidar during periods of increased surface winds (> 10 m/s), followed by an ice crystal layer that was observed up to 500 m a.g.l. These events were undetected by traditional precipitation gauges, causing the under-reporting of light precipitation. Given the prevalence of blowing snow and ice crystal events in the Arctic and their large radiative surface forcing of up to 36 W/m2, this can have important consequences when quantifying the Arctic water cycle and radiative balance.

  11. Frequency-driven quantum oscillations in a graphene layer under circularly polarized ac fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Monroy, R., E-mail: ricardovega@mail.uniatlantico.edu.co; Martinez Castro, O.; Salazar Cohen, G.

    2015-06-19

    In this paper we predict a new type of quantum oscillations driven by the frequency of a circularly polarized ac field in a monolayer of graphene placed inside an optical cavity. We show that the displacement of the structure of photon-dressed electron states near the Fermi level and the electron transitions, from extended states to bound photon-dressed electron states inside an energy gap, lead to a periodic change of singularities in the electron density of states, resulting in quantum oscillations in thermodynamic, transport and other properties in graphene.

  12. On the classification of mixed floating pollutants on the Yellow Sea of China by using a quad-polarized SAR image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Shao, Yun; Tian, Wei; Li, Kun

    2017-09-01

    This study explored different methodologies using a C-band RADARSAT-2 quad-polarized Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image located over China's Yellow Sea to investigate polarization decomposition parameters for identifying mixed floating pollutants from a complex ocean background. It was found that solitary polarization decomposition did not meet the demand for detecting and classifying multiple floating pollutants, even after applying a polarized SAR image. Furthermore, considering that Yamaguchi decomposition is sensitive to vegetation and the algal variety Enteromorpha prolifera, while H/A/alpha decomposition is sensitive to oil spills, a combination of parameters which was deduced from these two decompositions was proposed for marine environmental monitoring of mixed floating sea surface pollutants. A combination of volume scattering, surface scattering, and scattering entropy was the best indicator for classifying mixed floating pollutants from a complex ocean background. The Kappa coefficients for Enteromorpha prolifera and oil spills were 0.7514 and 0.8470, respectively, evidence that the composite polarized parameters based on quad-polarized SAR imagery proposed in this research is an effective monitoring method for complex marine pollution.

  13. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Moshonkin

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station "C" (52.75°N; 35.5°W from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days. There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4–7 days (45% of all cases, 2. 9–13 days (20–25%, 3. 14–18 days (10–15%, and 4. 21–30 days (10–15% and with a magnitude 1.5–2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization, state (density, and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30–50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10–25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise, though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and

  14. Quality control on the mixing layer height retrieved from LIDAR-ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Delcloo, Andy; Hamdi, Rafiq; Nemeghaire, Jean; Debal, Fabian

    2013-04-01

    LIDAR ceilometers were primarily designed for cloud base height detection (for air traffic safety and weather forecasting). They greatly improved over the last years and now offer the opportunity to monitor the vertical profile of aerosols and the mixing layer height (MLH) on a continuous temporal scale. The knowledge of MLH can improve the forecasting of the dispersion of trace gases and aerosols in the lowest layers of the atmosphere and can also improve the accuracy of the greenhouse gas concentration budgets highly depending on MLH. Therefore, during the next years, operational MLH monitoring networks of LIDAR ceilometers are established around the world, and in particular in Europe. To perform this task, different algorithms have been developed to retrieve the MLH from the ceilometer measurements. However, under specific atmospheric conditions, these algorithms fail to retrieve a similar MLH than other remote sensing retrieval techniques. On the other hand, the ceilometers are sometimes located in places where no other remote sensing measurements are available to assess the accuracy of the MLH retrieved by the algorithm. In this context, the development of several MLH quality control flags based on the ceilometer measurements only is desirable to detect automatically the failure of the MLH retrieval algorithms without the support of additional measurements. In Belgium, in 2013, three new ceilometers (Vaisala CL51) will be installed by the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMI) in addition to the one in Uccle (Belgium) that has already been installed since May 2011. RMI developed its own MLH retrieval algorithm based on the gradient and variance methods. The computation of several quality flags will be presented. In this work, an assessment of these quality flags is made by comparing the MLH retrieved by ceilometer measurements with the MLH retrieved by radio-sounding and the boundary layer height (BLH) directly computed by the ECMWF and the ALARO7

  15. Ion diode performance on a positive polarity inductive voltage adder with layered magnetically insulated transmission line flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshelwood, D. D.; Schumer, J. W.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Phipps, D.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Ottinger, P. F.; Apruzese, J. P.; Cooperstein, G.; Young, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    A pinch-reflex ion diode is fielded on the pulsed-power machine Mercury (R. J. Allen, et al., 15th IEEE Intl. Pulsed Power Conf., Monterey, CA, 2005, p. 339), which has an inductive voltage adder (IVA) architecture and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Mercury is operated in positive polarity resulting in layered MITL flow as emitted electrons are born at a different potential in each of the adder cavities. The usual method for estimating the voltage by measuring the bound current in the cathode and anode of the MITL is not accurate with layered flow, and the interaction of the MITL flow with a pinched-beam ion diode load has not been studied previously. Other methods for determining the diode voltage are applied, ion diode performance is experimentally characterized and evaluated, and circuit and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are performed. Results indicate that the ion diode couples efficiently to the machine operating at a diode voltage of about 3.5 MV and a total current of about 325 kA, with an ion current of about 70 kA of which about 60 kA is proton current. It is also found that the layered flow impedance of the MITL is about half the vacuum impedance.

  16. Efficient mixed-solvent exfoliation of few-quintuple layer Bi2S3 and its photoelectric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yaohui; Zhao, Qiyi; Yao, Zehan; Si, Keyu; Zhou, Yixuan; Xu, Xinlong

    2017-08-01

    A scalable liquid exfoliation of layered Bi2S3 employing a mixed-solvent strategy was used for the fabrication of Bi2S3 nanosheets. We found that 10% deionized water in 90% isopropyl alcohol is the best mixed solvent for the efficient and effective exfoliation of layered Bi2S3. These results are consistent with the absorbance spectra and enthalpy of mixing theory. The obtained Bi2S3 nanosheets had few-quintuple layers and were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. These Bi2S3 nanosheets can be used to fabricate large-scale thin films by filtration method; the films demonstrated sensitive photoelectric response with the rise and decay response of photocurrent on the sub-second scale under visible light excitation. The electronic structures of bulk and one-quintuple layer Bi2S3 are calculated by first-principle calculation for better understanding of the photoelectric response. A green mixed-solvent processing of Bi2S3 opens up the potential application of Bi2S3 optoelectric films to photoelectric detection and solar energy conversion devices.

  17. Progress Toward Analytic Predictions of Supersonic Hydrocarbon-Air Combustion: Computation of Ignition Times and Supersonic Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Scott Michael

    Combustion in scramjet engines is faced with the limitation of brief residence time in the combustion chamber, requiring fuel and preheated air streams to mix and ignite in a matter of milliseconds. Accurate predictions of autoignition times are needed to design reliable supersonic combustion chambers. Most efforts in estimating non-premixed autoignition times have been devoted to hydrogen-air mixtures. The present work addresses hydrocarbon-air combustion, which is of interest for future scramjet engines. Computation of ignition in supersonic flows requires adequate characterization of ignition chemistry and description of the flow, both of which are derived in this work. In particular, we have shown that activation energy asymptotics combined with a previously derived reduced chemical kinetic mechanism provides analytic predictions of autoignition times in homogeneous systems. Results are compared with data from shock tube experiments, and previous expressions which employ a fuel depletion criterion. Ignition in scramjet engines has a strong dependence on temperature, which is found by perturbing the chemically frozen mixing layer solution. The frozen solution is obtained here, accounting for effects of viscous dissipation between the fuel and air streams. We investigate variations of thermodynamic and transport properties, and compare these to simplified mixing layers which neglect these variations. Numerically integrating the mixing layer problem reveals a nonmonotonic temperature profile, with a peak occurring inside the shear layer for sufficiently high Mach numbers. These results will be essential in computation of ignition distances in supersonic combustion chambers.

  18. Atomisation and droplet formation mechanisms in a model two-phase mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Stephane; Ling, Yue; Fuster, Daniel; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2017-11-01

    We study atomization in a turbulent two-phase mixing layer inspired by the Grenoble air-water experiments. A planar gas jet of large velocity is emitted on top of a planar liquid jet of smaller velocity. The density ratio and momentum ratios are both set at 20 in the numerical simulation in order to ease the simulation. We use a Volume-Of-Fluid method with good parallelisation properties, implemented in our code http://parissimulator.sf.net. Our simulations show two distinct droplet formation mechanisms, one in which thin liquid sheets are punctured to form rapidly expanding holes and the other in which ligaments of irregular shape form and breakup in a manner similar but not identical to jets in Rayleigh-Plateau-Savart instabilities. Observed distributions of particle sizes are extracted for a sequence of ever more refined grids, the largest grid containing approximately eight billion points. Although their accuracy is limited at small sizes by the grid resolution and at large size by statistical effects, the distributions overlap in the central region. The observed distributions are much closer to log normal distributions than to gamma distributions as is also the case for experiments.

  19. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2014-06-02

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other free shear flows available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number (Sc). In the present study, such a strong jump is observed for a scalar with Sc ≈ 1. Conditional statistics of kinetic energy and scalar dissipation are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterised by a strong peak very close to the interface. Finally, it is shown that the geometric features of the interfaces correlate with relatively large scale structures as visualised by low-pressure isosurfaces. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  20. Mixed layer depth calculation in deep convection regions in ocean numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Peggy; Hu, Xianmin; Pennelly, Clark; Spence, Paul; Myers, Paul G.

    2017-12-01

    Mixed Layer Depths (MLDs) diagnosed by conventional numerical models are generally based on a density difference with the surface (e.g., 0.01 kg.m-3). However, the temperature-salinity compensation and the lack of vertical resolution contribute to over-estimated MLD, especially in regions of deep convection. In the present work, we examined the diagnostic MLD, associated with the deep convection of the Labrador Sea Water (LSW), calculated with a simple density difference criterion. The over-estimated MLD led us to develop a new tool, based on an observational approach, to recalculate MLD from model output. We used an eddy-permitting, 1/12° regional configuration of the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) to test and discuss our newly defined MLD. We compared our new MLD with that from observations, and we showed a major improvement with our new algorithm. To show the new MLD is not dependent on a single model and its horizontal resolution, we extended our analysis to include 1/4° eddy-permitting simulations, and simulations using the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) model.

  1. Seasonal variation of the global mixed layer depth: comparison between Argo data and FIO-ESM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yutong; Xu, Haiming; Qiao, Fangli; Dong, Changming

    2018-03-01

    The present study evaluates a simulation of the global ocean mixed layer depth (MLD) using the First Institute of Oceanography-Earth System Model (FIOESM). The seasonal variation of the global MLD from the FIO-ESM simulation is compared to Argo observational data. The Argo data show that the global ocean MLD has a strong seasonal variation with a deep MLD in winter and a shallow MLD in summer, while the spring and fall seasons act as transitional periods. Overall, the FIO-ESM simulation accurately captures the seasonal variation in MLD in most areas. It exhibits a better performance during summer and fall than during winter and spring. The simulated MLD in the Southern Hemisphere is much closer to observations than that in the Northern Hemisphere. In general, the simulated MLD over the South Atlantic Ocean matches the observation best among the six areas. Additionally, the model slightly underestimates the MLD in parts of the North Atlantic Ocean, and slightly overestimates the MLD over the other ocean basins.

  2. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially evolving mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cristancho, Juan

    2012-12-01

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analyzed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. Velocity and passive scalar statistics are computed and compared to the results of studies addressing other shear flows, such as turbulent jets and wakes. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other types of free shear flow available in the literature. In addition, a detailed analysis of the passive scalar field (with Sc 1) in the vicinity of the interface is presented. The scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number, but it is a new result for Schmidt number of order one. Finally, the dissipation for the kinetic energy and the scalar are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterized by a strong peak very close to the interface.

  3. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case

  4. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  5. Mesoporous mixed metal oxides derived from P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Zhou Jideng; Li Zhanshuang; He Yang; Lin Shuangshuang; Liu Qi; Zhang Milin; Jiang Zhaohua

    2010-01-01

    We report the preparation of mesoporous mixed metal oxides (MMOs) through a soft template method. Different amounts of P123 were used as structure directing agent to synthesize P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs). After calcination of as-synthesized LDHs at 500 o C, the ordered mesopores were obtained by removal of P123. The mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs fabricated by using 2 wt% P123 exhibited a high specific surface area of 108.1 m 2 /g, and wide distribution of pore size (2-18 nm). An investigation of the 'memory effect' of the mesoporous MMOs revealed that they were successfully reconstructed to ibuprofen intercalated LDHs having different gallery heights, which indicated different intercalation capacities. Due to their mesoporosity these unique MMOs have particular potential as drug or catalyst carriers. - Graphical abstract: Ordered mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs can be obtained through the calcination of P123-templated Mg-Al-CO 3 LDHs. The pore diameter is 2.2 nm. At the presence of ibuprofen, the Mg-Al MMOs can recover to Mg-Al-IBU LDHs, based on its 'remember effect'. Display Omitted

  6. A Study on Parameterization of the Beijing Winter Heavy Haze Events Associated with Height of Pollution Mixing Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Niu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available North China Plain, Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei province are the major areas facing the decreasing air quality and frequent pollution events in the recent years. Identifying the effect of meteorological conditions on changes in aerosol concentration and the mechanism for forming such heavy pollution in North China Plain has become the focus of scientific research. The influence of atmospheric boundary layer characteristics on air quality has become the focus of attention and research. However, the boundary layer describes that the influences of air pollution have sometimes been duplicated and confused with each other in some of the studies. It is necessary to pay attention to some extent, raising awareness of related pollution mixing layer. The conclusions of the study include the following: (1 The lowered height of pollution mixing layer (H_PML was favorable for the increase of the PM2.5 density. The lowered height of pollution mixing layer had significant impacts on formation of severe haze. (2 A statistical analysis of large-scale heavy pollution cases in eastern China shows that the H_PML parameters have significant contributions. (3 The feedback effect of the high value of the convection inhibition (CIN, which is unfavorable to vertical diffusion of pollution, causes further reduction of H_PML, resulting in cumulative pollution again.

  7. System of polarization correlometry of polycrystalline layers of urine in the differentiation stage of diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Yu. O.; Pashkovskaya, N. V.; Marchuk, Y. F.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Savich, V. O.

    2015-08-01

    The work consists of investigation results of diagnostic efficiency of a new azimuthally stable Muellermatrix method of analysis of laser autofluorescence coordinate distributions of biological liquid layers. A new model of generalized optical anisotropy of biological tissues protein networks is proposed in order to define the processes of laser autofluorescence. The influence of complex mechanisms of both phase anisotropy (linear birefringence and optical activity) and linear (circular) dichroism is taken into account. The interconnections between the azimuthally stable Mueller-matrix elements characterizing laser autofluorescence and different mechanisms of optical anisotropy are determined. The statistic analysis of coordinate distributions of such Mueller-matrix rotation invariants is proposed. Thereupon the quantitative criteria (statistic moments of the 1st to the 4th order) of differentiation of human urine polycrystalline layers for the sake of diagnosing and differentiating cholelithiasis with underlying chronic cholecystitis (group 1) and diabetes mellitus of degree II (group 2) are estimated.

  8. Suppression of Quasiparticle Scattering Signals in Bilayer Graphene Due to Layer Polarization and Destructive Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolie, Wouter; Lux, Jonathan; Pörtner, Mathias; Dombrowski, Daniela; Herbig, Charlotte; Knispel, Timo; Simon, Sabina; Michely, Thomas; Rosch, Achim; Busse, Carsten

    2018-03-01

    We study chemically gated bilayer graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy complemented by tight-binding calculations. Gating is achieved by intercalating Cs between bilayer graphene and Ir(111), thereby shifting the conduction band minima below the chemical potential. Scattering between electronic states (both intraband and interband) is detected via quasiparticle interference. However, not all expected processes are visible in our experiment. We uncover two general effects causing this suppression: first, intercalation leads to an asymmetrical distribution of the states within the two layers, which significantly reduces the scanning tunneling spectroscopy signal of standing waves mainly present in the lower layer; second, forward scattering processes, connecting points on the constant energy contours with parallel velocities, do not produce pronounced standing waves due to destructive interference. We present a theory to describe the interference signal for a general n -band material.

  9. Mixed convection boundary-layer flow from a horizontal circular cylinder with a constant surface heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazar, R.; Amin, N. [Department of Mathematics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Pop, I. [Faculty of Mathematics, University of Cluj, R-3400 Cluj, CP 253 (Romania)

    2004-02-01

    The laminar mixed convection boundary-layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder, which is maintained at a constant heat flux and is placed in a stream flowing vertically upward has been theoretically studied in this paper. The solutions for the flow and heat transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically for different values of the mixed convection parameter {lambda} with the Prandtl number Pr = 1 and 7, respectively. It is found, as for the case of a heated or cooled cylinder, considered by Merkin [5], that assisting flow delays separation of the boundary-layer and can, if the assisting flow is strong enough, suppress it completely. The opposing flow, on the other side, brings the separation point nearer to the lower stagnation point and for sufficiently strong opposing flows there will not be a boundary-layer on the cylinder. (orig.)

  10. Preliminary Study on Active Modulation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes with the Radio Propagation in Layered Space Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengguo; Li, Hailong; Fu, Luyao; Wang, Maoyan

    2016-06-01

    Radar echoes intensity of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) is greatly affected by the temperature of dusty plasma and the frequency of electromagnetic wave about the radar. In this paper, a new method is developed to explain the active experiment results of PMSE. The theory of wave propagation in a layered media is used to study the propagation characteristics of an electromagnetic wave at different electron temperatures. The simulation results show that the variation tendency of the reflected power fraction almost agrees with the results observed by radar in the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT). The radar echoes intensity of PMSE greatly decreases with the increase of the radio frequency and the enhancement of the electron temperature. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097 and 41304119) and by the National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment, China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation (CRIRP)

  11. Multifunctional polarization tomography of optical anisotropy of biological layers in diagnosis of endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, O. G.; Koval, L. D.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Ushenko, Yu. O.; Savich, V. O.; Sidor, M. I.; Marchuk, Yu. F.

    2015-09-01

    The theoretical background of azimuthally stable method Jones matrix mapping of histological sections of biopsy of uterine neck on the basis of spatial-frequency selection of the mechanisms of linear and circular birefringence is presented. The comparative results of measuring the coordinate distributions of complex degree of mutual anisotropy formed by polycristalline networks of blood plasma layers of donors (group 1) and patients with endometriosis (group 2). The values and ranges of change of the statistical (moments of the 1st - 4th order) parameters of complex degree of mutual anisotropy coordinate distributions are studied. The objective criteria of diagnostics of the pathology and differentiation of its severity degree are determined.

  12. Polar spacecraft observations of the turbulent outer cusp/magnetopause boundary layer of Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbit of the Polar spacecraft has been ideally suited for studying the turbulent region of the cusp that is located near or just outside the magnetopause current sheet at 7-9 RE. The wave data obtained in this region show that electromagnetic turbulence is dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz. The waves responsible for this turbulence usually propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and have an index of refraction that generally falls between the estimated cold plasma theoretical values of the electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler modes and may be composed of both modes in concert with kinetic Alfvén waves and/or fast magnetosonic waves. Fourier spectra of the higher frequency wave data also show the electromagnetic turbulence at frequencies up to and near the electron cyclotron frequency. This higher frequency electromagnetic turbulence is most likely associated with whistler mode waves. The lower hybrid drift and current gradient instabilities are suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the turbulence. The plasma and field environment of this turbulent region is examined and found to be extremely complex. Some of the wave activity is associated with processes occurring locally, such as changes in the DC magnetic field, while others are associated with solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field changes.

  13. Polar Spacecraft Observations of the Turbulent Outer Cusp/Magnetopause Boundary Layer of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; Menietti, J. D.; Dowell, J. H.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scudder, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The orbit of the Polar spacecraft has been ideally suited for studying the turbulent region of the cusp that is located near or just outside the magnetopause current sheet at 7-9 R(sub E). The wave data obtained in this region show that electromagnetic turbulence is dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz. The waves responsible for this turbulence usually propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and have an index of refraction that generally falls between the estimated cold plasma theoretical values of the electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler modes and may be composed of both modes in concert with kinetic Alfven waves and/or fast magnetosonic waves. Fourier spectra of the higher frequency wave data also show the electromagnetic turbulence at frequencies up to and near the electron cyclotron frequency. This higher frequency electromagnetic turbulence is most likely associated with whistler mode waves. The lower hybrid drift and current gradient instabilities are suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the turbulence. The plasma and field environment of this turbulent region is examined and found to be extremely complex. Some of the wave activity is associated with processes occurring locally, such as changes in the DC magnetic field, while others are associated with solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field changes.

  14. On periodically excited turbulent mixing layer created downstream of a plane Chevron partition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kit, E; Wygnanski, I

    2008-01-01

    The flow in a turbulent mixing layer resulting from the merger of two parallel, different velocity streams, created downstream of a 'Chevron'-shaped jagged partition was simulated numerically on the basis of experiments published in 2007. A small flap that was hinged at the trailing edge of the partition could oscillate at a prescribed frequency, and induce regular oscillations in the flow. The latter regulated the large eddy structure that was amenable to phase-locked data acquisition revealing the large spanwise vortices that were generated by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and streamwise vortices that were triggered by the chevron and were enhanced by a secondary instability in the flow. These, being locked in phase, were mapped by using particle image velocimetry. Numerical simulation of the equations of motion was then carried out in order to reveal the most unstable mechanisms leading to the generation of the streamwise vortical structure. The simulation started by assuming the flow to be two-dimensional (2D) and allowing the large spanwise eddies to develop temporally. At a prescribed time (or the state of development of the large spanwise rolls) the 2D computation was frozen and 3D simulation initiated. The latter exhibited typical evolution of translative instability, which bent the large spanwise structures and stretched some of them to create streamwise vorticity. Bulging of the spanwise eddies was also observed, but the bulging instability is a slower process than the bending one. The results of the simulations compare well to experiments and provide some understanding of this complex interaction.

  15. Frazil-ice growth rate and dynamics in mixed layers and sub-ice-shelf plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees Jones, David W.; Wells, Andrew J.

    2018-01-01

    The growth of frazil or granular ice is an important mode of ice formation in the cryosphere. Recent advances have improved our understanding of the microphysical processes that control the rate of ice-crystal growth when water is cooled beneath its freezing temperature. These advances suggest that crystals grow much faster than previously thought. In this paper, we consider models of a population of ice crystals with different sizes to provide insight into the treatment of frazil ice in large-scale models. We consider the role of crystal growth alongside the other physical processes that determine the dynamics of frazil ice. We apply our model to a simple mixed layer (such as at the surface of the ocean) and to a buoyant plume under a floating ice shelf. We provide numerical calculations and scaling arguments to predict the occurrence of frazil-ice explosions, which we show are controlled by crystal growth, nucleation, and gravitational removal. Faster crystal growth, higher secondary nucleation, and slower gravitational removal make frazil-ice explosions more likely. We identify steady-state crystal size distributions, which are largely insensitive to crystal growth rate but are affected by the relative importance of secondary nucleation to gravitational removal. Finally, we show that the fate of plumes underneath ice shelves is dramatically affected by frazil-ice dynamics. Differences in the parameterization of crystal growth and nucleation give rise to radically different predictions of basal accretion and plume dynamics, and can even impact whether a plume reaches the end of the ice shelf or intrudes at depth.

  16. Surface and interface properties of polar gallium nitride layers; Oberflaechen- und Grenzflaecheneigenschaften von polaren Galliumnitrid-Schichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Pierre

    2010-07-09

    The material properties of group III-nitrides allows manifold applications. Especially for the GaN-based gas and biosensor technology, an understanding of the GaN surfaces and their interaction with molecules is crucial for the successful development of sensor systems. Especially the influence of crystal orientation, surface termination and reconstruction on the interaction was analysed. To study the interaction of the GaN surface with molecules the reproducible and controllable preparation of GaN surfaces is necessary. Polar GaN layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The surface reconstruction and termination could be selectively adjusted by the growth parameters or further preparation steps. On the Ga-polar surface, gallium-induced and nitrogen-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed as well as non-reconstructed surface modifications could be generated and on the N-polar surface non-reconstructed. The different surface modifications differ considerably in the formation of surface states. The Ga-induced and N-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed surfaces presented two surface states (SS) at 1.4 eV and 3 eV as well as 2 eV and 3 eV, respectively. The non-reconstructed GaN(0001) presented three SS (1.5 eV, 2.5 eV and 3.4 eV) and the GaN(000-1) one SS (2.5 eV). The theoretical predicted surfaces sates (density functional theory) shows a good agreement with the measurements. The analysis revealed a dependence of the interaction of GaN surfaces with O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on the orientation, reconstruction, and surface termination of the films. The GaN(000-1) surface is much more reactive to oxygen and water than the (0001) orientated surfaces, while GaN is in general significantly more sensitive to water than to oxygen. The chemical bond configuration of the adsorbed species shows a significant dependence on surface termination. The measurements presented that the formation of nitrogen oxide and/or gallium oxide bonds depends on the surface modification. Furthermore the interaction

  17. Evolution of a Western Arctic Ice Ocean Boundary Layer and Mixed Layer Across a Developing Thermodynamically Forced Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    on measurements made by the turbulence package on AOFB 33. For shortwave radiative input (QH), we set the fractional solar radiation terms in Eqn...2.6. Air-Ocean Shortwave Radiation Overview at MIZ C2 .............................77 Figure 2.7. Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes Overview at MIZ C2...2005 (Perovich et al. 2007a). Identifying the processes that drive SIZ expansion requires an understanding of how this incoming solar radiation is

  18. Polarization Pyrometry of Layered Semiconductor Structures under Conditions of Low-Temperature Technological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, I. A.; Shvets, V. A.; Dulin, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Ikusov, D. G.; Uzhakov, I. N.; Rykhlitskii, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    Principal issues of using pyrometry for temperature monitoring in low-temperature processes in the technology of production of semiconductor structures are considered by an example of growing mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) layers on the GaAs substrate by the method of molecular beam epitaxy. Optical and thermophysical models are proposed to describe the processes of radiant heat transfer in a vacuum chamber. Based on these models, it is demonstrated that radiation from the heater and the signal reflected from the chamber walls, which are comparable in magnitude with the measured radiation emitted by the sample, should be taken into account in interpreting data measured by a pyrometer. Methods of useful signal identification are found. Experiments on temperature measurement by a pyrometer mounted on the MCT growth chamber are performed. Results of these experiments are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  19. The association of polar mesosphere summer echo layers with tial modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    Full Text Available The occurrence of PMSEs with time of day shows a semi-diurnal variation with minima at 8 and 20 h LT. PMSE layers observed for more than 30 min show an average rate of descent of 2 km h–1. These characteristics suggest the influence of tidal winds. When the observed steady wind and diurnal and semi-diurnal tides at EISCAT are added, the overall magnitude shows a time-variation which matches the occurrence of PMSEs, and the observed rate of descent, approximately 2 km h–1. Atmospheric gravity waves also contribute to the velocity of the neutral wind. When the wave reinforces the background wind, the PMSEs are stronger and descend more rapidly, but when the wave-related velocity opposes the background wind the PMSE is weaker and it descends more slowly.

