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Sample records for polar medicine related

  1. Kramers-Kronig relations for interstellar polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    The difficulties encountered in using the Kramers-Kronig relations to predict the behavior of interstellar polarization are pointed out, while at the same time their value in an interpretive role is acknowledged. Observations of interstellar circular polarization lead to restrictions on the interstellar grain composition, and additional constraints should be possible through measurement of linear polarization in the infrared and the ultraviolet

  2. Polar Biomedical Research: An Assessment. Appendix. Polar Medicine - A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    maneuvers rather than physiologic adaptation.8 5,150,151 m-- Pathologic Changes during Polar Life Life in the polar zones entails increased risks for diseases ...patient. Protein- calorie malnutrition (as in starvation,535 ,601 ,6 02 celiac sprue,6 03 or anorexia nervosa6 04 ) leads to decreased calorigenesis. In...determinations during hypothermia have not been establishedt thus the consequences of alterations of blood gases is unclear. There is same evidence, however

  3. Relativity mission with two counter-orbiting polar satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Patten, R.A.; Everitt, C.W.F.

    1975-01-01

    In 1918, J. Lense and H. Thirring calculated that a moon in orbit around a massive rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. An experiment to measure this effect with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar earth orbit is described. For a 2 1 / 2 year experiment, the measurement accuracy should approach 1 percent. In addition to precision tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler ranging data are taken at points of passing near the poles. New geophysical information on both earth harmonics and tidal effects is inherent in the polar ranging data. (auth)

  4. INVESTIGATION OF POLARIZATION PHASE DIFFERENCE RELATED TO FOREST FIELDS CHARACTERIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Majidi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The information content of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data significantly included in the radiometric polarization channels, hence polarimetric SAR data should be analyzed in relation with target structure. The importance of the phase difference between two co-polarized scattered signals due to the possible association between the biophysical parameters and the measured Polarization Phase Difference (PPD statistics of the backscattered signal recorded components has been recognized in geophysical remote sensing. This paper examines two Radarsat-2 images statistics of the phase difference to describe the feasibility of relationship with the physical properties of scattering targets and tries to understand relevance of PPD statistics with various types of forest fields. As well as variation of incidence angle due to affecting on PPD statistics is investigated. The experimental forest pieces that are used in this research are characterized white pine (Pinus strobus L., red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait., jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb., white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench Voss, black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill B.S.P., poplar (Populus L., red oak (Quercus rubra L. , aspen and ground vegetation. The experimental results show that despite of biophysical parameters have a wide diversity, PPD statistics are almost the same. Forest fields distributions as distributed targets have close to zero means regardless of the incidence angle. Also, The PPD distribution are function of both target and sensor parameters, but for more appropriate examination related to PPD statistics the observations should made in the leaf-off season or in bands with lower frequencies.

  5. Work-related stress and psychosomatic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao Mutsuhiro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article introduces key concepts of work-related stress relevant to the clinical and research fields of psychosomatic medicine. Stress is a term used to describe the body's physiological and/or psychological reaction to circumstances that require behavioral adjustment. According to the Japanese National Survey of Health, the most frequent stressors are work-related problems, followed by health-related and then financial problems. Conceptually, work-related stress includes a variety of conditions, such as overwork, unemployment or job insecurity, and lack of work-family balance. Job stress has been linked to a range of adverse physical and mental health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Stressful working conditions can also impact employee well-being indirectly by directly contributing to negative health behaviors or by limiting an individual's ability to make positive changes to lifestyle behaviors, such as smoking and sedentary behavior. Over the past two decades, two major job stress models have dominated the occupational health literature: the job demand-control-support model and the effort-reward imbalance model. In both models, standardized questionnaires have been developed and frequently used to assess job stress. Unemployment has also been reported to be associated with increased mortality and morbidity, such as by cardiovascular disease, stroke, and suicide. During the past two decades, a trend toward more flexible labor markets has emerged in the private and public sectors of developed countries, and temporary employment arrangements have increased. Temporary workers often complain that they are more productive but receive less compensation than permanent workers. A significant body of research reveals that temporary workers have reported chronic work-related stress for years. The Japanese government has urged all employers to implement four approaches to comprehensive mind

  6. Work-related stress and psychosomatic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces key concepts of work-related stress relevant to the clinical and research fields of psychosomatic medicine. Stress is a term used to describe the body's physiological and/or psychological reaction to circumstances that require behavioral adjustment. According to the Japanese National Survey of Health, the most frequent stressors are work-related problems, followed by health-related and then financial problems. Conceptually, work-related stress includes a variety of conditions, such as overwork, unemployment or job insecurity, and lack of work-family balance. Job stress has been linked to a range of adverse physical and mental health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Stressful working conditions can also impact employee well-being indirectly by directly contributing to negative health behaviors or by limiting an individual's ability to make positive changes to lifestyle behaviors, such as smoking and sedentary behavior. Over the past two decades, two major job stress models have dominated the occupational health literature: the job demand-control-support model and the effort-reward imbalance model. In both models, standardized questionnaires have been developed and frequently used to assess job stress. Unemployment has also been reported to be associated with increased mortality and morbidity, such as by cardiovascular disease, stroke, and suicide. During the past two decades, a trend toward more flexible labor markets has emerged in the private and public sectors of developed countries, and temporary employment arrangements have increased. Temporary workers often complain that they are more productive but receive less compensation than permanent workers. A significant body of research reveals that temporary workers have reported chronic work-related stress for years. The Japanese government has urged all employers to implement four approaches to comprehensive mind/body health care for stress

  7. Polarity related influence maximization in signed social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

  8. Traditional medicines, HIV, and related infections: workshop 2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M; Bessong, P; Liu, H

    2011-04-01

    Traditional medicines are an integral part of health care worldwide, even though their efficacy has not been scientifically proven. HIV-infected individuals may use them singularly or in combination with conventional medicines. Many in vitro studies have proven the anti-HIV, anti-Candida, and anti-herpes simplex virus potential of traditional plants and identified some of the mechanisms of action. Very few in vivo studies are available that involve a small number of participants and show controversial results. In addition, knowledge is limited of the role of traditional medicines in the enhancement of the immune system. The use of traditional medicines with antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) has created a problem because drug interactions compromise the efficacy of ARVs. Several currently popular plants have been studied in the laboratory for their interaction with ARVs, with disadvantageous results. Unfortunately, no clinical trials are available. The science of traditional medicines is relatively new and is at present being modernized worldwide. However, there are still ethical issues regarding traditional medicines that need to be addressed-for example, regulations regarding quality control and standardization of medicines, regulation and education of healers who deliver these medicines, and unregulated clinical trials. The workshop addressed the following questions about traditional medicine and their use in HIV infection: What are the mechanisms of action of anti-HIV traditional medicines? Should traditional medicines be used in conjunction with ARV? Do traditional medicines enhance the immune system? Should medicinal plants be used for the control of oral infections associated with HIV? What are the ethical issues surrounding the use of traditional medicines for the treatment of HIV and associated infections?

  9. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Work Related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to ...

  10. Tracer-tracer relations as a tool for research on polar ozone loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rolf

    2010-07-01

    The report includes the following chapters: (1) Introduction: ozone in the atmosphere, anthropogenic influence on the ozone layer, polar stratospheric ozone loss; (2) Tracer-tracer relations in the stratosphere: tracer-tracer relations as a tool in atmospheric research; impact of cosmic-ray-induced heterogeneous chemistry on polar ozone; (3) quantifying polar ozone loss from ozone-tracer relations: principles of tracer-tracer correlation techniques; reference ozone-tracer relations in the early polar vortex; impact of mixing on ozone-tracer relations in the polar vortex; impact of mesospheric intrusions on ozone-tracer relations in the stratospheric polar vortex calculation of chemical ozone loss in the arctic in March 2003 based on ILAS-II measurements; (4) epilogue.

  11. ESR and related experiments in spin-polarized atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yperen, G.H. van.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis deals with some experiments in (gaseous) spin-polarized atomic hydrogen. One uses the expression 'stabilized' atomic hydrogen, meaning that by choosing suitable conditions one can suppress the tendency of atoms to recombine into H 2 molecules, such that the lifetime of the atomic state is extended by many orders of magnitude. Research is focused at the study of processes that determine the decay rate of polarized H samples, with the ultimate goal of preparing samples of sufficiently high density and at low enough temperature to observe experimentally the behaviour of the (degenerate) quantum gas. ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) appears to be a very suitable measurement technique to study the properties of polarized H. This work describes the introduction of ESR as detection technique, and the first results of an experiment in polarized H using this technique. (orig.)

  12. Estimates of Leaf Relative Water Content from Optical Polarization Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, R. P.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    2017-12-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plant canopies remains a long term goal of remote sensing research. Existing approaches to remotely sensing canopy water status, such as the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and the Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT), have limitations. The CWSI, based upon remotely sensing canopy radiant temperature in the thermal infrared spectral region, does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWT is based upon the physics of water-light interaction in the 900-2000nm spectral region, not plant physiology. Our goal, development of a remote sensing technique for estimating plant water status based upon measurements in the VIS/NIR spectral region, would potentially provide remote sensing access to plant dehydration physiology - to the cellular photochemistry and structural changes associated with water deficits in leaves. In this research, we used optical, crossed polarization filters to measure the VIS/NIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, for 78 corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) leaves having relative water contents (RWC) between 0.60 and 0.98. Our results show that as RWC decreases R increases while T decreases. Our results tie R and T changes in the VIS/NIR to leaf physiological changes - linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf - and perhaps of a plant canopy - might be possible in the future.

  13. Antidiabetic, cytotoxic, antioxidant and antitrematodal medicinal efficacy of polar and non-polar phytochemicals of Balanites aegyptiaca Del.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Abd Al-Hay Saied Al-Ashaal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the biological activities of polar and non-polar extracts of Balanites aegyptiaca fruits. Methods: Antihyperglycemic activity using alloxan induced diabetic rats was evaluated. In vitro cytotoxicity against human carcinoma cell lines activity in addition to antioxidant and antitrematodal effects were investigated. Phytochemicals were determined using chromatographic and spectral analyses including TLC, GC and LC/MS/MS methods. Results: The reduction in blood glucose level reached 64.13%, 69.07% and 77.01% for hexane, chloroform and methanol extract, respectively. Isolated organs and histopathological examination illustrated improvement in treated animal's pancreas which is the master gland in controlling glucose level. The highest in vitro free radical scavenging capacity was achieved by chloroform extract (75.72%. Meanwhile, hexane and methanol extracts exhibited 44.01% and 41.77% scavenging capacity, respectively. Cytotoxic activity against human carcinoma cell lines illustrated efficacious influence against brain, liver, lung, breast and lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Brain cell line was the most susceptible cell line by both chloroform and methanol extracts. In vitro antitrematodal effectiveness showed that 100% mortality of Schistosoma worms was induced at the 3rd and 5th days for methanol and chloroform extracts. Meanwhile, both extracts exhibited antifasciolosis activity with LC50 of 63.19 and 55.15 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: The current results illustrated that Balanites aegyptiaca phytochemicals induced potent hypoglycemic activity and potent to moderate antioxidant and cytotoxic effects. Chloroform and methanol extracts were found to have antitrematodal efficacy against Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola gigantica hepatic worms.

  14. Relation between Radio Polarization and Spectral Index of Blazars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ties, including rapid variability, high and variability polarization, high luminosity and superluminal motion, etc. Their optical variability timescales can cover a range of hours to years from radio to γ-rays (Fan et al. 2004; Ulrich et al. 1997). When we analyse the different characters of blazars, spectral index (α) is very important.

  15. Relation between Radio Polarization and Spectral Index of Blazars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Blazars are a very special class of extragalactic objects showing some special proper- ties, including rapid variability, high and variability polarization, high luminosity and superluminal motion, etc. Their optical variability timescales can cover a range of hours to years from radio to γ-rays (Fan et al. 2004; Ulrich ...

  16. Uncertainties of atmospheric polarimetric measurements with sun-sky radiometers induced by errors of relative orientations of polarizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Kaitao; Sun, Bin; Wu, Yanke; Xu, Hua; Xie, Yisong; Goloub, Philippe; Wendisch, Manfred

    2018-04-01

    In this study errors of the relative orientations of polarizers in the Cimel polarized sun-sky radiometers are measured and introduced into the Mueller matrix of the instrument. The linearly polarized light with different polarization directions from 0° to 180° (or 360°) is generated by using a rotating linear polarizer in front of an integrating sphere. Through measuring the referential linearly polarized light, the errors of relative orientations of polarizers are determined. The efficiencies of the polarizers are obtained simultaneously. By taking the error of relative orientation into consideration in the Mueller matrix, the accuracies of the calculated Stokes parameters, the degree of linear polarization, and the angle of polarization are remarkably improved. The method may also apply to other polarization instruments of similar types.

  17. Ab-initio study of the relation between electric polarization and electric field gradients in ferroelectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, J N; Correia, J G; Butz, T; Picozzi, S; Fenta, A S; Amaral, V S

    2012-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction between the quadrupole moment of atomic nuclei and the electric field gradient (EFG) provides information on the electronic charge distribution close to a given atomic site. In ferroelectric materials, the loss of inversion symmetry of the electronic charge distribution is necessary for the appearance of the electric polarization. We present first-principles density functional theory calculations of ferroelectrics such as BaTiO$_{3}$, KNbO$_{3}$, PbTiO$_{3}$ and other oxides with perovskite structures, by focusing on both EFG tensors and polarization. We analyze the EFG tensor properties such as orientation and correlation between components and their relation with electric polarization. This work supports previous studies of ferroelectric materials where a relation between EFG tensors and polarization was observed, which may be exploited to study the ferroelectric order when standard techniques to measure polarization are not easily applied.

  18. Patient-related pitfalls and artifacts in nuclear medicine imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, D M; Forstrom, L A; O'Connor, M K; Thomas, P A; Cardew, A P

    1996-10-01

    Quality control in nuclear medicine is all important. This applies not only to preparation of the patient and acquisition of the image, but also to interpretation of the study. Although it may seem self-evident, it is important to remain aware of artifacts that are directly related to the patient and need special consideration. Furthermore, at times the distinction between normal variants and artifacts can be difficult. Commonly encountered patient-related artifacts include artifacts caused by attenuation, contamination artifacts, and artifacts caused by intravenous lines, tubes, and catheters. Less commonly, artifacts arise because of the use of multiple isotopes, the presence of fistulas or surgically altered anatomy, and pharmaceuticals and other substances interfering with expected radiopharmaceutical uptake and distribution. The diagnostic accuracy of nuclear medicine reporting can be improved by awareness of these patient-related artifacts. Both awareness and experience are also important when it comes to detecting and identifying normal (and abnormal) variants.

  19. Access to medicines: relations with the institutionalization of pharmaceutical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Damasceno de Barros

    2017-11-01

    = 4.3 (95%CI 2.4-7.5. CONCLUSIONS Aspects related to the institutionalization of pharmaceutical services have been strongly related to access to medicines. Our results indicate the need to prioritize its implementation, contributing to its consolidation in Brazil and to the effectiveness of health services regarding the purposes of pharmaceutical services policies.

  20. Access to medicines: relations with the institutionalization of pharmaceutical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Rafael Damasceno de; Costa, Ediná Alves; Santos, Djanilson Barbosa Dos; Souza, Gisélia Santana; Álvares, Juliana; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair

    2017-11-13

    To analyze the relationship between access to medicines by the population and the institutionalization of pharmaceutical services in Brazilian primary health care. This study is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services 2015), a cross-sectional, exploratory, and evaluative study composed of an information survey in a representative sample of cities, stratified by Brazilian regions. Access was defined based on the acquisition of medicines reported by the patient, ranging between: total, partial, or null. The institutionalization of pharmaceutical services was analyzed based on information provided by pharmaceutical services providers and by those responsible for medicines delivery. Chi-square test and multinomial logistic regression were used in the statistical analysis. Full access to medicines was greater when professionals affirmed there were the following aspects of the dimensions: "management tools," "participation and social control," "financing," and "personnel structure," with significant associations in the bivariate analysis. The "pharmaceutical care" dimension did not achieve such an association. After multinomial logistic regression, full access was more prevalent when those in charge of pharmaceutical services stated that: they always or repeatedly attend meetings of the Municipal Health Council, OR = 3.3 (95%CI 1.5-7.3); there are protocols for medicines delivery, OR = 2.7 (95%CI 1.2-6.1); there is computerized system for managing pharmaceutical services, OR = 3.9 (95%CI 1.9-8.0); those responsible for medicines delivery reported having participated in a course or training for professionals in the past two years, OR = 2.0 (95%CI 1.1-3.5); there is computerized system for pharmaceutical services management, OR = 4.3 (95%CI 2.4-7.5). Aspects related to the institutionalization of

  1. [The relations between music and medicine in history and present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2011-12-01

    Since the ancient world relations exist between music and medicine. In the prehistoric music, dance, rhythm and religious practice were important parts of shamanism and early medical procedures. Important philosophers of the classic period already began with the scientific research of musical and medical questions. During the middle age convents conserved ancient knowledge. They offered medical care and taught the ancient knowledge of medicine, arts and music. The Gregorian choral was created. Traditions of popular believe expressed the relations between music and medicine. The Renaissance became the great époque of art, music and science. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius presented a new style of artistic working and scientific knowledge. Also the basics of western music, like tonality was developed. With the separation of scientific subjects in natural sciences and humanities, the relationships between music and medicine fall into oblivion. During the classic and romantic era music and art were important parts of cultural live of the well educated society. With the development of neurology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis more physicians and scientists were interested in musical questions. Questions about the role of music in human behavior and the ancient method to use music in medical treatment became popular. In the early 20th century the music therapy was developed. Today the effects of music to the human brain are investigated with radionuclear methods. A lot of investigations showed the effect of music and music performance to humans. Music plays an important part in psychotherapy, therapeutic pedagogy and medical care, the importance of music and music therapy increases. In the 80ies of the 20th century the performing arts medicine was developed, which asks for the medical problems of performing musicians. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Herbal Prescriptions and Medicinal Herbs for Parkinson-Related Rigidity in Korean Medicine: Identification of Candidates Using Text Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Hyun; Hwang, Min Seob; Park, Hye Jin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Baek, Jin Ung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2018-03-27

    Dongeuibogam (DongYiBaoGian), one of the most important books in Korean medicine, comprises a comprehensive summary of all traditional medicines of North-East Asia before the 17th century. This medicinal literature was mined to establish a list of candidate herbs to treat Parkinson-related rigidity. A systematic search for terms describing Parkinson-related rigidity and candidate prescriptions for the treatment of Parkinson-related rigidity in the Dongeuibogam was performed. A high-frequency medicinal herb combination group and candidates for the treatment of Parkinson-related rigidity were also selected through an analysis of medicinal herb combination frequencies. The existing literature pertaining to the potential effects of candidate herbs for Parkinson-related rigidity was reviewed. Ten medicinal herb candidates for the treatment of Parkinson-related rigidity were selected, and their respective precedent studies were analyzed.

  3. Inclined Pulsar Magnetospheres in General Relativity: Polar Caps for the Dipole, Quadrudipole, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Philippov, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    In the canonical model of a pulsar, rotational energy is transmitted through the surrounding plasma via two electrical circuits, each connecting to the star over a small region known as a “polar cap.” For a dipole-magnetized star, the polar caps coincide with the magnetic poles (hence the name), but in general, they can occur at any place and take any shape. In light of their crucial importance to most models of pulsar emission (from radio to X-ray to wind), we develop a general technique for determining polar cap properties. We consider a perfectly conducting star surrounded by a force-free magnetosphere and include the effects of general relativity. Using a combined numerical-analytical technique that leverages the rotation rate as a small parameter, we derive a general analytic formula for the polar cap shape and charge-current distribution as a function of the stellar mass, radius, rotation rate, moment of inertia, and magnetic field. We present results for dipole and quadrudipole fields (superposed dipole and quadrupole) inclined relative to the axis of rotation. The inclined dipole polar cap results are the first to include general relativity, and they confirm its essential role in the pulsar problem. The quadrudipole pulsar illustrates the phenomenon of thin annular polar caps. More generally, our method lays a foundation for detailed modeling of pulsar emission with realistic magnetic fields.

  4. Menopause-related symptoms: traditional Chinese medicine vs hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Hoda; Feng Liu, Yan; Du, Lin; Hua Wang, Chao; Bahrami-Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Ollah Esmaily, Habib; Azizi, Hamideh; Ou Xue, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), acupuncture, and hormone therapy on menopause- related symptoms of peri- and postmenopausal women. Fifty-seven Chinese women completed 2 months of treatment with either CHM (5 g twice daily, n = 22), acupuncture plus CHM (Kun Bao Wan) 5 g twice daily plus sessions of acupuncture, n = 20), or hormone therapy (n = 15). Kupperman index score, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol, and the number of symptoms before and after treatment were the main outcome measures. CHM, acupuncture plus CHM, and hormone therapy significantly decreased Kupperman score (P acupuncture plus CHM and CHM with significantly better results by acupuncture plus CHM. Acupuncture plus CHM, as well as hormone therapy, significantly reduced the level of FSH (P .05). The mean difference in the level of FSH between baseline and 2 months among the three groups was significantly different (P = .02). This difference was only between CHM and hormone therapy with significantly better results by hormone therapy. The three treatments didn't make any significant increase in the level of E2 (P > .05). application of the combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture proved as effective as hormone therapy in the treatment of menopause-related symptoms, and it achieved better outcomes than herbal medicine alone.

  5. Challenges faced by visually disabled people in use of medicines, self-adopted coping strategies and medicine-related mishaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeraratne, Chamari L; Opatha, Sharmika T; Rosa, Chamith T

    2012-01-01

    Difficulties faced by visually disabled people when using medicines, self-adopted coping strategies, and medicine-related mishaps have been under-explored locally and internationally. The objective of this study was to gain insight regarding this long-neglected issue. A descriptive cross-sectional study, using an interviewer administered questionnaire on 63 visually disabled adults was carried out at a vocational training centre and a school for visually disabled students in Sri Lanka. Among 63 participants, 71% wanted to be independent in medicine use and 79% in spite of difficulties had self-administered medicines. They had difficulty in locating medicines (25.39%), identifying medicines and medicine containers (17.46%), and administering liquid medications (25.39%). These difficulties led to inaccurate dosing (14.28%), missed doses (39.68%), and discontinuation of treatment prematurely (28.57%). Self-adopted coping strategies to overcome these difficulties included using different sized and shaped containers, tying medicines to the attire, and dipping their finger into a measuring cup while measuring liquid medicines. Mishaps related to medicines such as taking vinegar instead of gripe mixture and, putting ear drops into eyes were disclosed. There were many challenges for visually disabled people in taking medicines and some self-adopted coping strategies were inadequate to overcome these.

  6. Rational Use of Medicines in Relation to Pharmaceutical Supply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued Acer Customer

    Number of medicine per prescription encounter. 2.8 ±1.2. Median. 3. Total number of medicines. 848. Minimum number of medicines. 1. Maximum number of medicines. 8. N = 300 patients. Records without discrepancies. 40%. Records with discrepancies. 60%. Figure 1. Effectiveness of inventory management.

  7. Network pharmacology of medicinal attributes and functions of Chinese herbal medicines: (II Relational networks and pharmacological mechanisms of medicinal attributes and functions of Chinese herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study, the database, CHM-DATA, with 1127 Chinese herbal medicines mainly having recorded chemical composition, involving 7 taste attributes, 5 medicinal properties, 1 toxicity attribute, 22 chemical composition categories, 12 meridians and collaterals (Gui Jing, and 78 medicinal functions (Gong Xiao, was used to calculate point correlations between these 125 attributes. Totally four relational networks, i.e., the networks for medicinal attributes and functions, for chemical composition and meridians and collaterals, for meridians and collaterals and medicinal functions, and for meridians and collaterals were constructed based on the significant point correlations. Network analysis indicated that the former three ones are scale-free complex networks and the last one tends to be a random network. Node degrees of the four networks follow power-law distribution. Detailed between-attribute relationships and medicinal mechanisms were revealed. For example, concerning chemical composition categories, alkaloids and amines have positive correlation / correspondence. More alkaloids correspond to more amines. Alkaloids negatively correlate with volatile oils / ordinary oils, carbohydrates / starch, ketones / flavonoids, and olefins. Alkaloids mainly function in decrease internal heat, dry dampness, etc. Organic acids and alkaloids have negative correlation. More organic acids mean the less alkaloids. Organic acids mainly act on large intestine meridians and collaterals, and function in moisten dryness. As for meridians and collaterals, kidney meridians and collaterals negatively correlate with lung meridians and collaterals, stomach meridians and collaterals, and large intestine meridians and collaterals. Kidney meridians and collaterals positively function in consolidate or warm kidney, invigorate male impotence (Yang or strengthen male essence, strengthen bones and muscles, stop diarrheal, regulate menstruation or promote blood flow, relieve

  8. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D; Wilson, Ryan R; Regehr, Eric V; St Martin, Michelle; Douglas, David C; Olson, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013) when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia), highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions.

  9. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn D Rode

    Full Text Available Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013 when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia, highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions.

  10. Survival and breeding of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea in relation to sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, E.V.; Hunter, C.M.; Caswell, H.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.

    2010-01-01

    1. Observed and predicted declines in Arctic sea ice have raised concerns about marine mammals. In May 2008, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed polar bears (Ursus maritimus) - one of the most ice-dependent marine mammals - as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. 2. We evaluated the effects of sea ice conditions on vital rates (survival and breeding probabilities) for polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea. Although sea ice declines in this and other regions of the polar basin have been among the greatest in the Arctic, to date population-level effects of sea ice loss on polar bears have only been identified in western Hudson Bay, near the southern limit of the species' range. 3. We estimated vital rates using multistate capture-recapture models that classified individuals by sex, age and reproductive category. We used multimodel inference to evaluate a range of statistical models, all of which were structurally based on the polar bear life cycle. We estimated parameters by model averaging, and developed a parametric bootstrap procedure to quantify parameter uncertainty. 4. In the most supported models, polar bear survival declined with an increasing number of days per year that waters over the continental shelf were ice free. In 2001-2003, the ice-free period was relatively short (mean 101 days) and adult female survival was high (0 ∙ 96-0 ∙ 99, depending on reproductive state). In 2004 and 2005, the ice-free period was longer (mean 135 days) and adult female survival was low (0 ∙ 73-0 ∙ 79, depending on reproductive state). Breeding rates and cub litter survival also declined with increasing duration of the ice-free period. Confidence intervals on vital rate estimates were wide. 5. The effects of sea ice loss on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea may apply to polar bear populations in other portions of the polar basin that have similar sea ice dynamics and have experienced similar, or more severe, sea ice declines. Our findings

  11. Survival and breeding of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea in relation to sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, Eric V; Hunter, Christine M; Caswell, Hal; Amstrup, Steven C; Stirling, Ian

    2010-01-01

    1. Observed and predicted declines in Arctic sea ice have raised concerns about marine mammals. In May 2008, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed polar bears (Ursus maritimus) - one of the most ice-dependent marine mammals - as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. 2. We evaluated the effects of sea ice conditions on vital rates (survival and breeding probabilities) for polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea. Although sea ice declines in this and other regions of the polar basin have been among the greatest in the Arctic, to date population-level effects of sea ice loss on polar bears have only been identified in western Hudson Bay, near the southern limit of the species' range. 3. We estimated vital rates using multistate capture-recapture models that classified individuals by sex, age and reproductive category. We used multimodel inference to evaluate a range of statistical models, all of which were structurally based on the polar bear life cycle. We estimated parameters by model averaging, and developed a parametric bootstrap procedure to quantify parameter uncertainty. 4. In the most supported models, polar bear survival declined with an increasing number of days per year that waters over the continental shelf were ice free. In 2001-2003, the ice-free period was relatively short (mean 101 days) and adult female survival was high (0.96-0.99, depending on reproductive state). In 2004 and 2005, the ice-free period was longer (mean 135 days) and adult female survival was low (0.73-0.79, depending on reproductive state). Breeding rates and cub litter survival also declined with increasing duration of the ice-free period. Confidence intervals on vital rate estimates were wide. 5. The effects of sea ice loss on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea may apply to polar bear populations in other portions of the polar basin that have similar sea ice dynamics and have experienced similar, or more severe, sea ice declines. Our findings therefore are

  12. Sociology, medicine and the construction of health-related sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nelson Filice de; Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2009-02-01

    Starting from a paper about closing the gap between sociology and medicine in Brazil and the United Kingdom that was published in 1971, a historical update was made with the aim of reflecting on the new shapes of health-related teaching and research within the social and human sciences, in these two countries. The methodology was qualitative and the study was developed using secondary data. The reflections were developed through the authors' immersion in Brazilian and British realities. It was concluded that the interface between sociology and health has expanded, although persistent old difficulties exist in relation to the structure and focus of the healthcare system, medical school power and medical student culture.

  13. Diabetes and related remedies in medieval Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Khademian, Sedigheh; Moein, Mahmoodreza

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a common metabolic disorder presenting increased amounts of serum glucose and will cover 5.4% of population by year 2025. Accordingly, this review was performed to gather and discuss the stand points on diagnosis, pathophysiology, non-pharmacological therapy and drug management of diabetes this disorder as described in medieval Persian medicine. To this, reports on diabetes were collected and analyzed from selected medical and pharmaceutical textbooks of Traditional Persian Medicine. A search on databases as Pubmed, Sciencedirect, Scopus and Google scholar was also performed to reconfirm the Anti diabetic activities of reported herbs. The term, Ziabites, was used to describe what is now spoken as diabetes. It was reported that Ziabites, is highly associated with kidney function. Etiologically, Ziabites was characterized as kidney hot or cold dystemperament as well as diffusion of fluid from other organs such as liver and intestines into the kidneys. This disorder was categorized into main types as hot (Ziabites-e-har) and cold (Ziabites-e-barid) as well as sweet urine (Bole-e-shirin). Most medieval cite signs of Ziabites were remarked as unusual and excessive thirst, frequent urination and polydipsia. On the management, life style modification and observing the essential rules of prevention in Persian medicine as well as herbal therapy and special simple manipulations were recommended. Current investigation was done to clarify the knowledge of medieval scientists on diabetes and related interventions. Reported remedies which are based on centuries of experience might be of beneficial for- further studies to the management of diabetes.

  14. Relative influences of climate change and human activity on the onshore distribution of polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan R.; Regehr, Eric V.; St. Martin, Michelle; Atwood, Todd C.; Peacock, Elizabeth; Miller, Susanne; Divoky, George J.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is altering habitat for many species, leading to shifts in distributions that can increase levels of human-wildlife conflict. To develop effective strategies for minimizing human-wildlife conflict, we must understand the relative influences that climate change and other factors have on wildlife distributions. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land during summer and autumn due to sea ice loss, leading to higher incidents of conflict and concerns for human safety. We sought to understand the relative influence of sea ice conditions, onshore habitat characteristics, and human-provisioned food attractants on the distribution and abundance of polar bears while on shore. We also wanted to determine how mitigation measures might reduce human-polar bear conflict associated with an anthropogenic food source. We built a Bayesian hierarchical model based on 14 years of aerial survey data to estimate the weekly number and distribution of polar bears on the coast of northern Alaska in autumn. We then used the model to predict how effective two management options for handling subsistence-harvested whale remains in the community of Kaktovik, Alaska might be. The distribution of bears on shore was most strongly influenced by the presence of whale carcasses and to a lesser extent sea ice and onshore habitat conditions. The numbers of bears on shore were related to sea ice conditions. The two management strategies for handling the whale carcasses reduced the estimated number of bears near Kaktovik by > 75%. By considering multiple factors associated with the onshore distribution and abundance of polar bears we discerned what role human activities played in where bears occur and how successful efforts to manage the whale carcasses might be for reducing human-polar bear conflict.

  15. Experiencing polar bears in the zoo: feelings and cognitions in relation to a visitor's conservation attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marseille, M.M.; Elands, B.H.M.; Brink, van den M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores which feelings and cognitions are involved in visitor experiences of zoo polar bears and how this experience relates to a visitor's conservation attitude. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 30 visitors in two Dutch zoos. Most respondents believed that a

  16. Forecasting the relative influence of environmental and anthropogenic stressors on polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd C. Atwood; Bruce G. Marcot; David C. Douglas; Steven C. Amstrup; Karyn D. Rode; George M. Durner; Jeffrey F. Bromaghin

    2016-01-01

    Effective conservation planning requires understanding and ranking threats to wildlife populations. We developed a Bayesian network model to evaluate the relative influence of environmental and anthropogenic stressors, and their mitigation, on the persistence of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Overall sea ice conditions, affected by rising global...

  17. Conservation status of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in relation to projected sea-ice declines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, Eric V; Laidre, Kristin L; Akçakaya, H Resit; Amstrup, Steven C; Atwood, Todd C; Lunn, Nicholas J; Obbard, Martyn; Stern, Harry; Thiemann, Gregory W; Wiig, Øystein

    2016-12-01

    Loss of Arctic sea ice owing to climate change is the primary threat to polar bears throughout their range. We evaluated the potential response of polar bears to sea-ice declines by (i) calculating generation length (GL) for the species, which determines the timeframe for conservation assessments; (ii) developing a standardized sea-ice metric representing important habitat; and (iii) using statistical models and computer simulation to project changes in the global population under three approaches relating polar bear abundance to sea ice. Mean GL was 11.5 years. Ice-covered days declined in all subpopulation areas during 1979-2014 (median -1.26 days year -1 ). The estimated probabilities that reductions in the mean global population size of polar bears will be greater than 30%, 50% and 80% over three generations (35-41 years) were 0.71 (range 0.20-0.95), 0.07 (range 0-0.35) and less than 0.01 (range 0-0.02), respectively. According to IUCN Red List reduction thresholds, which provide a common measure of extinction risk across taxa, these results are consistent with listing the species as vulnerable. Our findings support the potential for large declines in polar bear numbers owing to sea-ice loss, and highlight near-term uncertainty in statistical projections as well as the sensitivity of projections to different plausible assumptions. © 2016 The Authors.

  18. The nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity wave packets: dispersion and polarization relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-D. Zhang

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the results of the numerical simulations of nonlinear propagation of three Gaussian gravity-wave packets in isothermal atmosphere individually, the nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity waves are studied quantitatively. The analyses show that during the nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packets the mean flows are accelerated and the vertical wavelengths show clear reduction due to nonlinearity. On the other hand, though nonlinear effects exist, the time variations of the frequencies of gravity wave packets are close to those derived from the dispersion relation and the amplitude and phase relations of wave-associated disturbance components are consistent with the predictions of the polarization relation of gravity waves. This indicates that the dispersion and polarization relations based on the linear gravity wave theory can be applied extensively in the nonlinear region.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides

  19. The anatomy and relations of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, I G; Daly, J M

    2000-06-01

    Current tensions between evidence-based medicine (EBM) and some clinicians are counterproductive and unnecessary. The most contentious issues concern (a) the limitations of efficacy data from randomised trials as evidence; (b) differences in attitudes to medical diagnosis and clinical judgement; and (c) political concerns about the use of the concept of clinical evidence and guidelines to restrict physician autonomy. Health services research has evolved in response to a bureaucratic need to study health care, including clinical practice, in order to improve its effectiveness (defined mainly in terms of technological interventions), and to contain costs. Its perspective is from the top-down representing the interests of bureaucracy and managed care, and articulates with political demands for professional accountability and cost-containment. EBM has established its place as an important contributor to the methodological toolbox for health services research. There is a need for a corresponding coherent programme of clinical practice research which would locate EBM in the clinical environment beside quality assurance, the study of the appropriateness and effectiveness of interventions, and multidisciplinary research related to the art of medicine and supportive aspects of clinical care. EBM would then be seen as one organ in relation to many others making their contribution to the body of knowledge needed for clinical decisions and policy making. A 'centre for the study of clinical practice' would be an appropriate structure to support such a comprehensive programme of clinical practice research in a tertiary hospital. The bottom-up perspective of clinical practice research would complement the current top-down perspective of most health services research, providing information to doctors, patients and administrators concerning local quality of care and health outcomes, information which could also be aggregated for guidance of health policy makers. It would also

  20. Polar Bear Conservation Status in Relation to Projected Sea-ice Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    The status of the world's 19 subpopulations of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) varies as a function of sea-ice conditions, ecology, management, and other factors. Previous methods to project the response of polar bears to loss of Arctic sea ice—the primary threat to the species—include expert opinion surveys, Bayesian Networks providing qualitative stressor assessments, and subpopulations-specific demographic analyses. Here, we evaluated the global conservation status of polar bears using a data-based sensitivity analysis. First, we estimated generation length for subpopulations with available data (n=11). Second, we developed standardized sea-ice metrics representing habitat availability. Third, we projected global population size under alternative assumptions for relationships between sea ice and subpopulation abundance. Estimated generation length (median = 11.4 years; 95%CI = 9.8 to 13.6) and sea-ice change (median = loss of 1.26 ice-covered days per year; 95%CI = 0.70 to 3.37) varied across subpopulations. Assuming a one-to-one proportional relationship between sea ice and abundance, the median percent change in global population size over three polar bear generations was -30% (95%CI = -35% to -25%). Assuming a linear relationship between sea ice and normalized estimates of subpopulation abundance, median percent change was -4% (95% CI = -62% to +50%) or -43% (95% CI = -76% to -20%), depending on how subpopulations were grouped and how inference was extended from relatively well-studied subpopulations (n=7) to those with little or no data. Our findings suggest the potential for large reductions in polar bear numbers over the next three polar bear generations if sea-ice loss due to climate change continues as forecasted.

  1. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  2. Itinerant vending of medicines inside buses in Nigeria: vending strategies, dominant themes and medicine-related information provided

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuff, Kazeem B.; Wassi Sanni, Abd’

    Objective To determine vending strategies and marketing themes employed by itinerant bus vendors, and assess the accuracy and completeness of information provided on medicines being sold in an urban setting in Nigeria. Methods Cross-sectional study and content analysis of itinerant vending of medicines inside buses recorded with a mobile telephone on purposively selected routes in a mega city with an estimated 18 million residents in southwestern Nigeria over a 2-month period. Two coders independently assessed 192 vending episodes by 56 vendors for 147 OTC and prescription medicines. Inter-rater reliability (Gwet AC1 =0.924; pmarketers’ of medicines inside buses, markets, and motor parks. Of the 14400 consumers encountered inside buses during the study period, between 6.7% and 48.3% purchased the medicines promoted. Prayers against death from road traffic accidents and diseases of physical and / or meta-physical origins were the most frequently used (76•8%) ice-breaking opening statement / strategy to gain consumers’ attention. Hematinics, multi-vitamins, simple analgesic, NSAIDs and corticosteroids were the most frequently vended medicines. Consumers’ enquiries were related to dosing for children (51.8%), elderly (28.6%), and pregnancy (52.7%); and contra-indications during pregnancy (8.9%). Factual medicines information such as dose, frequency, potential side effects and contra-indications were not provided in majority of vending episodes. Conclusions Itinerant vending of medicines and the use of misleading and melodramatic themes to secure high consumer patronage appear considerable in Nigeria. Majority of the vendors did not correctly respond to consumers medicine-related enquiries, or provide detailed factual medicines information to guide appropriate use. These misleading promotional activities could potentially encourage inappropriate purchase and probable self-medication by consumers. PMID:24367466

  3. Parahydrogen-induced polarization of carboxylic acids: a pilot study of valproic acid and related structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lego, Denise; Plaumann, Markus; Trantzschel, Thomas; Bargon, Joachim; Scheich, Henning; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Gutmann, Torsten; Sauer, Grit; Bernarding, Johannes; Bommerich, Ute

    2014-07-01

    Parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) is a promising new tool for medical applications of MR, including MRI. The PHIP technique can be used to transfer high non-Boltzmann polarization, derived from parahydrogen, to isotopes with a low natural abundance or low gyromagnetic ratio (e.g. (13)C), thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio by several orders of magnitude. A few molecules acting as metabolic sensors have already been hyperpolarized with PHIP, but the direct hyperpolarization of drugs used to treat neurological disorders has not been accomplished until now. Here, we report on the first successful hyperpolarization of valproate (valproic acid, VPA), an important and commonly used antiepileptic drug. Hyperpolarization was confirmed by detecting the corresponding signal patterns in the (1)H NMR spectrum. To identify the optimal experimental conditions for the conversion of an appropriate VPA precursor, structurally related molecules with different side chains were analyzed in different solvents using various catalytic systems. The presented results include hyperpolarized (13)C NMR spectra and proton images of related systems, confirming their applicability for MR studies. PHIP-based polarization enhancement may provide a new MR technique to monitor the spatial distribution of valproate in brain tissue and to analyze metabolic pathways after valproate administration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The economic-geographical and environmental polarization as a factor of new functional relations between areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milinčić Miroljub A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Geographical clustering, in the way of economic-geographical polarization represents regular and positive process of development of human society. These processes are characterized by stressed intensity, together with relatively short time dimension at the territory of Serbia. Extreme recent ecological polarization is the main consequence of this type of recomposition of economic-geographical elements in the territory of Serbia. At the one hand, anthropogenic or socio-economic areas (locations, axis and crossroads of development are formed, together with the numerous ecological problems as developing barriers, while at the other hand are territories of economic-geographical stagnation also with satisfying quality of basic natural resources and environmental condition. These differences generates and permanently increases their spatial, resource and ecological interdependence.

  5. Polarization reversal, migration related shifts in human resource profiles, and spatial growth policies: a Venezuelan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L A; Lawson, V A

    1989-01-01

    "This article examines polarization reversal in terms of changing human resource profiles related to migration and to national policies affecting the spatial pattern of economic growth. It first demonstrates the relationship between these elements through a review that integrates three distinct themes in earlier research. Attention then turns to an empirical study of human resource variation among eight urban districts and the rest of Venezuela treated as a single unit. This comparison utilizes age, gender, educational attainment, and occupational status variables provided by individual records of Venezuela's 1971 Population Census. A concluding section relates empirical findings to policy alternatives." excerpt

  6. Itinerant vending of medicines inside buses in Nigeria: vending strategies, dominant themes and medicine-related information provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuff, Kazeem B; Wassi Sanni, Abd'

    2011-07-01

    To determine vending strategies and marketing themes employed by itinerant bus vendors, and assess the accuracy and completeness of information provided on medicines being sold in an urban setting in Nigeria. Cross-sectional study and content analysis of itinerant vending of medicines inside buses recorded with a mobile telephone on purposively selected routes in a mega city with an estimated 18 million residents in southwestern Nigeria over a 2-month period. Two coders independently assessed 192 vending episodes by 56 vendors for 147 OTC and prescription medicines. Inter-rater reliability (Gwet AC1 =0.924; p<0.0001). Fourteen thousands and four hundred potential consumers encountered 192 recorded episodes of vending of medicines inside 192 buses within the study periods. Forty-four (78•5%) of the 56 vendors were females in the 30-45 years age bracket, were mostly (75%) attired in the local 'Iro and Buba' Ankara fabric and showed laminated identity cards (97.5%) issued by the local association for 'marketers' of medicines inside buses, markets, and motor parks. Of the 14400 consumers encountered inside buses during the study period, between 6.7% and 48.3% purchased the medicines promoted. Prayers against death from road traffic accidents and diseases of physical and / or meta-physical origins were the most frequently used (76•8%) ice-breaking opening statement / strategy to gain consumers' attention. Hematinics, multi-vitamins, simple analgesic, NSAIDs and corticosteroids were the most frequently vended medicines. Consumers' enquiries were related to dosing for children (51.8%), elderly (28.6%), and pregnancy (52.7%); and contra-indications during pregnancy (8.9%). Factual medicines information such as dose, frequency, potential side effects and contra-indications were not provided in majority of vending episodes. Itinerant vending of medicines and the use of misleading and melodramatic themes to secure high consumer patronage appear considerable in Nigeria

  7. Forecasting the relative influence of environmental and anthropogenic stressors on polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Todd C.; Marcot, Bruce G.; Douglas, David C.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Rode, Karyn D.; Durner, George M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2016-01-01

    Effective conservation planning requires understanding and ranking threats to wildlife populations. We developed a Bayesian network model to evaluate the relative influence of environmental and anthropogenic stressors, and their mitigation, on the persistence of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Overall sea ice conditions, affected by rising global temperatures, were the most influential determinant of population outcomes. Accordingly, unabated rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations was the dominant influence leading to worsened population outcomes, with polar bears in three of four ecoregions reaching a dominant probability of decreased or greatly decreased by the latter part of this century. Stabilization of atmospheric GHG concentrations by mid-century delayed the greatly reduced state by ≈25 yr in two ecoregions. Prompt and aggressive mitigation of emissions reduced the probability of any regional population becoming greatly reduced by up to 25%. Marine prey availability, linked closely to sea ice trend, had slightly less influence on outcome state than sea ice availability itself. Reduced mortality from hunting and defense of life and property interactions resulted in modest declines in the probability of a decreased or greatly decreased population outcome. Minimizing other stressors such as trans-Arctic shipping, oil and gas exploration, and contaminants had a negligible effect on polar bear outcomes, although the model was not well-informed with respect to the potential influence of these stressors. Adverse consequences of loss of sea ice habitat became more pronounced as the summer ice-free period lengthened beyond four months, which could occur in most of the Arctic basin after mid-century if GHG emissions are not promptly reduced. Long-term conservation of polar bears would be best supported by holding global mean temperature to ≤ 2°C above preindustrial levels. Until further sea ice loss is stopped, management of other stressors may

  8. Rational Use of Medicines in Relation to Pharmaceutical Supply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmaceutical management involves a set of practices aiming at ensuring timely availability and appropriate use of safe, effective and quality pharmaceuticals and services in any health care setting. Rational use of medicines is often associated with efficiency of pharmaceutical supply system that operates in the health ...

  9. EU policies in personalized medicine-related technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaisser, S.; Vignola-Gagné, E.; Hüsing, B.; Enzing, C.; Valk, T. van der

    2009-01-01

    Against the background of a number of first drug-diagnostic co-products developed and introduce into the European market, European decision-makers feel impelled to react and position themselves in the field of personalized medicine. Their reactions cover a broad range, from the analysis of knowledge

  10. Chinese herbal medicine for cancer-related fatigue: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Xiang; Wang, Li-Qiong; Grant, Suzanne J; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer-related fatigue. We systematically searched seven electronic databases and two trial registries for randomized clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicine for cancer-related fatigue. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included trials using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were synthesized using RevMan 5.2 software. A total of 10 trials involving 751 participants with cancer-related fatigue were identified and the methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. Chinese herbal medicine used alone or in combination with chemotherapy or supportive care showed significant relief in cancer-related fatigue compared to placebo, chemotherapy or supportive care based on single trials. Chinese herbal medicine plus chemotherapy or supportive care was superior to chemotherapy or supportive care in improving quality of life. Data from one trial demonstrated Chinese herbal medicine exerted a greater beneficial effect on relieving anxiety but no difference in alleviating depression. Seven trials reported adverse events and no severe adverse effects were found in Chinese herbal medicine groups. The findings from limited number of trials suggest that Chinese herbal medicine seems to be effective and safe in the treatment of cancer-related fatigue. However, the current evidence is insufficient to draw a confirmative conclusion due to the poor methodological quality of included trials. Thus, conducting rigorously designed trials on potential Chinese herbal medicine is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine Services by Physicians and Their Relatives: The Role of Training Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive efforts to improve the attitude and practice of physicians with respect to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, the role of training background on physician's own utilization of mainstream Western medicine (WM and CAM remains unclear. We aimed to compare personal utilizations of WM and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM among doctors trained in WM only, TCM only or both. A retrospective population-based study was conducted using the 2004 Taiwan's National Health Insurance data. A total of 103 879 doctors and their relatives and 2 623 658 other adults with equivalent socioeconomic status were analyzed. Ambulatory care utilization of WM and TCM services was compared using the following three measures: probability of any use, number of visits and total annual expenditure. Doctors who were trained in Western medicine only (WMDs had the highest WM use, followed by doctors who were trained in both (WMD-CMDs, while Chinese medicine-trained doctors (CMDs had the lowest use. For TCM use, a reverse pattern was observed. Similar patterns were found among doctors' relatives. Compared with other adults with equivalent socioeconomic status, both the CMDs and WMD-CMDs had a greater use of TCM services. For WM, although the WMDs' probability and frequency of usage were similar to other adults, they incurred considerably higher expenditure. The use of WM and TCM by doctors and their relatives was significantly associated with the training background of the doctors. This highlights the importance of how increasing knowledge and understanding of other medical discipline may influence a practitioner's care-providing behaviors.

