WorldWideScience

Sample records for polar layered terrains

  1. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: History of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric water cycle at the present epoch involves summertime sublimation of water from the north polar cap, transport of water through the atmosphere, and condensation on one or both winter CO2 caps. Exchange with the regolith is important seasonally, but the water content of the atmosphere appears to be controlled by the polar caps. The net annual transport through the atmosphere, integrated over long timescales, must be the driving force behind the long-term evolution of the polar caps; clearly, this feeds back into the evolution of the layered terrain. We have investigated the behavior of the seasonal water cycle and the net integrated behavior at the pole for the last 10 exp 7 years. Our model of the water cycle includes the solar input, CO2 condensation and sublimation, and summertime water sublimation through the seasonal cycles, and incorporates the long-term variations in the orbital elements describing the Martian orbit.

  2. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The Martian polar caps and layered terrain presumably evolves by the deposition and removal of small amounts of water and dust each year, the current cap attributes therefore represent the incremental transport during a single year as integrated over long periods of time. The role was studied of condensation and sublimation of water ice in this process by examining the seasonal water cycle during the last 10(exp 7) yr. In the model, axial obliquity, eccentricity, and L sub s of perihelion vary according to dynamical models. At each epoch, the seasonal variations in temperature are calculated at the two poles, keeping track of the seasonal CO2 cap and the summertime sublimation of water vapor into the atmosphere; net exchange of water between the two caps is calculated based on the difference in the summertime sublimation between the two caps (or on the sublimation from one cap if the other is covered with CO2 frost all year). Results from the model can help to explain (1) the apparent inconsistency between the timescales inferred for layer formation and the much older crater retention age of the cap and (2) the difference in sizes of the two residual caps, with the south being smaller than the north.

  3. The Mars water cycle at other epochs - Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model is presented of the integrated role of seasonal water cycle on the evolution of polar deposits on Mars over the last 10 million years. From the model, it is concluded that the only major difference between the polar caps which affects their long-term behavior is ultimately the difference in their elevations. Because of that difference, there is a preference for CO2 frost to stay longer on the northern polar cap. The average difference in sublimation at the caps results in a net south-to-north transport of water ice over long time scales. Superimposed on any long-term behavior is a transfer of water ice between the caps on the 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr time scales. The amount of water exchanged is small compared to the total ice content of the polar deposits.

  4. Curtain eruptions from Enceladus' south-polar terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Joseph N.; Hurford, Terry A.; Rhoden, Alyssa R.; Berkson, Emily E.; Platts, Symeon S.

    2015-05-01

    Observations of the south pole of the Saturnian moon Enceladus revealed large rifts in the south-polar terrain, informally called `tiger stripes', named Alexandria, Baghdad, Cairo and Damascus Sulci. These fractures have been shown to be the sources of the observed jets of water vapour and icy particles and to exhibit higher temperatures than the surrounding terrain. Subsequent observations have focused on obtaining close-up imaging of this region to better characterize these emissions. Recent work examined those newer data sets and used triangulation of discrete jets to produce maps of jetting activity at various times. Here we show that much of the eruptive activity can be explained by broad, curtain-like eruptions. Optical illusions in the curtain eruptions resulting from a combination of viewing direction and local fracture geometry produce image features that were probably misinterpreted previously as discrete jets. We present maps of the total emission along the fractures, rather than just the jet-like component, for five times during an approximately one-year period in 2009 and 2010. An accurate picture of the style, timing and spatial distribution of the south-polar eruptions is crucial to evaluating theories for the mechanism controlling the eruptions.

  5. Exchange Processes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Mountainous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Serafin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of heat, momentum, and mass in the atmosphere over mountainous terrain is controlled by synoptic-scale dynamics, thermally driven mesoscale circulations, and turbulence. This article reviews the key challenges relevant to the understanding of exchange processes in the mountain boundary layer and outlines possible research priorities for the future. The review describes the limitations of the experimental study of turbulent exchange over complex terrain, the impact of slope and valley breezes on the structure of the convective boundary layer, and the role of intermittent mixing and wave–turbulence interaction in the stable boundary layer. The interplay between exchange processes at different spatial scales is discussed in depth, emphasizing the role of elevated and ground-based stable layers in controlling multi-scale interactions in the atmosphere over and near mountains. Implications of the current understanding of exchange processes over mountains towards the improvement of numerical weather prediction and climate models are discussed, considering in particular the representation of surface boundary conditions, the parameterization of sub-grid-scale exchange, and the development of stochastic perturbation schemes.

  6. Discovery of araneiforms outside of the South Polar Layered Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Aye, K.-Michael; Portyankina, Ganna; Hansen, Candice; Lintott, Chris J.; Allen, Campbell; Allen, Sarah; Calef, Fred J.; Duca, Simone; McMaster, Adam; R. M Miller, Grant

    2017-10-01

    Mars' south polar region is sculpted by the seasonal cycle of freezing and thawing of exposed carbon dioxide (CO2) ice. In the Southern Spring, CO2 jets loft dust and dirt through cracks in the sublimating CO2 ice sheet to the surface where winds blow the material into the hundreds of thousands of dark fans observed from orbit. During this seasonal process, it is thought that the CO2 gas also exploits weaknesses in the surface below the ice sheet to carve dendritic channels known as araneiforms. Planet Four: Terrains (http://terrains.planetfour.org) is a citizen science project enlisting the general public to review ~6 m/pixel resolution Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) subimages to identify: (1) araneiforms (including features with a central pit and radiating channels known as ‘spiders’) (2) erosional depressions, troughs, mesas, ridges, and quasi-circular pits characteristic of the South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) which we collectively refer to as ‘Swiss cheese terrain’, and (3) craters.We provide an overview of Planet Four: Terrains and discuss the distributions of our high confidence classic spider araneiforms and Swiss cheese terrain identifications in CTX images covering 11% of the South polar regions at latitudes ≤ -75 degrees N. Previously spiders were reported as being confined to the South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLD). We present the first identification of araneiforms at locations outside of the SPLD and discuss the implications for the CO2 jet hypothesis.Acknowledgements: This work uses data generated via the Zooniverse.org platform, development of which was supported by a Global Impact Award from Google, and by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. We also thank the HIRSE and MRO Teams for their help in scheduling and acquiring our requested observations.

  7. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  8. Layer-by-layer magnetometry of polarizing supermirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Ruecker, U; Toperverg, B; Brueckel, T; Ott, F

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the remagnetization behaviour of remanent polarizing supermirrors by polarized neutron reflectometry. Such a mirror can be remagnetized in a magnetic field of 30 mT. It is shown, that at lower fields, the mirror is not completely remagnetized, but the magnetization of the thinner layers can be flipped more easily than the magnetization of the thicker layers. With polarized neutron reflectometry, we are able to find out exactly how many layers are magnetized parallel and how many are magnetized antiparallel to the external field. Furthermore, information about structural and magnetic imperfections (roughness, domain formation) is available. (orig.)

  9. Hybrid fluorescent layer emitting polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadimasoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanorods have anisotropic absorption and emission properties. In this work a hybrid luminescent layer is produced based on a mixture of CdSe/CdS nanorods dispersed in a liquid crystal that is aligned by an electric field and polymerized by UV illumination. The film emits light with polarization ratio 0.6 (polarization contrast 4:1. Clusters of nanorods in liquid crystal can be avoided by applying an AC electric field with sufficient amplitude. This method can be made compatible with large-scale processing on flexible transparent substrates. Thin polarized light emitters can be used in LCD backlights or solar concentrators to increase the efficiency.

  10. Turbulent Characterization of atmospheric surface layer over non-homogeneous terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artinano Rodriguez de Torres, B.

    1989-01-01

    About 15000 wind and temperature profiles from a 100 m tower located in CEDER (Soria, Spain) have been analyzed. Using profiles in close neutral conditions, two main parameters of surface layer were obtained. Results show a great dependence of these parameters (Z 0 roughness length and u friction velocity) on flow conditions and terrain (tinctures. Difficulty finding neutral conditions in this type of terrain (gently rolling and scattered bush) and in this latitude , is also remarkable. (Author) 91 refs

  11. Assessment of HRSC Digital Terrain Models Produced for the South Polar Residual Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    The current Digital Terrain Models available for Mars consist of NASA MOLA (Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter) Digital Terrain Models with an average resolution of 112 m/ pixel (512 pixels/degree) for the polar region. The ESA/DLR High Resolution Stereo Camera is currently orbiting Mars and mapping its surface, 98% with resolution of ≤100 m/pixel and better and 100% at lower resolution [1]. It is possible to produce Digital Terrain Models from HRSC images using various methods. In this study, the method developed on Kim and Muller [2] which uses the VICAR open source program together with photogrammetry sofrware from DLR (Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt) with image matching based on the GOTCHA (Gruen-Otto-Chau) algorithm [3]. Digital Terrain Models have been processed over the South Pole with emphasis on areas around South Polar Residual Cap from High Resolution Stereo Camera images [4]. Digital Terrain Models have been produced for 31 orbits out of 149 polar orbits available. This study analyses the quality of the DTMs including an assessment of accuracy of elevations using the MOLA MEGDR (Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records) which has roughly 42 million MOLA PEDR (Precision Experiment Data Records) points between latitudes of 78 o -90 o S. The issues encountered in the production of Digital Terrain Models will be described and the statistical results and assessment method will be presented. The resultant DTMs will be accessible via http://i-Mars.eu/web-GIS References: [1] Neukum, G. et. al, 2004. Mars Express: The Scientific Payload pp. 17-35. [2] Kim, J.-R. and J.-P. Muller. 2009. PSS vol. 57, pp. 2095-2112. [3] Shin, D. and J.-P. Muller. 2012. Pattern Recognition, 45(10), 3795 -3809. [4] Putri, A.R. D., et al., Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B4, 463-469 Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received partial funding from the STFC "MSSL Consolidated Grant" ST/K000977/1 and partial support from the

  12. Assessment of WRF Surface Layer Formulations Over a Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2017-12-01

    The accurate and efficient estimation of surface turbulent fluxes is crucial to predict an adequate atmospheric evolution by atmospheric models. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, which is used to compute these fluxes in numerical models, utilizes the empirical stability correction functions. In the present study, impact of various functional forms of similarity functions on the computation of the surface fluxes under both unstable and stable stratification is analyzed. In addition, this study compares two surface layer parametrization schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting model over Ranchi (India). The model is run with three nested domains at a high resolution (1 Km) for `five' 4-day periods covering 15 days of Premonsoon season. The two surface layer schemes chosen for the analysis includes MM5 surface layer scheme having Businger-Dyer similarity functions, and revised MM5 scheme utilizing the functions those are valid for full ranges of atmospheric stabilities. The five planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes are selected to assess the influence of the surface layer schemes on the structure of the boundary layer. The schemes are- Asymmetric Convective Model Version 2 (ACM2), Bougeault-Lacarrere (Boulac), Medium Range Forecast (MRF), Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN), and Yonsei University (YSU) PBL schemes. The impact of surface layer parametrizations on the near surface diagnostic variables is analyzed and results are compared with the observations.The bias in the 2 m temperature (T2) and 10 m wind speed (U) across the PBL schemes is very small and each PBL scheme is able to reproduce the diurnal variation of T2 irrespective of the surface layer scheme used for the simulations. A relatively higher value nocturnal T2 is predicted with the revised MM5 surface layer scheme as compared to that obtained with the old MM5 scheme, while both the surface layer schemes reproduce almost similar T2 during convective conditions. However, compare to the

  13. Polarization volume holograms in layers of polymethylmethacrylate with phenanthrenequinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmysh, D. N.; Mahilny, U. V.

    2013-11-01

    Polarization volume holograms are recorded in the polymethylmethacrylate layers that contain phenanthrenequinone at a molar content of 2.5-3%. The effect of the polarization of recording beams on the kinetics of diffraction efficiency and properties of holograms is analyzed. Polarization hologram recording in the polymethylmethacrylate layers with phenanthrenequinone and a relatively high optical stability of the holograms are demonstrated.

  14. Ultra-thin, single-layer polarization rotator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, T. V.; Truong, V. V., E-mail: Truong.Vo-Van@Concordia.Ca [Department of Physics, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, H4B 1R6 (Canada); Do, P. A.; Haché, A. [Département de Physique et d’Astronomie, Université de Moncton, Moncton, New Brunswick, E1A 3E9 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate light polarization control over a broad spectral range by a uniform layer of vanadium dioxide as it undergoes a phase transition from insulator to metal. Changes in refractive indices create unequal phase shifts on s- and p-polarization components of incident light, and rotation of linear polarization shows intensity modulation by a factor of 10{sup 3} when transmitted through polarizers. This makes possible polarization rotation devices as thin as 50 nm that would be activated thermally, optically or electrically.

  15. How the geysers, tidal stresses, and thermal emission across the south polar terrain of enceladus are related

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porco, Carolyn; DiNino, Daiana; Nimmo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive examination of the geysering, tidal stresses, and anomalous thermal emission across the south pole of Enceladus and discuss the implications for the moon's thermal history and interior structure. A 6.5 yr survey of the moon's south polar terrain (SPT) by the Cassini imaging experiment has located ∼100 jets or geysers erupting from four prominent fractures crossing the region. Comparing these results with predictions of diurnally varying tidal stresses and with Cassini low resolution thermal maps shows that all three phenomena are spatially correlated. The coincidence of individual jets with very small (∼10 m) hot spots detected in high resolution Cassini VIMS data strongly suggests that the heat accompanying the geysers is not produced by shearing in the upper brittle layer but rather is transported, in the form of latent heat, from a sub-ice-shell sea of liquid water, with vapor condensing on the near-surface walls of the fractures. Normal stresses modulate the geysering activity, as shown in the accompanying paper; we demonstrate here they are capable of opening water-filled cracks all the way down to the sea. If Enceladus' eccentricity and heat production are in steady state today, the currently erupting material and anomalous heat must have been produced in an earlier epoch. If regional tidal heating is occurring today, it may be responsible for some of the erupting water and heat. Future Cassini observations may settle the question.

  16. `Surface-Layer' momentum fluxes in nocturnal slope flows over steep terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Pardyjak, E.; Higgins, C. W.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    A common working definition for the `surface layer' is the lowest 10% of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) where the turbulent fluxes are essentially constant. The latter part of this definition is a critical assumption that must hold for accurate flux estimations from land-surface models, wall models, similarity theory, flux-gradient relations and bulk transfer methods. We present cases from observed momentum fluxes in nocturnal slope flows over steep (35.5 degree), alpine terrain in Val Ferret, Switzerland that satisfy the classical definitions of the surface layer and other cases where no traditional surface layer is observed. These cases broadly fall into two distinct flow regimes occurring under clear-sky conditions: (1) buoyancy-driven, `katabatic flow', characterized by an elevated velocity maximum (katabatic jet peak) and (2) `downslope winds', for which larger-scale forcing prevents formation of a katabatic jet. Velocity profiles in downslope wind cases are quite similar to logarithmic profiles typically observed over horizontal and homogeneous terrain, and the corresponding momentum fluxes roughly resemble a constant-flux surface-layer. Contrastingly, velocity profiles in the katabatic regime exhibit a jet-like shape. This jet strongly modulates the corresponding momentum fluxes, which exhibit strong gradients over the shallow katabatic layer and usually change sign near the jet peak, where the velocity gradients also change sign. However, a counter-gradient momentum flux is frequently observed near the jet peak (and sometimes at higher levels), suggesting strong non-local turbulent transport within the katabatic jet layer. We compare our observations with katabatic flow theories and observational studies over shallow-angle slopes and use co-spectral analyses to better identify and understand the non-local transport dynamics. Finally, we show that because of the counter-gradient momentum fluxes, surface layer stability and even local stability can be

  17. Gravitational spreading, bookshelf faulting, and tectonic evolution of the South Polar Terrain of Saturn's moon Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, An; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2015-11-01

    Despite a decade of intense research the mechanical origin of the tiger-stripe fractures (TSF) and their geologic relationship to the hosting South Polar Terrain (SPT) of Enceladus remain poorly understood. Here we show via systematic photo-geological mapping that the semi-squared SPT is bounded by right-slip, left-slip, extensional, and contractional zones on its four edges. Discrete deformation along the edges in turn accommodates translation of the SPT as a single sheet with its transport direction parallel to the regional topographic gradient. This parallel relationship implies that the gradient of gravitational potential energy drove the SPT motion. In map view, internal deformation of the SPT is expressed by distributed right-slip shear parallel to the SPT transport direction. The broad right-slip shear across the whole SPT was facilitated by left-slip bookshelf faulting along the parallel TSF. We suggest that the flow-like tectonics, to the first approximation across the SPT on Enceladus, is best explained by the occurrence of a transient thermal event, which allowed the release of gravitational potential energy via lateral viscous flow within the thermally weakened ice shell.

  18. Ultra-thin, single-layer polarization rotator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Son

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate light polarization control over a broad spectral range by a uniform layer of vanadium dioxide as it undergoes a phase transition from insulator to metal. Changes in refractive indices create unequal phase shifts on s- and p-polarization components of incident light, and rotation of linear polarization shows intensity modulation by a factor of 103 when transmitted through polarizers. This makes possible polarization rotation devices as thin as 50 nm that would be activated thermally, optically or electrically.

  19. Layered magnets: polarized neutron reflection studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel, H.; Schreyer, A. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik/Festkoerperphysik, Bochum (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectivity measurements from extended surfaces, thin films and superlattices provide information on the chemical profile parallel to the film normal, including film thicknesses, average composition and interfacial roughness parameters. Reflectivity measurements with polarized neutrons are particularly powerful for analyzing the magnetic density profiles in thin films and superlattices in addition to chemical profiles. The basic theory of polarized neutron reflectivity is provided, followed by some examples and more recent applications concerning polarized neutron reflectivity studies from exchange coupled Fe/Cr superlattices. (author) 5 figs., 13 refs.

  20. Hydrogeologic and hydraulic characterization of aquifer and nonaquifer layers in a lateritic terrain (West Bengal, India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Sabinaya; Jha, Madan K.; Sharma, Shashi P.