  20. The association of polar mesosphere summer echo layers with tial modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of PMSEs with time of day shows a semi-diurnal variation with minima at 8 and 20 h LT. PMSE layers observed for more than 30 min show an average rate of descent of 2 km h–1. These characteristics suggest the influence of tidal winds. When the observed steady wind and diurnal and semi-diurnal tides at EISCAT are added, the overall magnitude shows a time-variation which matches the occurrence of PMSEs, and the observed rate of descent, approximately 2 km h–1. Atmospheric gravity waves also contribute to the velocity of the neutral wind. When the wave reinforces the background wind, the PMSEs are stronger and descend more rapidly, but when the wave-related velocity opposes the background wind the PMSE is weaker and it descends more slowly.

  1. On the homogeneity of a thick layer of mixed granules in optical quality inspection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.C.M.; Xia, H.

    2016-01-01

    Optical inspection of a thick layer of granules for foreign particles does not directly reveal their true number and the more so if the layer is not homogenous. This raises questions such as “how do I know if the layer is homogenous?” and “what is the relation between the observable particles and

  2. Tipping Point for Expansion of Layered Aluminosilicates in Weakly Polar Solvents: Supercritical CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaef, Herbert T; Loganathan, Narasimhan; Bowers, Geoffrey M; Kirkpatrick, R James; Yazaydin, A Ozgur; Burton, Sarah D; Hoyt, David W; Thanthiriwatte, K Sahan; Dixon, David A; McGrail, B Peter; Rosso, Kevin M; Ilton, Eugene S; Loring, John S

    2017-10-25

    Layered aluminosilicates play a dominant role in the mechanical and gas storage properties of the subsurface, are used in diverse industrial applications, and serve as model materials for understanding solvent-ion-support systems. Although expansion in the presence of H 2 O is well-known to be systematically correlated with the hydration free energy of the interlayer cation, particularly in environments dominated by nonpolar solvents (i.e., CO 2 ), uptake into the interlayer is not well-understood. Using novel high-pressure capabilities, we investigated the interaction of dry supercritical CO 2 with Na-, NH 4 -, and Cs-saturated montmorillonite, comparing results with predictions from molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the known trend in H 2 O and that cation solvation energies in CO 2 suggest a stronger interaction with Na, both the NH 4 - and Cs-clays readily absorbed CO 2 and expanded, while the Na-clay did not. The apparent inertness of the Na-clay was not due to kinetics, as experiments seeking a stable expanded state showed that none exists. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a large endothermicity to CO 2 intercalation in the Na-clay but little or no energy barrier for the NH 4 - and Cs-clays. Indeed, the combination of experiment and theory clearly demonstrate that CO 2 intercalation of Na-montmorillonite clays is prohibited in the absence of H 2 O. Consequently, we have shown for the first time that in the presence of a low dielectric constant, gas swelling depends more on the strength of the interaction between the interlayer cation and aluminosilicate sheets and less on that with solvent. The finding suggests a distinct regime in layered aluminosilicate swelling behavior triggered by low solvent polarizability, with important implications in geomechanics, storage, and retention of volatile gases, and across industrial uses in gelling, decoloring, heterogeneous catalysis, and semipermeable reactive barriers.

  3. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  4. The role of PEG conformation in mixed layers: from protein corona substrate to steric stabilization avoiding protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Comenge

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticles (NPs have been traditionally modified with a single ligand layer, mixture of ligands might help to combine different functionalities and to further engineer the NP surface. A detailed study of the competition between an alkanethiol (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and SH-PEG for the surface of AuNPs and the resultant behaviors of this model nanoconjugate is presented here. As a result, the physicochemical properties of these conjugates can be progressively tuned by controlling the composition and especially the conformation of the mixed monolayer. This has implications in the physiological stability. The controlled changes on the SH-PEG conformation rather than its concentration induce a change in the stabilization mechanism from electrostatic repulsion to steric hindrance, which changes the biological fate of NPs. Importantly, the adsorption of proteins on the conjugates can be tailored by tuning the composition and conformation of the mixed layer.

  5. Mixed convection boundary layer flow of viscoelastic nanofluid past a horizontal circular cylinder: Case of constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Rahimah; Afiqah Rawi, Noraihan; Kasim, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Shafie, Sharidan

    2017-09-01

    The steady of two-dimensional convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic nanofluid over a circular cylinder is investigated in this paper. Carboxymethyl cellulose solution (CMC) is chosen as the base fluid and copper as a nanoparticle with the Prandtl number Pr = 6.2. The governing boundary layer partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless forms. Then they are solved numerically by using the Keller-Box method. This paper focus on the effects of selected parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics and be presented in graphs. The results show that, the velocity profiles and the temperature profiles are increased by increasing the values of nanoparticles volume fraction. While velocity profile decreases when viscoelastic parameter is increase. The reverse trend is observed for the temperature profiles. Also, the values of reduced skin friction are increased by increasing mixed convection parameter, but the values of heat transfer coefficient produce an opposite behaviour with an increasing in mixed convection parameter.

  6. Spring summer imbalance of dissolved inorganic carbon in the mixed layer of the north-western Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Olivier; Monfray, Patrick; Bates, Nicholas R.

    1996-02-01

    The surface concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site (BATS) decreased gradually by ca. 30μmol kg1from April to October in 1989. This decrease occurred almost in the absence of measurable nitrate in the mixed layer. Although ancillary data about the C system point to the possible importance of lateral transport, horizontal gradients in surface [DIC] and the mean flow in the area indicate that local effects should prevail in the seasonal drawdown of DIC. On the basis of an one-dimensional model, we hence estimate the mixed layer budget of DIC for this period, from surface [DIC] data, temperature profiles, and concomitant meteorological records. According to model uncertainties, the [DIC] drawdown should be mostly explained (71 93%) by a net community production (NCP) averaging 1.4 2.3 mgC m3 d1, and to a lesser extent, by outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. These losses are partially compensated (waters of the thermocline. This NCP must be regarded as a lower estimate, since the mean flow from the northeast should bring waters with slightly higher [DIC] to the mixed layer at the BATS site. The model, which is sensitive to short-term variations in atmospheric forcing (hurricane passed through the region. Hence, the surface NCP should not have been supported by unsampled, pulse-like supplies of deep nutrients. Wet atmospheric deposition of nitrogen measured concurrently on Bermuda could contribute to the biological N requirement (10 20%). According to historical estimates, N2 fixation seems however, insufficient to meet the remaining demand. Comparison between NCP and primary production measured in situ suggests that most of photosynthetically fixed C (>50%) is not respired in the mixed layer.

  7. Supported Layered Double Hydroxide-Related Mixed Oxides and Their Application in the Total Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovanda, F.; Jirátová, Květa

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2011), s. 305-316 ISSN 0169-1317 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/1762; GA ČR GA106/09/1664 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : layered double hydroxides * hydrothermal reaction * mixed oxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.474, year: 2011

  8. Inferring strength and deformation properties of hot mix asphalt layers from the GPR signal: recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    , of both the different strength provision of each layer composing the hot mix asphalt pavement structure, and of the attenuation occurring to electromagnetic waves during their in-depth propagation. Promising results are achieved by matching modelled and measured elastic modulus data. This continuous statistically-based model enables to consider the whole set of information related to each single depth, in order to provide a more comprehensive prediction of the strength and deformation behavior of such a complex multi-layered medium. Amongst some further developments to be tackled in the near future, a model improvement could be reached through laboratory activities under controlled conditions and by adopting several frequency bandwidths suited for purposes. In addition, the perspective to compare electromagnetic data with mechanical measurements retrieved continuously, i.e., by means of specifically equipped lorries, could pave the way to considerable enhancements in this field of research. Acknowledgements - This work has benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

  9. Salinity-induced mixed and barrier layers in the southwestern tropical Atlantic Ocean off the northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Araujo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution hydrographic observations of temperature and salinity are used to analyze the formation and distribution of isothermal depth (ZT, mixed depth (ZM and barrier layer thickness (BLT in a section of the southwestern Atlantic (0°30´ N–14°00´ S; 31°24´–41°48´ W, adjacent to the northeastern Brazilian coast. Analyzed data consists of 279 CTD casts acquired during two cruises under the Brazilian REVIZEE Program. One occurred in late austral winter (August–October 1995 and another in austral summer (January–April 1997. Oceanic observations are compared to numerical modeling results obtained from the French Mercator-Coriolis Program. Results indicate that the intrusion of subtropical Salinity Maximum Waters (SMW is the major process contributing to the seasonal barrier layer formation. These waters are brought by the South Equatorial Current (SEC, from the subtropical region, into the western tropical Atlantic boundary. During late austral winter southeastern trade winds are more intense and ITCZ precipitations induce lower surface salinity values near the equator. During this period a 5–90 m thick BLT (median = 15 m is observed and BLT > 30 m is restricted to latitudes higher than 8° S, where the intrusion of salty waters between 8°–12.3° S creates shallow mixed layers over deep (ZT ≥ 90 m isothermal layers. During austral summer, shallow isothermal and mixed layers prevail, when northeasterly winds are predominant and evaporation overcomes precipitation, causing saltier waters at the surface/subsurface layers. During that period observed BLT varies from 5 to 70 m and presents thicker median value of 35 m, when comparing to the winter. Furthermore, BLT ≥ 30 m is observed not only in the southernmost part of the study area, as verified during late winter, but in the latitude range 2°–14° S, where near-surface salty waters are transported westward by the

  10. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Arnott

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of gases and aerosol particles have been measured at the mountain site of Altzomoni, 4010 m in altitude, located 60 km southeast of Mexico City, 50 km east of Puebla and 70 km northeast of Cuernavaca. The objective of this study was to evaluate the properties of gases and particles in the Regional Mixed Layer (RML of Mexico's Megapolis. Altzomoni is generally above the RML from late evening until late morning at which time the arrival of the RML is marked by increasing concentrations of CO and aerosol particles that reach their maxima in mid-afternoon. The average diurnal cycles for fourteen days in March, 2006 were evaluated during which time the synoptic scale circulation had three principal patterns: from the east (E, southwest (SW and west northwest (WNW. The original hypothesis was that air arriving from the direction of Mexico City would have much higher concentrations of anthropogenic gases and particles than air from Puebla or Cuernavaca, due to the relatively large differences in populations. In fact, not only were the average, maximum concentrations of CO and O3 (0.3 and 0.1 ppmv approximately the same for air originating from the WNW and E, but the average maximum concentrations of Peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN,PPN and particle organic matter (POM in air from the E exceeded those in air from the WNW. Comparisons of measurements from the mountain site with those made by aircraft during the same period, using the same type of aerosol mass spectrometer, show that the total masses of POM, NO3−, SO42− and NH4+ were approximately the same from aircraft measurements made over Mexico City and when winds were from the east at the mountain site. In contrast 75% of the total aerosol mass at the mountain site was POM whereas over Mexico City the fraction of POM was less than 60%. The measurements suggest the occasional influence of emissions from the nearby volcano, Popocatepetl, as well as possible incursions of biomass

  11. Formation of a mixed Fe(II)-Zn-Al layered hydroxide: Effects of Zn co-sorption on Fe(II) layered hydroxide formation and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, Autumn N.; Elzinga, Evert J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research demonstrated the formation of single divalent metal (Co, Ni, and ZnAl) and mixed divalent metal (NiZnAl) layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases from reactions of the divalent metal with Al-bearing substrates and soils in both laboratory experiments and in the natural environment. Recently Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases have been found in laboratory batch reaction studies, and although they have yet to be found in the natural environment. Potential locations of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases in nature include areas with suboxic and anoxic conditions. Because these areas can be environments of significant contaminant accumulation, it is important to understand the possible interactions and impacts of contaminant elements on LDH phase formation. One such contaminant, Zn, can also form as an LDH and has been found to form as a mixed divalent layered hydroxide phase. To understand how Zn impacts the formation of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phase formation and kinetics, 3 mM or 0.8 mM Fe(II) and 0.8 mM Zn were batch reacted with either 10 g/L pyrophyllite or 7.5 g/L γ-Al2O3 for up to three months under anoxic conditions. Aqueous samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and solid samples were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Shell-by-shell fits of Fe(II) and co-sorption samples with pyrophyllite show the formation of a mixed divalent metal (Fe(II)-Zn-Al) layered hydroxide phase, while Fe(II) and Zn co-sorption samples with γ-Al2O3 produce Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases and Zn in inner-sphere complexation with the γ-Al2O3. This study demonstrates the formation of a mixed divalent metal layered hydroxide and further iterates the importance of sorbent reactivity on LDH phase formation.

  12. Active Electro-Location of Objects in the Underwater Environment Based on the Mixed Polarization Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lili; Qi, Junwei; Xue, Wei

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a novel active localization method based on the mixed polarization multiple signal classification (MP-MUSIC) algorithm for positioning a metal target or an insulator target in the underwater environment by using a uniform circular antenna (UCA). The boundary element method (BEM) is introduced to analyze the boundary of the target by use of a matrix equation. In this method, an electric dipole source as a part of the locating system is set perpendicularly to the plane of the UCA. As a result, the UCA can only receive the induction field of the target. The potential of each electrode of the UCA is used as spatial-temporal localization data, and it does not need to obtain the field component in each direction compared with the conventional fields-based localization method, which can be easily implemented in practical engineering applications. A simulation model and a physical experiment are constructed. The simulation and the experiment results provide accurate positioning performance, with the help of verifying the effectiveness of the proposed localization method in underwater target locating. PMID:29439495

  13. Development of a polar direct-drive platform for studying inertial confinement fusion implosion mix on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, Paul A.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James R.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Kyrala, George A.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Montgomery, David S.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Shah, Rahul C.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Wysocki, Frederick J.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F699, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stephen Craxton, R.; McKenty, Patrick W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fitzsimmons, Paul [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Experiments were performed to develop a platform for the simultaneous measurement of mix and its effects on fusion burn. Two polar direct drive implosions of all-plastic capsules were conducted for the first time on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To measure implosion trajectory and symmetry, area image backlighting of these capsules was also employed for the first time on NIF, an advance over previous 1-D slit imaging experiments, providing detailed symmetry data of the capsules as they imploded. The implosion trajectory and low-mode asymmetry seen in the resultant radiographs agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700 kJ drive energy produced laser beam intensities exceeding laser-plasma instability thresholds. Post-shot simulations indicate that the capsule yield was reduced by a factor of two compared to pre-shot predictions owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. The pre-shot predictions of bang time agreed within 200 ps with the experimental results. The second shot incorporated a narrow groove encircling the equator of the capsule. A predicted yield reduction factor of three was not observed.

  14. Development of a polar direct-drive platform for studying inertial confinement fusion implosion mix on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, Paul A.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James R.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Kyrala, George A.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Montgomery, David S.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Shah, Rahul C.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Wysocki, Frederick J.; Batha, Steven H.; Stephen Craxton, R.; McKenty, Patrick W.; Fitzsimmons, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed to develop a platform for the simultaneous measurement of mix and its effects on fusion burn. Two polar direct drive implosions of all-plastic capsules were conducted for the first time on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To measure implosion trajectory and symmetry, area image backlighting of these capsules was also employed for the first time on NIF, an advance over previous 1-D slit imaging experiments, providing detailed symmetry data of the capsules as they imploded. The implosion trajectory and low-mode asymmetry seen in the resultant radiographs agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700 kJ drive energy produced laser beam intensities exceeding laser-plasma instability thresholds. Post-shot simulations indicate that the capsule yield was reduced by a factor of two compared to pre-shot predictions owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. The pre-shot predictions of bang time agreed within 200 ps with the experimental results. The second shot incorporated a narrow groove encircling the equator of the capsule. A predicted yield reduction factor of three was not observed

  15. Influence of the liquid layer within mixed-phase clouds on radar observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfitzenmaier, L.; Dufournet, Y.; Unal, C.M.H.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed-phase clouds play an important role in the earth system. They affect earth radiative balance and the climate (Comstock et al., 2007; Solomon et al., 2007) as well as the formation of precipitation (de Boer et al., 2009; Fan et al., 2011; Lamb and Verlinde, 2011). Within such mixed-phase clouds

  16. Copper(II) Schiff base complexes and their mixed thin layers with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence spectroscopy. For. Cu(II) layers the most intensive fluorescence bands due to intra-ligand transitions were observed between 462 and 503 nm. The fluorescence intensity of thin layers was corelated to the rotation speed. In the case of ...

  17. Spectral dependence of backscattering coefficient of mixed phase clouds over West Africa measured with two-wavelength Raman polarization lidar: Features attributed to ice-crystals corner reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovskii, I.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Tanre, D.; Ansmann, A.; Korenskiy, M.; Borovoi, A.; Hu, Q.; Whiteman, D. N.

    2017-11-01

    The existing models predict that corner reflection (CR) of laser radiation by simple ice crystals of perfect shape, such as hexagonal columns or plates, can provide a significant contribution to the ice cloud backscattering. However in real clouds the CR effect may be suppressed due to crystal deformation and surface roughness. In contrast to the extinction coefficient, which is spectrally independent, consideration of diffraction associated with CR results in a spectral dependence of the backscattering coefficient. Thus measuring the spectral dependence of the cloud backscattering coefficient, the contribution of CR can be identified. The paper presents the results of profiling of backscattering coefficient (β) and particle depolarization ratio (δ) of ice and mixed-phase clouds over West Africa by means of a two-wavelength polarization Mie-Raman lidar operated at 355 nm and 532 nm during the SHADOW field campaign. The lidar observations were performed at a slant angle of 43 degree off zenith, thus CR from both randomly oriented crystals and oriented plates could be analyzed. For the most of the observations the cloud backscatter color ratio β355/β532 was close to 1.0, and no spectral features that might indicate the presence of CR of randomly oriented crystals were revealed. Still, in two measurement sessions we observed an increase of backscatter color ratio to a value of nearly 1.3 simultaneously with a decrease of the spectral depolarization ratio δ355/δ532 ratio from 1.0 to 0.8 inside the layers containing precipitating ice crystals. We attribute these changes in optical properties to corner reflections by horizontally oriented ice plates.

  18. Possible role of electric forces in bromine activation during polar boundary layer ozone depletion and aerosol formation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Ekaterina

    2017-11-01

    This work presents a hypothesis about the mechanism of bromine activation during polar boundary layer ozone depletion events (ODEs) as well as the mechanism of aerosol formation from the frost flowers. The author suggests that ODEs may be initiated by the electric-field gradients created at the sharp tips of ice formations as a result of the combined effect of various environmental conditions. According to the author's estimates, these electric-field gradients may be sufficient for the onset of point or corona discharges followed by generation of high local concentrations of the reactive oxygen species and initiation of free-radical and redox reactions. This process may be responsible for the formation of seed bromine which then undergoes further amplification by HOBr-driven bromine explosion. The proposed hypothesis may explain a variety of environmental conditions and substrates as well as poor reproducibility of ODE initiation observed by researchers in the field. According to the author's estimates, high wind can generate sufficient conditions for overcoming the Rayleigh limit and thus can initiate ;spraying; of charged aerosol nanoparticles. These charged aerosol nanoparticles can provoke formation of free radicals, turning the ODE on. One can also envision a possible emission of halogen ion as a result of the ;electrospray; process analogous to that of electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry.

  19. Zn(3)(4-OOCC(6)H(4)PO(3))(2): A polar metal phosphonate with pillared layered structure showing SHG-activity and large dielectric anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Tang; Cao, Deng-Ke; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Zheng, Li-Min

    2010-10-07

    A new metal phosphonate Zn(3)(4-OOCC(6)H(4)PO(3))(2) (1) is reported which crystallizes in orthorhombic space group Pca2(1). It shows a pillared layered structure in which the {ZnO(4)}, {ZnO(5)} and {PO(3)C} polyhedra are connected through corner- or edge-sharing to form an inorganic layer in the ab plane which contains 4- and 5-member rings. These layers are pillared by the uni-oriented 4-carboxylatephenylphosphonate ligands, thus leading to a polar 3D architecture. The dielectric anisotropy measurements of a single crystal of 1 reveal that dielectric constant along the inter-layer is larger than that along the intra-layer with a ratio of about 2.3. Second harmonic generation (SHG) activity is observed.

  20. Anatomy of a metabentonite: nucleation and growth of illite crystals and their colescence into mixed-layer illite/smectite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Blum, A.E.; Serravezza, M.

    2011-01-01

    The illite layer content of mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) in a 2.5 m thick, zoned, metabentonite bed from Montana decreases regularly from the edges to the center of the bed. Traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern modeling using Markovian statistics indicated that this zonation results from a mixing in different proportions of smectite-rich R0 I/S and illite-rich R1 I/S, with each phase having a relatively constant illite layer content. However, a new method for modeling XRD patterns of I/S indicates that R0 and R1 I/S in these samples are not separate phases (in the mineralogical sense of the word), but that the samples are composed of illite crystals that have continuous distributions of crystal thicknesses, and of 1 nm thick smectite crystals. The shapes of these distributions indicate that the crystals were formed by simultaneous nucleation and growth. XRD patterns for R0 and R1 I/S arise by interparticle diffraction from a random stacking of the crystals, with swelling interlayers formed at interfaces between crystals from water or glycol that is sorbed on crystal surfaces. It is the thickness distributions of smectite and illite crystals (also termed fundamental particles, or Nadeau particles), rather than XRD patterns for mixed-layer I/S, that are the more reliable indicators of geologic history, because such distributions are composed of well-defined crystals that are not affected by differences in surface sorption and particle arrangements, and because their thickness distribution shapes conform to the predictions of crystal growth theory, which describes their genesis.

  1. Turbulent Mixing and Vertical Heat Transfer in the Surface Mixed Layer of the Arctic Ocean: Implication of a Cross-Pycnocline High-Temperature Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yusuke; Takeda, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the mixing processes in the vicinity of surface mixed layer (SML) of the Arctic Ocean. Turbulence activity and vertical heat transfer are quantitatively characterized in the Northwind Abyssal Plain, based on the RV Mirai Arctic cruise, during the transition from late summer to early winter 2014. During the cruise, noticeable storm events were observed, which came over the ship's location and contributed to the deepening of the SML. According to the ship-based microstructure observation, within the SML, the strong wind events produced enhanced dissipation rates of turbulent kinetic energy in the order of magnitude of ɛ = 10-6-10-4W kg-1. On thermal variance dissipation rate, χ increases toward the base of SML, reaching O(10-7) K2 s-1, resulting in vertical heat flux of O(10) W m-2. During the occasional energetic mixing events, the near-surface warm water was transferred downward and penetrated through the SML base, creating a cross-pycnocline high-temperature anomaly (CPHTA) at approximately 20-30 m depth. Near CPHTA, the vertical heat flux was anomalously magnified to O(10-100) W m-2. Following the fixed-point observation, in the regions of marginal and thick ice zones, the SML heat content was monitored using an autonomous drifting buoy, UpTempO. During most of the ice-covered period, the ocean-to-ice turbulent heat flux was dominant, rather than the diapycnal heat transfer across the SML bottom interface.

  2. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  3. Study of the equatorial Atlantic Ocean mixing layer using a one-dimensional turbulence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Tersiano Skielka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM is applied to the diagnostic turbulence field of the mixing layer (ML over the equatorial region of the Atlantic Ocean. Two situations were investigated: rainy and dry seasons, defined, respectively, by the presence of the intertropical convergence zone and by its northward displacement. Simulations were carried out using data from a PIRATA buoy located on the equator at 23º W to compute surface turbulent fluxes and from the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Project to close the surface radiation balance. A data assimilation scheme was used as a surrogate for the physical effects not present in the one-dimensional model. In the rainy season, results show that the ML is shallower due to the weaker surface stress and stronger stable stratification; the maximum ML depth reached during this season is around 15 m, with an averaged diurnal variation of 7 m depth. In the dry season, the stronger surface stress and the enhanced surface heat balance components enable higher mechanical production of turbulent kinetic energy and, at night, the buoyancy acts also enhancing turbulence in the first meters of depth, characterizing a deeper ML, reaching around 60 m and presenting an average diurnal variation of 30 m.O modelo General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM é aplicado para diagnosticar o campo de turbulência da camada de mistura oceânica (CM na região equatorial do Oceano Atlântico. Foram investigadas as estações chuvosa e seca, definidas, respectivamente, pela presença da zona de convergência intertropical e pelo seu deslocamento para norte. Simulações foram realizadas usando dados da bóia PIRATA (0º, 23ºW para o cálculo dos fluxos turbulentos de superfície e dados do Projeto NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget para "fechar" o balanço de radiação na superfície. Um esquema para assimilação de dados foi usado para considerar os mecanismos físicos não representados pelo modelo unidimensional

  4. Copper (II) Schiff base complexes and their mixed thin layers with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    111) substrates by a spin coating method and characterized with a scanningelectron microscopy (SEM/EDS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence spectroscopy. For Cu(II) layers the most intensive fluorescence bands due to ...

  5. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  6. Energetics of Wind-Induced Internal Wave Radiation from the Base of the Mixed Layer in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, G. S.; Mertens, C.; Myers, P. G.; Olbers, D. J.; Walter, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer mechanisms between atmosphere and the deep ocean have been studied for many years. Their importance to the ocean's energy balance and possible implications on mixing are widely accepted. The slab model is a well-established simulation of near-inertial motion and energy inferred through wind-ocean interaction. However, temporally coarse resolution wind forcing data in combination with rough internal wave energy flux assumptions are mainly used. A slab model using hourly wind forcing from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis allowing computations up to high latitudes without loss of resonance was set up. It was validated with buoy data from 44 sites in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans and the Mediterranean Sea. Augmenting the one-dimensional model by the horizontal divergence of the near-inertial current field at the mixed layer base led to direct estimates of energy transfer spectra of radiation of internal waves into the ocean interior. No crucial assumptions on transfer physics were made. Results of the hybrid model indicated the presence of internal wave modes at the base of the mixed layer. Spatially-advancing wind stress fronts were identified as their main driver and thus they acted as the major source for internal wave radiation into the deep ocean. Accordingly, mid-latitude storms with a strong seasonal cycle as well as isolated tropical storm tracks are dominant in energy fluxes in the North Atlantic.

  7. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemadpour, R.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: doran@srbiau.ac.ir [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehri Javan, N. [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in the magnetized plasmas whose constituents are superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons is studied theoretically. A nonlinear equation which describes the dynamics of the slowly varying amplitude is obtained using a relativistic two-fluid model. Based on this nonlinear equation and taking into account some nonlinear phenomena such as modulational instability, self-focusing and soliton formation are investigated. Effect of the magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons on these phenomena is considered. It is shown that the nonthermality and superthermality of particles can substantially change the nonlinearity of medium.