  12. Measuring medicine-related experiences from the patient perspective: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusiime, Barbra; Corlett, Sarah; Reeve, Joanne; Krska, Janet

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing drive to measure and so improve patients' experiences and outcomes of health care. This also applies to medicines, given their ubiquity as health care interventions. Patients' experiences of using medicines vary, and instruments which measure these are seen as an essential component to improve care. We aimed to identify generic measures of patients' experiences of using prescription medicines and to examine their properties and suitability for use in research or practice. Multiple electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, CINHAL Plus, PROQOLID ® , and Google Scholar. We identified, critically appraised, and summarized generic questionnaires assessing one or more aspects of the medicine use experience among adult patients using prescription medicines for chronic conditions, and the process of questionnaire development, degree of patient involvement, and/or validation processes. Fifteen questionnaires were included. Of these, nine measures were multidimensional, covering various aspects of medicine use. Six instruments covered only a single domain, assessing a specific facet of using medicines. Domains covered were the following: effectiveness; convenience, practicalities, and/or managing medicines; information, knowledge, and/or understanding; side effects; relationships and/or communication with health professionals; impact on daily living and/or social life; general satisfaction; attitudes; beliefs, concerns, and/or perceptions; medical follow-up and/or adherence-related issues; treatment- and/or medicine-related burden, perceived control, or autonomy; self-confidence about medicine use; availability and accessibility; and medicine-related quality of life. None of the identified questionnaires covered all domains. Instruments varied in the extent of patient involvement in both their development and validation. There is a scarcity of psychometrically sound, comprehensive, and generic measures of experiences

  13. Application of microscopy in authentication of valuable Chinese medicine I--Cordyceps sinensis, its counterfeits, and related products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Dawn; Wang, Lijing; Yang, Dajian; Mok, Daniel K W; Chan, Albert S C; Xu, Hongxi

    2012-01-01

    Light and polarized microscope was applied to authenticate 32 Cordyceps and 6 artificial counterfeits and 8 fermented Cordyceps as well as 7 Cordyceps capsules available in Hong Kong markets. Results showed that transverse sections of stroma and powder of larvae can be used to differentiate C. sinensis from its counterfeits. The fermented Cordyceps are in powder form. Among the eight fermented Cordyceps collected, half of them were pure; three were a mixture of fermented Cordyceps and soya beans; one was a mixture of unknown plant tissues and soya beans. For the seven Cordyceps capsules, the powders of five samples were a mixture of fermented Cordyceps and soya beans; the powders of other two were a mixture of C. sinensis stroma powder and fermented Cordyceps. The study indicated that the microscopy is an unambiguous method that requests fewer sample for the authentication of valuable Chinese medicine-C. sinensis and its related products. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Gotzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schuutze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2010-01-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures' tissue-inherent polarization properties.

  15. Coordination chemistry of technetium as related to nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.

    1982-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the area of technetium coordination chemistry during the last five years. The main driving force behind this recent surge of interest in the field has been due to the practical application of technetium-99m in the rapidly growing speciality of nuclear medicine. Technetium-99 is one of the products of nuclear fission reactions, but it was the development of the molybdenum-99-technetium-99m generator about two decades ago that provided the basis for the development of radiopharmaceuticals routinely used in modern diagnostic applications. The chemistry of this element has proven to be quite rich owing to its multiple oxidation states and variable geometry. This can be attributed to its position in the middle of the periodic table. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals comprise predominantly III, IV and V oxidation states of Tc and involve a variety of coordination complexes. Even though the chemistry of Tc has been slow to evolve, recent synthetic advances have provided a more scientific basis for the study of a number of compounds with diverse coordination geometries and structures. Ligands with oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur donor atoms have been utilized to elucidate various aspects of the coordination chemistry of Tc. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis has been extensively used to characterize Tc complexes and thus construct a firm foundation for the study of synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the chemistry of this element. (author)

  16. Pikuni-Blackfeet traditional medicine: Neuroprotective activities of medicinal plants used to treat Parkinson's disease-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rus Jacquet, Aurélie; Tambe, Mitali Arun; Ma, Sin Ying; McCabe, George P; Vest, Jay Hansford C; Rochet, Jean-Christophe

    2017-07-12

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder affecting 5% of the population over the age of 85 years. Current treatments primarily involve dopamine replacement therapy, which leads to temporary relief of motor symptoms but fails to slow the underlying neurodegeneration. Thus, there is a need for safe PD therapies with neuroprotective activity. In this study, we analyzed contemporary herbal medicinal practices used by members of the Pikuni-Blackfeet tribe from Western Montana to treat PD-related symptoms, in an effort to identify medicinal plants that are affordable to traditional communities and accessible to larger populations. The aims of this study were to (i) identify medicinal plants used by the Pikuni-Blackfeet tribe to treat individuals with symptoms related to PD or other CNS disorders, and (ii) characterize a subset of the identified plants in terms of antioxidant and neuroprotective activities in cellular models of PD. Interviews of healers and local people were carried out on the Blackfeet Indian reservation. Plant samples were collected, and water extracts were produced for subsequent analysis. A subset of botanical extracts was tested for the ability to induce activation of the Nrf2-mediated transcriptional response and to protect against neurotoxicity elicited by the PD-related toxins rotenone and paraquat. The ethnopharmacological interviews resulted in the documentation of 26 medicinal plants used to treat various ailments and diseases, including symptoms related to PD. Seven botanical extracts (out of a total of 10 extracts tested) showed activation of Nrf2-mediated transcriptional activity in primary cortical astrocytes. Extracts prepared from Allium sativum cloves, Trifolium pratense flowers, and Amelanchier arborea berries exhibited neuroprotective activity against toxicity elicited by rotenone, whereas only the extracts prepared from Allium sativum and Amelanchier arborea alleviated PQ-induced dopaminergic cell death

  17. Duration of Polar Activity Cycles and Their Relation to Sunspot Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, V. I.; Tlatov, A. G.; Sivaraman, K. R.

    2003-05-01

    We have defined the duration of polar magnetic activity as the time interval between two successive polar reversals. The epochs of the polarity reversals of the magnetic field at the poles of the Sun have been determined (1) by the time of the final disappearance of the polar crown filaments and (2) by the time between the two neighbouring reversals of the magnetic dipole configuration (l=1) from the Hα synoptic charts covering the period 1870-2001. It is shown that the reversals for the magnetic dipole configuration (l=1) occur on an average 3.3+/-0.5 years after the sunspot minimum according to the Hα synoptic charts (Table I) and the Stanford magnetograms (Table III). If we set the time of the final disappearance of the polar crown filaments (determined from the latitude migration of filaments) as the criterion for deciding the epoch of the polarity reversal of the polar fields, then the reversal occurs on an average 5.8+/-0.6 years from sunspot minimum (last column of Table I). We consider this as the most reliable diagnostic for fixing the epoch of reversals, as the final disappearance of the polar crown filaments can be observed without ambiguity. We show that shorter the duration of the polar activity cycle (i.e., the shorter the duration between two neighbouring reversals), the more intense is the next sunspot cycle. We also notice that the duration of polar activity is always more in even solar cycles than in odd cycles whereas the maximum Wolf numbers W\\max is always higher for odd solar cycles than for even cycles. Furthermore, we assume there is a secular change in the duration of the polar cycle. It has decreased by ~1.2 times during the last 120 years.

  18. Indicators related to the rational use of medicines and its associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marina Guimarães; Álvares, Juliana; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2017-11-13

    To evaluate indicators related to the rational use of medicines and its associated factors in Basic Health Units. This is a cross-sectional study carried out in a representative sample of Brazilian cities included in the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015). The data were collected by interviews with users, medicine dispensing professionals, and prescribers; and described by prescription, dispensing, and health services indicators. We analyzed the association between human resources characteristics of pharmaceutical services and dispensing indicators. At national level, the average number of medicines prescribed was 2.4. Among the users, 5.8% had antibiotic prescription, 74.8% received guidance on how to use the medicines at the pharmacy and, for 45.1% of users, all prescribed medicines were from the national list of essential medicines. All the indicators presented statistically significant differences between the regions of Brazil. The dispensing professionals that reported the presence of a pharmacist in the unit with a working load of 40 hours or more per week presented 1.82 more chance of transmitting information on the way of using the medicines in the dispensing process. The analysis of prescription, dispensing, and health services indicators in the basic health units showed an unsatisfactory proportion of essential medicines prescription and limitations in the correct identification of the medicine, orientation to the patients on medicines, and availability of therapeutic protocols in the health services.

  19. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Single Leaves from Optical Polarization Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Dahlgren, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. For monitoring canopy water status, existing approaches such as the Crop Water Stress Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness have limitations. The CWSI does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWI is based upon the physics of water-light interaction, not plant physiology. In this research, we applied optical polarization techniques to monitor the VIS/NIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both changed nonlinearly as each leaf dried, R increasing and T decreasing. Our results tie changes in the VIS/NIR R and T to leaf physiological changes - linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf - and perhaps of a plant canopy - might be possible in the future. However, using our approach to estimate the water status of a leaf does not appear possible at present, because our results display too much variability that we do not yet understand.

  20. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Single Leaves from Optical Polarization Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long-term goals of remote sensing research. For monitoring canopy water status, existing approaches such as the Crop Water Stress Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness have limitations. The CWSI does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWI is based upon the physics of water-light interaction, not plant physiology. In this research, we applied optical polarization techniques to monitor the VISNIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both changed nonlinearly as each leaf dried, R increasing and T decreasing. Our results tie changes in the VISNIR R and T to leaf physiological changes linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf and perhaps of a plant canopy might be possible in the future. However, using our approach to estimate the water status of a leaf does not appear possible at present, because our results display too much variability that we do not yet understand.

  1. Measuring medicine-related experiences from the patient perspective: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katusiime B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Barbra Katusiime,1 Sarah Corlett,1 Joanne Reeve,2 Janet Krska1 1Medway School of Pharmacy, The Universities of Kent and Greenwich, Chatham, Maritime, Kent, UK; 2Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Background: There is an increasing drive to measure and so improve patients’ experiences and outcomes of health care. This also applies to medicines, given their ubiquity as health care interventions. Patients’ experiences of using medicines vary, and instruments which measure these are seen as an essential component to improve care. We aimed to identify generic measures of patients’ experiences of using prescription medicines and to examine their properties and suitability for use in research or practice. Methods: Multiple electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, CINHAL Plus, PROQOLID®, and Google Scholar. We identified, critically appraised, and summarized generic questionnaires assessing one or more aspects of the medicine use experience among adult patients using prescription medicines for chronic conditions, and the process of questionnaire development, degree of patient involvement, and/or validation processes. Results: Fifteen questionnaires were included. Of these, nine measures were multidimensional, covering various aspects of medicine use. Six instruments covered only a single domain, assessing a specific facet of using medicines. Domains covered were the following: effectiveness; convenience, practicalities, and/or managing medicines; information, knowledge, and/or understanding; side effects; relationships and/or communication with health professionals; impact on daily living and/or social life; general satisfaction; attitudes; beliefs, concerns, and/or perceptions; medical follow-up and/or adherence-related issues; treatment- and/or medicine-related burden, perceived control, or autonomy; self-confidence about medicine use; availability and accessibility; and medicine-related

  2. Infrared renormalons and the relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataev, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the infrared renormalon calculus indicates that the QCD theoretical expressions for the Gross-Llewellyn Smith sum rule and for the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized ones contain an identical negative twist-4 1/Q 2 correction. This observation is supported by the consideration of the results of calculations of the corresponding twist-4 matrix elements. Together with the indication of the similarity of perturbative QCD contributions to these three sum rules, this observation leads to simple new theoretical relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules in the energy region Q 2 ≥ 1 GeV 2 . The validity of this relation is checked using concrete experimental data for the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized sum rules [ru

  3. Conservation status of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in relation to projected sea-ice declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidre, K. L.; Regehr, E. V.; Akcakaya, H. R.; Amstrup, S. C.; Atwood, T.; Lunn, N.; Obbard, M.; Stern, H. L., III; Thiemann, G.; Wiig, O.

    2016-12-01

    Loss of Arctic sea ice due to climate change is the most serious threat to polar bears (Ursus maritimus) throughout their circumpolar range. We performed a data-based sensitivity analysis with respect to this threat by evaluating the potential response of the global polar bear population to projected sea-ice conditions. We conducted 1) an assessment of generation length for polar bears, 2) developed of a standardized sea-ice metric representing important habitat characteristics for the species; and 3) performed population projections over three generations, using computer simulation and statistical models representing alternative relationships between sea ice and polar bear abundance. Using three separate approaches, the median percent change in mean global population size for polar bears between 2015 and 2050 ranged from -4% (95% CI = -62%, 50%) to -43% (95% CI = -76%, -20%). Results highlight the potential for large reductions in the global population if sea-ice loss continues. They also highlight the large amount of uncertainty in statistical projections of polar bear abundance and the sensitivity of projections to plausible alternative assumptions. The median probability of a reduction in the mean global population size of polar bears greater than 30% over three generations was approximately 0.71 (range 0.20-0.95. The median probability of a reduction greater than 50% was approximately 0.07 (range 0-0.35), and the probability of a reduction greater than 80% was negligible.

  4. Polarized photoproduction from nuclear targets with arbitrary spin and relation to deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoodbhoy, P.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad

    1990-01-01

    Inclusive photo-production from polarized targets of arbitrary spin is analyzed by using multipoles. The Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule, which was originally fromulated for spin-1/2 targets, is generalized to all spins and multipoles, and shown to have some interesting consequences. Measurements to test the new rules, or to derive nuclear structure information from them, could be incorporated into existing plans at electron accelerator facilities. Finally, the possible relevance of these generalized sum rules to sum rules measurable in polarized lepton-polarized target deep inelastic inclusive scattering is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Neuroplasticity-related mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effects of traditional herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshler, Yafit; Doron, Ravid

    2017-10-01

    Traditional herbal medicine can offer efficacious and safe alternative pharmacotherapies for depression. The ability of an herbal medicine to produce neuroadaptive processes, that enhance neuroplasticity and cellular resilience in response to chronic stress, may point to its antidepressant potential. We suggest that among many investigated herbal medicines, those that can enhance neuroplasticity may have stronger therapeutic potential. The current article presents a summary of traditional herbal medicines, which are thought to exert antidepressant-like effects in chronic stress models via neuroplasticity enhancement. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a biomarker for neuroplasticity-related mechanisms compromised in depression and recovered by conventional antidepressants, including synaptic plasticity, cell survival, neurogenesis and spine formation. We therefore presumed that if an herbal medicine up-regulates BDNF in the hippocampus and/or prefrontal cortex (PFC), its antidepressant-like effect is mediated, at least partially, via neuroplasticity-related mechanisms. Literature search was performed using the general terms depression, stress, neuroplasticity and herbal medicines. Screening of retrieved preclinical studies revealed 30 traditional herbal medicines: 8 single herbs, 15 bioactive constituents, and 7 herbal formulas. The antidepressant-like effects of these medicines were associated with reversal of chronic stress-induced impairment in neuroplasticity, most notably by BDNF up-regulation, activation of BDNF downstream signaling pathways and increase in neurogenesis in the hippocampus and/or PFC/frontal cortex. In light of the ability of these medicines to enhance neuroplasticity, we suggest that they may be suitable candidates for clinical investigation in depressed individuals. Once their efficacy, tolerability and safety will be substantiated, they may serve as natural alternatives to conventional antidepressants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  6. ROCK-Isoform-Specific Polarization of Macrophages Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souska Zandi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age is a major risk factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD, but the underlying cause is unknown. We find increased Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling and M2 characteristics in eyes of aged mice, revealing immune changes in aging. ROCK isoforms determine macrophage polarization into M1 and M2 subtypes. M2-like macrophages accumulated in AMD, but not in normal eyes, suggesting that these macrophages may be linked to macular degeneration. M2 macrophages injected into the mouse eye exacerbated choroidal neovascular lesions, while M1 macrophages ameliorated them, supporting a causal role for macrophage subtypes in AMD. Selective ROCK2 inhibition with a small molecule decreased M2-like macrophages and choroidal neovascularization. ROCK2 inhibition upregulated M1 markers without affecting macrophage recruitment, underlining the plasticity of these macrophages. These results reveal age-induced innate immune imbalance as underlying AMD pathogenesis. Targeting macrophage plasticity opens up new possibilities for more effective AMD treatment.

  7. Relative importance of indigenous medicinal plants from Layyah district, Punjab Province, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nadeem; Mahmood, Aqeel; Mahmood, Adeel; Tahir, S S; Bano, Asghari; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Hassan, Seema; Ishtiaq, Muhammad

    2014-08-08

    Ethnomedicinal reports are important for the discovery of new crude drugs from reported medicinal plants with high use value. The current study aimed to document the medicinal flora as well as medicinal knowledge of indigenous plants of local communities from Layyah district, Punjab Province, Pakistan. Rapid appraisal approach (RAA), semi-structured interviews, group meetings with herbalists, landowners and local people having awareness about the medicinal action of plants were employed to collect the data. Use values (UV) and frequency of citation (FC) were calculated to check the relative importance of plants. The current ethnomedicinal study reported 125 medicinal plant species diversified from 106 genus belonging to the 43 different families and Poaceae was the predominant family over others with 16 reported medicinal plants. Wild herbaceous plants were the predominant over other life forms while among plant parts, leaves contributed 32% followed by the stem (27%), fruit and flowers (15%). Allium sativum exhibited the highest use vale (UV) 0.92 while the lowest UV was exhibited by Lasiurus scindicus which was 0.15. Local communities of district Layyah still have a strong faith on herbal medicines for basic healthcare needs. Indigenous plants having high UV and FC should be subjected to the detailed phytochemical investigations to explore new natural drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [History of German-Baltic relations in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankler, H; Laschinski, G; Roots, I

    2004-04-30

    Today, the three Baltic countries Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, have well-known medical faculties with international standing. Their individual histories are briefly outlined. However, relations of the German academic world were closest with the university of Dorpat (today: Tartu). It was re-opened in 1802 by tsar Alexander I in order to keep young Baltic people from studying abroad. The medical faculty was its biggest faculty. The university was Russian, but the official language was German. So many a German professor came to Dorpat and many professors from Dorpat were offered a chair at a German university. The scientific imports connected Dorpat with other centres of West-European science, they brought knowledge and ideas and an exchange of information. The standard was high, and among the teaching staff was a handsome number of medical celebrities, e.g. the anatomist August Rauber and the surgeon Ernst von Bergmann. In Dorpat, Rudolf Buchheim brought a new science, experimental pharmacology, into being, which his pupil and successor, Oswald Schmiedeberg, fully established and propagated all over the world.

  9. Human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in relation to access to medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hunt, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Although access to medicines is a vital feature of the right to the highest attainable standard of health ("right to health"), almost two billion people lack access to essential medicines, leading to immense avoidable suffering. While the human rights responsibility to provide access to medicines lies mainly with States, pharmaceutical companies also have human rights responsibilities in relation to access to medicines. This article provides an introduction to these responsibilities. It briefly outlines the new UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and places the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in this context. The authors draw from the work of the first UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, in particular the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in Relation to Access to Medicines that he presented to the UN General Assembly in 2008, and his UN report on GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). While the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights are general human rights standards applicable to all business entities, the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies consider the specific human rights responsibilities of one sector (pharmaceutical companies) in relation to one area of activity (access to medicines). The article signals the human rights responsibilities of all pharmaceutical companies, with particular attention to patent-holding pharmaceutical companies. Adopting a right-to-health "lens," the article discusses GSK and accountability. The authors argue that human rights should shape pharmaceutical companies' policies, and provide standards in relation to which pharmaceutical companies could, and should, be held accountable. They conclude that it is now crucial to devise independent, accessible, transparent, and effective mechanisms to monitor pharmaceutical companies and hold them publicly accountable for their human rights responsibilities. © 2012 American

  10. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  11. Polarization sensitive changes in the human macula associated with normal aging and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNasdale, Dean Allan, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    The human macula occupies a relatively small, but crucial retinal area, as it is the location responsible for our most acute spatial vision and best color discrimination. Localizing important landmarks in the retina is difficult even in normal eyes where morphological inter-individual variability is high. This becomes even more challenging in the presence of sight-threatening pathology. With respect to the human macula, there remains a significant gap in the understanding of normal structure and function. Even less is known about the pathological mechanisms that occur in sight-threatening diseases including age-related macular degeneration. Because relatively little is known about normal aging changes, it is also difficult to differentiate those changes from changes associated with retinal disease. To better understand normal and pathological changes in the macula, imaging techniques using specific optical signatures are required. Structural features in the macula can be distinguished based on their intrinsic properties using specific light/tissue interactions. Because of the high degree of structural regularity in the macula, polarization sensitive imaging is potentially a useful tool for evaluating the morphology and integrity of the cellular architecture for both normal individuals and those affected by disease. In our investigations, we used polarization sensitive imaging to determining normal landmarks that are important clinically and for research investigations. We found that precision and accuracy in localizing the central macula was greatly improved through the use of polarization sensitive imaging. We also found that specific polarization alterations can be used to demonstrate systematic changes as a function of age, disproportionately affecting the central macular region. When evaluating patients with age-related macular degeneration, we found that precision and accuracy of localizing the central macula was also improved, even when significant pathology

  12. Surface polarity of beta-HMX crystal and the related adhesive forces with Estane binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu

    2008-12-02

    Here I present the results on the study of surface properties of beta-HMX crystal utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. The surface polarity of three principal crystal surfaces, (011), (010), and (110), is investigated by measuring the water contact angles. The calculated contact angles are in excellent agreement with the values measured by experiment and show that the surface polarity of three crystal surfaces are different. The free energies and forces of detaching an Estane chain (with and without surrounding nitroplasticizer molecules) from the three principal crystal surfaces are also calculated using the umbrella sampling method. I find that the force for Estane detachment increases with the increasing HMX surface polarity. In addition, my results show that the nitroplasticizer also plays an important role in the adhesion between Estane and HMX surfaces.

  13. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rode, Karyn D.; Wilson, Ryan R.; Regehr, Eric V.; St. Martin, Michelle; Douglas, David C.; Olson, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013) when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In bo...

  14. Gynecologic oncologists' attitudes and practices relating to integrative medicine: results of a nationwide AGO survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Evelyn; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bader, Werner; Brucker, Cosima; Dobos, Gustav; Fischer, Dorothea; Hanf, Volker; Hasenburg, Annette; Jud, Sebastian M; Kalder, Matthias; Kiechle, Marion; Kümmel, Sherko; Müller, Andreas; Müller, Myrjam-Alice T; Paepke, Daniela; Rotmann, Andre-Robert; Schütz, Florian; Scharl, Anton; Voiss, Petra; Wallwiener, Markus; Witt, Claudia; Hack, Carolin C

    2017-08-01

    The growing popularity and acceptance of integrative medicine is evident both among patients and among the oncologists treating them. As little data are available regarding health-care professionals' knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to the topic, a nationwide online survey was designed. Over a period of 11 weeks (from July 15 to September 30, 2014) a self-administered, 17-item online survey was sent to all 676 members of the Research Group on Gynecological Oncology (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie) in the German Cancer Society. The questionnaire items addressed the use of integrative therapy methods, fields of indications for them, advice services provided, level of specific qualifications, and other topics. Of the 104 respondents (15.4%) using integrative medicine, 93% reported that integrative therapy was offered to breast cancer patients. The second most frequent type of tumor in connection with which integrative therapy methods were recommended was ovarian cancer, at 80% of the participants using integrative medicine. Exercise, nutritional therapy, dietary supplements, herbal medicines, and acupuncture were the methods the patients were most commonly advised to use. There is considerable interest in integrative medicine among gynecological oncologists, but integrative therapy approaches are at present poorly implemented in routine clinical work. Furthermore there is a lack of specific training. Whether future efforts should focus on extending counseling services on integrative medicine approaches in gynecologic oncology or not, have to be discussed. Evidence-based training on integrative medicine should be implemented in order to safely guide patients in their wish to do something by themselves.

  15. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not yet known. To assess the risk for hepatotoxicity by Kampo medicines, we evaluated the daily coumarin intake of patients who were prescribed Kampo medicines and investigated the relation between hepatotoxicity and the coumarin intake. The clinical data of 129 outpatients (18 male and 111 female, median age 58 years) who had been prescribed keishibukuryogankayokuinin (TJ-125) between April 2008 and March 2013 was retrospectively investigated. Concurrent Kampo medicines and liver function were also surveyed. In addition to TJ-125, the patients took some of the other 32 Kampo preparations and 22 decoctions that include cinnamon bark. The coumarin content of these Kampo medicines was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). TJ-125 had the highest daily content of coumarin (5.63 mg/day), calculated from the daily cinnamon bark dosage reported in the information leaflet inserted in each package of Kampo medicine. The coumarin content in 1g cinnamon bark decoction was 3.0 mg. The daily coumarin intake of the patients was 0.113 (0.049-0.541) mg/kg/day, with 98 patients (76.0%) exceeding the TDI. Twenty-three patients had an abnormal change in liver function test value, but no significant difference was found in the incidence of abnormal change between the group consuming less than the TDI value (6/31, 19.4%) and the group consuming equal to or greater than the TDI value (17/98, 17.3%). In addition, no abnormal change related to cinnamon bark was found for individual

  16. Relative efficiency of precision medicine designs for clinical trials with predictive biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Weichung Joe; Lin, Yong

    2018-02-28

    Prospective randomized clinical trials addressing biomarkers are time consuming and costly, but are necessary for regulatory agencies to approve new therapies with predictive biomarkers. For this reason, recently, there have been many discussions and proposals of various trial designs and comparisons of their efficiency in the literature. We compare statistical efficiencies between the marker-stratified design and the marker-based precision medicine design regarding testing/estimating 4 hypotheses/parameters of clinical interest, namely, treatment effects in each marker-positive and marker-negative cohorts, marker-by-treatment interaction, and the marker's clinical utility. As may be expected, the stratified design is more efficient than the precision medicine design. However, it is perhaps surprising to find out how low the relative efficiency can be for the precision medicine design. We quantify the relative efficiency as a function of design factors including the marker-positive prevalence rate, marker assay and classification sensitivity and specificity, and the treatment randomization ratio. It is interesting to examine the trends of the relative efficiency with these design parameters in testing different hypotheses. We advocate to use the stratified design over the precision medicine design in clinical trials with predictive biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Fgf8-Related Secondary Organizers Exert Different Polarizing Planar Instructions along the Mouse Anterior Neural Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo-Enriquez, Ivan; Partanen, Juha; Martinez, Salvador; Echevarria, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Early brain patterning depends on proper arrangement of positional information. This information is given by gradients of secreted signaling molecules (morphogens) detected by individual cells within the responding tissue, leading to specific fate decisions. Here we report that the morphogen FGF8 exerts initially a differential signal activity along the E9.5 mouse neural tube. We demonstrate that this polarizing activity codes by RAS-regulated ERK1/2 signaling and depends on the topographical...

  18. Micro-environment and intracellular metabolism modulation of adipose tissue macrophage polarization in relation to chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Tu, Yixuan; Chen, Hainan; Jackson, Ampadu O; Patel, Vaibhav; Yin, Kai

    2018-02-23

    The accumulation and pro-inflammatory polarization of immune cells, mainly macrophages, in adipose tissue (AT) are considered crucial factors for obesity-induced chronic inflammatory diseases. In this review, we highlighted the role of adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) polarization on AT function in the obese state and the effect of the micro-environment and intracellular metabolism on the dynamic switch of ATMs into their pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes, which may have distinct influences on obesity-related chronic inflammatory diseases. Obesity-associated metabolic dysfunctions, including those of glucose, fatty acid, cholesterol, and other nutrient substrates such as vitamin D and iron in AT, promote the pro-inflammatory polarization of ATMs and AT inflammation via regulating the interaction between ATMs and adipocytes and intracellular metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and reverse cholesterol transportation. Focusing on the regulation of ATM metabolism will provide a novel target for the treatment of obesity-related chronic inflammatory diseases, including insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Knowledge of Emergency Medicine Residents in Relation to Prevention of Tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjat Derakhshanfar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge of emergency medicine residents about the management of patients suspected of having tetanus favoring wounds is very important due to their responsibility for the treatment of such patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this knowledge and making sure of the adequacy of instructions they have received in relation to prevention of tetanus.  Methods: A reliable and reproducible questionnaire was used to evaluate knowledge of all the emergency medicine residents in Imam Hussein Hospital in Tehran, Iran, about conditions favoring tetanus (9 questions and proper interventions in such conditions (12 questions. The questionnaires were completed and scored as poor and good. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze data. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results: In the present study, 73 emergency medicine residents were evaluated (45.2% male. Knowledge of 31 (42.5% residents in relation to conditions favoring tetanus and 41 (56.2% residents in correct therapeutic interventions was in good level. The most frequent incorrect answer was related to diabetic ulcers and wounds in patients with sepsis. There was an increase in scores of conditions favoring tetanus (P<0.001 and correct therapeutic interventions (P=0.001 with an increase in educational years. However, age (P=0.64, gender (P=0.31, job experience (P=0.38 and participation in educational courses (P=0.67 had no effect on the knowledge level of emergency medicine residents. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, the knowledge of emergency medicine residents about correct management of patients suspected of tetanus was low, which emphasizes the necessity of providing further instructions on prevention of tetanus in wound management. 

  20. The swimming polarity of multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes can change during an isolation process employing magnets: evidence of a relation between swimming polarity and magnetic moment intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Roger Duarte; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Magnetotactic microorganisms are characterized by swimming in the direction of an applied magnetic field. In nature, two types of swimming polarity have been observed: north-seeking microorganisms that swim in the same direction as the magnetic field, and south-seeking microorganisms that swim in the opposite direction. The present work studies the reversal in the swimming polarity of the multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis following an isolation process using high magnetic fields from magnets. The proportion of north- and south-seeking organisms was counted as a function of the magnetic field intensity used during the isolation of the organisms from sediment. It was observed that the proportion of north-seeking organisms increased when the magnetic field was increased. The magnetic moment for north- and south-seeking populations was estimated using the U-turn method. The average magnetic moment was higher for north- than south-seeking organisms. The results suggest that the reversal of swimming polarity must occur during the isolation process in the presence of high magnetic fields and magnetic field gradients. It is shown for the first time that the swimming polarity reversal depends on the magnetic moment intensity of multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes, and new studies must be undertaken to understand the role of magnetic moment polarity and oxygen gradients in determination of swimming polarity.

  1. Noise and vibration levels in artificial polar bear dens as related to selected petroleum exploration and developmental activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, A.S.; Lentfer, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Petroleum exploration and development are occurring in various locations in the Arctic, where there are important denning sites for polar bears. Petroleum activities usually coincide with winter denning activities by bears, who may abandon dens if subject to prolonged annoyance. A study was carried out to measure noise and vibration levels in artificial polar bear dens at Prudhoe's Bar, Alaska, resulting from seismic testing, drilling and transport. A microphone and an accelerometer were frozen to the floor of the dens, with leads passed through a consolidated snow filled entrance to a truck, tent or helicopter. Tests were carried out on land, sea ice, and next to a drilling tower on an artificial island, which was also used to measure noise levels resulting from a helicopter taking off. It was concluded that the dry and wind-beaten arctic snow muffles both sound and vibration extremely well, and it is unlikely that polar bears in their dens will be disturbed by the type of petroleum-related activities measured, provided they do not take place within 100 m of the dens. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. Patterns of relating between physicians and medical assistants in small family medicine offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Nancy C; Jacobson, C Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician-medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians' roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting.

  3. Automated Identification and Quantification of Subretinal Fibrosis in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using Polarization-Sensitive OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Philipp; Sugita, Mitsuro; Deák, Gábor; Baumann, Bernhard; Zotter, Stefan; Pircher, Michael; Sacu, Stefan; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    To identify and quantify subretinal fibrosis in eyes with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Eyes of patients with subretinal fibrosis secondary to nAMD were included in this case series. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmic examination to clearly identify advanced nAMD lesions with fibrosis. Examinations of PS-OCT were performed using a novel system with an integrated eye tracker. Areas of fibrosis in PS-OCT, automatically segmented using a custom-built algorithm, were compared with conventional imaging modalities including spectral-domain OCT, fluorescein angiography, and color fundus photography in their potential to visualize fibrosis in nAMD. Fifteen eyes of 15 consecutive patients were included. In polarization-sensitive OCT B-scans, a distinct "column-like" pattern was observed in averaged axis orientation images. En face analysis provided a precise mapping of the fibrotic scar component. Fibrous tissue was selectively identified by PS-OCT based on birefringence in all lesions, whereas in SD-OCT, subretinal hyperreflective material (SHRM) could not be further classified into scar tissue, fibrovascular material, or other AMD-specific material. Based on simultaneous polarization analyses in PS-OCT, the level of RPE alteration could be evaluated as well, showing thinning and loss of RPE associated with subretinal fibrosis. Using PS-OCT, subretinal fibrosis can be identified as an intrinsically birefringent structure and can be segmented based solely on tissue-specific contrast. Polarization-sensitive OCT offers a unique method to identify clinically relevant components of SHRM (i.e., neovascular tissue versus fibrous tissue) and therefore allows for an optimized disease management and evaluation of therapeutic strategies.

  4. Internal Medicine Residents' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Experiences Relating to Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S; Mirza, R; Nissim, R; Ridley, J

    2017-05-01

    Internal medicine residents are frequently called upon to provide palliative care to hospitalized patients, but report feeling unprepared to do so effectively. Curricular development to enhance residents' palliative care skills and competencies requires an understanding of current beliefs, attitudes and learning priorities. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with ten internal medicine residents to explore their understanding of and experiences with palliative care. All of the residents interviewed had a sound theoretical understanding of palliative care, but faced many challenges in being able to provide care in practice. The challenges described by residents were system-related, patient-related and provider-related. They identified several priority areas for further learning, and discussed ways in which their current education in palliative care could be enhanced. Our findings provide important insights to guide curricular development for internal medicine trainees. The top five learning priorities in palliative care that residents identified in our study were: 1) knowing how and when to initiate a palliative approach, 2) improving communication skills, 3) improving symptom management skills, 4) identifying available resources, and 5) understanding the importance of palliative care. Residents felt that their education in palliative care could be improved by having a mandatory rotation in palliative care, more frequent didactic teaching sessions, more case-based teaching from palliative care providers, opportunities to be directly observed, and increased support from palliative care providers after-hours.

  5. [Expedition medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  6. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  7. Fgf8-related secondary organizers exert different polarizing planar instructions along the mouse anterior neural tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Crespo-Enriquez

    Full Text Available Early brain patterning depends on proper arrangement of positional information. This information is given by gradients of secreted signaling molecules (morphogens detected by individual cells within the responding tissue, leading to specific fate decisions. Here we report that the morphogen FGF8 exerts initially a differential signal activity along the E9.5 mouse neural tube. We demonstrate that this polarizing activity codes by RAS-regulated ERK1/2 signaling and depends on the topographical location of the secondary organizers: the isthmic organizer (IsO and the anterior neural ridge (anr but not on zona limitans intrathalamica (zli. Our results suggest that Sprouty2, a negative modulator of RAS/ERK pathway, is important for regulating Fgf8 morphogenetic signal activity by controlling Fgf8-induced signaling pathways and positional information during early brain development.

  8. The Concept of Travel Medicine and the Actual Situation of Travel-Related Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunalı, Varol; Turgay, Nevin

    2017-06-01

    Travel medicine defines all diseases and medical situations that are related to travel. Travel medicine comprises infectious diseases, traumas, altitude sickness, sun burns, embolisms, jet lag, and many more travel-related situations. With the increasing possibility and ease of travel, the number of people who have travelled internationally has exceeded 1.13 billion in 2014, and the revenues of international travel have exceeded 1.25 trillion dollars. With every passing day, international travels are shifting toward the developing countries and to more exotic regions of the world, and travelers tend to be more adventurous and daring, thereby increasing risky behaviors during travels. Traveling plays an important role in transmitting infections such as Zika virus infection, Ebola, avian flu, severe acute respiratory syndrome, Chikungunya, and dengue fever and is the principal reason for the epidemics of these types of infections on a global scale. With this background, we suggest that travel medicine is an important but "neglected" medical discipline as the discipline of Parasitology itself like most parasitic diseases.

  9. Existential Issues in Sexual Medicine: The Relation Between Death Anxiety and Hypersexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watter, Daniel N

    2018-01-01

    Current sex therapy and sexual medicine protocols often ignore the existential dilemmas associated with sexual dysfunction and other problematic sexual problems. This oversight is especially apparent when assessing and treating the controversial phenomenon of hypersexuality, or "sexual addiction." A deeper understanding of the existential concept of death anxiety could offer an alternative treatment paradigm that might lead to a more effective treatment outcome. To explore the relation between the existential phenomenon of death anxiety and hypersexuality (ie, sexual addiction) and present an evaluation and treatment paradigm that is rooted in existential psychotherapy, a form of psychotherapy that is a deeply life-affirming and dynamic approach to therapy that focuses on concerns rooted in the individual's existence. A review of the literature focusing on the topics of hypersexuality, death anxiety, and existential psychotherapy was undertaken and a treatment paradigm is offered. Current treatment protocols for hypersexuality and sexual addiction were reviewed, as were current concepts in existential therapy. These were integrated into an assessment and treatment paradigm. Although sexual medicine and traditional sex therapy techniques can often alleviate sexual suffering, there are times when a more in-depth psychotherapy is needed to get to the root cause and ultimate assuagement of the presenting sexual symptoms. Existential psychotherapy is one such form of treatment that allows clinicians to probe the subterranean depths of the human psyche and make meaning of one's sexual behavior and its vagaries. Although certainly not all cases of hypersexuality are precipitated by a confrontation with mortality and death, there are cases in which sex is imbued with meaning as an antidote to the fear of death. Existential therapy is a form of treatment that could be particularly effective in many of these cases. Watter DN. Existential Issues in Sexual Medicine: The

  10. Readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganta, Abhishek; Yi, Paul H; Hussein, Khalil; Frank, Rachel M

    2014-04-01

    Although studies have revealed high readability levels of orthopedic patient education materials, no study has evaluated sports medicine-related patient education materials. We conducted a study to assess the readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). All sports medicine patient education articles available online in 2012 from the AAOS and the AOSSM, including the Stop Sports Injuries Campaign (STOP), were identified, and their readability was assessed with the Flesch-Kinkaid (FK) readability test. Mean overall FK grade level of the 170 articles reviewed (104 from AAOS, 36 from AOSSM, 30 from STOP) was 10.2. Mean FK levels for the 3 sources were 9.5 (AAOS), 11.0 (AOSSM), and 11.5 (STOP) (P = .16). Fifteen (8.8%) of the 170 articles had a readability level at or below eighth grade (average reading level of US adults); only 2 (1.2%) of the 170 articles were at or below the recommended sixth-grade level. The majority of sports medicine-related patient education materials from AAOS and AOSSM had reading levels higher than recommended, indicating that the majority of the patient population may find it difficult to comprehend these articles.

  11. Polarized light microscopy-detectable structures of human oocytes and embryos are related to the likelihood of conception in IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Emanuela; Evangelista, Francesca; Racca, Cinzia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Revelli, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    To clarify if birefringent structures of human oocytes and embryos, measurable by polarized light microscopy, have any value in predicting the chance of pregnancy in human in vitro fertilization and may halp to identify the most competent oocytes and embryos. The inner layer of the zona pellucida (IL-ZP) and the meiotic spindle (MS) were analyzed by polarized light microscopy in 258 oocytes and in the 209 embryos deriving from them. Data obtained from 102 ICSI cycles with conception were compared with those obtained in 156 cycles without conception. The retardance and area of the IL-ZP, as well as the retardance, length of the major axis, and area of the MS were measured. Furthermore, polarized light microscopy parameters were related to the embryo morphological score by multiple regression analysis. The mean area of the IL-ZP of both oocytes and embryos was significantly lower in conception than in non-conception cycles (p = 0.0001 for oocytes and p = 0.002 for embryos). The area of the IL-ZP in embryos was significantly, inversely related to the embryo morphological score (p = 0.011). The area, the major axis length and the retarcance of the MS, as well as the retardance of the IL-ZP in oocytes and embryos were comparable in conception and non-conception cycles. The area of the IL-ZP of the human oocytes may represent a marker of oocyte competence, as oocytes with a low IL-ZP area are more frequently obtained in conception cycles. When measured in embryos, a low IL-ZP area identifies embryos with a high chance of implantation.

  12. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flows and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere which are implied by a three-component picture of large-scale magnetospheric flow driven both by planetary rotation and the solar wind interaction. With increasing radial distance in the equatorial plane, these components consist of a region dominated by planetary rotation where planetary plasma sub-corotates on closed field lines, a surrounding region where planetary plasma is lost down the dusk tail by the stretching out of closed field lines followed by plasmoid formation and pinch-off, as first described for Jupiter by Vasyliunas, and an outer region driven by the interaction with the solar wind, specifically by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause and in the dawn tail, first discussed for Earth by Dungey. The sub-corotating flow on closed field lines in the dayside magnetosphere is constrained by Voyager plasma observations, showing that the plasma angular velocity falls to around half of rigid corotation in the outer magnetosphere, possibly increasing somewhat near the dayside magnetopause, while here we provide theoretical arguments which indicate that the flow should drop to considerably smaller values on open field lines in the polar cap. The implied ionospheric current system requires a four-ring pattern of field-aligned currents, with distributed downward currents on open field lines in the polar cap, a narrow ring of upward current near the boundary of open and closed field lines, and regions of distributed downward and upward current on closed field lines at lower latitudes associated with the transfer of angular momentum from the planetary atmosphere to the sub-corotating planetary magnetospheric plasma. Recent work has shown that the upward current associated with sub-corotation is not sufficiently intense to produce significant auroral acceleration and emission. Here we suggest that the observed auroral oval at Saturn instead corresponds to the ring of upward

  13. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flows and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere which are implied by a three-component picture of large-scale magnetospheric flow driven both by planetary rotation and the solar wind interaction. With increasing radial distance in the equatorial plane, these components consist of a region dominated by planetary rotation where planetary plasma sub-corotates on closed field lines, a surrounding region where planetary plasma is lost down the dusk tail by the stretching out of closed field lines followed by plasmoid formation and pinch-off, as first described for Jupiter by Vasyliunas, and an outer region driven by the interaction with the solar wind, specifically by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause and in the dawn tail, first discussed for Earth by Dungey. The sub-corotating flow on closed field lines in the dayside magnetosphere is constrained by Voyager plasma observations, showing that the plasma angular velocity falls to around half of rigid corotation in the outer magnetosphere, possibly increasing somewhat near the dayside magnetopause, while here we provide theoretical arguments which indicate that the flow should drop to considerably smaller values on open field lines in the polar cap. The implied ionospheric current system requires a four-ring pattern of field-aligned currents, with distributed downward currents on open field lines in the polar cap, a narrow ring of upward current near the boundary of open and closed field lines, and regions of distributed downward and upward current on closed field lines at lower latitudes associated with the transfer of angular momentum from the planetary atmosphere to the sub-corotating planetary magnetospheric plasma. Recent work has shown that the upward current associated with sub-corotation is not sufficiently intense to produce significant auroral acceleration and emission. Here we suggest that the observed auroral oval at Saturn instead corresponds to the ring of

  14. Polar layered deposits on Mars: Inner structure and relation to the climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, M.; Head, J.

    Martian polar layered deposits (PLD) have long been thought to contain a record of the past climate. Roles of deposition, ablation and flow in PLD are a subject of discussion and controversy. Understanding of these roles is critical for reading the climate record. We show that simple mechanism including latitude-dependent deposition and ablation, albedo feedback and role of slopes explains many essential features of the PLD. We consider the present-day PLD is a result of a history of H2O ice deposition and sublimation during some recent period of the geological history. The deposition - ablation balance is a function of latitude. Typically, net deposition occurs in the polar area inside some boundary latitude of zero balance, and net ablation occurs outside. This dividing latitude shifts back and forth due to climate change caused by (1) the change of the spin/orbit parameters ("astronomical forcing"), (2) availability of the water vapor source at lower latitudes (tropical mountain glaciers, high-latitude icy mantles, the opposite polar cap, groundwater discharge events), (3) internal climate instabilities. The outermost position of the ablation/deposition boundary was well outside the present margins of the PLD; in the opposite extremes, the area of the positive balance disappeared, and the whole polar cap underwent ablation. Through time such oscillations produced a dome-shaped stack of deposits with a possible thin layer of deposits outside the dome and with a number of unconformities inside. These unconformities will have an east-west oriented strike and a very shallow dip. There is a positive feedback between the deposition/ablation balance and albedo: high albedo favors deposition, and fresh deposits have high albedo. With this feedback, when the climate system goes through oscillations, the boundary latitude between positive and negative balance will stay for some periods of time at its outermost and innermost positions. This will result in steps in the

  15. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Associated With Job Contentment in Dental Professionals: Indian Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Background High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional ther...

  16. Cannabis in Chinese Medicine: Are Some Traditional Indications Referenced in Ancient Literature Related to Cannabinoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, E Joseph; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae) has a long history of utilization as a fiber and seed crop in China, and its achenes ("seeds") as well as other plant parts have been recorded in Chinese medical texts for nearly 2000 years. While the primary applications of cannabis in Chinese medicine center around the use of the achenes, ancient indications for the female inflorescence, and other plant parts include conditions such as pain and mental illness that are the subject of current research into cannabinoids such as cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). However, little previous research has been conducted to analyze the Chinese medical literature in light of recent advances in the pharmacology and taxonomy of cannabis, and most of the relevant Chinese historical records have not yet been translated into Western languages to facilitate textual research. Furthermore, many key questions remain unresolved in the Chinese literature, including how various traditional drug names precisely correspond to different plant parts, as well as the implications of long-term selection for fiber-rich cultivars on the medical applications of cannabis in Chinese medicine. In this article, prominent historical applications of cannabis in Chinese medicine are chronologically reviewed, and indications found in ancient Chinese literature that may relate to cannabinoids such as CBD and Δ 9 -THC are investigated.

  17. Why is now the best time for approaching the significant relation between "life and medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcărea, Theodor

    2008-01-01

    The present paper is aimed to analyze the need for an adequate engagement in a better understanding of the relation between "Life and Medicine", within the increasing importance of the patient's point of view, while quality of life is managed within medicine and even going beyond. It is necessary to reconsider the essential role of communication in an adequate offering of the right answers in accordance with the changes in medical care, quality of life being one benefit. Science should inform the news agenda on the way of building a collaborative environment, turning up the conversation focused on patients' lives, while practicing medicine with an open heart for the physician-patient-family relationship and based on models of quality of life outcomes. That is why it is important to create new knowledge and competencies starting from intangible resources such as an engagement as a consequence of a communication programme which produces an increased level of perception of the outcomes of the necessary mature actions as meeting and surpassing patient expectations, not forgetting the vulnerability to the way in which choices are described. From here is resulting the imperative of the development of better abilities in innovation, differentiation, branding and patient-driven health care service, largely opening the window of opportunity for the educational mission to educate marketers who make a difference by taking the lead from a strategic planning position.

  18. Treatment of malaria and related symptoms using traditional herbal medicine in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, Sultan; Beyene Tufa, Takele; Kebebe, Dereje; Belew, Sileshi; Mekonnen, Yimer; Gashe, Fanta; Mussa, Seid; Wynendaele, Evelien; Duchateau, Luc; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2018-03-01

    Medicinal plants have always been an integral part of different cultures in Ethiopia in the treatment of different illnesses including malaria and related symptoms. However, due to lack of proper documentation, urbanization, drought, acculturation and deforestation, there is an increased risk of losing this traditional knowledge. Hence, the use of the indigenous knowledge should be well documented and validated for potential future use. To gather and document information on medicinal plants which are used in the traditional treatment of malaria and related symptoms in Ethiopia. First, an ethnomedicinal survey of plants was conducted in 17 districts of Jimma zone, the Oromia national regional state of Ethiopia. Jimma zone is malarious and rich in natural flora. A total of 115 traditional healers were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire containing personal data of the respondents, and information on medicinal plants used to treat malaria and related symptoms. In addition, a literature search using Medline/PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and HINARI was conducted on the indigenous use, in-vitro/in-vivo anti-malarial activity reports, and the chemical characterization of medicinal plants of Ethiopia used against malaria. From ethnomedicinal survey, a total of 28 species of plants used in the traditional treatment of malaria and related symptoms in Jimma Zone were collected, identified and documented. In addition, the literature search revealed that 124 medicinal plant species were reported to be traditionally used in the treatment of malaria in Ethiopia. From both ethnomedicinal survey and the literature search, Asteraceae and Fabaceae were the most represented families and Allium sativum L., Carica papaya L., Vernonia amygdalina Del., Lepidium sativum L. and Croton macrostachyus Del. were the most frequently reported plant species for their anti-malarial use. The dominant plant parts used in the preparation of remedies were leaves. About 54% of the

  19. Mesoscale distribution of dominant diatom species relative to the hydrographical field along the Antarctic Polar Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetacek, Victor; Klaas, Christine; Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Rynearson, Tatiana A.