    2018-02-01

    The hydrogeologic and hydraulic characteristics of a lateritic terrain in West Bengal, India, were investigated. Test drilling was conducted at ten sites and grain-size distribution curves (GSDCs) were prepared for 275 geologic samples. Performance evaluation of eight grain-size-analysis (GSA) methods was carried out to estimate the hydraulic conductivity (K) of subsurface formations. Finally, the GSA results were validated against pumping-test data. The GSDCs indicated that shallow aquifer layers are coarser than the deeper aquifer layers (uniformity coefficient 0.19-11.4). Stratigraphy analysis revealed that both shallow and deep aquifers of varying thickness exist at depths 9-40 and 40-79 m, respectively. The mean K estimates by the GSA methods are 3.62-292.86 m/day for shallow aquifer layers and 0.97-209.93 m/day for the deeper aquifer layers, suggesting significant aquifer heterogeneity. Pumping-test data indicated that the deeper aquifers are leaky confined with transmissivity 122.69-693.79 m2/day, storage coefficient 1.01 × 10-7-2.13 × 10-4 and leakance 2.01 × 10-7-34.56 × 10-2 day-1. Although the K values yielded by the GSA methods are generally larger than those obtained from the pumping tests, the Slichter, Harleman and US Bureau Reclamation (USBR) GSA methods yielded reasonable values at most of the sites (1-3 times higher than K estimates by the pumping-test method). In conclusion, more reliable aquifers exist at deeper depths that can be tapped for dependable water supply. GSA methods such as Slichter, Harleman and USBR can be used for the preliminary assessment of K in lateritic terrains in the absence of reliable field methods.

  1. Parsing polarization squeezing into Fock layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Christian R.; Madsen, Lars Skovgaard; Klimov, Andrei B.

    2016-01-01

    photon number do the methods coincide; when the photon number is indefinite, we parse the state in Fock layers, finding that substantially higher squeezing can be observed in some of the single layers. By capitalizing on the properties of the Husimi Q function, we map this notion onto the Poincare space......, providing a full account of the measured squeezing....

  2. Global tectonic of Enceladus driven by subsidence of South Polar Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is the smallest celestial body in the Solar System where volcanic and tectonic activities are observed. Every second, the mass of ~200 kg is ejected into space from the South Polar Terrain (SPT) - [1]. Our hypothesis states that this mass loss is the main driving mechanism of the tectonic processes. The hypothesis is presented in [2] and [3]. We find that the loss of the volatiles results in a void, an instability, and motion of solid matter to fill the void. The motion includes: (i) Subsidence of the 'lithosphere' of SPT. (ii) Flow of the matter in the mantle. (iii) Motion of plates adjacent to SPT towards the active region. The numerical model of the subsidence process is developed. It is based on the model of thermal convection in the mantle. Special boundary conditions are applied that could simulate subsidence of SPT. If emerging void is being filled by the subsidence of SPT only, then the velocity of subsidence is ~0.05 mm per yr. However, numerical calculations indicate that all three types of motion are usually important. The role of a given motion depends on the viscosity distribution. Generally, for most of the models the subsidence is ~0.02 mm per yr, but mantle flow and plates' motion also play a role in filling the void. The preliminary results of the numerical model indicate also that the velocity of adjacent plates could be ~0.02 mm per yr for the Newtonian rheology. The SPT is not compressed, so "tiger stripes" could exist for long time. Only after significant subsidence the regime of stresses changes to compression. It means the end of activity in a given region. The future region of activity is suggested. Acknowledgments This work was partially supported by the National Science Centre (grant 2011/01/B/ST10/06653). Computer resources of Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modeling of University of Warsaw were also used in the research References [1] Spencer, J. R., et al. (2009) Enceladus: An Active Cryovolcanic

  3. CryoSat-2 swath interferometric altimetry for mapping polar land ice terrain and elevation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourmelen, N.; Escorihuela, M. J.; Foresta, L.; Shepherd, A.; Muir, A.; Hogg, A. E.; Roca, M.; Nagler, T.; Baker, S.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Reference and repeat-observations of Glacier and Ice Sheet Margin (GISM) topography are critical to identify changes in ice thickness, provide estimates of mass gain or loss and thus quantify the contribution of the cryosphere to sea level change. The lack of such sustained observations was identified in the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS) Cryosphere Theme Report as a major shortcoming. Conventional altimetry measurements over GISMs exist, but coverage has been sparse and characterized by coarse ground resolution. Additionally, and more importantly, they proved ineffective in the presence of steep slopes, a typical feature of GISM areas. Since the majority of Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet mass loss is estimated to lie within 100 km from the coast, but only about 10% is surveyed, there is the need for more robust and dense observations of GISMs, in both time and space. The ESA Altimetry mission CryoSat aims at gaining better insight into the evolution of the Cryosphere. CryoSat's revolutionary design features a Synthetic Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL), with two antennas for interferometry. The corresponding SAR Interferometer (SARIn) mode of operation increases spatial resolution while resolving the angular origin of off-nadir echoes occurring over sloping terrain. The SARIn mode is activated over GISMs and the elevation for the Point Of Closest Approach (POCA) is a standard product of the CryoSat mission. Here we present, through a wide range of examples in Polar settings, a new approach for more comprehensively exploiting the SARIn mode of CryoSat and produce ice elevation and elevation change with enhanced spatial resolution compared to standard CryoSat elevation products. In this so-called CryoSat Swath SARIn (CSSARIn) approach, the signal beyond the POCA is analysed, leading to between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude more elevation measurements than conventional approaches, and providing elevation where conventional POCA fails. We will

  4. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-25

    High resolution numerical simulation can provide insight into important physical processes that occur within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The present work employs large eddy simulation (LES) using the Weather Forecasting and Research (WRF) model, with the LES domain nested within mesoscale simulation, to simulate real conditions in the convective PBL over an area of complex terrain. A multiple nesting approach has been used to downsize the grid spacing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). A careful selection of grid spacing in the WRF Meso domain has been conducted to minimize artifacts in the WRF-LES solutions. The WRF-LES results have been evaluated with in situ and remote sensing observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia BasinWind Energy Study (CBWES). Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function (PDF) of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and data. Furthermore, the WRF-LES variables show a great deal of variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. The WRF-LES results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day. In addition to basic studies related to boundary-layer meteorology, results from these simulations can be used in other applications, such as studying wind energy resources, atmospheric dispersion, fire weather etc.

  5. Turbulent transport and production/destruction of ozone in a boundary layer over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhut, Gary K.; Jochum, Anne M.; Neininger, Bruno

    1994-01-01

    The first Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Swiss air pollution experiment POLLUMET took place in 1990 in the Aare River Valley between Bern and Zurich. During the IOP, fast response measurements of meteorological variables and ozone concentration were made within the boundary layer aboard a motorglider. In addition, mean values of meteorological variables and the concentrations of ozone and other trace species were measured using other aircraft, pilot balloons, tethersondes, and ground stations. Turbulent flux profiles of latent and sensible heat and ozone are calculated from the fast response data. Terms in the ozone mean concentration budget (time rate of change of mean concentration, horizontal advection, and flux divergence) are calculated for stationary time periods both before and after the passage of a cold front. The source/sink term is calculated as a residual in the budget, and its sign and magnitude are related to the measured concentrations of reactive trace species within the boundary layer. Relationships between concentration ratios of trace species and ozone concentration are determined in order to understand the influence of complex terrain on the processes that produce and destroy ozone.

  6. Subsidence of the South Polar Terrain and global tectonic of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: Enceladus is the smallest celestial body in the Solar System where volcanic and tectonic activities are observed. Every second, the mass of ˜200 kg is ejected into space from the South Polar Terrain (SPT) - [1]. The loss of matter from the body's interior should lead to global compression of the crust (like on Mercury). Typical effects of compression are: thrust faults, folding and subduction. However, such forms are not dominant on Enceladus. We propose here special dynamical process that could explain this paradox. Our hypothesis states that the mass loss from SPT is the main driving mechanism of the following tectonic processes: subsidence of SPT, flow in the mantle and motion of adjacent tectonic plates. The hypothesis is presented in [2] and [3]. We suggest that the loss of the volatiles results in a void, an instability, and motion of solid matter to fill the void. The motion includes: Subsidence of the 'lithosphere' of SPT. Flow of the matter in the mantle. Motion of plates adjacent to SPT towards the active region. Methods and results: The numerical model of the subsidence process is developed. It is based on the model of thermal convection in the mantle. Special boundary conditions are applied, that could simulate subsidence of SPT. If emerging void is being filled by the subsidence of SPT only, then the velocity of subsidence is ˜0.05 mmṡyr-1. However, numerical calculations indicate that all three types of motion are usually important. The role of a given motion depends on the viscosity distribution. Generally, for most of the models the subsidence is ˜0.02 mmṡyr-1, but mantle flow and plates' motion also play a role in filling the void. The preliminary results of the numerical model indicate also that the velocity of adjacent plates could be ˜0.02 mmṡyr-1 for the Newtonian rheology. Note that in our model the reduction of the crust area is not a result of compression but it is a result of the plate sinking. Therefore the

  7. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2017-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  8. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, K A [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-05-12

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  9. Immersed boundary methods for high-resolution simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Katherine Ann

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  10. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM.

  11. Electrically Rotatable Polarizer Using One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Nematic Liquid Crystal Defect Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryotaro Ozaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarization characteristics of defect mode peaks in a one-dimensional (1D photonic crystal (PC with a nematic liquid crystal (NLC defect layer have been investigated. Two different polarized defect modes are observed in a stop band. One group of defect modes is polarized along the long molecular axis of the NLC, whereas another group is polarized along its short axis. Polarizations of the defect modes can be tuned by field-induced in-plane reorientation of the NLC in the defect layer. The polarization properties of the 1D PC with the NLC defect layer is also investigated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation.

  12. Turbulent Characterization of atmospheric surface layer over non-homogeneous terrain; Caracterizacion turbulenta de la capa superficial atmosferica en un terreno no homogeneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artinano Rodriguez de Torres, B.

    1989-07-01

    About 15000 wind and temperature profiles from a 100 m tower located in CEDER (Soria, Spain) have been analyzed. Using profiles in close neutral conditions, two main parameters of surface layer were obtained. Results show a great dependence of these parameters (Z{sub 0} roughness length and u friction velocity) on flow conditions and terrain (tinctures. Difficulty finding neutral conditions in this type of terrain (gently rolling and scattered bush) and in this latitude , is also remarkable. (Author) 91 refs.

  13. Characteristics of the turbulence in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J.; Zhang, L.; Yuan, G.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate determination of surface turbulent fluxes in a stable boundary layer is of great practical importance in weather prediction and climate simulations, as well as applications related to air pollution. To gain an insight into the characteristics of turbulence in a stable boundary layer over the complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, we analyzed the data from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). We proposed a method to identify and efficiently isolate nonstationary motions from turbulence series, and examined the characteristics of nonstationary motions (nonstationary motions refer to gusty events on a greater scale than local shear-generated turbulence). The occurrence frequency of nonstationary motions was found to depend on the mean flow, being more frequent in weak wind conditions and vanishing when the wind speed, U, was greater than 3.0 m s-1. When U exceeded the threshold value of 1.0 m s-1 for the gradient Richardson number Ri ≤ 0.3 and 1.5 m s-1 for Ri > 0.3, local shear-generated turbulence depended systematically on U with an average rate of 0.05 U. However, for the weak wind condition, neither the mean wind speed nor the stability was an important factor for local turbulence. Under the weak wind stable condition, affected by topography-induced nonstationary motions, the local turbulence was anisotropic with a strong horizontal fluctuation and a weak vertical fluctuation, resulting in weakened heat mixing in the vertical direction and stronger un-closure of energy. These findings accessed the validity of similarity theory in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain, and revealed one reason for the stronger un-closure of energy in the night.

  14. Layer specific geostatistical coregionalisation of soil organic carbon utilising terrain attributes and spatial patterns of soil redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugoß, V.; Fiener, P.; Schneider, K.

    2009-04-01

    High-resolution soil organic carbon (SOC) maps are a major prerequisite for many environmental studies dealing with carbon stocks and fluxes as well as for biogeochemical modelling. Hence, the development of time and cost effective mapping methods is an important issue. In most cases these maps are interpolated based on measured point SOC data with different horizontal resolution, whereas additional secondary (terrain) information is often utilised. In this study the potential of external drift kriging (EDK) to improve the soil layer specific (I: 0-0.25 m, II: 0.25-0.5 m and III: 0.5-0.9 m) interpolation of SOC concentrations in a hilly 4.2 ha agriculturally used catchment was tested using three different input data densities (6, 16.9, and 37.9 soil samples/ha). A number of covariables were used in EDK with a special focus on those representing processes of soil moisture distribution and soil redistribution. The later was, among others, represented by the results of a relatively simple and robust water and tillage erosion model (WaTEM/SEDEM). With the EDK method a significant improvement of the precision of SOC maps derived from different input data densities was observed particularly for deeper soil layers. While in the plough layer only slight improvements could be found, covariables representing soil moisture distribution and especially soil redistribution substantially improved predictions in the two subsoil layers. A maximum relative improvement of 15.5% was found for soil layer III (16.9 soil samples/ha; Root Mean Square Error 0.153% kg kg-1). Comparing EDK results of medium and low resolution SOC input data (16.9 and 6 samples/ha) with OK results of high resolution inputs (37.9 samples/ha) shows a similar or even improved precision for soil layers I and III, while the reduction of input data density could not be fully compensated utilising covariables in soil layer II. In general, the results indicate the potential of EDK to improve SOC maps and to reduce

  15. Towards a climatology of orographic induced wave drag in the stable boundary layer over real terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.A.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Nappo, C.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) is of particular interest for numerous environmental issues as air quality, aviation, fog forecasting, wind energy engineering, and climate modelling. Unfortunately the current understanding of the SBL is still rather poor, and progress is slow. The relatively poor

  16. On the extension of the wind profile over homogeneous terrain beyond the surface boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Brümmer, B.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of profiles of meteorological measurements from a 160 m high mast at the National Test Site for wind turbines at H phi vs phi re (Denmark) and at a 250 m high TV tower at Hamburg (Germany) shows that the wind profile based on surface-layer theory and Monin-Obukhov scaling is valid up to ...

  17. Polarization-angle dependence of photoluminescence intensity of ordered GaInP{sub 2} layers: observation of polarization memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Brito-Orta, R. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Puebla (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2008-09-15

    We compare measured and calculated polarization-angle dependencies of the intensity of the photoluminescence emission from MOVPE-grown GaInP{sub 2} layers with different ordering parameters. We measured the polarization-angle dependencies of the emission propagating along the [001],[110] and [1 anti 10] directions at room temperature. Symmetry considerations were used to calculate the dependence of the relative intensity of the PL emission which was linearly polarized along different directions and to estimate the value of the valence-band splitting by fitting the measured dependencies with calculated curves. An intriguing influence of the polarization of the exciting beam on the relative amount of the polarized PL emission was observed in the emission from the (110) plane. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Consideration of R2Fe14B layers as targets with polarized electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogduin, JM; van Klinken, J

    Thin layers of R2Fe14B magnets (R = rare earth) can be magnetized perpendicularly to their planes and can be used as targets of polarized electrons with polarization of approximate to 4% to facilitate Moller/Bhabha and Compton polarimetry of electrons/positrons and photons, respectively. (C) 1998

  19. Depth enhancement of multi-layer light field display using polarization dependent internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Na-Young; Lim, Hong-Gi; Lee, Sung-Keun; Kim, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2013-12-02

    A technique to enhance the depth range of the multi-layer light field three-dimensional display is proposed. A set of the optical plates are stacked in front of the conventional multi-layer light field display, creating additional internal reflection for one polarization state. By switching between two orthogonal polarization states in synchronization with the displayed three-dimensional images, the depth range of the display can be doubled. The proposed method is verified experimentally, confirming its feasibility.

  20. TEM studies of GaN layers grown in non-polar direction: Laterally overgrown and pendeo-epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2008-08-01

    The formation of structural defects in GaN grown in non-polar directions is reviewed based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Stacking faults (SFs) formed on c-planes and also on prismatic planes bounded by partial dislocations, in addition to full dislocations, are major defects in these layers. Since c-planes are arranged perpendicular to the substrate, these defects propagate to the sample surface through the active areas of the devices and become detrimental for device applications. An established method to decrease the defect density is lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) and pendeo-epitaxy. The measured density of SFs in the seed areas is ˜1.3×10 6 cm -1and in the 'wing' areas ˜1.2×10 4 cm -1; a decrease of almost of two orders of magnitude. For overgrown samples, two opposite wings grow in opposite polar directions: [0 0 0 1] (Ga-growth polarity) and [0 0 0 1] (N-growth polarity) confirmed by convergent beam electron diffraction. Ga-polar wings are wider and often have different height than those grown with N-polarity, therefore planarity of these layers and cracking at the meeting front of two wings often occur. It is shown that two-step growth using MOCVD leads to satisfactory layer planarity.

  1. Extrapolating active layer thickness measurements across Arctic polygonal terrain using LiDAR and NDVI data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Rowland, Joel C; Hubbard, Susan S; Brumby, Steven P; Liljedahl, Anna K; Wainwright, Haruko; Wilson, Cathy J; Altmann, Garrett L; Dafflon, Baptiste; Peterson, John; Ulrich, Craig; Tweedie, Craig E; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2014-08-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with microtopography, such as active layer thickness ( ALT ), are labor intensive and difficult to document effectively through in situ methods at kilometer spatial extents, thus rendering remotely sensed methods desirable. Spatially explicit estimates of ALT can provide critically needed data for parameterization, initialization, and evaluation of Arctic terrestrial models. In this work, we demonstrate a new approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating centimeter-scale ALT in a 5 km 2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We use a simple regression-based, machine learning data-fusion algorithm that uses topographic and spectral metrics derived from multisensor data (LiDAR and WorldView-2) to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. Comparison of the ALT estimates with ground-based measurements, indicates the accuracy (r 2  = 0.76, RMSE ±4.4 cm) of the approach. While it is generally accepted that broad climatic variability associated with increasing air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT , consistent with prior studies, our findings using high-resolution LiDAR and WorldView-2 data, show that smaller-scale variability in ALT is controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic factors. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping ALT at high spatial resolution and across sufficiently large regions for improved understanding and predictions of coupled dynamics among permafrost, hydrology, and land-surface processes from readily available remote sensing data.