  9. Profiling of Saharan dust from the Caribbean to western Africa – Part 1: Layering structures and optical properties from shipborne polarization/Raman lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rittmeister

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present final and quality-assured results of multiwavelength polarization/Raman lidar observations of the Saharan air layer (SAL over the tropical Atlantic. Observations were performed aboard the German research vessel R/V Meteor during the 1-month transatlantic cruise from Guadeloupe to Cabo Verde over 4500 km from 61.5 to 20° W at 14–15° N in April–May 2013. First results of the shipborne lidar measurements, conducted in the framework of SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol–Cloud Interaction Experiment, were reported by Kanitz et al.(2014. Here, we present four observational cases representing key stages of the SAL evolution between Africa and the Caribbean in detail in terms of layering structures and optical properties of the mixture of predominantly dust and aged smoke in the SAL. We discuss to what extent the lidar results confirm the validity of the SAL conceptual model which describes the dust long-range transport and removal processes over the tropical Atlantic. Our observations of a clean marine aerosol layer (MAL, layer from the surface to the SAL base confirm the conceptual model and suggest that the removal of dust from the MAL, below the SAL, is very efficient. However, the removal of dust from the SAL assumed in the conceptual model to be caused by gravitational settling in combination with large-scale subsidence is weaker than expected. To explain the observed homogenous (height-independent dust optical properties from the SAL base to the SAL top, from the African coast to the Caribbean, we have to assume that the particle sedimentation strength is reduced and dust vertical mixing and upward transport mechanisms must be active in the SAL. Based on lidar observations on 20 nights at different longitudes in May 2013, we found, on average, MAL and SAL layer mean values (at 532 nm of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio of 17±5 sr (MAL and 43±8 sr (SAL, of the particle

  10. Profiling of Saharan dust from the Caribbean to western Africa - Part 1: Layering structures and optical properties from shipborne polarization/Raman lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmeister, Franziska; Ansmann, Albert; Engelmann, Ronny; Skupin, Annett; Baars, Holger; Kanitz, Thomas; Kinne, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    We present final and quality-assured results of multiwavelength polarization/Raman lidar observations of the Saharan air layer (SAL) over the tropical Atlantic. Observations were performed aboard the German research vessel R/V Meteor during the 1-month transatlantic cruise from Guadeloupe to Cabo Verde over 4500 km from 61.5 to 20° W at 14-15° N in April-May 2013. First results of the shipborne lidar measurements, conducted in the framework of SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment), were reported by Kanitz et al.(2014). Here, we present four observational cases representing key stages of the SAL evolution between Africa and the Caribbean in detail in terms of layering structures and optical properties of the mixture of predominantly dust and aged smoke in the SAL. We discuss to what extent the lidar results confirm the validity of the SAL conceptual model which describes the dust long-range transport and removal processes over the tropical Atlantic. Our observations of a clean marine aerosol layer (MAL, layer from the surface to the SAL base) confirm the conceptual model and suggest that the removal of dust from the MAL, below the SAL, is very efficient. However, the removal of dust from the SAL assumed in the conceptual model to be caused by gravitational settling in combination with large-scale subsidence is weaker than expected. To explain the observed homogenous (height-independent) dust optical properties from the SAL base to the SAL top, from the African coast to the Caribbean, we have to assume that the particle sedimentation strength is reduced and dust vertical mixing and upward transport mechanisms must be active in the SAL. Based on lidar observations on 20 nights at different longitudes in May 2013, we found, on average, MAL and SAL layer mean values (at 532 nm) of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) of 17±5 sr (MAL) and 43±8 sr (SAL), of the particle linear depolarization ratio of 0

  11. Towards Automated Characterization of Canopy Layering in Mixed Temperate Forests Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik Leiterer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canopy layers form essential structural components, affecting stand productivity and wildlife habitats. Airborne laser scanning (ALS provides horizontal and vertical information on canopy structure simultaneously. Existing approaches to assess canopy layering often require prior information about stand characteristics or rely on pre-defined height thresholds. We developed a multi-scale method using ALS data with point densities >10 pts/m2 to determine the number and vertical extent of canopy layers (canopylayer, canopylength, seasonal variations in the topmost canopy layer (canopytype, as well as small-scale heterogeneities in the canopy (canopyheterogeneity. We first tested and developed the method on a small forest patch (800 ha and afterwards tested transferability and robustness of the method on a larger patch (180,000 ha. We validated the approach using an extensive set of ground data, achieving overall accuracies >77% for canopytype and canopyheterogeneity, and >62% for canopylayer and canopylength. We conclude that our method provides a robust characterization of canopy layering supporting automated canopy structure monitoring.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic behavior of Mg–Fe–Al mixed oxides based on layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heredia, Angélica C., E-mail: angelicacheredia@gmail.com [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Córdoba-CITeQ, Maestro López esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba (Argentina); Oliva, Marcos I. [IFEG, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Agú, Ulises [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Córdoba-CITeQ, Maestro López esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Zandalazini, Carlos I. [CONICET (Argentina); INFIQC, FCQ Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); Marchetti, Sergio G. [CINDECA, UNLP, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Herrero, Eduardo R.; Crivello, Mónica E. [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Córdoba-CITeQ, Maestro López esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-09-15

    In the present work, Mg–Al–Fe layered double hydroxides were prepared by coprecipitation reaction with hydrothermal treatment. The characterization of precursors and their corresponding calcinated products (mixed oxides) were carried out by X ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), termogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy, specific surface area, Mössbauaer and magnetic properties. The Fe{sup 3+} species were observed in tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordination in brucite layered. The XPS analysis shows that the Fe{sup 3+} ions can be found in two coordination environments (tetrahedral and octahedral) as mixed oxides, and as spinel-structure. Oxides show a decrease in the specific surface areas when the iron loading is increased. The magnetic and Mössbauaer response show that MgAlFe mixed oxides are different behaviours such as different population ratios of ferromagnetic, weak-ferromagnetic, paramagnetic and superparamagnetic phases. The better crystallization of spinel structure with increased temperature, is correlated with the improved magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Mg–Al–Fe were successfully prepared by coprecipitation with hydrothermal treatment. • MgO, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were detected by XRD in the calcined samples. • The Fe{sup 3+} is in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination in the brucite layered. • The specific surface area is directly related with the iron content. • The magnetic properties and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} improve with increasing calcination temperature.

  13. Examination of evaporative fraction diurnal behaviour using a soil-vegetation model coupled with a mixed-layer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Lhomme

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In many experimental conditions, the evaporative fraction, defined as the ratio between evaporation and available energy, has been found stable during daylight hours. This constancy is investigated over fully covering vegetation by means of a land surface scheme coupled with a mixed-layer model, which accounts for entrainment of overlying air. The evaporation rate follows the Penman-Monteith equation and the surface resistance is given by a Jarvis type parameterization involving solar radiation, saturation deficit and leaf water potential. The diurnal course of the evaporative fraction is examined, together with the influence of environmental factors (soil water availability, solar radiation input, wind velocity, saturation deficit above the well-mixed layer. In conditions of fair weather, the curves representing the diurnal course of the evaporative fraction have a typical concave-up shape. Around midday (solar time these curves appear as relatively constant, but always lower that the daytime mean value. Evaporative fraction decreases when soil water decreases or when solar energy increases. An increment of saturation deficit above the mixed-layer provokes only a slight increase of evaporative fraction, and wind velocity has almost no effect. The possibility of estimation daytime evaporation from daytime available energy multiplied by the evaporative fraction at a single time of the day is also investigated. It appears that it is possible to obtain fairly good estimates of daytime evaporation by choosing adequately the time of the measurement of the evaporative fraction. The central hours of the day, and preferably about 3 hr before or after noon, are the most appropriate to provide good estimates. The estimation appears also to be much better when soil water availability (or evaporation is high than when it is low.

  14. Layer stackings and physical properties of mixed-layer structure phases. III. Preparation of mixed-layer structure phases of Re{sub X}Nb{sub 1-X}Se{sub 2} and Os{sub X}Nb{sub 1-X}Se{sub 2} and some electrical and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, K.; Chijimatsu, Y.; Maeda, N.; Ikeuchi, T.; Onuma, E. [Okayama Univ. of Sci. (Japan). Lab. for Solid State Chem.

    1998-05-01

    The binary systems, ReSe{sub 2}-NbSe{sub 2} and OsSe{sub 2}-NbSe{sub 2}, are studied. Mixed-layer structure phases are found in Re{sub X}Nb{sub 1-X}Se{sub 2} of the composition range, 0.12{<=}X<0.45, and in Os{sub X}Nb{sub 1-X}Se{sub 2} of the composition range, 0.10{<=}X<0.33. The mixed-layer structures of both phases are constructed by random and mixed stacking of the 2H{sub b}-layers and 3R-layers. The WSe{sub 2}-type 2H{sub b} phases are found in Re{sub X}Nb{sub 1-X}Se{sub 2} of the composition range, 0.45{<=}X{<=}0.55, and in Os{sub X}Nb{sub 1-X}Se{sub 2} of the composition range, 0.33{<=}X{<=}0.35. A novel mixed-layer structure constructed with 1T-layers and 2H{sub b}-layers is found in Os{sub X}Nb{sub 1-X}Se{sub 2} of the composition range, 0.35{<=}X<0.60. The magnetic susceptibilities of the samples of the mixed-layer phases show a weak Pauli-paramagnetism. Both the paramagnetic moments and the electrical conductivities of both phases decrease as the composition X increases. The behaviors of the paramagnetic moment and the electrical conductivity of those phases offer us a good example of the number of conduction electrons and their effect. (orig.) 5 refs.

  15. Calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for supersonic mixed compression inlets at angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The flow field in supersonic mixed compression aircraft inlets at angle of attack is calculated. A zonal modeling technique is employed to obtain the solution which divides the flow field into different computational regions. The computational regions consist of a supersonic core flow, boundary layer flows adjacent to both the forebody/centerbody and cowl contours, and flow in the shock wave boundary layer interaction regions. The zonal modeling analysis is described and some computational results are presented. The governing equations for the supersonic core flow form a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations. The equations for the characteristic surfaces and the compatibility equations applicable along these surfaces are derived. The characteristic surfaces are the stream surfaces, which are surfaces composed of streamlines, and the wave surfaces, which are surfaces tangent to a Mach conoid. The compatibility equations are expressed as directional derivatives along streamlines and bicharacteristics, which are the lines of tangency between a wave surface and a Mach conoid.

  16. Thermal radiation mixed convection boundary-layer flow in tightly coiled curved pipe for large Richardson number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of radiative mixed convection boundary-layer flow generated close to the inner walls of tightly coiled curved pipe for full range of Richardson number is investigated. In order to find numerical solutions the governing coupled, non-linear PDE are transformed into convenient form for integration by using primitive variable formulation. From this transformation the terms highest powers of Dean number are retained into boundary-layer form and then solved numerically by using finite difference method. Expressions for the axial and trans-verse components of skin friction, heat transfer coefficient, and flux thicknesses for various values of Richardson number, , angle, α, curvature of the pipe, Planck number, Rd, and Prandtl number are obtained and given graphically.

  17. Seasonal variability of mixed layer in the central Arabian Sea and its implication on nutrients and primary productivity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Narvekar, J.

    Kumar and Prasad, 1996 for detail). For the computation of wind- stress curl, Florida State University (FSU) winds for the period 1993-97 on a 1o x 1o grid was used. 3. Criteria for selecting the mixed layer depth In applying the concept... pattern though explained the cold SST during summer and shallow MLD during spring and fall intermonsoons, could not fully explain the MLD variations, especially during summer and winter in the northern latitudes. A look at the wind stress curl revealed...

  18. Electron spin injection from a regrown Fe layer in a spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, M.; Bhattacharya, P.; Shin, J.; Saha, D.

    2007-04-01

    An electroluminescence circular polarization of 23% and threshold current reduction of 11% are obtained in an electrically pumped spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. Electron spin injection is accomplished utilizing a regrown Fe/ n-AlGaAs Schottky tunnel barrier deposited around the base of the laser mesas. Negligible circular polarizations and threshold current reductions are measured for nonmagnetic and Fe-based control VCSELs, which provides convincing evidence of spin injection, transport, and detection in our spin-polarized laser.

  19. Observation of layered antiferromagnetism in self-assembled parallel NiSi nanowire arrays on Si(110) by spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ie-Hong; Hsu, Hsin-Zan

    2018-03-01

    The layered antiferromagnetism of parallel nanowire (NW) arrays self-assembled on Si(110) have been observed at room temperature by direct imaging of both the topographies and magnetic domains using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (SP-STM/STS). The topographic STM images reveal that the self-assembled unidirectional and parallel NiSi NWs grow into the Si(110) substrate along the [\\bar{1}10] direction (i.e. the endotaxial growth) and exhibit multiple-layer growth. The spatially-resolved SP-STS maps show that these parallel NiSi NWs of different heights produce two opposite magnetic domains, depending on the heights of either even or odd layers in the layer stack of the NiSi NWs. This layer-wise antiferromagnetic structure can be attributed to an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling between the adjacent layers in the multiple-layer NiSi NW with a B2 (CsCl-type) crystal structure. Such an endotaxial heterostructure of parallel magnetic NiSi NW arrays with a layered antiferromagnetic ordering in Si(110) provides a new and important perspective for the development of novel Si-based spintronic nanodevices.

  20. Fire and fire surrogate treatments in mixed-oak forests: Effects on herbaceous layer vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross Phillips; Todd Hutchinson; Lucy Brudnak; Thomas Waldrop

    2007-01-01

    Herbaceous layer vegetation responses to prescribed fire and fire surrogate treatments (thinning and understory removal) were examined. Results from 3 to 4 years following treatment are presented for the Ohio Hills Country and the Southern Appalachian Mountain sites of the National Fire and Fire Surrogate Study. At the Ohio Hills site, changes in forest structure were...

  1. Directional Emission from Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structures: Effect of Mixed Metal Layers, Dye Location and Dielectric Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2015-02-12

    Metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) structures provide directional emission close to the surface normal, which offers opportunities for new design formats in fluorescence based applications. The directional emission arises due to near-field coupling of fluorophores with the optical modes present in the MDM substrate. Reflectivity simulations and dispersion diagrams provide a basic understanding of the mode profiles and the factors that affect the coupling efficiency and the spatial distribution of the coupled emission. This work reveals that the composition of the metal layers, the location of the dye in the MDM substrate and the dielectric thickness are important parameters that can be chosen to tune the color of the emission wavelength, the angle of observation, the angular divergence of the emission and the polarization of the emitted light. These features are valuable for displays and optical signage.

  2. MOVPE growth of N-polar AlN on 4H-SiC: Effect of substrate miscut on layer quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemettinen, J.; Okumura, H.; Kim, I.; Kauppinen, C.; Palacios, T.; Suihkonen, S.

    2018-04-01

    We present the effect of miscut angle of SiC substrates on N-polar AlN growth. The N-polar AlN layers were grown on C-face 4H-SiC substrates with a miscut towards 〈 1 bar 1 0 0 〉 by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The optimal V/III ratios for high-quality AlN growth on 1 ° and 4 ° miscut substrates were found to be 20,000 and 1000, respectively. MOVPE grown N-polar AlN layer without hexagonal hillocks or step bunching was achieved using a 4H-SiC substrate with an intentional miscut of 1 ° towards 〈 1 bar 1 0 0 〉 . The 200-nm-thick AlN layer exhibited X-ray rocking curve full width half maximums of 203 arcsec and 389 arcsec for (0 0 2) and (1 0 2) reflections, respectively. The root mean square roughness was 0.4 nm for a 2 μm × 2 μm atomic force microscope scan.

  3. Mixed oxides obtained from Co and Mn containing layered double hydroxides: Preparation, characterization, and catalytic properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovanda, F.; Rojka, T.; Dobešová, J.; Machovič, V.; Bezdička, Petr; Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Grygar, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 179, č. 3 (2006), s. 812-823 ISSN 0022-4596 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/04/2116; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0366 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : layered double hydroxides * hydrotalcite-like compounds * thermal decomposition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.107, year: 2006

  4. Diversity of planktonic Ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda in the mixed layer of northeastern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Purushothaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic ostracods contribute significantly to the biomass of zooplankton in the Arabian Sea with an unusually high density due to swarming.  However, due to the small size, their abundance is often underestimated.  In this paper, the diversity of planktonic ostracods in the mixed layer depth of the northeastern Arabian Sea in relation to environmental parameters during the summer monsoon is presented.  The mean abundance in the mixed layer depth was very high.  About 26 species belonging to 17 genera representing two families were recognized.  Out of this, 25 species belonged to (3 sub families, 16 genera the order Myodocopa and one to the order Myodocopida.  The dominant species were Cypridina dentata, Euconchoecia aculeata, Conchoecia subarcuata and Orthoconchoecia atlantica.  Cypridina dentata and Euconchoecia aculeata contributed to about 89% of the total abundance.  The results suggest that the distribution and diversity of ostracods were very much influenced by the hydrographic conditions of the Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon. 

  5. Warmer, deeper, and greener mixed layers in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre over the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elodie; Raitsos, Dionysios E; Antoine, David

    2016-02-01

    Shifts in global climate resonate in plankton dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, and marine food webs. We studied these linkages in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (NASG), which hosts extensive phytoplankton blooms. We show that phytoplankton abundance increased since the 1960s in parallel to a deepening of the mixed layer and a strengthening of winds and heat losses from the ocean, as driven by the low frequency of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In parallel to these bottom-up processes, the top-down control of phytoplankton by copepods decreased over the same time period in the western NASG, following sea surface temperature changes typical of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). While previous studies have hypothesized that climate-driven warming would facilitate seasonal stratification of surface waters and long-term phytoplankton increase in subpolar regions, here we show that deeper mixed layers in the NASG can be warmer and host a higher phytoplankton biomass. These results emphasize that different modes of climate variability regulate bottom-up (NAO control) and top-down (AMO control) forcing on phytoplankton at decadal timescales. As a consequence, different relationships between phytoplankton, zooplankton, and their physical environment appear subject to the disparate temporal scale of the observations (seasonal, interannual, or decadal). The prediction of phytoplankton response to climate change should be built upon what is learnt from observations at the longest timescales. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G [SI ' Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Korablev, A; Esau, I, E-mail: avsmir@aari.nw.r [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Physiological characteristics and production of mixed layer and chlorophyll maximum phytoplankton populations in the Caribbean Sea and western Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Satoru; DiTullio, Giacomo R.; Laws, Edward A.

    1988-08-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthetic rates and relative and absolute growth rates were estimated using 14C techniques at five stations in the Carribean Sea and two stations in the western Atlantic. Integral photosynthetic rates at the Caribbean stations averaged (±1 S.D.) 633 ± 77 mg C m -2 d -1. Light-saturated growth rates were about 0.6 d -1. Relative growth rates averaged 85% in the surface mixed layer and 93% in the lower euphotic zone. Uptake of 14C at night accounted for 26% of the integral production at the Caribbean stations. The specific activity of Chl a carbon increased at night, and growth rates inferred from this increase were highly correlated with nocturnal 14C uptake. Based on the Chl a carbon specific activity data, about 76% of the nocturnal 14C uptake was attributed to phytoplankton. This uptake may have represented assimilation of labeled DOC excreted during the photoperiod. Over 80% of the Chl a in the chlorophyll maximum layers fell in the picoplankton size range. Incubation of these populations at higher irradiance levels revealed no indication of light adaptation over a 24 h period, a result consistent with recent studies of Synechococcus. Chlorophyll maximum populations occurred at about the 3% light level and were estimated to be growing with a doubling time of a little over 2 days. Estimated phytoplankton carbon concentrations were virtually identical in the mixed layers and chlorophyll maxima. The latter were therefore the result of adaptation of the phytoplankton to low irradiance levels and did not represent biomass maxima.

  8. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Ovchinnikov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE. Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel

  9. Secure transmission for mixed FSO-RF relay networks with physical-layer key encryption and wiretap coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Ren, Pinyi; Cheng, Julian; Du, Qinghe; Wang, Yichen; Sun, Li

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a secure transmission scheme to protect the confidential messages in a mixed free space optical-radio frequency (FSO-RF) relay network against malicious eavesdroppers. In the proposed scheme, the physical-layer key generation, encryption method and physical-layer wiretap coding are exploited to protect the FSO and RF links. Specifically, the overall transmission is divided into two time slots. In the first time slot, the transmitter and relay of the FSO link utilize the channel reciprocity of the FSO link to generate key packets. In the second time slot, the confidential messages will be securely transmitted from the transmitter to the receiver assisted by the relay over two phases. In the first phase, the transmitter sends the confidential messages to the relay through the FSO link encrypted by the generated key packets. In the second phase, the relay will forward these confidential messages to the receiver through the RF link protected by the physical-layer wiretap coding. For the proposed scheme, the key generation rate can be obtained. In addition, we analyze the performance of the connection outage probability and the secrecy outage probability, and optimally design the target transmission rate and secrecy rate such that the average secrecy rate is maximized. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance superiority of the proposed scheme in terms of the average secrecy rate.

  10. Self-organization of nanocluster δ-layers at ion-beam-mixed Si-SiO2 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2003-11-01

    This diploma thesis presents experimental evidence of a theoretical concept which predicts the self-organization of δ-layers of silicon nanoclusters in the buried oxide of a MOS-like structure. This approach of ''bottom-up'' structuring might be of eminent importance in view of future semiconductor memory devices. Unconventionally, a 15 nm thin SiO 2 layer, which is enclosed by a 50 nm poly-Si capping layer and the Si substrate, is irradiated with Si + ions. Ion impact drives the system to a state far from thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. the local composition of the target is modified to a degree unattainable in common processes. A region of SiO x (x 2 matrix at a distance of ∼3 nm from the Si substrate. The physical mechanisms of ion mixing of the two Si-SiO 2 interfaces and subsequent phase separation, which result in the desired sample structure, are elucidated from the viewpoint of computer simulations. In addition, experimental evidence is presented based on various methods, including TEM, RBS, and SIMS. A novel method of Si nanocluster decoration is of particular importance which applies Ge as contrast enhancing element in TEM studies of tiny Si nanoclusters. (orig.)

  11. Low-cost fabrication and polar-dependent switching uniformity of memory devices using alumina interfacial layer and Ag nanoparticle monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A facile and low-cost process was developed for fabricating write-once-read-many-times (WORM Cu/Ag NPs/Alumina/Al memory devices, where the alumina passivation layer formed naturally in air at room temperature, whereas the Ag nanoparticle monolayer was in situ prepared through thermal annealing of a 4.5 nm Ag film in air at 150°C. The devices exhibit irreversible transition from initial high resistance (OFF state to low resistance (ON state, with ON/OFF ratio of 107, indicating the introduction of Ag nanoparticle monolayer greatly improves ON/OFF ratio by four orders of magnitude. The uniformity of threshold voltages exhibits a polar-dependent behavior, and a narrow range of threshold voltages of 0.40 V among individual devices was achieved upon the forward voltage. The memory device can be regarded as two switching units connected in series. The uniform alumina interfacial layer and the non-uniform distribution of local electric fields originated from Ag nanoparticles might be responsible for excellent switching uniformity. Since silver ions in active layer can act as fast ion conductor, a plausible mechanism relating to the formation of filaments sequentially among the two switching units connected in series is suggested for the polar-dependent switching behavior. Furthermore, we demonstrate both alumina layer and Ag NPs monolayer play essential roles in improving switching parameters based on comparative experiments.

  12. Significance of the double-layer capacitor effect in polar rubbery dielectrics and exceptionally stable low-voltage high transconductance organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lee, Wen-Ya; Kong, Desheng; Pfattner, Raphael; Schweicher, Guillaume; Nakajima, Reina; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Wu, Hung-Chin; Lopez, Jeffery; Diao, Ying; Gu, Xiaodan; Himmelberger, Scott; Niu, Weijun; Matthews, James R.; He, Mingqian; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Both high gain and transconductance at low operating voltages are essential for practical applications of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we describe the significance of the double-layer capacitance effect in polar rubbery dielectrics, even when present in a very low ion concentration and conductivity. We observed that this effect can greatly enhance the OFET transconductance when driven at low voltages. Specifically, when the polar elastomer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (e-PVDF-HFP) was used as the dielectric layer, despite a thickness of several micrometers, we obtained a transconductance per channel width 30 times higher than that measured for the same organic semiconductors fabricated on a semicrystalline PVDF-HFP with a similar thickness. After a series of detailed experimental investigations, we attribute the above observation to the double-layer capacitance effect, even though the ionic conductivity is as low as 10-10 S/cm. Different from previously reported OFETs with double-layer capacitance effects, our devices showed unprecedented high bias-stress stability in air and even in water.

  13. Low-cost fabrication and polar-dependent switching uniformity of memory devices using alumina interfacial layer and Ag nanoparticle monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng; Li, Luman; Wang, Pengfei; Gan, Ying; Xu, Wei

    2017-11-01

    A facile and low-cost process was developed for fabricating write-once-read-many-times (WORM) Cu/Ag NPs/Alumina/Al memory devices, where the alumina passivation layer formed naturally in air at room temperature, whereas the Ag nanoparticle monolayer was in situ prepared through thermal annealing of a 4.5 nm Ag film in air at 150°C. The devices exhibit irreversible transition from initial high resistance (OFF) state to low resistance (ON) state, with ON/OFF ratio of 107, indicating the introduction of Ag nanoparticle monolayer greatly improves ON/OFF ratio by four orders of magnitude. The uniformity of threshold voltages exhibits a polar-dependent behavior, and a narrow range of threshold voltages of 0.40 V among individual devices was achieved upon the forward voltage. The memory device can be regarded as two switching units connected in series. The uniform alumina interfacial layer and the non-uniform distribution of local electric fields originated from Ag nanoparticles might be responsible for excellent switching uniformity. Since silver ions in active layer can act as fast ion conductor, a plausible mechanism relating to the formation of filaments sequentially among the two switching units connected in series is suggested for the polar-dependent switching behavior. Furthermore, we demonstrate both alumina layer and Ag NPs monolayer play essential roles in improving switching parameters based on comparative experiments.

  14. The roles of convection, extratropical mixing, and in-situ freeze-drying in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Read

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms for transporting and dehydrating air across the tropical tropopause layer (TTL are investigated with a conceptual two dimensional (2-D model. The 2-D TTL model combines the Holton and Gettelman cold trap dehydration mechanism (Holton and Gettelman, 2001 with the two column convection model of Folkins and Martin (2005. We investigate 3 possible transport scenarios through the TTL: 1 slow uniform ascent across the level of zero radiative heating without direct convective mixing, 2 convective mixing of H2O vapor at 100% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi with no ice retention, and 3 convective mixing of extremely subsaturated air (100% RHi following the moist adiabatic temperature above the level of neutral buoyancy with sufficient ice retention such that total H2O is 100%RHi. The three mechanisms produce similar seasonal cycles for H2O that are in good quantitative agreement with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS measurements. We use Aura MLS measurement of CO and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer measurement of HDO to distinguish among the transport mechanisms. Model comparisons with the observations support the view that H2O is predominantly controlled by regions having the lowest cold point tropopause temperature but the trace species CO and HDO support the convective mixing of dry air and lofted ice. The model provides some insight into the processes affecting the long term trends observed in stratospheric H2O.