    The quantitative distribution of dominant phytoplankton species was mapped at high spatial resolution (15 km spacing) during a quasi-synoptic, mesoscale survey of hydrographical, chemical, pigment, and zooplankton fields carried out along the Antarctic Polar Front within a grid 140×130 km 2 during austral summer. A rapid assessment method for quantifying phytoplankton species by microscopy in concentrated samples on board enabled estimation of total biomass and that of dominant species at hourly sampling intervals. The biomass distribution pattern derived from this method was remarkably coherent and correlated very well with chlorophyll concentrations and the location of different water masses covered by the grid. A "background" chlorophyll concentration of 0.5 mg m -3 in the grid could be assigned to the uniformly distributed pico- and nanophytoplankton; all higher values (up to 2.0 mg m -3) were contributed by large diatoms. Three species complexes ( Chaetoceros atlanticus/dichaeta, Pseudo-nitzschia cf. Lineola, and Thalassiothrix antarctica) contributed about one-third each to the biomass. Although all species were found throughout the study area, distinct patterns in abundance emerged: The Thalassiothrix maximum was located north of the frontal jet, Chaetoceros biomass was highest along the jet, and Pseudo-nitzschia was the most uniformly distributed of the three taxa. Since the meridional pattern of biomass and species composition persisted for about 5 weeks, despite heavy grazing pressure of small copepods, we hypothesize that the dominant species reflect the highest degree of grazer protection in the assemblage. This is accomplished by large size, needle-shaped cells, and long spines armed with barbs. We suggest that these persistent species sequester the limiting nutrient—iron—from the assemblage of smaller, less-defended species that must hence have higher turn-over rates.

  20. Non-polar lipids accumulate during storage of transfusion products and do not contribute to the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A L; Vervaart, M A T; van Bruggen, R; de Korte, D; Nieuwland, R; Kulik, W; Vlaar, A P J

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of non-polar lipids arachidonic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 12-HETE and 15-HETE during storage of transfusion products may play a role in the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress after transfusion. We investigated non-polar lipid accumulation in red blood cells (RBCs) stored for 42 days, plasma stored for 7 days at either 4 or 20°C and platelet (PLT) transfusion products stored for 7 days. Furthermore, we investigated whether transfusion of RBCs with increased levels of non-polar lipids induces TRALI in a 'two-hit' human volunteer model. All products were produced following Dutch Blood Bank protocols and are according to European standards. Non-polar lipids were measured with high-performance liquid chromotography followed by mass spectrometry. All non-polar lipids increased in RBCs after 21 days of storage compared to baseline. The non-polar lipid concentration in plasma increased significantly, and the increase was even more pronounced in products stored at 20°C. In platelets, baseline levels of 5-HETE and 15-HETE were higher than in RBCs or plasma. However, the non-polar lipids did not change significantly during storage of PLT products. Infusion of RBCs with increased levels of non-polar lipids did not induce TRALI in LPS-primed human volunteers. We conclude that non-polar lipids accumulate in RBC and plasma transfusion products and that accumulation is temperature dependent. Accumulation of non-polar lipids does not appear to explain the onset of TRALI (Dutch Trial Register - NTR4455). © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  1. Ontology-Oriented Diagnostic System for Traditional Chinese Medicine Based on Relation Refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiqin Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Chinese medicine treatments have become popular recently, the complicated Chinese medical knowledge has made it difficult to be applied in computer-aided diagnostics. The ability to model and use the knowledge becomes an important issue. In this paper, we define the diagnosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM as discovering the fuzzy relations between symptoms and syndromes. An Ontology-oriented Diagnosis System (ODS is created to address the knowledge-based diagnosis based on a well-defined ontology of syndromes. The ontology transforms the implicit relationships among syndromes into a machine-interpretable model. The clinical data used for feature selection is collected from a national TCM research institute in China, which serves as a training source for syndrome differentiation. The ODS analyzes the clinical cases to obtain a statistical mapping relation between each syndrome and associated symptom set, before rechecking the completeness of related symptoms via ontology refinement. Our diagnostic system provides an online web interface to interact with users, so that users can perform self-diagnosis. We tested 12 common clinical cases on the diagnosis system, and it turned out that, given the agree metric, the system achieved better diagnostic accuracy compared to nonontology method—92% of the results fit perfectly with the experts’ expectations.

  2. Ontology-oriented diagnostic system for traditional Chinese medicine based on relation refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peiqin; Chen, Huajun; Yu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Although Chinese medicine treatments have become popular recently, the complicated Chinese medical knowledge has made it difficult to be applied in computer-aided diagnostics. The ability to model and use the knowledge becomes an important issue. In this paper, we define the diagnosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as discovering the fuzzy relations between symptoms and syndromes. An Ontology-oriented Diagnosis System (ODS) is created to address the knowledge-based diagnosis based on a well-defined ontology of syndromes. The ontology transforms the implicit relationships among syndromes into a machine-interpretable model. The clinical data used for feature selection is collected from a national TCM research institute in China, which serves as a training source for syndrome differentiation. The ODS analyzes the clinical cases to obtain a statistical mapping relation between each syndrome and associated symptom set, before rechecking the completeness of related symptoms via ontology refinement. Our diagnostic system provides an online web interface to interact with users, so that users can perform self-diagnosis. We tested 12 common clinical cases on the diagnosis system, and it turned out that, given the agree metric, the system achieved better diagnostic accuracy compared to nonontology method-92% of the results fit perfectly with the experts' expectations.

  3. Mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 regulates GSK3β-dependent microtubule dynamics required for T cell migratory polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoxia Dong

    Full Text Available The mammalian diaphanous-related formin (mDia1, a Rho-regulated cytoskeletal modulator, has been shown to promote T lymphocyte chemotaxis and interaction with antigen presenting cells, but the mechanisms underpinning mDia1 roles in these processes have not been defined. Here we show that mDia1(-/- T cells exhibit impaired lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1-mediated T cell adhesion, migration and in vivo trafficking. These defects are associated with impaired microtubule (MT polarization and stabilization, altered MT dynamics and reduced peripheral clustering of the MT plus-end-protein, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC in migrating T cells following LFA-1-engagement. Loss of mDia1 also leads to impaired inducible inactivation of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β as well as hyperphosphorylation and reduced levels of APC in migrating T cells. These findings identify essential roles for the mDia1 formin in modulating GSK3β-dependent MT contributions to induction of T-cell polarity, adhesion and motility.

  4. Bibliometric analysis of medicine-related publications on poverty (2005-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sawalha, Ansam F; AbuTaha, Adham S; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2016-01-01

    Poverty is a global problem. The war against poverty requires not only financial support, but also poverty-related research to pinpoint areas of high need of intervention. In line with international efforts to fight poverty and negative consequences, we carried out this study to give a bibliometric overview of medicine-related literature on poverty. Such a s study is an indicator of the extent of interaction of various international key players on the war against poverty-related health problems. Scopus was used to achieve the objective of this study. The time span set for this study was 2005-2015. Poverty-related articles under the subject area "Medicine" were used to give bibliometric indicators such as annual growth of publications, international collaboration, highly cited articles, active countries, institutions, journals, and authors. The total number of retrieved articles was 1583. The Hirsh-index of retrieved articles was 56. A modest and fluctuating increase was seen over the study period. Visualization map of retrieved articles showed that "HIV", infectious diseases, mental health, India, and Africa were most commonly encountered terms. No significant dominance of any particular author or journal was observed in retrieved articles. The United States of America had the largest share in the number of published articles. The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Prevention and Control were among top active institutions/organizations. International collaboration was observed in less than one third of publications. Top cited articles focused on three poverty-related health issues, mainly, infectious diseases, malnutrition, and child development/psychology. Most of top articles were published in high impact journals. Data indicated that articles on poverty were published in high influential medical journals indicative of the importance of poverty as a global health problem. However, the number publications and the extent of international

  5. Evaluation of polar organic micropollutants as indicators for wastewater-related coastal water quality impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nödler, Karsten; Tsakiri, Maria; Aloupi, Maria; Gatidou, Georgia; Stasinakis, Athanasios S.; Licha, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Results from coastal water pollution monitoring (Lesvos Island, Greece) are presented. In total, 53 samples were analyzed for 58 polar organic micropollutants such as selected herbicides, biocides, corrosion inhibitors, stimulants, artificial sweeteners, and pharmaceuticals. Main focus is the application of a proposed wastewater indicator quartet (acesulfame, caffeine, valsartan, and valsartan acid) to detect point sources and contamination hot-spots with untreated and treated wastewater. The derived conclusions are compared with the state of knowledge regarding local land use and infrastructure. The artificial sweetener acesulfame and the stimulant caffeine were used as indicators for treated and untreated wastewater, respectively. In case of a contamination with untreated wastewater the concentration ratio of the antihypertensive valsartan and its transformation product valsartan acid was used to further refine the estimation of the residence time of the contamination. The median/maximum concentrations of acesulfame and caffeine were 5.3/178 ng L −1 and 6.1/522 ng L −1 , respectively. Their detection frequency was 100%. Highest concentrations were detected within the urban area of the capital of the island (Mytilene). The indicator quartet in the gulfs of Gera and Kalloni (two semi-enclosed embayments on the island) demonstrated different concentration patterns. A comparatively higher proportion of untreated wastewater was detected in the gulf of Gera, which is in agreement with data on the wastewater infrastructure. The indicator quality of the micropollutants to detect wastewater was compared with electrical conductivity (EC) data. Due to their anthropogenic nature and low detection limits, the micropollutants are superior to EC regarding both sensitivity and selectivity. The concentrations of atrazine, diuron, and isoproturon did not exceed the annual average of their environmental quality standards (EQS) defined by the European Commission. At two

  6. Anatomy of Subterranean Organs of Medicinally Used Cardueae and Related Species and its Value for Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Elisabeth; Saukel, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Numerous species of the Asteraceae, the composites, are famous for their use in both traditional and conventional medicine. Reliable anatomical descriptions of these plants and of possible adulterations provide a basis for fast identification and cheap purity controls of respective medicinal drugs by means of light microscopy. Nevertheless, detailed comparative studies on root and rhizome anatomy of valuable as well as related inconsiderable composite plants are largely missing yet. The presented study aims to narrow this gap by performing anatomical analyses of roots and rhizomes of 16 species belonging to the tribe Cardueae, of formerly and currently used drugs as well as their near relatives as potential adulterations (Carlina acaulis L., Carlina vulgaris L., Arctium lappa L., Arctium tomentosum Mill., Carduus defloratus L., Carduus personata (L.) Jacq, Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Cirsium vulgare (Savi) Ten., Cirsium erisithales (Jacq.) Scop., Onopordum acanthium L., Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn., Rhaponticum scariosum Lam., Centaurea jacea L., Centaurea scabiosa L., Centaurea cyanus L., Cnicus benedictus L.). A detailed verbal and graphical survey of the analysed anatomical features is provided. Several characters were finally extracted which allow for discrimination of the examined species and may be effectively used for drug quality controls. PMID:21617780

  7. [Systematic evaluation on clinical literature related with treatment of Parkinson's disease with traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-min; Tang, Xiang-jiang; Lao, Ying-rong

    2005-07-01

    To analyze the quality of scientific research design of clinical literature related with treatment of Parkinson's disease with traditional Chinese medicine, so as to objectively evaluate the therapeutic effect of TCM. According to principles of evidence-based medicine, clinical epidemiology/design measurement evaluation (DME), the "Table of Systematic Evaluation of Quality and Information Collection for TCM Clinical Research Literature" were established and used to evaluate clinical control trial literature related with treatment of Parkinson's disease with TCM published during 1979 to 2000. The method of randomization was not described in 66.7% of the literature. Although randomized design was declared in 33.3 %, problems or mistakes of randomized allocation still existed in them. No record about the state of dropped out or absconded cases in follow-up study and without any record of samples screening presented in all literature. There were some problems of key links concerning samples' homogeneity, outcome indexes selection, conclusion deduction and so on, which could also influence the quality and reliability of randomized controlled trials. Methodological design of clinical research of TCM on Parkinson's disease should be strengthened.

  8. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Stefano; Lanfranco, Andrea; Dellabianca, Antonio; Lumelli, Diego; Giorgi, Ines; Mazzacane, Fulvio; Fusi, Camilla; Scafa, Fabrizio; Candura, Stefano M

    2011-11-16

    The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV). After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service), the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder). Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females) suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65%) of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors) than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work.

  9. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonini Stefano

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49 for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV. Results After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service, the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder. Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65% of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. Conclusions At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work.

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for work related musculoskeletal disorders associated with job contentment in dental professionals: Indian outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-04-01

    High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD. Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (PComplementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders.

  11. Relative effectiveness assessments of oncology medicines for pricing and reimbursement decisions in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, S; Lipska, I; Leonardo Alves, T; Meijboom, K; Elsada, A; Vervölgyi, V; d'Andon, A; Timoney, A; Leufkens, H G; De Boer, A; Goettsch, W G

    2016-09-01

    There is a debate on the added clinical value of new, expensive, anticancer treatments. Among European decision makers, the relevance of commonly used end points in trials, especially overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and quality of life (QoL), varies, leading to the available evidence being valued differently. This research studies the extent to which the value of end points for cancer medicines differs among European decision makers. We compared guidelines and relative effectiveness assessments (REAs) of medicines for pricing or reimbursement decisions in England, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Poland, and Scotland. Anticancer medicines that received marketing authorization in Europe between 2011 and 2013 with at least four available national REAs were evaluated. A total of 79 REAs were included. Health technology assessment (HTA) guidelines indicate a preference for clinically and patient relevant end points such as OS and QoL above surrogate end points. Most guidelines do not specify whether PFS is considered a surrogate or patient-relevant end point. The number of REAs included per jurisdiction varied between 7 (The Netherlands) and 18 (Germany). OS data were included in all REAs and were the preferred end point by HTA agencies, but these data were not always mature or robust. QoL data are included in only 54% of the REAs, with a limited impact on the recommendations. PFS data are included in 70% of the REAs, but the extent to which HTA agencies find PFS relevant varies. European decision-making on relative effectiveness of anticancer medicines is affected by a gap in requested versus available clinical evidence, mainly because the regulator is willing to accept some degree of clinical uncertainty. A multi-stakeholder debate would be essential to align concrete robust evidence requirements in oncology and a collectively shared definition for relevant clinical benefit, which will benefit patients and society in general. © The Author

  12. [Study of traditional Chinese medicine syndrome features of AIDS-related chronic diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Liang; Wang, Rong-Bing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Gao, Hui; Tan, Xing-Hua; Wang, Cui-Fang; Li, Feng

    2013-08-01

    To study the AIDS-related chronic diarrhea in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical manifestations and syndrome factors, explore the characteristics of syndrome. A multicenter, prospective collection of 311 cases of AIDS patients with chronic diarrhea, study the characteristics of TCM syndrome by using the method of descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis. The common clinical manifestation of TCM: fatigue (229 cases, 73.63%), bowel (229 cases, 68.81%), diarrhea (194 cases, 62.38%), thin fur (201 cases, 64.63%), pink tongue (166 cases, 53.38%), greasy fur, thready pulse (126 cases, 40.51%), sink vein (64 cases, 20.58%), slippery pulse. 17 common factors were extracted, common disease syndrome factor as the spleen, stomach, liver, gallbladder and colon syndrome factors of disease, Qi, Yang deficiency, Qi stagnation, dampness and heat evil. AIDS-related chronic diarrhea symptoms involving multiple organs, the disease belongs to deficiency and excess.

  13. Ultrafast molecular photoionization by two-color orthogonally polarized ultraviolet laser pulses: Effects of relative pulse phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2017-09-01

    We present molecular photoionization by two-color 2ω1 =ω2 orthogonally polarized ultraviolet laser pulses. Simulations are performed on aligned H+ by numerically solving time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Two ionization processes with one ω2 photon interfering with two ω1 photon absorption are studied at different molecular alignments. Molecular frame photoelectron momentum and angular distributions exhibit asymmetries which are functions of the relative pulse phase. For resonant excitation processes by the ω1 pulse, symmetric distributions are obtained. An attosecond ionization model is adopted to describe the ultrafast ionization dynamics. The dependence of the ionization asymmetry on the molecular alignment allows to further monitor interference effects on orbital symmetry.

  14. Factors influencing emergency medicine physicians' management of sports-related concussions: a community-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Stephen; Kothari, Rashmi; Koestner, Amy; Mohney, Gretchen; Baker, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Numerous guidelines to grade and manage sports-related concussions have been published. However, little is known about how frequently they are implemented in the emergency department. This study evaluates the current practices of emergency physicians (EPs) in managing sports-related concussions. To evaluate the current practice of EP evaluation and management of sports-related concussions. All EPs and emergency medicine residents in Kalamazoo County were surveyed regarding their management of sports-related concussions. The surveys obtained demographic data, participants' use of guidelines, and the importance of clinical and non-clinical factors in deciding when to allow a player to return to play. Of the 73 EP respondents, only 23% used a nationally recognized guideline, with no significant difference between attending and resident EPs. The symptomatic complaints of loss of consciousness, amnesia of the event, and difficulty concentrating were ranked most important by EPs in assessing patients with sports-related concussions. Among non-clinical factors, residents were significantly more likely than attendings to report that medical-legal, parental, and players' concerns were more likely to influence their decision in allowing a patient to return to play. EPs take into consideration important clinical factors in assessing patients with sports-related concussion. However, almost 75% do not use any nationally recognized guideline in their evaluation. Residents are more likely than attendings to be influenced by non-clinical factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [The relative's need of participation in the care plan in a general medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Giovanna; Finotto, Stefano; Paverelli, Luisa; Carpanoni, Marika; Casadei, Elena Turroni

    2006-01-01

    All the scientific literature agrees on the fact that the shelter in hospital is a delicate moment for the patient. Also for relatives the shelter in hospital of their dear one is not of easy management, often they are excluded, insecure, alone and with a frankly uncertain role. The purpose of this study is to explore the role and the needs perceived from the relatives of an in-patient in a general medicine unit and to explore which role and which needs of the relatives are perceived from the nurses of a same ward. The sample of the study consisted of 49 relatives of in-patients in the ward of Medicina III dell'Azienda Ospedaliera di Reggio Emilia and of 18 nurses of the same ward. It was found that information is the most important need expressed by the relatives and that for the nurses is hard to satisfy it. Moreover, the nurses haven't a clear idea of the relative's role and they are inclined to exclude them from the care project.

  16. Exploring culturally and linguistically diverse consumer needs in relation to medicines use and health information within the pharmacy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Annim; Saini, Bandana; Chaar, Betty Bouad

    2015-01-01

    Low health literacy may result in adverse health outcomes for patients and is a problem faced by countries with multi-ethnic demography. For those of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, this problem can be compounded by language barriers such as low English proficiency (LEP). The pharmacy is often the last point of health-care provider contact before patients begin taking their medicines and the first point of care for minor ailments. There is a paucity of data exploring or establishing the needs of this population with respect to general medicine use/health information and pharmacist assistance. This study aimed to investigate the needs of CALD Australians with low or negligible English proficiency, specifically in regards to their understanding of health and medicines and the role of pharmacy in achieving best medicine use outcomes for this population. A qualitative method was employed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals of CALD backgrounds with a self-reported low or negligible English proficiency. The interviews explored past experiences with medicines use and interaction with health care professionals. A grounded theory approach with the method of constant comparison was undertaken for analyzing the data. Interviews were conducted until there was a saturation of themes. Thirty-one interviews were conducted, and data analyses identified themes relating to medicine use of CALD community members which were broadly categorized into: (1) health information, (2) interactions with health care professionals, (3) social networks and (4) perceptions and beliefs influencing health-related behavior. In CALD communities there are significant barriers to patient understanding and optimal use of medicines. There is significant potential for pharmacy to facilitate in addressing these issues as currently pharmacy is largely playing the role of dispenser of medicines. Whilst timely access of medicines is being ensured, there seems

  17. Recurrence relations for orthogonal polynomials for PDEs in polar and cylindrical geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Megan; Lambers, James V

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces two families of orthogonal polynomials on the interval (-1,1), with weight function [Formula: see text]. The first family satisfies the boundary condition [Formula: see text], and the second one satisfies the boundary conditions [Formula: see text]. These boundary conditions arise naturally from PDEs defined on a disk with Dirichlet boundary conditions and the requirement of regularity in Cartesian coordinates. The families of orthogonal polynomials are obtained by orthogonalizing short linear combinations of Legendre polynomials that satisfy the same boundary conditions. Then, the three-term recurrence relations are derived. Finally, it is shown that from these recurrence relations, one can efficiently compute the corresponding recurrences for generalized Jacobi polynomials that satisfy the same boundary conditions.

  18. Constitution of traditional chinese medicine and related factors in women of childbearing age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao-Yu Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigates the constitution of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM among women who want to be pregnant in one year and explores factors related to TCM constitution. Methods: This study was conducted on women who participated in free preconception check-ups provided by the Zhabei District Maternity and Child Care Center in Shanghai, China. The information regarding the female demographic characteristics, physical condition, history of pregnancy and childbearing, diet and behavior, and social psychological factors was collected, and TCM constitution assessment was performed. The Chi-square test, t-test, logistic regression analysis, and multinomial logistic regression analysis were used to explore the related factors of TCM constitution. Results: The participants in this study were aged 28.3 ± 3.0 years. Approximately fifty-five women in this study had Unbalanced Constitution. Logistic regression analysis showed that Shanghai residence, dysmenorrhea, gum bleeding, aversion to vegetables, preference for raw meat, job stress, and economic stress were significantly and negatively associated with Balanced Constitution. Multinomial logistic analysis showed that Shanghai residence was significantly associated with Yang-deficiency, Yin-deficiency, and Stagnant Qi Constitutions; gum bleeding was significantly associated with Yin-deficiency, Stagnant Blood, Stagnant Qi, and Inherited Special Constitutions; aversion to vegetables was significantly associated with Damp-heat Constitution; job stress was significantly associated with Yang-deficiency, Phlegm-dampness, Damp-heat, Stagnant Blood, and Stagnant Qi Constitutions; and economic stress was significantly associated with Yang-deficiency, and Stagnant Qi Constitutions. Conclusion: The application of TCM constitution to preconception care would be beneficial for early identification of potential TCM constitution risks and be beneficial for early intervention (e.g., health

  19. Extracting relations from traditional Chinese medicine literature via heterogeneous entity networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Huaiyu; Moens, Marie-Francine; Luyten, Walter; Zhou, Xuezhong; Mei, Qiaozhu; Liu, Lu; Tang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a unique and complex medical system that has developed over thousands of years. This article studies the problem of automatically extracting meaningful relations of entities from TCM literature, for the purposes of assisting clinical treatment or poly-pharmacology research and promoting the understanding of TCM in Western countries. Instead of separately extracting each relation from a single sentence or document, we propose to collectively and globally extract multiple types of relations (eg, herb-syndrome, herb-disease, formula-syndrome, formula-disease, and syndrome-disease relations) from the entire corpus of TCM literature, from the perspective of network mining. In our analysis, we first constructed heterogeneous entity networks from the TCM literature, in which each edge is a candidate relation, then used a heterogeneous factor graph model (HFGM) to simultaneously infer the existence of all the edges. We also employed a semi-supervised learning algorithm estimate the model's parameters. We performed our method to extract relations from a large dataset consisting of more than 100,000 TCM article abstracts. Our results show that the performance of the HFGM at extracting all types of relations from TCM literature was significantly better than a traditional support vector machine (SVM) classifier (increasing the average precision by 11.09%, the recall by 13.83%, and the F1-measure by 12.47% for different types of relations, compared with a traditional SVM classifier). This study exploits the power of collective inference and proposes an HFGM based on heterogeneous entity networks, which significantly improved our ability to extract relations from TCM literature. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Medicinal Plants or Related Natural Products for Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone de Souza Nascimento

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the effects of medicinal plants (MPs or related natural products (RNPs on fibromyalgia (FM patients, we evaluate the possible benefits and advantages of MP or RNP for the treatment of FM based on eight randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs involving 475 patients. The methodological quality of all studies included was determined according to JADAD and “Risk of Bias” with the criteria in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions 5.1.0. Evidence suggests significant benefits of MP or RNP in sleep disruption, pain, depression, joint stiffness, anxiety, physical function, and quality of life. Our results demonstrated that MP or RNP had significant effects on improving the symptoms of FM compared to conventional drug or placebo; longer tests are required to determine the duration of the treatment and characterize the long-term safety of using MP, thus suggesting effective alternative therapies in the treatment of pain with minimized side effects.

  1. Relations between Spiritism and Medicine in Modern Rio Grande do Sul: Apometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Teixeira Weber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many investigations have addressed the new perspectives of the history of medicine in the last few years, accounting for the integration of subjects that only now emerge as speakers, doctors, healers, and adepts of religious activities. This article discusses the historical experience of an espírita group led by Dr. José Lacerda de Azevedo, involved in the development of a healing technique in the Hospital Espírita de Porto Alegre (hepa, Brazil, between 1964 and 1986. The group was associated to an espírita perspective in the treatment of illnesses. The technique, called apometry, is characterized by being a system that aims to reconcile the principles of various religions through a scientific approach. The case of apometry evidences the existence of an extended network of social and institutional relations based on the promotion of alternate spaces of healing.

  2. Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Hou

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes substantial public health care burdens. Intensive efforts have been made to find effective and safe disease-modifying treatment and symptomatic intervention alternatives against AD. Smart Soup (SS, a Chinese medicine formula composed of Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii (AT, Poria cum Radix Pini (PRP and Radix Polygalae (RP, is a typical prescription against memory deficits. Here, we assessed the efficacy of SS against AD. Oral administration of SS ameliorated the cognitive impairment of AD transgenic mice, with reduced Aβ levels, retarded Aβ amyloidosis and reduced Aβ-induced gliosis and neuronal loss in the brains of AD mice. Consistently, SS treatment reduced amyloid-related locomotor dysfunctions and premature death of AD transgenic Drosophila. Mechanistic studies showed that RP reduced Aβ generation, whereas AT and PRP exerted neuroprotective effects against Aβ. Taken together, our study indicates that SS could be effective against AD, providing a practical therapeutic strategy against the disease.

  3. Cancer-Related Stress and Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita D. Chandwani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A cancer diagnosis elicits strong psychophysiological reactions that characterize stress. Stress is experienced by all patients but is usually not discussed during patient-healthcare professional interaction; thus underdiagnosed, very few are referred to support services. The prevalence of CAM use in patients with history of cancer is growing. The purpose of the paper is to review the aspects of cancer-related stress and interventions of commonly used complementary and alternative techniques/products for amelioration of cancer-related stress. Feasibility of intervention of several CAM techniques and products commonly used by cancer patients and survivors has been established in some cancer populations. Efficacy of some CAM techniques and products in reducing stress has been documented as well as stress-related symptoms in patients with cancer such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, yoga, Tai Chi Chuan, acupuncture, energy-based techniques, and physical activity. Much of the research limitations include small study samples and variety of intervention length and content. Efficacy and safety of many CAM techniques and some herbs and vitamin B and D supplements need to be confirmed in further studies using scientific methodology. Several complementary and alternative medicine therapies could be integrated into standard cancer care to ameliorate cancer-related stress.

  4. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-01-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N 2 on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm 2 , to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  5. [Relations between the scientific thought and the medicine: the contributions of Plato and Aristotle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjeltia, K Zouaoui; Lelubre, C

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of philosophy and rational thought, a question has been raised: Is medicine an art, a science, a technique, or the three of them? In this paper we discuss two monuments of Western thought that have approached this topic: Plato and Aristotle. For Plato, medicine is focused on what is transient and changing and therefore it is a subordinate science. However, he has a positive view because it presupposes knowledge of all and he takes medicine as a dialectical model. Aristotle places medicine in his classification of sciences. He emphasizes the idea that the purpose of medicine is based on what "happens most often" and insists on essential role of experimentation. It is remarkable to notice that these ideas developed 2.500 years ago are still relevant and remain the core of the epistemological conceptions of modern medicine.

  6. Integration of naturopathic medicine into acute inpatient care: An approach for patient-centred medicine under diagnosis-related groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeyke, Tobias; Nöhammer, Elisabeth; Scheuer, Hans Christoph; Stummer, Harald

    2017-08-01

    The integration of naturopathic methods into acute inpatient care has been the subject of very few scientific studies. Patient expectations of the service received in hospital are increasing, and the integration of naturopathy into clinical practice can serve as Unique Selling Proposition. The present study was conducted over a period of two years. In total, over 1700 patients were included in the study. The setting is an acute hospital specialising in a multimodal, patient-centred approach to treatment. Patient satisfaction with the use of holistic care, patient perception of adherence to treatment and the amount of time care staff spend with patients were all investigated. The patients' principal diagnoses were also recorded using the DRG classification system, as were the number of concomitant diseases and the length of their stay in hospital. The majority of patients rate the integration of complementary care in the acute hospital very positively. The effects on patient perception of adherence to treatment and the amount of time care staff spend with patients are also assessed positively. At the same time, we can see that patients who receive patient-centred care in this study predominantly suffer from diseases and disorders of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, diseases of the nervous system and mental diseases and disorders. They also have numerous concomitant diseases. It could be shown that patients are very satisfied with the combination of naturopathy and academic medicine and with approaches that take patient preferences into account. Integrating naturopathy can be considered for multimorbid patients, in particular. Moreover, patient-centred care can improve staff satisfaction levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Europe: Health-related and sociodemographic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Laura M; Kemppainen, Teemu T; Reippainen, Jutta A; Salmenniemi, Suvi T; Vuolanto, Pia H

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research was to study health-related and sociodemographic determinants of the use of different complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments in Europe and differences in CAM use in various European countries. The study was based on a design-based logistic regression analysis of the European Social Survey (ESS), Round 7. We distinguished four CAM modalities: manual therapies, alternative medicinal systems, traditional Asian medical systems and mind-body therapies. In total, 25.9% of the general population had used CAM during the last 12 months. Typically, only one CAM treatment had been used, and it was used more often as complementary rather than alternative treatment. The use of CAM varied greatly by country, from 10% in Hungary to almost 40% in Germany. Compared to those in good health, the use of CAM was two to fourfold greater among those with health problems. The health profiles of users of different CAM modalities varied. For example, back or neck pain was associated with all types of CAM, whereas depression was associated only with the use of mind-body therapies. Individuals with difficult to diagnose health conditions were more inclined to utilize CAM, and CAM use was more common among women and those with a higher education. Lower income was associated with the use of mind-body therapies, whereas the other three CAM modalities were associated with higher income. Help-seeking differed according to the health problem, something that should be acknowledged by clinical professionals to ensure safe care. The findings also point towards possible socioeconomic inequalities in health service use.

  8. Drug related problems identified by clinical pharmacist at the Internal Medicine Ward in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunahlah, Nibal; Elawaisi, Anfal; Velibeyoglu, Fatih Mehmet; Sancar, Mesut

    2018-01-29

    Background Drug-related problems (DRPs) interfere with patient optimal therapeutic outcomes and may be associated with higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditures. Objective This study aimed to identify DRPs and their causes in a Turkish hospital. Setting Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Teaching and Research Hospital, Internal Medicine Ward, Istanbul, Turkey. Method Cross-sectional study included a total of 100 patients. Patient demographics, medications, and history were evaluated. Data regarding recent medications were analyzed by two clinical pharmacists and an Internal Medicine physician. The DRPs were identified via V7.0 PCNE classification. Lexicomp ® was used to assess the drug-drug interactions. UpToDate ® recommendations and national guidelines were applied in the assessment of compliance with approved medication procedures. Main outcome measures Number and causes of the potential DRPs. Results At least one potential DRP was seen in 80% of the patients and 163 potential DRPs were identified (average = 1.6 DRPs/patient). The most common causes of DRPs were errors in drug selection (44.78%), dose selection (27.61%) and medication procedures (21.47%). There were significant correlations (p < 0.05) between DRPs and age (r = 0.4), number of drugs used (r = 0.32), duration of hospitalization (r = 0.25), renal impairment (r = - 0.34) and inflammation (r = 0.31). Conclusion The majority of the patients had DRPs. Patients with renal impairment, inflammation, polypharmacy or an extended hospital stay had a much higher chance of developing DRPs.

  9. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not y...

  10. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  11. Polar mesosphere summer echo strength in relation to solar variability and geomagnetic activity during 1997–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Smirnova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on measurements of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE with the 52 MHz radar ESRAD, located near Kiruna, in Northern Sweden, during the summers of 1997–2009. Here, a new independent calibration method allowing estimation of possible changes in antenna feed losses and transmitter output is described and implemented for accurate calculation of year-to-year variations of PMSE strength (expressed in absolute units – radar volume reflectivity η. The method is based on radar-radiosonde comparisons in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere region simultaneously with PMSE observations. Inter-annual variations of PMSE volume reflectivity are found to be strongly positively correlated with the local geomagnetic K-index, both when averaged over all times of the day, and when considering 3-h UT intervals separately. Increased electron density due to energetic particle precipitation from the magnetosphere is suggested as one of the possible reasons for such a correlation. Enhanced ionospheric electric field may be another reason but this requires further study. Multi-regression analysis of inter-annual variations of PMSE η shows also an anti-correlation with solar 10.7 cm flux and the absence of any statistically significant trend in PMSE strength over the interval considered (13-years. Variations related to solar flux and K-index account for 86% of the year-to-year variations in radar volume reflectivity.

  12. Elements related to attrition of women faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Pooja

    Recent studies have shown that the number of women faculty in academic medicine is much lesser than the number of women that are graduating from medical schools. Many academic institutes face the challenge of retaining talented faculty and this attrition from academic medicine prevents career advancement of women faculty. This case study attempts to identify some of the reasons for dissatisfaction that may be related to the attrition of women medical faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine. Data was collected using a job satisfaction survey, which consisted of various constructs that are part of a faculty's job and proxy measures to gather the faculty's intent to leave their current position at the University of Pittsburgh or academic medicine in general. The survey results showed that although women faculty were satisfied with their job at the University of Pittsburgh, there are some important factors that influenced their decision of potentially dropping out. The main reasons cited by the women faculty were related to funding pressures, work-life balance, mentoring of junior faculty and the amount of time spent on clinical responsibilities. The analysis of proxy measures showed that if women faculty decided to leave University of Pittsburgh, it would most probably be due to better opportunity elsewhere followed by pressure to get funding. The results of this study aim to provide the School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh with information related to attrition of its women faculty and provide suggestions for implications for policy to retain their women faculty.

  13. TNF-α decreases VEGF secretion in highly polarized RPE cells but increases it in non-polarized RPE cells related to crosstalk between JNK and NF-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Terasaki

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in situ is critical for maintaining the homeostasis of the retina and choroid. VEGF is also involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We studied the effect of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α on the secretion of VEGF in polarized and non-polarized RPE cells (P-RPE cells and N-RPE cells, respectively in culture and in situ in rats. A subretinal injection of TNF-α caused a decrease in VEGF expression and choroidal atrophy. Porcine RPE cells were seeded on Transwell™ filters, and their maturation and polarization were confirmed by the asymmetrical VEGF secretion and trans electrical resistance. Exposure to TNF-α decreased the VEGF secretion in P-RPE cells but increased it in N-RPE cells in culture. TNF-α inactivated JNK in P-RPE cells but activated it in N-RPE cells, and TNF-α activated NF-κB in P-RPE cells but not in N-RPE cells. Inhibition of NF-κB activated JNK in both types of RPE cells indicating crosstalk between JNK and NF-κB. TNF-α induced the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on JNK in P-RPE cells because NF-κB is continuously inactivated. In N-RPE cells, however, it was not evident because NF-κB was already activated. The basic activation pattern of JNK and NF-κB and their crosstalk led to opposing responses of RPE cells to TNF-α. These results suggest that VEGF secretion under inflammatory conditions depends on cellular polarization, and the TNF-α-induced VEGF down-regulation may result in choroidal atrophy in polarized physiological RPE cells. TNF-α-induced VEGF up-regulation may cause neovascularization by non-polarized or non-physiological RPE cells.

  14. Quantifying federal funding and scholarly output related to the academic emergency medicine consensus conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Dinh, Tu; May, Larissa; Yadav, Kabir; Gaddis, Gary M; Cone, David C

    2014-01-01

    Every year since 2000, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) has presented a one-day consensus conference to generate a research agenda for advancement of a scientific topic. One of the 12 annual issues of AEM is reserved for the proceedings of these conferences. The purpose of this study was to measure academic productivity of these conferences by evaluating subsequent federal research funding received by authors of conference manuscripts and calculating citation counts of conference papers. This was a cross-sectional study. In 2012, the NIH RePORTER system was searched to identify subsequent federal funding obtained by authors of the consensus conference issues from 2000 to 2010. Funded projects were coded as related or unrelated to conference topic. Citation counts for all conference manuscripts were quantified using Scopus and Google Scholar. Simple descriptive statistics were reported. Eight hundred fifty-two individual authors contributed to 280 papers published in the 11 consensus conference issues. One hundred thirty-seven authors (16%) obtained funding for 318 projects. A median of 22 topic-related projects per conference (range 10-97) accounted for a median of $20,488,331 per conference (range $7,779,512 to $122,918,205). The average (± SD) number of citations per paper was 15.7 ± 20.5 in Scopus and 23.7 ± 32.6 in Google Scholar. The authors of consensus conference manuscripts obtained significant federal grant support for follow-up research related to conference themes. In addition, the manuscripts generated by these conferences were frequently cited. Conferences devoted to research agenda development appear to be an academically worthwhile endeavor.

  15. Why don't girls choose technological studies? Adolescents' stereotypes and attitudes towards studies related to medicine or engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sáez, Mercedes; Puertas, Susana; Sáinz, Milagros

    2011-05-01

    Gender differences in choice of studies emerge already in adolescence. Two studies with adolescents are presented, the goal of which is to explore the influence of gender by assessing males and females who choose studies related to Medicine or Engineering. Study 1, correlational (N = 330, mean age 15.9, 56.7% girls), shows that girls who choose technology are more poorly appraised than girls who choose other studies. Study 2 (N = 130; mean age 16.77, 56.2% girls), experimental, measures implicit attitudes (using the IAT) towards males and females from Medicine and Engineering. Implicit attitudes are more favorable towards women if they are studying Medicine and towards men if they study Engineering. The results are analyzed with relation to the percentages of boys and girls in the different fields of study.

  16. [Veterinary medicine of the GDR in strained relations between technical instructions and political guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, H; Azar, J

    2003-01-01

    The development of Veterinary Medicine in the Soviet Occupation Zone in Germany and the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) is sketched in highlights. After the collectivization of agriculture (1960) a centralistically controlled national veterinary system was established. It was suited to the requirements of the industrially organized animal production. The successive classification of socialistic veterinary administration was associated with the following matters: the extension of veterinary subject matters, a vertical division of work with the aid of newly created technical veterinary professions, and a penetration of the profession with political guidelines. As the professional level of the veterinary system in the GDR was relatively high the reflection in retrospective needs to be evaluated in a differentiated way considering the textual and social conditions. In spite of centralism and indoctrination the veterinary system remained professionally autonomous with islands of political independence, which sustained the identity of this profession. The latter formed the base for self renewal of the East German veterinary system at the end of the socialistic area 1989/1990.

  17. Comparative analysis of diosgenin in Dioscorea species and related medicinal plants by UPLC-DAD-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tao; Fan, Lan-Lan; Chen, Hong-Li; Zhu, Guo-Yuan; Suen, Hau-Man; Tang, Yi-Na; Zhu, Lin; Chu, Chu; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Chen, Hu-Biao

    2014-08-09

    Dioscorea is a genus of flowering plants, and some Dioscorea species are known and used as a source for the steroidal sapogenin diosgenin. To screen potential resource from Dioscorea species and related medicinal plants for diosgenin extraction, a rapid method to compare the contents of diosgenin in various plants is crucial. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with diode array detection (DAD) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) method was developed for identification and determination of diosgenin in various plants. A comprehensive validation of the developed method was conducted. Twenty-four batches of plant samples from four Dioscorea species, one Smilax species and two Heterosmilax species were analyzed by using the developed method.The present method presented good sensitivity, precision and accuracy. Diosgenin was found in three Dioscorea species and one Heterosmilax species, namely D. zingiberensis, D. septemloba, D. collettii and H. yunnanensis. The method is suitable for the screening of diosgenin resources from plants. D. zingiberensis is an important resource for diosgenin harvesting.

  18. Deliberate Practice in Medicine: The Motivation to Engage in Work-Related Learning and Its Contribution to Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wiel, Margje W. J.; Van den Bossche, Piet

    2013-01-01

    This study examined physicians' motivation to engage in work-related learning and its contribution to expertise development beyond work experience. Based on deliberate practice theory, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 residents and 28 experienced physicians in internal medicine, focusing on the activities they engaged in during…

  19. Identification of the Flow of Innovations in Tourism Related to Aesthetic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfiluk Eugenia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic medicine is, next to the wellness and spa, one of the most rapidly growing segments of health tourism. Its dynamic growth is closely linked to innovative offers (perhaps better described as “product innovation”. To date, however, there have been no scientific studies focusing on this market. Services in the field of aesthetic medicine are usually discussed descriptively as a subcategory of medical tourism, and innovation in this sector remains unexplored.

  20. Medicinal Plants Used for Treatment of Diarrhoeal Related Diseases in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizuneh Woldeab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of relevant antidiarrhoeal medicinal plants based on the fundamental knowledge accumulated by indigenous people of Ethiopia. The review includes an inventory carried out on the phytochemical and pharmacological analysis of plant species used in the treatments of diarrhoeal diseases. This study is based on a review of the literature published in scientific journals, books, theses, proceedings, and reports. A total of 132 medicinal plants used by local people of Ethiopia are reported in the reviewed literature. Herbs (43.6% were the primary source of medicinal plants, followed by trees (27%. Some findings include the predominance of leaf material used (78%, as well as the frequent use of crushing of the plant parts (38% as a mode of preparation. This study demonstrates the importance of traditional medicines in the treatment of basic human ailments such as diarrhoeal diseases in Ethiopia. Baseline information gaps were observed in different regions of Ethiopia. Thus, documentation of the knowledge held by other regions of Ethiopia that have so far received less attention and urban ethnobotany is recommended for future ethnobotanical studies. In addition, phytochemical studies are recommended mainly on frequently utilized medicinal plants for treatment of diarrhoeal diseases which can serve as a basis for future investigation of modern drug development. Although societies in Ethiopia have long used medicinal plants for diarrhoeal diseases treatment, it is also a good practice to perform toxicological tests.

  1. Responsibilities of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Provider in the Treatment and Prevention of Climate Change-Related Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkison, William B; Kearney, Gregory D; Saberi, Pouné; Guidotti, Tee; McCarthy, Ronda; Cook-Shimanek, Margaret; Pensa, Mellisa A; Nabeel, Ismail

    2018-02-01

    : Workers are uniquely susceptible to the health hazards imposed by environmental changes. Occupational and environmental medicine (OEM) providers are at the forefront of emerging health issues pertaining to working populations including climate change, and must be prepared to recognize, respond to, and mitigate climate change-related health effects in workers. This guidance document from the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine focuses on North American workers health effects that may occur as a result of climate change and describes the responsibilities of the OEM provider in responding to these health challenges.

  2. Skull pathology in East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears (Ursus maritimus) during 1892 to 2002 in relation to organochlorine pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonne, Christian; Riget, Frank F.; Dietz, Rune; Wiig, Oystein; Kirkegaard, Maja; Born, Erik W.

    2007-01-01

    East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are heavily polluted with long-range transported organochlorines such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). To investigate the negative health impacts, a time-trend study of skull pathology was conducted on 269 East Greenland and 241 Svalbard polar bears. The skulls were sampled during 1892-2002 and 1964-1992, respectively. Seven different pathological changes were found: adonti, displacement of teeth, caries, osseous proliferations, exostosis, tooth wear and periodontitis. Only tooth wear and periodontitis was in a prevalence that allowed statistical treatment. The most severe cases of tooth wear and periodontitis were accompanied by a substantial loss of alveolar bone structure. The prevalence of tooth wear and periodontitis increased significantly with age (p < 0.001) with incisor wear being more severe than in canines, premolars and molars (p < 0.001). No sex difference was found for tooth wear (p = 0.22) while a significant difference between sexes was found for periodontitis (p = 0.01) with males having higher prevalence than females (odds ratio of 2.5 for males:females). In East Greenland, the prevalence of tooth wear was significantly higher in polar bears collected in the pre pollution period (< 1960) than in bears sampled during polluted periods (1960-1980 and 1981-2002) (p < 0.001). Regarding periodontitis, the prevalence was not significantly different between pre-pollution and pollution periods (p = 0.309). Polar bears from Svalbard had significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear (p < 0.001) and periodontitis (p = 0.02) than polar bears from East Greenland. The tooth wear and periodontitis odds ratios for Svalbard:East Greenland were 135 and 2.6, respectively. Hence, we found a clear age/sex link and geographical difference but no evidence for an association between skull pathology and exposure to organochlorines in East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears

  3. Skull pathology in East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears (Ursus maritimus) during 1892 to 2002 in relation to organochlorine pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonne, Christian [National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Arctic Environment, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark) and Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Buelowsvej 17, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)]. E-mail: csh@dmu.dk; Riget, Frank F. [National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Arctic Environment, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Dietz, Rune [National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Arctic Environment, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Wiig, Oystein [Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, PO Box 1172 Blindern, N-0562 Oslo (Norway); Kirkegaard, Maja [National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Arctic Environment, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Born, Erik W. [Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, PO Box 570, DK-3900 Nuuk, Greenland (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are heavily polluted with long-range transported organochlorines such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). To investigate the negative health impacts, a time-trend study of skull pathology was conducted on 269 East Greenland and 241 Svalbard polar bears. The skulls were sampled during 1892-2002 and 1964-1992, respectively. Seven different pathological changes were found: adonti, displacement of teeth, caries, osseous proliferations, exostosis, tooth wear and periodontitis. Only tooth wear and periodontitis was in a prevalence that allowed statistical treatment. The most severe cases of tooth wear and periodontitis were accompanied by a substantial loss of alveolar bone structure. The prevalence of tooth wear and periodontitis increased significantly with age (p < 0.001) with incisor wear being more severe than in canines, premolars and molars (p < 0.001). No sex difference was found for tooth wear (p = 0.22) while a significant difference between sexes was found for periodontitis (p = 0.01) with males having higher prevalence than females (odds ratio of 2.5 for males:females). In East Greenland, the prevalence of tooth wear was significantly higher in polar bears collected in the pre pollution period (< 1960) than in bears sampled during polluted periods (1960-1980 and 1981-2002) (p < 0.001). Regarding periodontitis, the prevalence was not significantly different between pre-pollution and pollution periods (p = 0.309). Polar bears from Svalbard had significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear (p < 0.001) and periodontitis (p = 0.02) than polar bears from East Greenland. The tooth wear and periodontitis odds ratios for Svalbard:East Greenland were 135 and 2.6, respectively. Hence, we found a clear age/sex link and geographical difference but no evidence for an association between skull pathology and exposure to organochlorines in East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears.

  4. The role of traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo) in the practice of psychosomatic medicine: the usefulness of Kampo in the treatment of the stress-related symptoms of women, especially those with peri-menopausal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiroyama, Takahisa

    2013-10-22

    A serious problem currently plaguing the medical field is the widening gap between academic medicine, which studies the features and causes of illness, and the medical care that patients desire. An example of this gap can be observed in the practice of psychotherapy, which is effective only for certain patients. Kampo medicine that combines the advantages of Western medicine with those of traditional Japanese medicine is currently undergoing a revival in the healthcare sector. The therapeutic policies underlying Kampo medicine are based on the physical constitution and current symptoms of each patient. For this reason, Kampo medicine is referred to as "tailor-made medicine" and has properties similar to "mind and body" or psychosomatic medicine. Some women exhibit multiple undefined stress-related symptoms during the peri-menopausal period. In order to accurately diagnose and provide patient-specific treatment, physicians should not only investigate the various stress factors in patients' lives but should also provide a Sho, or a Kampo diagnosis. The therapeutic approach in Kampo medicine is aimed at harmonizing the mind, body, and spirit; this practice involves the use of narrative and holistic medication that treats the entire being of the patient, resulting in an increased number of specialized treatment plans.There are many Kampo prescriptions tailored to treat women who exhibit various stress-related symptoms. Both Kampo and psychosomatic medicine are based on the principles of narrative-based medicine, and by integrating these two medical systems, an ideal system can be devised to better cope with the various needs of patients. This new medical system established by integrating and harmonizing Western and Eastern medicine can be used for the treatment of women with stress-related symptoms.