  2. Extrapolating active layer thickness measurements across Arctic polygonal terrain using LiDAR and NDVI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Rowland, Joel C; Hubbard, Susan S; Brumby, Steven P; Liljedahl, Anna K; Wainwright, Haruko; Wilson, Cathy J; Altmann, Garrett L; Dafflon, Baptiste; Peterson, John; Ulrich, Craig; Tweedie, Craig E; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2014-01-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with microtopography, such as active layer thickness (ALT), are labor intensive and difficult to document effectively through in situ methods at kilometer spatial extents, thus rendering remotely sensed methods desirable. Spatially explicit estimates of ALT can provide critically needed data for parameterization, initialization, and evaluation of Arctic terrestrial models. In this work, we demonstrate a new approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating centimeter-scale ALT in a 5 km2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We use a simple regression-based, machine learning data-fusion algorithm that uses topographic and spectral metrics derived from multisensor data (LiDAR and WorldView-2) to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. Comparison of the ALT estimates with ground-based measurements, indicates the accuracy (r2 = 0.76, RMSE ±4.4 cm) of the approach. While it is generally accepted that broad climatic variability associated with increasing air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT, consistent with prior studies, our findings using high-resolution LiDAR and WorldView-2 data, show that smaller-scale variability in ALT is controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic factors. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping ALT at high spatial resolution and across sufficiently large regions for improved understanding and predictions of coupled dynamics among permafrost, hydrology, and land-surface processes from readily available remote sensing data. PMID:25558114

  3. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals for linearly-polarized thermal emission and thermophotovoltaic device including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P.

    2016-07-26

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 .mu.m, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 .mu.m. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization.

  4. Flexo- and piezo-electric polarization of smectic layers in ferroelectric and antiferroelectric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczyński, W.; Hoffmann, J.; Dardas, D.; Nowicka, K.; Bielejewska, N.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report on how flexoelectric and piezoelectric polarization components can be determined by a method based on simultaneous studies of dielectric and electrooptic properties of the chiral smectic liquid crystal in the regime of weak electric fields. As a rule, the measurements of spontaneous polarization are performed using switching experiments. The polarization measured in this way is not complete—it contains the piezoelectric component only. However, the knowledge of the entire local polarization of a single smectic layer is of great importance—it is necessary for correct determination of some material parameters, for instance elastic constants. Our experiments performed in a helical smectic mixture demonstrated that flexoelectric contribution to the local spontaneous polarization is significant in both ferroelectric and antiferroelectric phases. In the antiferroelectric phase, the flexoelectric polarization is less due to higher helical pitch.

  5. Layered and Laterally Constrained 2D Inversion of Time Domain Induced Polarization Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Ramm, James; Auken, Esben

    transform of a complex resistivity forward response and the inversion extracts the spectral information of the time domain measures in terms of the Cole-Cole parameters. The developed forward code and inversion algorithm use the full time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate...... algorithm retrieves consistent values for both the Cole-Cole parameters and the layer thicknesses and is a promising tool for identifying formation boundaries, e.g. in for discriminating sand and clay layers or pollution fans, due to the chargeability of these layers.......In a sedimentary environment, quasi-layered models often represent the actual geology more accurately than smooth minimum-structure models. We have developed a new layered and laterally constrained inversion algorithm for time domain induced polarization data. The algorithm is based on the time...

  6. Broadband infrared reflective surfaces using doped and stacked polar dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janipour, Mohsen; Sendur, Kursat

    2018-02-01

    Polar dielectrics, such as SiC, are excellent candidates for operation in extreme environments due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. In addition, they can achieve good IR reflection in the Reststrahlen band. However, these materials have relatively narrow spectral bandwidth for reflection, especially considering that the broadband illumination sources in extreme environments. In this study, we investigated the broadband reflection properties of polar dielectrics by engineering the Reststrahlen band through doping and stacked layers. Our results indicate that by doping polar dielectrics, spectral reflection bandwidth can be significantly broadened. In addition, we demonstrate that by stacking different polar dielectric layers, the reflection spectrum of different materials can be overlapped, and thereby, significantly broader spectrum is obtained.

  7. Mapping polar bear maternal denning habitat in the National Petroleum Reserve -- Alaska with an IfSAR digital terrain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, George M.; Simac, Kristin S.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska (NPR-A) in northeastern Alaska provides winter maternal denning habitat for polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and also has high potential for recoverable hydrocarbons. Denning polar bears exposed to human activities may abandon their dens before their young are able to survive the severity of Arctic winter weather. To ensure that wintertime petroleum activities do not threaten polar bears, managers need to know the distribution of landscape features in which maternal dens are likely to occur. Here, we present a map of potential denning habitat within the NPR-A. We used a fine-grain digital elevation model derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR) to generate a map of putative denning habitat. We then tested the map’s ability to identify polar bear denning habitat on the landscape. Our final map correctly identified 82% of denning habitat estimated to be within the NPR-A. Mapped denning habitat comprised 19.7 km2 (0.1% of the study area) and was widely dispersed. Though mapping denning habitat with IfSAR data was as effective as mapping with the photogrammetric methods used for other regions of the Alaskan Arctic coastal plain, the use of GIS to analyze IfSAR data allowed greater objectivity and flexibility with less manual labor. Analytical advantages and performance equivalent to that of manual cartographic methods suggest that the use of IfSAR data to identify polar bear maternal denning habitat is a better management tool in the NPR-A and wherever such data may be available.

  8. Valley polarization in magnetically doped single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate that valley polarization can be induced and controlled in semiconducting single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides by magnetic doping, which is important for spintronics, valleytronics, and photonics devices. As an example, we investigate Mn-doped MoS2 by first-principles calculations. We study how the valley polarization depends on the strength of the spin orbit coupling and the exchange interaction and discuss how it can be controlled by magnetic doping. Valley polarization by magnetic doping is also expected for other honeycomb materials with strong spin orbit coupling and the absence of inversion symmetry.

  9. Internal stratigraphy of the South Polar Layered Deposits, Mars from SHARAD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, J. L.; Campbell, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    The South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLD) are one of the largest deposits of water ice on Mars, composed of alternating layers of ice and dust. The accumulation of the layers is driven by orbital forcings (e.g., obliquity) and both the cadence and structure of these layers preserve a record of the past martian climate. Image of very limited exposed layering suggest several distinct sequences, demarcated by erosional hiatuses, with a gently domical shape. Here we use the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) sounder dataset to investigate the internal stratigraphy of the SPLD in order to further constrain the south polar climate record. We identify four distinct units based in part on their degree of vertical sharpness (focus) in the SHARAD data: (1) upper focused layer packets, (2) focused layer packets, (3) blurred layer packets, and (4) reflection free zones (RFZs). A diffuse echo pattern related to uncertain aspects of composition or layer roughness is termed fog. The upper focused layer packets are concentrated in the area between 270° to 90°E, close to the residual polar cap. The focused and blurred layer packets cover a large portion of the SPLD and are subdivided into two different units, those with an average reflecting-interface brightness and those with substantially brighter reflectors. The brighter radar reflectors have a coherent spatial distribution and only comprise a small portion of the entire unit. The diffuse echoes are separated into a fog that is present throughout the entire vertical column of the SPLD and a fog that begins at the surface and traverses only the uppermost layers. Depending on the geometry of individual SHARAD tracks, reflectors can be traced for hundreds of kilometers, but the fog obscures much of the internal layering, and is related to the focusing distortion that prevents individual reflectors from being traced across the entire SPLD. We identify a major deviation from a gently domical SPLD shape in a 200 km dome. Its presence suggests

  10. The polar layered deposits on Mars: Inference from thermal inertia modeling and geologic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    It is widely believed that the Martian polar layered deposits record climate variations over at least the last 10 to 100 m.y., but the details of the processes involved and their relative roles in layer formation and evolution remain obscure. Weathering of the Martian layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the thermal inertias, water vapor abundances, and geologic relationships observed in the Martian polar regions. The nonvolatile components of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particles upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. This scenario for the origin and evolution of the dark material within the polar layered deposits is consistent with the available imaging and thermal data. Further experimental measurements of the thermophysical properties of magnetite and maghemite under Martian conditions are needed to better test this hypothesis.

  11. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  12. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  13. Hall effect on MHD flow of visco-elastic micro-polar fluid layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MHD flow of visco-elastic (Rivlin-Ericksen type) micro-polar fluid layer heated from below on porous medium and the nature of the components like medium permeability, heat ...... porous medium over a stretching sheet with chemical reaction,” Journal of Applied Mathematics, Vol. 1, pp. 446-455. Sen G., 1978 International ...

  14. How many molecular layers of polar solvent molecules control chemistry? The concept of compensating dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhals, Heinz; Braun, Patricia; Dietl, Christian; Mayer, Peter

    2013-09-27

    The extension of the solvent influence of the shell into the volume of a polar medium was examined by means of anti-collinear dipoles on the basis of the E(T)(30) solvent polarity scale (i.e., the molar energy of excitation of a pyridinium-N-phenolatebetaine dye; generally: E(T) =28,591 nm kcal mol(-1)/λmax) where no compensation effects were found. As a consequence, solvent polarity effects are concentrated to a very thin layer of a few thousand picometres around the solute where extensions into the bulk solvent become unimportant. A parallelism to the thin surface layer of water to the gas phase is discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A snapshot of the polar ionosphere. [satellite observation of F layer and topside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitteker, J. H.; Brace, L. H.; Maier, E. J.; Burrows, J. R.; Dodson, W. H.; Winningham, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a picture of the north polar F layer and topside ionosphere obtained primarily from three satellites (Alouette 2, ISIS 1, ISIS 2) that passed over the region within a time interval of about 50 min on a magnetically quiet day. The horizontal distribution of electron densities at the peak of the F layer is found to be similar to synoptic results from the IGY. Energetic-particle and ionospheric-plasma data are also presented, and the F-layer data are discussed in terms of these measurements as well as in terms of electric-field and neutral N2 density measurements made by other satellites on other occasions. The major feature observed is a tongue of F-region ionization extending from the dayside across the polar cap, which is accounted for by antisunward drift due to magnetospheric convection. In the F layer and topside ionosphere, the main effect of auroral precipitation appears to be heating and expansion of the topside. A region of low F-layer density appears on the morning side of the polar cap, which may be due to convection and possibly also to enhanced N2 densities.

  16. Pellet fusion gain calculations modified by electrostatic double layers and by spin polarized nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, H.; Cicchitelli, L.; Elijah, J.S.; Ghatak, A.K.; Goldsworthy, M.T.; Lalousis, P.; Eliezer, S.

    1984-01-01

    All preceding hydrodynamic computations of plasmas are wrong if the thermal conductivity is essential because electronic thermal conductivity is decreased in plasma inhomogeneities due to electrostatic double layers. In the worst case, ionic conductivity remains. We compare this with a possible electronic conductivity by the fast tail of the energy distribution. Using the volume ignition for fusion gain computations, we study the increase of gain by spin-polarization of nuclei for the DT reaction especially in non-linear ranges. Gain can increase by a factor 3.1. Contents are the following: electrostatic fields and double layers in inhomogeneous plasma, change of thermal conduction by double layers, consequences for pellet fusion, gain calculation with spin polarized nuclei. (Mori, K.)

  17. Transport-driven formation of a polar ozone layer on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmessin, Franck; Lefèvre, Franck

    2013-11-01

    Since the seasonal and spatial distribution of ozone on Mars was detected by the ultraviolet spectrometer onboard the spacecraft Mariner 7, our understanding has evolved considerably thanks to parallel efforts in observations and modelling. At low-to-mid latitudes, martian ozone is distributed vertically in two main layers, a near-surface layer and a layer at an altitude between 30 and 60km (ref. ). Here we report evidence from the SPICAM UV spectrometer onboard the Mars Express orbiter for the existence of a previously overlooked ozone layer that emerges in the southern polar night at 40-60km in altitude, with no counterpart observed at the north pole. Comparisons with global climate simulations for Mars indicate that this layer forms as a result of the large-scale transport of oxygen-rich air from sunlit latitudes to the poles, where the oxygen atoms recombine to form ozone during the polar night. However, transport-driven ozone formation is counteracted in our simulations by the destruction of ozone by reactions with hydrogen radicals, whose concentrations vary seasonally on Mars, reflecting seasonal variations of water vapour. We conclude that the observed dichotomy between the ozone layers of the two poles, with a significantly richer layer in the southern hemisphere, can be explained by the interplay of these mechanisms.

  18. A Mesoscale Model-Based Climatography of Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Characteristics over the Complex Terrain of North-Western Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Stefano; De Wekker, Stephan F J; Knievel, Jason C

    Nocturnal boundary-layer phenomena in regions of complex topography are extremely diverse and respond to a multiplicity of forcing factors, acting primarily at the mesoscale and microscale. The interaction between different physical processes, e.g., drainage promoted by near-surface cooling and ambient flow over topography in a statically stable environment, may give rise to special flow patterns, uncommon over flat terrain. Here we present a climatography of boundary-layer flows, based on a 2-year archive of simulations from a high-resolution operational mesoscale weather modelling system, 4DWX. The geographical context is Dugway Proving Ground, in north-western Utah, USA, target area of the field campaigns of the MATERHORN (Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program) project. The comparison between model fields and available observations in 2012-2014 shows that the 4DWX model system provides a realistic representation of wind speed and direction in the area, at least in an average sense. Regions displaying strong spatial gradients in the field variables, thought to be responsible for enhanced nocturnal mixing, are typically located in transition areas from mountain sidewalls to adjacent plains. A key dynamical process in this respect is the separation of dynamically accelerated downslope flows from the surface.

  19. Mechanisms of impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the atmosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the impact of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O on the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular on its expected recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circu-lation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the North to South Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar strato-spheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abun-dance of the greenhouse gases on the long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2, essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weak-ness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification be-gins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard

  20. Electric field Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation in multi-layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chizhu; Tan, Zuojun; Zhang, Shuhui; Chen, Siyu

    2017-10-01

    Electric field Monte Carlo (EMC) simulation is capable of modeling the polarization and coherence phenomena of light. Previous EMC program treat the turbid media as an infinite slab. An electric field Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation in multi-layered media (EMCML) is presented in this paper. The complex electric field vectors are traced during the scattering and the reflection (or refraction) events. In order to improve the computational efficiency, our EMCML program is implemented in parallel in the GPU. The validity of EMCML is demonstrated by comparison between simulation results obtained by EMCML and previously reported programs.

  1. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  2. Double-layer structure in polar mesospheric clouds observed from SOFIE/AIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Double-layer structures in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs are observed by using Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE data between 2007 and 2014. We find 816 and 301 events of double-layer structure with percentages of 10.32 and 7.25 % compared to total PMC events, and the mean distances between two peaks are 3.06 and 2.73 km for the Northern Hemisphere (NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH respectively. Double-layer PMCs almost always have less mean ice water content (IWC than daily IWC during the core of the season, but they are close to each other at the beginning and the end. The result by averaging over all events shows that the particle concentration has obvious double peaks, while the particle radius exhibits an unexpected monotonic increase with decreasing altitude. By further analysis of the background temperature and water vapour residual profiles, we conclude that the lower layer is a reproduced one formed at the bottom of the upper layer. 56.00 and 47.51 % of all double-layer events for the NH and SH respectively have temperature enhancements larger than 2 K locating between their double peaks. The longitudinal anti-correlation between the gravity waves' (GWs' potential energies and occurrence frequencies of double-layer PMCs suggests that the double-layer PMCs tend to form in an environment where the GWs have weaker intensities.

  3. Influence of tides and gravity waves on layering processes in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hoffmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE have been studied at Andenes (69° N, 16° E, Norway, using VHF radar observations since 1994. One remarkable feature of these observations is the fact that {during 50% of the time,} the radar echoes occur in the form of two or more distinct layers. In the case of multiple PMSE layers, statistical analysis shows that the lower layer occurs at a mean height of ~83.4 km, which is almost identical to the mean height of noctilucent clouds (NLC derived from observation with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the same site. To investigate the layering processes microphysical model simulations under the influence of tidal and gravity waves were performed. In the presence of long period gravity waves, these model investigations predict an enhanced formation of multiple PMSE layer structures, where the lower layer is a consequence of the occurrence of the largest particles at the bottom of the ice cloud. This explains the coincidence of the lowermost PMSE layers and NLC. During periods with enhanced amplitudes of the semidiurnal tide, the observed NLC and PMSE show pronounced tidal structures comparable to the results of corresponding microphysical simulations. At periods with short period gravity waves there is a tendency for a decreasing occurrence of NLC and for variable weak PMSE structures.

  4. Study on the layered dusty plasma structures in the summer polar mesopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional hydrodynamic equations are adopted to build a one-dimensional theoretical model to study the effect of gravity wave on layered dusty plasma structures formation and evolution near the polar summer mesospause region associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism gives consideration to the charged ice particle motion by the gravity wave modulation, making a significant contribution to the vertical transport of heavy ice particles and convergence into thin layers. And numerical results show that the pattern of the multi-layer structure depends on the ration of the initial ice particles density distribution to the vertical wavelength of the gravity waves, the ice particle size and the wind velocity caused by gravity wave. Also, the variation of ion density distribution under the influence of gravity wave has also been examined. Finally, the electron density depletions (bite-outs layers has been simulated according to the charge conservation laws, and the results are compared to the ECT02 rocket sounding data, which agree well with the measuring.

  5. Kinetics of polar mesospheric plasma layers: Comparison of theoretical results with observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M. S.; Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.; Dixit, Amrit

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for the physical understanding of the charge distribution on ice dust particles in plasma layers of polar mesospheric clouds PMCs (Noctilucent clouds and polar mesospheric summer echoes). For the case of pure ice dust (with high work function), the charging of the particles occurs only because of the accretion of electronic and ionic species on the surface of ice grains. The analysis is based on the number and energy balance of constituents and allows the charge to be only an integral multiple (positive or negative) of the electronic charge. Amongst other interesting results, the theory explains the observed charge distribution on pure ice particles and corresponding reduction of electron density (viz., Bite out) in the PMCs.