  15. Investigation of the mixing layer height derived from ceilometer measurements in the Kathmandu Valley and implications for local air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mues

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study 1 year of ceilometer measurements taken in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, in the framework of the SusKat project (A Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley were analysed to investigate the diurnal variation of the mixing layer height (MLH and its dependency on the meteorological conditions. In addition, the impact of the MLH on the temporal variation and the magnitude of the measured black carbon concentrations are analysed for each season. Based on the assumption that black carbon aerosols are vertically well mixed within the mixing layer and the finding that the mixing layer varies only little during night time and morning hours, black carbon emission fluxes are estimated for these hours and per month. Even though this method is relatively simple, it can give an observationally based first estimate of the black carbon emissions in this region, especially illuminating the seasonal cycle of the emission fluxes. The monthly minimum median MLH values typically range between 150 and 200 m during night and early morning hours, the monthly maximum median values between 625 m in July and 1460 m in March. Seasonal differences are not only found in the absolute MLHs, but also in the duration of the typical daytime maximum ranging between 2 and 3 h in January and 6–7 h in May. During the monsoon season a diurnal cycle has been observed with the smallest amplitude (typically between 400 and 500 m, with the lowest daytime mixing height of all seasons (maximum monthly median values typically between 600 and 800 m, and also the highest night-time and early morning mixing height of all seasons (minimum monthly median values typically between 200 and 220 m. These characteristics can mainly be explained with the frequently present clouds and the associated reduction in incoming solar radiation and outgoing longwave radiation. In general, the black carbon concentrations show a clear anticorrelation with MLH measurements

  16. Friction Modifier Using Adherent Metallic Multilayered or Mixed Element Layer Conversion Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Starks, Lloyd L., Sr. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process for creating conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes for surfaces, wherein the conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes contain potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The process comprises forming an aqueous solution of water, phosphoric acid or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide, an alkali metal hydroxide, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The aqueous solution forms an anti-friction multilayer conversion and/or mixed element coating or a spin, drawing, and extrusion finish on a surface when applied to the surface, either directly without the use of applied external electromotive force, or as an additive in lubricating fluids.

  17. Sound generated by instability waves of supersonic flows. I Two-dimensional mixing layers. II - Axisymmetric jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Burton, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the phenomenon of sound generation by spatially growing instability waves in high-speed flows. It is pointed out that this process of noise generation is most effective when the flow is supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. The inner and outer asymptotic expansions corresponding to an excited instability wave in a two-dimensional mixing layer and its associated acoustic fields are constructed in terms of the inner and outer spatial variables. In matching the solutions, the intermediate matching principle of Van Dyke and Cole is followed. The validity of the theory is tested by applying it to an axisymmetric supersonic jet and comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements. Very favorable agreements are found both in the calculated instability-wave amplitude distribution (the inner solution) and the near pressure field level contours (the outer solution) in each case.

  18. MHD Effect on Unsteady Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow past a Circular Cylinder with Constant Wall Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M. A.; Mohamad, N. F.; Ilias, M. R.; Shafie, S.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effect is a study on motion of electrical-conducting fluid under magnetic fields. This effect has great intention due to its applications such as design of heat exchanger and nuclear reactor. In the problem in fluid motion, flow of separation can reduced the effectiveness of the system as well as can increased the energy lost. This study will present the results on reducing the flow separation by considering magnetic effect. In this study, unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow past a circular cylinder is given attention. Focus of study is on the separation times that affected by the magnetic fields. The mathematical models in the form of partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as Keller-box method. The effect of magnetic parameter on velocity and temperature profiles as well as skin friction and Nusselt number are studied.

  19. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a moving vertical flat plate in an external fluid flow with viscous dissipation effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norfifah Bachok

    Full Text Available The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface.

  20. On the annual cycle of the sea surface temperature and the mixed layer depth in the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, V.M.; Villanueva, E.E.; Adem, J. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-04-01

    Using an integrated mixed layer model, we carry out a simulation of the annual cycle of the sea surface temperature (SST) and of the mixed layer depth (MLD) in the Gulf of Mexico. We also compute the annual cycle of the entrainment velocity in the deepest region of the Gulf of Mexico. The model is based on the thermal energy equation and on an equation of mechanical and thermal energy balance based on the Kraus-Turner theory; both equation are coupled and are vertically integrated in the mixed layer. The model equations are solved in a uniform grid of 25 km in the Gulf of Mexico, the northwestern region of the Caribbean Sea and the eastern coast of Florida. The surface ocean current velocity and the atmospheric variables are prescribed in the model using observed values. We show the importance of the Ekman pumping in the entrainment velocity. We found that the upwelling plays an important role in increasing the entrainment velocity, producing an important reduction in the SST and diminishing the depth of the mixed layer in the Campeche Bay. In the rest of the Gulf of Mexico the downwelling tends to reduce the entrainment velocity, increasing the SST and the MLD. Comparison of the computed annual cycle of the SST and the MLD with the corresponding observations reported by Robinson (1973) shows a good agreement. In the deepest region of the Gulf of Mexico, the photosynthetic pigment concentration data obtained from the Mexican Pacific Cd-Rom of environmental analysis shows significant correlation with the computed annual cycle of the computed entrainment velocity only in January, April, May, June and September. [Spanish] Usando un modelo integrado en la capa de mezcla hemos obtenido una simulacion del ciclo anual de la temperatura de la superficie del mar (SST), de la profundidad de la capa de mezcla (MLD) en el Golfo de Mexico, asi como el ciclo anual de la velocidad de penetracion vertical turbulenta a traves de la termoclina en la region mas profunda del golfo de

  1. Atomic layer deposition and properties of mixed Ta2O5 and ZrO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaupo Kukli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thin solid films consisting of ZrO2 and Ta2O5 were grown by atomic layer deposition at 300 °C. Ta2O5 films doped with ZrO2, TaZr2.75O8 ternary phase, or ZrO2 doped with Ta2O5 were grown to thickness and composition depending on the number and ratio of alternating ZrO2 and Ta2O5 deposition cycles. All the films grown exhibited resistive switching characteristics between TiN and Pt electrodes, expressed by repetitive current-voltage loops. The most reliable windows between high and low resistive states were observed in Ta2O5 films mixed with relatively low amounts of ZrO2, providing Zr to Ta cation ratio of 0.2.

  2. Contrasting atmospheric boundary layer chemistry of methylhydroperoxide (CH3OOH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 above polar snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Friel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric hydroperoxides (ROOH were measured at Summit, Greenland (72.97° N, 38.77° W in summer 2003 (SUM03 and spring 2004 (SUM04 and South Pole in December 2003 (SP03. The two dominant hydroperoxides were H2O2 and CH3OOH (from here on MHP with average (±1σ mixing ratios of 1448 (±688 pptv, 204 (±162 and 278 (±67 for H2O2 and 578 (±377 pptv, 139 (±101 pptv and 138 (±89 pptv for MHP, respectively. In early spring, MHP dominated the ROOH budget and showed night time maxima and daytime minima, out of phase with the diurnal cycle of H2O2, suggesting that the organic peroxide is controlled by photochemistry, while H2O2 is largely influenced by temperature driven exchange between the atmosphere and snow. Highly constrained photochemical box model runs yielded median ratios between modeled and observed MHP of 52%, 148% and 3% for SUM03, SUM04 and SP03, respectively. At Summit firn air measurements and model calculations suggest a daytime sink of MHP in the upper snow pack, which decreases in strength through the spring season into the summer. Up to 50% of the estimated sink rates of 1–5×1011 molecules m−3 s−1 equivalent to 24–96 pptv h−1 can be explained by photolysis and reaction with the OH radical in firn air and in the quasi-liquid layer on snow grains. Rapid processing of MHP in surface snow is expected to contribute significantly to a photochemical snow pack source of formaldehyde (CH2O. Conversely, summer levels of MHP at South Pole are inconsistent with the prevailing high NO concentrations, and cannot be explained currently by known photochemical precursors or transport, thus suggesting a missing source. Simultaneous measurements of H2O2, MHP and CH2O allow to constrain the NO background today and potentially also in the past using ice cores, although it seems less likely that MHP is preserved in firn and ice.

  3. Synergetic Influences of Mixed-Host Emitting Layer Structures and Hole Injection Layers on Efficiency and Lifetime of Simplified Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Myung Hwan; Song, Wonjun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-03-09

    We used various nondestructive analyses to investigate various host material systems in the emitting layer (EML) of simple-structured, green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to clarify how the host systems affect its luminous efficiency (LE) and operational stability. An OLED that has a unipolar single-host EML with conventional poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) showed high operating voltage, low LE (∼26.6 cd/A, 13.7 lm/W), and short lifetime (∼4.4 h @ 1000 cd/m(2)). However, the combined use of a gradient mixed-host EML and a molecularly controlled HIL that has increased surface work function (WF) remarkably decreased operating voltage and improved LE (∼68.7 cd/A, 77.0 lm/W) and lifetime (∼70.7 h @ 1000 cd/m(2)). Accumulated charges at the injecting interfaces and formation of a narrow recombination zone close to the interfaces are the major factors that accelerate degradation of charge injection/transport and electroluminescent properties of OLEDs, so achievement of simple-structured OLEDs with high efficiency and long lifetime requires facilitating charge injection and balanced transport into the EML and distributing charge carriers and excitons in EML.

  4. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedghi, Mohammad, E-mail: msedghi@uwyo.edu; Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University Avenue, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  5. Controllable Release of Interleukin-4 in Double-Layer Sol-Gel Coatings on TiO2 Nanotubes for Modulating Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengting; Gao, LIli; Chen, Junhong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianxin; Lu, Xiong; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2017-10-23

    Classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages play key roles in regulating immune responses. M1 macrophages initiate angiogenesis in the early stages of wound healing or after implantation. However, their prolonged activation can lead to chronic inflammation. We speculated that biomedical implants with specific properties can induce a shift from M1 to M2 macrophages at a specific time point to promote tissue repair and wound healing. To investigate this possibility, drug-loaded double-layer sol-gel coatings were fabricated on TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs), which were used to modulate the switch from the M1 to the M2 phenotype by controlled release of interleukin (IL)-4. The lower sol-gel layer with IL-4 consisted of a carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) hydrogel, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide, and N-hydroxysuccinimide as a crosslinker (IL4/TNT). The upper layer fabricated on the IL4/TNT sample was another type of CMCS hydrogel that used genipin (GP) as a crosslinker (GP/IL4/TNT). We found that IL-4 was released from GP/IL4/TNTs in a controlled manner, with the greatest release occurring after 72 h. GP/IL4/TNT stimulated the polarization of macrophages from the M1 to M2 phenotype after the macrophage polarization from the M0 to M1 phenotype. This provides a template for the fabrication of biomaterials that can direct macrophage polarization and stimulate tissue regeneration following the initial inflammatory response to implants. . © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Ultrathin limit and dead-layer effects in local polarization switching of BiFeO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maksymovych, P.; Huijben, Mark; Pan, M.; Jesse, S.; Balke, N.; Chu, Y.H.; Chang, H.J.; Borisevich, A.Y.; Baddorf, A.P.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.; Ramesh, R.; Kalinin, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    Using piezoresponse force microscopy in an ultrahigh vacuum, polarization switching has been detected and quantified in epitaxial BiFeO3 films from 200 to about 4 unit cells thick. Local remnant piezoresponse was utilized to probe both ferroelectric properties and effects of imperfect electrical

  7. Intimal lining layer macrophages but not synovial sublining macrophages display an IL-10 polarized-like phenotype in chronic synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarus, Carmen A.; Noordenbos, Troy; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial tissue macrophages play a key role in chronic inflammatory arthritis, but the contribution of different macrophage subsets in this process remains largely unknown. The main in vitro polarized macrophage subsets are classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages,

  8. Relativistic spin-polarized KKR theory for superconducting heterostructures: Oscillating order parameter in the Au layer of Nb/Au/Fe trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csire, Gábor; Deák, András; Nyári, Bendegúz; Ebert, Hubert; Annett, James F.; Újfalussy, Balázs

    2018-01-01

    The fully relativistic spin-polarized multiple-scattering theory is developed for inhomogeneous superconductors, including superconducting/normal-metal/ferromagnet heterostructures. The method allows the solution of the first-principles Dirac-Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations combined with a semiphenomenological parametrization of the exchange-correlation functional. Simple conditions are derived for the case when the right-hand-side and left-hand-side solutions must be treated separately when setting up the corresponding Green's function. As an application of the theory, we calculate the order parameters of Nb/Fe and Nb/Au/Fe systems. We find Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov-like oscillations in the iron layers, but more interestingly an oscillatory behavior is observed in the gold layers as well. The band-structure calculations suggest that this is the consequence of an interplay between the quantum-well states and ferromagnetism.

  9. The sensitivity of primary productivity to intra-seasonal mixed layer variability in the sub-Antarctic Zone of the Atlantic Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joubert, WR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available , 1998). Similarly, under low light conditions, enhanced rates of re-stratification associated with lateral advection from eddy and frontal instabilities (i.e., Taylor and5 Ferrari, 2011; Mahadevan et al., 2012) reduce the depth of the mixed layer... dense water over weekly timescales. Such mechanisms rapidly reduce the depth of mixing leading to increased20 light exposure and more phytoplankton growth (Mahadevan et al., 2012). Similarly, Tay- lor and Ferrari (2011) showed that frontal instabilities...

  10. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll and Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea - A basin-scale habitat comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Bagøien, Espen

    2012-09-01

    Seasonal patterns for mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll, and Calanus finmarchicus in different water masses between 62 and 70°N of the Norwegian Sea were compared using spatiotemporally aggregated basin-scale data. Norwegian Coastal Water was stratified throughout the year due to a low-salinity upper layer. The winter mixed layer depth was typically about 50-60m, and the spring phytoplankton bloom peaked in late April. In Atlantic and Arctic Waters the winter mixed layer depths were much greater, typically about 175-250m. Due to the requirement for thermal stratification, the phytoplankton build-ups there were slower and the peaks were delayed until late May. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrient consumption and chlorophyll was similar for the Atlantic and Arctic areas. Young Calanus copepodites of the first new generation in Coastal Water peaked in early May, preceding the peak in Atlantic Water by about 2weeks, and that in Arctic Water by about 6weeks. While the young G 1 cohorts in Coastal and Atlantic waters coincided rather well in time with the phytoplankton blooms, the timing of the cohort in Arctic Water was delayed compared to the phytoplankton. Two or more Calanus generations in Coastal Water, and two generations in Atlantic Water were observed. Only one generation was found in Arctic Water, where scarce autumn data precludes evaluation of a possible second generation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Snow nitrate photolysis in polar regions and the mid-latitudes: Impact on boundary layer chemistry and implications for ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatko, Maria C.

    The formation and recycling of nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO 2) associated with snow nitrate photolysis has important implications for air quality and the preservation of nitrate in ice core records. This dissertation examines snow nitrate photolysis in polar and mid-latitude regions using field and laboratory based observations combined with snow chemistry column models and a global chemical transport model to explore the impacts of snow nitrate photolysis on boundary layer chemistry and the preservation of nitrate in polar ice cores. Chapter 1 describes how a global chemical transport model is used to calculate the photolysis-driven flux and redistribution of nitrogen across Antarctica, and Chapter 2 presents similar work for Greenland. Snow-sourced NOx is most dependent on the quantum yield for nitrate photolysis as well as the concentration of photolabile nitrate and light-absorbing impurities (e.g., black carbon, dust, organics) in snow. Model-calculated fluxes of snow-sourced NOx are similar in magnitude in Antarctica (0.5--7.8x108 molec cm-2 s -1) and Greenland (0.1--6.4x108 molec cm-2 s-1) because both nitrate and light-absorbing impurity concentrations in snow are higher (by factors of 2 and 10, respectively) in Greenland. Snow nitrate photolysis influences boundary layer chemistry and ice-core nitrate preservation less in Greenland compared to Antarctica largely due to Greenland's proximity to NOx-source regions. Chapter 3 describes how a snow chemistry column model combined with chemistry and optical measurements from the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2014 is used to calculate snow-sourced NOx in eastern Utah. Daily-averaged fluxes of snow-sourced NOx (2.9x10 7--1.3x108 molec cm-2 s-1) are similar in magnitude to polar snow-sourced NO x fluxes, but are only minor components of the Uintah Basin boundary layer NOx budget and can be neglected when developing ozone reduction strategies for the region. Chapter 4 presents chemical and optical

  12. Combined thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric analysis of lipid classes and fatty acids in malnourished polar bears (Ursus maritimus) which swam to Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibler, Dorothee; Krüger, Sabine; Skírnisson, Karl; Vetter, Walter

    2017-03-01

    Between 2008 and 2011, four polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Greenland population swam and/or drifted on ice to Iceland where they arrived in very poor body condition. Body fat resources in these animals were only between 0% and 10% of the body weight (usually 25%). Here we studied the lipid composition in different tissues (adipose tissue if available, liver, kidney and muscle). Lipid classes were determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and on-column gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The fatty acid pattern of total lipids and free fatty acids was analyzed by GC/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Additionally, cholesteryl esters and native fatty acid methyl esters, initially detected as zones in thin layer chromatograms, were enriched by solid phase extraction and quantified by GC/MS. The ratio of free fatty acids to native fatty acid methyl esters could be correlated with the remained body lipids in the polar bears and thus may also serve as a marker for other starving animals or even for humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-layer solid-phase extraction and evaporation-enrichment methods for polar organic chemicals from aqueous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köke, Niklas; Zahn, Daniel; Knepper, Thomas P; Frömel, Tobias

    2018-03-01

    Analysis of polar organic chemicals in the aquatic environment is exacerbated by the lack of suitable and widely applicable enrichment methods. In this work, we assessed the suitability of a novel combination of well-known solid-phase extraction (SPE) materials in one cartridge as well as an evaporation method and for the enrichment of 26 polar model substances (predominantly log D evaporation method were investigated for the recovery and matrix effects of the model substances and analyzed with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS). In total, 65% of the model substances were amenable (> 10% recovery) to the mlSPE method with a mean recovery of 76% while 73% of the model substances were enriched with the evaporation method achieving a mean recovery of 78%. Target and non-target screening comparison of both methods with a frequently used reversed-phase SPE method utilizing "hydrophilic and lipophilic balanced" (HLB) material was performed. Target analysis showed that the mlSPE and evaporation method have pronounced advantages over the HLB method since the HLB material retained only 30% of the model substances. Non-target screening of a ground water sample with the investigated enrichment methods showed that the median retention time of all detected features on a HILIC system decreased in the order mlSPE (3641 features, median t R 9.7 min), evaporation (1391, 9.3 min), HLB (4414, 7.2 min), indicating a higher potential of the described methods to enrich polar analytes from water compared with HLB-SPE. Graphical abstract Schematic of the method evaluation (recovery and matrix effects) and method comparison (target and non-target analysis) of the two investigated enrichment methods for very polar chemicals in aqueousmatrices.

  14. The Open-Ocean Sensible Heat Flux and Its Significance for Arctic Boundary Layer Mixing During Early Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Manisha; Wu, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL) clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multiyear Japanese cruise-ship observations from RV Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean-atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime), yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure) followed by the highly stable (stratus) regime. Overall, it can explain 10 of the open ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative) mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the RV Mirai for better understanding and

  15. The open-ocean sensible heat flux and its significance for Arctic boundary layer mixing during early fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganeshan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multi-year Japanese cruise-ship observations from R/V Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean–atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime, yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure followed by the highly stable (stratus regime. Overall, it can explain  ∼  10 % of the open-ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the R/V Mirai for

  16. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  17. Characterization of Organic Thin Film Solar Cells of PCDTBT : PC71BM Prepared by Different Mixing Ratio and Effect of Hole Transport Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Srinivasan Murugesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic thin film solar cells (OTFSCs have been successfully fabricated using PCDTBT : PC71BM with different mixing ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 8 and the influence of hole transport layer thickness (PEDOT : PSS. The active layers with different mixing ratios of PCDTBT : PC71BM have been fabricated using o-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB. The surface morphology of the active layers and PEDOT : PSS layer with different thicknesses were characterized by AFM analysis. Here, we report that the OTFSCs with high performance have been optimized with 1 : 4 ratios of PCDTBT : PC71BM. The power conversion efficiency (PCE = 5.17% of the solar cells was significantly improved by changing thickness of PEDOT : PSS layer. The thickness of the PEDOT : PSS layer was found to be of significant importance; the thickness of the PEDOT : PSS layer at 45 nm (higher spin speed 5000 rpm shows higher short circuit current density (Jsc and lower series resistance (Rs and higher PCE.

  18. Mixed layers of β-lactoglobulin and SDS at air-water interfaces with tunable intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Weichsel, Ulrike; Kraft, Elena; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2014-04-17

    Mixtures of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied at pH 3.8 and 6.7 under equilibrium conditions. At these pH conditions, BLG carries either a positive or a negative net charge, respectively, which enables tunable electrostatic interactions between anionic SDS surfactants and BLG proteins. For pH 3.8, vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry indicate strong BLG-SDS complex formation at air-water interfaces that is caused by attractive electrostatic interactions. The latter complexes are already formed in the bulk solution which was confirmed by a thermodynamic study of BLG-SDS mixtures using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). For acidic conditions we determine from our ITC data an exothermal binding enthalpy of -40 kJ mol(-1). Increasing SDS/BLG molar ratios above 10 leads to a surface excess of SDS and thus to a charge reversal from a positive net charge with BLG as the dominating surface adsorbed species to a negatively charged layer with SDS as the dominating surface species. The latter is evidenced by a pronounced minimum in SFG intensities that is also accompanied by a phase change of O-H stretching bands due to a reorientation of H2O within the local electric field. This phase change which occurs at SDS/BLG molar ratio between 1 and 10 causes a polarity change in SFG intensities from BLG aromatic C-H stretching vibrations. Conclusions from SFG spectra are corroborated by ellipsometry which shows a dramatic increase in layer thicknesses at molar ratios where a charge reversal occurs. The formation of interfacial multilayers comprising SDS-BLG complexes is, thus, caused by cancellation of electrostatic interactions which leads to agglomeration at the interface. In contrast to pH 3.8, behavior of BLG-SDS mixtures at pH 6.7 is different due to repulsive electrostatic interactions between SDS and BLG which lead to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy of -17 kJ mol(-1). Finally, it has to be mentioned that

  19. Effectiveness of Three Different Irrigants - 17% Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid, Q-MIX, and Phytic Acid in Smear Layer Removal: A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagzap, Janhavi Balasaheb; Patil, Sanjay S; Gade, Vandana Jaykumar; Chandhok, Deepika J; Upagade, Madhura A; Thakur, Deepa A

    2017-01-01

    Removal of smear layer from the root canal walls is important for long-standing endodontic success. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare smear layer removing ability among 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Q-MIX, and phytic acid by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This in-vitro experimental study assessed smear layer removal using three different irrigants. Thirty single-rooted freshly extracted human permanent premolars were collected, disinfected, and decoronated to a standardized root length of 13 mm. Root canals were cleaned and shaped till F2 universal rotary protaper at working length 1 mm short of the apex. They were randomly divided into three groups, and final irrigation was done accordingly. Group 1 ( n = 10): with 1 ml of 17% EDTA, Group 2 ( n = 10): with 1 ml of Q-MIX, Group 3 ( n = 10): with 1 ml of phytic acid. Samples were then longitudinally sectioned and evaluated under SEM at coronal, middle, and apical levels. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test were performed. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Smear layer removing ability among irrigants and sections in descending order: 17 EDTA > Q-MIX > phytic acid; coronal > middle > apical. 17% EDTA showed better and promising results followed by Q-MIX and then phytic acid.

  20. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF WIND SPEED AND MIXING-LAYER HEIGHT ON AIR QUALITY IN KRAKOW (POLAND IN THE YEARS 2014-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert OLENIACZ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the role of wind speed and mixing-layer height in shaping the levels of pollutant concentrations in the air of Krakow (Southern Poland. The hourly averaged measurements of concentrations of selected air pollutants and wind speed values from the period of 2014-2015, recorded at two of the air quality monitoring stations within Krakow (both industrial and urban background were used for this purpose. Temporal variability of mixing-layer height in the area of the monitoring stations was determined using numerical modelling with the CALMET model and the measurements derived from, i.a., two upper air stations. It was found that wind speed and mixing-layer height are in at least moderate agreement with the concentration values for some pollutants. For PM10, PM2.5, NO2, NOx, CO and C6H6 correlation coefficient is of negative value, which indicates that the low wind speed and low mixing-layer height may be the dominant reason for elevated concentrations of these substances in the air, especially in the winter months. Moderate but positive correlation was found between O3 concentrations and analysed meteorological parameters, proving that the availability of appropriate precursors and their inflow from the neighbouring areas have an important role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. On the other hand, in case of SO2, a weak both positive and negative correlation coefficient was obtained, depending on the period and location of the station concerned.

  1. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems.

  2. Application of exciplex in the fabrication of white organic light emitting devices with mixed fluorescent and phosphorescent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dan; Duan, Yahui; Yang, Yongqiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Hu, Nan [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Sun, Fengbo [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Duan, Yu, E-mail: duanyu@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a highly efficient fluorescent/phosphorescent white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) was fabricated using exciplex light emission. The hole-transport material 4,4',4''-tris(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and electron-transport material, 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen), were mixed to afford a blue-emitting exciplex. The WOLED was fabricated with a yellow phosphorescent dye, Ir(III) bis(4-phenylthieno [3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C{sup 2'}) acetylacetonate (PO-01), combined with the exciplex. In this structure, the energy can be efficiently transferred from the blend layer to the yellow phosphorescent dye, thus improving the efficiency of the utilization of the triplet exciton. The maximum power efficiency of the WOLED reached a value 9.03 lm/W with an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%. The Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates (x,y) of the device were from (0.39, 0.45) to (0.27, 0.31), with a voltage range of 4–9 V. - Highlights: • An exciplex/phosphorescence hybrid white OLED was fabricated for the first time with blue/orange complementary emitters. • By using exciplex as the blue emitter, non-radiative triplet-states on the exciplex can be harvested for light-emission by transferring them to low triplet-state phosphors.

  3. Marine isoprene production and consumption in the mixed layer of the surface ocean - a field study over two oceanic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booge, Dennis; Schlundt, Cathleen; Bracher, Astrid; Endres, Sonja; Zäncker, Birthe; Marandino, Christa A.

    2018-02-01

    Parameterizations of surface ocean isoprene concentrations are numerous, despite the lack of source/sink process understanding. Here we present isoprene and related field measurements in the mixed layer from the Indian Ocean and the eastern Pacific Ocean to investigate the production and consumption rates in two contrasting regions, namely oligotrophic open ocean and the coastal upwelling region. Our data show that the ability of different phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) to produce isoprene seems to be mainly influenced by light, ocean temperature, and salinity. Our field measurements also demonstrate that nutrient availability seems to have a direct influence on the isoprene production. With the help of pigment data, we calculate in-field isoprene production rates for different PFTs under varying biogeochemical and physical conditions. Using these new calculated production rates, we demonstrate that an additional significant and variable loss, besides a known chemical loss and a loss due to air-sea gas exchange, is needed to explain the measured isoprene concentration. We hypothesize that this loss, with a lifetime for isoprene between 10 and 100 days depending on the ocean region, is potentially due to degradation or consumption by bacteria.

  4. BIG1 is required for the survival of deep layer neurons, neuronal polarity, and the formation of axonal tracts between the thalamus and neocortex in developing brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Jie Teoh

    Full Text Available BIG1, an activator protein of the small GTPase, Arf, and encoded by the Arfgef1 gene, is one of candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy. To know the involvement of BIG1 in epileptic encephalopathy, we analyzed BIG1-deficient mice and found that BIG1 regulates neurite outgrowth and brain development in vitro and in vivo. The loss of BIG1 decreased the size of the neocortex and hippocampus. In BIG1-deficient mice, the neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs and the interneurons were unaffected. However, Tbr1+ and Ctip2+ deep layer (DL neurons showed spatial-temporal dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis gradually progressed from the piriform cortex (PIR, peaked in the neocortex, and then progressed into the hippocampus from embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5 to E17.5. The upper layer (UL and DL order in the neocortex was maintained in BIG1-deficient mice, but the excitatory neurons tended to accumulate before their destination layers. Further pulse-chase migration assay showed that the migration defect was non-cell autonomous and secondary to the progression of apoptosis into the BIG1-deficient neocortex after E15.5. In BIG1-deficient mice, we observed an ectopic projection of corticothalamic axons from the primary somatosensory cortex (S1 into the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN. The thalamocortical axons were unable to cross the diencephalon-telencephalon boundary (DTB. In vitro, BIG1-deficient neurons showed a delay in neuronal polarization. BIG1-deficient neurons were also hypersensitive to low dose glutamate (5 μM, and died via apoptosis. This study showed the role of BIG1 in the survival of DL neurons in developing embryonic brain and in the generation of neuronal polarity.