  5. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  6. A web-based knowledge management system integrating Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine for relational medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Hernandez, Maria C; Lai-Yuen, Susana K; Piegl, Les A; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-10-26

    This article presents the design of a web-based knowledge management system as a training and research tool for the exploration of key relationships between Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine, in order to facilitate relational medical diagnosis integrating these mainstream healing modalities. The main goal of this system is to facilitate decision-making processes, while developing skills and creating new medical knowledge. Traditional Chinese Medicine can be considered as an ancient relational knowledge-based approach, focusing on balancing interrelated human functions to reach a healthy state. Western Medicine focuses on specialties and body systems and has achieved advanced methods to evaluate the impact of a health disorder on the body functions. Identifying key relationships between Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine opens new approaches for health care practices and can increase the understanding of human medical conditions. Our knowledge management system was designed from initial datasets of symptoms, known diagnosis and treatments, collected from both medicines. The datasets were subjected to process-oriented analysis, hierarchical knowledge representation and relational database interconnection. Web technology was implemented to develop a user-friendly interface, for easy navigation, training and research. Our system was prototyped with a case study on chronic prostatitis. This trial presented the system's capability for users to learn the correlation approach, connecting knowledge in Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine by querying the database, mapping validated medical information, accessing complementary information from official sites, and creating new knowledge as part of the learning process. By addressing the challenging tasks of data acquisition and modeling, organization, storage and transfer, the proposed web-based knowledge management system is presented as a tool for users in medical training and research to explore, learn and

  7. Cordyceps s.l. (Ascomycetes) Species Used as Medicinal Mushrooms are Closely Related with Higher Ability to Produce Cordycepin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Huang, I-Ching; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps s.l. (sensu lato) species have been used as herbal medicines; one of their main constituents is cordycepin. As genome sequencing techniques have become more cost-effective and more popular, more entomogenous fungal genomes have been sequenced and published. Here, we constructed a phylogenetic tree based on 18S rRNA sequences from Cordyceps species and analyzed the copy number of the key enzymes involved in biosynthesis of cordycepin from related fungal genomes that have been published. The sequences of the 18S rRNA gene were examined, and seven single nucleotides were found that could represent the evolutionary history of Cordyceps s.l. and which perfectly fit the phylogenetic tree. Their evolution was influenced mainly by host factors, rather than geographical location. The Cordyceps s.l. species that are used as herbal medicines are closely related in the phylogenetic tree. The major species for Chinese pharmaceutical markets, such as C. militaris and C. sinensis, have higher copy numbers of 5'-nucleotidase and adenylate kinase, and ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), respectively. Moreover, absence of an RNR inhibitor may cause cordycepin accumulation. Presence of an RNR inhibitor may lead to lower cordycepin levels in fungal species in which no medicinal applications have been described. Cordycepin is not only an important secondary metabolite that is used as an herbal medicine, but it also has significance for understanding the evolution of these entomogenous species.

  8. Professional Beliefs Related to the Practice of Pediatric Medicine and School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes that pediatric medicine and school psychology are complementary fields. Five professional beliefs are reviewed: (a) the importance of classification, (b) a preference for evidence-based interventions, (c) an endorsement of advocacy in public policy, (d) the importance of working with the whole child including his/her parents,…

  9. Sedation practice for paediatric nuclear medicine procedures in Denmark related to EANM guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Linda; Andersen, Trine Borup; Petersen, Lars J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine sedation practices for paediatric nuclear medicine examinations. A questionnaire was sent to all nuclear medicine departments in Denmark about sedation practices during 2012. The response rate was 100% (18 departments). Three departments did not examine children at all. The total number of paediatric examinations among the remaining 15 sites varied from 20 to 1,583 (median 191). Sedation practice showed that approximately 50% of the sites regularly (>50% of the patients) used pharmacological sedation for renography in children aged 6-12 months and 1-3 years. A minority of centres (∼15%) regularly used sedation in children aged 0-6 months, and no sites regularly used sedation in children aged and 4-6 years. Similar findings were found for renal scintigraphy. However, one large site used no sedation in children aged 1-3 years for renography but approximately 50% of patients used it in the same age group receiving renal scintigraphy with SPET. There was a trend for reduced use of sedation with increasing total number of paediatric medicine procedures. The most frequently used agents were benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The most common route of administration was rectal, oral, and intravenous. The sedation practices varied considerably among Danish nuclear medicine departments. The sedation of children in clinical practice seemed to be more prevalent than is recommended by guidelines.

  10. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  11. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  12. Nuclear medicine in the monitoring of organ function and the detection of injury related to cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Olmos, R.A.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Schoot, J.B. van der

    1993-01-01

    This article emphasizes the role of nuclear medicine in the monitoring of function to prevent or limit injury in organs in which toxicity related to cancer therapy may have implications for the survival and/or the quality of life of the patient. After a brief discussion of the advantages of nuclear medicine techniques in detecting organ injury, the effect of radiation therapy and chemotherapy on normal tissue is discussed, underlining the need to characterize adverse effects of cancer therapy in long-term survivors. The use of radionuclides to document organ injury and effects from cancer therapy in heart, digestive tract, kidneys, lungs major salivary glands skeleton and brain is then reviewed. In a short section the potential applicability of positron emission tomography in documenting organ toxicity during cancer therapy is discussed. Thanks to the various available radiopharmaceuticals, the ability of the tracers to document specific functional aspects, the improved methods for visualization and quantitation of organ injury and the possibilities of physiological or pharmacological intervention, nuclear medicine gives the clinician potent tools for the monitoring of organ function at risk during cancer therapy. The trend to intensify cancer treatment by combining various treatment modalities and the increasing chances of prolonged survival in a large number of patients call for effective integration of nuclear medicine methods into the recommended guidelines for grading organ injury in clinical oncology. (orig.)

  13. Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Moderate-to-Severe Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ningqun; Li, Jie; Huang, Xiaobo; Chen, Wenqiang; Chen, Yujing

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-to-severe asthma has a substantial impact on the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of the patients. Cordyceps sinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine that is evaluated clinically for the treatment of many diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy, diabetic kidney disease, and lung fibrosis. In order to investigate the effects of Cordyceps sinensis on patients with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma, 120 subjects were randomized to receive Corbin capsule containing Co...

  14. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  15. Tumour angiogenesis pathways: related clinical issues and implications for nuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, Christophe van de; De Winter, Olivier; Dierckx, Rudi Andre; Oltenfreiter, Ruth; Slegers, Guido; Signore, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis is essential for growth, invasion and metastasis. Retrospective studies suggest that it is an independent prognostic factor that merits prospective validation. Furthermore, as tumour blood vessels show many differences from normal vessels and are not genetically unstable, they form a key area for therapy development. However, as anti-angiogenic therapy is primarily cytostatic and not cytotoxic, novel tailor-made specific end-points for treatment monitoring are required. In this regard, suitable molecular parameters for imaging tumour angiogenesis by means of nuclear medicine are being explored. Here we review current knowledge on the multiple pathways controlling tumour angiogenesis and try to assess which are the most clinically relevant for nuclear medicine imaging. Parameters that may influence the imaging potential of radiopharmaceuticals for angiogenesis imaging such as molecular weight and structure, their targeted location within the tumour and their usefulness in terms of specificity and constancy of the targeted molecular pathway are discussed. (orig.)

  16. A modified Delphi study of structures and processes related to medicines management for elderly hospitalised patients in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shemeili, Saeed; Klein, Susan; Strath, Alison; Fares, Saleh; Stewart, Derek

    2016-10-01

    The structures and processes around the management of medicines for elderly, hospitalized patients are ill defined. This study aimed to determine consensus related to strategic and operational approaches in the United Arab Emirates. A modified Delphi technique, consensus study with first round statements developed from systematic reviews related to medicines management. Normalization process theory and the theoretical domains framework were applied in the construction of statements, organized into key elements of medicines management: guidelines for medicines management, medicines reconciliation, medicines selection, prescribing and review, medicines adherence, medicines counselling, health professional training and evaluation research. Seventy per cent (summative agree and strongly agree) was set as the target for consensus. Thirty panellists were recruited, representing senior physicians working within geriatrics, hospital pharmacy and nursing directors, chief health professionals (including social workers) and policy makers within the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi and academics. A high level of consensus was obtained for most statements relating to the structures and processes of medicines management. While consensus was not achieved for targeting only those patients with medicines related issues, it was achieved for focusing on all elderly admissions. Similarly, consensus was not achieved for which professions were most suited to roles but was achieved for trained and competent staff. High levels of consensus were obtained for structures and processes of medicines management relating to elderly hospitalized patients. Trained and competent health professionals were preferred to specific professions for any tasks and that all elderly patients and not targeted patients should be the focus for medicines management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Effect of aerospace weightlessness on cognitive functions and the relative dialectical analysis of Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Liu, Xin-Min; Wu, Li-Sha; Yang, Si-Jin; Wang, Qiong

    2014-03-01

    Aerospace medicine has paid more and more attention to abnormal changes of physiological functions induced by weightlessness and studies on their prevention during space flight. In this paper, the effect of space weightlessness on cognitive functions was introduced. We tried to analyze the correlation between the cognitive function changes and relevant Chinese medical syndromes, thus providing a potential available way to prevent and treat weightlessness induced cognitive deficit during space flight.

  18. Regenerating medicine related to the stem-cells and its mechanisms of action from adults cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Ramirez, Porfirio

    2009-01-01

    Regenerating medicine is a branch of Medicine very developed in past years. Advances in this field have been closely linked with the new knowledge achieved on stem-cells and its ability to become in cells of different tissues. This type of medicine is based on the behaviors adopted by organism to substitute those damaged cells by the healthy ones by different processes in specific tissues. Therapeutic measures used may include the stem-cell transplantation, the use of soluble molecules, genic therapy and tissues engineering. Nowadays, the more used method is the adult stem-cells. However, is not well known the mechanisms by which the transplanted cells could to improve or to promote the tissue regeneration. To explain these mechanisms some hypotheses has been proposed including the cellular trans-differentiation, cells fusion, and the effects secondaries to cells release by cells of different soluble molecules with specific actions; in addition to the autocrine and paracrine effects that may have these soluble factors, it is suggested too the existence of a telecrine action. It is probable that more than one of these mechanisms be executed

  19. Alternatives to relational databases in precision medicine: Comparison of NoSQL approaches for big data storage using supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Enrique Israel

    Improvements in medical and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the production of electronic data over the last decade. As a result, data management is rapidly becoming a major determinant, and urgent challenge, for the development of Precision Medicine. Although successful data management is achievable using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), exponential data growth is a significant contributor to failure scenarios. Growing amounts of data can also be observed in other sectors, such as economics and business, which, together with the previous facts, suggests that alternate database approaches (NoSQL) may soon be required for efficient storage and management of big databases. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to test in the Precision Medicine field since alternate database architectures are complex to assess and means to integrate heterogeneous electronic health records (EHR) with dynamic genomic data are not easily available. In this dissertation, we present a novel set of experiments for identifying NoSQL database approaches that enable effective data storage and management in Precision Medicine using patients' clinical and genomic information from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). The first experiment draws on performance and scalability from biologically meaningful queries with differing complexity and database sizes. The second experiment measures performance and scalability in database updates without schema changes. The third experiment assesses performance and scalability in database updates with schema modifications due dynamic data. We have identified two NoSQL approach, based on Cassandra and Redis, which seems to be the ideal database management systems for our precision medicine queries in terms of performance and scalability. We present NoSQL approaches and show how they can be used to manage clinical and genomic big data. Our research is relevant to the public health since we are focusing on one of the main

  20. Factors contributing to medicine-related problems in adult patients with diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases in Saudi Arabia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hamid, Abdullah Mahdi; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Aljadhey, Hisham; Aslanpour, Zoe

    2017-11-12

    To investigate the factors contributing to medicine-related problems (MRPs) among patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and/or diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted. Interviews were audio recorded then transcribed into Microsoft Word. The transcribed interviews were then imported into the qualitative analysis software NVivo where thematic analysis was applied. Thematic synthesis was achieved by coding and developing subthemes/themes from the findings of the interviews. Five healthcare centres in Najran, Saudi Arabia. 25 adult patients with diabetes and/or CVDs. The study cohort included 16 men and 9 women with a median age of 61.8 years (40-85 years). Diabetes was the main condition encountered among 23 patients and CVDs were reported among 18 patients. Perceived factors leading to MRPs were of four types and related to: patient-, healthcare system-, clinical (condition-) and medicine-related factors. Patient-related factors were related to living situation, religious practices, diet/exercise and patients' behaviour towards the condition and medicines. Healthcare system-related factors comprised sources and availability of medicines, ease of access to healthcare system and patient satisfaction with healthcare providers. Clinical (condition-) related factors associated with both the knowledge and control over condition, and effects of the condition among medicines intake. Medicine-related factors included lack of knowledge about medicines and medicine use. The results of this study uncovered many factors associated with MRPs among patients with CVDs and diabetes in Saudi Arabia, especially in reference to lifestyle and medicine use. Improving communication with healthcare professional alongside the introduction of national clinical guidance would mitigate the unwanted health complications related to medicine use. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All

  1. Simultaneous determination of multiple sesquiterpenes in Curcuma wenyujin herbal medicines and related products with one single reference standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Jing; An, Yue-Wei; Hu, Guang; Yin, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Min

    2013-02-06

    Some Curcuma species are widely used as herbal medicines. Sesquiterpenes are their important bioactive compounds and their quantitative analysis is generally accomplished by gas chromatography (GC) or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), but the instability and high cost of some sesquiterpene reference standards have limited their application. It is necessary to find a practicable means to control the quality of herbal medicines. Using one stable component contained in Curcuma species to determine multiple analogues should be a practical option. In this study, a simple HPLC method for determination of sesquiterpenes using relative response factors (RRFs) has been developed. The easily available and stable active component curdione was selected as the reference compound for calculating the RRFs of the other eight sesquiterpenes, including zedoarondiol (Zedo), isozedoarondiol (Isoz), aerugidiol (Aeru), (4S,5S)-(+)-germacrone-4,5-epoxide (Epox), curcumenone (Curc), neocurdione (Neoc), germacrone (Germ) and furanodiene (Fura). Their RRFs against curdione were between 0.131-1.301, with a good reproducibility. By using the RRFs, the quantification of sesquiterpenes in Curcuma wenyujin herbal medicines and related products was carried out. The method is especially useful for the determination of (4S,5S)-(+)-germacrone-4,5-epoxide, curcumenone, germacrone and furanodiene, which often are regarded as the principle components in Curcuma species, but unstable when were purified. It is an ideal means to analyze the components for which reference standards are not readily available.

  2. Anti-inflammatory, anticholinesterase, antioxidant and phytochemical properties of medicinal plants used for pain-related ailments in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawole, O A; Amoo, S O; Ndhlala, A R; Light, M E; Finnie, J F; Van Staden, J

    2010-02-03

    Extracts of seven South African medicinal plants used traditionally for the treatment of pain-related ailments were evaluated. The study was aimed at evaluating medicinal and therapeutic potentials of the investigated traditional medicinal plants. Plant extracts were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity and other pharmacological properties such as anticholinesterase and antioxidant activities. Phytochemical analysis of total phenolic contents, condensed tannins, gallotannins and flavonoids in the aqueous methanol extracts of the medicinal plants were also carried out. The evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of 50% methanol (50% MeOH), petroleum ether (PE), dichloromethane (DCM) and ethanol (EtOH) plant extracts was done against cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2) enzymes. 50% MeOH, PE, DCM and EtOH extracts were tested for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, while 50% MeOH extracts were tested for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and ferric-reducing power in the antioxidant assays. Total phenolic compounds, condensed tannins, gallotannins and flavonoids were quantitatively determined using spectrophotometric methods. At the screening assay concentration (0.25 microg/microl), 13 extracts showed good COX-1 inhibitory activity (>50%), while good activity was observed in 15 extracts against COX-2 enzyme. All the extracts of Crinum moorei (bulbs) showed good inhibition against both COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. Though not significantly different (P=0.05), the highest COX-1 percentage inhibition (100%) was shown by Aloe ferox leaf PE and Colocasia antiquorum tuber DCM extracts, while Colocasia antiquorum tuber PE extract exhibited the highest (92.7%) percentage inhibition against COX-2. Crinum moorei bulb DCM extract showed the lowest EC(50) value (2.9 microg/ml) in the AChE assay. In addition, good to moderate bioactivities were observed in some extracts of Aloe ferox (leaves), Crinum moorei (bulbs) and Pycnostachys

  3. Fluorine Gauche Effect Explained by Electrostatic Polarization Instead of Hyperconjugation: An Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) and Relative Energy Gradient (REG) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Joseph C R; Popelier, Paul L A

    2018-02-08

    We present an interacting quantum atoms (IQA) study of the gauche effect by comparing 1,2-difluoroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and three conformers of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexafluorocyclohexane. In the 1,2-difluoroethane, the gauche effect is observed in that the gauche conformation is more stable than the anti, whereas in 1,2-dichloroethane the opposite is true. The analysis performed here is exhaustive and unbiased thanks to using the recently introduced relative energy gradient (REG) method [ Thacker , J. C. R. ; Popelier , P. L. A. Theor. Chem. Acc . 2017 , 136 , 86 ], as implemented in the in-house program ANANKE. We challenge the common explanation that hyperconjugation is responsible for the gauche stability in 1,2-difluoroethane and instead present electrostatics as the cause of gauche stability. Our explanation of the gauche effect is also is seen in other molecules displaying local gauche conformations, such as the recently synthesized "all-cis" hexafluorocyclohexane and its conformers where all the fluorine atoms are in the equatorial positions. Using our extension of the traditional IQA methodology that allows for the partitioning of electrostatic terms into polarization and charge transfer, we propose that the cause of gauche stability is 1,3 C···F electrostatic polarization interactions. In other words, if a number of fluorine atoms are aligned, then the stability due to polarization of nearby carbon atoms is increased.

  4. Cannabis in Chinese Medicine: Are Some Traditional Indications Referenced in Ancient Literature Related to Cannabinoids?

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, E. Joseph; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae) has a long history of utilization as a fiber and seed crop in China, and its achenes (“seeds”) as well as other plant parts have been recorded in Chinese medical texts for nearly 2000 years. While the primary applications of cannabis in Chinese medicine center around the use of the achenes, ancient indications for the female inflorescence, and other plant parts include conditions such as pain and mental illness that are the subject of current research into can...

  5. Dietary fat composition, food matrix and relative polarity modulate the micellarization and intestinal uptake of carotenoids from vegetables and fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Palika, Ravindranadh; Jyrwa, Yvette Wilda; Bhaskarachary, K; Pullakhandam, Raghu

    2017-02-01

    Dietary fat increases carotenoid bioavailability by facilitating their transfer to the aqueous micellar fraction during digestion. However, the specific effect of both quantity and type of dietary fat required for optimal carotenoid absorption remained unexplored. In the present study, the effect of amount and type of vegetable oils on carotenoid micellarization from carrot, spinach, drumstick leaves and papaya using in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model have been assessed. Although, dietary fat (0.5-10% w/w) significantly increased the micellarization of carotenoids from all the test foods, the extent of increase was determined by the food matrix (papaya > drumstick = spinach > carrot) and polarity of carotenoids (lutein > β-carotene = α-carotene > lycopene). Among the dietary fats tested the carotenoid micellarization was twofold to threefold higher with dietary fat rich in unsaturated fatty acids (olive oil = soybean oil = sunflower oil) compared to saturated fatty acids (peanut oil = palm oil > coconut oil). Intestinal cell uptake of lutein exceeded that of β-carotene from micellar fraction of spinach leaves digested with various oils. However, cellular uptake of β-carotene is depended on the carotenoid content in micellar fraction rather than the type of fat used. Together these results suggest that food matrix, polarity of carotenoids and type of dietary fat determines the extent of carotenoid micellarization from vegetables and fruits.

  6. Prognostic Ability of Practitioners of Traditional Arabic Medicine: Comparison with Western Methods through a Relative Patient Progress Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Graz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ancient Greek medical theory based on balance or imbalance of humors disappeared in the western world, but does survive elsewhere. Is this survival related to a certain degree of health care efficiency? We explored this hypothesis through a study of classical Greco-Arab medicine in Mauritania. Modern general practitioners evaluated the safety and effectiveness of classical Arabic medicine in a Mauritanian traditional clinic, with a prognosis/follow-up method allowing the following comparisons: (i actual patient progress (clinical outcome compared with what the traditional ‘tabib’ had anticipated (= prognostic ability and (ii patient progress compared with what could be hoped for if the patient were treated by a modern physician in the same neighborhood. The practice appeared fairly safe and, on average, clinical outcome was similar to what could be expected with modern medicine. In some cases, patient progress was better than expected. The ability to correctly predict an individual's clinical outcome did not seem to be better along modern or Greco-Arab theories. Weekly joint meetings (modern and traditional practitioners were spontaneously organized with a modern health centre in the neighborhood. Practitioners of a different medical system can predict patient progress. For the patient, avoiding false expectations with health care and ensuring appropriate referral may be the most important. Prognosis and outcome studies such as the one presented here may help to develop institutions where patients find support in making their choices, not only among several treatment options, but also among several medical systems.

  7. Infectious Diseases Physicians’ Attitudes and Practices Related to Complementary and Integrative Medicine: Results of a National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana D. Shere-Wolfe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and integrative medicine (IM modalities are widely used by patients, including those with infectious diseases (ID. Methods. One thousand randomly selected ID practitioners were surveyed. The survey was divided into domains related to familiarity and recommendation, beliefs and attitudes, and use of CAM/IM modalities. Results. The response rate was 31%. ID physicians were most familiar with vitamin and mineral supplementation (83%, massage (80%, acupuncture (79%, chiropractic (77%, yoga (74%, and herbal medicine (72%. ID physicians most recommended vitamin and mineral supplementation (80% and massage (62%. Yoga, meditation, and acupuncture were recommended by 52%, 45%, and 46%, respectively. Drug interactions, clinical research, and knowledge of CAM/IM modalities were factors that were considered a major influence. Almost 80% of respondents indicated an interest in IM versus 11% for CAM. Most respondents (75% felt that IM modalities are useful, and more than 50% believed that they could directly affect the immune system or disease process. Conclusion. ID physicians expressed a markedly greater interest for IM versus CAM. They appear to be familiar and willing to recommend some CAM/IM modalities and see a role for these in the management of certain infectious diseases. Data regarding clinical efficacy and safety appear to be important factors.

  8. Infectious diseases physicians' attitudes and practices related to complementary and integrative medicine: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shere-Wolfe, Kalpana D; Tilburt, Jon C; D'Adamo, Chris; Berman, Brian; Chesney, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and integrative medicine (IM) modalities are widely used by patients, including those with infectious diseases (ID). Methods. One thousand randomly selected ID practitioners were surveyed. The survey was divided into domains related to familiarity and recommendation, beliefs and attitudes, and use of CAM/IM modalities. Results. The response rate was 31%. ID physicians were most familiar with vitamin and mineral supplementation (83%), massage (80%), acupuncture (79%), chiropractic (77%), yoga (74%), and herbal medicine (72%). ID physicians most recommended vitamin and mineral supplementation (80%) and massage (62%). Yoga, meditation, and acupuncture were recommended by 52%, 45%, and 46%, respectively. Drug interactions, clinical research, and knowledge of CAM/IM modalities were factors that were considered a major influence. Almost 80% of respondents indicated an interest in IM versus 11% for CAM. Most respondents (75%) felt that IM modalities are useful, and more than 50% believed that they could directly affect the immune system or disease process. Conclusion. ID physicians expressed a markedly greater interest for IM versus CAM. They appear to be familiar and willing to recommend some CAM/IM modalities and see a role for these in the management of certain infectious diseases. Data regarding clinical efficacy and safety appear to be important factors.

  9. Marine target detection in quad-pol synthetic aperture radar imagery based on the relative phase of cross-polarized channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunhua; Li, Huimin; Zhang, Yanmin; Guo, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    A focus on marine target detection in noise corrupted fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is presented. The property of the relative phase between two cross-polarized channels reveals that the relative phases evaluated within sea surface area or noise corrupted area are widely spread phase angle region [-π,π] due to decorrelation effect; however, the relative phases are concentrated to zero and ±π for real target and its first-order azimuth ambiguities (FOAAs), respectively. Exploiting this physical behavior, the reciprocal of the mean square value of the relative phase (RMSRP) is defined as a new parameter for target detection, and the experiments based on fully polarimetric Radarsat-2 SAR images show that the strong noise and the FOAAs can be effectively suppressed in RMSRP image. Meanwhile, validity of the new parameter for target detection is also verified by two typical Radarsat-2 SAR images, in which targets' ambiguities and strong noise are present.

  10. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  11. Management of recurrent aphthous stomatitis with medicinal herbs and their related phytochemicals in clinic: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is one of the most common painful mucosal diseases seen in the oral cavity of patients. Pathogenesis and etiology of this disorder is still unclear. RAS is categorized into minor, major, and herpetiform ulcers. Ulcers classified as minor, consist more than 85% cases of RAS. The goal of this study was to review the efficacy of medicinal plants and their bioactive phytochemicals used in clinical trials in the management of the recurrent aphthous lesions.Methods: Different electronic resources including Science Direct, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were used as the searching engines. The key words were ‘plant’, ‘phytochemical’, or ‘herb’ and ‘aphthosis’, ‘aphthous’, ‘aphthae’, ‘aphthous ulcer’, ‘recurrent aphthous stomatitis’, or ‘aphthous stomatitis’. Finally, all the relevant clinical trials were regained.  Results: The results showed that plants such as Satureja khuzistanica, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Alchemilla vulgaris, Matricaria chamomilla, Punica granatum var. pleniflora, Myrtus communis, Melissa officinalis, Rosa damascena, Aloe vera, Nicotiana tabacum, and bioactive ingredients like acemannan and berberine possessed potential beneficial effects in oral diseases and could be effective in decreasing ulcer size, pain intensity, duration of  complete lesion healing, average time of pain elimination, aphthae number, diameter of inflammatory halo and necrotic zone of the ulcer and provided satisfaction in patients who suffered from RAS.Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that herbal medicines could be considered as future pharmaceutical drugs or adjuvant treatments to improve their efficacy and alleviate the side effects in the management of RAS.

  12. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); et al.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  13. Bibliometric analysis of medicine - related publications on refugees, asylum-seekers, and internally displaced people: 2000 - 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M

    2017-03-20

    Wars and violent domestic conflicts have forced millions of people to move outside their homes. Meeting the basic health needs of those people requires an understanding of research activity and research output on this topic. The objective of this study was to shed light on the quantity and impact of medicine - related publications on refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced people (IDP). Scopus database was used to retrieve required data. Specifically, the number of publications, top productive countries and institutions, highly cited articles, citation analysis, international collaboration, and journals involved in publishing articles on refugees, asylum seekers and IDP were reviewed and analyzed. The time span for the study was set from year 2000 to 2015. Two thousands five hundred and thirty publications were retrieved. The h-index of retrieved articles was 64. A steep rise in number of publications was noticed after 2011. Top productive countries were the United States of America, Australia and the United Kingdom. The American public health institute (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and the United Nations refugee agency were among the top active organizations on this topic. Active journals in publishing on health of refugees, asylum seekers and IDP were those on mental health, psychology, public health and general medicine. Publications on Somali, Afghani, Iraqi, and Syrian refugees received a significant share of medicine-related publications. Analysis of publications based on region showed that publications on refugees from Middle East is rising sharply and is approaching those on African refugees. Bibliometric analysis reveals that research publications on refugees have been increasing in a dramatic way and articles are being published in journals with high impact factor and international reputation, not only in general medicine and public health, but also mental health and psychology journals. Analysis of publications related to

  14. Anti-inflammatory properties of the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris might be related to its linear (1¿3)-ß-D-glucan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smiderle, F.R.; Baggio, C.H.; Borato, D.G.; Santana-Filho, A.P.; Sassaki, G.L.; Iacomini, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    The Ascomycete Cordyceps militaris, an entomopathogenic fungus, is one of the most important traditional Chinese medicines. Studies related to its pharmacological properties suggest that this mushroom can exert interesting biological activities. Aqueous (CW and HW) and alkaline (K5) extracts

  15. Empathy as related to motivations for medicine in a sample of first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Pereira, Manuel; Trancas, Bruno; Loureiro, José; Papoila, Ana; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel

    2013-02-01

    Professionalism and empathy are crucial in clinical settings. An association would be expected between empathic attitudes and altruistic motivations for a medical education. However, data is scarce in first-year students, and a previous small-scale study did not fully confirm the hypothesis that person-oriented motives would have a strong relationship to empathy. The present study tested this association in a larger sample. 202 first-year medical students (M age = 19.0 yr., SD = 2.7; 67.3% women) were assessed cross-sectionally, using the Vaglum and colleagues' indexes on motives for choosing medicine (security/status, person-orientation, and interest in the natural sciences) and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy for students. There was a weak association between empathy and person-orientation, but the evidence regarding links between empathy and the three motivation scores was low overall. In this Portuguese sample there was not a clear-cut association between empathy and motivations for medical school.

  16. Some Topics in Relation to José Celestino Mutis and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Palacios Sánchez

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available José Celestino Mutis showed different interestareas of study and worked in multipleknowledge fields: mathematics, mineralogy, astronomy,zoology and botanic, the one in whichis best known. However, he was a medical doctor,whit profound an up to date knowledge. Hestudied at Sevilla University, and in the RoyalCollege of Cadiz. He arrived to the “NuevoReino de Granada” as personal medical doctorof the the viceroy Pedro Messía de la Cerda andduring 47 years, period of time he lived there,he always exercised his profession. We showeda special interest in the study of cinchona andthe only work he published was El Arcano dela quina. He advised in public health manyviceroys and he contributed in different fieldsbut particularly in the prevention of smallpoxby inoculation. He played a decisive role in thereopening of the medical school of the ColegioMayor de Nuestra Señora del Rosario. Someof his achievements justifies the appellative“Father of the Medicine in Colombia”.

  17. How the geysers, tidal stresses, and thermal emission across the south polar terrain of enceladus are related

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porco, Carolyn; DiNino, Daiana; Nimmo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive examination of the geysering, tidal stresses, and anomalous thermal emission across the south pole of Enceladus and discuss the implications for the moon's thermal history and interior structure. A 6.5 yr survey of the moon's south polar terrain (SPT) by the Cassini imaging experiment has located ∼100 jets or geysers erupting from four prominent fractures crossing the region. Comparing these results with predictions of diurnally varying tidal stresses and with Cassini low resolution thermal maps shows that all three phenomena are spatially correlated. The coincidence of individual jets with very small (∼10 m) hot spots detected in high resolution Cassini VIMS data strongly suggests that the heat accompanying the geysers is not produced by shearing in the upper brittle layer but rather is transported, in the form of latent heat, from a sub-ice-shell sea of liquid water, with vapor condensing on the near-surface walls of the fractures. Normal stresses modulate the geysering activity, as shown in the accompanying paper; we demonstrate here they are capable of opening water-filled cracks all the way down to the sea. If Enceladus' eccentricity and heat production are in steady state today, the currently erupting material and anomalous heat must have been produced in an earlier epoch. If regional tidal heating is occurring today, it may be responsible for some of the erupting water and heat. Future Cassini observations may settle the question.

  18. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Tonini, Stefano; Lanfranco, Andrea; Dellabianca, Antonio; Lumelli, Diego; Giorgi, Ines; Mazzacane, Fulvio; Fusi, Camilla; Scafa, Fabrizio; Candura, Stefano M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bully...

  19. Competence development as normative practice - Educational reform in medicine as heuristic model to relate worldview and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Glas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a Normative Practice Model (NPM for education was developed. Two hypotheses guided this article: (1 the presupposition that developments in medical education are relevant for education in general and (2 the idea that medical education, just as education in general, can be interpreted as a normative practice. The Normative Practice Model was initially designed for medicine. This original version attempted to clarify why norms and values are intrinsic to medical practice, what these norms and values are, and how they are related. This article introduced the recent reform of medical specialist training programmes in the Netherlands as a case study for application of the Normative Practice Model to education. This reform elucidates how and why norms and values are intrinsic to medical education. The Normative Practice Model offers a global framework that enables one to locate and evaluate the relative contribution of each of the norms and values. By doing so the model also gives an answer to the more general question of whether and how worldview and education are connected. It appears that in highly technical and specialised practices such as medicine, the concept of competence is used as bridge between valued-laden motivations and attitudes on the one hand and measurable performance on the other hand. In this article it was argued that thinking about competences in the context of normative practices helps to elucidate the relationship between worldview and education.

  20. A systematic review of complementary and alternative medicine interventions for the management of cancer-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan-John, Jennifer; Molassiotis, Alex; Richardson, Alison; Ream, Emma

    2013-07-01

    Fatigue, experienced by patients during and following cancer treatment, is a significant clinical problem. It is a prevalent and distressing symptom yet pharmacological interventions are used little and confer limited benefit for patients. However, many cancer patients use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and some evidence suggests it may relieve fatigue. A systematic review was conducted to appraise the effectiveness of CAM interventions in ameliorating cancer-related fatigue. Systematic searches of biomedical, nursing, and specialist CAM databases were conducted, including Medline, Embase, and AMED. Included papers described interventions classified as CAM by the National Centre of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and evaluated through randomized controlled trial (RCT) or quasi-experimental design. Twenty studies were eligible for the review, of which 15 were RCTs. Forms of CAM interventions examined included acupuncture, massage, yoga, and relaxation training. The review identified some limited evidence suggesting hypnosis and ginseng may prevent rises in cancer-related fatigue in people undergoing treatment for cancer and acupuncture and that biofield healing may reduce cancer-related fatigue following cancer treatments. Evidence to date suggests that multivitamins are ineffective at reducing cancer-related fatigue. However, trials incorporated within the review varied greatly in quality; most were methodologically weak and at high risk of bias. Consequently, there is currently insufficient evidence to conclude with certainty the effectiveness or otherwise of CAM in reducing cancer-related fatigue. The design and methods employed in future trials of CAM should be more rigorous; increasing the strength of evidence should be a priority.

  1. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  2. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  3. A new strategy for earthquake focal mechanisms using waveform-correlation-derived relative polarities and cluster analysis: Application to the 2014 Long Valley Caldera earthquake swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Hill, David P.

    2016-01-01

    In microseismicity analyses, reliable focal mechanisms can typically be obtained for only a small subset of located events. We address this limitation here, presenting a framework for determining robust focal mechanisms for entire populations of very small events. To achieve this, we resolve relative P and S wave polarities between pairs of waveforms by using their signed correlation coefficients—a by-product of previously performed precise earthquake relocation. We then use cluster analysis to group events with similar patterns of polarities across the network. Finally, we apply a standard mechanism inversion to the grouped data, using either catalog or correlation-derived P wave polarity data sets. This approach has great potential for enhancing analyses of spatially concentrated microseismicity such as earthquake swarms, mainshock-aftershock sequences, and industrial reservoir stimulation or injection-induced seismic sequences. To demonstrate its utility, we apply this technique to the 2014 Long Valley Caldera earthquake swarm. In our analysis, 85% of the events (7212 out of 8494 located by Shelly et al. [2016]) fall within five well-constrained mechanism clusters, more than 12 times the number with network-determined mechanisms. Of the earthquakes we characterize, 3023 (42%) have magnitudes smaller than 0.0. We find that mechanism variations are strongly associated with corresponding hypocentral structure, yet mechanism heterogeneity also occurs where it cannot be resolved by hypocentral patterns, often confined to small-magnitude events. Small (5–20°) rotations between mechanism orientations and earthquake location trends persist when we apply 3-D velocity models and might reflect a geometry of en echelon, interlinked shear, and dilational faulting.

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  5. Professional and veterinary competencies: addressing human relations and the human-animal bond in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cindy L; Conlon, Peter D; Long, Kendra C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and degree of coverage of human relations and the human-animal bond in veterinary curricula across North America. The attitudes and opinions of a cohort of veterinary students and alumni about human relations skills and human-animal bond training in the veterinary program was also investigated. Twenty veterinary schools across North America were contacted and data were collected regarding their coverage of human relations and the human-animal bond in the curriculum. A survey was developed to measure attitudes and opinions about this type of training. The survey was disseminated to students in years 1 to 4 and alumni from the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC). Data were analyzed descriptively. Based on availability of contact people, 20 schools in North America were contacted, and all participated in the study. Each of the veterinary schools surveyed has incorporated strategies for teaching human relations skills through required courses, electives, guest speakers, and/or community service programs. The overall participation rate for OVC students was 53%. Ninety-nine percent of all students surveyed agreed that their ability to deal with people using effective human relations skills was a concern, and all students said they would like to receive more training in this area. There was a 41% participation rate for OVC alumni. Fifty-five percent of alumni said they had learned enough in the veterinary program to employ effective human relations skills in practice, yet 65% felt they had not received enough instruction in addressing the human-animal bond specifically. It is apparent that veterinary schools recognize the need to prepare entry-level practitioners to deal with the human-animal bond and with human relations. It is also evident that students and practitioners value receiving information of this nature in the curriculum and desire further training. Specific learning objectives for veterinary curricula have

  6. Patient safety incident reports related to traditional Japanese Kampo medicines: medication errors and adverse drug events in a university hospital for a ten-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Makoto; Nogami, Tatsuya; Watari, Hidetoshi; Kitahara, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroki; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki

    2017-12-21

    Kampo medicine is traditional Japanese medicine, which originated in ancient traditional Chinese medicine, but was introduced and developed uniquely in Japan. Today, Kampo medicines are integrated into the Japanese national health care system. Incident reporting systems are currently being widely used to collect information about patient safety incidents that occur in hospitals. However, no investigations have been conducted regarding patient safety incident reports related to Kampo medicines. The aim of this study was to survey and analyse incident reports related to Kampo medicines in a Japanese university hospital to improve future patient safety. We selected incident reports related to Kampo medicines filed in Toyama University Hospital from May 2007 to April 2017, and investigated them in terms of medication errors and adverse drug events. Out of 21,324 total incident reports filed in the 10-year survey period, we discovered 108 Kampo medicine-related incident reports. However, five cases were redundantly reported; thus, the number of actual incidents was 103. Of those, 99 incidents were classified as medication errors (77 administration errors, 15 dispensing errors, and 7 prescribing errors), and four were adverse drug events, namely Kampo medicine-induced interstitial pneumonia. The Kampo medicine (crude drug) that was thought to induce interstitial pneumonia in all four cases was Scutellariae Radix, which is consistent with past reports. According to the incident severity classification system recommended by the National University Hospital Council of Japan, of the 99 medication errors, 10 incidents were classified as level 0 (an error occurred, but the patient was not affected) and 89 incidents were level 1 (an error occurred that affected the patient, but did not cause harm). Of the four adverse drug events, two incidents were classified as level 2 (patient was transiently harmed, but required no treatment), and two incidents were level 3b (patient was

  7. Analysis of contributing factors associated to related patients safety incidents in Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Delgado, M C; Merino de Cos, P; Sirgo Rodríguez, G; Álvarez Rodríguez, J; Gutiérrez Cía, I; Obón Azuara, B; Alonso Ovies, Á

    2015-01-01

    To explore contributing factors (CF) associated to related critical patients safety incidents. SYREC study pos hoc analysis. A total of 79 Intensive Care Departments were involved. The study sample consisted of 1.017 patients; 591 were affected by one or more incidents. The CF were categorized according to a proposed model by the National Patient Safety Agency from United Kingdom that was modified. Type, class and severity of the incidents was analyzed. A total 2,965 CF were reported (1,729 were associated to near miss and 1,236 to adverse events). The CF group more frequently reported were related patients factors. Individual factors were reported more frequently in near miss and task related CF in adverse events. CF were reported in all classes of incidents. The majority of CF were reported in the incidents classified such as less serious, even thought CF patients factors were associated to serious incidents. Individual factors were considered like avoidable and patients factors as unavoidable. The CF group more frequently reported were patient factors and was associated to more severe and unavoidable incidents. By contrast, individual factors were associated to less severe and avoidable incidents. In general, CF most frequently reported were associated to near miss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  8. The attractions of medicine: the generic motivations of medical school applicants in relation to demography, personality and achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katona Cornelius

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The motivational and other factors used by medical students in making their career choices for specific medical specialities have been looked at in a number of studies in the literature. There are however few studies that assess the generic factors which make medicine itself of interest to medical students and to potential medical students. This study describes a novel questionnaire that assesses the interests and attractions of different aspects of medical practice in a varied range of medical scenarios, and relates them to demographic, academic, personality and learning style measures in a large group of individuals considering applying to medical school. Methods A questionnaire study was conducted among those attending Medlink, a two-day conference for individuals considering applying to medical school for a career in medicine. The main outcome measure was the Medical Situations Questionnaire, in which individuals ranked the attraction of three different aspects of medical practise in each of nine detailed, realistic medical scenarios in a wide range of medical specialities. As well as requiring clear choices, the questionnaire was also designed so that all of the possible answers were attractive and positive, thereby helping to eliminate social demand characteristics. Factor analysis of the responses found four generic motivational dimensions, which we labelled Indispensability, Helping People, Respect and Science. Background factors assessed included sex, ethnicity, class, medical parents, GCSE academic achievement, the 'Big Five' personality factors, empathy, learning styles, and a social desirability scale. Results 2867 individuals, broadly representative of applicants to medical schools, completed the questionnaire. The four generic motivational factors correlated with a range of background factors. These correlations were explored by multiple regression, and by path analysis, using LISREL to assess direct and

  9. The attractions of medicine: the generic motivations of medical school applicants in relation to demography, personality and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Livingston, G; Katona, Cornelius

    2006-02-21

    The motivational and other factors used by medical students in making their career choices for specific medical specialities have been looked at in a number of studies in the literature. There are however few studies that assess the generic factors which make medicine itself of interest to medical students and to potential medical students. This study describes a novel questionnaire that assesses the interests and attractions of different aspects of medical practice in a varied range of medical scenarios, and relates them to demographic, academic, personality and learning style measures in a large group of individuals considering applying to medical school. A questionnaire study was conducted among those attending Medlink, a two-day conference for individuals considering applying to medical school for a career in medicine. The main outcome measure was the Medical Situations Questionnaire, in which individuals ranked the attraction of three different aspects of medical practise in each of nine detailed, realistic medical scenarios in a wide range of medical specialities. As well as requiring clear choices, the questionnaire was also designed so that all of the possible answers were attractive and positive, thereby helping to eliminate social demand characteristics. Factor analysis of the responses found four generic motivational dimensions, which we labelled Indispensability, Helping People, Respect and Science. Background factors assessed included sex, ethnicity, class, medical parents, GCSE academic achievement, the 'Big Five' personality factors, empathy, learning styles, and a social desirability scale. 2867 individuals, broadly representative of applicants to medical schools, completed the questionnaire. The four generic motivational factors correlated with a range of background factors. These correlations were explored by multiple regression, and by path analysis, using LISREL to assess direct and indirect effects upon the factors. Helping People was

  10. Greigite-related complex magnetic polarity records unraveled through an integrated rock magnetic analysis: A case study on Neogene sections in East Timor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aben, F. M.; Bakker, R. R.; Dekkers, M. J.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Harris, R. A.; Zachariasse, J.; Duffy, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    , therefore deemed to carry a reliable nearly syn-depositional signal. The third suite, residing in a few clay levels, consists of late diagenetic greigite intergrown between sheet silicates, resulting in anomalously high magnetizations. A revised magnetostratigraphy of the Viqueque Type section is obtained by using reliable sample levels containing early diagenetic greigite only. This magnetostratigraphy shows a polarity pattern consistent with biostratigraphy and is correlated unequivocally to the GPTS. This case study shows that a well-designed rock magnetic research combined with microscopy can unravel complex and seemingly inconsistent polarity patterns related to greigite. End-member modelling of IRM-acquisition curves by itself cannot distinguish the subtle differences between the various greigite populations but is nonetheless crucial to the integrated approach because it enables to categorize samples for dedicated microscopy study. We recommend this approach to assess the veracity of the polarity of greigite-bearing strata.

  11. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  12. Relation between safe use of medicines and Clinical Pharmacy Services at Pediatric Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Lucas Miyake; Silva, Daniella Matsubara da; Comarella, Larissa

    2016-12-01

    Clinical Pharmacy Services (CPS) are considered standard of care and they are endorsed by the Joint Commission International, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. In Brazil, single experiences have been discreetly arising and the importance of these services to children and adolescents care has led to interesting results, but certainly are under reported. This short report aims to discuss the effect of implementing a bedside CPS at a Brazilian Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). This is a cross-sectional study conducted in a 12 bed PICU community hospital, from Campo Largo/Brazil. Subjects with<18 years old admitted to PICU were included for descriptive analysis if received a CPS intervention. Of 53 patients accompanied, we detected 141 preventable drug-related problems (DRPs) which were solved within clinicians (89% acceptance of all interventions). The most common interventions performed to improve drug therapy included: preventing incompatible intravenous solutions (21%) and a composite of inadequate doses (17% due to low, high and non-optimized doses). Among the top ten medications associated with DRPs, five were antimicrobials. By analyzing the correlation between DRPs and PICU length of stay, we found that 74% of all variations on length of stay were associated with the number of DRPs. Adverse drug reactions due to avoidable DRPs can be prevented by CPS in a multifaceted collaboration with other health care professionals, who should attempt to use active and evidence-based strategies to reduce morbidity related to medications. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  13. Relation between safe use of medicines and Clinical Pharmacy Services at Pediatric Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Miyake Okumura

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Clinical Pharmacy Services (CPS are considered standard of care and is endorsed by the Joint Commission International, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. In Brazil, single experiences have been discreetly arising and the importance of these services to children and adolescents care has led to interesting results, but certainly are under reported. This short report aims to discuss the effect of implementing a bedside CPS at a Brazilian Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in a 12 bed PICU community hospital, from Campo Largo/Brazil. Subjects with<18 years old admitted to PICU were included for descriptive analysis if received a CPS intervention. Results: Of 53 patients accompanied, we detected 141 preventable drug-related problems (DRPs which were solved within clinicians (89% acceptance of all interventions. The most common interventions performed to improve drug therapy included: preventing incompatible intravenous solutions (21% and a composite of inadequate doses (17% due to low, high and non-optimized doses. Among the top ten medications associated with DRPs, five were antimicrobials. By analyzing the correlation between DRPs and PICU length of stay, we found that 74% of all variations on length of stay were associated with the number of DRPs. Conclusions: Adverse drug reactions due to avoidable DRPs can be prevented by CPS in a multifaceted collaboration with other health care professionals, who should attempt to use active and evidence-based strategies to reduce morbidity related to medications.

  14. Herbal and Alternative Medicine Use in Tanzanian Adults Admitted with Hypertension-Related Diseases: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Liwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypertension is increasingly common in sub-Saharan Africa where traditional medicine use is also common. We conducted a hospital-based, mixed-methods study to determine prevalence, pattern, and correlates of herbal and alternative medicine use in Tanzanian adults hospitalized with hypertension. Methods. A standardized questionnaire was administered. In-depth interviews were performed on a subset of participants. Factors associated with herbal medicine use were determined by logistic regression. The association between traditional medicine uses and allopathic medication adherence was determined using ordinal logistic regression. Qualitative data were analyzed according to grounded theory. Results. Of 213 adults enrolled, 52 (24.4% reported using herbs during the previous month and 47 (22.1% reported concurrent use of herbs and allopathic medicines. Lower educational level, nonprofessional employment, and lack of health insurance were significantly associated with herbal medicine use. Alternative medicines use was not associated with lower medication adherence. Qualitative interviews identified several important themes including reasons for herbal medicine use. Conclusion. The use of traditional medicines is very common among patients with hypertension. Adults from low socioeconomic status, those with misunderstandings about hypertension, and those without health insurance were more likely to take herbs. Open, nonjudgmental communication between healthcare workers and patients regarding use of traditional medicines must be encouraged in Africa.