  6. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface. The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain. Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  7. Electrical properties of surface and interface layers of the N- and In-polar undoped and Mg-doped InN layers grown by PA MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarova, T. A.; Kampert, E.; Law, J.; Jmerik, V. N.; Paturi, P.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    Electrical properties of N-polar undoped and Mg-doped InN layers and In-polar undoped InN layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA MBE) were studied. Transport parameters of the surface and interface layers were determined from the measurements of the Hall coefficient and resistivity as well as the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at magnetic fields up to 60 T. Contributions of the 2D surface, 3D near-interface, and 2D interface layers to the total conductivity of the InN films were defined and discussed to be dependent on InN surface polarity, Mg doping, and PA MBE growth conditions.

  8. Spatiotemporal Variability of Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budgets in the Convective Boundary Layer over Both Simple and Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Raj K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Pekour, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Kosovic, Branko [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; Mirocha, Jeffrey D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California; Ennis, Brandon L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    2017-12-01

    The assumption of sub-grid scale (SGS) horizontal homogeneity within a model grid cell, which forms the basis of SGS turbulence closures used by mesoscale models, becomes increasingly tenuous as grid spacing is reduced to a few kilometers or less, such as in many emerging high-resolution applications. Herein, we use the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation to study the spatio-temporal variability in two types of terrain—complex (Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study [CBWES] site, north-eastern Oregon) and flat (ScaledWind Farm Technologies [SWiFT] site, west Texas) using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In each case six-nested domains (three domains each for mesoscale and large-eddy simulation [LES]) are used to downscale the horizontal grid spacing from 10 km to 10 m using the WRF model framework. The model output was used to calculate the values of the TKE budget terms in vertical and horizontal planes as well as the averages of grid cells contained in the four quadrants (a quarter area) of the LES domain. The budget terms calculated along the planes and the mean profile of budget terms show larger spatial variability at CBWES site than at the SWiFT site. The contribution of the horizontal derivative of the shear production term to the total production shear was found to be 45% and 15% of the total shear, at the CBWES and SWiFT sites, respectively, indicating that the horizontal derivatives applied in the budget equation should not be ignored in mesoscale model parameterizations, especially for cases with complex terrain with <10 km scale.

  9. Simulated Diurnal Cycles and Seasonal Variability of Low-Level Jets in the Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain on the Coast of Southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Min; Wang, Qin Geng; Xu, Jianjun

    2017-10-01

    The thermal and dynamical causes of boundary layer low-level jets (LLJs) over the southeast coast of China (a very complex terrain) are explored using a very high resolution diagnostic model California Meteorological (CALMET) along with the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model, combined with observations. Both diurnal and seasonal variations in LLJs are investigated using simulations during two observational periods and four months in 2011. Two configurations, with different vertical and horizontal resolutions, are compared. The results show that the use of higher vertical and horizontal resolutions (including land cover/use) in the diagnostic model CALMET leads to large improvements in simulating boundary layer LLJs over complex terrain as compared with using lower vertical and horizontal resolutions in both WRF-ARW and CALMET models. The simulations using the diagnostic model CALMET better reproduced the observations, in that both LLJ events occur in the night (nocturnal LLJs) and in the afternoon (afternoon LLJs) are noticed. Compared to the nocturnal LLJs, the afternoon LLJs have larger wind speeds and occur at lower heights. The afternoon LLJ characteristics are closely associated with local thermodynamic circulations including the mountain-valley breeze and land-ocean breeze, which are regulated by the thermal contrasts between the ocean and mountains, and diurnal cycle of boundary layer friction. A comprehensive analysis of an afternoon LLJ and nocturnal LLJ indicates that there are large differences in wind field, vertical motions, and water vapor distributions between them. The local thermodynamic circulations also strongly affect vertical motions; even under a relatively stable atmosphere, the vertical motions during LLJs are stronger than the monthly average. Afternoon LLJ events, associated with the southeasterly land-ocean breeze in summer, occur more frequently than in winter; in contrast, nocturnal LLJ events occur in

  10. Bistable states of TM polarized non-linear waves guided by symmetric layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, D.

    1985-04-01

    Dispersion relations for TM polarized non-linear waves propagating in a symmetric single film optical waveguide are derived. The system consists of a layer of thickness d with dielectric constant epsilon 1 bounded at two sides by a non-linear medium characterized by the diagonal dielectric tensor epsilon 11 =epsilon 22 =epsilon 0 , epsilon 33 =epsilon 0 +α|E 3 | 2 , where E 3 is the normal electric field component. For sufficiently large d/lambda (lambda is the wavelength) we predict bistable states of both symmetric and antisymmetric modes provided that the power flow is the control parameter. (author)

  11. Surface and crystal structure of nitridated sapphire substrates and their effect on polar InN layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuridina, D.; Dinh, D.V.; Pristovsek, M.; Lacroix, B.; Chauvat, M.-P.; Ruterana, P.; Kneissl, M.; Vogt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the surface and crystal properties has been performed at clean c-plane sapphire substrates, sapphire layers after nitridation, and subsequently grown InN layers deposited by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. The (1 × 1) surface of clean sapphire reconstructs into a (√(31) × √(31))R ± 9° structure after annealing at 1050 °C, which was performed prior to the nitridation process. The formation of crystalline AlN was observed for nitridation above 800 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy performed on the nitridated layers shows that N-Al chemical bonds dominate this structure, while the number of N-O bonds is negligibly small. Amorphous AlN x O y layers form during nitridation below 800 °C, where N-O bonds dominate. All layers formed by nitridation show defects associated with N bonds. The morphology of the nitridated layers affects the surface and crystal quality of the subsequently grown polar InN layers. N-polar InN layers with a smooth surface and single crystalline structure were grown on the AlN nitridated layers, while In-polar InN layers with a rough surface and a polycrystalline structure were grown on the amorphous nitridated layers.

  12. Plasma and magnetic field characteristics of the distant polar cusp near local noon: The entry layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sckopke, N.; Rosenbauer, H.; Hedgecock, P.C.

    1976-01-01

    Heos 2 plasma and magnetic field measurements in the distant polar cusp region reveal the existence of a plasma layer on day side field lines just inside the magnetopause. Density and temperature in this layer are nearly the same as they are in the adjacent magnetosheath, but the flow lacks the order existing both in the magnetosheath and in the plasma mantle. Flow directions toward and away from the sun but, in general, parallel to the field lines have been found. The magnetopause (as defined by a sudden rotation of the magnetic field vector) mostly coincides with the transition to ordered magnetosheath flow. The inner boundary of the layer is located just within the outer boundary of the hot ring current plasma. In the region of overlap the hot electrons have the signature of trapped particles, though often at reduced intensity. The magnetic field is strongly fluctuating in magnitude, while its orientation is more stable, consistent with a connection to the earth, but is systematically distorted out of the meridian plane. The layer is thought to be a consequence of the entry of magnetosheath plasma, which does not appear to be unobstructed, as has been claimed in the concept of a magnetospheric cleft. The magnetopause has a cusplike indentation which is elongated in local time. The existence of field-aligned currents (total strength approx. =10 6 A) and their location of flow in the inner part of the entry layer (into the ionosphere before noon and out of it after noon) are inferred from the systematic bending of field lines. It is proposed that the dynamo of the related current system is provided by the transfer of perpendicular momentum resulting from the plasma entry into the layer. The essential features of the entry layer might be compatible with the model of plasma flow through the magnetopause of Levy et al. (1964) if a 'dam' effect caused by the cusp geometry were added

  13. A compact fluorescence polarization analyzer with high-transmittance liquid crystal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Osamu; Satou, Ken; Nakamura, Ayano; Sumiyoshi, Ken; Shirokawa, Masanori; Mizokuchi, Chikaaki; Shiota, Kunihiro; Maeki, Masatoshi; Ishida, Akihiko; Tani, Hirofumi; Shigemura, Koji; Hibara, Akihide; Tokeshi, Manabu

    2018-02-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) offers easy operation and rapid processing, making it implementable in molecular interaction analysis. Previously we have developed a unique FP measurement system using a liquid crystal (LC) layer and an image sensor. The system is based on a principle of synchronized detection between the switching rate of the LC layer and the sampling rate of the CCD. The FP system realized simultaneous multiple sample detection; however, the measurement precision was lower than that of the conventional FP apparatus. The main drawbacks were low light transmittance of the LC layer and insufficient synchronization between the LC layer and CCD. In this paper, we developed a new FP analyzer based on LC-CCD synchronization detection. By using a newly designed LC with high transmittance and improving synchronization, the performance of the system has been dramatically improved. Additionally, we reduced the cost by using an inexpensive CCD and an LED as the excitation source. Simultaneous FP immunoassay of multiple samples of prostaglandin E2 was performed. The error rate of the FP system is reduced from 16.9% to 3.9%, as comparable to the commercial conventional FP system.

  14. 3D Modeling of South Polar Layered Deposits on Mars with SHARAD radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, W.; Grima, C.; Mouginot, J.; Herique, A.; Seu, R.; Biccari, D.; Orosei, R.

    2007-08-01

    The SHAllow RADar (SHARAD) is a subsurface sounding instrument aboard the NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft. The routine science observations started in November 2006 has already provided a huge amount of data promising an unprecedented insight into the Martian subsurface. The main SHARAD scientific objectives are to map the underground distribution of water over the planet as well as to seek buried geological structures in order to understand the formation of the superficial Martian landscape. SHARAD is working at a 20 MHz central frequency with a 10 MHz bandwidth. The operating parameters allow a 10 m vertical free space resolution and a penetration depth in the range of 0.1 to 1 km. Horizontally, the cross-track and along-track foot print range are respectively 3-7 km and 0.3-1 km. Assuming a low impurities water ice the depth range of the radar should be 1 km with about 7 m of theoretical vertical resolution. This makes possible to sound the internal polar caps structures like never before. We report some observations made in Planum Australe over a 36.000 km2 area. 24 orbits crossing it have been selected. Each shows clear radar echoes with linear shape reaching the radar later than the surface echo. After comparison with simulations able to highlight any potential clutter signals, they have been interpreted as being polar layers. From this set of data a 3D modeling of the subsurface layering was undertaken. We show the results and discuss the method employed. A comparison between the layers behaviour determined in this study, the MOLA topography and the basal mapping made by MARSIS recently, allows initiating geomorphologic discussions.

  15. Anisotropic hybrid excitation modes in monolayer and double-layer phosphorene on polar substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi-Pouya, S.; Vazifehshenas, T.; Salavati-fard, T.; Farmanbar, M.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the anisotropic hybrid surface optical (SO) phonon-plasmon dispersion relations in monolayer and double-layer phosphorene systems located on the polar substrates, such as SiO2, h -BN, and Al2O3 . We calculate these hybrid modes by using the dynamical dielectric function in the random phase approximation in which the electron-electron interaction and long-range electric field generated by the substrate SO phonons via Fröhlich interaction are taken into account. In the long-wavelength limit, we obtain some analytical expressions for the hybrid SO phonon-plasmon dispersion relations which agree with those obtained from the loss function. Our results indicate a strong anisotropy in SO phonon-plasmon modes, which are stronger along the light-mass direction in our heterostructures. Furthermore, we find that the type of substrate has a significant effect on the dispersion relations of the coupled modes. Importantly, the hybrid excitations are apparently sensitive to the misalignment and separation between layers in double-layer phosphorene.

  16. NWP Forecast Errors of Boundary Layer Flow in Complex Terrain Observed During the Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) Field Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, James M.

    2017-04-01

    The Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) is a U.S. Department of Energy and NOAA-led program whose goal is to improve the accuracy of NWP forecasts of wind speed in complex terrain for wind energy applications. WFIP2 includes a field campaign held in the vicinity of the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S., which began in October 2015, and will continue through March, 2017. As part of WFIP2 a large suite of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation has been deployed, including a network of three 449 MHz radar wind profilers (RWP's) with RASS, eight 915 MHz RWP's with RASS, 18 sodars, 4 profiling microwave radiometers, 5 scanning lidars, 5 profiling lidars, a network of 10 microbarographs, and many surface meteorological stations. Key NWP forecast models utilized for WFIP2 are the 13 km resolution Rapid Refresh (RAP), 3km High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR), 0.75km HRRR-Nest, and the 12 km North American Mesoscale (NAM) forecast system. Preliminary results from WFIP2 will be presented, including seasonal variations of model forecast errors of wind speed, direction, temperature and humidity profiles and boundary layer depths; meteorological phenomena producing large forecast errors; and the relative skill of the various NWP forecasting systems. Diurnal time height cross-sections of the model's mean bias and RMSE are evaluated for each of the models, providing a holistic view of model accuracy at simulating boundary layer structure. Model errors are analyzed as a function of season (3 month averages) and location, and show the impact of increasing model resolution on forecast skill. Seasonal averages of model biases and RMSE provide more robust results than do shorter case study episodes, and can be used to verify that model errors found in shorter case study episodes are in fact representative. The results are used to identify specific model weaknesses and the corresponding parameterization schemes that are in greatest need of

  17. Comparison of indirect methods for the estimation of Boundary Layer height over flat-terrain in a coastal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Contini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an analysis of different indirect methods for the calculation of the boundary layer height (BLH using sodar, ultrasonic anemometer and a prognostic model based on single point surface measurements is presented. In particular the automatic spectral routine developed for Remtech sodar is compared with the results obtained with the parameterization of the vertical velocity variance of a minisodar, with the calculation of a prognostic model, with a parameterization based on horizontal velocity spectra and with the BLH evaluated from the intensity of minisodar echoes in stable conditions. The data of a radiosonde system taken in a nearby site was also analysed to get an independent evaluation of BLH for comparison. There is a significant scatter in the data for both the evaluation through the variance of vertical wind speed and the spectral analysis of the horizontal wind velocity although created by different effects. In unstable conditions the different methods give a similar pattern even if the prognostic model in some days predicts a significantly higher BLH with respect to the other methods. In stable nocturnal conditions the performances of the Remtech routine are worse than those in unstable conditions with an evident overestimation of the BLH that it is likely related to the overestimation of vertical turbulence and to the use of multiple range gates in the algorithm. Taking as reference the evaluation of BLH of the sodar, the spectral method applied to ultrasonic anemometer data seems to be affected by the lowest biases and it is a possible candidate, for the development of automatic routines for operational evaluation of BLH possibly with a different parameterisation for stable and unstable cases.

  18. A revised surface age for the North Polar Layered Deposits of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Margaret E.; Byrne, Shane; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Dundas, Colin M.

    2016-01-01

    The North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) of Mars contain a complex stratigraphy that has been suggested to retain a record of past eccentricity- and obliquity-forced climate changes. The surface accumulation rate in the current climate can be constrained by the crater retention age. We scale NPLD crater diameters to account for icy target strength and compare surface age using a new production function for recent small impacts on Mars to the previously used model of Hartmann (2005). Our results indicate that ice is accumulating in these craters several times faster than previously thought, with a 100 m diameter crater being completely infilled within centuries. Craters appear to have a diameter-dependent lifetime, but the data also permit a complete resurfacing of the NPLD at ~1.5 ka.

  19. Massive CO2 Ice Deposits Sequestered in the South Polar Layered Deposits of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Davis, Brian J.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Byrne, Shane; Mellon, Michael T.; Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Haberle, Robert M.; Kahre, Melinda A.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Carter, Lynn M.; Smith, Isaac B.; Holt, John W.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Nunes, Daniel C.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Egan, Anthony F.; Titus, Timothy N.; Seu, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Shallow Radar soundings from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal a buried deposit of carbon dioxide (CO2) ice within the south polar layered deposits of Mars with a volume of 9500 to 12,500 cubic kilometers, about 30 times that previously estimated for the south pole residual cap. The deposit occurs within a stratigraphic unit that is uniquely marked by collapse features and other evidence of interior CO2 volatile release. If released into the atmosphere at times of high obliquity, the CO2 reservoir would increase the atmospheric mass by up to 80%, leading to more frequent and intense dust storms and to more regions where liquid water could persist without boiling.

  20. Polarized dependence of nonlinear susceptibility in a single layer graphene system in infrared region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solookinejad, G., E-mail: ghsolooki@gmail.com

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of a single-layer graphene nanostructure driven by a weak probe light and an elliptical polarized coupling field is discussed theoretically. The Landau levels of graphene can be separated in infrared or terahertz regions under the strong magnetic field. Therefore, by using the density matrix formalism in quantum optic, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of the medium can be derived. It is demonstrated that by adjusting the elliptical parameter, one can manipulate the linear and nonlinear absorption as well as Kerr nonlinearity of the medium. It is realized that the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be possible with zero linear absorption and nonlinear amplification at some values of elliptical parameter. Our results may be having potential applications in quantum information science based on Nano scales devices.

  1. Polar layered deposits on Mars: Inner structure and relation to the climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, M.; Head, J.

    Martian polar layered deposits (PLD) have long been thought to contain a record of the past climate. Roles of deposition, ablation and flow in PLD are a subject of discussion and controversy. Understanding of these roles is critical for reading the climate record. We show that simple mechanism including latitude-dependent deposition and ablation, albedo feedback and role of slopes explains many essential features of the PLD. We consider the present-day PLD is a result of a history of H2O ice deposition and sublimation during some recent period of the geological history. The deposition - ablation balance is a function of latitude. Typically, net deposition occurs in the polar area inside some boundary latitude of zero balance, and net ablation occurs outside. This dividing latitude shifts back and forth due to climate change caused by (1) the change of the spin/orbit parameters ("astronomical forcing"), (2) availability of the water vapor source at lower latitudes (tropical mountain glaciers, high-latitude icy mantles, the opposite polar cap, groundwater discharge events), (3) internal climate instabilities. The outermost position of the ablation/deposition boundary was well outside the present margins of the PLD; in the opposite extremes, the area of the positive balance disappeared, and the whole polar cap underwent ablation. Through time such oscillations produced a dome-shaped stack of deposits with a possible thin layer of deposits outside the dome and with a number of unconformities inside. These unconformities will have an east-west oriented strike and a very shallow dip. There is a positive feedback between the deposition/ablation balance and albedo: high albedo favors deposition, and fresh deposits have high albedo. With this feedback, when the climate system goes through oscillations, the boundary latitude between positive and negative balance will stay for some periods of time at its outermost and innermost positions. This will result in steps in the

  2. Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Balin, Yurii; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Penner, Iogannes; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2014-10-06

    Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds are observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar. These layers of thickness of several hundred meters are identified by three attributes: the backscatter reveals a sharp ridge while the depolarization ratio and color ratio become deep minima. These attributes have been justified by theoretical calculations of these quantities within the framework of the physical-optics approximation.