  5. Update of the Polar SWIFT model for polar stratospheric ozone loss (Polar SWIFT version 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2017-07-01

    The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate. To date, climate models often use prescribed ozone fields, since a full stratospheric chemistry scheme is computationally very expensive. Polar SWIFT is based on a set of coupled differential equations, which simulate the polar vortex-averaged mixing ratios of the key species involved in polar ozone depletion on a given vertical level. These species are O3, chemically active chlorine (ClOx), HCl, ClONO2 and HNO3. The only external input parameters that drive the model are the fraction of the polar vortex in sunlight and the fraction of the polar vortex below the temperatures necessary for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Here, we present an update of the Polar SWIFT model introducing several improvements over the original model formulation. In particular, the model is now trained on vortex-averaged reaction rates of the ATLAS Chemistry and Transport Model, which enables a detailed look at individual processes and an independent validation of the different parameterizations contained in the differential equations. The training of the original Polar SWIFT model was based on fitting complete model runs to satellite observations and did not allow for this. A revised formulation of the system of differential equations is developed, which closely fits vortex-averaged reaction rates from ATLAS that represent the main chemical processes influencing ozone. In addition, a parameterization for the HNO3 change by denitrification is included. The rates of change of the concentrations of the chemical species of the Polar SWIFT model are purely chemical rates of change in the new version, whereas in the original Polar SWIFT model, they included a transport effect caused by the

  6. Mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide and layered metal oxide nanosheets: useful precursors for the porous nanocomposites and hybrid films of graphene/metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Ri; Kim, In Young; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Jang Mee; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2012-02-20

    Homogeneously mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide, or RGO, and layered manganate nanosheets have been synthesized by a simple addition of the exfoliated colloid of RGO into that of layered MnO(2). The obtained mixed colloidal suspensions with the RGO/MnO(2) ratio of ≤0.3 show good colloidal stability without any phase separation and a negatively charged state with a zeta (ζ) potential of -30 to -40 mV. The flocculation of these mixed colloidal suspensions with lithium cations yields porous nanocomposites of Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) with high electrochemical activity and a markedly expanded surface area of around 70-100 m(2)  g(-1). Relative to the Li/RGO and Li/layered MnO(2) nanocomposites (≈116 and ≈167 F g(-1)), the obtained Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) nanocomposites deliver a larger capacitance of approximately 210 F g(-1) with good cyclability of around 95-97 % up to the 1000th cycle, thus indicating the positive effect of hybridization on the electrode performances of RGO and lithium manganate. Also, an electrophoretic deposition of the mixed colloidal suspensions makes it possible to easily fabricate uniform hybrid films composed of graphene and manganese oxide. The obtained films show a distinct electrochemical activity and a homogeneous distribution of RGO and MnO(2). The present experimental findings clearly demonstrate that the utilization of the mixed colloidal suspensions as precursors provides a facile and universal methodology to synthesize various types of graphene/metal oxide hybrid materials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Spectral Induced Polarization of Low-pH Concrete. Influence of the Electrical Double Layer and Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, P. G.; Gaboreau, S.; Zimmermann, E.; Hoerdt, A.; Claret, F.; Huisman, J. A.; Tournassat, C.

    2017-12-01

    Low-pH concretes are foreseen to be used in nuclear waste disposal. Understanding their reactivity upon the considered host-rock is a key point. Evolution of mineralogy, porosity, pore size distribution and connectivity can be monitored in situ using geophysical methods such as induced polarization (IP). This electrical method consists of injecting an alternating current and measuring the resulting voltage in the porous medium. Spectral IP (SIP) measurements in the 10 mHz to 10 kHz frequency range were carried out on low-pH concrete and cement paste first in equilibrium and then in contact with a CO2 enriched and diluted water. We observed a very high resistivity of the materials (> 10 kOhm m) and a strong phase shift between injected current and measured voltage (superior to 40 mrad and above 100 mrad for frequencies > 100 Hz). These observations were modelled by considering membrane polarization with ion exclusion in nanopores whose surface electrical properties were computed using a basic Stern model of the cement/water interface. Pore size distribution was deduced from SIP and was compared to the measured ones. In addition, we observed a decrease of the material resistivity due to the dissolution of cement in contact with external water. Our results show that SIP may be a valuable method to monitor the mineralogy and the petrophysical and transport properties of cements.

  8. Study of different HILIC, mixed-mode, and other aqueous normal-phase approaches for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based determination of challenging polar pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Andrea; Robles-Molina, José; Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Dernovics, Mihaly; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of different chromatographic approaches for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS(/MS)) determination of 24 highly polar pesticides. The studied compounds, which are in most cases unsuitable for conventional LC-MS(/MS) multiresidue methods were tested with nine different chromatographic conditions, including two different hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) columns, two zwitterionic-type mixed-mode columns, three normal-phase columns operated in HILIC-mode (bare silica and two silica-based chemically bonded columns (cyano and amino)), and two standard reversed-phase C18 columns. Different sets of chromatographic parameters in positive (for 17 analytes) and negative ionization modes (for nine analytes) were examined. In order to compare the different approaches, a semi-quantitative classification was proposed, calculated as the percentage of an empirical performance value, which consisted of three main features: (i) capacity factor (k) to characterize analyte separation from the void, (ii) relative response factor, and (iii) peak shape based on analytes' peak width. While no single method was able to provide appropriate detection of all the 24 studied species in a single run, the best suited approach for the compounds ionized in positive mode was based on a UHPLC HILIC column with 1.8 μm particle size, providing appropriate results for 22 out of the 24 species tested. In contrast, the detection of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid could only be achieved with a zwitterionic-type mixed-mode column, which proved to be suitable only for the pesticides detected in negative ion mode. Finally, the selected approach (UHPLC HILIC) was found to be useful for the determination of multiple pesticides in oranges using HILIC-ESI-MS/MS, with limits of quantitation in the low microgram per kilogram in most cases. Graphical Abstract HILIC improves separation of multiclass polar pesticides.

  9. Conversion of terahertz wave polarization at the boundary of a layered superconductor due to the resonance excitation of oblique surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averkov, Yu O; Yakovenko, V M; Yampol'skii, V A; Nori, Franco

    2012-07-13

    We predict a complete TM↔TE transformation of the polarization of terahertz electromagnetic waves reflected from a strongly anisotropic boundary of a layered superconductor. We consider the case when the wave is incident on the superconductor from a dielectric prism separated from the sample by a thin vacuum gap. The physical origin of the predicted phenomenon is similar to the Wood anomalies known in optics and is related to the resonance excitation of the oblique surface waves. We also discuss the dispersion relation for these waves, propagating along the boundary of the superconductor at some angle with respect to the anisotropy axis, as well as their excitation by the attenuated-total-reflection method.

  10. Temporal and spectral cloud screening of polar winter aerosol optical depth (AOD: impact of homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds and crystal layers on climatological-scale AODs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. O'Neill

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared star-photometry-derived, polar winter aerosol optical depths (AODs, acquired at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, and Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, with GEOS-Chem (GC simulations as well as ground-based lidar and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals over a sampling period of two polar winters. The results indicate significant cloud and/or low-altitude ice crystal (LIC contamination which is only partially corrected using temporal cloud screening. Spatially homogeneous clouds and LICs that remain after temporal cloud screening represent an inevitable systematic error in the estimation of AOD: this error was estimated to vary from 78 to 210 % at Eureka and from 2 to 157 % at Ny-Ålesund. Lidar analysis indicated that LICs appeared to have a disproportionately large influence on the homogeneous coarse-mode optical depths that escape temporal cloud screening. In principle, spectral cloud screening (to yield fine-mode or submicron AODs reduces pre-cloud-screened AODs to the aerosol contribution if one assumes that coarse-mode (super-micron aerosols are a minor part of the AOD. Large, low-frequency differences between these retrieved values and their GC analogue appeared to be often linked to strong, spatially extensive planetary boundary layer events whose presence at either site was inferred from CALIOP profiles. These events were either not captured or significantly underestimated by the GC simulations. High-frequency AOD variations of GC fine-mode aerosols at Ny-Ålesund were attributed to sea salt, while low-frequency GC variations at Eureka and Ny-Ålesund were attributable to sulfates. CALIOP profiles and AODs were invaluable as spatial and temporal redundancy support (or, alternatively, as insightful points of contention for star photometry retrievals and GC estimates of AOD.

  11. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of high quality, high indium composition N-polar InGaN layers for tunnel devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cory; Romanczyk, Brian; Catalano, Massimo; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Wenjun; DiGiovanni, Domenic; Kim, Moon J.; Fay, Patrick; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Keller, Stacia

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the growth of high quality N-polar InGaN films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented with a focus on growth process optimization for high indium compositions and the structural and tunneling properties of such films. Uniform InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well stacks with indium compositions up to 0.46 were grown with local compositional analysis performed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within a scanning transmission electron microscope. Bright room-temperature photoluminescence up to 600 nm was observed for films with indium compositions up to 0.35. To study the tunneling behavior of the InGaN layers, N-polar GaN/In0.35Ga0.65N/GaN tunnel diodes were fabricated which reached a maximum current density of 1.7 kA/cm2 at 5 V reverse bias. Temperature-dependent measurements are presented and confirm tunneling behavior under reverse bias.

  12. An Ultra-Wideband, Microwave Radar for Measuring Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Mapping Near-Surface Internal Layers in Polar Firn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Ben; Gomez-Garcia, Daniel; Leuschen, Carl; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Patel, Azsa; Markus, Thorsten; Holt, Benjamin; Gogineni, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is generally covered with snow, which can vary in thickness from a few centimeters to >1 m. Snow cover acts as a thermal insulator modulating the heat exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, and it impacts sea-ice growth rates and overall thickness, a key indicator of climate change in polar regions. Snow depth is required to estimate sea-ice thickness using freeboard measurements made with satellite altimeters. The snow cover also acts as a mechanical load that depresses ice freeboard (snow and ice above sea level). Freeboard depression can result in flooding of the snow/ice interface and the formation of a thick slush layer, particularly in the Antarctic sea-ice cover. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an ultra-wideband, microwave radar capable of operation on long-endurance aircraft to characterize the thickness of snow over sea ice. The low-power, 100mW signal is swept from 2 to 8GHz allowing the air/snow and snow/ ice interfaces to be mapped with 5 c range resolution in snow; this is an improvement over the original system that worked from 2 to 6.5 GHz. From 2009 to 2012, CReSIS successfully operated the radar on the NASA P-3B and DC-8 aircraft to collect data on snow-covered sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic for NASA Operation IceBridge. The radar was found capable of snow depth retrievals ranging from 10cm to >1 m. We also demonstrated that this radar can be used to map near-surface internal layers in polar firn with fine range resolution. Here we describe the instrument design, characteristics and performance of the radar.

  13. Synthesis of ZnO nanowire arrays on ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seed layer for dye sensitized solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marimuthu, T. [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Anandhan, N., E-mail: anandhan_kn@rediffmail.com [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Thangamuthu, R. [Electrochemical Materials Science Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India); Mummoorthi, M. [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Ravi, G. [Photonic Crystal Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India)

    2016-08-25

    ZnO nanowire arrays (NWAs) were synthesized on ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seeded FTO conducting glass plate by two-step sol-gel and hydrothermal method, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the presence of mixed and hexagonal phases in seed layer and NWAs, respectively. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the FTO glass plate is uniformly covered with grains and a few nanorods in seed layer and dense NWAs are vertically grown on the seed layer. The hexagonal structure and high crystal quality have been confirmed by micro Raman spectra. Photoluminescence spectra also present that NWAs have high crystal quality and less atomic defects. UV spectra indicate that NWAs are absorbed more dye molecules and it has the band gap equal to bulk material. The efficiency of ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seed layer and ZnO NWAs is found to be 0.56 and 0.84% respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectra reveal that NWAs DSSC has high charge transfer recombination resistance than the seed layer DSSC. - Highlights: • ZnO nanowire arrays were synthesized by two-step sol-gel and hydrothermal method. • The crystal structure and crystalline quality of films are confirmed by Raman spectra. • The emission properties of films are investigated by photoluminescence spectra. • ZnO nanowire arrays (NWAs) have higher charge transfer recombination resistance. • The conversion efficiency of the seed layer and NWAs is to be 0.56 and 0.84%.

  14. Quantifying the relationship between PM2.5 concentration, visibility and planetary boundary layer height for long-lasting haze and fog-haze mixed events in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Tian; Guo, Xueliang; Guo, Lijun; Zhang, Tianhang

    2018-01-01

    Air quality and visibility are strongly influenced by aerosol loading, which is driven by meteorological conditions. The quantification of their relationships is critical to understanding the physical and chemical processes and forecasting of the polluted events. We investigated and quantified the relationship between PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter is 2.5 µm and less) mass concentration, visibility and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height in this study based on the data obtained from four long-lasting haze events and seven fog-haze mixed events from January 2014 to March 2015 in Beijing. The statistical results show that there was a negative exponential function between the visibility and the PM2.5 mass concentration for both haze and fog-haze mixed events (with the same R2 of 0.80). However, the fog-haze events caused a more obvious decrease of visibility than that for haze events due to the formation of fog droplets that could induce higher light extinction. The PM2.5 concentration had an inversely linear correlation with PBL height for haze events and a negative exponential correlation for fog-haze mixed events, indicating that the PM2.5 concentration is more sensitive to PBL height in fog-haze mixed events. The visibility had positively linear correlation with the PBL height with an R2 of 0.35 in haze events and positive exponential correlation with an R2 of 0.56 in fog-haze mixed events. We also investigated the physical mechanism responsible for these relationships between visibility, PM2.5 concentration and PBL height through typical haze and fog-haze mixed event and found that a double inversion layer formed in both typical events and played critical roles in maintaining and enhancing the long-lasting polluted events. The variations of the double inversion layers were closely associated with the processes of long-wave radiation cooling in the nighttime and short-wave solar radiation reduction in the daytime. The upper-level stable

  15. Using modal decompositions to explain the sudden expansion of the mixing layer in the wake of a groyne in a shallow flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, J. E.; Brevis, W.; Keylock, C. J.; Safarzadeh, A.

    2017-09-01

    The sudden expansion of the mixing layer created in the wake of a single groyne is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In the region of the sudden expansion a patch of high Reynolds shear stresses are observed. Using low-order representations, created from a Dynamic Mode Decomposition and a search criteria based on a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, the spatio-temporal mechanism of the sudden expansion is investigated. The present study demonstrates the sudden expansion is created by the periodic merging of eddies. These eddies originate from the upstream separation and the tip of the groyne and merge with recirculating eddies created, downstream of the groyne, at the interface of the mixing layer and the lateral wall.

  16. Thermodynamic description of equilibria in mixed fluids (H 2O-non-polar gas) over a wide range of temperature (25-700°C) and pressure (1-5000 bars)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfiev, Nikolai; Zotov, Alexander

    1999-07-01

    A new method for computing complicated equilibria in hydrothermal mixed fluids, H 2O-non-polar gas, is proposed. The computation algorithm is based on the electrostatic approach for the interaction between aqueous species and H 2O. The approach uses the SUPCRT92 database and the HKF format and may be considered as an application of the revised HKF model for mixed H 2O-non-polar gas fluids. Thermodynamic properties of dissolved gases at high temperatures and pressures are calculated using the Redlich-Kwong approach. Dielectric permittivity of the mixed solvent is estimated by the modified Kirkwood equation. The proposed approach is validated using available experimental data on the dissociation constants of H 2O and NaCl and the solubility of both covalent and ion crystals (SiO 2, AgCl, Ag 2SO 4, Ca(OH) 2, CaCO 3) in H 2O-non-polar component (dioxane, Ar, CO 2) mixtures. Predicted and experimental data are in close agreement over a wide range of P- T- xgas conditions (up to 500°C, 4 kbar and 0.25-0.3 mole fraction of non-polar gas). It is also shown how the computation method can be applied to estimate the Born parameters of aqueous species. The proposed approach enables not only examination of isolated reactions, but the study of equilibria of whole systems. Thus, it allows modelling of mixed natural fluids.

  17. Role of the ocean mixed layer processes in the response of the North Pacific winter SST and MLD to global warming in CGCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Bo Young; Noh, Yign [Yonsei University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Global Environmental Laboratory, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeh, Sang-Wook [Hanyang University, Department of Environmental Marine Science, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    It is investigated how the changes of winter sea surface temperature (SST) and mixed layer depth (MLD) under climate change projections are predicted differently in the North Pacific depending on the coupled general circulation models (CGCMs), and how they are related to the dynamical property of the simulated ocean mixed layer. For this purpose the dataset from eleven CGCMs reported to IPCC's AR4 are used, while detailed analysis is given to the MRI and MIROC models. Analysis of the CGCM data reveals that the increase of SST and the decrease of MLD in response to global warming tend to be smaller for the CGCM in which the ratio of ocean heat transport (OHT) to surface heat flux (SHF), R (=OHT/SHF), is larger in the heat budget of the mixed layer. The negative correlation is found between the changes of OHT and SHF under global warming, which may weaken the response to global warming in the CGCM with larger R. It is also found that the models with low horizontal resolution tend to give broader western boundary currents, larger R, and the smaller changes of SST and MLD under global warming. (orig.)

  18. Grain size, morphometry and mineralogy of airborne input in the Canary basin: evidence of iron particle retention in the mixed layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Jaramillo-Vélez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aeolian dust plays an important role in climate and ocean processes. Particularly, Saharan dust deposition is of importance in the Canary Current due to its content of iron minerals, which are fertilizers of the ocean. In this work, dust particles are characterized mainly by granulometry, morphometry and mineralogy, using image processing and scanning northern Mauritania and the Western Sahara. The concentration of terrigenous material was measured in three environments: the atmosphere (300 m above sea level, the mixed layer at 10 m depth, and 150 m depth. Samples were collected before and during the dust events, thus allowing the effect of Saharan dust inputs in the water column to be assessed. The dominant grain size was coarse silt. Dominant minerals were iron oxy-hydroxides, silicates and Ca-Mg carbonates. A relative increase of iron mineral particles (hematite and goethite was detected in the mixed layer, reflecting a higher permanence of iron in the water column despite the greater relative density of these minerals in comparison with the other minerals. This higher iron particle permanence does not appear to be explained by physical processes. The retention of this metal by colloids or microorganisms is suggested to explain its long residence time in the mixed layer.

  19. Tracer Studies of the Influence of Foreign Substances at the Surface of the Electrodes. I. Polarization Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llopis, J.; Gamboa, J. M.; Arizmendi, L.

    1961-01-01

    Radioactive stearic acid ( 1 4C) has been used to determine the number of molecular layers present on copper electrode surfaces and its distribution. The stability of these layers under the experimental conditions has been studied and it has been shown that its presence has no influence on the anodic and cathodic polarization. an increase of these polarizations has been observed with mixed multilayers of stearic acid and sterolamide. (Author) 13 refs

  20. The influence of anatase-rutile mixed phase and ZnO blocking layer on dye-sensitized solar cells based on TiO2nanofiberphotoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jianning; Li, Yan; Hu, Hongwei; Bai, Li; Zhang, Shuai; Yuan, Ningyi

    2013-01-01

    High performance is expected in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) that utilize one-dimensional (1-D) TiO2 nanostructures owing to the effective electron transport. However, due to the low dye adsorption, mainly because of their smooth surfaces, 1-D TiO2 DSSCs show relatively lower efficiencies than nanoparticle-based ones. Herein, we demonstrate a very simple approach using thick TiO2 electrospun nanofiber films as photoanodes to obtain high conversion efficiency. To improve the performance of the DSCCs, anatase-rutile mixed-phase TiO2 nanofibers are achieved by increasing sintering temperature above 500°C, and very thin ZnO films are deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method as blocking layers. With approximately 40-μm-thick mixed-phase (approximately 15.6 wt.% rutile) TiO2 nanofiber as photoanode and 15-nm-thick compact ZnO film as a blocking layer in DSSC, the photoelectric conversion efficiency and short-circuit current are measured as 8.01% and 17.3 mA cm-2, respectively. Intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy measurements reveal that extremely large electron diffusion length is the key point to support the usage of thick TiO2 nanofibers as photoanodes with very thin ZnO blocking layers to obtain high photocurrents and high conversion efficiencies.

  1. The Impact of the Afternoon Planetary Boundary-Layer Height on the Diurnal Cycle of CO and CO2 Mixing Ratios at a Low-Altitude Mountaintop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Temple R.; De Wekker, Stephan F. J.; Pal, Sandip

    2018-02-01

    Mountaintop trace-gas mixing ratios are often assumed to represent free atmospheric values, but are affected by valley planetary boundary-layer (PBL) air at certain times. We hypothesize that the afternoon valley-PBL height relative to the ridgetop is important in the diurnal cycle of mountaintop trace-gas mixing ratios. To investigate this, we use, (1) 4-years (1 January 2009-31 December 2012) of CO and CO2 mixing-ratio measurements and supporting meteorological observations from Pinnacles (38.61°N , 78.35°W , 1017 m a.s.l.), which is a monitoring site in the Appalachian Mountains, (2) regional O3 mixing-ratio measurements, and (3) PBL heights determined from a nearby sounding station. Results reveal that the amplitudes of the diurnal cycles of CO and CO2 mixing ratios vary as a function of the daytime maximum valley-PBL height relative to the ridgetop. The mean diurnal cycle for the subset of days when the afternoon valley-PBL height is at least 400 m below the ridgetop shows a daytime CO mixing-ratio increase, implying the transport of PBL air from the valley to the mountaintop. During the daytime, on days when the PBL heights exceed the mountaintop, PBL dilution and entrainment cause CO mixing ratios to decrease. This decrease in CO mixing ratio, especially on days when PBL heights are at least 400 m above the ridgetop, suggests that measurements from these days can be used as with afternoon measurements from flat terrain in applications requiring regionally-representative measurements.

  2. The properties of photonic band gap and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized photonic crystals as the mixed polarized modes considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gap (PBG) and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, in which the homogeneous magnetized plasma spheres are immersed in the homogeneous dielectric background, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The dispersive properties of all of the EM modes are studied because the PBG is not only for the extraordinary and ordinary modes but also for the mixed polarized modes. The equations for PBGs also are theoretically deduced. The numerical results show that the PBG and a flatbands region can be observed. The effects of the dielectric constant of dielectric background, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the dispersive properties of all of the EM modes in such 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively. Theoretical simulations show that the PBG can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs with similar structure, the larger PBG can be obtained in such 3D MPPCs. It is also shown that the upper edge of flatbands region cannot be tuned by the filling factor and dielectric constant of dielectric background, but it can be manipulated by the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency.

  3. Boundary layer physics over snow and ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Anderson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the unique chemical environment over snow and ice in recent decades, particularly in the polar regions, have stimulated increasing interest in the boundary layer processes that mediate exchanges between the ice/snow interface and the atmosphere. This paper provides a review of the underlying concepts and examples from recent field studies in polar boundary layer meteorology, which will generally apply to atmospheric flow over snow and ice surfaces. It forms a companion paper to the chemistry review papers in this special issue of ACP that focus on processes linking halogens to the depletion of boundary layer ozone in coastal environments, mercury transport and deposition, snow photochemistry, and related snow physics. In this context, observational approaches, stable boundary layer behavior, the effects of a weak or absent diurnal cycle, and transport and mixing over the heterogeneous surfaces characteristic of coastal ocean environments are of particular relevance.

  4. Highly Efficient White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Controllable Excitons Behavior by a Mixed Interlayer between Fluorescence Blue and Phosphorescence Yellow-Emitting Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hong Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (HWOLED has been demonstrated with a mixed interlayer between fluorescent blue and phosphorescent yellow-emitting layers. The device structure is simplified by using a controllable fluorescence-mixed interlayer-phosphorescence emission layer structure. The electroluminance (EL performance can be modulated easily by adjusting the ratio of the hole-predominated material to the electron-predominated material in the interlayer. It is found that the HWOLED with a ratio of 3 : 2 exhibits a current efficiency of 34 cd/A and a power efficiency of 29 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 with warm white Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE1931 coordinates of (0.4273, 0.4439. The improved efficiency and adaptive CIE coordinates are attributed to the controllable mixed interlayer with enhanced charge carrier transport, optimized excitons distribution, and improved harvestings of singlet and triplet excitons.

  5. The influence of the UV irradiation intensity on photocatalytic activity of ZnAl layered double hydroxides and derived mixed oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadnađev-Kostić Milica S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs have been studied to a great extent as environmental-friendly complex materials that can be used as photocatalysts or photocatalyst supports. ZnAl layered double hydroxides and their derived mixed oxides were chosen for the investigation of photocatalytic performances in correlation with the UV intensities measured in the South Pannonia region. Low supersaturation coprecipitation method was used for the ZnAl LDH synthesis. For the characterization of LDH and thermal treated samples powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, nitrogen adsorption-desorption were used. The decomposition of azodye, methylene blue was chosen as photocatalytic test reaction. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by thermal decomposition of ZnAl LDH has stable activity in the broader UV light irradiation range characterizing the selected region. Photocatalytic activity could be mainly attributed to the ZnO phase, detected both in LDH and thermally treated samples. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by the calcination of ZnAl LDH has a stable activity within the measured UV light irradiation range; whereas the parent ZnAl LDH catalyst did not perform satisfactory when low UV irradiation intensity is implied.

  6. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (< 0.001 wt %) and/or zwitter-ionic phospholipid (SOPC) surface layer on the behaviour of the gradient flexoelectric and surface induced polarization domains arising in a homeotropic E7 (a mixture of 5CB, 7CB, 8OCB and 5CT) nematic layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinov, H P; Pavlic, J I; Marinov, Y G; Petrov, A G; Sridevi, S; Rafailov, P M; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U

    2010-01-01

    The influence has been studied of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a concentration between 0.0001 and 0.001 wt % and a dried zwitter-ionic phospholipid (SOPC: l-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) layer of thickness, smaller than 0.5 μm, deposited only on a half of one of the two glass plates, on the behaviour of the gradient flexoelectric and surface polarization induced domains arising in a homeotropic nematic E7 (a mixture of 5CB, 7CB, 8OCB and 5CT) layer. We have observed for the first time different polar on/off formation of the surface polarization induced domains in the region of the liquid crystal cell without surface deposited lipid SOPC layer. On the other hand, the SOPC layer strongly decreases the gradient of the electric field thus leading to less-pronounced flexoelectric domains. However, the SOPC layer does not influence the creation of surface polarization induced domains and of injection induced domains arising at voltages above 4V. Appropriate dynamic light transmitted curves have been recorded and typical microphotographs have been taken.