  15. Herbal and Alternative Medicine Use in Tanzanian Adults Admitted with Hypertension-Related Diseases: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Rebecca; Jaka, Hyasinta; Bougaila, Amina; Smart, Luke; Langwick, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension is increasingly common in sub-Saharan Africa where traditional medicine use is also common. We conducted a hospital-based, mixed-methods study to determine prevalence, pattern, and correlates of herbal and alternative medicine use in Tanzanian adults hospitalized with hypertension. Methods A standardized questionnaire was administered. In-depth interviews were performed on a subset of participants. Factors associated with herbal medicine use were determined by logistic regression. The association between traditional medicine uses and allopathic medication adherence was determined using ordinal logistic regression. Qualitative data were analyzed according to grounded theory. Results Of 213 adults enrolled, 52 (24.4%) reported using herbs during the previous month and 47 (22.1%) reported concurrent use of herbs and allopathic medicines. Lower educational level, nonprofessional employment, and lack of health insurance were significantly associated with herbal medicine use. Alternative medicines use was not associated with lower medication adherence. Qualitative interviews identified several important themes including reasons for herbal medicine use. Conclusion The use of traditional medicines is very common among patients with hypertension. Adults from low socioeconomic status, those with misunderstandings about hypertension, and those without health insurance were more likely to take herbs. Open, nonjudgmental communication between healthcare workers and patients regarding use of traditional medicines must be encouraged in Africa. PMID:28634545

  16. The relation of Complementary-Alternative Medicine use with glomerular filtration rate and depression in patients with chronic kidney disease at predialysis stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Bennur; Atay, Ahmet Engin; Gokmen, Emel Saglam; Karakoc, Ayten; Sari, Hakan; Sarisakal, Samprie; Kahvecioglu, Serdar; Kayabasi, Hasan; Sit, Dede

    2015-05-08

    Complementary and alternative medicine is a broad field of health including all health care practices and methods; and their accompanying theories and beliefs. In the present study, we aimed to examine the frequency of complementary-alternative medicine use, and its relation with glomerular filtration rate and depression in patients with chronic kidney disease at predialysis stage. A total of 1053 predialysis patients; 518 female and 535 male, that were followed up with chronic kidney disease for at least 3 months were enrolled into the study. Demographic features, biochemical parameters and findings of physical examination were recorded. Their compliance to diet, and knowledge about disease were questioned. Beck depression inventory and questionnaire regarding to complementary-alternative medicine use were performed. The overall frequency of complementary-alternative medicine use was 40.3% . Total ratio of herbal products was 46%. Complementary-alternative medicine use was significantly more frequent in female or single patients, and patients that informed about chronic kidney disease or under strict diet (p:0.007, p:0.016, p:0.02, p:0.016; respectively). When glomerular filtration rate of participants were considered, complementary-alternative medicine use was similar in different stages of kidney disease. Depression was observed in 41.9% of patients and significantly frequent in patients with alternative method use (p:0.002). Depression score was higher as creatinine increases and glomerular filtration rate decreases (p:0.002; r: 0,093). We determined that complementary-alternative medicine use gradually increases at predialysis stage as glomerular filtration rate decreases and there is a strict relation between complementary-alternative medicine use and depression or female gender. Disorder related stressors may lead to seeking of alternative methods. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacists' medicines-related interventions for people with intellectual disabilities: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Máire; Meštrović, Arijana; Henman, Martin

    2015-08-01

    People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have complex pharmaceutical care needs due to a high prevalence of multimorbidity, a notable degree of polypharmacy and a high risk of adverse drug reactions. Despite this, people with ID often experience significant health disparities compared to the general population. In most developed countries, increasing emphasis on deinstitutionalisation and community integration also means greater utilisation of primary health care services where general practitioners, pharmacists and carers may lack appropriate information about the pharmaceutical needs of this population. Aim of the review To explore what type of pharmaceutical care interventions were being undertaken for people with ID and how pharmacists' contributed to the care of people with ID as part of multidisciplinary teams. Systematic searches of the following electronic databases were carried out; CINAHL, Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, Science Direct and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts. Results were limited to the period 1994-2014 using search terms 'learning disabilities', 'intellectual disabilities', 'mental retardation', 'developmental disabilities', 'learning difficulties' and 'pharmacist intervention', 'pharmaceutical care', 'primary care', 'pharmacy' "pharmacists" "pharmacy technicians". Agreement on studies to be included was arrived at by consensus and by using a pre-determined set of inclusion criteria. Due to the heterogeneous nature of the study aims, methods and presentation of study outcomes found, a narrative review was considered appropriate. In total, after removal of duplicates, 70 abstracts were identified and screened from the initial search. After screening and consensus agreement, eight articles which met the inclusion criteria were included in the review and were analysed under the following three themes; pharmacist interventions, pharmacists collaboration in provision of care, qualitative studies relating to patient, carers

  18. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard – fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline – second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing. PMID:27812301

  19. Policy interventions related to medicines: Survey of measures taken in European countries during 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Sabine; Zimmermann, Nina; de Joncheere, Kees

    2016-12-01

    Policy-makers can use a menu of pharmaceutical policy options. This study aimed to survey these measures that were implemented in European countries between 2010 and 2015. We did bi-annual surveys with competent authorities of the Pharmaceutical Pricing and Reimbursement Information network. Additionally, we consulted posters produced by members of this network as well as further published literature. Information on 32 European countries (all European Union Member States excluding Luxembourg; Iceland, Norway, Serbia, Switzerland, Turkey) was included. 557 measures were reported between January 2010 and December 2015. The most frequently mentioned measure was price reductions and price freezes, followed by changes in patient co-payments, modifications related to the reimbursement lists and changes in distribution remuneration. Most policy measures were identified in Portugal, Greece, Belgium, France, the Czech Republic, Iceland, Spain and Germany. 22% of the measures surveyed could be classified as austerity. Countries that were strongly hit by the financial crisis implemented most policy changes, usually aiming to generate savings and briefly after the emergence of the crisis. Improvements in the economic situation tended to lead to an easing of austerity measures. Countries also implemented policies that aimed to enhance enforcement of existing measures and increase efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The approach of cancer related fatigue in rehabilitation medicine: Part II – Therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salca Amalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting with patient’ diagnose and continuing throughout the treatment and thereafter, cancer-related fatigue (CRF is a distressing and disabling symptom, highly prevalent across the cancer continuum2. This is a review article mainly focusing on the rehabilitation objectives and interventions in CRF, and implementation issues, according to the report of an NCCN member institution4. Implementation is the most problematic, considering the large number of patients to whom it is addressed to and the variety of pathologies within this group of patients. The onset of CRF is difficult to establish, because of the limitations of reporting this symptom4, but it is a valuable predictor in prognosis. The main interventions in rehabilitation applicable to these patients are discussed in correlation to the objectives of each phase of therapeutic management in cancer: pre-operatory, before, during or after radio and/or chemotherapy Conclusion: Rehabilitation interventions should be applied to all patients diagnosed with cancer, according to their phase of oncologic treatment and the objectives. This should be practiced as preventive measure, but as a therapeutic one to, considering the high incidence of CFR before diagnose.

  1. Work-related outcome after acute coronary syndrome: Implications of complex cardiac rehabilitation in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Monica; Ratti, Gennaro; Gerardi, Donato; Capogrosso, Cristina; Ricciardi, Gianfranco; Fulgione, Cosimo; Latte, Salvatore; Tammaro, Paolo; Covino, Gregorio; Nienhaus, Albert; Grazillo, Elpidio Maria; Mallardo, Mario; Capogrosso, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is frequent in the working-age population. Traditional outcomes, such as mortality and hospital readmission, are useful for evaluating prognosis. Fit-for-work is an emerging outcome with clinical as well as socioeconomic significance. We describe the possible benefit of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program for return to work (RTW) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We evaluated 204 patients with recent ACS. They were divided into 4 groups on the basis of their occupational work load: very light (VL), light (L), moderate (M), and heavy (H). Work-related outcomes were assessed with the Work Performance Scale (WPS) of the Functional Status Questionnaire and as "days missed from work" (DMW) in the previous 4 weeks. The variables considered for outcomes were percent ejection fraction, functional capacity expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs), and participation or non-participation in the CR program (CR+ and CR-). One hundred thirty (66%) patients took part in the CR program. Total WPS scores for CR+ and CR- subgroups were VL group: 18±4 vs. 14±4 (p workplace, in particular among clerical workers. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  2. PHOTOSPHERIC FLOW FIELD RELATED TO THE EVOLUTION OF THE SUN'S POLAR MAGNETIC PATCHES OBSERVED BY HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaithakkal, Anjali John; Suematsu, Y.; Kubo, M. [Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Iida, Y.; Tsuneta, S. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Shiota, D., E-mail: anjali.johnk@nao.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the role of photospheric plasma motions in the formation and evolution of polar magnetic patches using time-sequence observations with high spatial resolution. The observations were obtained with the spectropolarimeter on board the Hinode satellite. From the statistical analysis using 75 magnetic patches, we found that they are surrounded by strong converging, supergranulation associated flows during their apparent lifetime and that the converging flow around the patch boundary is better observed in the Doppler velocity profile in the deeper photosphere. Based on our analysis, we suggest that the like-polarity magnetic fragments in the polar region are advected and clustered by photospheric converging flows, thereby resulting in the formation of polar magnetic patches. Our observations show that, in addition to direct cancellation, magnetic patches decay by fragmentation followed by unipolar disappearance or unipolar disappearance without fragmentation. It is possible that the magnetic patches of existing polarity fragment or diffuse away into smaller elements and eventually cancel out with opposite polarity fragments that reach the polar region around the solar cycle maximum. This could be one of the possible mechanisms by which the existing polarity decays during the reversal of the polar magnetic field.

  3. Barriers to Effective Teamwork Relating to Pediatric Resuscitations: Perceptions of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Joshua M; Chang, Todd P; Ziv, Nurit; Nager, Alan L

    2017-10-09

    In the pediatric emergency department (PED), resuscitations require medical teams form ad hoc, rarely communicating beforehand. Literature has shown that the medical community has deficiencies in communication and teamwork. However, we as medical providers do not know or understand the perceived barriers of our colleagues. Physicians may perceive a barrier that is different from nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, or technicians. Perhaps we do not know in which area of teamwork and communication we are deficient. Only when we understand the perceptions of our fellow coworkers can we take steps toward improvement in quality resuscitations and therefore patient safety. The primary objectives of this study were to describe and understand the perceived barriers to effective communication and teamwork among different disciplines forming spontaneous resuscitation teams at a tertiary urban PED and to determine if providers of different disciplines perceived these barriers differently. This was a mixed-methods study conducted in a single, tertiary care freestanding children's hospital emergency department. Survey questions were iteratively developed to measure the construct of barriers and best practices within resuscitation teamwork, which was administered to staff among 5 selected roles: physicians, nurses, respiratory technicians, PED technicians, and PED pharmacists. It contained open-ended questions to provide statements on specific barriers or goals in effective teamwork, as well as a priority ranking on 25 different statements on teamwork extracted from the literature. From the participant data, 9 core themes related to resuscitation teamwork were coalesced using affinity diagramming by the authors. All statements from the survey were coded to the 9 core themes by 2 authors, with high reliability (κ = 0.93). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the prevalence of themes mentioned by survey participants. A χ test was used to determine differences

  4. Isihlambezo: utilization patterns and potential health effects of pregnancy-related traditional herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, C A; Veale, D J

    1997-04-01

    Isihlambezo is a herbal decoction used by many Zulu women in South Africa as a preventative health tonic during pregnancy. Though the practice is cited by ethnographers and medical practitioners, few studies have focused on specific elements of isihlambezo use and preparation. Moreover, though some evidence exists suggesting negative effects of its ingestion, the maternal-fetal health impact and toxicity of isihlambezo have not been adequately studied. We examined two aspects of this traditional antenatal health practice: (1) the potential impact of urbanization and access to Western clinic-based care on popularity and utilization patterns of isihlambezo, and (2) the potential maternal-fetal health effects of its use. Interviews were conducted among rural and urban women in clinic and non-clinic settings regarding socio-behavioral aspects of isihlambezo use. The pharmacology of certain plant ingredients of isihlambezo was investigated through laboratory assays, literature review, and interviews with traditional healers. There were significant differences by area of interview in nearly all aspects of isihlambezo use examined. Though isihlambezo was most popular among urbanites and clinic non-attenders, it was considered an important antenatal health care alternative by the majority of women surveyed. Mixing traditional and clinic-based antenatal care was also strongly advocated. Pharmacological analysis suggested the possibility of both therapeutic and harmful consequences of isihlambezo. It was suggested that the following factors might contribute the popularity of isihlambezo among urban women: high cost and inferior quality of clinic care, use of isihlambezo as a means of adapting to urbanization-related stress, and socio-cultural transition.

  5. Annickia affinis and A. chlorantha (Enantia chlorantha)--A review of two closely related medicinal plants from tropical Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, D K; Van Vuuren, S F; Moteetee, A N

    2015-12-24

    Annickia affinis (Exell) Versteegh & Sosef, closely related to A. chlorantha Setten & P.J.Maas (both species also referred to as Enantia chlorantha Oliv.), from the Annonaceae family, are multi-purpose medicinal plants used widely across tropical Africa. The two Annickia species are morphologically distinct from each other and have different distribution patterns, but are frequently confused. Furthermore, the name Enantia chlorantha is an illegitimate name, but is still used today. A review of the literature was undertaken and an in-depth analysis of previous research and future prospectives are considered. While a myriad of publications cite the species "Enantia chlorantha", this is not the case for A. affinis and A. chlorantha, and no reviews are available for any of the species to date. Consequently, a summary of their ethnobotany, phytochemistry and biological properties is presented here (for the period 1933 - November 2014) in order to substantiate their traditional importance as medicines for rural people in Africa. To this effect, these species seem to be the preferred traditional treatments for malaria in tropical Africa, an area suffering heavily under the malaria pandemic. Their chemical composition is dominated particularly by various isoquinoline alkaloids, as well as by acetogenins and sesquiterpenes, which have been isolated from the bark and leaves. All three of these classes of compounds have been reported to exhibit noteworthy biological activity. Due to their widespread use, especially of the bark, these species have already been categorized as threatened with extinction. Consequently this study further aims to identify areas where more research needs to be conducted involving these important species, and also to suggest possible means of increasing the biological activities of their extracts as a way to conserve the species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  7. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Lead Discovery for Alzheimer’s Disease Related Target Protein RbAp48 from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Jin Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency or loss of function of Retinoblastoma-associated proteins (RbAp48 is related with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and AD disease is associated with age-related memory loss. During normal function, RbAp48 forms a complex with the peptide FOG-1 (friend of GATA-1 and has a role in gene transcription, but an unstable complex may affect the function of RbAp48. This study utilizes the world’s largest traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database and virtual screening to provide potential compounds for RbAp48 binding. A molecular dynamics (MD simulation was employed to understand the variations after protein-ligand interaction. FOG1 was found to exhibit low stability after RbAp48 binding; the peptide displayed significant movement from the initial docking position, a phenomenon which matched the docking results. The protein structure of the other TCM candidates was not variable during MD simulation and had a greater stable affinity for RbAp48 binding than FOG1. Our results reveal that the protein structure does not affect ligand binding, and the top three TCM candidates Bittersweet alkaloid II, Eicosandioic acid, and Perivine might resolve the instability of the RbAp48-FOG1 complex and thus be used in AD therapy.

  9. Ethical Considerations Related to Return of Results from Genomic Medicine Projects: The eMERGE Network (Phase III Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Fossey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the Institutional Review Board (IRB process at 9 academic institutions in the electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE Network, for proposed electronic health record-based genomic medicine studies, to identify common questions and concerns. Sequencing of 109 disease related genes and genotyping of 14 actionable variants is being performed in ~28,100 participants from the 9 sites. Pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants in actionable genes are being returned to study participants. We examined each site’s research protocols, informed-consent materials, and interactions with IRB staff. Research staff at each site completed questionnaires regarding their IRB interactions. The time to prepare protocols for IRB submission, number of revisions and time to approval ranged from 10–261 days, 0–11, and 11–90 days, respectively. IRB recommendations related to the readability of informed consent materials, specifying the full range of potential risks, providing options for receiving limited results or withdrawal, sharing of information with family members, and establishing the mechanisms to answer participant questions. IRBs reviewing studies that involve the return of results from genomic sequencing have a diverse array of concerns, and anticipating these concerns can help investigators to more effectively engage IRBs.

  10. Cardiovascular aspects of geriatric medicines in traditional Persian medicine; a review of phytochemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Jamshidi, Sahar; Zargaran, Arman

    2016-10-15

    Geriatrics are a group of patients over 65 years and with multiple comorbidities and different functional impairments. Apart from decline in body mass, presence of exhaustion and general fatigue, an aged person may also suffer from various disorders. Approximately, around 30% of geriatric subjects have significant cardiovascular ailments. Apart from the intensive management of cardiovascular aspects in elderly, monitoring of the complementary cardiac medicine in those people should be received more attention. There are many management lines for a cardio-geriatric condition in Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM). Accordingly, this paper aimed to deal with those medicaments as well as evidence-based clinical aspects and phytochemistry. By searching through main pharmaceutical manuscripts of Persian medicine during 10th-18th centuries (A.D.), concurrently, natural medicines for geriatrics and remedies for cardiovascular ailments were derived. On the other side, related phytochemical and pharmacological aspects of those remedies were highlighted. In all, 38 cardiovascular and 34 geriatric medicaments were found in those manuscripts. Antihyperlipidemic and cholesterol lowering activities of those medicines were the most reported activities in current medicine. However, other pharmacological reports were related to hypotensive, coagulant, cardio-protective and cardiotonic activities. In regard of the chemical composition, medicaments were mainly of polyphenols and flavonoids and also most of the employed extracts and fractions were yielded from polar or semi-polar solvents. With reference to these findings, flavonoid-rich medicaments from Persian medicine may be selected as considerable herbs for geriatrics with cardiovascular ailments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Taraxacum officinale and related species-An ethnopharmacological review and its potential as a commercial medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M; Poirrier, P; Chamy, R; Prüfer, D; Schulze-Gronover, C; Jorquera, L; Ruiz, G

    2015-07-01

    Dandelion (Taraxacum spec) is a wild plant that has been used for centuries as a traditional medicine in the relief and treatment of several diseases. This use is due to the presence of sesquiterpenes, saponins, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and sugars, among others, found in the organs of the plant. The aim of this work is to provide a current review of developments and trends in research on the Taraxacum genus, with a focus on traditional uses and pharmacological properties. This should shed light on the potential of this plant as an attractive commercial herbal medicine. Documents were collected, analyzed, and classified for information regarding medical, agronomic, genetic, and biological aspects of the Taraxacum species. This process was based on a thorough search of documents indexed by scientific search engines. Two important periods of research on Taraxacum have been identified: the first, between 1930 and 1950; and the second, from 1990 to today. During the former, agricultural and genetics research on this plant were, due to the shortage of natural rubber, the focus. In contrast, the main drive in Taraxacum research is now the recovery of bioactives and/or applications in medicine. Pharmacology is the main area in which these plants have been tested, thanks in part to its widely known traditional uses; however, there is less than enthusiastic interest in further human clinical trials. In other areas, Taraxacum sports an enormous list of compounds of industrial interest; and while it is true that only a small amount of these compounds is immediately available in Taraxacum organs and makes it relatively commercially unattractive, only scarce efforts have been made to improve yields. Compounding this issue, most studies of its growth and cultivation have been focused mainly on controlling it as a weed detrimental to certain industrial crops. To wit, in spite of all the research carried out, less than 1% of all the species identified so far (>2500) have

  12. Polar compounds isolated from the leaves of Calea prunifolia H.B.K. and their anti-adrenergic related vasodilator activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puebla, Pilar; San Feliciano, Arturo [Laboratory of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Miguel de Unamuno, Salamanca University (Spain); Aranguren, Nataly; Rincon, Javier; Rojas, Maritza; Guerrero, Mario, E-mail: mfguerrerop@unal.edu.co [Pharmacy Department, School of Sciences, National University of Colombia, Bogota D.C. (Colombia)

    2011-09-15

    The leaves of Calea prunifolia H.B.K., medicinal specie used in Colombian folk medicine for hypertension have been analysed for their chemical constituents, resulting in the isolation of one flavonoid glycoside, one quinic acid derivative and one kaurane diterpenoid glycoside. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis, including HRMS, 1D- and 2D-NMR data. The vasodilator effect related to anti adrenergic activity of the three compounds was evaluated in isolated aortic rings from Wistar rats contracted cumulatively with phenylephrine (from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 5 x 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}). Although these compounds were devoid of significant vasodilator activity when they were tested alone (1 {mu}g mL-1), mixtures of them (1:1:1) and the own EtOH extract exerted preventive anti-adrenergic activity increasing the phenylephrine CE{sub 50} from 2.3 x 10{sup -8} to 1.3 x 10{sup -7} and 8.0 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  13. Productive structure and production relations between polarized region by Londrina and the rest of Paraná in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Moretto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article had as objective estimate the sector linkages and the overflowing of the production multiplier between the North of Parana and the Rest of Parana, using the interregional input-output matrix for 1995. The main results showed that a agriculture and food processing sectors stood out in the productive structure of North of Parana State, comparing to the Rest of Parana State, as disseminators of inter-sector relations b the industrial structure of the Rest of Parana presented more diversification as compared to the North Region, showing less dependence on agriculture and food processing sectors for its dynamic; c the overflowing effect of the production multiplier in the direction Rest of Parana-North of Parana was 4,9%, whereas in the direction North of Parana-Rest of Parana it was 12%, revealing a greater dependency of the productive process of the North of Parana vis-a-vis the Rest of Parana; d the Rest of Parana, although more diversified in its productive structure, showed more dependence on the North of Parana as for the answer to the input requirements of the food processing sectors when facing growth in its final demand.

  14. Medicine procurement and the use of flexibilities in the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, 2001–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Jacquelyn; Toebes, Brigit; Hogerzeil, Hans V

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Millions of people, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, lack access to effective pharmaceuticals, often because they are unaffordable. The 2001 Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO) adopted the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) Agreement and Public Health. The declaration recognized the implications of intellectual property rights for both new medicine development and the price of medicines. The declaration outlined measures, known as TRIPS flexibilities, that WTO Members can take to ensure access to medicines for all. These measures include compulsory licensing of medicines patents and the least-developed countries pharmaceutical transition measure. The aim of this study was to document the use of TRIPS flexibilities to access lower-priced generic medicines between 2001 and 2016. Overall, 176 instances of the possible use of TRIPS flexibilities by 89 countries were identified: 100 (56.8%) involved compulsory licences or public noncommercial use licences and 40 (22.7%) involved the least-developed countries pharmaceutical transition measure. The remainder were: 1 case of parallel importation; 3 research exceptions; and 32 non-patent-related measures. Of the 176 instances, 152 (86.4%) were implemented. They covered products for treating 14 different diseases. However, 137 (77.8%) concerned medicines for human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome or related diseases. The use of TRIPS flexibilities was found to be more frequent than is commonly assumed. Given the problems faced by countries today in procuring high-priced, patented medicines, the practical, legal pathway provided by TRIPS flexibilities for accessing lower-cost generic equivalents is increasingly important. PMID:29531417

  15. Medicine procurement and the use of flexibilities in the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, 2001-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hoen, Ellen Fm; Veraldi, Jacquelyn; Toebes, Brigit; Hogerzeil, Hans V

    2018-03-01

    Millions of people, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, lack access to effective pharmaceuticals, often because they are unaffordable. The 2001 Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO) adopted the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) Agreement and Public Health. The declaration recognized the implications of intellectual property rights for both new medicine development and the price of medicines. The declaration outlined measures, known as TRIPS flexibilities, that WTO Members can take to ensure access to medicines for all. These measures include compulsory licensing of medicines patents and the least-developed countries pharmaceutical transition measure. The aim of this study was to document the use of TRIPS flexibilities to access lower-priced generic medicines between 2001 and 2016. Overall, 176 instances of the possible use of TRIPS flexibilities by 89 countries were identified: 100 (56.8%) involved compulsory licences or public noncommercial use licences and 40 (22.7%) involved the least-developed countries pharmaceutical transition measure. The remainder were: 1 case of parallel importation; 3 research exceptions; and 32 non-patent-related measures. Of the 176 instances, 152 (86.4%) were implemented. They covered products for treating 14 different diseases. However, 137 (77.8%) concerned medicines for human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome or related diseases. The use of TRIPS flexibilities was found to be more frequent than is commonly assumed. Given the problems faced by countries today in procuring high-priced, patented medicines, the practical, legal pathway provided by TRIPS flexibilities for accessing lower-cost generic equivalents is increasingly important.

  16. [The relation of the faculty of veterinary medicine with the tropics: from developig assistance-projects to international cooporation 1987-2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paling, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    In the introduction three stages are distinguished in the relation between the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and the tropics: (1) Development of a veterinary infrastructure (research and education) in the former colonies, Netherlands-Indies, Surinam and The Netherlands Antilles (1850 - ca. 1949); (2) Developing Aid Assistance (1965-2000) and (3) Cooperation on the basis of bilateral treaties that express the mutual interests of the two countries involved (1993-today). The Faculty in Utrecht entered into such alliances with sister faculties in Thailand, South-Africa and Malaysia. As a result of internal and external factors the study of tropical veterinary medicine was no longer core business of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Utrecht. Tropical veterinary medicine was incorporated in the Department of Parasitology and Tropical Veterinary Medicine. The Office for International Cooperation of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, founded in 1987, partly took over the role of the former institute. Its activities are education and information, research support of the ongoing projects and networking. The accent moved from aid to cooperation for mutual interest.

  17. Polarized Moessbauer transitions in mixed hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.; Tarina, D.

    1975-01-01

    A contribution to the theory of elliptical polarization in the Moessbauer effect for transitions between mixed nuclear states is reported. A relation between the two-dimensional complex vector parameterization and the photon polarization density matrix was used in describing changes in the polarization of the gamma-ray involved. (A.K.)

  18. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-27

    Jan 27, 2014 ... and regulated by several polarity proteins. These polarity pro- teins are often targeted by EMT inducers, leading to their altered function, ultimately facilitating cell migration (Martin-Belmonte and Perez-Moreno 2012). EMT-related alterations include over- expression or deregulation of components of polarity ...

  19. ACNP Public Education Program on nuclear medicine and related low-level waste issues. Final technical report, 7 July 1980-30 June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the ACNP Public Education Program was to educate and inform the greatest number of people in the areas of radiation and health and, in turn, to gain the public's understanding of Nuclear Medicine. The related low-level waste issues also were incorporated into the program. To carry out the program's objectives and design to educate the public, the ACNP established a Speaker Bureau which consists of those members of the ACNP and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) who go through the training seminars, conducted by ACNP, and are available to speak publicly about Nuclear Medicine and related low-level waste issues. In addition, the ACNP developed the necessary audiovisual and printed materials to be used in their own right or as supplemental tools. Promotion of the Speakers Bureau and the audiovisual materials to the media and other various public forums was undertaken

  20. [Legal medicine specialists within the framework of acute care : Analysis of legal medicine consultations in relation to the victims' statistics of the state office of criminal investigation in Saxony-Anhalt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliske, G; Heide, S; Lucas, B; Brandstädter, K; Walcher, F; Kropf, S; Lessig, R; Piatek, S

    2017-09-18

    In acute medical care, there are patients who have been injured by the influence of others. The aim of this study was to analyze all cases which were presented to the Institute for Legal Medicine of the University Halle (Saale). The cases where analyzed in relation to the victims' statistics of the state office of criminal investigation in Saxony-Anhalt. The consultations of the Institute for Legal Medicine Halle-Wittenberg for 2012-2015 were evaluated with regard to the age and gender distribution, the reasons for the consultation and time until the request for consultations. These cases were statistically compared to the victims' statistics of the state office of criminal investigation in Saxony-Anhalt 2014-2015. A total of 536 cases (55.6% male and 44.4% female patients) were evaluated. In all, 62.1% of patients were under 18 years of age; 43.5% of all consultations were requested by pediatric (surgery) clinics. The most common reasons for consultation were sexual child abuse or violence against children (50.7%). Compared to the victims' statistics, significantly more children were examined by legal medicine specialists than could have been expected (p < 0.001). In adult patients, the most common causes for consultation were acts of violence (20.4%) and domestic violence (10.1%). Among adults, significantly more women and fewer men were presented than expected (p = 0.001). There were only a small number of consultations of legal medicine specialists in relation to the victims' statistics. Most of them were children and women. The temporal latency between the act of violence and the consultations was one day and more. The latency and the renunciation of the consultation of the legal medicine specialists can lead to loss of evidence.

  1. A study using virtual reality as a source of complementary information for nuclear medicine patients and its relatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça, Sérgio F.; Nascimento, Ana C.H.; Mol, Antônio C.A.; Marins, Eugênio R.; Suíta, Júlio C., E-mail: sergio.f2014@hotmail.com, E-mail: acris@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, E-mail: eugenio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: suita@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This work consists in the research, analysis and unification of the guidelines transmitted to the patients and their relatives in the radioiodine therapy procedures. The goal is to provide greater understanding of the use of nuclear radiation and better understanding of treatment, to help patients better adapt to therapy, to demystify misconceptions about radiation use, and to improve care for their protection and for people close to them. Based on written and verbal information, collected in the scientific literature and in loco accompanying the routine of the therapeutic rooms of Nuclear Medicine Services in Rio de Janeiro, the set of actions that define scenarios experienced by radioiodine therapy patients and their helpers is being generated. Based on this information, a virtual environment is being developed in the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN / CNEN), a virtual environment that will allow the visualization of the procedures and instructions passed to the patients by the SMN1 teams. With this virtual environment, the patient will be able to perform an immersive visualization and to experience the different phases of the treatment, increasing the chances of efficiency of their participation in the process. (author)

  2. A study using virtual reality as a source of complementary information for nuclear medicine patients and its relatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonça, Sérgio F.; Nascimento, Ana C.H.; Mol, Antônio C.A.; Marins, Eugênio R.; Suíta, Júlio C.

    2017-01-01

    This work consists in the research, analysis and unification of the guidelines transmitted to the patients and their relatives in the radioiodine therapy procedures. The goal is to provide greater understanding of the use of nuclear radiation and better understanding of treatment, to help patients better adapt to therapy, to demystify misconceptions about radiation use, and to improve care for their protection and for people close to them. Based on written and verbal information, collected in the scientific literature and in loco accompanying the routine of the therapeutic rooms of Nuclear Medicine Services in Rio de Janeiro, the set of actions that define scenarios experienced by radioiodine therapy patients and their helpers is being generated. Based on this information, a virtual environment is being developed in the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN / CNEN), a virtual environment that will allow the visualization of the procedures and instructions passed to the patients by the SMN1 teams. With this virtual environment, the patient will be able to perform an immersive visualization and to experience the different phases of the treatment, increasing the chances of efficiency of their participation in the process. (author)

  3. Imaging features of medicine-related osteonecrosis of the jaws: comparison between panoramic radiography and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuxing; Wang, Diancan; Wang, Yang; Peng, Xin; Guo, Chuanbin

    2016-08-01

    The current staging system of medicine-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) assigns patients to different stages based on clinical manifestations. The extent of bone disease cannot be fully determined without radiologic evaluation. Missing radiologic information may lead to incorrect classification of MRONJ, resulting in poor outcomes of treatment. The objective of this study was to compare computed tomography (CT) and panoramic radiography (PR) features of MRONJ in different stages to achieve accurate staging on the basis of combined findings from clinical staging and imaging. A retrospective study was carried out to analyze the differences in the radiographic features of various clinical stages in MRONJ, as shown by PR and CT. Both PR and CT could detect the typical syndrome of osseous sclerosis in grade 0 and grade 1. For the patients of grade 2, more features were observed on CT, such as periosteal reaction, cortical perforation, and periosteal bone deposition. CT was also conducive to analyzing the degree of the maxillary lesion and soft tissue involvement as compared with PR. This study showed that CT detects changes that may not be revealed by plain radiography in patients with MRONJ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Affecting Recruitment and Attrition in Randomised Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Pregnancy-Related Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Ciara; Sinclair, Marlene; McCullough, Julie E M; Liddle, Sarah Dianne; Hughes, Ciara M

    2016-01-01

    Background . Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for pregnancy-related issues have encountered issues with recruitment and attrition. Little is known about the cause of these issues. Methods . Data was gathered from an antenatal CAM randomised controlled trial. During foetal anomaly appointments, women meeting inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the trial. Numbers of women invited and eligible were recorded. Reasons for noninterest were noted and analysed. Focus groups exploring trial experience of participants were also conducted. Findings . Of the 428 women invited to participate, 376 were eligible and just under a quarter participated. Reasons for nonparticipation included concerns about CAM and lack of interest in participation in research. Other factors negatively affecting recruitment included recruitment timing, competition for participants, limited support from staff, and inadequate trial promotion. Factors encouraging recruitment included being interested in research and seeking pain relief. Reasons for dropping out were time constraints, travel issues, work commitments, and pregnancy issues. Several women in the sham and usual care group dropped out due to dissatisfaction with treatment allocation. Conclusion . CAM researchers must explore problems encountered with recruitment and attrition so that evidence-based implementation strategies to address the issues can be developed.

  5. Traditional Chinese Medicine Curcumin Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer to Radiation by Altering the Expression of DNA Repair-related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangen; Qiu, Jianming; Wang, Dong; Tao, Yong; Song, Yihuan; Wang, Hongtao; Tang, Juping; Wang, Xing; Sun, Y U; Yang, Zhijian; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Human colon cancer HT-29 cells were treated with curcumin (2.5 μM), irradiation (10 Gy) and the combination of irradiation and curcumin. Cell proliferation was assessed using the MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V-PE/7-AAD analysis. PCR was performed to determine differential-expression profiling of 95 DNA-repair genes in irradiated cells and cells treated with both irradiation and curcumin. Differentially-expressed genes were confirmed by Western blotting. In vivo radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin was assessed in a xenograft mouse model of HT-29 colon cancer. Curcumin was administrated daily by intraperitoneal injection at 20 mg/kg/dose. Mice received irradiation (10 Gy) twice weekly. Apoptosis of the cancer cells following treatment was determined by TUNEL staining. Irradiation induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of HT-29 cells in vitro. Concurrent curcumin treatment sensitized the HT-29 tumor to irradiation (phuman colon cancer in vitro and in vivo to radiation. Downregulation of LIG4 and PNKP and upregulation of XRCC5 and CCNH DNA-repair-related genes were involved in the radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin in colon cancer. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Moderate-to-Severe Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningqun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate-to-severe asthma has a substantial impact on the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL of the patients. Cordyceps sinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine that is evaluated clinically for the treatment of many diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy, diabetic kidney disease, and lung fibrosis. In order to investigate the effects of Cordyceps sinensis on patients with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma, 120 subjects were randomized to receive Corbin capsule containing Cordyceps sinensis for 3 months (treatment group, n=60, whereas the control group (n=60 did not receive treatment with Corbin capsule. Inhaled corticosteroid and as-needed β-agonists were used in the treatment of both groups. HR-QOL was measured with the Juniper’s Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ. The incidence of asthma exacerbation, pulmonary function testing, and serum measurements of inflammatory mediators were also evaluated. The results showed that the treatment group indicated a significant increase in AQLQ scores and lung function compared with the control group. The expression levels of the inflammation markers IgE, ICAM-1, IL-4, and MMP-9 in the serum were decreased and IgG increased in the treatment group compared with the control group. Therefore, the conclusion was reached that a formulation of Cordyceps sinensis improved the HR-QOL, asthma symptoms, lung function, and inflammatory profile of the patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-IPC-16008730.

  7. Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Moderate-to-Severe Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningqun; Li, Jie; Huang, Xiaobo; Chen, Wenqiang; Chen, Yujing

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-to-severe asthma has a substantial impact on the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of the patients. Cordyceps sinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine that is evaluated clinically for the treatment of many diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy, diabetic kidney disease, and lung fibrosis. In order to investigate the effects of Cordyceps sinensis on patients with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma, 120 subjects were randomized to receive Corbin capsule containing Cordyceps sinensis for 3 months (treatment group, n = 60), whereas the control group ( n = 60) did not receive treatment with Corbin capsule. Inhaled corticosteroid and as-needed β -agonists were used in the treatment of both groups. HR-QOL was measured with the Juniper's Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). The incidence of asthma exacerbation, pulmonary function testing, and serum measurements of inflammatory mediators were also evaluated. The results showed that the treatment group indicated a significant increase in AQLQ scores and lung function compared with the control group. The expression levels of the inflammation markers IgE, ICAM-1, IL-4, and MMP-9 in the serum were decreased and IgG increased in the treatment group compared with the control group. Therefore, the conclusion was reached that a formulation of Cordyceps sinensis improved the HR-QOL, asthma symptoms, lung function, and inflammatory profile of the patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-IPC-16008730.

  8. THE APPROACH OF CANCER RELATED FATIGUE IN RHEABILITATION MEDICINE: PART I – MECHANISMS, SYMPTOMS, CLINICAL EVALUATION AND SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALCA Amalia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer related fatigue (CRF is the most disabling and distressing symptom in cancer, throughout the whole history of the illness, including successfully treated cases. Rehabilitation medicine could have a positive impact on these patients’ outcomes, if well targeted. With these purpose, the rehabilitation clinician needs to correctly assess fatigue using standard, reliable scales. This review of articles and trials synthesizes the epidemiology, mechanics (including causes and effects, clinical presentation and means of assessment in CRF. CRF causes and mechanisms are not well known. Understanding them would provide specific targets to fatigue management. Clinical presentation is very variable, a wide range of features being found in literature. Poorly medical reports in assessing fatigue offer variable percentages of prevalence, inconsistent with patients’ daily burden due to CRF. There are many tools used to assess fatigue in clinical research and on them depends the percentages reported as fatigue prevalence. The hereby gathered information are useful in the approach of a patient that addresses to a rehabilitation clinician for CRF management.

  9. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  10. Omics in Ophthalmology: Advances in Genomics and Precision Medicine for Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-03-01

    The genomic revolution has had a huge impact on our understanding of the genetic defects and disease mechanisms underlying ophthalmic diseases. Two examples are discussed here. The first is Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal dystrophy leading to severe vision loss in children, and the second is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly. Twenty years ago, the genetic causes of these diseases were unknown. Currently, more than 20 LCA genes have been identified, and genetic testing can now successfully identify the genetic defects in at least 75% of all LCA cases. Gene-specific treatments have entered the clinical trial phase for three LCA genes, and for seven LCA genes gene-specific therapies have been tested in model systems. Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, more than 40 loci have been identified for AMD, accounting for 15%-65% of the total genetic contribution to AMD. Despite the progress that has been made so far, genetic testing is not yet recommended for AMD, but this may change if we move to clinical trials or treatments that are dependent on an individual's genotype. The identification of serum or plasma biomarkers using other "-omics" technologies may further improve predictive tests and our understanding of the disease mechanisms of AMD. Ultimately, it is anticipated that predictive tests will help to stratify patients for the most suitable therapy, which will enable the development of precision medicine, tailored to individual needs.

  11. A Study of the Veterinary Medicine Graduates of the WICHE Student Exchange Programs Showing the Relation of That Group to the Total Veterinarian Manpower of the WICHE States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO.

    The relation of veterinarian manpower of the WICHE (Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) states to the veterinary medicine graduates of the WICHE student exchange programs (SEP) is presented. The states included in the WICHE program are Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming. Tables…

  12. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Kubiak, Christine; Whitfield, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe.......In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe....

  13. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  14. Towards personal health care with model-guided medicine: long-term PPPM-related strategies and realisation opportunities within 'Horizon 2020'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Heinz U; Golubnitschaja, Olga

    2014-01-01

    At the international EPMA Summit carried out in the EU Parliament (September 2013), the main challenges in Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine have been discussed and strategies outlined in order to implement scientific and technological innovation in medicine and healthcare utilising new strategic programmes such as 'Horizon 2020'. The joint EPMA (European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine) / IFCARS (International Foundation for Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery) paper emphasises the consolidate position of the leading experts who are aware of the great responsibility of being on a forefront of predictive, preventive and personalised medicine. Both societies consider long-term international partnerships and multidisciplinary projects to create PPPM relevant innovation in science, technological tools and practical implementation in healthcare. Personalisation in healthcare urgently needs innovation in design of PPPM-related medical services, new products, research, education, didactic materials, propagation of targeted prevention in the society and treatments tailored to the person. For the paradigm shift from delayed reactive to predictive, preventive and personalised medicine, a new culture should be created in communication between individual professional domains, between doctor and patient, as well as in communication with individual social (sub)groups and patient cohorts. This is a long-term mission in personalised healthcare with the whole spectrum of instruments available and to be created in the field.

  15. Gender- and sex-specific sports-related injury research in emergency medicine: a consensus on future research direction and focused application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raukar, Neha P; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Kane, Kathleen; Davenport, Moira; Espinoza, Tamara R; Weiland, Jessica; Franco, Vanessa; Vaca, Federico E

    2014-12-01

    Title IX, the commercialization of sports, the social change in sports participation, and the response to the obesity epidemic have contributed to the rapid proliferation of participation in both competitive organized sports and nontraditional athletic events. As a consequence, emergency physicians are regularly involved in the acute diagnosis, management, disposition, and counseling of a broad range of sports-related pathology. Three important and highly publicized mechanisms of injury in sports relevant to emergency medicine (EM) include concussion, heat illness, and sudden cardiac death. In conjunction with the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," a consensus group consisting of experts in EM, emergency neurology, sports medicine, and public health convened to deliberate and develop research questions that could ultimately advance the field of sports medicine and allow for meaningful application in the emergency department (ED) clinical setting. Sex differences in injury risk, diagnosis, ED treatment, and counseling are identified in each of these themes. This article presents the consensus-based priority research agenda. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  16. Age-related differences in breast carcinoma knowledge, beliefs, and perceived risk among women visiting an academic general medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, N C; Lee, A M; McDermott, M M

    1997-08-01

    This study assessed whether age-related differences in breast carcinoma knowledge and perceived risk exist among women in a primary care setting and whether these women's beliefs about the best age to begin screening mammography reflect those of their physicians. Consecutive women ages 30-70 years who visited an academic general medicine practice were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing breast carcinoma knowledge, beliefs, and perceived risk. Women's risk estimates were compared with individual risk probabilities derived from the Gail model. Women's beliefs about when to begin screening mammography were compared with the beliefs of the attending physicians in the practice. Questionnaire results were compared across age groups. Six hundred seventy-four women completed the survey. Overall, knowledge scores were negatively correlated with age (correlation coefficient = -0.30, P = 0.001). The level of knowledge about the benefits of mammography was high across all age groups. In contrast, knowledge that breast carcinoma incidence increases with age was poor. Only 28% of all women recognized that breast carcinoma is more common among women age 65 years than among women age 40 years. Among all women, 26% underestimated their risk of developing breast carcinoma in the next 10 years, 32% correctly estimated their risk, and 42% overestimated their risk. Fifty-five percent thought that mammography should begin when a woman is age 30-35 years. In contrast, all surveyed physicians recommended that a woman start undergoing mammography at age 40 years or older. In this primary care setting, older women had poorer breast carcinoma knowledge than younger women but were equally likely to appreciate the benefits of mammography. Most women were unaware that age is a risk factor for breast carcinoma. Improved education of females by their physicians may resolve some of the observed discrepancies regarding the optimal age to begin screening mammography.

  17. Interim relative potency factors for the toxicological risk assessment of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in food and herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Karl-Heinz; Schrenk, Dieter

    2016-11-30

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are among the most potent natural toxins occurring in a broad spectrum of plant species from various families. Recently, findings of considerable contamination of teas/herbal infusions prepared from non-PA plants have been reported. These are obviously due to cross-contamination with minor amounts of PA plants and can affect both food and herbal medicines. Another source of human exposure is honey collected from PA plants. These findings illustrate the requirement for a comprehensive risk assessment of PAs, hampered by the enormous number of different PA congeners occurring in nature. Up to now, risk assessment is based on the carcinogenicity of certain PAs after chronic application to rats using the sum of detected PAs as dose metric. Because of the well-documented large structure-dependent differences between sub-groups of PA congeners with respect to their genotoxicity and (cyto)toxicity, however, this procedure is inadequate. Here we provide an overview of recent attempts to assess the risk of PA exposure and the available literature on the toxic effects and potencies of different congeners. Based on these considerations, we have derived interim Relative Potency (REP) factors for a number of abundant PAs suggesting a factor of 1.0 for cyclic di-esters and open-chain di-esters with 7S configuration, of 0.3 for mono-esters with 7S configuration, of 0.1 for open-chain di-esters with 7R configuration and of 0.01 for mono-esters with 7R configuration. For N-oxides we suggest to apply the REP factor of the corresponding PA. We are confident that the use of these values can provide a more scientific basis for PA risk assessment until a more detailed experimental analysis of the potencies of all relevant congeners can be carried out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Patterns of self-medication with medicinal plants and related adverse events--a South American survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, Alicia E; Ragone, Maria I

    2010-10-01

    Medicinal plants are useful as a natural therapy to treat minor illnesses, as gastrointestinal disorders or as topic antiinflammatories. Also, they have been increasingly used as a coadjuvant in cronic diseases as hypertension, diabetes or hyperlipidemias. Nevertheless, many of the plants have active principles which are contraindicated or need precaution in certain illnesses as coagulation disorders or in certain states as pregnancy or breastfeeding. In this review we had compiled the side-effects, precautions and interactions with other medicines of many plants which are used in self-medication in our region. A previous population study gave us information on the consumption of medicinal plants in 73 pharmacies of the Buenos Aires province, in Argentina. During a period of one year, there were 37102 self-medicated plants, while only 1532 were prescribed by the physician. Among the most frequently self-medicated plants are Malva sylvestris L., Matricaria chamomile L, and Quassia amara. Among the most frequently prescribed are also "malva" and "chamomile", Tilia cordata Mill. and Valeriana officinalis. Based in the most consumed medicinal plants in our region, we reviewed the risks of such plants and the precautions that should be taken for a rational use. Also, we detected 15 adverse-reactions reported by the pharmacists through a pharmaceutical vigilance program, which are described and analyzed here. The results of the study and other reports suggest that adverse reactions of herbal medicines could be avoided if preventing self-medication, and taking into consideration possible contraindications and interactions.

  19. Longitudinal analysis of associations between women's consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners/use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenbo; Adams, Jon; Hickman, Louise; Sibbritt, David W

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine associations between consultations with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners/use of self-prescribed CAM and menopause-related symptoms. Data were obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Generalized estimating equations were used to conduct longitudinal data analyses, which were restricted to women born in 1946-1951 who were surveyed in 2007 (survey 5; n = 10,638) and 2010 (survey 6; n = 10,011). Women with menopause-related symptoms were more likely to use self-prescribed CAM but were not more likely to consult a CAM practitioner. Overall, CAM use was lower among women who had undergone hysterectomy or women who had undergone oophorectomy, compared with naturally postmenopausal women, and decreased with increasing age of postmenopausal women. Weak associations between CAM use and hot flashes were observed. Women experiencing hot flashes were more likely to consult a massage therapist (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.00-1.20) and/or use self-prescribed herbal medicines (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23) than women not experiencing hot flashes. Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of self-prescribed CAM among naturally or surgically postmenopausal women are associated with menopause-related symptoms. Our study findings should prompt healthcare providers, in particular family medicine practitioners, to be cognizant of clinical evidence for CAM typically used for the management of common menopause-related symptoms in their aim to provide safe, effective, and coordinated care for women.

  20. Analysis of data related to the update of diagnosis reference levels in radiology and nuclear medicine. Assessment 2009-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roch, Patrice; Celier, David

    2012-10-01

    This report presents and comments the results of the analysis of 'patient' dosimetric data which radiology and nuclear medicine establishments had to transmit to the IRSN. The first part concerns conventional radiology and the analysis is made from a general point of view, and then by examination type (in the case of adults and of children). A synthesis of results since 2004 is proposed in terms of transmitted data, of data representativeness, of influence of detection technology on the delivered dose, of evolution of diagnosis reference level. With the same approach, the next parts address scanography examinations and nuclear medicine

  1. Critical Illness-Related Corticosteroid Insufficiency (CIRCI): A Narrative Review from a Multispecialty Task Force of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annane, Djillali; Pastores, Stephen M; Arlt, Wiebke; Balk, Robert A; Beishuizen, Albertus; Briegel, Josef; Carcillo, Joseph; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Cooper, Mark S; Marik, Paul E; Meduri, Gianfranco Umberto; Olsen, Keith M; Rochwerg, Bram; Rodgers, Sophia C; Russell, James A; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-12-01

    To provide a narrative review of the latest concepts and understanding of the pathophysiology of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI). A multi-specialty task force of international experts in critical care medicine and endocrinology and members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Medline, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Three major pathophysiologic events were considered to constitute CIRCI: dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, altered cortisol metabolism, and tissue resistance to glucocorticoids. The dysregulation of the HPA axis is complex, involving multidirectional crosstalk between the CRH/ACTH pathways, autonomic nervous system, vasopressinergic system, and immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated that plasma clearance of cortisol is markedly reduced during critical illness, explained by suppressed expression and activity of the primary cortisol-metabolizing enzymes in the liver and kidney. Despite the elevated cortisol levels during critical illness, tissue resistance to glucocorticoids is believed to occur due to insufficient glucocorticoid alpha-mediated anti-inflammatory activity. Novel insights into the pathophysiology of CIRCI add to the limitations of the current diagnostic tools to identify at-risk patients and may also impact how corticosteroids are used in patients with CIRCI.