  3. Physical Models of Layered Polar Firn Brightness Temperatures from 0.5 to 2 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shurun; Aksoy, Mustafa; Brogioni, Marco; Macelloni, Giovanni; Durand, Michael; Jezek, Kenneth C.; Wang, Tian-Lin; Tsang, Leung; Johnson, Joel T.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We investigate physical effects influencing 0.5-2 GHz brightness temperatures of layered polar firn to support the Ultra Wide Band Software Defined Radiometer (UWBRAD) experiment to be conducted in Greenland and in Antarctica. We find that because ice particle grain sizes are very small compared to the 0.5-2 GHz wavelengths, volume scattering effects are small. Variations in firn density over cm- to m-length scales, however, cause significant effects. Both incoherent and coherent models are used to examine these effects. Incoherent models include a 'cloud model' that neglects any reflections internal to the ice sheet, and the DMRT-ML and MEMLS radiative transfer codes that are publicly available. The coherent model is based on the layered medium implementation of the fluctuation dissipation theorem for thermal microwave radiation from a medium having a nonuniform temperature. Density profiles are modeled using a stochastic approach, and model predictions are averaged over a large number of realizations to take into account an averaging over the radiometer footprint. Density profiles are described by combining a smooth average density profile with a spatially correlated random process to model density fluctuations. It is shown that coherent model results after ensemble averaging depend on the correlation lengths of the vertical density fluctuations. If the correlation length is moderate or long compared with the wavelength (approximately 0.6x longer or greater for Gaussian correlation function without regard for layer thinning due to compaction), coherent and incoherent model results are similar (within approximately 1 K). However, when the correlation length is short compared to the wavelength, coherent model results are significantly different from the incoherent model by several tens of kelvins. For a 10-cm correlation length, the differences are significant between 0.5 and 1.1 GHz, and less for 1.1-2 GHz. Model results are shown to be able to match the v

  4. Interactions between complicated flow-dispersion patterns and boundary layer evolution in a mountainous complex terrain during elevated SO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaios, Vasileios N.; Triantafyllou, Athanassios G.; Garas, Stylianos; Krestou, Athina; Leivaditou, Elena

    2017-08-01

    The dispersion of air pollutants from multiple industrial stacks located in complex topography is an interesting subject. An attractive case is that of the wider region of Western Macedonia in NW Greece, where the greater amount of electric power of Greece is being produced by lignite power plant stations (LPPS). Considerable amounts of atmospheric pollutants are emitted by those LPPS into the atmosphere due to the quantities of coal burned. The variability of the topographic features and the terrain complexity of the area may lead to the formation of local atmospheric circulations of various types, which affect pollutant's transport and dispersion. In the present work, the dispersion conditions that favor the pollutants accumulation in the area are investigated. For this purpose, 1 year's hourly SO2 concentrations, surface wind measurements and a mesoscale meteorological and air pollution model (The Air Pollution Model, TAPM) were used. The SO2 and wind measurements were collected in situ from monitoring stations located nearby and at a greater distance from the power plants. Yearly and daily variations of SO2 concentrations are analyzed and discussed, and the period with the highest concentrations is selected. During this period, the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the area as well as the pollutants dispersion is examined. Statistical measures between modeled and observed meteorological data were in good agreement and a good correlation coefficient 0.68 and 0.98 was found in the SO2 variations. The analysis of the wind fields indicated better ventilation in the center of the area due to topographic venturi effects, while the dispersion mechanism which resulted in the relatively high ground level concentrations was fumigation. Finally, the evolution of the ABL was affected by the complex interactions between topography and mesoscale flows as it was found by the turbulent kinetic energy cross sections.

  5. The Ultrathin Limit and Dead-layer Effects in Local Polarization Switching of BiFeO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro [ORNL; Huijben, Mark [University of Twente, Netherlands; Pan, Minghu [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Balke, Nina [ORNL; Chang, Hye Jung [ORNL; Borisevich, Albina Y [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL; Rijnders, Guus [MESA+ University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands; Blank, Dave H. A. [University of Twente, Netherlands; Ramesh, R. [University of California, Berkeley; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Using piezoresponse force microscopy in ultra-high vacuum, polarization switching has been detected and quantified in epitaxial BiFeO3 films from 200 down to ~ 4 unit cells. Local remnant piezoresponse was used to infer the applied electric field inside the ferroelectric volume, and account for the elusive effect of dead-layers in ultrathin films. The dead-layer manifested itself in the slower than anticipated decrease of the switching bias with film thickness, yielding apparent Kay-Dunn scaling of the switching field, while the statistical analysis of hysteresis loops revealed lateral variation of the dead-layer with sub-10 nm resolution.

  6. Tipping Point for Expansion of Layered Aluminosilicates in Weakly Polar Solvents: Supercritical CO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Loganathan, Narasimhan [College; Bowers, Geoffrey M. [Department; Kirkpatrick, R. James [College; Yazaydin, A. Ozgur [College; Department; Burton, Sarah D. [William; Hoyt, David W. [William; Thanthiriwatte, K. Sahan [Department; Dixon, David A. [Department; McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Ilton, Eugene S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Loring, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States

    2017-10-11

    Layered aluminosilicates play a dominant role in the mechanical and gas storage properties of the subsurface, are used in diverse industrial applications, and serve as model materials for understanding solvent-ion-support systems. Although expansion in the presence of H2O is well known to be systematically correlated with the hydration free energy of the interlayer cation, in environments dominated by non-polar solvents (i.e. CO2), uptake into the interlayer is not well-understood. Using novel high pressure capabilities, we investigated the interaction of super-critical CO2 with Na+-, NH4+-, and Cs+-saturated montmorillonite, comparing results with predictions from molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the known trend in H2O, and that cation solvation energies in CO2 suggest a stronger interaction with Na+, both the NH4+- and Cs+-clays readily absorbed CO2 and expanded while the Na+-clay did not. The apparent inertness of the Na+-clay was not due to kinetics, as experiments seeking a stable expanded state showed that none exists. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a large endothermicity to CO2 intercalation in the Na+-clay, but little or no energy barrier for the NH4+- and Cs+-clays. Consequently, we have shown for the first time that in the presence of a low dielectric constant gas swelling depends more on the strength of the interaction between interlayer cation and aluminosilicate sheets and less on that with solvent. The finding suggests a distinct regime in layered aluminosilicates swelling behavior triggered by low solvent polarizability, with important implications in geomechanics, storage and retention of volatile gases, and across industrial uses in gelling, decoloring, heterogeneous catalysis, and semi-permeable reactive barriers.

  7. Halogens and their role in polar boundary-layer ozone depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Simpson

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available During springtime in the polar regions, unique photochemistry converts inert halide salt ions (e.g. Br into reactive halogen species (e.g. Br atoms and BrO that deplete ozone in the boundary layer to near zero levels. Since their discovery in the late 1980s, research on ozone depletion events (ODEs has made great advances; however many key processes remain poorly understood. In this article we review the history, chemistry, dependence on environmental conditions, and impacts of ODEs. This research has shown the central role of bromine photochemistry, but how salts are transported from the ocean and are oxidized to become reactive halogen species in the air is still not fully understood. Halogens other than bromine (chlorine and iodine are also activated through incompletely understood mechanisms that are probably coupled to bromine chemistry. The main consequence of halogen activation is chemical destruction of ozone, which removes the primary precursor of atmospheric oxidation, and generation of reactive halogen atoms/oxides that become the primary oxidizing species. The different reactivity of halogens as compared to OH and ozone has broad impacts on atmospheric chemistry, including near complete removal and deposition of mercury, alteration of oxidation fates for organic gases, and export of bromine into the free troposphere. Recent changes in the climate of the Arctic and state of the Arctic sea ice cover are likely to have strong effects on halogen activation and ODEs; however, more research is needed to make meaningful predictions of these changes.

  8. The Density of the North Polar Layered Deposit from Gravity and Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, L.; Lewis, K. W.

    2017-12-01

    The North Polar Layered Deposit (NPLD) of Mars is a vast reservoir of water ice with a volume of 1.14 million km3. Radar data indicates that the ice in the NPLD is extremely pure with dust content between 5 % to 10 %, however the radar data has not been able to put a direct constraint on the density of the NPLD. Here, we localize the gravity and topography signature of the NPLD and place a direct constraint on its density. We performed a grid search by generating admittance spectrum at each latitude and longitude between 75° N to 90° N and 0° E to 360° E, using a spherical cap of angular radius () of 7°, and a harmonic-bandwidth of the localization window Lwin of 37°. A region between Gemina Lingula and Planum Boreum was found to possesss an adequate correlation between gravity and topography. The estimated admittance spectra were compared with synthetic admittance spectra to constrain the load-density and the elastic thickness of the lithosphere. We constructed forward models by assuming that the lithosphere is a thin shell that deforms elastically in response to surface loads. We find that the bulk density of the NPLD ranges between 1000 to 1100 kg.m-3. Assuming a grain density of 3000 kg.m-3 for dust, the NPLD region within our localized window can contain dust content between 3 - 8 %, which is in an excellent agreement with the radar data.

  9. Polarization-selective infrared bandpass filter based on a two-layer subwavelength metallic grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohne, Andrew J.; Moon, Benjamin; Baumbauer, Carol L.; Gray, Tristan; Dilts, James; Shaw, Joseph A.; Dickensheets, David L.; Nakagawa, Wataru

    2017-08-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a polarization-selective infrared bandpass filter based on a two-layer subwavelength metallic grating for use in polarimetric imaging. Gold nanowires were deposited via physical vapor deposition (PVD) onto a silicon surface relief grating that was patterned using electron beam lithography (EBL) and fabricated using standard silicon processing techniques. Optical characterization with a broad-spectrum tungsten halogen light source and a grating spectrometer showed normalized peak TM transmission of 53% with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 122 nm, which was consistent with rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) simulations. Simulation results suggested that device operation relied on suppression of the TM transmission caused by surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation at the gold-silicon interface and an increase in TM transmission caused by a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonance in the cavity between the gratings. TE rejection occurred at the initial air/gold interface. We also present simulation results of an improved design based on a two-dielectric grating where two different SPP resonances allowed us to improve the shape of the passband by suppressing the side lobes. This newer design resulted in improved side-band performance and increased peak TM transmission.

  10. Magnetic materials. Tilt engineering of spontaneous polarization and magnetization above 300 K in a bulk layered perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Michael J; Mandal, Pranab; Dyer, Matthew S; Alaria, Jonathan; Borisov, Pavel; Niu, Hongjun; Claridge, John B; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2015-01-23

    Crystalline materials that combine electrical polarization and magnetization could be advantageous in applications such as information storage, but these properties are usually considered to have incompatible chemical bonding and electronic requirements. Recent theoretical work on perovskite materials suggested a route for combining both properties. We used crystal chemistry to engineer specific atomic displacements in a layered perovskite, (Ca(y)Sr(1- y))(1.15)Tb(1.85)Fe2O7, that change its symmetry and simultaneously generate electrical polarization and magnetization above room temperature. The two resulting properties are magnetoelectrically coupled as they arise from the same displacements. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Tailoring the Dielectric Layer Structure for Enhanced Performance of Organic Field-Effect Transistors: The Use of a Sandwiched Polar Dielectric Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shijiao; Yang, Xin; Zhuang, Xinming; Yu, Junsheng; Li, Lu

    2016-07-07

    To investigate the origins of hydroxyl groups in a polymeric dielectric and its applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), a polar polymer layer was inserted between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) dielectric layers, and its effect on the performance as an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) was studied. The OFETs with a sandwiched dielectric layer of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) or poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) containing hydroxyl groups had shown enhanced characteristics compared to those with only PMMA layers. The field-effect mobility had been raised more than 10 times in n -type devices (three times in the p -type one), and the threshold voltage had been lowered almost eight times in p -type devices (two times in the n -type). The on-off ratio of two kinds of devices had been enhanced by almost two orders of magnitude. This was attributed to the orientation of hydroxyl groups from disordered to perpendicular to the substrate under gate-applied voltage bias, and additional charges would be induced by this polarization at the interface between the semiconductor and dielectrics, contributing to the accumulation of charge transfer.

  12. Tailoring the Dielectric Layer Structure for Enhanced Performance of Organic Field-Effect Transistors: The Use of a Sandwiched Polar Dielectric Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijiao Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the origins of hydroxyl groups in a polymeric dielectric and its applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs, a polar polymer layer was inserted between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA dielectric layers, and its effect on the performance as an organic field-effect transistor (OFET was studied. The OFETs with a sandwiched dielectric layer of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA or poly(4-vinylphenol (PVP containing hydroxyl groups had shown enhanced characteristics compared to those with only PMMA layers. The field-effect mobility had been raised more than 10 times in n-type devices (three times in the p-type one, and the threshold voltage had been lowered almost eight times in p-type devices (two times in the n-type. The on-off ratio of two kinds of devices had been enhanced by almost two orders of magnitude. This was attributed to the orientation of hydroxyl groups from disordered to perpendicular to the substrate under gate-applied voltage bias, and additional charges would be induced by this polarization at the interface between the semiconductor and dielectrics, contributing to the accumulation of charge transfer.

  13. Spatial variation in soil active-layer geochemistry across hydrologic margins in polar desert ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Barrett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar deserts are characterized by severe spatial-temporal limitations of liquid water. In soil active layers of the Antarctic Dry Valleys, liquid water is infrequently available over most of the arid terrestrial landscape. However, soils on the margins of glacial melt-water streams and lakes are visibly wet during the brief Austral summer when temperatures permit the existence of liquid water. We examined the role of these hydrologic margins as preferential zones for the transformation and transport of nutrient elements and solutes in an environment where geochemical weathering and biological activity is strictly limited by the dearth of liquid water. We report on hydropedological investigations of aquatic-terrestrial transition zones adjacent to 11 stream and lake systems in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Our results show that wetted zones extended 1–11 m from the edges of lotic and lentic systems. While capillary demand and surface evaporation drive a one-way flux of water through these zones, the scale of these transition zones is determined by the topography and physical characteristics of the surrounding soils. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes appear to be influenced by both the hydrology and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes. Salt concentrations are enriched near the distal boundary of the wetted fronts due to evapo-concentration of pore water in lake margin soils, while organic matter, ammonium and phosphate concentrations are highest in stream channel sediments where potential for biological activity is greatest. Thus, in the Antarctic Dry Valleys, intermittently wet soils on the margins of streams and lakes are important zones of both geochemical cycling and biological activity.

  14. Interface characterization of atomic layer deposited high-k on non-polar GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ye; Zeng, Ke; Singisetti, Uttam

    2017-10-01

    The interface properties between dielectrics and semiconductors are crucial for electronic devices. In this work, we report the electrical characterization of the interface properties between atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on non-polar a-plane ( 11 2 ¯ 0 ) and m-plane ( 1 1 ¯ 00 ) GaN grown by hybrid vapor phase epitaxy. A metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) structure was used to evaluate the interface properties. The impact of annealing on the interface properties was also investigated. The border trap in the oxide, characterized by the capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis loop, was low. The interface state density (Dit), extracted using the ac conductance method, is in the range of 0.5 × 1012/cm2 eV to 7.5 × 1011/cm2 eV within an energy range from 0.2 eV to 0.5 eV below the conduction band minimum. The m-plane GaN MOSCAPs exhibited better interface properties than the a-plane GaN MOSCAPs after annealing. Without annealing, Al2O3 dielectrics had higher border trap density and interface state density compared to HfO2 dielectrics. However, the annealing had different impacts on Al2O3 dielectrics as compared to HfO2. Our results showed that the annealing degraded the quality of the interface in HfO2, but it improved the quality of the interface in Al2O3 devices. The annealing also reduced the positive trapped oxide charge, resulting in a shift of C-V curves towards the positive bias region.

  15. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. A time-lapse DC-IP monitoring system has been acquiring at least six datasets per day on a 42-electrode profile with 0.5. m electrode spacing since July 2013. Remote control of the data acquisition system enables interactive adaptation...

  16. Interfacial mixing in as-deposited Si/Ni/Si layers analyzed by x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debarati, E-mail: debarati@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Basu, Saibal; Singh, Surendra [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, Sumalay; Dev, Bhupendra Nath [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Room temperature diffusion in Si/Ni/Si trilayer detected through complementary x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyses of XPNR data generated the construction of the layered structure in terms of physical parameters along with alloy layers created by diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattering length density information from XPNR provided quantitative assessment of the stoichiometry of alloys formed at the Si/Ni and Ni/Si interfaces. - Abstract: Interdiffusion occurring across the interfaces in a Si/Ni/Si layered system during deposition at room temperature was probed using x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). Exploiting the complementarity of these techniques, both structural and magnetic characterization with nanometer depth resolution could be achieved. Suitable model fitting of the reflectivity profiles identified the formation of Ni-Si mixed alloy layers at the Si/Ni and Ni/Si interfaces. The physical parameters of the layered structure, including quantitative assessment of the stoichiometry of interfacial alloys, were obtained from the analyses of XRR and PNR patterns. In addition, PNR provided magnetic moment density profile as a function of depth in the stratified medium.

  17. Polarization properties of real aluminum mirrors; I. Influence of the aluminum oxide layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, G.; Snik, F.; Keller, C.U.

    2009-01-01

    In polarimetry, it is important to characterize the polarization properties of the instrument itself to disentangle real astrophysical signals from instrumental effects. This article deals with the accurate measurement and modeling of the polarization properties of real aluminum mirrors, as used in

  18. Polar orientation of a pendant anionic chromophore in thick layer-by-layer self-assembled polymeric films

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Akhilesh; Davis, Richey M.; Durak, Cemil; Heflin, James R.; Gibson, Harry W.