  8. Effect of Variable Viscosity on Vortex Instability of Non-Darcy Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow Adjacent to a Nonisothermal Horizontal Surface in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of variable viscosity on the flow and vortex instability for non-Darcy mixed convection boundary layer flow on a nonisothermal horizontal plat surface in a saturated porous medium. The variation of viscosity is expressed as an exponential function of temperature. The analysis of the disturbance flow is based on linear stability theory. The base flow equations and the resulting eigenvalue problem are solved using finite difference schemes. It is found that the variable viscosity effect enhances the heat transfer rate and destabilizes the flow for liquid heating, while the opposite trend is true for gas heating.

  9. Observation of interior and boundary-layer mixing processes due to near-inertial waves in a stratified basin without tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Eefke; Umlauf, Lars

    2010-05-01

    Near-inertial waves form an important contribution to oceanic energy and shear spectra, and thus play a major role in mixing the ocean's interior. Here, we compare internal-wave mixing processes in the interior of a stratified basin to those occurring on the sloping boundaries. We use the virtually tideless Baltic Sea as a natural laboratory, allowing us to isolate the effect of near-inertial waves that is otherwise (often) overshadowed by internal tides. The measurements presented here consist of moored ADCPs and CTD loggers in the center of the basin and on the slopes, combined with densely spaced shear-microstructure and ADCP cross-slope transects. During summer stratification, a three-layer density structure, with a thermocline and a deeper halocline, was observed with clear signals of downward near-inertial energy propagation after a short wind event. These motions are interpreted as near-inertial wave modes interacting with the sloping topography. Dissipation rates observed in the center of the basin scale with shear and stratification parameters in the way suggested by MacKinnon and Gregg (2003) for the shelf. On the slopes, microstructure transects reveal a periodic near-bed dissipation rate signal and a growing and decaying bottom boundary layer (BBL) thickness; both signals are triggered by near-bottom currents oscillating with a near-inertial frequency. Near-bottom dissipation rates are greatly enhanced compared to the interior, and, due to the straining of lateral density gradients by the cross-slope velocity, mixing is rather efficient, and contributes significantly to the basin-scale mixing.

  10. Phase diagrams in mixed spin-3/2 and spin-2 Ising system with two alternative layers within the effective-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Polat, Yasin; Keskin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The phase diagrams in the mixed spin-3/2 and spin-2 Ising system with two alternative layers on a honeycomb lattice are investigated and discussed by the use of the effective-field theory with correlations. The interaction of the nearest-neighbour spins of each layer is taken to be positive (ferromagnetic interaction) and the interaction of the adjacent spins of the nearest-neighbour layers is considered to be either positive or negative (ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic interaction). The temperature dependence of the layer magnetizations of the system is examined to characterize the nature (continuous or discontinuous) of the phase transitions and obtain the phase transition temperatures. The system exhibits both second- and first-order phase transitions besides triple point (TP), critical end point (E), multicritical point (A), isolated critical point (C) and reentrant behaviour depending on the interaction parameters. We have also studied the temperature dependence of the total magnetization to find the compensation points, as well as to determine the type of behaviour, and N-type behaviour in Néel classification nomenclature existing in the system. The phase diagrams are constructed in eight different planes and it is found that the system also presents the compensation phenomena depending on the sign of the bilinear exchange interactions. (general)

  11. MHD mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid through a porous medium due to an exponentially stretching sheet

    KAUST Repository

    Ferdows, M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching sheet was studied. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Nactsheim-Swigert shooting technique together with Runge-Kutta six-order iteration schemes. The effects of the governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics were obtained and discussed. The numerical solutions for the wall skin friction coefficient, the heat and mass transfer coefficient, and the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are computed, analyzed, and discussed graphically. Comparison with previously published work is performed and excellent agreement is observed. 2012 M. Ferdows et al.

  12. MHD Mixed Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid through a Porous Medium due to an Exponentially Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ferdows

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching sheet was studied. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Nactsheim-Swigert shooting technique together with Runge-Kutta six-order iteration schemes. The effects of the governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics were obtained and discussed. The numerical solutions for the wall skin friction coefficient, the heat and mass transfer coefficient, and the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are computed, analyzed, and discussed graphically. Comparison with previously published work is performed and excellent agreement is observed.

  13. Total Oxidation of Ethanol over Layered Double Hydroxide-Related Mixed Oxide Catalysts: Effect of Cation Composition.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.; Ludvíková, Jana; Balabánová, Jana; Klempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 277, NOV 15 (2016), s. 61-67 ISSN 0920-5861. [Czech-Italian- Spanish Conference on Molecular Sieves and Catalysis /16./. Amantea, 14.06.2015-17.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : layered double hydroxides * transition metal oxides * vox oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.636, year: 2016

  14. Total Oxidation of Ethanol over Layered Double Hydroxide-Related Mixed Oxide Catalysts: Effect of Cation Composition.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.; Ludvíková, Jana; Balabánová, Jana; Klempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 277, NOV 15 (2016), s. 61-67 ISSN 0920-5861. [Czech-Italian-Spanish Conference on Molecular Sieves and Catalysis /16./. Amantea, 14.06.2015-17.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : layered double hydroxides * transition metal oxides * vox oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.636, year: 2016

  15. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  16. A novel composite alignment layer for transflective liquid crystal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuangyao; Li Xuan; Tao Du; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Kwok, Hoi Sing

    2010-01-01

    A novel composite photoalignment layer for transflective liquid crystal displays is explored. The key technique is to introduce a functional photo-crosslinkage into a rewritable azodye material with proper mixing. Bearing good alignment quality derived from the azodye material, the composite layer provides strong azimuthal and polar anchoring energy comparable to that of rubbed polyimide layers. The capability of dual modes fabrication in one cell exhibited by azodyes could be well retained and the new alignment film exhibits a display resolution of up to 2 μm. Furthermore, after exposure to strong LED unpolarized light the composite layer shows much better stability than that with a pure azodye material.

  17. Investigating the role of air-sea forcing on the variability of hydrography, circulation, and mixed layer depth in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Srivastava

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: An effort is made to understand and quantify the influence of near surface zonal and meridional winds, incoming shortwave radiation, and freshwater flux air-sea forcings on the seasonal variability of the hydrography, circulation, and mixed layer depth of the Arabian Sea (AS and Bay of Bengal (BoB. Sensitivity experiments using an ocean general circulation model are carried out for this purpose in the Indian ocean around 65°–95°E, 5°–22°N during 1998–2014 (17 years. In the absence of near surface wind forcing, the sea surface temperature of the region greatly increases in all the seasons, whereas, in the absence of incoming shortwave radiation forcing, exactly opposite is the case. The sea surface salinity of the AS and BoB decreases in the absence of wind and shortwave radiation forcings, whereas, in the northern BoB it increases in the absence of freshwater flux forcing. The sub-surface changes in the stratification of temperature and salinity are also investigated. The influence of the air-sea forcings on the mixed layer depth of the region is found to be highly seasonally dependent. The effect of air-sea forcings on the seasonal variability of the upper ocean vertical stability is studied using the vertical shear of the horizontal velocity, buoyancy frequency, and energy required for mixing as quantifiers. The near surface wind forcing has highest contribution in changing the surface circulation of the region. Keywords: Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal, Air-sea forcing, Ocean general circulation model, Hydrography and circulation, Vertical stability

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition of Electron Selective SnOx and ZnO Films on Mixed Halide Perovskite: Compatibility and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Aitola, Kerttu; Sveinbjörnsson, Kári; Saki, Zahra; Larsson, Fredrik; Törndahl, Tobias; Johansson, Erik; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edoff, Marika

    2017-09-06

    The compatibility of atomic layer deposition directly onto the mixed halide perovskite formamidinium lead iodide:methylammonium lead bromide (CH(NH 2 ) 2 , CH 3 NH 3 )Pb(I,Br) 3 (FAPbI 3 :MAPbBr 3 ) perovskite films is investigated by exposing the perovskite films to the full or partial atomic layer deposition processes for the electron selective layer candidates ZnO and SnO x . Exposing the samples to the heat, the vacuum, and even the counter reactant of H 2 O of the atomic layer deposition processes does not appear to alter the perovskite films in terms of crystallinity, but the choice of metal precursor is found to be critical. The Zn precursor Zn(C 2 H 5 ) 2 either by itself or in combination with H 2 O during the ZnO atomic layer deposition (ALD) process is found to enhance the decomposition of the bulk of the perovskite film into PbI 2 without even forming ZnO. In contrast, the Sn precursor Sn(N(CH 3 ) 2 ) 4 does not seem to degrade the bulk of the perovskite film, and conformal SnO x films can successfully be grown on top of it using atomic layer deposition. Using this SnO x film as the electron selective layer in inverted perovskite solar cells results in a lower power conversion efficiency of 3.4% than the 8.4% for the reference devices using phenyl-C 70 -butyric acid methyl ester. However, the devices with SnO x show strong hysteresis and can be pushed to an efficiency of 7.8% after biasing treatments. Still, these cells lacks both open circuit voltage and fill factor compared to the references, especially when thicker SnO x films are used. Upon further investigation, a possible cause of these losses could be that the perovskite/SnO x interface is not ideal and more specifically found to be rich in Sn, O, and halides, which is probably a result of the nucleation during the SnO x growth and which might introduce barriers or alter the band alignment for the transport of charge carriers.

  19. Enhancement of Fracture Resistance by Multiple Cracks in Layered Structures under Mode I and Mix Mode Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios; Sørensen, Bent F.

    beams bonded together with a thermoset adhesive, more delamination cracks could be developed next to the main/primary adhesive/laminate crack. An analytical model, based on the J integral, was developed for multiple delaminations [3]. It is shown that the maximum possible increase (upper limit......Layered structures are susceptible to delamination because they often exhibit low interlaminar fracture resistance. Through-thickness stresses e.g. due to manufacturing defects or geometric discontinuities, can result in growing interlaminar cracks which may lead to loss of structural integrity [1...

  20. Inhibition of mixed-layer deepening during winter in the northeastern Arabian Sea by the West India coastal current

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shankar, D.; Remya, R.; Vinayachandran, P.N.; Chatterjee, Abhisek; Behera, A.

    -layer deepening during winter1 in the northeastern Arabian Sea by the2 West India Coastal Current3 D. Shankar · R. Remya ·4 P. N. Vinayachandran · Abhisek5 Chatterjee · Ambica Behera6 the date of receipt and acceptance should be inserted later7 Abstract Though...-Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services, Hyderabad, India Ambica Behera Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, India Author version: Clim. Dyn., vol.47(3); 2016; 1049-1072 2 D. Shankar et al. winds from the Indian subcontinent, data show...

  1. Foaming and adsorption behavior of bovine and camel proteins mixed layers at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnaf, Roua; Picart-Palmade, Laetitia; Attia, Hamadi; Marchesseau, Sylvie; Ayadi, M A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to examine foaming and interfacial behavior of three milk protein mixtures, bovine α-lactalbumin-β-casein (M1), camel α-lactalbumin-β-casein (M2) and β-lactoglobulin-β-casein (M3), alone and in binary mixtures, at the air/water interface in order to better understand the foaming properties of bovine and camel milks. Different mixture ratios (100:0; 75:25; 50:50; 25:75; 0:100) were used during foaming tests and interfacial protein interactions were studied with a pendant drop tensiometer. Experimental results evidenced that the greatest foam was obtained with a higher β-casein amount in all camel and bovine mixtures. Good correlation was observed with the adsorption and the interfacial rheological properties of camel and bovine protein mixtures. The proteins adsorbed layers are mainly affected by the presence of β-casein molecules, which are probably the most abundant protein at interface and the most efficient in reducing the interfacial properties. In contrast of, the globular proteins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin that are involved in the protein layer composition, but could not compact well at the interface to ensure foams creation and stabilization because of their rigid molecular structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The polar mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  3. Tracer-tracer relations as a tool for research on polar ozone loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rolf

    2010-07-01

    The report includes the following chapters: (1) Introduction: ozone in the atmosphere, anthropogenic influence on the ozone layer, polar stratospheric ozone loss; (2) Tracer-tracer relations in the stratosphere: tracer-tracer relations as a tool in atmospheric research; impact of cosmic-ray-induced heterogeneous chemistry on polar ozone; (3) quantifying polar ozone loss from ozone-tracer relations: principles of tracer-tracer correlation techniques; reference ozone-tracer relations in the early polar vortex; impact of mixing on ozone-tracer relations in the polar vortex; impact of mesospheric intrusions on ozone-tracer relations in the stratospheric polar vortex calculation of chemical ozone loss in the arctic in March 2003 based on ILAS-II measurements; (4) epilogue.

  4. Solution-Processed CuInS2-Based White QD-LEDs with Mixed Active Layer Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepfer, Svenja; Frohleiks, Julia; Hong, A-Ra; Jang, Ho Seong; Bacher, Gerd; Nannen, Ekaterina

    2017-03-29

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are attractive candidates for future lighting technology. However, in contrast to display applications, the realization of balanced white lighting devices remains conceptually challenging. Here, we demonstrate two-component white light-emitting QD-LEDs with high color rendering indices (CRI) up to 78. The implementation of orange CuInS 2 /ZnS (CIS/ZnS) QDs with a broad emission and high quantum yield together with blue ZnCdSe/ZnS QDs in a mixed approach allowed white light emission with low blue QD content. The devices reveal only a small color drift in a wide operation voltage range. The correlated color temperature (CCT) could be adjusted between 2200 and 7200 K (from warm white to cold white) by changing the volume ratio between orange and blue QDs (1:0.5 and 1:2).

  5. Spin-polarized photoemission from SiGe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A.; Bottegoni, F.; Isella, G.; Cecchi, S.; Chrastina, D.; Finazzi, M.; Ciccacci, F. [LNESS-Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    We apply the principles of Optical Orientation to measure by Mott polarimetry the spin polarization of electrons photoemitted from different group-IV heterostructures. The maximum measured spin polarization, obtained from a Ge/Si{sub 0.31}Ge{sub 0.69} strained film, undoubtedly exceeds the maximum value of 50% attainable in bulk structures. The explanation we give for this result lies in the enhanced band orbital mixing between light hole and split-off valence bands as a consequence of the compressive strain experienced by the thin Ge layer.

  6. Analysis of mixing-layer height retrieval methods using backscatter lidar returns and microwave-radiometer temperature observations in the context of synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    Mixing Layer Height (MLH) is an important parameter in many different atmospheric and meteorological applications. However, there does not exist a single instrument or method which provides accurate and physically consistent estimates of MLH. Instead, there are several methods for MLH estimation based on the measurements of different atmospheric tracers using different instruments [1, 2]. In this work, MLH retrieval methods using backscattered lidar signals and Microwave Radiometer (MWR)-retrieved potential-temperature profiles are compared in terms of their associated uncertainties. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used for MLH retrieval from backscattered lidar signals [3] and parcel method [4] is used for MLH retrieval from MWR-retrieved potential-temperature profiles. Measurement and retrieval errors are revisited and incorporated into the MLH estimation methods used. Uncertainties on MLH estimates from the two methods are compared along with a combined MLH-retrieval discussion case. The uncertainty analysis is validated using long-term lidar and MWR measurement data, under different atmospheric conditions, from the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany [5]. MLH estimates from a Doppler wind lidar and radiosondes are used as reference. This work has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, FP7 People, ITN Marie Curie Actions Programme (2012-2016) in the frame of ITaRS project (GA 289923), H2020 programme under ACTRIS-2 project (GA 654109), the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness - European Regional Development Funds under TEC2015-63832-P project, and from the Generalitat de Catalunya (Grup de Recerca Consolidat) 2014-SGR-583. [1] S. Emeis, Surface-based Remote Sensing of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. 978-90-481-9339-4, Springer, 2010. [2] P. Seibert, F. Beyrich, S.-E. Gryning, S. Joffre, A. Rasmussen, and P. Tercier, "Review and intercomparison of operational methods for the

  7. Chemical properties and GMR improvement of specular spin valves with nano-oxide layers, formed in ambient mixed gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quang, H D; Hien, N T; Oh, S K; Sinh, N H; Yu, S C

    2004-01-01

    Specular spin valves (SVs) containing nano-oxide layers (NOLs) structured as substrate/seed/AF/P 1 /NOL/P 2 /Cu/F/NOL, have been fabricated. The NOLs were formed by natural oxidation in different ambient atmospheres of pure oxygen, oxygen/nitrogen and oxygen/argon gas mixtures. The fabrication conditions were optimized to enhance the magnetoresistance (MR) ratio, to suppress the interlayer coupling fields (H f ) between the free and pinned layers, to suppress the high interface density of the NOL, to ease the control of the NOL thickness and to form a smooth NOL/P 2 interface for promoting specular electron scattering. The characteristics of our specular SVs are the MR ratio of 14.1%, the exchange bias field of 44-45 mT, and H f weaker than 1.0 mT. The optimal conditions for oxidation time, total oxidation pressure and the annealing temperature were found to be 300 s, 0.14 Pa (oxygen/argon = 80/20) and 250 deg. C, respectively. Also, the origin of thermal stability of MMn-based (M = Fe, Pt, Ir, etc) specular SVs has been explained in detail by chemical properties of NOL using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profile analyses. Thermal stability turns out to be caused by a decrease in MR ratios at high temperatures (>250 deg. C), which is a serious problem for device applications using the SV structure as a high density read head device

  8. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  9. Effect of LaInO3 layer thickness on the conductance enhancement at the LaInO3/Ba1-XLaXSnO3 polar interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chulkwon; Kim, Useong; Shin, Juyeon; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Youjung; Char, Kookrin

    We have recently reported on the high performance thin film transistors based on La-doped BaSnO3 (BLSO), which has high electron mobility and thermal stability, with LaInO3 (LIO) gate dielectric. During the course of this research we have observed 104 times enhancement of the sheet conductance of BLSO channel layer, which implies formation of 2DEG, after the interface formation with LIO. Detailed further study revealed that the La concentration in the BLSO channel layer critically affects the enhancement of sheet conductance on the LIO/BSO interface. We investigated the LIO thickness dependence on the conductance of LIO/BSO interface and will discuss the origin of this phenomenon in terms of the intrinsic interface polarization in the LIO layer. This understanding is the first step towards the device application of the perovskite oxide heterostructures and may potentially lead to new interface states.

  10. Use of weathered and fresh bottom ash mix layers as a subbase in road constructions: environmental behavior enhancement by means of a retaining barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Zermeño, R; Chimenos, J M; Giró-Paloma, J; Formosa, J

    2014-12-01

    The presence of neoformed cement-like phases during the weathering of non-stabilized freshly quenched bottom ash favors the development of a bound pavement material with improved mechanical properties. Use of weathered and freshly quenched bottom ash mix layers placed one over the other allowed the retention of leached heavy metals and metalloids by means of a reactive percolation barrier. The addition of 50% of weathered bottom ash to the total subbase content diminished the release of toxic species to below environmental regulatory limits. The mechanisms of retention and the different processes and factors responsible of leaching strongly depended on the contaminant under concern as well as on the chemical and physical factors. Thus, the immediate reuse of freshly quenched bottom ash as a subbase material in road constructions is possible, as both the mechanical properties and long-term leachability are enhanced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical Layer Security Enhancement in Multiuser Mixed RF#x002F;FSO Relay Networks under RF Interference

    KAUST Repository

    El-Malek, Ahmed H. Abd

    2017-05-12

    In this paper, the impact of radio frequency (RF) co-channel interference (CCI) on the performance of multiuser (MU) mixed RF#x002F;free space optical (FSO) relay network with opportunistic user scheduling is studied. In the considered system, a user is opportunistically selected to communicate with a single destination through an amplify-and- forward (AF) relay in the presence of a single passive eavesdropper. The RF#x002F;FSO channel models are assumed to follow Rayleigh#x002F;Gamma-Gamma fading models, respectively with pointing errors and identical RF CCI signals. Exact closed-form expression for the system outage probability is derived. Then, an asymptotic expression for the outage probability is obtained at the high signal- to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) regime. The asymptotic results are used to formulate a power allocation problem to obtain optimal RF transmission power. Then, the secrecy performance is studied in the presence of CCI at both the authorized relay and eavesdropper by obtaining exact and asymptotic closed-form expressions for the intercept probability. The derived analytical formulas herein are supported by numerical and simulation results to clarify the main contributions of the work.

  12. Enhancing Physical Layer Security of Multiuser SIMO Mixed RF/FSO Relay Networks with Multi-Eavesdroppers

    KAUST Repository

    El-Malek, Ahmed H. Abd

    2017-02-09

    In this paper, we investigate the secrecy performance of multiuser (MU) single-input multiple-output (SIMO) mixed radio frequency (RF)/free space optical (FSO) relay network with opportunistic user scheduling and multiple eavesdropping attacks. The considered system includes multiple users, one amplify-and-froward (AF) relay, one destination and multiple eavesdroppers. The users are connected with a multi-antenna relay through RF links and the relay is connected with the destination through an FSO link. Maximal ratio combining (MRC) scheme is used at the relay node to combine the received signals at its different antennas. The RF/FSO channels are assumed to follow Nakagami-m/Gamma-Gamma fading models with considering the effect of pointing errors. In particular, we derive closed- form expressions for the exact and asymptotic outage probabilities. The asymptotic outage results are then used to obtain the optimal RF transmission power based on the dominant link between the RF and FSO links. Then, the considered system secrecy performance is investigated in the presence of multi- eavesdroppers where exact closed-form expression for the intercept probability is derived. Finally, a cooperative jamming model is proposed along with power allocation to enhance the system secrecy performance. Monte-Carlo simulations are provided to validate the achieved exact and asymptotic results.

  13. Spatial distribution and the interdecadal change of leading modes of heat budget of the mixed-layer in the tropical Pacific and the association with ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Kumar, Arun; Huang, Bohua

    2016-03-01

    Using heat budget diagnosis of ocean mixed layer from the Global Ocean Data Assimilation System, the spatial distribution of the leading modes of the heat budget was examined. The analysis was for the tropical Pacific in 1979-2013 and was based on combined empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) analysis. The interdecadal changes of the leading modes and their associations with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) were also analyzed. The first leading CEOF mode (CEOF1) corresponds to the ENSO mature phase. The contribution from the zonal advection was relatively small along the equator, except the region near the Pacific coast of Central America. The vertical entrainment and diffusion (surface heat flux) had pronounced maxima with positive (negative) values along the equatorial central and eastern Pacific. The meridional advection displayed a different spatial pattern with large positive values on both sides of the equator and smaller values along the equator. The total meridional advection anomaly was mainly determined by advection of anomalous temperature by climatological current responsible for broadening of the ENSO SSTA pattern meridionally. The zonal advection varied almost simultaneously with the tendency of ocean temperature anomaly in the mixed layer. The second leading CEOF mode (CEOF2) included contribution to SSTA tendency during the ENSO developing phase. The distribution pattern and amplitude of the zonal advection in the eastern Pacific in CEOF2 was similar to but with opposite sign to that in CEOF1. The amplitudes of the other dynamical and thermodynamical terms were smaller than that in CEOF1 and spatial distributions displayed an opposite variation between the Pacific coast of Central America and central and eastern tropical Pacific in CEOF2. A comparison of two periods (1979-1999 and 2000-2013) suggested that coupling in the tropical Pacific weakened at ENSO time scales and shifted to a relatively higher frequency regime (from 2 to 4 years averaged

  14. Photocatalytic ability of Bi6Ti3WO18 nanoparticles with a mix-layered Aurivillius structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Longqing; Feng, Yongyi; Cao, Lei; Xue, Mingqiang; Qin, Chuanxiang; Huang, Yanlin; Qin, Lin; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2018-01-01

    Aurivillius phase layered perovskites Bi6Ti3WO18 was prepared by the sol-gel citrate-complexation synthesis. The sample developed into the plate-like nanoparticles with the exposed (001) facets. The phase formation and structure have been verified via X-ray polycrystalline powder diffraction (XRD) Rietveld refinements. The nanoparticles were investigated via the measurements such as FE-SEM, TEM, EDS, and the surface analyses. UV-Vis absorption data revealed that the Aurivillius compound has a direct band characteristic with the band energy of 2.214 eV. The band structure of Bi6Ti3WO18 nanoparticles was discussed on the base of the experiments and theoretical calculation. Bi3+-containing Aurivillius Bi6Ti3WO18 shows efficient photocatalytic degradation for rhodamine B dye (RhB) with the visible light irradiation ( λ > 420 nm). Dynamic characteristic of the light-created excitons was measured by the luminescence and decay lifetime. The multivalent properties of W and Ti ions in the Aurivillius-like lattices of Bi6Ti3WO18 photocatalyst were discussed.

  15. Reduction of Leaching Impacts by Applying Biomass Bottom Ash and Recycled Mixed Aggregates in Structural Layers of Roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Manuel; Galvin, Adela P; Agrela, Francisco; Beltran, Manuel G; Ayuso, Jesus

    2016-03-24

    This research is focused on analyzing the environmental pollution potential of biomass bottom ashes as individual materials, as mixtures manufactured with biomass bottom ashes and granular construction aggregates, and these mixtures treated with cement. For the environmental assessment of all of the samples and materials mentioned, the following leaching procedures have been performed: the compliance batch test of UNE-EN 12457-3:2003 for aggregates and bottom ashes; the column test according to NEN 7343:1994 for the mixtures prepared in the laboratory; and the tank test by EA NEN 7375:2004 for analyzing the behavior of mixtures after their solidification/stabilization with 5% cement. After the discussion of the data, the reduction of the pollution load of the most hazardous biomass bottom ashes after their combination with different aggregates can be confirmed, which implies their possible application in civil infrastructures, such as filler embankments and road construction layers, without negatively impacting the environment. In addition, the positive effect of the stabilization/solidification of the cement-treated mixtures with a reduction of the heavy metals that were released at the highest levels, namely As, Hg Cr, Ni, Cu, Se and Mo, was proven.

  16. Integrating seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation forward osmosis process using thin-film composite mixed matrix membrane with functionalized carbon nanotube blended polyethersulfone support layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeon-Gyu; Son, Moon; Choi, Heechul

    2017-10-01

    Thin-film composite mixed matrix membrane (TFC MMM) with functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT) blended in polyethersulfone (PES) support layer was synthesized via interfacial polymerization and phase inversion. This membrane was firstly tested in lab-scale integrating seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation forward osmosis (FO) process. Water flux of TFC MMM was increased by 72% compared to that of TFC membrane due to enhanced hydrophilicity. Although TFC MMM showed lower water flux than TFC commercial membrane, enhanced reverse salt flux selectivity (RSFS) of TFC MMM was observed compared to TFC membrane (15% higher) and TFC commercial membrane (4% higher), representing membrane permselectivity. Under effluent organic matter (EfOM) fouling test, 16% less normalized flux decline of TFC MMM was observed compared to TFC membrane. There was 8% less decline of TFC MMM compared to TFC commercial membrane due to fCNT effect on repulsive foulant-membrane interaction enhancement, caused by negatively charged membrane surface. After 10 min physical cleaning, TFC MMM displayed higher recovered normalized flux than TFC membrane (6%) and TFC commercial membrane (4%); this was also supported by visualized characterization of fouling layer. This study presents application of TFC MMM to integrated seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation FO process for the first time. It can be concluded that EfOM fouling of TFC MMM was suppressed due to repulsive foulant-membrane interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pillar-Layered Metal-Organic Framework with Sieving Effect and Pore Space Partition for Effective Separation of Mixed Gas C2H2/C2H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xu-Jia; Wei, Qin; Cai, Yue-Peng; Wu, Bing-Bing; Feng, Hai-Xing; Yu, Ying; Dong, Ren-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The removal of acetylene from the industrial feed gas to purify the ethylene is an important and challenging issue. The adsorption-based separation is a more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method compared to the current removal approaches such as partial hydrogenation and solvent extraction, while facing the challenge of developing materials with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity and C 2 H 2 capacity. Herein, by expanding mixed-metal organic frameworks (M'MOFs) structure with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity, we report a pillar-layered MOF, {[Cd 5 (MPCZ) 2 (BDC) 3 (NO 3 ) 2 (H 2 O) 4 ]·G} n (MECS-5), which not only inherits the sieving effects of M'MOF series but also develops its own characteristic-the 2D layer with expanding space and the plane pore-partition group to "cover" it. MECS-5 shows higher ideal adsorption solution theory C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity than the most reported MOFs, especially more than 5 times higher than MOF-74 series while displaying great enhancement in the C 2 H 2 capacity, more than 2 times higher compared to the M'MOF. The column breakthrough experiment further proves the possibility of MECS-5a for real industrial ethylene purification.