  2. Content and conceptual frameworks of psychology and social work preceptor feedback related to the educational requests of family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Luc; Rocque, Rhéa; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2017-06-01

    Supervision of communication competency in clinical settings in medicine is an important component of professional training. The purpose of this study was to describe the content and rationale of psychology and social work preceptor feedback to family medicine residents who express educational needs during case-based written vignettes. We conducted a qualitative study with 25 psychology and social work preceptors from family medicine departments of the three French-speaking universities in the province of Quebec, Canada. During an individual interview, preceptors were asked to respond to three short case-based written vignettes depicting resident educational issues regarding communication and to explain their responses. Authors analyzed the content of responses and the conceptual frameworks reported. The three vignettes elicited 475 responses, including 58 distinct responses and 33 distinct conceptual frameworks. Therapeutic alliance and stages of grief were the two most reported conceptual frameworks. The vignettes stimulated a wealth of responses and conceptual frameworks among psychology and social work preceptors in family medicine. The complete list of responses could be useful for faculty development activities by stimulating preceptors' reflexive practice with regard to their responses, the educational goals of these responses and the conceptual frameworks underlying their feedback. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The polarization and beaming effect for GRBs

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, K. S.; Fan, J. H.; Dai, Z. G.

    1999-01-01

    Both observations and theoretical models suggest that the emissions in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the afterglows are beamed. We argue that the recent polarization measured in the afterglows gives further evidence of beaming in GRBs. In this approach, we adopted the polarization-magnitude relation of BL Lacertae objects to 4 GRBs with available polarization measurements and found that the data of the 4 GRBs are consistent with the relation of BL Lacertae objects. This result suggests that the...

  4. III Italian Consensus Conference on Malignant Mesothelioma of the Pleura. Epidemiology, Public Health and Occupational Medicine related issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, C; Bianchi, C; Chellini, E; Consonni, D; Fubini, B; Gennaro, V; Marinaccio, A; Menegozzo, M; Mirabelli, D; Merler, E; Merletti, F; Musti, M; Oddone, E; Romanelli, A; Terracini, B; Zona, A; Zocchetti, C; Alessi, M; Baldassarre, A; Dianzani, I; Maule, M; Mensi, C; Silvestri, S

    2015-09-09

    The III Italian Consensus Conference on Pleural Mesothelioma (MM) convened on January 29th 2015. This report presents the conclusions of the 'Epidemiology, Public Health and Occupational Medicine' section. MM incidence in 2011 in Italy was 3.64 per 100,000 person/years in men and 1.32 in women. Incidence trends are starting to level off. Ten percent of cases are due to non-occupational exposure. Incidence among women is very high in Italy, because of both non-occupational and occupational exposure. The removal of asbestos in place is proceeding slowly, with remaining exposure. Recent literature confirms the causal role of chrysotile. Fibrous fluoro-edenite was classified as carcinogenic by IARC (Group 1) on the basis of MM data. A specific type (MWCNT-7) of Carbon Nanotubes was classified 2B. For pleural MM, after about 45 years since first exposure, the incidence trend slowed down; with more studies needed. Cumulative exposure is a proxy of the relevant exposure, but does not allow to distinguish if duration or intensity may possibly play a prominent role, neither to evaluate the temporal sequence of exposures. Studies showed that duration and intensity are independent determinants of MM. Blood related MM are less than 2.5%. The role of BAP1 germline mutations is limited to the BAP1 cancer syndrome, but negligible for sporadic cases. Correct MM diagnosis is baseline; guidelines agree on the importance of the tumor gross appearance and of the hematoxylin-eosin-based histology. Immunohistochemical markers contribute to diagnostic confirmation: the selection depends on morphology, location, and differential diagnosis. The WG suggested that 1) General Cancer Registries and ReNaM Regional Operational Centres (COR) interact and systematically compare MM cases; 2) ReNaM should report results presenting the diagnostic certainty codes and the diagnostic basis, separately; 3) General Cancer Registries and COR should interact with pathologists to assure the up

  5. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  6. Anodic Concentration Polarization in SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williford, Rick E.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Maupin, Gary D.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Wachsman, ED, et al

    2003-08-01

    Concentration polarization is important because it determines the maximum power output of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at high fuel utilization. Anodic concentration polarization occurs when the demand for reactants exceeds the capacity of the porous ceramic anode to supply them by gas diffusion mechanisms. High tortuosities (bulk diffusion resistances) are often assumed to explain this behavior. However, recent experiments show that anodic concentration polarization originates in the immediate vicinity of the reactive triple phase boundary (TPB) sites near the anode/electrolyte interface. A model is proposed to describe how concentration polarization is controlled by two localized phenomena: competitive adsorption of reactants in areas adjacent to the reactive TPB sites, followed by relatively slow surface diffusion to the reactive sites. Results suggest that future SOFC design improvements should focus on optimization of the reactive area, adsorption, and surface diffusion at the anode/electrolyte interface.

  7. PREFACE: International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics & 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas L. S.; deHarak, Bruno A.

    2010-01-01

    From 30 July to 1 August 2009, over a hundred scientists from 18 countries attended the International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics and the 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions which were held at the W T Young Library of the University of Kentucky, USA. Both conferences were satellite meetings of the XXVI International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) held in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, 21-28 July 2009. These symposia covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical topics involving excitation, ionization (single and multiple), and molecular fragmentation, of a wide range of targets by photons and charged particles (polarized and unpolarized). Atomic targets ranged from hydrogen to the heavy elements and ions, while molecular targets ranged from H2 to large molecules of biological interest. On the experimental front, cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS), also known as the Reaction Microscope because of the complete information it gives about a wide variety of reactions, is becoming commonplace and has greatly expanded the ability of researchers to perform previously inaccessible coincidence experiments. Meanwhile, more conventional spectrometers are also advancing and have been used for increasingly sophisticated and exacting measurements. On the theoretical front great progress has been made in the description of target states, and in the scattering calculations used to describe both simple and complex reactions. The international nature of collaborations between theorists and experimentalists is exemplified by, for example, the paper by Ren et al which has a total of 13 authors of whom the experimental group of six is from Heidelberg, Germany, one theoretical group is from Australia, with the remainder of the theoreticians coming from several different institutions in the United States. A total of 52 invited talks and

  8. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  9. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  10. Association between use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenbo; Sibbritt, David W; Hickman, Louise; Adams, Jon

    2015-10-01

    To examine the association between self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use and menopause-related symptoms, stratified by menopausal status. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 10,011 menopausal women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, conducted in 2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were applied to identify if the use of selected self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine was significantly associated with a range of menopause-related symptoms. Vitamins/minerals were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.20) and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.16). Yoga/meditation was more likely to be used by women with hysterectomy (adjusted OR=1.76) or natural menopausal women (adjusted OR=1.38) experiencing anxiety. Herbal medicines were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.22), tiredness (adjusted OR=1.20), and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.17), and by women with oophorectomy experiencing tiredness (adjusted OR=1.45). Aromatherapy oils were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing night sweats (adjusted OR=1.25) and by women with hysterectomy experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=2.02). Chinese medicines were more likely to be used by women with oophorectomy experiencing stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=4.06) and/or palpitations (adjusted OR=3.06). Our study will help improve the patient-provider communication regarding complementary and alternative medicine use for menopause, and we conclude that menopausal status should be taken into account by providers for menopause care. The women's experience and motivations of such use warrant further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Asim A.; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS’s Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine’s dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site’s competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees’ work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine

  12. Liver injury associated with the use of Fructus Psoraleae (Bol-gol-zhee or Bu-gu-zhi) and its related proprietary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wing I; Tse, Man Li; Ngan, Teresa; Lin, Jieru; Lee, Ws Ken; Poon, Wing Tat; Mak, Tony Wl; Leung, Vincent King Sun; Chau, Tai Nin

    2009-08-01

    Fructus Psoraleae (FP) is used by herbalists for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, vitiligo, and psoriasis. It is used alone, or in combination with other herbs, in some countries in the form of proprietary medicine. It is recognized as one of the emerging hepatotoxins and here we report three cases of acute hepatitis after exposed to FP and its related proprietary medicine. It seems possible that psoralen and its related chemicals may be responsible for the hepatotoxicity. Decoction with other herbs may result in higher concentration of toxic constituents and in more severe liver injury. In summary, FP is associated with hepatotoxicity in some individuals. Pharmacovigilance for the potential side effects of herbal products is necessary.

  13. Nuclear medicine physics

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, Joao Jose

    2011-01-01

    Edited by a renowned international expert in the field, Nuclear Medicine Physics offers an up-to-date, state-of-the-art account of the physics behind the theoretical foundation and applications of nuclear medicine. It covers important physical aspects of the methods and instruments involved in modern nuclear medicine, along with related biological topics. The book first discusses the physics of and machines for producing radioisotopes suitable for use in conventional nuclear medicine and PET. After focusing on positron physics and the applications of positrons in medicine and biology, it descr

  14. A systematic review of qualitative research on the contributory factors leading to medicine-related problems from the perspectives of adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hamid, A; Ghaleb, M; Aljadhey, H; Aslanpour, Z

    2014-09-19

    To synthesise contributing factors leading to medicine-related problems (MRPs) in adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus from their perspectives. A systematic literature review of qualitative studies regarding the contributory factors leading to MRPs, medication errors and non-adherence, followed by a thematic synthesis of the studies. We screened Pubmed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycInfo, International Pharmaceutical Abstract and PsycExtra for qualitative studies (interviews, focus groups and questionnaires of a qualitative nature). Thematic synthesis was achieved by coding and developing themes from the findings of qualitative studies. The synthesis yielded 21 studies that satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three themes emerged that involved contributing factors to MRPs: patient-related factors including socioeconomic factors (beliefs, feeling victimised, history of the condition, lack of finance, lack of motivation and low self-esteem) and lifestyle factors (diet, lack of exercise/time to see the doctor, obesity, smoking and stress), medicine-related factors (belief in natural remedies, fear of medicine, lack of belief in medicines, lack of knowledge, non-adherence and polypharmacy) and condition-related factors (lack of knowledge/understanding, fear of condition and its complications, and lack of control). MRPs represent a major health threat, especially among adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus. The patients' perspectives uncovered hidden factors that could cause and/or contribute to MRPs in these groups of patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Analysis of data relative to the update of diagnostic reference levels in radiology and nuclear medicine. 2011-2012 review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Applying the Order of 24 October 2011 on diagnostic reference levels, departments of radiology and nuclear medicine must send a sample of 'patient' dosimetric data to the IRSN each year. The results of the analysis of dosimetric data performed between the 1 January 2011 and the 31 December 2012 presented in this report should enable the authority to define the needs for updating regulations. Professional involvement in DRLs improved globally over the 2011-2012 period but is heterogeneous according to the imaging area considered. The participation of conventional radiology professionals is still low, with less than 30% against over 75% in CT and 85% in nuclear medicine. Data collection in pediatrics, considering all the fields of medical imaging, remains extremely limited. This shows almost no dose assessment for children by imaging departments, and has the effect of not allowing authorities to provide professionals with DRLs representative of pediatric practices. The analysis of radiology doses and nuclear medicine administered activities by IRSN shows an overall decrease of statistical indicators on which DRLs are indexed. These results lead to proposals for updating reference values for a large number of examinations. In addition to the analysis of data collected for examinations currently mentioned in regulatory texts, IRSN recommends to update DRLs in a more general way by changing the strategy for collecting and updating pediatric DRLs, by including interventional radiology - specialty in which the radiation protection presents a major challenge - by introducing a more ambitious indicator than the 75. percentile in conventional radiology and nuclear medicine - the 25. percentile statistical indicator, and by taking into account new technologies inducing additional exposures to the patient as CT-scan associated with the PET. (authors)

  16. The Hemispheric Asymmetry of Polar Faculae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this paper, the north–south (N–S) asymmetry of the polar faculae at relatively low (RLLs), relatively high (RHLs) as well as total latitudes (TLs) respectively, are investigated. It is found that. the polar faculae behave in a different asymmetrical way at different latitudinal bands;; the asymmetry of solar activity ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. ... General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  18. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  19. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  20. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  1. Deadly medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the methods the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum used to make an exhibition on the complex history of Nazi eugenics accessible to the museum's mass public and at the same time, provocative for special audiences consisting of professionals and students from the biomedical fields. Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race showed how both eugenics and related "euthanasia" programs in Nazi Germany helped pave the road to the Holocaust. The exhibition implicitly evoked the present-day appeal of biological explanations for human behavior and of new visions of human perfection. Educational programs used the exhibition as a springboard for discussions of bioethics and medical ethics.

  2. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  3. Epithelial cell polarity, stem cells and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2011-01-01

    After years of extensive scientific discovery much has been learned about the networks that regulate epithelial homeostasis. Loss of expression or functional activity of cell adhesion and cell polarity proteins (including the PAR, crumbs (CRB) and scribble (SCRIB) complexes) is intricately related......, deregulation of adhesion and polarity proteins can cause misoriented cell divisions and increased self-renewal of adult epithelial stem cells. In this Review, we highlight some advances in the understanding of how loss of epithelial cell polarity contributes to tumorigenesis....

  4. In vivo and in vitro changes in neurochemical parameters related to mercury concentrations from specific brain regions of polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Anke; Kwan, Michael; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) has been detected in polar bear brain tissue, but its biological effects are not well known. Relationships between Hg concentrations and neurochemical enzyme activities and receptor binding were assessed in the cerebellum, frontal lobes, and occipital lobes of 24 polar bears collected from Nunavik (Northern Quebec), Canada. The concentration-response relationship was further studied with in vitro experiments using pooled brain homogenate of 12 randomly chosen bears. In environmentally exposed brain samples, there was no correlative relationship between Hg concentration and cholinesterase (ChE) activity or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) binding in any of the 3 brain regions. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the occipital lobe showed a negative correlative relationship with total Hg concentration. In vitro experiments, however, demonstrated that Hg (mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride) can inhibit ChE and MAO activities and muscarinic mAChR binding. These results show that Hg can alter neurobiochemical parameters but the current environmental Hg exposure level does have an effect on the neurochemistry of polar bears from northern Canada. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Syringe shape and positioning relative to efficiency volume inside dose calibrators and its role in nuclear medicine quality assurance programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.A.M. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: a.miranda@portugalmail.pt; Carrasco, M.F. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Lencart, J. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Bastos, A.L. [Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    A careful analysis of geometry and source positioning influence in the activity measurement outcome of a nuclear medicine dose calibrator is presented for {sup 99m}Tc. The implementation of a quasi-point source apparent activity curve measurement is proposed for an accurate correction of the activity inside several syringes, and compared with a theoretical geometric efficiency model. Additionally, new geometrical parameters are proposed to test and verify the correct positioning of the syringes as part of acceptance testing and quality control procedures.

  6. Natural products as potential human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel inhibitors - outcomes from a screening of widely used herbal medicines and edible plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Anja; Jähne, Evelyn A; Baburin, Igor; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    Inhibition of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel is the single most important risk factor leading to acquired long QT syndrome. Drug-induced QT prolongation can cause severe cardiac complications, including arrhythmia, and is thus a liability in drug development. Considering the importance of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel as an antitarget and the daily intake of plant-derived foods and herbal products, surprisingly few natural products have been tested for channel blocking properties. In an assessment of possible human ether-a-go-go-related gene liabilities, a selection of widely used herbal medicines and edible plants (vegetables, fruits, and spices) was screened by means of a functional two-microelectrode voltage-clamp assay with Xenopus oocytes. The human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel blocking activity of selected extracts was investigated with the aid of a high-performance liquid chromatography-based profiling approach, and attributed to tannins and alkaloids. Major European medicinal plants and frequently consumed food plants were found to have a low risk for human ether-a-go-go-related gene toxicity. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  8. The concept of normality through history: a didactic review of features related to philosophy, statistics and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, A A; Conti, A; Gensini, G F

    2006-09-01

    Normality characterises in medicine any possible qualitative or quantitative situation whose absence implies an illness or a state of abnormality. The illness concept was first a philosophical one. But the use of mathematics in the study of biological events, which began with Galton (1822-1911) and with Pearson (1857-1936), changed the frame of reference. In the second part of the 19th century mathematics was used to study the distribution of some biological characteristics in the evolution of the species. Around 1900, statistics became the basis for the study of the diffusion of the illnesses. Half a century later statistics made possible the transition from the description of single cases to groups of cases. Even more important is the concept of "normality" in laboratory medicine. In this field the search for the "perfect norm" was, and possibly still is, under way. The widespread use of statistics in the laboratory has allowed the definition, in a certain sense, of a new normality. This is the reason why the term "reference value" has been introduced. However, even the introduction of this new term has merely shifted the problem, and not resolved it.

  9. Relation between Body Humors and Hypercholesterolemia: An Iranian Traditional Medicine Perspective Based on the Teaching of Avicenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtiazy, M; Keshavarz, M; Khodadoost, M; Kamalinejad, M; Gooshahgir, S A; Shahrad Bajestani, H; Hashem Dabbaghian, F; Alizad, M

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. One of the important risk factors of cardiovascular disease is hyperlipidemia especially high levels of serum cholesterol. Due to the importance of hypercholesterolemia, being a serious condition, various treatments are used to control it, regardless of the cause, most of treatments, focused on reducing the level of serum lipids. This study aims to determine various view points for hypercholesterolemia in Iranian traditional medicine. We used several Iranian traditional medicine resources and literatures; then based on these texts; a pilot study was designed to assess their effects in 10 patients with high plasma cholesterol. The sign and symptoms in main digestive organs (Stomach and liver) were also evaluated. Some patients showed hepatic temperament but all patients had gastric temperament. With reference to Iranian traditional medical texts and literatures, the organs involved in the process of digestion, particularly the stomach and the liver play the most important role. Yet the proper function of stomach as the first step involved in the digestion chain should be emphasized.

  10. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  11. Consumption of medicines in high-risk pregnancy: evaluation of determinants related to the use of prescription drugs and self-medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Dayse Araújo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of drugs during pregnancy still represents a challenge for medicine, since the majority of drugs cross the placental barrier with a potential to cause several congenital problems to the fetus, and most of them have not been clinically tested in pregnant patients. At the same time, the medicalization phenomenon, self-medication, and lack of patient information about the misuse of medicines are additional problems. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of medicine consumption in high-risk pregnancies and the determinants related to this consumption pattern. In order to do so, a cross-sectional descriptive study was performed with puerperal women who had a history of high-risk pregnancy. Statistically significant associations were found between self-medication and fewer prenatal visits, and cigarette use during pregnancy and a higher number of children. According to these data, the vulnerability of this population to the risks of drug use is evident, demonstrating a gap that requires urgent interventions in health-care education.

  12. Analysis of data relative to the update of diagnostic reference levels in radiology and nuclear medicine. 2013-2015 review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-11-01

    Applying the Order of 24 October 2011 on diagnostic reference levels, departments of radiology and nuclear medicine must send a sample of 'patient' dosimetric data to the IRSN each year. The results of the analysis of dosimetric data performed between the 1 January 2013 and the 31 December 2015 presented in this report should enable the authority to define the needs for updating regulation. This assessment takes place in a national and international context particularly rich and active since the last years. More than 20 years after the official introduction of the DRL concept by ICRP and the first regulation requirements at a European level, the good and the bad sides of the DRLs systems implemented by several countries, including France, has shown the necessity of complementary actions regarding some specific practices (pediatrics, interventional radiology). On one hand, from a national point of view, the current collection and analysis system is highly efficient for evaluation of practices in France and for DRL update ability. On the other hand, as an optimization implementation tool, regarding the lack of professionals involvement, the current system should not be considered as fully effective in radiology. However, when the professionals carry out DRL data collection and analysis, optimization actions are implemented for nearly all the cases. During the 2013-2015 period, professionals involvement in DRLs globally improved but is heterogeneous according to the imaging area considered. The participation of conventional radiology professionals is still low, with less than 30% against about 80% in CT and more than 85% in nuclear medicine. From a dosimetric point of view, the national analysis shows an overall decrease of statistical indicators in radiology, computed tomography and nuclear medicine on which DRLs are indexed. These results lead to proposals for updating reference values for a large number of examinations. In addition to the analysis of data

  13. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, T.; Koike, F.; Sakimoto, K.; Okasaka, R.; Kawasaki, K.; Takiyama, K.; Oda, T.; Kato, T.

    1992-04-01

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  15. Polar drive on OMEGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha P.B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High-convergence polar-drive experiments are being conducted on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commum. 133, 495 (1997] using triple-picket laser pulses. The goal of OMEGA experiments is to validate modeling of oblique laser deposition, heat conduction in the presence of nonradial thermal gradients in the corona, and implosion energetics in the presence of laser–plasma interactions such as crossed-beam energy transfer. Simulated shock velocities near the equator, where the beams are obliquely incident, are within 5% of experimentally inferred values in warm plastic shells, well within the required accuracy for ignition. High, near-one-dimensional areal density is obtained in warm-plastic-shell implosions. Simulated backlit images of the compressing core are in good agreement with measured images. Outstanding questions that will be addressed in the future relate to the role of cross-beam transfer in polar drive irradiation and increasing the energy coupled into the target by decreasing beam obliquity.

  16. The sensitivity of income polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Azhar

    2009-01-01

    This study looks at polarization and its components' sensitivity to assumptions about equivalence scales, income definition, ethical income distribution parameters, and the income accounting period. A representative sample of Danish individual incomes from 1984 to 2002 is utilised. Results show...... that polarization has increased over time, regardless of the applied measure, when the last part of the period is compared to the first part of the period; primary causes being increased inequality (alienation) and faster income growth among high incomes relative to those in the middle of the distribution...

  17. Veterinary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallfelz, F.A.; Comar, C.L.; Wentworth, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the expanding horizons of nuclear medicine, the equipment necessary for a nuclear medicine laboratory is listed, and the value of this relatively new field to the veterinary clinician is indicated. Although clinical applications to veterinary medicine have not kept pace with those of human medicine, many advances have been made, particularly in the use of in vitro techniques. Areas for expanded applications should include competitive protein binding and other in vitro procedures, particularly in connection with metabolic profile studies. Indicated also is more intensive application by the veterinarian of imaging procedures, which have been found to be of such great value to the physician. (U.S.)

  18. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  19. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  20. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  1. Medicines from Marine Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Coleman, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Few of us realise that the oceans of the world are a relatively untapped reservoir of new natural product-derived medicines to combat the many diseases that plague humanity. We explore the role that an unremarkable sea snail and sea squirt are playing in providing us with new medicines for the alleviation of chronic pain and cancer respectively.…

  2. Football emergency medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the planning and preparation for effective and efficient medical service provision during the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa, the collaboration between the disciplines of sports and emergency medicine has resulted in the dawning of the subspecialty of football emergency medicine. Sports physicians and related ...

  3. Use of the Polarized Radiance Distribution Camera System in the RADYO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    polarizer’s (Melles Griot , 03 FPG 019). Polarizer’s are orientated at 0 deg, 60 deg, and 120 deg (angles relative to the first polarizer). The combination...combination of a broadband mica quarter wave plate (Melles Griot , 02 WRM001) and a polarizer to form a circular polarization analyzer. The combination of the

  4. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  5. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educational - Medicine Prize Related The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to people and ... this page MLA style: "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine – Educational". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media ...

  6. Charge transport in non-polar and semi-polar III-V nitride heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konar, Aniruddha; Verma, Amit; Fang, Tian; Zhao, Pei; Jana, Raj; Jena, Debdeep

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the intense research focus on the optical properties, the transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar III-nitride semiconductors remain relatively unexplored to date. The purpose of this paper is to discuss charge-transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar orientations of GaN in a comparative fashion to what is known for transport in polar orientations. A comprehensive approach is adopted, starting from an investigation of the differences in the electronic bandstructure along different polar orientations of GaN. The polarization fields along various orientations are then discussed, followed by the low-field electron and hole mobilities. A number of scattering mechanisms that are specific to non-polar and semi-polar GaN heterostructures are identified, and their effects are evaluated. Many of these scattering mechanisms originate due to the coupling of polarization with disorder and defects in various incarnations depending on the crystal orientation. The effect of polarization orientation on carrier injection into quantum-well light-emitting diodes is discussed. This paper ends with a discussion of orientation-dependent high-field charge-transport properties including velocity saturation, instabilities and tunneling transport. Possible open problems and opportunities are also discussed. (paper)

  7. Association between use of complementary/alternative medicine and health-related behaviors among health fair participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Andrew R; Crane, Lori A; Davidson, Arthur J; Steiner, John F

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and standard preventive care is not well defined. We surveyed 1,593 health fair participants on their use of CAM and determined odds ratios for standard preventive care and healthy behaviors among users of provider-based CAM (e.g., chiropractic) and users of herbs or supplements. Users of provider-based CAM were no less likely than nonusers to receive standard preventive care, with the exception of lower likelihood of influenza vaccination among elderly CAM users (OR 0.2). Herbs or supplements were used by a majority of respondents (61%), and users were more likely to report engaging in healthy behaviors such as eating a low-fat diet (OR 1.5) and taking a daily multivitamin (OR 2.0). Those who use alternative therapies, including herbs or supplements, appear no less likely overall than nonusers to receive standard preventive care. In addition, users of herbs or supplements are more likely to engage in healthy behaviors and appear to be a more health-conscious group. Overall, our findings support the notion that unconventional therapies are more complementary than alternative to standard preventive care. Copyright 2002 American Health Foundation and Elsevier Science.

  8. Moxibustion in Early Chinese Medicine and Its Relation to the Origin of Meridians: A Study on the Unearthed Literatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiankang; Han, Li; Liu, Juntian; Yu, Mengyun

    2017-01-01

    Moxibustion is an integral part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). It achieved higher level of recognition and had more general application in ancient times than in contemporary life. As the vital historical sources, the records of unearthed literatures offered precious insights to Chinese social life pattern and medical practice in Qin and Han dynasties (221 BC–220 AD). There was no surprise that the bamboo and silk documents excavated from Mawangdui (马王堆) tomb, Hantanpo (旱滩坡) tomb, and other relics had a large amount of texts relevant to moxibustion. This research sorted moxibustion recordings from seven unearthed literatures and discovered that moxibustion had been developed into different modalities and utilized to treat many diseases at that time. In addition, the indications, contraindications of moxibustion, and the method of postmoxibustion care were also discussed. On this basis, some hints were provided to support the hypothesis that the practice of moxibustion led to the discovery of meridians. All our preliminary results in the research have drawn attention for this old therapy and given a new source for its application in clinic and scientific research. PMID:28298936

  9. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for work-related pain correlates with career satisfaction among dental hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chismark, Aubreé; Asher, Gary; Stein, Margot; Tavoc, Tabitha; Curran, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMSP) is associated with work stress and burn-out among registered dental hygienists, with prevalence estimates ranging between 64 to 93%. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing CMSP. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental hygienists who use CAM have greater career satisfaction compared to conventional therapy (CT) users. ADHA members (n=2,431) in North Carolina (n=573) and California (n=1,858) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 25.3% (n=617) was obtained, revealing that 76.5% (n=472) suffered from CMSP. The use of CAM or CT was reported among 80.7% (n=381) of dental hygienists with CMSP. CAM users reported greater overall health (79.3% vs. 54.0%, pCAM therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance career satisfaction for dental hygienists who suffer from CMSP. Ergonomics education may help reduce the number of hygienists who suffer from CMSP. Increased student awareness of CMSP risk is needed to reduce CMSP in the future by enhancing ergonomics education and incorporating CAM, such as yoga stretches, into the classroom and clinic routine.

  10. The origin of radio pulsar polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.

    2017-12-01

    Polarization of radio pulsar profiles involves a number of poorly understood, intriguing phenomena, such as the existence of comparable amounts of orthogonal polarization modes (OPMs), strong distortions of polarization angle (PA) curves into shapes inconsistent with the rotating vector model (RVM), and the strong circular polarization V which can be maximum (instead of zero) at the OPM jumps. It is shown that the comparable OPMs and large V result from a coherent addition of phase-delayed waves in natural propagation modes, which are produced by a linearly polarized emitted signal. The coherent mode summation implies opposite polarization properties to those known from the incoherent case, in particular, the OPM jumps occur at peaks of V, whereas V changes sign at a maximum linear polarization fraction L/I. These features are indispensable to interpret various observed polarization effects. It is shown that statistical properties of emission and propagation can be efficiently parametrized in a simple model of coherent mode addition, which is successfully applied to complex polarization phenomena, such as the stepwise PA curve of PSR B1913+16 and the strong PA distortions within core components of pulsars B1933+16 and B1237+25. The inclusion of coherent mode addition opens the possibility for a number of new polarization effects, such as inversion of relative modal strength, twin minima in L/I coincident with peaks in V, 45° PA jumps in weakly polarized emission, and loop-shaped core PA distortions. The empirical treatment of the coherency of mode addition makes it possible to advance the understanding of pulsar polarization beyond the RVM model.

  11. Thyroid hormones and deiodinase activity in plasma and tissues in relation to high levels of organohalogen contaminants in East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Kristin Møller; Krokstad, Julie Stene; Villanger, Gro Dehli; Blair, David A D; Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Letcher, Robert J; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown relationships between organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) and circulating levels of thyroid hormones (THs) in arctic wildlife. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the possible functional effects of OHCs on TH status in target tissues for TH-dependent activity. The relationships between circulating (plasma) levels of OHCs and various TH variables in plasma as well as in liver, muscle and kidney tissues from East Greenland sub-adult polar bears (Ursus maritimus) sampled in 2011 (n=7) were therefore investigated. The TH variables included 3.3',5.5'-tetraiodothyronine or thyroxine (T4), 3.3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) and type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) deiodinase activities. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with correlation analyses demonstrated negative relationships between individual polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their hydroxylated (OH-) metabolites and T4 in both plasma and muscle. There were both positive and negative relationships between individual OHCs and D1 and D2 activities in muscle, liver and kidney tissues. In general, PCBs, OH-PCBs and polybrominated dipehenyl ethers (PBDEs) were positively correlated to D1 and D2 activities, whereas organochlorine pesticides and byproducts (OCPs) were negatively associated with D1 and D2 activities. These results support the hypothesis that OHCs can affect TH status and action in the target tissues of polar bears. TH levels and deiodinase activities in target tissues can be sensitive endpoints for exposure of TH-disrupting compounds in arctic wildlife, and thus, tissue-specific responses in target organs should be further considered when assessing TH disruption in wildlife studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  14. Nuclear medicine and AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.F.; Middlesex Hospital, London

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear medicine has a central role to play in the diagnosis of the malignant and infectious conditions. This article reviews the role of radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of HIV-related disease. (orig./MG)

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  17. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  18. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  19. Biomarkers in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael J; Smith, Emily R; Turfle, Phillip G

    2017-02-08

    This article summarizes the relevant definitions related to biomarkers; reviews the general processes related to biomarker discovery and ultimate acceptance and use; and finally summarizes and reviews, to the extent possible, examples of the types of biomarkers used in animal species within veterinary clinical practice and human and veterinary drug development. We highlight opportunities for collaboration and coordination of research within the veterinary community and leveraging of resources from human medicine to support biomarker discovery and validation efforts for veterinary medicine.

  20. Influence of absorption in linear polarization imaging of melanoma tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongzhi Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The contrast mechanism of different polarization imaging techniques for melanoma in mouse skin is studied using both experiments and Monte Carlo simulations. Total intensity, linear polarization difference imaging (DPI, degree of polarization imaging (DOPI and rotating linear polarization imaging (RLPI are applied and the relative contrasts of these polarization imaging methods between the normal and cancerous tissues are compared. A two-layer absorption-scattering model is proposed to explain the contrast mechanism of the polarization imaging for melanoma. By taking into account of both scattering of symmetrical and asymmetrical scatterers and absorption of inter-scatterer medium, the two-layer model reproduces the relative contrasts for polarization images observed in experiments. The simulation results also show that, the parameters of polarization imaging change more dramatically with the variation of absorption in the bottom layer than the top layer.

  1. Interpretive Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the

  2. The 100 Most-Cited Human Cleft Lip and Palate-Related Articles Published in Dentistry, Oral Surgery, and Medicine Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Panagiotis; Antonarakis, Gregory S

    2015-07-01

    To identify the 100 most-cited articles pertaining to human cleft lip and palate research published in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine journals and to identify their principal bibliometric characteristics. Web-based bibliometric analysis. The Web of Science was searched to identify the 100 most-cited clinical articles related to cleft lip and/or palate. Information was extracted with regard to total number of citations, number of authors, affiliations, year, and journal of publication, Medical Subject Headings, type of study, specific area of study. Trends in citations were assessed. The 100 most-cited articles identified received between 437 and 58 citations. The oldest was published in 1954 and the most recent in 2008. The number of authors ranged from 1 to 12, with an average of three authors per article. Most of the first authors were affiliated with institutions in the United States, with the most prolific institution being the University of Iowa. More than 70% of the studies appeared in The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. There was a significant negative correlation between average citations per year and time since publication (P articles in human cleft lip and palate research published in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine journals are listed and characterized. This can be used as a potential knowledge base for specialists in training or to produce relevant knowledge defining the direction of future research.

  3. Polarization volume holograms in layers of polymethylmethacrylate with phenanthrenequinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmysh, D. N.; Mahilny, U. V.

    2013-11-01

    Polarization volume holograms are recorded in the polymethylmethacrylate layers that contain phenanthrenequinone at a molar content of 2.5-3%. The effect of the polarization of recording beams on the kinetics of diffraction efficiency and properties of holograms is analyzed. Polarization hologram recording in the polymethylmethacrylate layers with phenanthrenequinone and a relatively high optical stability of the holograms are demonstrated.

  4. Employment Polarization in Local Labor Markets : The Dutch Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terzidis, Nikolaos; van Maarseveen, Raoul; Ortega - Argiles, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Recent literature documents the pervasiveness of job polarization in the labor markets of the developed world. However, relatively little is known about polarization on a sub-national level. We exploit extensive data on both genders from Statistics Netherlands to confirm polarization as an important

  5. Light-matter interactions in a polarization standing wave

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; MacDonald, K.F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the application of polarization standing waves (PSW) to the coherent control of light-matter interactions in planar photonic nanostructures. Such waves, formed by counter-propagating (linear or circular) orthogonally polarized beams can uniquely detect polarization conversion, planar chirality and related asymmetric transmission effects.

  6. Adapting the HSV polarization-color mapping for regions with low irradiance and high polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Tyo, J; Ratliff, Bradley M; Alenin, Andrey S

    2016-10-15

    Many mappings from polarization into color have been developed so that polarization information can be displayed. One of the most common of these maps the angle of linear polarization into color hue and degree of linear polarization into color saturation, while preserving the irradiance information from the polarization data. While this strategy enjoys wide popularity, there is a large class of polarization images for which it is not ideal. It is common to have images where the strongest polarization signatures (in terms of degree of polarization) occur in regions of relatively low irradiance: either in shadow in reflective bands or in cold regions in emissive bands. Since the irradiance is low, the chromatic properties of the resulting images are generally not apparent. Here we present an alternate mapping that uses the statistics of the angle of polarization as a measure of confidence in the polarization signature, then amplifies the irradiance in regions of high confidence, and leaves it unchanged in regions of low confidence. Results are shown from an LWIR and a visible spectrum imager.

  7. Polarization digital holographic microscopy using low-cost liquid crystal polarization rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovhaliuk, Rostyslav Yu

    2018-02-01

    Polarization imaging methods are actively used to study anisotropic objects. A number of methods and systems, such as imaging polarimeters, were proposed to measure the state of polarization of light that passed through the object. Digital holographic and interferometric approaches can be used to quantitatively measure both amplitude and phase of a wavefront. Using polarization modulation optics, the measurement capabilities of such interference-based systems can be extended to measure polarization-dependent parameters, such as phase retardation. Different kinds of polarization rotators can be used to alternate the polarization of a reference beam. Liquid crystals are used in a rapidly increasing number of different optoelectronic devices. Twisted nematic liquid crystals are widely used as amplitude modulators in electronic displays and light valves or shutter glass. Such devices are of particular interest for polarization imaging, as they can be used as polarization rotators, and due to large-scale manufacturing have relatively low cost. A simple Mach-Zehnder polarized holographic setup that uses modified shutter glass as a polarization rotator is demonstrated. The suggested approach is experimentally validated by measuring retardation of quarter-wave film.

  8. A comparison of risk and protective factors related to suicide ideation among residents and specialists in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneroth, Mari; Gustafsson Sendén, Marie; Løvseth, Lise T; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Fridner, Ann

    2014-03-22

    Physicians have an elevated risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts, which might be due to work-related factors. However, the hierarchical work positions as well as work-related health differ among resident and specialist physicians. As such, the correlates of suicide ideation may also vary between these two groups. In the present study, work- and health-related factors and their association with suicidal thoughts among residents (n=234) and specialists (n=813) working at a university hospital were examined using cross-sectional data. Logistic regression analysis showed that having supportive meetings was associated with a lower level of suicide ideation among specialists (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.50-0.94), while an empowering leadership was related to a lower level of suicide ideation among residents (OR=0.55, 95% CI: 0.32-0.94). Having been harassed at work was associated with suicidal ideation among specialists (OR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.31-3.91). In addition, sickness presenteeism and work disengagement were associated with suicide ideation in both groups of physicians. These findings suggest that different workplace interventions are needed to prevent suicide ideation in residents and specialists.

  9. What causes Mars' annular polar vortices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, A. D.; Waugh, D. W.; Guzewich, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    A distinctive feature of the Martian atmosphere is that the winter polar vortices exhibit annuli of high potential vorticity (PV) with a local minimum near the pole. These annuli are seen in observations, reanalyses, and free-running general circulation model simulations of Mars, but are not generally a feature of Earth's polar vortices, where there is a monotonic increase in magnitude of PV with latitude. The creation and maintenance of the annular polar vortices on Mars are not well understood. Here we use simulations with a Martian general circulation model to the show that annular vortices are related to another distinctive, and possibly unique in the solar system, feature of the Martian atmosphere: the condensation of the predominant atmospheric gas species (CO2) in polar winter regions. The latent heat associated with CO2 condensation leads to destruction of PV in the polar lower atmosphere, inducing the formation of an annular PV structure.

  10. A note on polarized light from magnetars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capparelli, L.M.; Damiano, A.; Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Maiani, L. [CERN, Theory Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-11-15

    In a recent paper it is claimed that vacuum birefringence has been experimentally observed for the first time by measuring the degree of polarization of visible light from a magnetar candidate, a neutron star with a magnetic field presumably as large as B ∝ 10{sup 13} G. The role of such a strong magnetic field is twofold. First, the surface of the star emits, at each point, polarized light with linear polarization correlated with the orientation of the magnetic field. Depending on the relative orientation of the magnetic axis of the star with the direction to the distant observer, a certain degree of polarization should be visible. Second, the strong magnetic field in the vacuum surrounding the star could enhance the effective degree of polarization observed: vacuum birefringence. We compare experimental data and theoretical expectations concluding that the conditions to support a claim of strong evidence of vacuum birefringence effects are not met. (orig.)

  11. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km.

    The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  12. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km. The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  13. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  14. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  15. Electron Cyclotron Waves Polarization in the TJII Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappa, A.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the theoretical calculations related with the electron cyclotron (EC) waves polarization control in the TJII stellarator. Two main aspects will be distinguished: the determination of the vacuum polarization that the wave must exhibit if a given propagation mode in a cold plasma is desired and the calculation of the behavior of the grooved polarizers and other transmission systems used to launch the vacuum wave with the required polarization. (Author) 13 refs.

  16. Switching the response of metasurfaces in polarization standing waves

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; MacDonald, K.F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that standing waves of polarization, as opposed to intensity, can be engaged to coherently control light-matter interactions in planar photonic nanostructures, presenting unique opportunities for all-optical data processing and polarization-dependent molecular spectroscopy. Such waves, formed by counter-propagating (linear or circular) orthogonally polarized beams can, for example, uniquely detect polarization conversion, planar chirality and related asymmetric t...

  17. [Complementary medicine in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Moshe; Gamus, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been an increase in the use and popularity of complementary medicine in Israel. Currently, there are over 100 complementary medicine clinics in the public health sector supported by the four health funds and most hospitals in Israel. The number of visits to those clinics reaches close to 3 million visits annually. This reflects an extensive system of care that Israelis utilize in addition to the conventional heaLthcare system. However, the communication between the two systems is still Limited and the education of complementary medicine providers is not regulated by the Ministry of Health. Concurrently, there are a growing number of physicians who expand the knowledge on these therapies and actually integrate them in patients' care. This issue describes experiences and knowledge related to the integration of complementary medicine in the Israeli healthcare system and provides additional research data in support of further integration of complementary medicine within conventional healthcare.

  18. Salidroside attenuates neuroinflammation and improves functional recovery after spinal cord injury through microglia polarization regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggui; Wang, Qingqing; Lou, Yiting; Xu, Jianxiang; Feng, Zhenhua; Chen, Yu; Tang, Qian; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Zengjie; Wu, Yaosen; Tian, Naifeng; Zhou, Yifei; Xu, Huazi; Zhang, Xiaolei

    2018-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe neurological disease; however, few drugs have been proved to treat SCI effectively. Neuroinflammation is the major pathogenesis of SCI secondary injury and considered to be the therapeutic target of SCI. Salidroside (Sal) has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects in airway, adipose and myocardial tissue; however, the role of Sal in SCI therapeutics has not been clarified. In this study, we showed that Sal could improve the functional recovery of spinal cord in rats as revealed by increased BBB locomotor rating scale, angle of incline, and decreased cavity of spinal cord injury and apoptosis of neurons in vivo. Immunofluorescence double staining of microglia marker and M1/M2 marker demonstrated that Sal could suppress M1 microglia polarization and activate M2 microglia polarization in vivo. To verify how Sal exerts its effects on microglia polarization and neuron protection, we performed the mechanism study in vitro in microglia cell line BV-2 and neuron cell line PC12. The results showed that Sal prevents apoptosis of PC12 cells in coculture with LPS-induced M1 BV-2 microglia, also the inflammatory secretion phenotype of M1 BV-2 microglia was suppressed by Sal, and further studies demonstrated that autophagic flux regulation through AMPK/mTOR pathway was involved in Sal regulated microglia polarization after SCI. Overall, our study illustrated that Sal could promote spinal cord injury functional recovery in rats, and the mechanism may relate to its microglia polarization modulation through AMPK-/mTOR-mediated autophagic flux stimulation. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Polarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on transversely and longitudinally polarized nucleons at HERMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hommes, B.

    2005-01-01

    The HERMES experiment has measured double spin asymmetries in the cross section for deep-inelastic scattering of longitudinal polarized positrons off longitudinal polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets. From these asymmetries, based on inclusive and semi-inclusive measurements, polarized quark distributions were extracted as a function of x. Single-spin azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive pion production were measured by the HERMES experiment for the first time, with a transversely polarized hydrogen target. Two different sine-dependencies were extracted which can be related to the quark transversity distribution h q 1 (x) and the Sivers function (Author)

  20. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  1. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  2. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  3. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  4. Enhancement of molecular NMR signal induced by polarization transfer from laser-polarized 129Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xianping

    2001-01-01

    There is a large non-equilibrium nuclear polarization and a longer relaxation time in the laser-polarized 129 Xe produced by means of optical pumping and spin exchange. The characteristics of the laser-polarized 129 Xe permit the transfer of the polarization to enhance the atomic nuclear spin in liquid, solid and surface of solid molecules. Therefore, the sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements for the molecules is enhanced and applications in the investigations of materials and surface sciences are expanded. The progress in the investigations of materials and surface sciences are expanded. The progress in the investigations of the polarization transfer between laser-polarized 129 Xe and the atomic nuclei in the molecules, the relative physics and the measurement of some parameters are introduced

  5. Optically pumped electron spin polarized targets for use in the production of polarized ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    The production of relatively dense electron spin polarized alkali metal vapor targets by optical pumping with intense cw dye lasers is discussed. The target density and electron spin polarization depend on the dye laser intensity and bandwidth, the magnetic field at the target, and the electron spin depolarization time. For example in a magnetic field of 1.5 x 10 3 G, and using 1 W dye laser with a bandwidth of 10 10 Hz one can construct an electron spin polarized Na vapor target with a target thickness of 1.6 x 10 13 atoms/cm 2 and an average electron spin polarization of about 90% even though the Na atoms are completely depolarized at every wall collision. Possible uses of the electron spin polarized targets for the production of intense beams of polarized H - or 3 He - ions are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Voices used by nurses when communicating with patients and relatives in a department of medicine for older people - An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Anette; Boman, Åse; Wagman, Petra; Pennbrant, Sandra

    2018-03-01

    To describe how nurses communicate with older patients and their relatives in a department of medicine for older people in western Sweden. Communication is an essential tool for nurses when working with older patients and their relatives but often patients and relatives experience shortcomings in the communication exchanges. They may not receive information or are not treated in a professional way. Good communication can facilitate the development of a positive meeting and improve the patient's health outcome. An ethnographic design informed by the sociocultural perspective was applied. Forty participatory observations were conducted and analyzed during the period October 2015 to September 2016. The observations covered 135 hours of nurse-patient-relative interaction. Field notes were taken and 40 informal field conversations with nurses and 40 with patients and relatives were carried out. Semi-structured follow-up interviews were conducted with five nurses. In the result, it was found that nurses communicate with four different voices: a medical voice described as being incomplete, task-oriented and with a disease perspective; a nursing voice described as being confirmatory, process-oriented and with a holistic perspective; a pedagogical voice described as being contextualized, comprehension-oriented and with a learning perspective; and a power voice described as being distancing and excluding. The voices can be seen as context-dependent communication approaches. When nurses switch between the voices this indicates a shift in the orientation or situation. The results indicate that if nurses successfully combine the voices, while limiting the use of the power voice, the communication exchanges can become a more positive experience for all parties involved and a good nurse-patient-relative communication exchange can be achieved. Working for improved communication between nurses, patients and relatives is crucial for establishing a positive nurse-patient-relative

  7. Sun Exposure, Sun-Related Symptoms, and Sun Protection Practices in an African Informal Traditional Medicines Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caradee Y. Wright

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Informal workers in African market trade have little formal protection against sun exposure. We aimed to examine sun exposure, sun-related symptoms, and sun protection practices in an informal occupational setting. Trained fieldworkers asked 236 workers in the Warwick Junction market about their workplace, skin and eye sensitivity and skin colour, symptoms faced at work during the summer due to heat, and preventive measures. Data were analyzed using univariate logistic regression to assess the effect of gender and the risk of experiencing symptoms to sun exposure in relation to pre-existing diseases and perception of sun exposure as a hazard. Of the 236 participants, 234 were Black African and 141 (59.7% were female. Portable shade was the most commonly used form of sun protection (69.9%. Glare from the sun (59.7% and excessive sweating (57.6% were commonly reported sun-related health symptoms. The use of protective clothing was more prevalent among those who perceived sun exposure as a hazard (p = 0.003. In an informal occupational setting, sun exposure was high. Protective clothing and portable shade to eliminate heat and bright light were self-implemented. Action by local authorities to protect informal workers should consider sun exposure to support workers in their efforts to cope in hot weather.

  8. Sun Exposure, Sun-Related Symptoms, and Sun Protection Practices in an African Informal Traditional Medicines Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Caradee Y; Reddy, Tarylee; Mathee, Angela; Street, Renée A

    2017-09-28

    Informal workers in African market trade have little formal protection against sun exposure. We aimed to examine sun exposure, sun-related symptoms, and sun protection practices in an informal occupational setting. Trained fieldworkers asked 236 workers in the Warwick Junction market about their workplace, skin and eye sensitivity and skin colour, symptoms faced at work during the summer due to heat, and preventive measures. Data were analyzed using univariate logistic regression to assess the effect of gender and the risk of experiencing symptoms to sun exposure in relation to pre-existing diseases and perception of sun exposure as a hazard. Of the 236 participants, 234 were Black African and 141 (59.7%) were female. Portable shade was the most commonly used form of sun protection (69.9%). Glare from the sun (59.7%) and excessive sweating (57.6%) were commonly reported sun-related health symptoms. The use of protective clothing was more prevalent among those who perceived sun exposure as a hazard ( p = 0.003). In an informal occupational setting, sun exposure was high. Protective clothing and portable shade to eliminate heat and bright light were self-implemented. Action by local authorities to protect informal workers should consider sun exposure to support workers in their efforts to cope in hot weather.