    2008-01-01

    Multilayer films with up to 600 bilayers and 740 nm thickness were fabricated using the alternating deposition of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly{1-[p-(3'-carboxy-4'-hydroxyphenylazo)benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethand iyl} on glass substrates. Linear relationships for absorbance, thickness, and the square root of the second harmonic intensity versus the number of bilayers demonstrates that the films have long range polar order and optical homogeneity. The deposition conditions (i.e., pH o...

  19. Well-constructed cellulose acetate membranes for forward osmosis: Minimized internal concentration polarization with an ultra-thin selective layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sui

    2010-09-01

    The design and engineering of membrane structure that produces low salt leakage and minimized internal concentration polarization (ICP) in forward osmosis (FO) processes have been explored in this work. The fundamentals of phase inversion of cellulose acetate (CA) regarding the formation of an ultra-thin selective layer at the bottom interface of polymer and casting substrate were investigated by using substrates with different hydrophilicity. An in-depth understanding of membrane structure and pore size distribution has been elucidated with field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FESEM) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). A double dense-layer structure is formed when glass plate is used as the casting substrate and water as the coagulant. The thickness of the ultra-thin bottom layer resulted from hydrophilic-hydrophilic interaction is identified to be around 95nm, while a fully porous, open-cell structure is formed in the middle support layer due to spinodal decomposition. Consequently, the membrane shows low salt leakage with mitigated ICP in the FO process for seawater desalination. The structural parameter (St) of the membrane is analyzed by modeling water flux using the theory that considers both external concentration polarization (ECP) and ICP, and the St value of the double dense-layer membrane is much smaller than those reported in literatures. Furthermore, the effects of an intermediate immersion into a solvent/water mixed bath prior to complete immersion in water on membrane formation have been studied. The resultant membranes may have a single dense layer with an even lower St value. A comparison of fouling behavior in a simple FO-membrane bioreactor (MBR) system is evaluated for these two types of membranes. The double dense-layer membrane shows a less fouling propensity. This study may help pave the way to improve the membrane design for new-generation FO membranes. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    Photoluminescence measurements have been made on a set of epitaxially grown strained GaAs photocathode structures. The photocathodes are designed to exhibit a strain-induced enhancement of the electron spin polarization obtainable by optical pumping with circularly polarized radiation of near band gap energy. For the case of non-strained GaAs, the degree of spin polarization is limited to 50% by crystal symmetry. Under an appropriate uniaxial compression or tension, however, the valence band structure near the gap minimum is modified such that a spin polarization of 100% is theoretically possible. A total of nine samples with biaxial compressive strains ranging from zero to ∼0.8% are studied. X-ray diffraction analysis, utilizing Bragg reflections, is used to determine the crystal lattice structure of the samples. Luminescence spectra and luminescence circular polarization data are obtained at room temperature, ∼78 K and ∼12 K. The degree of luminescence circular polarization is used as a relative measure of the photo-excited electron spin polarization. The room temperature luminescence circular polarization data is compared with the measured electron spin polarization when the samples are used as electron photo-emitters with a negative electron affinity surface preparation. The luminescence data is also analyzed in conjunction with the crystal structure data with the goal of understanding the strain dependent valence band structure, optical pumping characteristics and spin depolarization mechanisms of the photocathode structures. A simple model is used to describe the luminescence data, obtained for the set of samples. Within the assumptions of the model, the deformation potentials a, b and d for GaAs are determined. The measured values are a = -10.16±.21 eV, b = -2.00±.05 eV and d = -4.87±.29 eV. Good agreement with published values of the deformation potentials provides support for the model used to describe the data

  1. Layered Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes Observed with the Tri-Static Eiscat VHF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I.; Anyairo, C.; Häggström, I.; Tjulin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are strong radar echoes that are typically observed at 50 to 500 MHz. They are often discussed in the context of dusty plasma studies and linked to e.g. the existence of charged ice particles, neutral atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stratification. The PMSE are observed at mesospheric temperature minimum when ice particles form, though the exact path of formation is still a topic for research. Mesospheric smoke particles that are assumed to form after or during the meteor ablation process possibly contribute to the formation of the ice particles. For understanding the formation of the radar echoes their variation with scattering angle is an important parameter. We analyze PMSE observations with the tri-static EISCAT VHF radar (224 MHz) during one day in June when PMSE were observed almost continuously from 7:00 to 13:00 UT. The radar signal was transmitted and received in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø. The receivers in Kiruna and Sodankylä were pointed at typical PMSE heights above the Tromsø transmitter and detected radar reflections at the same time and altitude as the Tromsø radar. The altitude of the PMSE changed with time and the extension of the echoes in altitude was smaller toward the end of the observation. These observations are among the first tri-static observations of PMSE. The observations suggest that the scattering process underlying the PMSE occurs over a broad range of scattering angles. Based on the observations we will show that the spectral width of the received echoes is most likely determined by the variations within the observed volume rather than by the scattering process. The observed frequency shifts suggest a layer structure and horizontal motions that vary with altitude. UHF (933 MHz) radar observations were carried out in parallel, they display predominantly incoherent scatter and an electron density typical for the altitude. Some other studies, have in

  2. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  3. Giant bulk photovoltaic effect and spontaneous polarization of single-layer monochalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Tonatiuh; Fregoso, Benjamin M.; Mendoza, Bernardo S.; Morimoto, Takahiro; Moore, Joel E.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    We implement and use a first-principles density functional theory approach to calculate the shift current response of monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides. We find a larger effective three- dimensional effective polarization ( 1.9 C/m2) and shift current ( 200 μA/V2) than have been previously observed in common ferroelectrics. By using a one-dimensional Rice-Mele tight-binding model we investigate the shift-current tensor along the polarization axis, its relation with polarization, and the conditions under which shift-current reaches a maximum. Importantly, our calculations predict that shift current can be largest in the UV visible range, indicating the potential of these materials for optoelectronic applications. BMF and TR share equal contributions. We acknowledge AFOSR MURI, Conacyt, NERSC, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the DOE.

  4. A One-Dimensional Model Study of the Occurrence and the Termination of Polar Boundary-Layer Ozone Depletion Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Le; Gutheil, Eva

    2015-04-01

    The tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs) in polar spring have attracted increased attention in the last thirty years. A dramatic decline of the surface ozone mixing ratio from tens of parts per billion (ppb) to less than one ppb within a few days is observed in various observation sites in polar regions. Previous studies suggest that the halogen species, especially bromine, acts as a catalyst in a chemical reaction cycle, which causes the destruction of ozone in the polar boundary layer. Moreover, a group of heterogeneous reactions with the involvement of HOBr occur on the surface of different substrates such as suspended aerosols and sea ice, leading to the activation of bromide from these substrates, and a following enhancement of the total bromine amount in the boundary layer occurs. This phenomenon is widely known as the 'bromine explosion' mechanism. However, the initiation and the termination steps of the ODEs are still not well understood. In the present study, a one-dimensional model, KINAL-T, is developed with the aim of investigating the role of the boundary layer in the occurrence and the termination of the ODEs. The 1-D model is an extension of the previous box model study1, explicitly including the vertical convection of gas. The parameterization of the vertical profile of the turbulent diffusivity from Pielke and Mahrer (1975)2 is adopted. Moreover, in the 1-D model, a bromine-related reaction scheme taken from Cao et al. (2014)1 is used, in which not only the gas phase but also the heterogeneous reactions are implemented. The simulation results show that the tropospheric ozone depletion event in a 200 m boundary layer starts after 12 days under the condition of a potential temperature gradient of 0.7 K km-1 and a wind speed of 5 m s-1. The whole depletion process of ozone takes approximately 2.5 days. The vertical profiles of ozone and bromine-containing compounds at different days are also captured. Instead of preventing the ozone from the

  5. Zero-field spin transfer oscillators based on magnetic tunnel junction having perpendicular polarizer and planar free layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally studied spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization oscillations in an asymmetric MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction device consisting of an in-plane magnetized free layer and an out-of-plane magnetized polarizer. A steady auto-oscillation was achieved at zero magnetic field and room temperature, with an oscillation frequency that was strongly dependent on bias currents, with a large frequency tunability of 1.39 GHz/mA. Our results suggest that this new structure has a high potential for new microwave device designs.

  6. Auroral and magnetic variations in the polar cusp and cleft. Signatures of magnetopause boundary layer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandholt, P.E.; Egeland, A.

    1987-10-01

    By combining continous ground-based observations of polar cleft/cusp auroras and local magnetic variations with electromagnetic parameters obtained from satellites in polar orbit (low-altitude cleft/cusp) and in the magnetosheath/interplanetary space, different electrodynamic processes in the polar cleft/cusp have been investigated. One of the more controversial questions in this field is related to the observed shifts in latitude of cleft/cusp auroras and the relationships with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation, local magnetic disturbances (DP2 and DPY modes) and magnetospheric substorms. A new approach which may contribute to clarifying these complicated relationships, simultaneous groundbased observations of the midday and evening-midnight sectors of the auroral oval, is illustrated. A related topic is the spatial relationship between the cleft/cusp auroras and the ionospheric convection currents. A characteristic feature of the polar cusp and cleft regions during negative IMF B z is repeated occurrence of certain short-lived auroral structures moving in accordance with the local convection pattern. Satellite measurements of particle precipitation, magnetic field and ion drift components permit detailed investigations of the electrodynamics of these cusp/cleft structures. Information on electric field components, Birkeland currents, Poynting flux, height-integrated Pedersen conductivity and Joule heat dissipation rate has been derived. These observations are discussed in relation to existing models of temporal plasma injections from the magnetosheath

  7. Role of the boundary layer in the occurrence and termination of the tropospheric ozone depletion events in polar spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Le; Platt, Ulrich; Gutheil, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the polar spring are frequently observed in a stable boundary layer condition, and the end of the events occurs when there is a breakup of the boundary layer. In order to improve the understanding of the role of the boundary layer in the ozone depletion event, a one-dimensional model is developed, focusing on the occurrence and the termination period of the ozone depletion episode. A module accounting for the vertical air transport is added to a previous box model, and a first-order parameterization is used for the estimation of the vertical distribution of the turbulent diffusivity. Simulations are performed for different strengths of temperature inversion as well as for different wind speeds. The simulation results suggest that the reactive bromine species released from the underlying surface into the lowest part of the troposphere initially stay in the boundary layer, leading to an increase of the bromine concentration. This bromine accumulation causes the ozone destruction below the top of the boundary layer. After the ozone is totally depleted, if the temperature inversion intensity decreases or the wind speed increases, the severe ozone depletion event tends to transit into a partial ozone depletion event or it recovers to the normal ozone background level of 30-40 ppb. This recovery process takes about 2 h. Due to the presence of high-level HBr left from the initial occurrence of ODEs, the complete removal of ozone in the boundary layer is achieved a few days after the first termination of ODE. The time required for the recurrence of the ozone depletion in a 1000 m boundary layer is approximately 5 days, while the initial occurrence of the complete ozone consumption takes 15 days. The present model is suitable to clarify the reason for both the start and the termination of the severe ozone depletion as well as the partial ozone depletion in the observations.

  8. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (...... non-intrusively and reliably image freezing patterns and their lateral variation on a 10-100 m scale that is difficult to sample by point measurements.......) measurements at high temporal resolution at a heath tundra site on Disko Island on the west coast of Greenland (69°N). Borehole sediment characteristics and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. Data acquired during the freezing period of October 2013 – February 2014 clearly image...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below-freezing...

  9. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H.; Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Su, Yan-Kuin; Wang, Kang L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL

  10. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shyh-Jer, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Su, Yan-Kuin, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, Kun-Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kang L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL.

  11. Impact of light polarization on photoluminescence intensity and quantum efficiency in AlGaN and AlInGaN layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, C.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed emission intensity, quantum efficiency, and emitted light polarization of c-plane AlGaN and AlInGaN layers (λ = 320-350 nm) by temperature dependent photoluminescence. Low indium content in AlInGaN structures causes a significant intensity increase by change of the polarization of the emitted light. Polarization changes from E ⊥ c to E ‖ c with increasing aluminum content. It switches back to E ⊥ c with the incorporation of indium. The polarization degree decreases with temperature. This temperature dependence can corrupt internal quantum efficiency determination by temperature dependent photoluminescence.

  12. Investigation of the spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric boundary layer depths over mountainous terrain observed with a suite of ground-based and airborne instruments during the MATERHORN field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S.; De Wekker, S.; Emmitt, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present first results of the spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric boundary layer depths obtained with a suite of ground-based and airborne instruments deployed during the first field phase of The Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program (http://www3.nd.edu/~dynamics/materhorn/index.php) at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG, Utah, USA) in Fall 2012. We mainly use high-resolution data collected on selected intensive observation periods obtained by Doppler lidars, ceilometer, and in-situ measurements from an unmanned aerial vehicle for the measurements of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depths. In particular, a Navy Twin Otter aircraft flew 6 missions of about 5 hours each during the daytime, collecting remotely sensed (Doppler lidar, TODWL) wind data in addition to in-situ turbulence measurements which allowed a detailed investigation of the spatial heterogeneity of the convective boundary layer turbulence features over a steep isolated mountain of a horizontal and vertical scale of about 10 km and 1 km, respectively. Additionally, we use data collected by (1) radiosonde systems at two sites of Granite Mountain area in DPG (Playa and Sagebrush), (2) sonic anemometers (CSAT-3D) for high resolution turbulence flux measurements near ground, (3) Pyranometer for incoming solar radiation, and (4) standard meteorological measurements (PTU) obtained near the surface. In this contribution, we discuss and address (1) composites obtained with lidar, ceilometer, micro-meteorological measurements, and radiosonde observations to determine the quasi-continuous regime of ABL depths, growth rates, maximum convective boundary layer (CBL) depths, etc., (2) the temporal variability in the ABL depths during entire diurnal cycle and the spatial heterogeneity in the daytime ABL depths triggered by the underlying orography in the experimental area to investigate the most possible mechanisms (e.g. combined effect of diurnal cycle and orographic trigger

  13. Frequency-driven quantum oscillations in a graphene layer under circularly polarized ac fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Monroy, R., E-mail: ricardovega@mail.uniatlantico.edu.co; Martinez Castro, O.; Salazar Cohen, G.

    2015-06-19

    In this paper we predict a new type of quantum oscillations driven by the frequency of a circularly polarized ac field in a monolayer of graphene placed inside an optical cavity. We show that the displacement of the structure of photon-dressed electron states near the Fermi level and the electron transitions, from extended states to bound photon-dressed electron states inside an energy gap, lead to a periodic change of singularities in the electron density of states, resulting in quantum oscillations in thermodynamic, transport and other properties in graphene.

  14. Ion diode performance on a positive polarity inductive voltage adder with layered magnetically insulated transmission line flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshelwood, D. D.; Schumer, J. W.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Phipps, D.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Ottinger, P. F.; Apruzese, J. P.; Cooperstein, G.; Young, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    A pinch-reflex ion diode is fielded on the pulsed-power machine Mercury (R. J. Allen, et al., 15th IEEE Intl. Pulsed Power Conf., Monterey, CA, 2005, p. 339), which has an inductive voltage adder (IVA) architecture and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Mercury is operated in positive polarity resulting in layered MITL flow as emitted electrons are born at a different potential in each of the adder cavities. The usual method for estimating the voltage by measuring the bound current in the cathode and anode of the MITL is not accurate with layered flow, and the interaction of the MITL flow with a pinched-beam ion diode load has not been studied previously. Other methods for determining the diode voltage are applied, ion diode performance is experimentally characterized and evaluated, and circuit and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are performed. Results indicate that the ion diode couples efficiently to the machine operating at a diode voltage of about 3.5 MV and a total current of about 325 kA, with an ion current of about 70 kA of which about 60 kA is proton current. It is also found that the layered flow impedance of the MITL is about half the vacuum impedance.

  15. System of polarization correlometry of polycrystalline layers of urine in the differentiation stage of diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Yu. O.; Pashkovskaya, N. V.; Marchuk, Y. F.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Savich, V. O.

    2015-08-01

    The work consists of investigation results of diagnostic efficiency of a new azimuthally stable Muellermatrix method of analysis of laser autofluorescence coordinate distributions of biological liquid layers. A new model of generalized optical anisotropy of biological tissues protein networks is proposed in order to define the processes of laser autofluorescence. The influence of complex mechanisms of both phase anisotropy (linear birefringence and optical activity) and linear (circular) dichroism is taken into account. The interconnections between the azimuthally stable Mueller-matrix elements characterizing laser autofluorescence and different mechanisms of optical anisotropy are determined. The statistic analysis of coordinate distributions of such Mueller-matrix rotation invariants is proposed. Thereupon the quantitative criteria (statistic moments of the 1st to the 4th order) of differentiation of human urine polycrystalline layers for the sake of diagnosing and differentiating cholelithiasis with underlying chronic cholecystitis (group 1) and diabetes mellitus of degree II (group 2) are estimated.

  16. Suppression of Quasiparticle Scattering Signals in Bilayer Graphene Due to Layer Polarization and Destructive Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolie, Wouter; Lux, Jonathan; Pörtner, Mathias; Dombrowski, Daniela; Herbig, Charlotte; Knispel, Timo; Simon, Sabina; Michely, Thomas; Rosch, Achim; Busse, Carsten

    2018-03-01

    We study chemically gated bilayer graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy complemented by tight-binding calculations. Gating is achieved by intercalating Cs between bilayer graphene and Ir(111), thereby shifting the conduction band minima below the chemical potential. Scattering between electronic states (both intraband and interband) is detected via quasiparticle interference. However, not all expected processes are visible in our experiment. We uncover two general effects causing this suppression: first, intercalation leads to an asymmetrical distribution of the states within the two layers, which significantly reduces the scanning tunneling spectroscopy signal of standing waves mainly present in the lower layer; second, forward scattering processes, connecting points on the constant energy contours with parallel velocities, do not produce pronounced standing waves due to destructive interference. We present a theory to describe the interference signal for a general n -band material.