  18. Reversible Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Structural Transformation in a Mixed-Ligand 2D Layered Metal-Organic Framework: Structural Characterization and Sorption Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A 3D supramolecular network, [Cd(bipy(C4O4(H2O2]·3H2O (1 (bipy = 4,4′-bipyridine and C4O42− = dianion of H2C4O4, constructed by mixed-ligand two-dimensional (2D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs has been reported and structurally determined by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction method and characterized by other physicochemical methods. In 1, the C4O42− and bipy both act as bridging ligands connecting the Cd(II ions to form a 2D layered MOF, which are then extended to a 3D supramolecular network via the mutually parallel and interpenetrating arrangements among the 2D-layered MOFs. Compound 1 shows a two-step dehydration process with weight losses of 11.0% and 7.3%, corresponding to the weight-loss of three guest and two coordinated water molecules, respectively, and exhibits an interesting reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC structural transformation upon de-hydration and re-hydration for guest water molecules. The SCSC structural transformation have been demonstrated and monitored by single-crystal and X-ray powder diffraction, and thermogravimetic analysis studies.

  19. Dynamic compensation temperature in the mixed spin-1 and spin-2 Ising model in an oscillating field on alternate layers of a hexagonal lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Tugba [Institute of Science, Bozok University, 66200 Yozgat (Turkey); Temizer, Uemuet, E-mail: umut.temizer@bozok.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Bozok University, 66200 Yozgat (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    The dynamic behavior of a mixed spin-1 and spin-2 Ising system with a crystal-field interaction in the presence of a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field on a hexagonal lattice is studied by using the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. The lattice is formed by alternate layers of spins {sigma}=1 and S=2. The Hamiltonian model includes intersublattice, intrasublattice and crystal-field interactions. The set of mean-field dynamic equations is obtained by employing the Glauber transition rates. Firstly, we study time variations of the average sublattice magnetizations in order to find the phases in the system, and the thermal behavior of the average sublattice magnetizations in a period or the dynamic sublattice magnetizations to obtain the dynamic phase transition points as well as to characterize the nature (continuous and discontinuous) of transitions. Then, the behavior of the dynamic total magnetization as a function of the temperature is investigated to find the dynamic compensation points as well as determine the type of behavior. We also present the dynamic phase diagrams for both presence and absence of the dynamic compensation temperatures in the nine different planes. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, besides the paramagnetic (p), antiferromagnetic (af), ferrimagnetic (i) and non-magnetic (nm) fundamental phases, eight different mixed phases and the compensation temperature or L- and N-types behavior in the Neel classification nomenclature exist in the system. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mixed spin (1, 2) Ising system is studied by using the Glauber dynamics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We employ the Glauber transition rates to construct the dynamic equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase diagrams are presented in the nine different planes. ? The system displays L- and N-types compensation temperatures.

  20. Effect of the undoped BaSnO3 space layer on the high mobility LaInO3/Ba1-xLaxSnO3 polar interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Juyeon; Park, Chulkwon; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Youjung; Char, Kookrin

    We have recently reported on the sheet conductance enhancement at the interface between two band insulators: LaInO3 (LIO) and BaSnO3 (BSO). The advantages of the two-dimensional electron gas-like (2DEG) state at the LIO/Ba1-xLaxSnO3 (BLSO) polar interface are its stability, the controllability of the local carrier concentration, and the high electron mobility of BLSO. The origin of enhanced conductance at the interface is still under investigation, but the doping level of BSO is a critical parameter for the polar charge contribution. We have investigated a new structure using an undoped BSO space layer at the LIO/BLSO interface. On one hand, this new structure will improve the mobility of the LIO/BLSO structure by reducing La impurity scattering. On the other hand, through this new structure we can answer the issues related with La diffusion at the LIO/BLSO polar interface and trace the origin of the 2DEG-like charge. This new modified structure of the LIO/BSO polar interface looks promising for higher electron mobility devices.

  1. The nonlinear development of three-dimensional disturbances at hyperbolic stagnation points: A model of the braid region in mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Kerswell, R. R.

    2000-05-01

    The properties of steady, two-dimensional flows with spatially uniform strain rates ɛ and rotation rates γ where ɛ2⩾γ2, and hence open, hyperbolic, streamlines are investigated. By comparison with a high resolution numerical simulation of a free shear layer, such a quadratic flow is an idealized local model of the "braid" region which develops between neighboring saturated Kelvin-Helmholtz billows in an unstable free shear layer. A class of exact three-dimensional nonlinear solutions for spatially periodic perturbations is derived. These solutions satisfy the condition that the amplitude of the time-varying wave number of the perturbation remains bounded in time, and hence that pressure plays an asymptotically small role in their dynamics. In the limit of long time, the energy of such perturbations in an inviscid flow grows exponentially, with growth rate 2√ɛ2-γ2 , and the perturbation pressure plays no significant role in the dynamic evolution. This asymptotic growth rate is not the maximal growth rate accessible to general perturbations, which may grow transiently at rate 2ɛ, independently of γ. However, almost all initial conditions lead to, at most, transient growth and hence finite asymptotic perturbation energy in an inviscid flow as time increases, due to the finite amplitude effects of pressure perturbations. Perturbations which do undergo significant transient growth take the form of streamwise-aligned perturbation vorticity which varies periodically in the spanwise direction. By comparison of this local model with a numerically simulated mixing layer, appropriately initialized "hyperbolic instabilities" appear to have significantly larger transient growth rates than an "elliptical instability" of the primary billow core. These hyperbolic instabilities appear to be a simple model for the spanwise periodic perturbations which are known to lead to the nucleation of secondary rib vortices in the braid region between adjacent billow cores.

  2. Tracer Studies of the Influence of Foreign Substances at the Surface of the Electrodes. I. Polarization Phenomena; Accion de las sustancias extranas en la superficie de los electrodos. Estudio mediante radiotrazadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llopis, J.; Gamboa, J. M.; Arizmendi, L.

    1961-07-01

    Radioactive stearic acid ({sup 1}4C) has been used to determine the number of molecular layers present on copper electrode surfaces and its distribution. The stability of these layers under the experimental conditions has been studied and it has been shown that its presence has no influence on the anodic and cathodic polarization. an increase of these polarizations has been observed with mixed multilayers of stearic acid and sterolamide. (Author) 13 refs.

  3. Synthesis of sol–gel silica particles in reverse micelles with mixed-solvent polar cores: tailoring nanoreactor structure and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bürglová, Kristýna; Hlaváč, Jan [Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (Czech Republic); Bartlett, John R., E-mail: jbartlett@usc.edu.au [University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach for producing metal oxide nano- and microparticles via sol–gel processing in confined media (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelles), in which the chemical and physical properties of the polar aqueous core of the reverse micelles are modulated by the inclusion of a second polar co-solvent. The co-solvents were selected for their capacity to solubilise compounds with low water solubility and included dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, ethylene glycol, n-propanol, dimethylacetamide and N-methylpyrrolidone. A broad range of processing conditions across the sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate/cyclohexane/water phase diagram were identified that are suitable for preparing particles with dimensions <50 to >500 nm. In contrast, only a relatively narrow range of processing conditions were suitable for preparing such particles in the absence of the co-solvents, highlighting the role of the co-solvent in modulating the properties of the polar core of the reverse micelles. A mechanism is proposed that links the interactions between the various reactive sites on the polar head group of the surfactant and the co-solvent to the nucleation and growth of the particles.

  4. {tau} polarization in SUSY cascade decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.Y. [Chonbuk Univ., Jeonju (Korea), Dept. of Physics and RIPC]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hagiwara, K. [KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Kim, Y.G. [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea). ARCSEC; Mawatari, K. [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul (Korea). School of Physics; Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    {tau} leptons emitted in cascade decays of supersymmetric particles are polarized. The polarization may be exploited to determine spin and mixing properties of the neutralinos and stau particles involved. (orig.)

  5. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  6. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  7. Nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of alfalfa-mixed grass forage wrapped with minimal stretch film layers and stored for different lengths of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coblentz, W K; Ogden, R K; Akins, M S; Chow, E A

    2017-07-01

    A key aspect of managing baled silages is to quickly achieve and then rigorously maintain anaerobic conditions within the silage mass. The concept of inserting an O 2 -limiting barrier (OB) into plastic commercial silage wraps has been evaluated previously, yielding mixed or inconclusive results. Our objective for this study was to maximize the challenge to a commercial polyethylene bale wrap, or the identical wrap containing an OB, by using minimal plastic (4 layers), and then extending storage periods as long as 357 d. Forty-eight 1.2 × 1.2-m large-round bales of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and mixed grass forage (66.3 ± 8.66% alfalfa; DM basis) were made at 2 moisture concentrations [47.5 (ideal) or 36.1% (dry)], wrapped with 4 layers of plastic containing an OB or no OB, and then stored for 99, 243, or 357 d. After storage, yeast counts within the 0.15-m deep surface layer were not affected by treatment (mean = 5.85 log 10 cfu/g); mold counts could not be analyzed statistically because 26 bales were nondetectable at a 3.00 log 10 cfu/g detection limit, but means among detectable counts were numerically similar for OB (4.74 log 10 cfu/g) and no OB (4.77 log 10 cfu/g). Fermentation characteristics were most affected by initial bale moisture, resulting in a more acidic final pH for ideal compared with dry bales (5.52 vs. 6.00). This was facilitated by greater concentrations of total fermentation acids (3.80 vs. 1.45% of dry matter), lactic acid (2.24 vs. 0.71% of dry matter), and acetic acid (1.07 vs. 0.64% of dry matter) within ideal compared with dry silages. Plastic wrap type had no effect on final concentrations of any fermentation product. During fermentation and storage, we noted greater change in concentrations of fiber components and whole-plant ash within the 0.15-m deep surface layer than in the bale core, and these changes always differed statistically from 0 (no change) based on pre-ensiled baseline concentrations. Overall, concentrations of water

  8. The effect of SiC powder mixing electrical discharge machining on white layer thickness, heat flux and fatigue life of AISI D2 die steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Khazraji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with studying the effect of powder mixing electrical discharge machining (PMEDM parameters using copper and graphite electrodes on the white layer thickness (WLT, the total heat flux generated and the fatigue life. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to plan and design the experimental work matrices for two groups of experiments: for the first EDM group, kerosene dielectric was used alone, whereas the second was treated by adding the SiC micro powders mixing to dielectric fluid (PMEDM. The total heat flux generated and fatigue lives after EDM and PMEDM models were developed by FEM using ANSYS 15.0 software. The graphite electrodes gave a total heat flux higher than copper electrodes by 82.4%, while using the SiC powder and graphite electrodes gave a higher total heat flux than copper electrodes by 91.5%. The lowest WLT values of 5.0 µm and 5.57 µm are reached at a high current and low current with low pulse on time using the copper and graphite electrodes and the SiC powder, respectively. This means that there is an improvement in WLT by 134% and 110%, respectively, when compared with the use of same electrodes and kerosene dielectric alone. The graphite electrodes with PMEDM and SiC powder improved the experimental fatigue safety factor by 7.30% compared with the use of copper electrodes and by 14.61% and 18.61% compared with results using the kerosene dielectric alone with copper and graphite electrodes, respectively.

  9. Structural and electric properties of AgGaTe{sub 2} layers prepared using mixed source of Ag{sub 2}Te and Ga{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruno, Aya [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Masakazu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami Memorial Research Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    AgGaTe{sub 2} layers were prepared on Si substrates by a closed space sublimation method using a mixed powder source of Ag{sub 2}Te and Ga{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer deposition was introduced to eliminate melt-back etching. The effect of the molar ratio of Ag{sub 2}Te and Ga{sub 2}Te{sub 3} in the mixed source on the crystallinity of the AgGaTe{sub 2} layer was investigated. The composition and the phase of the layer was found to change depending on the molar ratio in the deposits, which could be controlled by the source molar ratio along with the Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer thickness. It was confirmed that (112) oriented uniform AgGaTe{sub 2} layer with an abrupt interface between AgGaTe{sub 2} and Si was formed after those parameters were tuned. The obtained layer exhibited the acceptor concentration of around 2.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. A solar cell was fabricated using the p-AgGaTe{sub 2}/n-Si heterojunction, and exhibited a conversion efficiency of 1.15%. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-04-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl{sup 2} electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO{sub 2} or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, {beta}-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the {beta}- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) 'indifferent electrolyte' ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl{sup +} ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations 0.34 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid 'ice-like' structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl₂) solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, Ian C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sposito, Garrison [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl–CaCl2 electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO2 or high-level radioactive waste (0.34–1.83 molc dm-3). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, β-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the β- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) “indifferent electrolyte” ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl+ ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations {>=0.34 molc dm-3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid “ice-like” structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2) solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, Ian C; Sposito, Garrison

    2011-08-15

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl(2) electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO(2) or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol(c) dm(-3)). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, β-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the β- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) "indifferent electrolyte" ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl(+) ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations ≥0.34 mol(c) dm(-3), properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid "ice-like" structures for water on clay mineral surfaces. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-01-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl 2 electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO 2 or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol c dm -3 ). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, β-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the β- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) 'indifferent electrolyte' ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl + ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations 0.34 mol c dm -3 , properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid 'ice-like' structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  14. A Novel Dynamic Physical Layer Impairment-Aware Routing and Wavelength Assignment (PLI-RWA) Algorithm for Mixed Line Rate (MLR) Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) Optical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sridhar

    2016-12-01

    The ever-increasing global Internet traffic will inevitably lead to a serious upgrade of the current optical networks' capacity. The legacy infrastructure can be enhanced not only by increasing the capacity but also by adopting advance modulation formats, having increased spectral efficiency at higher data rate. In a transparent mixed-line-rate (MLR) optical network, different line rates, on different wavelengths, can coexist on the same fiber. Migration to data rates higher than 10 Gbps requires the implementation of phase modulation schemes. However, the co-existing on-off keying (OOK) channels cause critical physical layer impairments (PLIs) to the phase modulated channels, mainly due to cross-phase modulation (XPM), which in turn limits the network's performance. In order to mitigate this effect, a more sophisticated PLI-Routing and Wavelength Assignment (PLI-RWA) scheme needs to be adopted. In this paper, we investigate the critical impairment for each data rate and the way it affects the quality of transmission (QoT). In view of the aforementioned, we present a novel dynamic PLI-RWA algorithm for MLR optical networks. The proposed algorithm is compared through simulations with the shortest path and minimum hop routing schemes. The simulation results show that performance of the proposed algorithm is better than the existing schemes.

  15. Polarization of the epithelial layer and apical localization of integrins are required for engulfment of apoptotic cells in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Tracy L; Kleinsorge, Sarah E; Timmons, Allison K; Taylor, Jeffrey D; McCall, Kimberly

    2015-12-01

    Inefficient clearance of dead cells or debris by epithelial cells can lead to or exacerbate debilitating conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Despite the importance of engulfment by epithelial cells, little is known about the molecular changes that are required within these cells. The misregulation of integrins has previously been associated with disease states, suggesting that a better understanding of the regulation of receptor trafficking could be key to treating diseases caused by defects in phagocytosis. Here, we demonstrate that the integrin heterodimer αPS3/βPS becomes apically enriched and is required for engulfment by the epithelial follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary. We found that integrin heterodimer localization and function is largely directed by the α-subunit. Moreover, proper cell polarity promotes asymmetric integrin enrichment, suggesting that αPS3/βPS trafficking occurs in a polarized fashion. We show that several genes previously known for their roles in trafficking and cell migration are also required for engulfment. Moreover, as in mammals, the same α-integrin subunit is required by professional and non-professional phagocytes and migrating cells in Drosophila. Our findings suggest that migrating and engulfing cells use common machinery, and demonstrate a crucial role for integrin function and polarized trafficking of integrin subunits during engulfment. This study also establishes the epithelial follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary as a powerful model for understanding the molecular changes required for engulfment by a polarized epithelium. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Numerical simulation of inter-annual variations in the properties of the upper mixed layer in the Black Sea over the last 34 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Georgy I.; Wobus, Fred; Zatsepin, Andrei G.; Akivis, Tatiana M.; Zanacchi, Marcus; Stanichny, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    The Black Sea is a nearly land-locked basin where a combination of salt and heat budgets results in a unique thermohaline water mass structure. An important feature of the Black Sea is that oxygen is dissolved and rich sea life made possible only in the upper water levels. This is due to a strong pycnocline which cannot be mixed even by strong winds or winter convection (Shapiro, 2008). The upper mixed layer (UML) with a nearly uniform temperature profile and a very sharp seasonal thermocline at its lower boundary develops during the summer season (Sur & Ilyin, 1997). The deepening of the UML has an important effect on the supply of nutrients into the euphotic upper layer from the underlying nutrient-rich water mass. The temperature of the UML at any given location is dependent on the surface heat flux, horizontal advection of heat, the depth and the rate of deepening of the UML. In this study we use a 3D ocean circulation model, NEMO-SHELF (O'Dea et al, 2012) to simulate the parameters of the UML in the Black Sea over the last 34 years. The model has horizontal resolution of 1/12×1/16 degrees and 33 layers in the vertical. The vertical discretization uses a hybrid enveloped s-z grid developed in Shapiro et al. (2012). The model is spun up from climatology (Suvorov et al., 2004); it is forced by the Drakkar Forcing Set v5.2 (Brodeau et al., 2010, Meinvielle et al., 2013) and river discharges from 8 major rivers are included. For each year the model is run from 1st January and the data for the period April to October are used for analysis. The sea surface temperature produced by the model is compared with satellite data ( Modis-Aqua, 2013) to show a good agreement. The model simulations are validated against in-situ observations (BSERP-3, 2004; Piotukh et al., 2011). The analysis is performed for the deep basin where the depth of the sea is greater than 1000m. It clearly shows the inter-annual variations of both the SST and the depth of UML. The depth of UML is

  17. Polarized Scintillating Targets at Psi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2001-02-01

    Scintillating polarized targets are now routinely available: blocks of 18×18×5 mm scintillating organic polymer, doped with TEMPO, polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. A 19 mm diameter plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat.

  18. Improvement of SOFC electrodes using mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Y.; Hishinuma, M. [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Since the electrode reaction of SOFC is limited to the proximity of a triple phase boundary (TPB), the local current density at the electrode and electrolyte interface is larger than mean current density, which causes large ohmic and electrode polarization. This paper describes an application of mixed ionic-electronic conductors to reduce such polarization by means of (1) enhancing ionic conductivity of the electrolyte surface layer by coating a high ionic conductors, and (2) reducing the local current density by increasing the electrochemically active sites.

  19. Observation of profiles of turbulence in stationary and well mixed convective boundary layers over the ARM Southern Great Plains and the Tropical Western Pacific sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Turner, D. D.; Heus, T.; Newsom, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    The high temporal and vertical resolution and the ability to operate continuously under most atmospheric conditions make Raman lidars outstanding tools for studying turbulence in the convective boundary layer (CBL). Raman lidars have been used to study the turbulent structure of the CBL and the entrainment zone; however, previous studies have been in general based on a limited number of cases, which restricts the representativeness of the results for different atmospheric conditions. This study uses data from the autonomous Raman lidars that measure water vapor over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site located at Lamont, Oklahoma (USA) and the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site located at Darwin (Australia) as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The data from SGP used here spans 4 years from January 2012 to December 2015 and the TWP data span 6 years from January 2010 to December 2015. The vertical profiles of turbulent fluctuations have been derived using an auto covariance technique to separate out the instrument random error from the atmospheric variability over a set of 2-h period time series during which the CBL is quasi-stationary and well mixed. The temporal and vertical resolutions of water vapor are 10 s and 37.5 m, respectively. The error analysis of the Raman lidars observations demonstrates that the lidars are capable of resolving the vertical structure of turbulence in the CBL, and the small noise errors allow us to thoroughly examine different moments up to the fourth-order. The monthly, seasonal and yearly variations of the vertical profiles of variance, skewness, kurtosis and integral scale have been carefully analyzed. We particularly highlight noticeable differences between the structure of turbulence in the CBL and the entrainment zone at the SGP and TWP sites.

  20. Deciphering the Temporal and Spatial Complexity in Submarine Canyons in Antarctica: the Role of Mixed Layer Depth in Regulating Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F.; Kohut, J. T.; Schofield, O.; Oliver, M. J.; Gorbunov, M. Y.

    2016-02-01

    There is a high spatial and temporal variability in the biophysical processes regulating primary productivity in submarine canyons in the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). WAP canyon heads are considered biological "hotspots" by providing predictable food resource and driving penguin foraging locations. Because the physiology and composition of the phytoplankton blooms and the physical mechanisms driving them aren't well understood, we aim to characterize the dynamics of the spring phytoplankton bloom at the head of a canyon in the WAP. A 6-year record of Slocum glider deployments is analyzed, corresponding to over 16,000 water column profiles. The mixed layer depth (MLD), determined by the maximum of the buoyancy frequency criteria, was found to be the MLD definition with the highest ecological relevance. The same holds true for other regions in Antarctica such as the Ross and Amundsen Seas. A FIRe sensor on a glider was used to evaluate physiological responses of phytoplankton to canyon dynamics using fluorescence kinetics. Initial results show a spatial influence, with increased photosynthetic efficiencies found at the canyon head. The strongest signal was the seasonal cycle. The shoaling of the MLD in early January results in increased chlorophyll a concentrations and as MLD deepens in mid season due to wind forcing, phytoplankton concentrations decrease, likely due to decreased light availability. A consistent secondary peak in chlorophyll matches a shoaling in MLD later in the growth season. A steady warming and increase in salinity of the MLD is seen throughout the season. Spatial differences were recorded at the head of the canyon and result from the local circulation. Shallower MLD found on the northern region are consistent with a fresher surface ocean (coastal influence) and increased chlorophyll concentrations. The southern region is thought to be more oceanic influenced as intrusions of warm deep water (mUCDW) to the upper water column were recorded

  1. Defect-induced mix experiment for NIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt M.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME-II will measure the implosion and mix characteristics of CH capsules filled with 5 atmospheres of DT by incorporating mid-Z dopant layers of Ge and Ga. This polar direct drive (PDD experiment also will demonstrate the filling of a CH capsule at target chamber center using a fill tube. Diagnostics for these experiments include areal x-ray backlighting to obtain early time images of the implosion trajectory and a multiple-monochromatic imager (MMI to collect spectrally-resolved images of the capsule dopant line emission near bangtime. The inclusion of two (or more thin dopant layers at separate depths within the capsule shell facilitates spatial correlation of mix between the layers and the hot gas core on a single shot. The dopant layers are typically 2 μm thick and contain dopant concentrations of 1.5%. Three dimensional Hydra simulations have been performed to assess the effects of PDD asymmetry on capsule performance.

  2. Mixed P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles as a top scattering layer to enhance performance of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaohua, E-mail: mksxh@163.com; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Yalong; Sun, Panpan; Huang, Niu; Sun, Yihua

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mixed P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles were employed to form a top scattering layer. • The top scattering layer exhibits superior light scattering effect. • The bottom nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer can make good use of the back-scattered light. • Bilayer TiO{sub 2} photoanode shows faster interfacial electron transfer and slower charge recombination process. • Bilayer photoanode enhances the DSSC efficiency by a factor of 25%. - Abstract: Herein, we report a bilayer TiO{sub 2} photoanode composed of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} (NCT) bottom layer and mixed P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles (PR) top scattering layer. The present structure performs well in solar light harvesting which is mainly attributed to the fact that the top scattering layer exhibits superior light scattering effect and meanwhile the NCT bottom layer with large dye-loading capacity can make better use of the back-scattered light. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit voltage decay measurements demonstrate that DSSC based on bilayer photoanode shows faster interfacial electron transfer and slower charge recombination process than that based on NCT monolayer photoanode. These advantages render the DSSCs based on NCT-PR bilayer photoanode exhibiting superior performance under AM1.5G simulated solar irradiation. As an example, by tuning mass ratio between P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles in the top scattering layer, the DSSC based on NCT-PR bilayer photoanode exhibits an optimum solar energy conversion efficiency of 9.0%, which is about 1.25 times higher than that of monolayer NCT device (7.2%) with the same film thickness.

  3. Study of mixed phase clouds over west Africa: Ice-crystal corner reflection effects observed with a two-wavelength polarization lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselovskii Igor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidar sounding is used for the analysis of possible contribution of the corner reflection (CR effect to the total backscattering in case of ice crystals. Our study is based on observations of mixed phase clouds performed during the SHADOW campaign in Senegal. Mie-Raman lidar allows measurements at 355 nm and 532 nm at 43 dg. off-zenith angle, so the extinction and backscattering Ångström exponents can be evaluated. In some measurements we observed the positive values of backscattering Ångström exponent, which can be attributed to the corner reflection by horizontally oriented ice plates.

  4. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  5. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  6. Eddy dynamics in the Southern Ocean: How does the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with sea-bed topography influence the surface mixed layer and hence the carbon-climate feedback processes?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kobo, N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean: How does the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with sea-bed topography infl uence the surface mixed layer and hence the carbon-climate feedback processes N KOBO, S HERBETTE, PMS MONTEIRO AND C REASON CSIR Natural Resources... encounters topography the generation of mesoscale features (such as eddies) can result. These mesoscale features influence water mass formation, meridional heat transport and carbon dioxide uptake[2]. This project investigates the how. METHODS...

  7. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis Part II: evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ochoa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009 in which measurements of trace gases and particles, at a remote, high altitude mountain site, 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of the air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor mixing ratio (WMR, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and acyl peroxy nitrate (APN are simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. Comparisons between the model and measurements are also evaluated for particle size distributions (PSDs of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM. The model predictions of the diurnal trends in temperature, WMR and trace gases were generally well correlated; 13 of the 18 correlations were significant at a confidence level of <0.01. Less satisfactory were the average hourly differences between model and measurements that showed predicted values within expected, natural variation for only 10 of the 18 comparisons. The model performed best when comparing with the measurements during periods when the air originated from the east. In that case all six of the parameters being compared had average differences between the model and measurements less than the expected standard deviation. For the cases when the air masses are from the southwest or west northwest, only two of the comparisons from each case showed differences less than the expected standard deviation. The differences appear to be a result of an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer predicted by the model and too much dilution. There also is more O3 being produced, most likely by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources than is predicted by the model.