  9. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  10. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements. PMID:29503479

  11. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  12. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  13. Radioisotopes in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A number of advances in diverse fields of science and technology and the fruitful synchronization of many a new development to address the issues related to health care in terms of prognosis and diagnosis resulted in the availability of host of modern diagnostic tools in medicine. Nuclear medicine, a unique discipline in medicine is one such development, which during the last four decades has seen exponential growth. The unique contribution of this specialty is the ability to examine the dynamic state of every organ of the body with the help of radioactive tracers. This tracer application in nuclear medicine to monitor the biological molecules that participate in the dynamic state of body constituents has led to a whole new approach to biology and medicine. No other technique has the same level of sensitivity and specificity as obtained in radiotracer technique in the study of in-situ chemistry of body organs. As modem medicine becomes oriented towards molecules rather than organs, nuclear medicine will be in the forefront and will become an integral part of a curative process for regular and routine application. Advances in nuclear medicine will proceed along two principal lines: (i) the development of improved sensitive detectors of radiation, powerful and interpretable data processing, image analysis and display techniques, and (ii) the production of exotic and new but useful radiopharmaceuticals. All these aspects are dealt with in detail in this talk

  14. Cancer-Related Genetic Testing and Personalized Medicine for Adolescents: A Narrative Review of Impact and Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetsch, Janine; Wakefield, Claire E; Warby, Meera; Tucker, Katherine; Patterson, Pandora; McGill, Brittany C; Metcalfe, Alison; Cohn, Richard J; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-01-16

    Genetic testing is becoming increasingly available for adolescents who are undergoing cancer treatment or at risk of cancer predisposition syndromes. With this narrative review, we aimed to synthesize the evidence on psychosocial outcomes and adolescents' understanding of genetic testing-thus far, an underresearched topic. Both psychological benefits and harms of predictive testing were reported in adolescents from high-risk families. Harms were mainly related to cancer-specific distress and increased worries. Findings on genetic understanding were sparse. Future studies should focus on psychosocial outcomes and adolescents' understanding undergoing genetic testing and enabling access to genetic counseling pre-testing and post-testing.

  15. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Wheat Polar Lipid Extract and protection of the skin against dehydration pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    substantiation of a health claim related to Wheat Polar Lipid Extract and protection of the skin against dehydration. The Panel considers that Wheat Polar Lipid Extract is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect is “contributes to improve skin hydration”. The target population proposed by the applicant...... is healthy adults with skin dryness. The Panel considers that protection of the skin against dehydration is a beneficial physiological effect. The applicant identified one published and two unpublished human intervention studies as being pertinent to the health claim. The Panel considers that no conclusions...... the consumption of Wheat Polar Lipid Extract and protection of the skin against dehydration....

  16. Vulnerable Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  17. Material and device studies for the development of ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) along polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya

    Over the past few years, significant effort was dedicated to the development of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for a variety of applications. Such applications include chemical and biological detection, water purification and solid-state lighting. III-Nitride LEDs based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown along the conventional [0001] (polar) direction suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), due to the existence of strong electric fields that arise from spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization. Thus, there is strong motivation to develop MQW-based III-nitride LED structures grown along non-polar and semi-polar directions. The goal of this dissertation is to develop UV-LEDs along the [0001] polar and [11 2¯ 0] non-polar directions by the method of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The polar and non-polar LEDs were grown on the C-plane and R-plane sapphire substrates respectively. This work is a combination of materials science studies related to the nucleation, growth and n- and p-type doping of III-nitride films on these two substrates, as well as device studies related to fabrication and characterization of UV-LEDs. It was observed that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films grown on R-plane sapphire depends strongly on the kinetic conditions of growth of the Aluminum Nitride (AIN) buffer. Specifically, growth of the AIN buffer under group III-rich conditions leads to nitride films having the (11 2¯ 0) non polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface, while growth of the buffer under nitrogen rich conditions leads to nitride films with the (11 2¯ 6) semi-polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface. The electron concentration and mobility for the films grown along the polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions were investigated. P-type doping of Gallium Nitride (GaN) films grown on the nonpolar (11 2¯ 0) plane do not suffer from polarity inversion and thus the material was doped p-type with a hole concentration

  18. Role of relative humidity in controlling rate of aflatoxin contamination in certain medicinal herbs under prolonged storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbazza, Z.E.; Mahmoud, M.I.; Roushdy, H.M.; Farrag, H.A.; Tablawy, S.Y.E.I.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of water activity on growth of aspergillus flavus test strain and aflatoxin production was studied in sabouraoud's yeast broth regulated with glycerol. Aflatoxin production increased with increasing the a w . The minimal a w was 0.92 for fungal growth and aflatoxins production. Growth of A.flavus test strain and aflatoxin production at 26+- I o and two relative humidities of 85% and 92.9% along four months incubation period on caraway, khlla, shih balady and wild chamomile samples were investigated. At 92.9% Rh, growth of A.flavus on caraway and khella samples was noticed after 20 days of incubation and increased with time incubation and increased with time. Aflatoxin production was detected after 30 days and decreased with prolonged incubation. Fungal growth and aflatoxin production were not observed on shih balady and wild chamomile samples at 92.9% Rh, and on the for studied herbs at 85%, Rh. 3 tabs

  19. Polarization at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Cancer patients undertaking bone scans in a department of Nuclear Medicine have significant stress related to the examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioka, C.; Manetou, M.; Dimakopoulos, N.; Christidi, S.; Kouraklis, G.

    2005-01-01

    Bone scanning is a standard screening procedure for evaluation of metastases in cancer patient. In addition to the staging procedures, bone scan is a valuable test for deciding palliative therapeutic options in selected patients. The aim of this study was to investigate if patients with cancer who were undertaking routine bone scans had any stress related to the test. We asked 83 consecutive patients with various types of cancer if they had anxiety just prior to undergoing the test. Overall, we found that 53 (64%) patients had increased anxiety related to the examination and 30 (36%) patients did not. Among the 53 patients who were anxious about the bone scan, 32 were concerned about the results of the examination, 13 worried about the effects of the radiation, 4 were anxious for both results/radiation, and 4 patients had stress but could not specify the reason. Among the 32 patients who were concerned about the results of the examination, 15 were having their first bone scans, while 17 had already undergone the procedure before. Among the 13 patients who were mainly concerned about the risks of the radiation exposure during the test, 9 were having bone scans for the first time. Out of the 4 patients who feared both the results and radiation, 3 were having bone scans for the first time and 1 had it for several times. Finally, out of the 4 patients who had anxiety about the test but could not identify the reason, 3 were having bone scans for the first time and one had the test before but was claustrophobic. Our findings indicate that most patients (64%) with cancer who underwent a routine bone scan to check for metastatic disease had intense stress related either to the results or the side effects of the examination. However, there were more patients who were concerned about the results of the test rather than the effects of radiation. Among the patients who feared the effects of radioactivity most were having the test for the first time. A previous study in a

  1. Use Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  2. Women supporting patients, men curing cancer: gender-related variations among Israeli Arab practitioners of traditional medicine in their treatment of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper-Giveon, Ariela; Schiff, Elad; Samuels, Noah; Ben-Arye, Eran

    2015-06-01

    The use of complementary traditional medicine (CTM) is prevalent among patients with cancer. An understanding of cultural and religious values is needed to design an effective patient-centered supportive treatment program. To examine gender-related demographic and professional characteristics; treatment goals and approaches; and attitudes toward integration among Arab practitioners of CTM. Male and female Arab CTM practitioners treating patients with cancer were located by snowballing through practitioner and clientele networks. Participants underwent semi-structured, in-depth interviews which were analyzed thematically, with a focus on gender-related issues. A total of 27 Arab CTM practitioners participated in the study (17 males, 10 females). Female practitioners were found to be treating women exclusively, with male practitioners treating both genders. Female practitioners tend to be younger, unmarried, urban-based and non-Muslim. Male practitioners set out to "cure" the cancer, while female practitioners focus on symptoms and quality of life. Male practitioners employ a more schematic and structured therapeutic approach; female practitioners a more eclectic and practical one. Male practitioners employ a collectivist approach, involving family members, while female practitioners interact exclusively with the patient. Finally, male CTM practitioners see integration as a means for recognition, increasing their power base. In contrast, female practitioners perceive integration as a foothold in fields from which they have previously been shut out. A number of gender-related issues can have a significant impact on CTM therapy among Arab patients. Further research is needed in order to understand the implications of these differences.

  3. Lifestyle Medicine-Related Cardiovascular Risk Factor Changes in Employees Participating in a Pharmacist-Run Risk Reduction Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyue Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death among American adults accounting for approximately one-third of all deaths. It has been shown, however, that the actual causes of death are related to lifestyle behaviors such as tobacco use, poor diet and physical activity and alcohol consumption. A pharmacist-run employee health program, started in 2008, sought to lower CVD risk through the use of individualized lifestyle behavior programming, medication therapy management, and care coordination activities. Following one year of participation in the program, employee participants were shown to significantly increase exercise quantity (p < 0.001, fruit and vegetable consumption (p < 0.001, and decrease self-reported stress level (p = 0.006. The percentage of program participants simultaneously adherent to the recommended levels of exercise, combined fruit and vegetable intake and tobacco abstinence at one-year was 34.5% vs. 5.5% at baseline. This compares with only 5.1% of the U.S. population adherent to the same three behaviors. Pharmacists can positively impact healthy lifestyle behaviors when working in an employee health setting.

  4. Lifestyle Medicine-Related Cardiovascular Risk Factor Changes in Employees Participating in a Pharmacist-Run Risk Reduction Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lenz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death among American adults accounting for approximately one-third of all deaths. It has been shown, however, that the actual causes of death are related to lifestyle behaviors such as tobacco use, poor diet and physical activity and alcohol consumption. A pharmacist-run employee health program, started in 2008, sought to lower CVD risk through the use of individualized lifestyle behavior programming, medication therapy management, and care coordination activities. Following one year of participation in the program, employee participants were shown to significantly increase exercise quantity (p < 0.001, fruit and vegetable consumption (p < 0.001, and decrease self-reported stress level (p = 0.006. The percentage of program participants simultaneously adherent to the recommended levels of exercise, combined fruit and vegetable intake and tobacco abstinence at one-year was 34.5% vs. 5.5% at baseline. This compares with only 5.1% of the U.S. population adherent to the same three behaviors. Pharmacists can positively impact healthy lifestyle behaviors when working in an employee health setting.   Type: Original Research

  5. "Morphology is a witness which doesn't lie": diagnosis by similarity relation and analogical inference in clinical forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gethin

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, I utilise semi-structured interviews with Forensic Medical Examiners (FMEs) in Scotland in order to investigate their diagnostic work. Drawing upon classic medical sociological work on diagnosis (for instance, the work of Paul Atkinson and Michael Bloor), my understanding of diagnosis is as a subjective, but socially-constructed activity whereby medical practitioners are taught to identify (in this case) injury types, initially by ostension, then also by examination. I then extend the analysis postulated within the classic studies by outlining a mechanistic method for the actual cognitive process of diagnosis, drawn from a sociologically informed reading of the historian of science, Thomas Kuhn. It is argued that diagnosis is achieved by similarity relation (comparing new cases to those previously observed), and analogical reasoning (drawing inferences based on the analogy with previous cases). Given that new cases subtly alter the individual FME's classificatory schema, resulting in potential differences in diagnoses, the FME community are required to conduct much reparative work in order to construct their evidence as consensual and factual, as is required by law. The paper will conclude with some brief comments on the future of forensic medical examinations, particularly concerning the fact/opinion distinction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Photonic crystal based polarization insensitive flat lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turduev, M.; Bor, E.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a new design of an inhomogeneous artificially created photonic crystal lens structure consisting of annular dielectric rods to efficiently focus both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of light into the same focal point. The locations of each individual cell that contains the annular dielectric rods are determined according to a nonlinear distribution function. The inner and outer radii of the annular photonic dielectric rods are optimized with respect to the polarization insensitive frequency response of the transmission spectrum of the lens structure. The physical background of the polarization insensitive focusing mechanism is investigated in both spatial and frequency domains. Moreover, polarization independent wavefront transformation/focusing has been explored in detail by investigating the dispersion relation of the structure. Corresponding phase index distribution of the lens is attained for polarization insensitive normalized frequency range of a/λ  =  0.280 and a/λ  =  0.300, where a denotes the lattice constant of the designed structure and λ denotes the wavelength of the incident light. We show the wave transformation performance and focal point movement dynamics for both polarizations of the lens structure by specially adjusting the length of the structure. The 3D finite-difference time domain numerical analysis is also performed to verifiy that the proposed design is able to focus the wave regardless of polarization into approximately the same focal point (difference between focal distances of both polarizations stays below 0.25λ) with an operating bandwidth of 4.30% between 1476 nm and 1541 nm at telecom wavelengths. The main superiorities of the proposed lens structure are being all dielectric and compact, and having flat front and back surfaces, rendering the proposed lens design more practical in the photonic integration process in various applications such as optical switch

  7. Polarized proton target with horizontal spin orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, Eh.I.; Kiselev, Yu.F.; Kozlenko, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Proton target, the polarization vector of which may be arbitrary oriented in horizontal plane relatively to the beam, is developed and tested. 70% value of polarization is obtained. 0.6 K temperature is acquired through 3 He pumping out continuous cycle. 1.2-propylene glycol - Cr(V) was used as working medium. Magnetic system is made in the form of Helmholtz sperconducting coils with working curren close to critical one. Target polarization is measured by NMR technique using original system of proton signal processing

  8. Nuclear Medicine and Application of Nuclear Techniques in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiharto, Kunto

    1996-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques medicine covers not only nuclear medicine and radiology in strict sense but also determination of body mineral content by neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence technique either in vitro or in vivo, application of radioisotopes as tracers in pharmacology and biochemistry, etc. This paper describes the ideal tracer in nuclear medicine, functional and morphological imaging, clinical aspect and radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Nuclear technique offers facilities and chances related to research activities and services in medicine. The development of diagnostic as well as therapeutic methods using monoclonal antibodies labeled with radioisotope will undoubtedly play an important role in the disease control

  9. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  10. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  11. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  12. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  13. Nuclear tele medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R.

    2005-01-01

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  14. Polarization measurement in the COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, K; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Le Goff, J M; Magnon, A; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Matsuda, T

    2004-01-01

    Continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to determine the target polarization in the COMPASS experiment. The system is made of the so-called Liverpool Q-meters, Yale-cards, and VME modules for data taking and system controlling. In 2001 the NMR coils were embedded in the target material, while in 2002 and 2003 the coils were mounted on the outer surface of the target cells to increase the packing factor of the material. Though the error of the measurement became larger with the outer coils than with the inner coils, we have performed stable measurements throughout the COMPASS run time for 3 years. The maximum polarization was +57% and -53% as the average in the target cells.

  15. Reiki and related therapies in the dialysis ward: an evidence-based and ethical discussion to debate if these complementary and alternative medicines are welcomed or banned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Martina; Clari, Roberta; Moro, Irene; Banino, Elena; Boero, Enrico; Crosio, Alessandro; Dayne, Romina; Rosset, Lorenzo; Scarpa, Andrea; Serra, Enrica; Surace, Alessandra; Testore, Alessio; Colombi, Nicoletta; Piccoli, Barbara Giorgina

    2013-06-21

    Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAMs) are increasingly practiced in the general population; it is estimated that over 30% of patients with chronic diseases use CAMs on a regular basis. CAMs are also used in hospital settings, suggesting a growing interest in individualized therapies. One potential field of interest is pain, frequently reported by dialysis patients, and seldom sufficiently relieved by mainstream therapies. Gentle-touch therapies and Reiki (an energy based touch therapy) are widely used in the western population as pain relievers.By integrating evidence based approaches and providing ethical discussion, this debate discusses the pros and cons of CAMs in the dialysis ward, and whether such approaches should be welcomed or banned. In spite of the wide use of CAMs in the general population, few studies deal with the pros and cons of an integration of mainstream medicine and CAMs in dialysis patients; one paper only regarded the use of Reiki and related practices. Widening the search to chronic pain, Reiki and related practices, 419 articles were found on Medline and 6 were selected (1 Cochrane review and 5 RCTs updating the Cochrane review). According to the EBM approach, Reiki allows a statistically significant but very low-grade pain reduction without specific side effects. Gentle-touch therapy and Reiki are thus good examples of approaches in which controversial efficacy has to be balanced against no known side effect, frequent free availability (volunteer non-profit associations) and easy integration with any other pharmacological or non pharmacological therapy. While a classical evidence-based approach, showing low-grade efficacy, is likely to lead to a negative attitude towards the use of Reiki in the dialysis ward, the ethical discussion, analyzing beneficium (efficacy) together with non maleficium (side effects), justice (cost, availability and integration with mainstream therapies) and autonomy (patients' choice) is likely to lead to a

  16. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  17. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  18. Vector meson production from a polarized nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, M.

    2007-04-01

    We provide a framework to analyze the electroproduction process ep→epρ with a polarized target, writing the angular distribution of the ρ decay products in terms of spin density matrix elements that parameterize the hadronic subprocess γ * p → ρp. Using the helicity basis for both photon and meson, we find a representation in which the expressions for a polarized and unpolarized target are related by simple substitution rules. (orig.)

  19. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  20. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  1. Emergency ultrasound and echocardiography in patients with infarct-related cardiogenic shock : A survey among members of the German Society of Medical Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, G; Hempel, D; Pfister, R; Janssens, U

    2018-04-09

    Current international and national guidelines promote the use of emergency echocardiography in patients with cardiogenic shock. We assessed whether these recommendations are followed in clinical practice of infarct-related cardiogenic shock patients. For this purpose we conducted a web-based survey among all members of the German Society of Medical Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (DGIIN); 40% of the DGIIN members completed the survey. Participants reported that in their department emergency echocardiography/ultrasound is performed on most patients in infarct-related cardiogenic shock presenting to the emergency department/chest pain unit or intensive care unit (58.6% versus 81.4%). Only 33% stated that on patients admitted directly to the catheterization laboratory emergency ultrasound/echocardiography is applied in their institution. Local availability of a standardized algorithm was lacking in the majority of departments (77.2%). A great proportion (38.3%) of participants stated that they personally had no formal training in emergency ultrasound. In order to meet the demands of the current guidelines, in addition to integration of ultrasound examinations into diagnostic algorithms, a structured training of all emergency and intensive care physicians is necessary.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of the Traditional Herbal Medicine, Gamiguibi-tang, in Patients With Cancer-Related Sleep Disturbance: A Prospective, Randomized, Wait-List-Controlled, Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Young; Oh, Hye Kyung; Ryu, Han Sung; Yoon, Sung Soo; Eo, Wankyu; Yoon, Seong Woo

    2017-10-01

    Sleep disturbance is the second most bothersome symptom in patients with cancer, and it can significantly impair their quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of the traditional herbal medicine Gamiguibi-tang (GGBT) in patients with cancer-related sleep disturbance. We conducted a prospective, randomized, wait-list-controlled, open-label pilot clinical trial on cancer-related sleep disturbance. Patients with cancer experiencing poor sleep quality with a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index of at least 6 were randomly assigned to the GGBT and wait-list groups to receive GGBT and conventional care, respectively, for 2 weeks. The primary endpoint was the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) score. Fatigue, depression, and cognitive impairment were assessed as the secondary endpoints by using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Thirty participants who met the eligibility criteria were enrolled. Sleep disturbance assessed using the ISI improved significantly more in the GGBT group than in the wait-list group (-5.5 ± 4.4 vs 0.1 ± 1.1, P sleep disturbance. Further research is needed to investigate the efficacy and safety of GGBT.

  3. Evidence for evanescent waves at interfaces in a high-index prism/liquid-crystal-Au-NPs/glass/air structure and effects of relative concentration of gold nanoparticles, wavelength, polarization, and incident angle of the laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Kunal; Singh, Ankit; Sharma, Suresh

    2011-10-01

    Incorporation of relatively small concentrations of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) is known to lower the operating threshold voltage and increase optical transmission through the device.ootnotetextA. Hinojosa and S. C. Sharma, Applied Physics Letters, 97, 081114 (2010) In order to understand whether there is an interplay between the localized surface plasmon resonance at Au-NPs-dielectric interfaces and the electro-optical properties of PDLC devices, we have investigated propagation of light through a high-index prism/liquid-crystal-Au-NPs/glass/air structure by using Kretschmann geometry as functions of concentration of Au NPs in the liquid crystal, and the wavelength, polarization, and angle of incidence of the laser beam. We will discuss to what extent the results of these experiments support an interplay between the localized surface plasmon resonance at NPs/dielectric interfaces and optical propagation through the above-described structure.

  4. Polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The author discusses a number of interrelated hadronic spin effects which test fundamental features of perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For example, the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton and the axial coupling g{sub A} on the nucleon are shown to be related to each other for fixed proton radius, independent of the form of the underlying three-quark relativistic quark wavefunction. The renormalization scale and scheme ambiguities for the radiative corrections to the Bjorken sum rule for the polarized structure functions can be eliminated by using commensurate scale relations with other observables. Other examples include (a) new constraints on the shape and normalization of the polarized quark and gluon structure functions of the proton at large and small x{sub bj}; (b) consequences of the principle of hadron retention in high x{sub F} inclusive reactions; (c) applications of hadron helicity conservation to high momentum transfer exclusive reactions; and (d) the dependence of nuclear structure functions and shadowing on virtual photon polarization. The author also discusses the implications of a number of measurements which are in striking conflict with leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions, such as the extraordinarily large spin correlation A{sub NN} observed in large angle proton-proton scattering, the anomalously large {rho}{pi} branching ratio of the J/{psi}, and the rapidly changing polarization dependence of both J/{psi} and continuum lepton pair hadroproduction observed at large x{sub F}. The azimuthal angular dependence of the Drell-Yan process is shown to be highly sensitive to the projectile distribution amplitude, the fundamental valence light-cone wavefunction of the hadron.

  5. Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valid therapies, delaying proven treatment for serious conditions. Holistic Treatments Holistic medicine is a system of health care ... techniques including meditation, biofeedback and relaxation training. While holistic treatments can be part of a good physical regimen, ...

  6. Hsp Polarization Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    This proposal defines the procedure for determining the instrumental polarization of the polarimetric IDT (IDT#1, POL) on the HSP. 1 of 2 unpolarized standard stars wil be observed using various filter-polarizer combinations. These observations will permit the instrumental polarization to be calibrated. The instrumental polarization must be determined to a high precision in order to vectoriallly remove it from HSP polarization observations to determine the actual astronomical polarization. Final run of proposal will look at one of 2 possible stars previously observed to get another look at the throughput. Revision History: Mark H. Slovak 8/30/88 Translated to V2 proposal instructions (RPSS V6.2) S. Laurent 1/20/89 Updated: Sally Laurent 2/24/89, 3/20/89, 4/13/89, 5/12/89 Modified: P. Stanley 1/15/90 - change to use CTA selected targets only; Fixes for aberration problem - SALM 7/30/90; Based on SV/HSP 1386. New submission changed targets and revised scheduling strategy. Revised: 26 Aug 92 J. Dolan, L. Walter, P. Reppert want to re-run the proposal (3985) one last time to bring down errors.

  7. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  8. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, Paul; Blanc, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of radioisotopes in medical diagnostics are briefly reviewed. Each organ system is considered and the Nuclear medicine procedures pertinent to that system are discussed. This includes, the principle of the test, the detector and the radiopharmaceutical used, the procedure followed and the clinical results obtained. The various types of radiation detectors presently employed in Nuclear Medicine are surveyed, including scanners, gamma cameras, positron cameras and procedures for obtaining tomographic presentation of radionuclide distributions [fr

  9. On the polarization of fermion in an intermediate state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, A. E.; Lomov, V. P.

    2017-06-01

    We show that calculation of a final fermion polarization (for a pure initial state) is equivalent to the problem of looking for complete polarization axis of bispinor. This gives the method for calculation of polarization applicable both for final and intermediate state fermions. We suggest to use fermion propagator (bare or dressed) in form of spectral representation, which gives the orthogonal off-shell energy projectors. This representation leads to covariant separation of particle and antiparticle contributions and gives a natural definition for polarization of intermediate state fermion. The most evident application is related with consistent description of t-quark polarization.

  10. Comparison of Leiomyoma of Modern Medicine and Traditional Persian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansaz, Mojgan; Tajadini, Haleh

    2016-04-01

    Leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor of the pelvic that is associated with reproductive problems such as infertility, frequent abortions, and undesirable prenatal outcomes. High prevalence of leiomyoma and its relation with important gynecological complications, especially during reproductive ages, on the one hand, and high medical expenses and significant complications of common treatments, on the other, made us search traditional Persian medicine texts for a similar disease. In traditional Persian medicine, a condition has been introduced similar to leiomyoma (Oram-e-rahem). In this article, by collecting materials from traditional medicine texts on leiomyoma, we aim to provide theories for further studies on this topic, as there is an obvious difference between traditional Persian medicine and modern medicine with regard to leiomyoma. When modern medicine has not found a suitable response to treatment, reviewing of traditional Persian medicine for finding better treatment strategies is wise. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related ...

  12. Exploring Science Through Polar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Bell, R. E.; Zadoff, L.; Kelsey, R.

    2003-12-01

    Exploring the Poles is a First Year Seminar course taught at Barnard College, Columbia University. First Year Seminars are required of incoming students and are designed to encourage critical analysis in a small class setting with focused discussion. The class links historical polar exploration with current research in order to: introduce non-scientists to the value of environmental science through polar literature; discuss issues related to venturing into the unknown that are of relevance to any discipline: self-reliance, leadership, preparation, decisions under uncertainty; show students the human face of science; change attitudes about science and scientists; use data to engage students in exploring/understanding the environment and help them learn to draw conclusions from data; integrate research and education. These goals are met by bringing analysis of early exploration efforts together with a modern understanding of the polar environment. To date to class has followed the efforts of Nansen in the Fram, Scott and Amundsen in their race to the pole, and Shackleton's Endurance. As students read turn-of-the-century expedition journals, expedition progress is progressively revealed on an interactive map showing the environmental context. To bring the exploration process to life, students are assigned to expedition teams for specific years and the fates of the student "expeditions" are based on their own decisions. For example, in the Arctic, they navigate coastal sea ice and become frozen into the ice north of Siberia, re-creating Nansen's polar drift. Fates of the teams varied tremendously: some safely emerged at Fram Strait in 4 years, while others nearly became hopelessly lost in the Beaufort Gyre. Students thus learn about variability in the current polar environment through first hand experience, enabling them to appreciate the experiences, decisions, and, in some cases, the luck, of polar explorers. Evaluation by the Columbia Center for New Media, Teaching

  13. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  14. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  15. Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Shohreh

    Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

  16. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  17. Polarized electrons at Jefferson laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously. Initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented

  18. Polar low monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  19. Discovery of discriminatory quality control markers for Chinese herbal medicines and related processed products by combination of chromatographic analysis and chemometrics methods: Radix Scutellariae as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Bo; Wang, Long; Xiong, Zi-Yue; Gao, Wen; Li, Ping; Li, Hui-Jun

    2017-05-10

    The processing procedure of traditional Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) plays an essential role in clinical applications. However, little progress has been made on the quality control of crude and processed products. The present work, taking Radix Scutellariae (RS), wine-processed RS and carbonized RS as a typical case, developed a comprehensive strategy integrating chromatographic analysis and chemometric methods for quality evaluation and discrimination of crude RS and its processed products. Chemical fingerprints were established by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and similarity analyses were calculated based on eleven common characteristic peaks. Subsequently, four chemical markers were discovered by back propagation-artificial neural network (BP-ANN) modeling. The selected markers were quantified by the 'single standard to determine multi-components' (SSDMC) method, and then the quantitative data were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Furthermore, support vector machine (SVM) was employed to predict the different processed products of RS. Finally, a hotmap visualization was conducted for clarifying the distribution of major flavonoids among different drugs. Collectively, the proposed strategy might be well-acceptable for quality control of CHMs and their related processed products from the processing mechanism-based perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of relative isotopic abundance measurements in a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer for elemental composition determination of natural products in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Jun; Huo, Jia-Li; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Li, Na; Fang, Dong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Guo-Lin; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The relative isotopic abundance (RIA) measurement errors of a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) instrument incorporating analog-to-digital converter detectors were systemically evaluated by stochastically collecting about 200 data in positive ion mass spectrometry (MS) mode. Errors varied with peak intensities at definite spectral acquisition rates but were very close, even if peak intensities changed sharply at different spectral acquisition rates with the same concentration. Intensity thresholds were systematically defined at 1 Hz of spectral acquisition rates. RIA measurement errors were also evaluated using peak area. It seemed that peak area was better adapted for the high-intensity ions while peak intensity was suited for very low-intensity ions. Several known compounds were selected for RIA measurements for product ions in tandem mass spectropmetry (MS/MS) mode. An extract of a representative traditional Chinese medicinal, Paederia scandens was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-QToF-MS/MS. The unique elemental compositions of some compounds could not be identified even with exact masses and MS/MS spectra of measured and reference compounds. RIA errors, especially of (M+2)M(-1), provided vital information for determining the elemental composition.

  1. Anti-inflammatory properties of the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris might be related to its linear (1→3-β-D-glucan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fhernanda R Smiderle

    Full Text Available The Ascomycete Cordyceps militaris, an entomopathogenic fungus, is one of the most important traditional Chinese medicines. Studies related to its pharmacological properties suggest that this mushroom can exert interesting biological activities. Aqueous (CW and HW and alkaline (K5 extracts containing polysaccharides were prepared from this mushroom, and a β-D-glucan was purified. This polymer was analysed by GC-MS and NMR spectrometry, showing a linear chain composed of β-D-Glcp (1→3-linked. The six main signals in the 13C-NMR spectrum were assigned by comparison to reported data. The aqueous (CW, HW extracts stimulated the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 by THP-1 macrophages, while the alkaline (K5 extract did not show any effect. However, when the extracts were added to the cells in the presence of LPS, K5 showed the highest inhibition of the pro-inflammatory genes expression. This inhibitory effect was also observed for the purified β-(1→3-D-glucan, that seems to be the most potent anti-inflammatory compound present in the polysaccharide extracts of C. militaris. In vivo, β-(1→3-D-glucan also inhibited significantly the inflammatory phase of formalin-induced nociceptive response, and, in addition, it reduced the migration of total leukocytes but not the neutrophils induced by LPS. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the anti-inflammatory effect of β-(1→3-D-glucan.

  2. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  3. The Bochum Polarized Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicherz, G.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Bochum 'Polarized Target' group develops the target material 6 LiD for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Several different materials like alcohols, alcanes and ammonia are under investigation. Solid State Targets are polarized in magnetic fields higher than B=2.5T and at temperatures below T=1K. For the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization process, paramagnetic centers are induced chemically or by irradiation with ionizing beams. The radical density is a critical factor for optimization of polarization and relaxation times at adequate magnetic fields and temperatures. In a high sensitive EPR--apparatus, an evaporator and a dilution cryostat with a continuous wave NMR--system, the materials are investigated and optimized. To improve the polarization measurement, the Liverpool NMR-box is modified by exchanging the fixed capacitor for a varicap diode which not only makes the tuning very easy but also provides a continuously tuned circuit. The dependence of the signal area upon the circuit current is measured and it is shown that it follows a linear function

  4. In-line Fiber Polarizer

    OpenAIRE

    Perumalsamy, Priya

    1998-01-01

    Polarizers and polarization devices are important components in fiber optic communication and sensor systems. There is a growing need for efficient low loss components that are compatible with optical fibers. An all fiber in-line polarizer is a more desirable alternative that could be placed at appropriate intervals along communication links. An in-line fiber polarizer was fabricated and tested. The in-line fiber polarizer operates by coupling optical energy propagatin...

  5. [Proteomics and transfusion medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, N; Prudent, M; Crettaz, D; Tissot, J-D

    2011-04-01

    The term "proteomics" covers tools and techniques that are used to analyze and characterize complex mixtures of proteins from various biological samples. In this short review, a typical proteomic approach, related to the study of particular and illustrative situation related to transfusion medicine is reported. This "case report" will allow the reader to be familiar with a practical proteomic approach of a real situation, and will permit to describe the tools that are usually used in proteomic labs, and, in a second part, to present various proteomic applications in transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. October 2001 physics pp. 775–793. Dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules under giga hertz electric field. K DUTTA, S K SIT and S ... BDH, England, n-hexane and n-heptane from M/s. E Merck ... used in medicine as drug to induce sleep and relieve pain and in the manufacture of D.D.T..

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  11. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  13. Ancient medicine--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Lipozencić, Jasna; Pucarin-Cvetković, Jasna; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Schachter, Neil; Mucić-Pucić, Branka; Neralić-Meniga, Inja

    2008-01-01

    Different aspects of medicine and/or healing in several societies are presented. In the ancient times as well as today medicine has been closely related to magic, science and religion. Various ancient societies and cultures had developed different views of medicine. It was believed that a human being has two bodies: a visible body that belongs to the earth and an invisible body of heaven. In the earliest prehistoric days, a different kind of medicine was practiced in countries such as Egypt, Greece, Rome, Mesopotamia, India, Tibet, China, and others. In those countries, "medicine people" practiced medicine from the magic to modern physical practices. Medicine was magical and mythological, and diseases were attributed mostly to the supernatural forces. The foundation of modern medicine can be traced back to ancient Greeks. Tibetan culture, for instance, even today, combines spiritual and practical medicine. Chinese medicine developed as a concept of yin and yang, acupuncture and acupressure, and it has even been used in the modern medicine. During medieval Europe, major universities and medical schools were established. In the ancient time, before hospitals had developed, patients were treated mostly in temples.

  14. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser; Analise da birrefringencia do colageno e do coeficiente de atenuacao de amostras de pele sadia e queimada irradiadas pelo laser de He-Ne linearmente polarizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-07-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N{sub 2} on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm{sup 2}, to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  15. Medicinal smokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Faridi, Pouya; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Ghasemi, Younes

    2006-11-24

    All through time, humans have used smoke of medicinal plants to cure illness. To the best of our knowledge, the ethnopharmacological aspects of natural products' smoke for therapy and health care have not been studied. Mono- and multi-ingredient herbal and non-herbal remedies administered as smoke from 50 countries across the 5 continents are reviewed. Most of the 265 plant species of mono-ingredient remedies studied belong to Asteraceae (10.6%), followed by Solanaceae (10.2%), Fabaceae (9.8%) and Apiaceae (5.3%). The most frequent medical indications for medicinal smoke are pulmonary (23.5%), neurological (21.8%) and dermatological (8.1%). Other uses of smoke are not exactly medical but beneficial to health, and include smoke as a preservative or a repellent and the social use of smoke. The three main methods for administering smoke are inhalation, which accounts for 71.5% of the indications; smoke directed at a specific organ or body part, which accounts for 24.5%; ambient smoke (passive smoking), which makes up the remaining 4.0%. Whereas inhalation is typically used in the treatment of pulmonary and neurological disorders and directed smoke in localized situations, such as dermatological and genito-urinary disorders, ambient smoke is not directed at the body at all but used as an air purifier. The advantages of smoke-based remedies are rapid delivery to the brain, more efficient absorption by the body and lower costs of production. This review highlights the fact that not enough is known about medicinal smoke and that a lot of natural products have potential for use as medicine in the smoke form. Furthermore, this review argues in favor of medicinal smoke extended use in modern medicine as a form of drug delivery and as a promising source of new active natural ingredients.

  16. Political Competition and Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signa...... for costs before an upcoming election. It is shown that the more polarized the political parties the more distorted the incumbent's policy choice.......This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signal...

  17. Physics of polarized targets

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    For developing, building and operating solid polarized targets we need to understand several fields of physics that have seen sub stantial advances during the last 50 years. W e shall briefly review a selection of those that are important today. These are: 1) quantum statistical methods to describe saturation and relaxation in magnetic resonance; 2) equal spin temperature model for dy namic nuclear polarization; 3 ) weak saturation during NMR polarization measurement; 4 ) refrigeration using the quantum fluid properties of helium isotopes. These, combined with superconducting magnet technologies, permit today to reach nearly complete pola rization of almost any nuclear spins. Targets can be operated in frozen spin mode in rather low and inhomogeneous field of any orientation, and in DNP mode in beams of high intensity. Beyond such experiments of nuclear and particle physics, applications a re also emerging in macromolecular chemistry and in magnetic resonance imaging. This talk is a tribute to Michel Borghini...

  18. No More Polarization, Please!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mia Reinholt

    The organizational science literature on motivation has for long been polarized into two main positions; the organizational economic position focusing on extrinsic motivation and the organizational behavior position emphasizing intrinsic motivation. With the rise of the knowledge economy...... and the increasing levels of complexities it entails, such polarization is not fruitful in the attempt to explain motivation of organizational members. This paper claims that a more nuanced perspective on motivation, acknowledging the co-existence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, the possible interaction...... between the two as well as different types of motivations filling in the gap between the two polar types, is urgently needed in the organizational science literature. By drawing on the research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation conducted in social psychology and combining this with contributions from...

  19. Polarized source upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, T.B.; Rummel, R.L.; Carter, E.P.; Westerfeldt, C.R.; Lovette, A.W.; Edwards, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The decision was made this past year to move the Lamb-shift polarized ion source which was first installed in the laboratory in 1970. The motivation was the need to improve the flexibility of spin-axis orientation by installing the ion source with a new Wien-filter spin precessor which is capable of rotating physically about the beam axis. The move of the polarized source was accomplished in approximately two months, with the accelerator being turned off for experiments during approximately four weeks of this time. The occasion of the move provided the opportunity to rewire completely the entire polarized ion source frame and to rebuild approximately half of the electronic chassis on the source. The result is an ion source which is now logically wired and carefully documented. Beams obtained from the source are much more stable than those previously available

  20. A lunar polar expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-09-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  1. Purification of polar compounds from Radix isatidis using conventional C18 column coupled with polar-copolymerized C18 column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Guo, Zhimou; Xiao, Yuansheng; Wang, Chaoran; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Xinmiao

    2010-11-01

    Regarding hydrophilic interaction chromatography and normal phase liquid chromatography, RPLC is another choice used to separate polar compounds with the improvement of polar-modified C18 stationary phase. In this study, a method using conventional C18 column coupled with polar-copolymerized C18 column was successfully developed for the separation and purification of polar compounds from Radix isatidis, which is one of the most commonly used traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). An XTerra MS C18 column was used to fractionate the extract of R. isatidis and a homemade polar-copolymerized C18 column was utilized for the final purification due to its good separation selectivity and high resolution for polar compounds. The established purification system demonstrated good orthogonality for the polar compounds. As a result, ten compounds were purified and three of them were identified as 3-methyl-5-vinyloxazolidin-2-one (compound A), 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (compound B) and 3-methylfuran-2-carboxylic acid (compound G) based on the MS, IR and extensive NMR data, respectively. It was demonstrated to be a feasible and powerful technique for the purification of polar compounds under RPLC mode and more chemical information of TCMs will be obtained to interpret the efficiency of TCMs.

  2. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  3. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  4. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  5. The polar mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  6. Internal polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. (AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  7. AGS polarized H- source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.G.; Sluyters, T.

    1985-01-01

    The AGS polarized H - source is now operational. During a month-long experimental physics run in July 1984, pulses equivalent to 15 μA x 300 μs (approx. 3 x 10 10 protons) were injected into the RFQ preaccelerator. Beam polarization, measured at 200 MeV, was approx. 75%. After the run, a program to increase the H - yield of the source was begun and significant progress has been made. The H - current is now frequently 20 to 30 μA. A description of the source and some details of our operating experience are given. We also briefly describe the improvement program

  8. Global thermodynamics of a polar ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, C.J. van der; Oerlemans, J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the global characteristics of a polar ice sheet are investigated. When looking at a drainage system as a whole, conservation of heat yields a very simple functional relation. Coupling this relation to an equation describing the large-scale dynamics of a drainage system makes it

  9. [Medicine in sports or sport medicine?] ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimer, S; Tonković-Lojović, M

    2001-01-01

    Sports medicine is a profession pertaining to primary health care of sport population (competitors, coaches, referees, participants in sports recreation). It embraces the physical and mental health protection and promotion of participants in relation to a particular sport activity and sport environment, directing athletes to a sport and adapting them to sport and the sport to them. Sports medicine takes part in selection procedure, training process planning and programming, and cares for epidemiological, hygienic, nutritional and other problems in sport. The Republic of Croatia belongs to those world states in which the field of sports medicine is regulated neither by a law or by profession. A consequence is that wide circle of physicians and paramedics work in clubs and various medical units without any legal or/and professional control not being adequately educated nor having licence for it. This review is an appeal to the Croatian Medical Chamber and the Ministry of Health to make efforts to promote the education and medical profession in sports medicine.

  10. Higher education, wages, and polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Valletta, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The earnings gap between people with a college degree and those with no education beyond high school has been growing since the late 1970s. Since 2000, however, the gap has grown more for those who have earned a post-graduate degree as well. The divergence between workers with college degrees and those with graduate degrees may be one manifestation of rising labor market polarization, which benefits those earning the highest and the lowest wages relatively more than those in the middle of the...

  11. The physics of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    This course is intended to give a description of the basic physical concepts which underlie the study and the interpretation of polarization phenomena. Apart from a brief historical introduction (Sect. 1), the course is organized in three parts. A first part (Sects. 2 - 6) covers the most relevant facts about the polarization phenomena that are typically encountered in laboratory applications and in everyday life. In Sect. 2, the modern description of polarization in terms of the Stokes parameters is recalled, whereas Sect. 3 is devoted to introduce the basic tools of laboratory polarimetry, such as the Jones calculus and the Mueller matrices. The polarization phenomena which are met in the reflection and refraction of a beam of radiation at the separation surface between two dielectrics, or between a dielectric and a metal, are recalled in Sect. 4. Finally, Sect. 5 gives an introduction to the phenomena of dichroism and of anomalous dispersion and Sect. 6 summarizes the polarization phenomena that are commonly encountered in everyday life. The second part of this course (Sects. 7-14) deals with the description, within the formalism of classical physics, of the spectro-polarimetric properties of the radiation emitted by accelerated charges. Such properties are derived by taking as starting point the Liénard and Wiechert equations that are recalled and discussed in Sect. 7 both in the general case and in the non-relativistic approximation. The results are developed to find the percentage polarization, the radiation diagram, the cross-section and the spectral characteristics of the radiation emitted in different phenomena particularly relevant from the astrophysical point of view. The emission of a linear antenna is derived in Sect. 8. The other Sections are devoted to Thomson scattering (Sect. 9), Rayleigh scattering (Sect. 10), Mie scattering (Sect. 11), bremsstrahlung radiation (Sect. 12), cyclotron radiation (Sect. 13), and synchrotron radiation (Sect. 14

  12. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  13. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  14. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  15. Predictive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, Marianne; ten Have, Henk

    2015-01-01

    In the last part of the twentieth century, predictive medicine has gained currency as an important ideal in biomedical research and health care. Research in the genetic and molecular basis of disease suggested that the insights gained might be used to develop tests that predict the future health

  16. Bioenergetic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-01-01

    Here we discuss a specific therapeutic strategy we call ‘bioenergetic medicine’. Bioenergetic medicine refers to the manipulation of bioenergetic fluxes to positively affect health. Bioenergetic medicine approaches rely heavily on the law of mass action, and impact systems that monitor and respond to the manipulated flux. Since classically defined energy metabolism pathways intersect and intertwine, targeting one flux also tends to change other fluxes, which complicates treatment design. Such indirect effects, fortunately, are to some extent predictable, and from a therapeutic perspective may also be desirable. Bioenergetic medicine-based interventions already exist for some diseases, and because bioenergetic medicine interventions are presently feasible, new approaches to treat certain conditions, including some neurodegenerative conditions and cancers, are beginning to transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24004341

  17. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...

  18. Diurnal and seasonal occurrence of polar patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rodger

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the diurnal and seasonal variation of polar patches, as identified in two years of HF-radar data from Halley, Antarctica during a period near sunspot maximum, shows that there is a broad maximum in occurrence centred about magnetic noon, not local noon. There are minima in occurrence near midsummer and midwinter, with maxima in occurrence between equinox and winter. There are no significant correlations between the occurrence of polar patches and the corresponding hourly averages of the solar wind and IMF parameters, except that patches usually occur when the interplanetary magnetic field has a southward component. The results can be understood in terms of UT and seasonal differences in the plasma concentration being convected from the dayside ionosphere into the polar cap. In summer and winter the electron concentrations in the polar cap are high and low, respectively, but relatively unstructured. About equinox, a tongue of enhanced ionisation is convected into the polar cap; this tongue is then structured by the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field, but these Halley data cannot be used to separate the various competing mechanisms for patch formation. The observed diurnal and seasonal variation in the occurrence of polar patches are largely consistent with predictions of Sojka et al. (1994 when their results are translated into the southern hemisphere. However, the ionospheric effects of flux transfer events are still considered essential in their formation, a feature not yet included in the Sojka et al. model.

  19. Advancing Environmental Prediction Capabilities for the Polar Regions and Beyond during The Year of Polar Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kirstin; Goessling, Helge; Hoke, Winfried; Kirchhoff, Katharina; Jung, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Environmental changes in polar regions open up new opportunities for economic and societal operations such as vessel traffic related to scientific, fishery and tourism activities, and in the case of the Arctic also enhanced resource development. The availability of current and accurate weather and environmental information and forecasts will therefore play an increasingly important role in aiding risk reduction and safety management around the poles. The Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) has been established by the World Meteorological Organization's World Weather Research Programme as the key activity of the ten-year Polar Prediction Project (PPP; see more on www.polarprediction.net). YOPP is an internationally coordinated initiative to significantly advance our environmental prediction capabilities for the polar regions and beyond, supporting improved weather and climate services. Scheduled to take place from mid-2017 to mid-2019, the YOPP core phase covers an extended period of intensive observing, modelling, prediction, verification, user-engagement and education activities in the Arctic and Antarctic, on a wide range of time scales from hours to seasons. The Year of Polar Prediction will entail periods of enhanced observational and modelling campaigns in both polar regions. With the purpose to close the gaps in the conventional polar observing systems in regions where the observation network is sparse, routine observations will be enhanced during Special Observing Periods for an extended period of time (several weeks) during YOPP. This will allow carrying out subsequent forecasting system experiments aimed at optimizing observing systems in the polar regions and providing insight into the impact of better polar observations on forecast skills in lower latitudes. With various activities and the involvement of a wide range of stakeholders, YOPP will contribute to the knowledge base needed to managing the opportunities and risks that come with polar climate change.

  20. [Research on the Thermal Infrared Polarization Properties of Fresh Snow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-ting; Li, Zhao-liang; Tang, Bo-hui; Sun, Wei-qi; Zhao, Yun-sheng

    2015-07-01

    used (CH1 to CH4). The snow emissive polarization is isotropic and the relative azimuth view angle has no significant impact on the snow emissive polarization properties. The impact of the polarization angle may be neglected if the investigation of the relative azimuth view angle on the fresh snow thermal emissive polarization is conducted. The difference of the fresh snow emissive polarization properties mainly comes from the snow surface roughness and structure.

  1. DUAL POLARIZATION ANTENNA ARRAY WITH VERY LOW CROSS POLARIZATION AND LOW SIDE LOBES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    formation of grating lobes are inhibited in selected directions of the radiation and cross polarization within the main lobe is suppressed at least 30 dB below the main lobe peak value. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the antenna elements of the antenna array comprise probe-fed patches......The present invention relates to an antenna array adapted to radiate or receive electromagnetic waves of one or two polarizations with very low cross polarization and low side lobes. An antenna array comprising many antenna elements, e.g. more than ten antenna elements, is provided in which...

  2. GPS scintillations associated with cusp dynamics and polar cap patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yaqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relative scintillation level associated with cusp dynamics (including precipitation, flow shears, etc. with and without the formation of polar cap patches around the cusp inflow region by the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR and two GPS scintillation receivers. A series of polar cap patches were observed by the ESR between 8:40 and 10:20 UT on December 3, 2011. The polar cap patches combined with the auroral dynamics were associated with a significantly higher GPS phase scintillation level (up to 0.6 rad than those observed for the other two alternatives, i.e., cusp dynamics without polar cap patches, and polar cap patches without cusp aurora. The cusp auroral dynamics without plasma patches were indeed related to GPS phase scintillations at a moderate level (up to 0.3 rad. The polar cap patches away from the active cusp were associated with sporadic and moderate GPS phase scintillations (up to 0.2 rad. The main conclusion is that the worst global navigation satellite system space weather events on the dayside occur when polar cap patches enter the polar cap and are subject to particle precipitation and flow shears, which is analogous to the nightside when polar cap patches exit the polar cap and enter the auroral oval.

  3. GPS scintillations associated with cusp dynamics and polar cap patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Spicher, Andres; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Miloch, Wojciech J.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the relative scintillation level associated with cusp dynamics (including precipitation, flow shears, etc.) with and without the formation of polar cap patches around the cusp inflow region by the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) and two GPS scintillation receivers. A series of polar cap patches were observed by the ESR between 8:40 and 10:20 UT on December 3, 2011. The polar cap patches combined with the auroral dynamics were associated with a significantly higher GPS phase scintillation level (up to 0.6 rad) than those observed for the other two alternatives, i.e., cusp dynamics without polar cap patches, and polar cap patches without cusp aurora. The cusp auroral dynamics without plasma patches were indeed related to GPS phase scintillations at a moderate level (up to 0.3 rad). The polar cap patches away from the active cusp were associated with sporadic and moderate GPS phase scintillations (up to 0.2 rad). The main conclusion is that the worst global navigation satellite system space weather events on the dayside occur when polar cap patches enter the polar cap and are subject to particle precipitation and flow shears, which is analogous to the nightside when polar cap patches exit the polar cap and enter the auroral oval.