  17. Preliminary Study on Active Modulation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes with the Radio Propagation in Layered Space Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengguo; Li, Hailong; Fu, Luyao; Wang, Maoyan

    2016-06-01

    Radar echoes intensity of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) is greatly affected by the temperature of dusty plasma and the frequency of electromagnetic wave about the radar. In this paper, a new method is developed to explain the active experiment results of PMSE. The theory of wave propagation in a layered media is used to study the propagation characteristics of an electromagnetic wave at different electron temperatures. The simulation results show that the variation tendency of the reflected power fraction almost agrees with the results observed by radar in the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT). The radar echoes intensity of PMSE greatly decreases with the increase of the radio frequency and the enhancement of the electron temperature. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097 and 41304119) and by the National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment, China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation (CRIRP)

  18. Multifunctional polarization tomography of optical anisotropy of biological layers in diagnosis of endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, O. G.; Koval, L. D.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Ushenko, Yu. O.; Savich, V. O.; Sidor, M. I.; Marchuk, Yu. F.

    2015-09-01

    The theoretical background of azimuthally stable method Jones matrix mapping of histological sections of biopsy of uterine neck on the basis of spatial-frequency selection of the mechanisms of linear and circular birefringence is presented. The comparative results of measuring the coordinate distributions of complex degree of mutual anisotropy formed by polycristalline networks of blood plasma layers of donors (group 1) and patients with endometriosis (group 2). The values and ranges of change of the statistical (moments of the 1st - 4th order) parameters of complex degree of mutual anisotropy coordinate distributions are studied. The objective criteria of diagnostics of the pathology and differentiation of its severity degree are determined.

  19. Polar spacecraft observations of the turbulent outer cusp/magnetopause boundary layer of Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbit of the Polar spacecraft has been ideally suited for studying the turbulent region of the cusp that is located near or just outside the magnetopause current sheet at 7-9 RE. The wave data obtained in this region show that electromagnetic turbulence is dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz. The waves responsible for this turbulence usually propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and have an index of refraction that generally falls between the estimated cold plasma theoretical values of the electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler modes and may be composed of both modes in concert with kinetic Alfvén waves and/or fast magnetosonic waves. Fourier spectra of the higher frequency wave data also show the electromagnetic turbulence at frequencies up to and near the electron cyclotron frequency. This higher frequency electromagnetic turbulence is most likely associated with whistler mode waves. The lower hybrid drift and current gradient instabilities are suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the turbulence. The plasma and field environment of this turbulent region is examined and found to be extremely complex. Some of the wave activity is associated with processes occurring locally, such as changes in the DC magnetic field, while others are associated with solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field changes.

  20. Polar Spacecraft Observations of the Turbulent Outer Cusp/Magnetopause Boundary Layer of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; Menietti, J. D.; Dowell, J. H.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scudder, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The orbit of the Polar spacecraft has been ideally suited for studying the turbulent region of the cusp that is located near or just outside the magnetopause current sheet at 7-9 R(sub E). The wave data obtained in this region show that electromagnetic turbulence is dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz. The waves responsible for this turbulence usually propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and have an index of refraction that generally falls between the estimated cold plasma theoretical values of the electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler modes and may be composed of both modes in concert with kinetic Alfven waves and/or fast magnetosonic waves. Fourier spectra of the higher frequency wave data also show the electromagnetic turbulence at frequencies up to and near the electron cyclotron frequency. This higher frequency electromagnetic turbulence is most likely associated with whistler mode waves. The lower hybrid drift and current gradient instabilities are suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the turbulence. The plasma and field environment of this turbulent region is examined and found to be extremely complex. Some of the wave activity is associated with processes occurring locally, such as changes in the DC magnetic field, while others are associated with solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field changes.

  1. Surface and interface properties of polar gallium nitride layers; Oberflaechen- und Grenzflaecheneigenschaften von polaren Galliumnitrid-Schichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Pierre

    2010-07-09

    The material properties of group III-nitrides allows manifold applications. Especially for the GaN-based gas and biosensor technology, an understanding of the GaN surfaces and their interaction with molecules is crucial for the successful development of sensor systems. Especially the influence of crystal orientation, surface termination and reconstruction on the interaction was analysed. To study the interaction of the GaN surface with molecules the reproducible and controllable preparation of GaN surfaces is necessary. Polar GaN layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The surface reconstruction and termination could be selectively adjusted by the growth parameters or further preparation steps. On the Ga-polar surface, gallium-induced and nitrogen-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed as well as non-reconstructed surface modifications could be generated and on the N-polar surface non-reconstructed. The different surface modifications differ considerably in the formation of surface states. The Ga-induced and N-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed surfaces presented two surface states (SS) at 1.4 eV and 3 eV as well as 2 eV and 3 eV, respectively. The non-reconstructed GaN(0001) presented three SS (1.5 eV, 2.5 eV and 3.4 eV) and the GaN(000-1) one SS (2.5 eV). The theoretical predicted surfaces sates (density functional theory) shows a good agreement with the measurements. The analysis revealed a dependence of the interaction of GaN surfaces with O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on the orientation, reconstruction, and surface termination of the films. The GaN(000-1) surface is much more reactive to oxygen and water than the (0001) orientated surfaces, while GaN is in general significantly more sensitive to water than to oxygen. The chemical bond configuration of the adsorbed species shows a significant dependence on surface termination. The measurements presented that the formation of nitrogen oxide and/or gallium oxide bonds depends on the surface modification. Furthermore the interaction

  2. Polarization Pyrometry of Layered Semiconductor Structures under Conditions of Low-Temperature Technological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, I. A.; Shvets, V. A.; Dulin, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Ikusov, D. G.; Uzhakov, I. N.; Rykhlitskii, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    Principal issues of using pyrometry for temperature monitoring in low-temperature processes in the technology of production of semiconductor structures are considered by an example of growing mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) layers on the GaAs substrate by the method of molecular beam epitaxy. Optical and thermophysical models are proposed to describe the processes of radiant heat transfer in a vacuum chamber. Based on these models, it is demonstrated that radiation from the heater and the signal reflected from the chamber walls, which are comparable in magnitude with the measured radiation emitted by the sample, should be taken into account in interpreting data measured by a pyrometer. Methods of useful signal identification are found. Experiments on temperature measurement by a pyrometer mounted on the MCT growth chamber are performed. Results of these experiments are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  3. The association of polar mesosphere summer echo layers with tial modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    Full Text Available The occurrence of PMSEs with time of day shows a semi-diurnal variation with minima at 8 and 20 h LT. PMSE layers observed for more than 30 min show an average rate of descent of 2 km h–1. These characteristics suggest the influence of tidal winds. When the observed steady wind and diurnal and semi-diurnal tides at EISCAT are added, the overall magnitude shows a time-variation which matches the occurrence of PMSEs, and the observed rate of descent, approximately 2 km h–1. Atmospheric gravity waves also contribute to the velocity of the neutral wind. When the wave reinforces the background wind, the PMSEs are stronger and descend more rapidly, but when the wave-related velocity opposes the background wind the PMSE is weaker and it descends more slowly.

  4. The association of polar mesosphere summer echo layers with tial modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of PMSEs with time of day shows a semi-diurnal variation with minima at 8 and 20 h LT. PMSE layers observed for more than 30 min show an average rate of descent of 2 km h–1. These characteristics suggest the influence of tidal winds. When the observed steady wind and diurnal and semi-diurnal tides at EISCAT are added, the overall magnitude shows a time-variation which matches the occurrence of PMSEs, and the observed rate of descent, approximately 2 km h–1. Atmospheric gravity waves also contribute to the velocity of the neutral wind. When the wave reinforces the background wind, the PMSEs are stronger and descend more rapidly, but when the wave-related velocity opposes the background wind the PMSE is weaker and it descends more slowly.

  5. Tipping Point for Expansion of Layered Aluminosilicates in Weakly Polar Solvents: Supercritical CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaef, Herbert T; Loganathan, Narasimhan; Bowers, Geoffrey M; Kirkpatrick, R James; Yazaydin, A Ozgur; Burton, Sarah D; Hoyt, David W; Thanthiriwatte, K Sahan; Dixon, David A; McGrail, B Peter; Rosso, Kevin M; Ilton, Eugene S; Loring, John S

    2017-10-25

    Layered aluminosilicates play a dominant role in the mechanical and gas storage properties of the subsurface, are used in diverse industrial applications, and serve as model materials for understanding solvent-ion-support systems. Although expansion in the presence of H 2 O is well-known to be systematically correlated with the hydration free energy of the interlayer cation, particularly in environments dominated by nonpolar solvents (i.e., CO 2 ), uptake into the interlayer is not well-understood. Using novel high-pressure capabilities, we investigated the interaction of dry supercritical CO 2 with Na-, NH 4 -, and Cs-saturated montmorillonite, comparing results with predictions from molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the known trend in H 2 O and that cation solvation energies in CO 2 suggest a stronger interaction with Na, both the NH 4 - and Cs-clays readily absorbed CO 2 and expanded, while the Na-clay did not. The apparent inertness of the Na-clay was not due to kinetics, as experiments seeking a stable expanded state showed that none exists. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a large endothermicity to CO 2 intercalation in the Na-clay but little or no energy barrier for the NH 4 - and Cs-clays. Indeed, the combination of experiment and theory clearly demonstrate that CO 2 intercalation of Na-montmorillonite clays is prohibited in the absence of H 2 O. Consequently, we have shown for the first time that in the presence of a low dielectric constant, gas swelling depends more on the strength of the interaction between the interlayer cation and aluminosilicate sheets and less on that with solvent. The finding suggests a distinct regime in layered aluminosilicate swelling behavior triggered by low solvent polarizability, with important implications in geomechanics, storage, and retention of volatile gases, and across industrial uses in gelling, decoloring, heterogeneous catalysis, and semipermeable reactive barriers.

  6. Ribbon terrain formation and implications for lithosphere evolution, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, V. L.; Willis, J. J.

    1997-03-01

    Venus terrain ribbons comprise a fabric of alternating, parallel, closely-spaced, radar-dark/bright lineaments showing a distinct dark-bright pairing. It is presently argued that the opening of tensile fractures within a brittle layer above a sharp brittle ductile transition over a ductile substrate can account for the formation of the observed geometric characteristics of ribbon terrain.

  7. TERRAIN, NEWTON COUNTY, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographical data that were used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, DARKE COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, TROUSDALE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, PIERCE, COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, KITSAP COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, Norfolk County, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, BARNSTABLE COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, HANCOCK COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, POTTER COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, WRIGHT COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, BERKS COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, UNION PARISH, LOUSIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, RANKIN COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, Clinton COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, HOWARD COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. Possible role of electric forces in bromine activation during polar boundary layer ozone depletion and aerosol formation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Ekaterina

    2017-11-01

    This work presents a hypothesis about the mechanism of bromine activation during polar boundary layer ozone depletion events (ODEs) as well as the mechanism of aerosol formation from the frost flowers. The author suggests that ODEs may be initiated by the electric-field gradients created at the sharp tips of ice formations as a result of the combined effect of various environmental conditions. According to the author's estimates, these electric-field gradients may be sufficient for the onset of point or corona discharges followed by generation of high local concentrations of the reactive oxygen species and initiation of free-radical and redox reactions. This process may be responsible for the formation of seed bromine which then undergoes further amplification by HOBr-driven bromine explosion. The proposed hypothesis may explain a variety of environmental conditions and substrates as well as poor reproducibility of ODE initiation observed by researchers in the field. According to the author's estimates, high wind can generate sufficient conditions for overcoming the Rayleigh limit and thus can initiate ;spraying; of charged aerosol nanoparticles. These charged aerosol nanoparticles can provoke formation of free radicals, turning the ODE on. One can also envision a possible emission of halogen ion as a result of the ;electrospray; process analogous to that of electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry.

  7. Zn(3)(4-OOCC(6)H(4)PO(3))(2): A polar metal phosphonate with pillared layered structure showing SHG-activity and large dielectric anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Tang; Cao, Deng-Ke; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Zheng, Li-Min

    2010-10-07

    A new metal phosphonate Zn(3)(4-OOCC(6)H(4)PO(3))(2) (1) is reported which crystallizes in orthorhombic space group Pca2(1). It shows a pillared layered structure in which the {ZnO(4)}, {ZnO(5)} and {PO(3)C} polyhedra are connected through corner- or edge-sharing to form an inorganic layer in the ab plane which contains 4- and 5-member rings. These layers are pillared by the uni-oriented 4-carboxylatephenylphosphonate ligands, thus leading to a polar 3D architecture. The dielectric anisotropy measurements of a single crystal of 1 reveal that dielectric constant along the inter-layer is larger than that along the intra-layer with a ratio of about 2.3. Second harmonic generation (SHG) activity is observed.

  8. Improved Inlet Conditions for Terrain CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    The atmospheric boundary layer flow over different types of terrain is studied through simulations made with the finite volume CFD code of Ellipsys 2D and 3D. The simulations are compared to measurements made at the Høvsøre test site and over the hill of Askervein.The primary objective...... for describing the flow after a change in the surface roughness. The derivation of these expressions is based on a range of simulations of flows over flat terrain with different types of roughness changes.The derived expressions show good agreement with simulations and could, as intended, be used to define inlet...... conditions for flow simulations over terrain, where an upstream roughness change is thought to have an influence. More thorough experimental verification is however, thought necessary to make the expressions sufficiently reliable. The same goes for the simulations-based conclusions regarding the flow over...

  9. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  10. Electron spin injection from a regrown Fe layer in a spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, M.; Bhattacharya, P.; Shin, J.; Saha, D.

    2007-04-01

    An electroluminescence circular polarization of 23% and threshold current reduction of 11% are obtained in an electrically pumped spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. Electron spin injection is accomplished utilizing a regrown Fe/ n-AlGaAs Schottky tunnel barrier deposited around the base of the laser mesas. Negligible circular polarizations and threshold current reductions are measured for nonmagnetic and Fe-based control VCSELs, which provides convincing evidence of spin injection, transport, and detection in our spin-polarized laser.

  11. Observation of layered antiferromagnetism in self-assembled parallel NiSi nanowire arrays on Si(110) by spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ie-Hong; Hsu, Hsin-Zan

    2018-03-01

    The layered antiferromagnetism of parallel nanowire (NW) arrays self-assembled on Si(110) have been observed at room temperature by direct imaging of both the topographies and magnetic domains using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (SP-STM/STS). The topographic STM images reveal that the self-assembled unidirectional and parallel NiSi NWs grow into the Si(110) substrate along the [\\bar{1}10] direction (i.e. the endotaxial growth) and exhibit multiple-layer growth. The spatially-resolved SP-STS maps show that these parallel NiSi NWs of different heights produce two opposite magnetic domains, depending on the heights of either even or odd layers in the layer stack of the NiSi NWs. This layer-wise antiferromagnetic structure can be attributed to an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling between the adjacent layers in the multiple-layer NiSi NW with a B2 (CsCl-type) crystal structure. Such an endotaxial heterostructure of parallel magnetic NiSi NW arrays with a layered antiferromagnetic ordering in Si(110) provides a new and important perspective for the development of novel Si-based spintronic nanodevices.

  12. Flow on noisy terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsirogiannis, Konstantinos; Haverkort, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Computing watersheds on triangulated terrain models in a robust manner is a difficult task as it is sensitive to noise that appears in the elevation values of the input. This is amplified by the existence of many very small watersheds (corresponding to spurious minima) that obscure the overall hy...... to use a robust flow model together with exact arithmetic....

  13. MOVPE growth of N-polar AlN on 4H-SiC: Effect of substrate miscut on layer quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemettinen, J.; Okumura, H.; Kim, I.; Kauppinen, C.; Palacios, T.; Suihkonen, S.

    2018-04-01

    We present the effect of miscut angle of SiC substrates on N-polar AlN growth. The N-polar AlN layers were grown on C-face 4H-SiC substrates with a miscut towards 〈 1 bar 1 0 0 〉 by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The optimal V/III ratios for high-quality AlN growth on 1 ° and 4 ° miscut substrates were found to be 20,000 and 1000, respectively. MOVPE grown N-polar AlN layer without hexagonal hillocks or step bunching was achieved using a 4H-SiC substrate with an intentional miscut of 1 ° towards 〈 1 bar 1 0 0 〉 . The 200-nm-thick AlN layer exhibited X-ray rocking curve full width half maximums of 203 arcsec and 389 arcsec for (0 0 2) and (1 0 2) reflections, respectively. The root mean square roughness was 0.4 nm for a 2 μm × 2 μm atomic force microscope scan.

  14. Analysing wind farm efficiency on complex terrains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Terzi, Ludovico; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Rodrigo, Javier Sanz

    2014-01-01

    Actual performances of onshore wind farms are deeply affected both by wake interactions and terrain complexity: therefore monitoring how the efficiency varies with the wind direction is a crucial task. Polar efficiency plot is therefore a useful tool for monitoring wind farm performances. The approach deserves careful discussion for onshore wind farms, where orography and layout commonly affect performance assessment. The present work deals with three modern wind farms, owned by Sorgenia Green, located on hilly terrains with slopes from gentle to rough. Further, onshore wind farm of Nprrekffir Enge has been analysed as a reference case: its layout is similar to offshore wind farms and the efficiency is mainly driven by wakes. It is shown and justified that terrain complexity imposes a novel and more consistent way for defining polar efficiency. Dependency of efficiency on wind direction, farm layout and orography is analysed and discussed. Effects of atmospheric stability have been also investigated through MERRA reanalysis data from NASA satellites. Monin-Obukhov Length has been used to discriminate climate regimes

  15. Low-cost fabrication and polar-dependent switching uniformity of memory devices using alumina interfacial layer and Ag nanoparticle monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A facile and low-cost process was developed for fabricating write-once-read-many-times (WORM Cu/Ag NPs/Alumina/Al memory devices, where the alumina passivation layer formed naturally in air at room temperature, whereas the Ag nanoparticle monolayer was in situ prepared through thermal annealing of a 4.5 nm Ag film in air at 150°C. The devices exhibit irreversible transition from initial high resistance (OFF state to low resistance (ON state, with ON/OFF ratio of 107, indicating the introduction of Ag nanoparticle monolayer greatly improves ON/OFF ratio by four orders of magnitude. The uniformity of threshold voltages exhibits a polar-dependent behavior, and a narrow range of threshold voltages of 0.40 V among individual devices was achieved upon the forward voltage. The memory device can be regarded as two switching units connected in series. The uniform alumina interfacial layer and the non-uniform distribution of local electric fields originated from Ag nanoparticles might be responsible for excellent switching uniformity. Since silver ions in active layer can act as fast ion conductor, a plausible mechanism relating to the formation of filaments sequentially among the two switching units connected in series is suggested for the polar-dependent switching behavior. Furthermore, we demonstrate both alumina layer and Ag NPs monolayer play essential roles in improving switching parameters based on comparative experiments.