    The measured and modeled PSD compare very well with respect to their general shape and the diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log

  8. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McInnes, K.L. [CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Mordialloc (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  9. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  10. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  11. Study on the polarity, solubility, and stacking characteristics of asphaltenes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Long-li

    2014-07-01

    The structure and transformation of fused aromatic ring system in asphaltenes play an important role in the character of asphaltenes, and in step affect the properties of heavy oils. Polarity, solubility and structural characteristics of asphaltenes derived from Tahe atmospheric residue (THAR) and Tuo-826 heavy crude oil (Tuo-826) were analyzed for study of their internal relationship. A fractionation method was used to separate the asphaltenes into four sub-fractions, based on their solubility in the mixed solvent, for the study of different structural and physical-chemical properties, such as polarity, solubility, morphology, stacking characteristics, and mean structural parameters. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation can present the intuitive morphology of asphaltene molecules, and shows that the structure of asphaltenes is in local order as well as long range disorder. The analysis results showed that n-heptane asphaltenes of THAR and Tuo-826 had larger dipole moment values, larger fused aromatic ring systems, larger mean number of stacking layers, and less interlayer spacing between stacking layers than the corresponding n-pentane asphaltenes. The sub-fractions that were inclined to precipitate from the mixture of n-heptane and tetrahydrofuran had larger polarity and less solubility. From the first sub-fraction to the fourth sub-fraction, polarity, mean stacking numbers, and average layer size from the TEM images follow a gradual decrease. The structural parameters derived from TEM images could reflect the largest fused aromatic ring system in asphaltene molecule, yet the parameters derived from 1H NMR data reflected the mean message of poly-aromatic ring systems. The structural parameters derived from TEM images were more consistent with the polarity variation of sub-fractions than those derived from 1H NMR data, which indicates that the largest fused aromatic ring system will play a more important role in the stacking characteristics of

  12. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  13. Mix design of asphalt mixture used for the waterproof and anti-cracking layer in the rainy area of South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuming; Dong, Aixia; Liu, Chaoqun; Wu, Wenqing

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the asphalt mixture (porosity pavement to improve its interlayer structure and to enhance its related waterproof and anti-cracking ability. Considering the weather characteristics and traffic conditions in Jiangxi Province, appropriate raw materials were selected. Based on the technical indexes of the raw materials, expected porosity (cracking layer, and to obtain the optimum amount of the asphalt and fiber used based on Marshall tests. The high-temperature rutting test, low-temperature cracking test, and water stability test were conducted to evaluate the pavement performance of the waterproof and anti-cracking layer. A waterproof and anti-cracking layer was added between the upper and middle layers of the asphalt pavement, which has excellent performance for avoiding cracks and water damage.

  14. Artificial anisotropy and polarizing filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, François; Escoubas, Ludovic; Lazaridès, Basile

    2002-06-01

    The calculated spectral transmittance of a multilayer laser mirror is used to determine the effective index of the single layer equivalent to the multilayer stack. We measure the artificial anisotropy of photoresist thin films whose structure is a one-dimensional, subwavelength grating obtained from interference fringes. The limitation of the theory of the first-order effective index homogenization is discussed. We designed normal-incidence, polarizing coating and a polarization rotator by embedding anisotropic films in simple multilayer structures.

  15. To the analysis of the theory of mathematical model of hydrodynamics of a bulk layer of a mix of vegetative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research work on finding out the interdependence between the dynamic separation of the working apparatus (machine, statistic separation and the degree of filling the apparatus (machine. The final mathematic model of calculating separation - an important hydrodynamic parameter of a layer of vegetable material while extragent is being filtrated through it. The authors worked out a universal method of defining hydrodynamic characteristics of a layer of material which can be applied to any vegetable materials and their mixtures worked up as required.

  16. Latitude-energy structure of multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS data in plasma sheet boundary layer and boundary plasma sheet below 6 RE radial distance: basic properties and statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Velocity dispersed ion signatures (VDIS occurring at the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL are a well reported feature. Theory has, however, predicted the existence of multiple ion beamlets, similar to VDIS, in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, i.e. at latitudes below the PSBL. In this study we show evidence for the multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS ion data and basic properties of the ion beamlets will be presented. Statistics of the occurrence frequency of ion multiple beamlets show that they are most common in the midnight MLT sector and for altitudes above 4 RE, while at low altitude (≤3 RE, single beamlets at PSBL (VDIS are more common. Distribution functions of ion beamlets in velocity space have recently been shown to correspond to 3-dimensional hollow spheres, containing a large amount of free energy. We also study correlation with ~100 Hz waves and electron anisotropies and consider the possibility that ion beamlets correspond to stable auroral arcs.

  17. Influence of absorption in linear polarization imaging of melanoma tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongzhi Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The contrast mechanism of different polarization imaging techniques for melanoma in mouse skin is studied using both experiments and Monte Carlo simulations. Total intensity, linear polarization difference imaging (DPI, degree of polarization imaging (DOPI and rotating linear polarization imaging (RLPI are applied and the relative contrasts of these polarization imaging methods between the normal and cancerous tissues are compared. A two-layer absorption-scattering model is proposed to explain the contrast mechanism of the polarization imaging for melanoma. By taking into account of both scattering of symmetrical and asymmetrical scatterers and absorption of inter-scatterer medium, the two-layer model reproduces the relative contrasts for polarization images observed in experiments. The simulation results also show that, the parameters of polarization imaging change more dramatically with the variation of absorption in the bottom layer than the top layer.

  18. Storage characteristics, nutritive value, and fermentation characteristics of large-round bales of alfalfa-mixed grass forage wrapped with different layers of stretch film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baled silage has become a popular form of forage conservation; however, many practical management questions have not been investigated thoroughly. Our objectives were to evaluate the number of polyethylene wrapping layers and the presence (OB) or absence (SUN) of an O2-limiting barrier within the wr...

  19. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  20. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  1. Partial spin polarization of a conductance in a bi-layer In0.52 Al0.48 As / In0.53 Ga0.47 As heterostructure based nanowire for the rectangular and the smooth lateral confinement potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-03-01

    We simulate the electron transport in a vertical bi-layer nanowire in order to study an influence of the lateral confinement's shape on a spin polarization of wire's conductance. The active part of considered quantum wire constitutes a double inverted heterojunction In0.52 Al0.48 As /In0.53 Ga0.47 As which nanostructure can be fabricated in molecular beam epitaxy process while the lateral confinement potential can be finally formed by means of cleaved overgrowth or surface oxidization methods giving the desired rectangular and smooth lateral confinement. In calculations we take into account interaction between charge carriers using DFT within local spin density approximation. We show that if the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wire axis, the pseudogaps are opened in energy dispersion relation E (k) what in conjunction with spin Zeeman shift of spin-up and spin-down subbands may enhance the spin polarization of conductance with reference to a single layer wire. For nanowire with rectangular lateral confinement potential we found that the electron density has two maximums localized at wire edges in each layers. This modificates strongly all magnetosubbands giving up to four energy minimums in lowest subband and considerably diminishes widths of pseudogaps what translates into low maximal spin polarization of conductance, not exceeding 40%. This drawback is absent in wire with smooth lateral confinement. However, in order to gain a large spin polarization simultaneous tuning of magnetic field as well as the Fermi energies in both layers of nanowire are required.

  2. Glider and satellite high resolution monitoring of a mesoscale eddy in the Algerian basin: effects on the mixed layer depth and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotroneo, Yuri; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Budillon, Giorgio; Fusco, Giannetta; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2016-04-01

    Despite of the extensive bibliography about the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea and its sub-basins, the debate on mesoscale dynamics and its impacts on biochemical processes is still open because of their intrinsic time scales and of the difficulties in sampling. In order to clarify some of these processes, the "Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey - ABACUS" project was proposed and realized through access to JERICO Trans National Access (TNA) infrastructures between September and December 2014. In this framework, a deep glider cruise was carried out in the area between Balearic Islands and Algerian coasts to establish an endurance line for monitoring the basin circulation. During the mission, a mesoscale eddy, identified on satellite altimetry maps, was sampled at high-spatial horizontal resolution (4 km) along its main axes and from surface to 1000 m depth. Data were collected by a Slocum glider equipped with a pumped CTD and biochemical sensors that collected about 100 complete casts inside the eddy. In order to describe the structure of the eddy, in situ data were merged with new generation remotely sensed data as daily synoptic sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll concentration (Chl-a) images from MODIS satellites as well as sea surface height and geostrophic velocities from AVISO. From its origin along the Algerian coast in the eastern part of the basin, the eddy propagated to north-west at a mean speed of about 4 km/day with a mean diameter of 112/130 km, a mean elevation of 15.7 cm and clearly distinguished by the surrounding waters thanks to its higher SST and Chl-a values. Temperature and salinity values along the water column confirm the origin of the eddy from the AC showing the presence of recent Atlantic water in the surface layer and Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) in the deeper layer. Eddy footprint is clearly evident in the multiparametric vertical sections conducted along its main axes. Deepening of temperature, salinity and

  3. Phase transitions in the mixed quadratic-layer antiferromagnets with competing anisotropies K2Cosub(x)Fesub(1-x)F4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlak, W.A.H.M.

    1985-09-01

    The magnetic phases of the randomly mixed two-dimensional antiferromagnet K 2 Cosub(x)Fesub(1-x)F 4 have been explored, utilizing neutron diffraction, Moessbauer absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Ordered phases similar to those found in K 2 FeF 4 and K 2 CoF 4 have been detected for low and high x, respectively. By virtue of the competition between the orthogonal anisotropies of the Fe 2+ and Co 2+ ions a third ordered so-called oblique phase is found for 0.20 2+ and Co 2+ . Studies have been undertaken of the critical behavior, the sublattice magnetization and the magnetization of individual ions, and the magnetic excitations, for compositions x and temperatures T covering all relevant parts of the phase diagram. In addition, the magnetic structure of a system which enters the oblique phase is investigated in an external magnetic field. Strong nonequilibrium behavior, related to random-field effects, has been observed

  4. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source with high polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Alley, R.K.; Aoyagi, H.

    1993-04-01

    For the 1992 operating cycle of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the polarized electron source (PES) during its maiden run successfully met the pulse intensity and overall efficiency requirements of the SLC. However, the polarization of the bulk GaAs cathode was low (∼27%) and the pulse-to-pulse stability was marginal. We have shown that adequate charge for the SLC can be extracted from a strained layer cathode having P e ∼80% even though the quantum efficiency (QE) is - beam stability. The performance of the PES during the 1993 SLC operating cycle with these and other improvements is discussed

  5. Quantitative studies of the Martian south polar region using spacecraft images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herkenhoff, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Mariner 9 images were processed for comparison with nearly simultaneous infrared spectra of the south polar cap of Mars. Combined analysis of these observations indicates that the southern residual cap was covered by carbon dioxide frost throughout the summer of 1971-72. Five color/albedo units have been recognized and mapped in the southern layered deposits on Mars. Shadow brightnesses were measured and modeled in order to correct for the effects of atmospheric scattering and quantify the albedo and color of the surface. The layered deposits appear to be mantled by red dust, except where eolian stripping has exposed the darker, less red underlying bedrock. Frost and bare ground are mixed below the resolution of the images in many areas, some of which appear to be younger than the surrounding layered terrain. The available observational data suggest that the layered deposits are composed of bright dust, water ice, and a small amount of dark material. Weathering of the layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the data presented here and previous observations of the north polar deposits. The non-volatile component of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust or sand. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particle upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. Eventual destruction of the particle could allow recycling of the dark dust into the layered deposits via atmospheric suspension

  6. Thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, C.H.; Kohlhepp, J.T.; Paluskar, P.V.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Jonge, W.J.M. de

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization in Al/AlOx/ferromagnet junctions based on the spin-polarized tunneling technique, in which the Zeeman-split superconducting density of states in the Al electrode is used as a detector for the spin polarization. Thermal robustness of the polarization, which is of key importance for the performance of magnetic tunnel junction devices, is demonstrated for post-deposition anneal temperatures up to 500 o C with Co and Co 90 Fe 10 top electrodes, independent of the presence of an FeMn layer on top of the ferromagnet

  7. Synthesis, structure, and properties of randomly mixed and layer-ordered SrMn1-xGaxO3-δ perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, E.N.; Avdeev, M.; Short, S.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Dabrowski, B.; Chmaissem, O.; Mais, J.; Kolesnik, S.

    2004-01-01

    We report the synthesis of SrMn 1-x Ga x O 3-δ perovskite compounds and describe the dependence of their phase stability and structural and physical properties over extended cation and oxygen composition ranges. Using special synthesis techniques, we have extended the solubility limit of Ga 3+ in the cubic perovskite phase to x∼0.33. Higher Ga concentrations lead to mixed phases until a single-phase ordered double-perovskite structure is obtained at x=0.5, i.e., Sr 2 MnGaO 6-δ . In the cubic perovskite phase the maximum oxygen content is 3-x/2, which corresponds to 100% Mn 4+ . All maximally oxygenated solid solution compounds are found to order antiferromagnetically, with the transition temperature linearly decreasing as Ga content increases. Reducing the oxygen content introduces frustration into the magnetic system and a spin-glass state is observed for SrMn 0.7 Ga 0.3 O 2.5 below 30 K. The brownmillerite phase at low oxygen content, Sr 2 MnGaO 5 , is found to have Icmm crystallographic symmetry. At 12 K its magnetic structure is found to order in the Icm'm' magnetic symmetry corresponding to a G-type antiferromagnetic structure of Mn 3+ ions. At higher oxygen content, Sr 2 MnGaO 5.5 is found to have Cmmm crystallographic symmetry with disordered oxygen vacancies. At 12 K two competing long-range magnetic structures are found for the Mn 4+ sublattice having C I m'm'm symmetry (G-type), and C P m'm'm symmetry (C-type), together with a G-type short-range magnetic correlations

  8. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Polymer photovoltaic cells sensitive to the circular polarization of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilot, Jan; Abbel, Robert; Lakhwani, Girish; Meijer, E.W.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Meskers, Stefan C.J. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2010-05-25

    Chiral conjugated polymer is used to construct a photovoltaic cell whose response depends on the circular polarization of the incoming light. The selectivity for left and right polarized light as a function of the thickness of the polymer layer is accounted for by modeling of the optical properties of all layers inside the device. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Polarization effects in silicon-clad optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, R. F.; Batchman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    By changing the thickness of a semiconductor cladding layer deposited on a planar dielectric waveguide, the TE or TM propagating modes may be selectively attenuated. This polarization effect is due to the periodic coupling between the lossless propagating modes of the dielectric slab waveguide and the lossy modes of the cladding layer. Experimental tests involving silicon claddings show high selectivity for either polarization.

  11. An assessment of ten ocean reanalyses in the polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uotila, Petteri

    2017-04-01

    Ocean reanalysis (ORA) combines observations either statistically or with a hydrodynamical model, to reconstruct historical changes in the ocean. Global and regional ORA products are increasingly used in polar research, but their quality remains to be systematically assessed. To address this, the Polar ORA Intercomparison Project (PORA-IP) has been established following on from the ORA-IP project (Balmaseda et al. 2015, with other papers in a special issue of Climate Dynamics). The PORA-IP is constituted under the COST EOS initiative with plans to review reanalyses products in both the Arctic and Antarctic, and is endorsed by YOPP - the Year of Polar Prediction project. Currently, the PORA-IP team consists of 21 researchers from 15 institutes and universities. The ORA-IP products with polar physics, such as sea ice, have been updated where necessary and collected in a public database. In addition to model output, available observational polar climatologies are collected and used in the assessments. Due to the extensive variety of products, this database should become a valuable resource outside the PORA-IP community. For a comprehensive evaluation of the ten ORA products (CGLORSv5, ECDA3.1, GECCO2, Glorys2v4, GloSea5_GO5, MOVEG2i, ORAP5, SODA3.3.1, TOPAZ4 and UR025.4) in the Arctic and Southern Oceans several specific diagnostics are assessed. The PORA-IP diagnostics target the following topics: hydrography; heat, salinity and freshwater content; ocean transports and surface currents; mixed layer depth; sea-ice concentration and thickness; and snow thickness over sea ice. Based on these diagnostics, ORA product biases against observed data and their mutual spread are quantified, and possible reasons for discrepancies discussed. So far, we have identified product outliers and evaluated the multi-model mean. We have identified the importance of the atmospheric forcing, air-ocean coupling protocol and sea-ice data assimilation for the product performance. Moreover, we

  12. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  13. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  14. Polarized nuclei in plastic scintillators: a new class of polarized targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.; Nemchonok, I. B.

    2001-06-01

    Polarized scintillating targets are now routinely available: protons, deuterons or other nuclei in blocks of scintillating organic polymer, doped with the free radical TEMPO, are polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. A 19 mm diameter plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable nuclear polarizations have been achieved newly in boron enriched polystyrene-based scintillating material. A scintillator target with high detection sensitivity for low energy neutrons has been so made available, in which both protons and boron nuclei are polarized. .

  15. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  16. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Marine phytoplanktons influence the air-sea exchanges of carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and ocean radiation transfer as well as albedo of ocean surface water, which affect earth climate system through thermodynamical processes within the closed system of the planet earth. It has long been recognized that absorption.

  17. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    shinbashi, Minatoku, Tokyo 105 Japan. Physical Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India. DKRZ, Bundesstrasse 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany. Japan Marine Science & Technology Center, ...

  18. Mixed and Mixing Systems Worldwide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sean.Donlan

    MIXED AND MIXING SYSTEMS WORLDWIDE: A PREFACE. 2012 VOLUME 15 No 3 ... dissenters, Mixed Jurisdictions Worldwide galvanised scholarship on mixed systems, especially for jurists in those ... Comparative Law, the International Association of Legal Science and numerous law faculties across the classical ...

  19. Mixed spectral finite elements and perfectly matched layers for elastic waves in time domain; Elements finis mixtes spectraux et couches absorbantes parfaitement adaptees pour la propagation d'ondes elastiques en regime transitoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauqueux, S.

    2003-02-01

    We consider the propagation of elastic waves in unbounded domains. A new formulation of the linear elasticity system as an H (div) - L{sup 2} system enables us to use the 'mixed spectral finite element method', This new method is based on the definition of new spaces of approximation and the use of mass-lumping. It leads to an explicit scheme with reduced storage and provides the same solution as the spectral finite element method. Then, we model unbounded domains by using Perfectly Matched Layers. Instabilities in the PML in the case of particular 2D elastic media are pointed out and investigated. The numerical method is validated and tested in the case of acoustic and elastic realistic models. A plane wave analysis gives results about numerical dispersion and shows that meshes adapted to the physical and geometrical properties of the media are more accurate than the others. Then, an extension of the method to fluid-solid coupling is introduced for 2D seismic propagation. (author)

  20. A Highly Excited Turbulent Mixing Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    Chief, Technical Information Di ivision e November 84 APPROVED. FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED 87 4 24 048 Unclassified SECU TY...locked components of measured velocity, with conven- tional flow vizualization techniques. Such a comparison could provide a link between qualitative

  1. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  2. The influence of iron and light on net community production in the Subantarctic and Polar Frontal Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, N.; Difiore, P. J.; Barnett, B. A.; Bender, M. L.; Bowie, A. R.; Tilbrook, B.; Petrou, K.; Westwood, K. J.; Wright, S. W.; Lefevre, D.

    2011-02-01

    The roles of iron and light in controlling biomass and primary productivity are clearly established in the Southern Ocean. However, their influence on net community production (NCP) and carbon export remains to be quantified. To improve our understanding of NCP and carbon export production in the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) and the northern reaches of the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ), we conducted continuous onboard determinations of NCP as part of the Sub-Antarctic Sensitivity to Environmental Change (SAZ-Sense) study, which occurred in January-February 2007. Biological O2 supersaturation was derived from measuring O2/Ar ratios by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry. Based on these continuous measurements, NCP during the austral summer 2007 in the Australian SAZ was approximately 43 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. NCP showed significant spatial variability, with larger values near the Subtropical front, and a general southward decrease. For shallower mixed layers (export from the Southern Ocean mixed layer.

  3. South Polar Region of Mars: Topography and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The polar layered deposits of Mars represent potentially important volatile reservoirs and tracers for the planet's geologically recent climate history. Unlike the north polar cap, the uppermost surface of the bright residual south polar deposit is probably composed of carbon dioxide ice. It is unknown whether this ice extends through the entire thickness of the deposit. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL), launched in January 1999, is due to arrive in December 1999 to search for water and carbon dioxide on layered deposits near the south pole (SP) of Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Reversible Polarization Rotation in Epitaxial Ferroelectric Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Guangqing; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Hsin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    large-scale polarization rotation switching (≈60 μC cm−2) and an effective d 33 response 500% (≈250 pm V−1) larger than the PZT-R layer alone. Furthermore, this enhancement is stable for more than 107 electrical switching cycles. These bilayers present a simple and highly controllable means to design...... and optimize rotational polar systems as an alternate to traditional composition-based approaches. The precise control of the subtle interface-driven interactions between the lattice and the external factors that control polarization opens a new door to enhanced—or completely new—functional properties....

  5. Direct injection of spin-polarized carriers across YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 5-6. Direct injection of spin-polarized ... from the CMR layer is 38 mA. This clearly shows that spin-polarized quasiparticles injected from the CMR layer into the YBCO layer suppress the critical current of the superconductor via the pair-breaking phenomena.

  6. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  7. Boundary layer physics over snow and ice

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, P. S.; Neff, W. D.

    2008-01-01

    Observations of the unique chemical environment over snow and ice in recent decades, particularly in the polar regions, have stimulated increasing interest in the boundary layer processes that mediate exchanges between the ice/snow interface and the atmosphere. This paper provides a review of the underlying concepts and examples from recent field studies in polar boundary layer meteorology, which will generally apply to atmospheric flow over snow and ice surfaces. It forms a companion paper t...

  8. A quantitative analysis of the reactions involved in stratospheric ozone depletion in the polar vortex core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2017-09-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the chemical reactions involved in polar ozone depletion in the stratosphere and of the relevant reaction pathways and cycles. While the reactions involved in polar ozone depletion are well known, quantitative estimates of the importance of individual reactions or reaction cycles are rare. In particular, there is no comprehensive and quantitative study of the reaction rates and cycles averaged over the polar vortex under conditions of heterogeneous chemistry so far. We show time series of reaction rates averaged over the core of the polar vortex in winter and spring for all relevant reactions and indicate which reaction pathways and cycles are responsible for the vortex-averaged net change of the key species involved in ozone depletion, i.e., ozone, chlorine species (ClOx, HCl, ClONO2), bromine species, nitrogen species (HNO3, NOx) and hydrogen species (HOx). For clarity, we focus on one Arctic winter (2004-2005) and one Antarctic winter (2006) in a layer in the lower stratosphere around 54 hPa and show results for additional pressure levels and winters in the Supplement. Mixing ratios and reaction rates are obtained from runs of the ATLAS Lagrangian chemistry and transport model (CTM) driven by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim reanalysis data. An emphasis is put on the partitioning of the relevant chemical families (nitrogen, hydrogen, chlorine, bromine and odd oxygen) and activation and deactivation of chlorine.

  9. A quantitative analysis of the reactions involved in stratospheric ozone depletion in the polar vortex core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Wohltmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a quantitative analysis of the chemical reactions involved in polar ozone depletion in the stratosphere and of the relevant reaction pathways and cycles. While the reactions involved in polar ozone depletion are well known, quantitative estimates of the importance of individual reactions or reaction cycles are rare. In particular, there is no comprehensive and quantitative study of the reaction rates and cycles averaged over the polar vortex under conditions of heterogeneous chemistry so far. We show time series of reaction rates averaged over the core of the polar vortex in winter and spring for all relevant reactions and indicate which reaction pathways and cycles are responsible for the vortex-averaged net change of the key species involved in ozone depletion, i.e., ozone, chlorine species (ClOx, HCl, ClONO2, bromine species, nitrogen species (HNO3, NOx and hydrogen species (HOx. For clarity, we focus on one Arctic winter (2004–2005 and one Antarctic winter (2006 in a layer in the lower stratosphere around 54 hPa and show results for additional pressure levels and winters in the Supplement. Mixing ratios and reaction rates are obtained from runs of the ATLAS Lagrangian chemistry and transport model (CTM driven by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis data. An emphasis is put on the partitioning of the relevant chemical families (nitrogen, hydrogen, chlorine, bromine and odd oxygen and activation and deactivation of chlorine.

  10. Mixed biexcitons in single quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Biexcitonic complexes in a ZnSe single quantum well are investigated by spectrally resolved four-wave mixing (FWM). The formation of heavy-heavy-hole XXh and of mixed heavy-light-hole XXm biexcitons showing binding energies of Delta(h) = 4.8 meV and Delta(m)= 2.8 meV is identified by polarization...

  11. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  12. Role of residual layer and large-scale phenomena on the evolution of the boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blay, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Coster, de O.; Faloona, I.; Garrouste, O.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-layer theory and large-eddy simulations are used to analyze the dynamics of the boundary layer on two intensive operational periods during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) campaign: 1st and 2nd of July 2011, when convective boundary layers (CBLs) were observed.

  13. Freely tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-02-18

    A freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband terahertz waves is demonstrated using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized terahertz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. This low-cost, high-efficiency, and freely tunable device has potential applications as material analysis, wireless communication, and THz imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Hydrogen Distribution in the Lunar Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Bakhtin, B. N.; Bodnarik, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Harshmann, K.; Fedosov, F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a method of conversion of the lunar neutron counting rate measured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument collimated neutron detectors, to water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) in the top approximately 1 m layer of lunar regolith. Polar maps of the Moon’s inferred hydrogen abundance are presented and discussed.

  15. Boundary layer heights derived from velocity spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Kaellstrand, B. [Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    It is a well-known fact that the height of the mixed layer determines the size of the largest and most energetic eddies that can be observed in the unstable boundary layer, and consequently a peak can be observed in the power spectra of the along-wind velocity component at scales comparable to the mixed layer depth. We will now show how the mixed layer depth can be derived from the u-specta and the results will be compared with direct measurements using pibal and tethersonde measurements. (au)

  16. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  17. PSI: Very slow polarized muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    At the 'pion factory' of the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute, a collaboration of PSI, Heidelberg and Zurich (ETH) has recently produced intense beams of positive muons which have kinetic energies as low as 10 eV and with complete polarization (spin orientation). The new results were achieved at a surface muon channel, transporting positive muons from the decay of positive pions stopped at the surface of a pion production target. Surface muons with 4 MeV kinetic energy were transported by a conventional secondary beam channel and partially stopped in a moderator consisting of a layer of solidified noble gas deposited on a cold metallic substrate

  18. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...

  19. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  20. Natural melanin composites by layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Taesik; Shim, Bong Sub

    2015-04-01

    Melanin is an electrically conductive and biocompatible material, because their conjugated backbone structures provide conducting pathways from human skin, eyes, brain, and beyond. So there is a potential of using as materials for the neural interfaces and the implantable devices. Extracted from Sepia officinalis ink, our natural melanin was uniformly dispersed in mostly polar solvents such as water and alcohols. Then, the dispersed melanin was further fabricated to nano-thin layered composites by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. Combined with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), the melanin nanoparticles behave as an LBL counterpart to from finely tuned nanostructured films. The LBL process can adjust the smart performances of the composites by varying the layering conditions and sandwich thickness. We further demonstrated the melanin loading degree of stacked layers, combination nanostructures, electrical properties, and biocompatibility of the resulting composites by UV-vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), multimeter, and in-vitro cell test of PC12, respectively.