  4. Lobbying and political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Ursprung, Heinrich W.

    2002-01-01

    Standard spatial models of political competition give rise to equilibria in which the competing political parties or candidates converge to a common position. In this paper I show how political polarization can be generated in models that focus on the nexus between pre-election interest group lobbying and electoral competition.

  5. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  6. Polarization of Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.

    1957-01-01

    The numerical results for the polarization of Bremsstrahlung are presented. The multiple scattering of electrons in the target is taken into account. The angular-and photon energy dependences are seen on the curves for an incident 25 MeV electron energy. (Author) [fr

  7. DESY: HERA polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new HERA electron-proton collider at DESY in Hamburg achieved the first luminosity for electron-proton collisions on 19 October last year. Only one month later, on 20 November, HERA passed another important milestone with the observation of transverse electron polarization

  8. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  9. Graphics of polar figure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this work, is that starting from a data file coming from a spectra that has been softened, and of the one that have been generated its coordinates to project it in stereographic form, to create the corresponding polar figure making use of the Cyber computer of the ININ by means of the GRAPHOS package. This work only requires a Beta, Fi and Intensity (I) enter data file. It starts of the existence of a softened spectra of which have been generated already with these data, making use of some language that in this case was FORTRAN for the Cyber computer, a program is generated supported in the Graphos package that allows starting of a reading of the Beta, Fi, I file, to generate the points in a stereographic projection and that it culminates with the graph of the corresponding polar figure. The program will request the pertinent information that is wanted to capture in the polar figure just as: date, name of the enter file, indexes of the polar figure, number of levels, radio of the stereographic projection (cms.), crystalline system to which belongs the sample, name the neuter graph file by create and to add the own general data. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of impact on health-related quality of life and cost effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Kong, Lin-lin; Zhang, Yi-ye; Li, Shu-chuen

    2012-12-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), an important part of health care in China and with increased popularity worldwide, has received extensive attention from governments at all levels. With the current emphasis on clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness, TCM, as indeed do all other treatments, requires rigorous evidence to be considered in reimbursement decision-making. Nevertheless, despite the fact that TCM treatment has always been considered to possess the advantage of improving the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients, there is a lack of systematic study about available evidence to assess the impact of TCM treatments on HRQOL of patients. The current study aimed to perform a review of available literature to evaluate whether sufficient evidence existed to allow an assessment of the impact on HRQOL and cost effectiveness of TCM treatments. This information would support a recommendation for wider use of TCM in the clinical setting as well as its consideration for reimbursement. A structured search was performed using data sources including MEDLINE,(®) Cumulative Index for Allied Health and Nursing (CINAHL), PubMed, Cochrane database, EBSCO, SciSearch, Embase, and Google Scholar from 2000 to 2010. The search was supplemented with manual search after relevant articles were retrieved. After culling, a total 31 articles covering a range of TCM therapies applied to a variety of conditions were retrieved. The measurement tools used in these studies to assess impact in patient's HRQOL were mainly SF-36-based scales, but the results of HRQOL/patient preference studies were inconsistent and inconclusive. Of the 10 articles of cost-effectiveness evaluation of TCM treatments, the majority reported that TCM treatments resulted in better outcomes at a higher cost, but the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was below the usually recommended thresholds. The overall results showed acupuncture and t'ai chi to be the most studied TCM-related therapies. The

  11. Relationship between Obesity-related Hormone Peptides and Quality of Life in Obese Women among Different Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Lung Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between obesity-related hormone peptides and quality of life in obese women among different traditional Chinese medicine (TCM syndrome groups (證型 zhèng xíng. 260 obese women met with age between 20 and 65 years old and body mass index (BMI ≧ 27 kg/m2, were recruited. The participants filled out a questionnaire on obese TCM syndrome groups, which was designed by professional TCM doctors, and two questionnaires on quality of life (QOL, WHOQOL-BREF Taiwan version and MOS Short Form-12 (SF-12. Data of biochemical characteristics and obesity-related hormone peptides were collected at the same time. According to the responses provided, the obese subjects were classified into spleen deficiency with dampness encumbrance syndrome (脾虛濕阻證 pí xū shī zǔ zhèng; SDD, stomach heat with dampness encumbrance syndrome (胃熱濕阻證 wèi rè shī zǔ zhèng; SHD, liver depression and qi stagnation syndrome (肝鬱氣滯證 gān yù qì zhì zhèng; LDQ, dual spleen-kidney deficiency syndrome (脾腎兩虛證 pí shèn liǎng xū zhèng; SKD, yin deficiency with internal heat syndrome (陰虛內熱證 yīn xū nèi rè zhèng; YDI and a control group. For physical conditions, SDD group had significantly higher means in weight and BMI compared with the control group. The insulin and leptin levels in SHD group were significantly higher than those in the control group. The LDQ group showed marked decrease in mental condition scores compared with the control group. This study found that obese women in the SDD group were fatter than those in the control group. SHD group might have greater influence on the regulation of obesity-related hormone peptides. The LDQ group had poor QOL than the control group. Analysis of TCM syndrome groups among obese women merits further investigation.

  12. Relationship between Obesity-related Hormone Peptides and Quality of Life in Obese Women among Different Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, You-Lung; Lien, Chun-Ying; Chiu, Jung-Peng; Luo, Ching-Min; Liu, Chia-Yu; Chen, I-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Hua

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between obesity-related hormone peptides and quality of life in obese women among different traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome groups ( zhèng xíng). 260 obese women met with age between 20 and 65 years old and body mass index (BMI) ≧ 27 kg/m(2), were recruited. The participants filled out a questionnaire on obese TCM syndrome groups, which was designed by professional TCM doctors, and two questionnaires on quality of life (QOL), WHOQOL-BREF Taiwan version and MOS Short Form-12 (SF-12). Data of biochemical characteristics and obesity-related hormone peptides were collected at the same time. According to the responses provided, the obese subjects were classified into spleen deficiency with dampness encumbrance syndrome ( pí xū shī zǔ zhèng; SDD), stomach heat with dampness encumbrance syndrome ( wèi rè shī zǔ zhèng; SHD), liver depression and qi stagnation syndrome ( gān yù qì zhì zhèng; LDQ), dual spleen-kidney deficiency syndrome ( pí shèn liǎng xū zhèng; SKD), yin deficiency with internal heat syndrome ( yīn xū nèi rè zhèng; YDI) and a control group. For physical conditions, SDD group had significantly higher means in weight and BMI compared with the control group. The insulin and leptin levels in SHD group were significantly higher than those in the control group. The LDQ group showed marked decrease in mental condition scores compared with the control group. This study found that obese women in the SDD group were fatter than those in the control group. SHD group might have greater influence on the regulation of obesity-related hormone peptides. The LDQ group had poor QOL than the control group. Analysis of TCM syndrome groups among obese women merits further investigation.

  13. Comparison of Sasang Constitutional Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Yeol Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and Ayurveda are three different forms of Asian traditional medicine. Although these traditions share a lot in common as holistic medicines, the different philosophical foundations found in each confer distinguishing attributes and unique qualities. SCM is based on a constitution-based approach, and is in this way relatively more similar to the Ayurvedic tradition than to the TCM, although many of the basic SCM theories were originally derived from TCM, a syndrome-based medicine. SCM and TCM use the same botanical materials that are distributed mainly in the East Asian region, but the basic principles of usage and the underlying rationale are completely different from each other. Meanwhile, the principles of the Ayurvedic use of botanical resources are very similar to those seen in SCM, but the medicinal herbs used in Ayurveda generally originate from the West Asian region which displays a different spectrum of flora.

  14. Readability of neurosurgery-related patient education materials provided by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Paul J; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2013-11-01

    Most professional organizations now provide patient information material, and not all of this material is appropriate for the average American adult to comprehend. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the United States Department of Health and Human Services recommend that patient education materials be written at the sixth-grade level. Our aim was to assess the readability of neurosurgery-related patient education material and compare it with The American Medical Association, NIH, and United States Department of Health and Human Services recommendations. Materials provided by the American Association of Neurologic Surgeons (AANS) and the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and National Institutes of Health were assessed with the Flesch-Kincaid grade level and Flesch Reading Ease score with Microsoft Office Word software. None of the articles had Flesch-Kincaid grade levels at or below the sixth-grade level. All articles on the AANS Conditions and Treatments section were written at or above the ninth-grade level; three of the AANS Camera-Ready Fact Sheets and four of the NIH/NLM articles were written between the seventh- and eighth-grade levels. Current patient education material provided by the AANS is written well above the recommended level. Material from the NLM and NIH performed better, but was still above the recommended sixth-grade level. Education materials should contain information relevant to patients' conditions, be accurate in the information they present, and be written with the average patient in mind. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and determination of related substances of ceftaroline fosamil in medicinal product by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Michalska, Katarzyna; Bus, Katarzyna; Kiljan, Monika; Tyski, Stefan

    2017-10-25

    Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is an advanced-generation cephalosporin antibacterial agent approved for treatment in the European Union in 2012. The drug is dedicated to curing complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The developed analytical method of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by diode array detector (DAD) set at 243nm was used to identify and determine degradation products of ceftaroline fosamil. The elaborated method demonstrated good selectivity and linearity [r>0.998 for the range 0.8-1.2mg/mL (80-120%) and r>0.997 for the range 0.005-0.015mg/mL (0.5-1.5%)]. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were equal to 0.15μg/mL and 0.5μg/mL, respectively. The forced decomposition of ceftaroline fosamil carried out under acidic, basic, oxidative, photolytic and thermal conditions revealed the high sensitivity of ceftaroline on photodegradation and thermolysis processes. Representative ceftaroline samples were selected and analysed by LC coupled with electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS) to identify the related substances that appeared under stress conditions. The LC-DAD method was transferred without any modification to LC-MS/MS system, allowing it to correlate results back to the LC-DAD method. Eight unknown signals were detected in the photolytic and thermal stress solutions for ceftaroline fosamil. The evaluated method was applied to the analysis of a medicinal product containing ceftaroline fosamil - Zinforo™, 600mg, powder for concentrate for solution for infusion. Moreover, the optimised conditions allowed for the successful separation of eight cephalosporin antibiotics possessing a molecular structure similar to ceftaroline (cefepime, cefapirin, ceftazidime, cefpirome, cefalonium, cefotaxime, cefquinome, cefalotin). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. IKZF1, a new susceptibility gene for cold medicine-related Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis with severe mucosal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Mayumi; Sawai, Hiromi; Sotozono, Chie; Hitomi, Yuki; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Kim, Mee Kum; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Joo, Choun-Ki; Kannabiran, Chitra; Wakamatsu, Tais Hitomi; Sangwan, Virender; Rathi, Varsha; Basu, Sayan; Ozeki, Takeshi; Mushiroda, Taisei; Sugiyama, Emiko; Maekawa, Keiko; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Aihara, Michiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Sekine, Akihiro; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira; Hamuro, Junji; Saito, Yoshiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and its severe form, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), are acute inflammatory vesiculobullous reactions of the skin and mucous membranes, including the ocular surface, oral cavity, and genitals. These reactions are very rare but are often associated with inciting drugs, infectious agents, or both. We sought to identify susceptibility loci for cold medicine-related SJS/TEN (CM-SJS/TEN) with severe mucosal involvement (SMI). A genome-wide association study was performed in 808 Japanese subjects (117 patients with CM-SJS/TEN with SMI and 691 healthy control subjects), and subsequent replication studies were performed in 204 other Japanese subjects (16 cases and 188 control subjects), 117 Korean subjects (27 cases and 90 control subjects), 76 Indian subjects (20 cases and 56 control subjects), and 174 Brazilian subjects (39 cases and 135 control subjects). In addition to the most significant susceptibility region, HLA-A, we identified IKZF1, which encodes Ikaros, as a novel susceptibility gene (meta-analysis, rs4917014 [G vs. T]; odds ratio, 0.5; P = 8.5 × 10(-11)). Furthermore, quantitative ratios of the IKZF1 alternative splicing isoforms Ik1 and Ik2 were significantly associated with rs4917014 genotypes. We identified IKZF1 as a susceptibility gene for CM-SJS/TEN with SMI not only in Japanese subjects but also in Korean and Indian subjects and showed that the Ik2/Ik1 ratio might be influenced by IKZF1 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which were significantly associated with susceptibility to CM-SJS/TEN with SMI. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relation of prostatic specific antigen, bone scan and Gleason score in prostate cancer Nuclear Medicine Center IPEN - INEN, 1993-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza Perez, German E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To establish the relationship of serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score and bone scan, to determine bone metastases in prostate cancer patients (PC). Material and Methods: A retrospective cases and series study was performed in patients with prostate cancer derived to the Centre of Nuclear Medicine IPEN-INEN from 1993 to 1995. 165 patients were included. Frequency charts were done for every study variable, quantitative variables were expressed by mean ± SD; for qualitative variables percentages were used. To confirm relations a Chi-square (χ2) test was applied. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for a 20 ng/mL cut off point of PSA and a Gleason score of 8 were carried out using contingency charts. Diagnostic performance of this tests were performed applying R.O.C. curve. Results: Mean age was 71.27 ± 7.6 years. Bone metastases were found in 84 (50.9%) patients. For a 20 ng/mL PSA, sensitivity was of 0.92, specificity of 0.47, PPV of 0.64 and NPV of 0.84; for a Gleason score of 8, sensitivity was 0.59, specificity 0.69, PPV O.67 and NPV 0.62. The probability to have a positive bone scan with a Gleason score of 8 is up to 10% for ≤ 4 ng/mL PSA; 15% for ≤ 10 ng/mL PSA, and 20% if PSA level is ≤ 20 ng/mL. Conclusions: We conclude, for the studied population, that it is necessary to perform a bone scan in all recently diagnosed prostate cancer patients, independently of PSA levels and Gleason score, in order to determine if bone metastases are present. (author)

  18. Philosophy of medicine 2017: reviewing the situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    In this introduction to a special subsection of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics comprising separate reviews of the Springer Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine, The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine, and The Bloomsbury Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Medicine, I compare the three texts with respect to their overall organization and their approach to the relation between the science and the art of medicine. I then indicate two areas that merit more explicit attention in developing a comprehensive philosophy of medicine going forward: health economics and systematic relations within the field as a whole. The reviews that follow speak for themselves.

  19. The evolution of sports medicine in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Benedict

    2013-10-01

    Sports medicine is a relatively new subspecialty in Singapore. This commentary chronicles its evolution in Singapore from 1969, through various milestones, to the present day. The first sports medicine clinic in Singapore was established in 1971 at Farrer Park. Notable institutions that followed include the Sports Medicine and Research Centre (1973), Soldier Performance Centre, Changi Sports Medicine Centre (2003), Singapore Sports Medicine Centre (2006), and other multidisciplinary centres of restructured hospitals. Formal groundwork to establish sports medicine as a subspecialty began in 2005, with its first trainee commencing traineeship at the Changi Sports Medicine Centre in 2007, and culminated in the subspecialty register at the beginning of 2011. Also captured in this discussion are the broader scopes of sports medicine, including military sports medicine, the sports sciences, exercise medicine, and event medical coverage.

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also very helpful. Often, a monitor with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ...

  2. Tablet Use within Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the scholarly literature related to tablet computer use in medicine. Forty-four research-based articles were examined for emerging categories and themes. The most studied uses for tablet computers include: patients using tablets to complete diagnostic survey instruments, medical professionals using tablet computers to view…

  3. Libyan Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the journal is to publish high quality medical data in the different discipline of medicine. It also aims at rapid publication via the advanced online publication. The journal is directed to clinicians and researcher around the globe. The scope of the journal covers all medical research and related subjects.

  4. Characteristics of volume polarization holography with linear polarization light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jinliang; Wu, An'an; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jue; Lin, Xiao; Tan, Xiaodi; Shimura, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Volume polarization holographic recording in phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PQ-PMMA) photopolymer with linear polarized light is obtained. The characteristics of the volume polarization hologram are experimentally investigated. It is found that beyond the paraxial approximation the polarization states of the holographic reconstruction light are generally different from the signal light. Based on vector wave theoretical analyses and material properties, the special exposure condition for correctly holographic reconstruction is obtained and experimentally demonstrated.

  5. Central African Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Central African Journal of Medicine is a quarterly refereed general medical journal which seeks to promote the practice and science of medicine in Africa. Emphasis is placed on general medical topics, reflecting common and important conditions in the region. The journal also covers related medical fields. Submissions ...

  6. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the π degree production at high p perpendicular and in the Λ (Σ degree), π ± , π degree production at large x F , and Δσ L (pp, bar pp) measurements. 18 refs

  7. NUCLEON POLARIZATION IN 3-BODY MODELS OF POLARIZED LI-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHELLINGERHOUT, NW; KOK, LP; COON, SA; ADAM, RM

    1993-01-01

    Just as He-3 --> can be approximately characterized as a polarized neutron target, polarized Li-6D has been advocated as a good isoscalar nuclear target for the extraction of the polarized gluon content of the nucleon. The original argument rests upon a presumed ''alpha + deuteron'' picture of Li-6,

  8. Nuclear medicine in sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Anshu Rajnish

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear medicine can synergistically contribute to the sports medicine field, in the management of sports-related stress injures. Bone scintigraphy is commonly requested for evaluation of athletes with pain. Three-Phase 99m Tc MDP Bone Scan has emerged as the imaging reference standard for diagnosing such injuries. The inherently high-contrast resolution of the bone scan allows early detection of bone trauma and becomes positive within six to seventy-two hours after the onset of symptoms. The bone scan is able to demonstrate stress injuries days to weeks before the radiograph

  9. REVIEW: Nuclear medicine dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabin, Michael

    2006-07-01

    A brief overview is provided of the history of the development of internal dose methods for use in nuclear medicine. Basic methods of internal dosimetry and the systems that have been developed for use in nuclear medicine are described. The development of the MIRD system and the International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium series is outlined. The evolution of models and tools for calculating dose estimates is reviewed. Current efforts in developing more patient-specific methods, particularly for use in therapy calculations, development of small scale and microdosimetry techniques, and of relating internal radiation doses to observed biological effects are described and evaluated.

  10. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  11. Development and initial validation of a Traditional Chinese Medicine symptom-specific outcome measure: a Zheng-related atopic dermatitis symptom questionnaire (ZRADSQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darong; Huang, Chujun; Mo, Xiumei; Liu, Junfeng; Cai, Jianxiong; Liu, Chi; Zhu, Haili; Li, Hongyi; Chen, Dacan

    2013-12-21

    Zheng represents pattern differentiation in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), as the basic unit and a key concept in TCM therapeutic theory, is based on the physiology and pathology of TCM. None of the outcome measurements of atopic dermatitis (AD) are Zheng-specific. The effectiveness of TCM is likely to be underestimated without a Zheng-related symptom-specific instrument. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument for measuring the Zheng-related symptom-specific status of patients with AD. We followed standard methodology to develop the instrument, including item generation and selection, item reduction and presentation, and pretesting, and recruited 188 patients with AD involved in a six-center randomized-controlled trial (ChiCTR-TRC-08000156) to validate the questionnaire. We conducted construct validity, reliability, and responsiveness analysis. The standardized effect size (SES) and standardized response mean (SRM) were used to calculate the responsiveness of additional items and the total score for the rating items. ZRADSQ has 15 items, with 12 rating items and 3 additional items. The 12 rating items fall within three domains: AD symptoms (n = 6 items); Heat (n = 4 items) and Mood (n = 2 items). Confirmatory factor analysis provided good support for a three-factor model (d.f. = 51, x2=97.11, RMSEA = 0.07, CFI = 0.96), and the Pearson's correlation coefficient between ZRADSQ and Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) was 0.40 (P < 0.001). The reliability was also good, with a Cronbach's alpha value for ZRADSQ of 0.84, a split-half coefficient of 0.75, and a test-retest reliability coefficient of 0.98. The standardized effect size and standardized response mean were close to or larger than 1, which indicated moderate to good responsiveness. The ZRADSQ demonstrates promising reliability, validity, and responsiveness. It can be used to determine whether Zheng-specific or symptom-specific treatments relieve the symptom that is most bothersome

  12. Dispersing surface-modified imogolite nanotubes in polar and non-polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Brant, Jonathan A.

    2018-02-01

    Furthering the development of nanocomposite structures, namely membranes for water treatment applications, requires that methods be developed to ensure nanoparticle dispersion in polar and non-polar solvents, as both are widely used in associated synthesis techniques. Here, we report on a two-step method to graft polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and a one-step method for octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA), onto the outer surfaces of imogolite nanotubes. The goal of these approaches was to improve and maintain nanotube dispersion in polymer compatible polar and non-polar solvents. The PVP coating modified the imogolite surface charge from positive to weakly negative at pH ≤ 9; the OPA made it weakly positive at acidic pH values to negative at pH ≥ 7. The PVP surface coating stabilized the nanotubes through steric hindrance in polar protic, dipolar aprotic, and chloroform. In difference to the PVP, the OPA surface coating allowed the nanotubes to be dispersed in n-hexane and chloroform, but not in the polar solvents. The lack of miscibility in the polar solvents, as well as the better dispersion in n-hexane, was attributed to the stronger hydrophobicity of the OPA polymer relative to the PVP. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Environmental medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steneberg, A.

    1996-01-01

    'Environmental medicine' deals with the manifold health problems from environmental factors of chemical, physical and psychosocial origin that are possible or have been observed. The book gives insight into the current state of knowledge of environmental medicine institutions, possibilities of diagnosis and therapeutic methods. It offers a systematic overview of pollutant sources and pollutant effects and points out, inter alia, syndromes that are discussed in connection with environmental factors: not only allergies and carcinogenous diseases but also symptom complexes that are hard to diagnose by ordinary methods such as the sick-building syndrome, multiple sensitivity to chemicals, electrosensitivity, amalgam intoxications, disorders due to wood preservatives and fungal diseases. The lingering course of a disease and a set of symptoms varying from one patient to another are the rule, not the exception, because environmental diseases are due above all to the chronic uptake of low pollutant doses (orig./MG) [de

  14. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e+e- collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point

  15. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented

  16. ENERGY MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, T. M.

    1987-01-01

    Energy medicine is the most comprehensive concept introduced in medical diagnostics and therapy to account for a whole range of phenomena and methods available to help an individual proceed from sickness to health. The modern medical theories do not account for, much less accept many traditional therapies due to deep suspicion that the older methods are not scientific. However, the Holistic Health groups around the world have now created an environment for therapies which work at subtle energ...

  17. Transfusion medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application

  18. The effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with major depressive disorder - an experimental medicine blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Ulla Benedichte

    2012-04-01

    The mechanisms of action for selective serotonin re-uptake in-hibitors (SSRI) in depressed patients remain widely unknown. The serotonergic neurotransmitter system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system may interact. Further, the serotonergic neurotransmitter system seems closely linked to personality and cognition. It is not known if SSRIs have a direct effect on the HPA system, personality or cognition that is independent of their effect on depression. Thus, healthy individuals with a genetic liability for depression represent a group of particular interest when investigating if intervention with SSRIs affects these potential biomarkers. SSRIs may affect these potential biomarkers in depressed patients, but it is unclear if the effect is directly on the biomarkers or is secondary to the effect of SSRIs on depressive symptoms. It has newer been tested whether an intervention with a SSRI has a beneficial effect on these potential biomarkers in healthy individuals with a genetic liability for depression. The aim of the thesis was by an experimental medicine blinded controlled trial, to investigate if long-term intervention with SSRI versus placebo decreases cortisol response in the dexamethasone corticotropin-releasing hormone (DEX-CRH) test in healthy first-degree relatives to patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Further, to test the hypothesis that a SSRI may reduce neuroticism in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with MDD. Finally, to test whether SSRI enhance cognitive function in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with MDD. Eighty healthy first-degree relatives to patients with MDD were randomised to receive escitalopram 10 mg versus matching pla-cebo daily for four weeks in a blinded trial. The primary outcome measure was the intervention difference in the change of the total area under the curve (CorAUCtotal) for plasma cortisol in the DEX-CRH test at entry to after four weeks of intervention. The secondary outcomes

  19. Solar Illumination Control of the Polar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, L.; Maggiolo, R.; De Keyser, J.; André, M.; Eriksson, A. I.; Haaland, S.; Li, K.; Poedts, S.

    2017-11-01

    Polar wind outflow is an important process through which the ionosphere supplies plasma to the magnetosphere. The main source of energy driving the polar wind is solar illumination of the ionosphere. As a result, many studies have found a relation between polar wind flux densities and solar EUV intensity, but less is known about their relation to the solar zenith angle at the ionospheric origin, certainly at higher altitudes. The low energy of the outflowing particles and spacecraft charging means it is very difficult to measure the polar wind at high altitudes. We take advantage of an alternative method that allows estimations of the polar wind flux densities far in the lobes. We analyze measurements made by the Cluster spacecraft at altitudes from 4 up to 20 RE. We observe a strong dependence on the solar zenith angle in the ion flux density and see that both the ion velocity and density exhibit a solar zenith angle dependence as well. We also find a seasonal variation of the flux density.

  20. Polarized Raman microspectroscopy on intact human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Katrin R; Koster, Joachim; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2008-10-01

    Polarization-resolved Raman microspectroscopy with near-infrared laser excitation was applied to intact human hair in order to non-invasively investigate the conformation and orientation of the polypeptide chains. By varying the orientation of the hair shaft relative to the polarization directions of the laser/analyzer, a set of four polarized Raman spectra is obtained; this allows to simultaneously determine both the secondary structure of hair proteins and the orientation of the polypeptide strands relative to the axis of the hair shaft. For the amide I band, results from a quantitative analysis of the polarized Raman spectra are compared with theoretically expected values for fibers with uniaxial symmetry. Based on the polarization behavior of the amide I band and further vibrational bands, a partial ordering of alpha-helical polypeptide strands parallel to the hair shaft can be concluded. We suggest that this microspectroscopic approach may be used for human hair diagnostics by detecting structural or orientational alterations of keratins.

  1. [Medical supervision of sports by the São Paulo State Department of Physical Education: relations between sports and medicine in the 1930s and 1940s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana Carolina Vimieiro; Dalben, André

    2011-06-01

    The article analyzes medical evaluations of athletes conducted in the early years of the São Paulo State Department of Physical Education's (DEF-SP) medical office, founded in 1935 to promote medical supervision of 'exercise and sports' in the state. Through sports medicine supervision, and influenced by eugenicist scientific reasoning, the DEF-SP endeavored to promote more hygienic sports habits that would mold physical types suited for certain modalities of sports. We also observed that in these early years of sports medicine in São Paulo, efforts were made to define the characteristics of a Brazilian physical type.

  2. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  3. Engineering in translational medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a broad area of engineering research in translational medicine. Leaders in academic institutions around the world contributed focused chapters on a broad array of topics such as: cell and tissue engineering (6 chapters), genetic and protein engineering (10 chapters), nanoengineering (10 chapters), biomedical instrumentation (4 chapters), and theranostics and other novel approaches (4 chapters). Each chapter is a stand-alone review that summarizes the state-of-the-art of the specific research area. Engineering in Translational Medicine gives readers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of a broad array of related research areas, making this an excellent reference book for scientists and students both new to engineering/translational medicine and currently working in this area.

  4. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base

  5. On Determinants of Political Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Grechyna, Daryna

    2015-01-01

    Political polarization has been shown to significantly influence a country's economic performance. However, little is known about the drivers of political polarization. In this article, we aim to identify the main determinants of political polarization using Bayesian Model Averaging to overcome the problem of model uncertainty. We find that the level of trust within a country and the degree of income inequality are the most robust determinants of political polarization.

  6. What is precision medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Inke R; Fuchs, Oliver; Hansen, Gesine; von Mutius, Erika; Kopp, Matthias V

    2017-10-01

    The term "precision medicine" has become very popular over recent years, fuelled by scientific as well as political perspectives. Despite its popularity, its exact meaning, and how it is different from other popular terms such as "stratified medicine", "targeted therapy" or "deep phenotyping" remains unclear. Commonly applied definitions focus on the stratification of patients, sometimes referred to as a novel taxonomy, and this is derived using large-scale data including clinical, lifestyle, genetic and further biomarker information, thus going beyond the classical "signs-and-symptoms" approach.While these aspects are relevant, this description leaves open a number of questions. For example, when does precision medicine begin? In which way does the stratification of patients translate into better healthcare? And can precision medicine be viewed as the end-point of a novel stratification of patients, as implied, or is it rather a greater whole?To clarify this, the aim of this paper is to provide a more comprehensive definition that focuses on precision medicine as a process. It will be shown that this proposed framework incorporates the derivation of novel taxonomies and their role in healthcare as part of the cycle, but also covers related terms. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  7. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base

  8. Some isomorphic properties ofm-polar fuzzy graphs with applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, Ganesh; Pal, Madhumangal

    2016-01-01

    The theory of graphs are very useful tool in solving the combinatorial problems in different areas of computer science and computational intelligence systems. In this paper, we present a frame work to handle m -polar fuzzy information by combining the theory of m -polar fuzzy sets with graphs. We introduce the notion of weak self complement m -polar fuzzy graphs and establish a necessary condition for m -polar fuzzy graph to be weak self complement. Some properties of self complement and weak self complement m -polar fuzzy graphs are discussed. The order, size, busy vertices and free vertices of an m -polar fuzzy graphs are also defined and proved that isomorphic m -polar fuzzy graphs have same order, size and degree. Also, we have presented some results of busy vertices in isomorphic and weak isomorphic m -polar fuzzy graphs. Finally, a relative study of complement and operations on m -polar fuzzy graphs have been made. Applications of m -polar fuzzy graph are also given at the end.

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.J. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  10. Polarized electrogowdy spacetimes censored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nungesser, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.nungesser@aei.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    A sketch of the proof of strong cosmic censorship is presented for a class of solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations, those with polarized Gowdy symmetry. A key element of the argument is the observation that by means of a suitable choice of variables the central equations in this problem can be written in a form where they are identical to the central equations for general (i.e. non-polarized) vacuum Gowdy spacetimes. Using this it is seen that the results of Ringstroem on strong cosmic censorship in the vacuum case have implications for the Einstein-Maxwell case. Working out the geometrical meaning of these analytical results leads to the main conclusion.

  11. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  12. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stirling, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Polar bears are the largest of the eight species of bears found worldwide and are covered in a pigment-free fur giving them the appearance of being white. They are the most carnivorous of bear species consuming a high-fat diet, primarily of ice-associated seals and other marine mammals. They range throughout the circumpolar Arctic to the southernmost extent of seasonal pack ice.

  13. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d- 3 He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs

  14. On polarization in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchi, Karis Amata

    close to physiological conditions, making these effects biologically relevant. In this work, we consider the case of asymmetric membranes which can display spontaneous polarization in the absence of a field. Close to the phase transition, we find that the membrane displays piezoelectric, flexoelectric...... on different geometries point in the direction of a flexoelectric mechanism behind current rectification in lipid bilayers. Finally, we suggest that our updated equivalent circuit should be included in the interpretation of elctrophysiological data....

  15. Multifrequency Behaviour of Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Reinsch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic variables emit over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper I will review observations of polars in relevant passbands obtained during the last decade and will discuss their diagnostical potential to access the physics of the main components within the binary systems. This will include a discussion of intrinsic source variability and the quest for simultaneous multi-frequency observations.

  16. Visualization of polarization state and its application in optics classroom teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bing; Liu, Wei; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wei; Yao, Tianfu; Liu, Shugang

    2017-08-01

    Polarization of light and the related knowledge are key and difficult points in optical teaching, and they are difficult to be understood since they are very abstract concepts. To help students understand the polarization properties of light, some classroom demonstration experiments have been constructed by employing the optical source, polarizers, wave plates optical cage system and polarization axis finder (PAF). The PAF is a polarization indicating device with many linear polarizing components concentric circles, which can visualize the polarization axis's direction of linearly polarized light intuitively. With the help of these demonstration experiment systems, the conversion and difference between the linear polarized light and circularly polarized light have been observed directly by inserting or removing a quarter-wave plate. The rotation phenomenon of linearly polarized light's polarization axis when it propagates through an optical active medium has been observed and studied in experiment, and the strain distribution of some mounted and unmounted lenses have also been demonstrated and observed in experiment conveniently. Furthermore, some typical polarization targets, such as liquid crystal display (LCD), polarized dark glass and skylight, have been observed based on PAF, which is quite suitable to help students understand these targets' polarization properties and the related physical laws. Finally, these demonstration experimental systems have been employed in classroom teaching of our university in physical optics, optoelectronics and photoelectric detection courses, and they are very popular with teachers and students.

  17. Young women's use of medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dana Lee; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2009-01-01

    , a unifying concept involving growing autonomy in medicine use emerged. This concept consisted of three parts: the great influence of family norms when autonomy was limited, growing autonomy under changing influences and assertion of autonomy and positioning of own behaviour relative to the norm. This study...... taking practices and ideas about appropriate medicine use within their family and peer group. Young women possessed a keen awareness of medicine-related norms, although medicine use was a topic only rarely discussed with others. At the interface of these themes pertaining to family and peer norms...... of the influential role that perceived norms in peer and family contexts can play in young women's use of medicine....

  18. Polar Business Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Caisse

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar business design aims to enable entrepreneurs, managers, consultants, researchers, and business students to better tackle model-based analysis, creation, and transformation of businesses, ventures, and, more generically, collective endeavors of any size and purpose. It is based on a systems-thinking approach that builds on a few interrelated core concepts to create holistic visual frameworks. These core concepts act as poles linked by meaningful dyads, flows, and faces arranged in geometric shapes. The article presents two such polar frameworks as key findings in an ongoing analytic autoethnography: the three-pole Value−Activity−Stakeholder (VAS triquetra and the four-pole Offer−Creation−Character−Stakeholder (OCCS tetrahedron. The VAS triquetra is a more aggregated model of collective endeavors. The OCCS tetrahedron makes a trade-off between a steeper learning curve and deeper, richer representation potential. This article discusses how to use these two frameworks as well as their limits, and explores the potential that polar business design offers for future research.

  19. Polarization transfer in weak pion production off the nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.; Kowal, Beata E.

    2018-01-01

    Polarization transfer (PT) observables in the single pion production induced by the charged current interaction of the neutrino with the nucleon are examined. The polarization components of the final nucleon and the charged lepton are calculated within two models for the pion production. The predictions are made for neutrino energy of the order of 1 GeV as well as for the T2K energy distribution. It is demonstrated that the PT observables, the degree of polarization and the polarization components of outgoing fermions, are sensitive to assumptions about the nonresonant background model. In particular it is shown that the normal components of the polarization of the outgoing nucleon and the lepton are determined by the interference between the resonant (RES) and nonresonant (NB) amplitudes. Moreover, the sign of the normal component of the polarization of the charged lepton is fixed by the relative sign between the RES and the NB amplitudes.

  20. The essential features and modes of bacterial polar growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Todd A; Zupan, John R; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Polar growth represents a surprising departure from the canonical dispersed cell growth model. However, we know relatively little of the underlying mechanisms governing polar growth or the requisite suite of factors that direct polar growth. Underscoring how classic doctrine can be turned on its head, the peptidoglycan layer of polar-growing bacteria features unusual crosslinks and in some species the quintessential cell division proteins FtsA and FtsZ are recruited to the growing poles. Remarkably, numerous medically important pathogens utilize polar growth, accentuating the need for intensive research in this area. Here we review models of polar growth in bacteria based on recent research in the Actinomycetales and Rhizobiales, with emphasis on Mycobacterium and Agrobacterium species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pregnancy and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the- ... care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be ...

  2. Buying & Using Medicine Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health professionals to make the best medicine choices, buy safely, and use medicine so it's as safe ... Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Buying Medicines Over the Internet BeSafeRx: Know Your Online Pharmacy Buying Medicine from ...

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth / For Teens / Complementary and Alternative Medicine What's ... a replacement. How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  4. Study on the thermal structure of the Venusian polar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, M.; Taguchi, M.; Fukuhara, T.; Kouyama, T.; Imamura, T.; Sato, T. M.; Futaguchi, M.; Yamada, T.; Nakamura, M.; Iwagami, N.; Suzuki, M.; Ueno, M.; Sato, M.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Takagi, S.

    2017-12-01

    other observation periods. From these results, possibility of north-south symmetrical rotation of polar vortices, temporal variation of the rotation period and its dependences on local time and spatial resolution will be discussed. Relation between the variation in rotation period and global circulation will help to understand the dynamics of Venusian atmosphere.

  5. INFLUENCE OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE ACHIEVEMENTS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPORT MEDICINE METHODOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Yashina, E R; Kurashvili, V A; Turzin, P S

    Modern technologies of aerospace medicine develop at rapid pace pulling on its orbit all spheres of the human activity, including sport. Innovations play a major role in the progress of sport medicine areas related to the biomedical support of precontest training. Overview of the most important aerospace medicine achievements and their methodical implications for sport medicine is presented. Discussion is devoted to how the aerospace medicine technologies can raise effectiveness of the biomedical support to different sectors of sport and fitness.

  6. Nephrotoxicity and Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Xie, Yun; Guo, Maojuan; Rosner, Mitchell H; Yang, Hongtao; Ronco, Claudio

    2018-04-03

    Chinese herbal medicine has been practiced for the prevention, treatment, and cure of diseases for thousands of years. Herbal medicine involves the use of natural compounds, which have relatively complex active ingredients with varying degrees of side effects. Some of these herbal medicines are known to cause nephrotoxicity, which can be overlooked by physicians and patients due to the belief that herbal medications are innocuous. Some of the nephrotoxic components from herbs are aristolochic acids and other plant alkaloids. In addition, anthraquinones, flavonoids, and glycosides from herbs also are known to cause kidney toxicity. The kidney manifestations of nephrotoxicity associated with herbal medicine include acute kidney injury, CKD, nephrolithiasis, rhabdomyolysis, Fanconi syndrome, and urothelial carcinoma. Several factors contribute to the nephrotoxicity of herbal medicines, including the intrinsic toxicity of herbs, incorrect processing or storage, adulteration, contamination by heavy metals, incorrect dosing, and interactions between herbal medicines and medications. The exact incidence of kidney injury due to nephrotoxic herbal medicine is not known. However, clinicians should consider herbal medicine use in patients with unexplained AKI or progressive CKD. In addition, exposure to herbal medicine containing aristolochic acid may increase risk for future uroepithelial cancers, and patients require appropriate postexposure screening. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casier, Ph.; Lepage, B.

    1998-01-01

    Except for dedicated devices for mobile nuclear cardiology for instance, the market is set on variable angulation dual heads cameras. These cameras are suited for all general applications and their cost effectiveness is optimized. Now, all major companies have such a camera in their of products. But, the big question in nuclear medicine is about the future of coincidence imaging for the monitoring of treatments in oncology. Many companies are focused on WIP assessments to find out the right crustal thickness to perform both high energy FDG procedures and low energy Tc procedures, with the same SPECT camera. The classic thickness is 3/8''. Assessments are made with 1/2'', 5/8'' or 3/4'' crystals. If FDG procedures proved to be of great interest in oncology, it may lead to the design of a dedicated SPECT camera with a 1'' crustal. Due to the short half of FDG, it may be the dawning of slip ring technology. (e.g. Varicam from Elscint). The three small heads camera market seems to be depressed. Will the new three large heads camera unveiled by Picker, reverse that trend? The last important topic in nuclear medicine is the emergence of new flat digital detectors to get rid of the old bulky ones. Digirad is the first company to manufacture a commercial product based on that technology. Bichron, Siemens and General Electric are working on that development, too. But that technology is very expensive and the market for digital detection in nuclear medicine is not as large as the market in digital detection in radiology. (author)

  8. Polarized electron sources for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    Linear colliders require high peak current beams with low duty factors. Several methods to produce polarized e - beams for accelerators have been developed. The SLC, the first linear collider, utilizes a photocathode gun with a GaAs cathode. Although photocathode sources are probably the only practical alternative for the next generation of linear colliders, several problems remain to be solved, including high voltage breakdown which poisons the cathode, charge limitations that are associated with the condition of the semiconductor cathode, and a relatively low polarization of ≤5O%. Methods to solve or at least greatly reduce the impact of each of these problems are at hand

  9. Detailed analysis of evolution of the state of polarization in all-fiber polarization transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiushan; Jain, Ravinder K

    2006-10-30

    We present a detailed analysis of key attributes and performance characteristics of controllably-spun birefringent-fiber-based all-fiber waveplates or "all fiber polarization transformers" (AFPTs), first proposed and demonstrated by Huang [11]; these AFPTs consist essentially of a long carefully-designed "spin-twisted" high-birefringence fiber, fabricated by slowly varying the spin rate of a birefringent fiber preform (either from very fast to very slow or vice versa) while the fiber is being drawn. The evolution of the eigenstate from a linear polarization state to a circular polarization state, induced by slow variation of the intrinsic structure from linear anisotropy at the unspun end to circular anisotropy at the fast-spun end, enables the AFPT to behave like an all-fiber quarter-wave plate independent of the wavelength of operation. Power coupling between local eigenstates causes unique evolution of the polarization state along the fiber, and has been studied to gain insight into - as well as to understand detailed characteristics of -- the polarization transformation behavior. This has been graphically illustrated via plots of the relative power in these local eigenstates as a function of distance along the length of the fiber and plots of the extinction ratio of the output state of polarization (SOP) as a function of distance and the normalized spin rate. Deeper understanding of such polarization transformers has been further elucidated by quantitative calculations related to two crucial requirements for fabricating practical AFPT devices. Our calculations have also indicated that the polarization mode dispersion behaviour of the AFPT is much smaller than that of the original birefringent fiber. Finally, a specific AFPT was experimentally investigated at two widely-separated wavelengths (1310 nm and 1550 nm) of interest in telecommunications systems applications, further demonstrating and elucidating the broadband character of such AFPTs.

  10. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...... of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists...

  11. Mountain medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen

    2016-01-01

    Travelling to high altitudes is an increasingly popular form of recreational holiday. Individual medical advice may be essential for certain groups of individuals such as patients with chronic disorders, pregnant women or children. This is the second part in a series of two articles on mountain...... medicine. The first part covered high-altitude physiology and medical aspects of objective alpine dangers and the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This part covers altitude sickness, fluid balance, nutrition, and precautions for patients with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnant women...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any allergies. You may have some concerns about nuclear medicine. However, because the amount of radiotracer used is small, the level of radiation exposure is relatively low and the benefit of ...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of radiation exposure is relatively low and the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. To learn more about nuclear medicine, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you ...

  14. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.E. Jr.; Squire, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    The book presents a number of fundamental imaging principles in nuclear medicine. The fact that low radiation doses are sufficient for the study of normal and changed physiological functions of the body is an important advancement brought about by nuclear medicine. The possibility of quantitative investigations of organs and organ regions and of an assessment of their function as compared to normal values is a fascinating new diagnostic dimension. The possibility of comparing the findings with other pathological findings and of course control in the same patient lead to a dynamic continuity with many research possibilities not even recognized until now. The limits of nuclear scanning methods are presented by the imprecise structural information of the images. When scintiscans are compared with X-ray images or contrast angiography, the great difference in the imaging of anatomical details is clearly seen. But although the present pictures are not optimal, they are a great improvement on the pictures that were considered clinically valuable a few years ago. (orig./AJ) [de

  15. Bringing Polar Science to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruccoli, A.; Madsen, J. M.; Porter, M.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF sponsored IceCube (OPP-0236449) and Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) projects have developed a model for engaging K-12 teachers in a variety of scientific disciplines using polar science as a unifying theme. An intensive workshop, Science in the Ice, provided teachers with background content knowledge and seed ideas for activities aligned with national teaching standards. These activities were used to support the introduction of authentic science investigations related to current polar research in the classroom. The pilot workshop, sponsored by the NSF supported Math-Science Partnership SCALE (0227016), demonstrated the viability of this approach for involving a continuum of teachers from novice to master in a meaningful professional development model that can lead to sustainable classroom changes. This model for teacher professional development is based on the premise that the most robust educational outreach efforts involve teachers that are prepared, supported, and connected to a network of researchers and educators. This network can also serve to both stimulate interest in polar research and as a vehicle for delivering classroom materials related to the International Polar Year. An overview of Science in the Ice will be provided to show how the natural fascination with extreme environments can be used to introduce on-going research to the classroom from multiple disciplines---glaciology, geology, and astrophysics---with a common thread of polar science. The case for involving teachers now to fully capitalize on the potential of the International Polar Year, by providing professional development opportunities including field experiences with researchers, will be made.

  16. [Exploration of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by western medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-jing

    2015-02-01

    "Microcosmic syndrome", "treatment based on syndrome differentiation", and "combination of disease identification and syndrome differentiation" generally refer to a mode: following the syndrome if with no disease identified, following the disease if with no syndrome type differentiated. For example, Chinese medical treatment of hypertension, high blood lipids, increased transaminase, and so on candirectly use Chinese recipes, but no longer with syndrome differentiation. Clinical application of Chinese patent medicine can also obtain favorable clinical. Western doctors need not follow syndrome differentiation. The invention of artemisinin was screened from more than 40 000 kinds of compounds and herbs, but with no reference of any traditional Chinese medical theory. A lot of folk remedy and empirical recipes have obtained effective efficacy but unnecessarily with profound Chinese medical theories. Various evidences showed that disease can also be cured without syndrome differentiation. I held that it might be associated with the same mechanism of Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Any disease can be cured or alleviated by Chinese medicine is a result from its modern pharmacological effect, which is achieved by improving etiologies, and pathogeneses. I was inspired by whether we can directly use traditional Chinese medicine with modern pharmacological effects to treat symptomatic disease. So I raised an idea of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by Western medicine, i.e., we find and use Chinese herbs with relatively effective modern pharmacological effect to treat diseases targeting at patients' clinical symptoms and signs, as well as various positive laboratory results (collectively called as microscopic dialectical indicators). More Western doctors would use it to treat disease due to omission of complicated and mysterious syndrome differentiation. This will promote extensive application and expansion of Chi- nese medicine and pharmacy, enlarge the team of

  17. The cultivation of medicinal, aromatic and spice plants in South Marocco. Relation to a trip to the regions between Agadir - Marrakech - Ouarzazate and Tata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ait Chitt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies about aromatic, medicinal and seasoning plants are integrated into activities of Department of "Vegetables Cultures" of the Section of Agadir (Agronomical and Veterinary Institute Hassan II. An explanatory mission has been carried out in the provinces of Agadir and Marrakech in semi-barren areas and of Ouarzazate and Tata in Saharan regions. The mean cultivated species are listed. A technical and economical approach is considered.

  18. Ligand electronic parameters as a measure of the polarization of the C≡O bond in [M(CO)(x)L(y)]n complexes and of the relative stabilization of [M(CO)(x)L(y)](n/n+1) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobi, Fabio

    2010-11-15

    The electronic description of octahedral (fac-[M(CO)(3)L(3)](n), with M = Re, Ru, and Mn, and [Cr(CO)(5)L](n)), square-planar (cis-[Pt(CO)(2)L(2)](n)), and tetrahedral ([Ni(CO)(3)L](n)) carbonyl complexes (where L = monodentate ligand) was obtained via density functional theory and natural population analyses in order to understand what effects are probed in these species by vibrational spectroscopy and electrochemistry as a function of the ligand electronic parameter of the associated L. The analysis indicates that while ligand electronic parameters may be considered as a measure of the net donor power of the ligand, the net transfer of the electron density (or charge) does not occur from the ligand to the metal ion. In [M(CO)(x)L(y)](n) carbonyl species, the charge transfer occurs from the ligand L to the oxygen atom of the bound carbon monoxides. This charge transfer translates into changes of the polarization (or permanent dipole) and the covalency of the C≡O bonds, and it is this effect that is probed in IR spectroscopy. As the analysis shifts from IR radiations to electrochemical potentials, the parameters best describe the relative thermodynamic stability of the oxidized and reduced [M(CO)(x)L(y)](n/n+1) species. No relationship is found between the metal natural charge of the [M(CO)(x)L(y)](n) fragments analyzed and the parameters. Brief considerations are given on the possible design of CO-releasing molecules.

  19. Circularly polarized antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Steven; Zhu, Fuguo

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive insight into the design techniques for different types of CP antenna elements and arrays In this book, the authors address a broad range of topics on circularly polarized (CP) antennas. Firstly, it introduces to the reader basic principles, design techniques and characteristics of various types of CP antennas, such as CP patch antennas, CP helix antennas, quadrifilar helix antennas (QHA), printed quadrifilar helix antennas (PQHA), spiral antenna, CP slot antennas, CP dielectric resonator antennas, loop antennas, crossed dipoles, monopoles and CP horns. Adva

  20. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.