  16. Significance of the double-layer capacitor effect in polar rubbery dielectrics and exceptionally stable low-voltage high transconductance organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lee, Wen-Ya; Kong, Desheng; Pfattner, Raphael; Schweicher, Guillaume; Nakajima, Reina; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Wu, Hung-Chin; Lopez, Jeffery; Diao, Ying; Gu, Xiaodan; Himmelberger, Scott; Niu, Weijun; Matthews, James R.; He, Mingqian; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Both high gain and transconductance at low operating voltages are essential for practical applications of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we describe the significance of the double-layer capacitance effect in polar rubbery dielectrics, even when present in a very low ion concentration and conductivity. We observed that this effect can greatly enhance the OFET transconductance when driven at low voltages. Specifically, when the polar elastomer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (e-PVDF-HFP) was used as the dielectric layer, despite a thickness of several micrometers, we obtained a transconductance per channel width 30 times higher than that measured for the same organic semiconductors fabricated on a semicrystalline PVDF-HFP with a similar thickness. After a series of detailed experimental investigations, we attribute the above observation to the double-layer capacitance effect, even though the ionic conductivity is as low as 10-10 S/cm. Different from previously reported OFETs with double-layer capacitance effects, our devices showed unprecedented high bias-stress stability in air and even in water.

  17. Low-cost fabrication and polar-dependent switching uniformity of memory devices using alumina interfacial layer and Ag nanoparticle monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng; Li, Luman; Wang, Pengfei; Gan, Ying; Xu, Wei

    2017-11-01

    A facile and low-cost process was developed for fabricating write-once-read-many-times (WORM) Cu/Ag NPs/Alumina/Al memory devices, where the alumina passivation layer formed naturally in air at room temperature, whereas the Ag nanoparticle monolayer was in situ prepared through thermal annealing of a 4.5 nm Ag film in air at 150°C. The devices exhibit irreversible transition from initial high resistance (OFF) state to low resistance (ON) state, with ON/OFF ratio of 107, indicating the introduction of Ag nanoparticle monolayer greatly improves ON/OFF ratio by four orders of magnitude. The uniformity of threshold voltages exhibits a polar-dependent behavior, and a narrow range of threshold voltages of 0.40 V among individual devices was achieved upon the forward voltage. The memory device can be regarded as two switching units connected in series. The uniform alumina interfacial layer and the non-uniform distribution of local electric fields originated from Ag nanoparticles might be responsible for excellent switching uniformity. Since silver ions in active layer can act as fast ion conductor, a plausible mechanism relating to the formation of filaments sequentially among the two switching units connected in series is suggested for the polar-dependent switching behavior. Furthermore, we demonstrate both alumina layer and Ag NPs monolayer play essential roles in improving switching parameters based on comparative experiments.

  18. Hybrid RANS/LES applied to complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind in complex terrain is limited by computational cost. The number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-ground turbulent structures (eddies) are very high. The traditional solution to the problem has been to apply a wall function...... aspect ratio in the RANS layer and thereby resolve the mean near-wall velocity profile. The method is applicable to complex terrain and the benefits of traditional LES are kept intact. Using the hybrid method, simulations of the wind over a natural complex terrain near Wellington in New Zealand...

  19. Recirculation over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutter, Eric; Yi, Chuixiang; Hendrey, George; Liu, Heping; Eaton, Timothy; Ni-Meister, Wenge

    2017-06-01

    This study generated eddy covariance data to investigate atmospheric dynamics leeward of a small, forested hillside in upstate New York. The causes and effects of recirculation eddies were examined to support the larger goal of improving measurement of the exchange of energy, moisture, and trace gases between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere over complex terrain. Sensors operated at five different altitudes on two separate towers—one at the top of the hill and one down the slope to the east—for approximately 8 weeks in the spring of 2013. During the experiment, the vertical potential temperature gradient was found to be the primary factor for determining whether winds interacting with the terrain features caused a recirculating eddy leeward of the hill. The study found evidence that the recirculation influenced carbon dioxide flux and caused the air column to be vertically well mixed.

  20. Quantifying Human Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    streaming media and instantaneous communications, nearly instant gratification has become the norm for most of the world. An investment in human terrain...Information is often thought of only as free when it resides on the unclassified enclave because the internet has made such tremendous amounts of information...freely available to anyone with access to the internet . This freedom of information fosters a self-perpetuating cycle of growth, where the freedom

  1. Controllable Release of Interleukin-4 in Double-Layer Sol-Gel Coatings on TiO2 Nanotubes for Modulating Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengting; Gao, LIli; Chen, Junhong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianxin; Lu, Xiong; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2017-10-23

    Classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages play key roles in regulating immune responses. M1 macrophages initiate angiogenesis in the early stages of wound healing or after implantation. However, their prolonged activation can lead to chronic inflammation. We speculated that biomedical implants with specific properties can induce a shift from M1 to M2 macrophages at a specific time point to promote tissue repair and wound healing. To investigate this possibility, drug-loaded double-layer sol-gel coatings were fabricated on TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs), which were used to modulate the switch from the M1 to the M2 phenotype by controlled release of interleukin (IL)-4. The lower sol-gel layer with IL-4 consisted of a carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) hydrogel, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide, and N-hydroxysuccinimide as a crosslinker (IL4/TNT). The upper layer fabricated on the IL4/TNT sample was another type of CMCS hydrogel that used genipin (GP) as a crosslinker (GP/IL4/TNT). We found that IL-4 was released from GP/IL4/TNTs in a controlled manner, with the greatest release occurring after 72 h. GP/IL4/TNT stimulated the polarization of macrophages from the M1 to M2 phenotype after the macrophage polarization from the M0 to M1 phenotype. This provides a template for the fabrication of biomaterials that can direct macrophage polarization and stimulate tissue regeneration following the initial inflammatory response to implants. . © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Urban Terrain Zone Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    concern in this study centers largely on whether the site is restrictive to urban expansion or permits it. For example, • Tel Aviv’s growth has been... urban growth has been rapid and have high proportions of framed buildings. These are Tel Aviv, Beirut, Panama City, Caracas, Kuala Lumpur, Tunis, and...Sea) 3) Asia and 4) Latin America. 56 Open SpKO 9.42 dethed 21-.0 27.32 42.3 X Figure 22. Urban terrain zones, major groups: Area. 57 Table 3 Urban

  3. Navigating Hypermasculine Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina Eske

    2017-01-01

    The study addresses how young women navigate urban terrains that are characterized by high levels of interpersonal aggression and crime. It is argued that young women apply a range of gendered tactics to establish safety and social mastery, and that these are framed by the limits and possibilities...... imposed by a street-based hypermasculine script. The analysis rests on an ethnographic study among 25 young Danish women aged 13 to 23 experienced in engaging in street-based physical violence. The study suggests that explorations of female tactics can provide a useful method of analysis for understanding...

  4. Probing the Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Runa

    2016-01-01

    navigational agility in everyday life conduct. The essay presents the case of the covert building of a chicken farm and house-to-become, where Palestinian landowner HH speculates in the territorial uncertainty and potential flexibility of the line dividing Area B from Area C, crossing his plot. HH’s disguised......Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating...

  5. Ultrathin limit and dead-layer effects in local polarization switching of BiFeO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maksymovych, P.; Huijben, Mark; Pan, M.; Jesse, S.; Balke, N.; Chu, Y.H.; Chang, H.J.; Borisevich, A.Y.; Baddorf, A.P.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.; Ramesh, R.; Kalinin, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    Using piezoresponse force microscopy in an ultrahigh vacuum, polarization switching has been detected and quantified in epitaxial BiFeO3 films from 200 to about 4 unit cells thick. Local remnant piezoresponse was utilized to probe both ferroelectric properties and effects of imperfect electrical

  6. Intimal lining layer macrophages but not synovial sublining macrophages display an IL-10 polarized-like phenotype in chronic synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarus, Carmen A.; Noordenbos, Troy; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial tissue macrophages play a key role in chronic inflammatory arthritis, but the contribution of different macrophage subsets in this process remains largely unknown. The main in vitro polarized macrophage subsets are classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages,

  7. Relativistic spin-polarized KKR theory for superconducting heterostructures: Oscillating order parameter in the Au layer of Nb/Au/Fe trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csire, Gábor; Deák, András; Nyári, Bendegúz; Ebert, Hubert; Annett, James F.; Újfalussy, Balázs

    2018-01-01

    The fully relativistic spin-polarized multiple-scattering theory is developed for inhomogeneous superconductors, including superconducting/normal-metal/ferromagnet heterostructures. The method allows the solution of the first-principles Dirac-Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations combined with a semiphenomenological parametrization of the exchange-correlation functional. Simple conditions are derived for the case when the right-hand-side and left-hand-side solutions must be treated separately when setting up the corresponding Green's function. As an application of the theory, we calculate the order parameters of Nb/Fe and Nb/Au/Fe systems. We find Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov-like oscillations in the iron layers, but more interestingly an oscillatory behavior is observed in the gold layers as well. The band-structure calculations suggest that this is the consequence of an interplay between the quantum-well states and ferromagnetism.

  8. Snow nitrate photolysis in polar regions and the mid-latitudes: Impact on boundary layer chemistry and implications for ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatko, Maria C.

    The formation and recycling of nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO 2) associated with snow nitrate photolysis has important implications for air quality and the preservation of nitrate in ice core records. This dissertation examines snow nitrate photolysis in polar and mid-latitude regions using field and laboratory based observations combined with snow chemistry column models and a global chemical transport model to explore the impacts of snow nitrate photolysis on boundary layer chemistry and the preservation of nitrate in polar ice cores. Chapter 1 describes how a global chemical transport model is used to calculate the photolysis-driven flux and redistribution of nitrogen across Antarctica, and Chapter 2 presents similar work for Greenland. Snow-sourced NOx is most dependent on the quantum yield for nitrate photolysis as well as the concentration of photolabile nitrate and light-absorbing impurities (e.g., black carbon, dust, organics) in snow. Model-calculated fluxes of snow-sourced NOx are similar in magnitude in Antarctica (0.5--7.8x108 molec cm-2 s -1) and Greenland (0.1--6.4x108 molec cm-2 s-1) because both nitrate and light-absorbing impurity concentrations in snow are higher (by factors of 2 and 10, respectively) in Greenland. Snow nitrate photolysis influences boundary layer chemistry and ice-core nitrate preservation less in Greenland compared to Antarctica largely due to Greenland's proximity to NOx-source regions. Chapter 3 describes how a snow chemistry column model combined with chemistry and optical measurements from the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2014 is used to calculate snow-sourced NOx in eastern Utah. Daily-averaged fluxes of snow-sourced NOx (2.9x10 7--1.3x108 molec cm-2 s-1) are similar in magnitude to polar snow-sourced NO x fluxes, but are only minor components of the Uintah Basin boundary layer NOx budget and can be neglected when developing ozone reduction strategies for the region. Chapter 4 presents chemical and optical

  9. Information measures for terrain visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Xavier; Sima, Aleksandra A.; Feixas, Miquel; Buckley, Simon J.; Sbert, Mateu; Howell, John A.

    2017-02-01

    Many quantitative and qualitative studies in geoscience research are based on digital elevation models (DEMs) and 3D surfaces to aid understanding of natural and anthropogenically-influenced topography. As well as their quantitative uses, the visual representation of DEMs can add valuable information for identifying and interpreting topographic features. However, choice of viewpoints and rendering styles may not always be intuitive, especially when terrain data are augmented with digital image texture. In this paper, an information-theoretic framework for object understanding is applied to terrain visualization and terrain view selection. From a visibility channel between a set of viewpoints and the component polygons of a 3D terrain model, we obtain three polygonal information measures. These measures are used to visualize the information associated with each polygon of the terrain model. In order to enhance the perception of the terrain's shape, we explore the effect of combining the calculated information measures with the supplementary digital image texture. From polygonal information, we also introduce a method to select a set of representative views of the terrain model. Finally, we evaluate the behaviour of the proposed techniques using example datasets. A publicly available framework for both the visualization and the view selection of a terrain has been created in order to provide the possibility to analyse any terrain model.

  10. Impact of terrain heterogeneity on near-surface turbulence structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesquet, Clément; Drobinski, Philippe; Barthlott, Christian; Dubos, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    This study investigates the impact of terrain heterogeneity on local turbulence measurements using 18 months of turbulence data taken on a 30 m tower at the SIRTA mixed land-use observatory under varying stability conditions and fetch configurations. These measurements show that turbulence variables such as the turbulent kinetic energy or momentum fluxes are strongly dependent on the upstream complexity of the terrain (presence of trees or buildings, open field). However, using a detection technique based on wavelet transforms which permits the isolation of the large-scale coherent structures from small-scale background fluctuations, the study shows that, for all stability conditions, whatever the upstream complexity of the terrain, the coherent structures display universal properties which are independent of the terrain nature: the frequency of occurrence, time duration of the coherent structures, the time separation between coherent structures and the relative contribution of the coherent structures to the total fluxes (momentum and heat) appear to be independent of the upstream roughness. This is an important result since coherent structures are known to transport a large portion of the total energy. This study extends to all stability conditions a numerical study by Fesquet et al. [Fesquet, C., Dupont, S., Drobinski, P., Barthlott, C., Dubos, T., 2008. Impact of terrain heterogeneities on coherent structures properties: experimental and numerical approaches. In: 18th Symposium on Boundary Layers and Turbulence. No. 11B.1. Stockholm, Sweden., Fesquet, C., Dupont, S., Drobinski, P., Dubos, T., Barthlott, C., in press. Impact of terrain heterogeneity on coherent structure properties: numerical approach. Bound.-Layer Meteorol.] conducted in neutral conditions which shows that a reason for such behavior is that the production of local active turbulence in an internal boundary layer associated with coherent structure originating from the outer layer and impinging

  11. Washboard Terrain on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; White, Oliver L.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnnon, William B.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Lauer, Tod R.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Catherine; Ennico, Kimberly; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-10-01

    Washboard texture or patterning consists of fields of parallel to sub-parallel ridges typically spaced ~1-2 km crest to crest and a few 100 m in amplitude (Fig. 4a in Moore et al., 2016, Science, 351, 1284-1293). For the most part, underlying topography can be easily discerned. We will refer to discrete, well-bounded patches of these landforms as Washboard Terrain (WT). WT is observed to occur along the rim, and just beyond the rim, of Sputnik basin from the West to NNW. Where it is seen in high-resolution data, it has clearly defined limits, beyond which it would be able to be seen if it were there. WT doesn’t occur at very low latitudes or very high latitudes (ranging from 22°N to 62°N). WT seems to occur most conspicuously on relatively level, gently sloping terrain. It is restricted to elevations between ~-2 km to Milankovitch timescales of ~1 Ma. If this hypothesis has validity, then perhaps the intermediate-albedo reddish material may be akin to ground moraine deposits.

  12. Polar boundary layer bromine explosion and ozone depletion events in the chemistry-climate model EMAC v2.52: implementation and evaluation of AirSnow algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Stefanie; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin

    2018-03-01

    Ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the polar boundary layer have been observed frequently during springtime. They are related to events of boundary layer enhancement of bromine. Consequently, increased amounts of boundary layer volume mixing ratio (VMR) and vertical column densities (VCDs) of BrO have been observed by in situ observation, ground-based as well as airborne remote sensing, and from satellites. These so-called bromine explosion (BE) events have been discussed serving as a source of tropospheric BrO at high latitudes, which has been underestimated in global models so far. We have implemented a treatment of bromine release and recycling on sea-ice- and snow-covered surfaces in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) based on the scheme of Toyota et al. (2011). In this scheme, dry deposition fluxes of HBr, HOBr, and BrNO3 over ice- and snow-covered surfaces are recycled into Br2 fluxes. In addition, dry deposition of O3, dependent on temperature and sunlight, triggers a Br2 release from surfaces associated with first-year sea ice. Many aspects of observed bromine enhancements and associated episodes of near-complete depletion of boundary layer ozone, both in the Arctic and in the Antarctic, are reproduced by this relatively simple approach. We present first results from our global model studies extending over a full annual cycle, including comparisons with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite BrO VCDs and surface ozone observations.

  13. Combined thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric analysis of lipid classes and fatty acids in malnourished polar bears (Ursus maritimus) which swam to Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibler, Dorothee; Krüger, Sabine; Skírnisson, Karl; Vetter, Walter

    2017-03-01

    Between 2008 and 2011, four polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Greenland population swam and/or drifted on ice to Iceland where they arrived in very poor body condition. Body fat resources in these animals were only between 0% and 10% of the body weight (usually 25%). Here we studied the lipid composition in different tissues (adipose tissue if available, liver, kidney and muscle). Lipid classes were determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and on-column gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The fatty acid pattern of total lipids and free fatty acids was analyzed by GC/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Additionally, cholesteryl esters and native fatty acid methyl esters, initially detected as zones in thin layer chromatograms, were enriched by solid phase extraction and quantified by GC/MS. The ratio of free fatty acids to native fatty acid methyl esters could be correlated with the remained body lipids in the polar bears and thus may also serve as a marker for other starving animals or even for humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multi-layer solid-phase extraction and evaporation-enrichment methods for polar organic chemicals from aqueous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köke, Niklas; Zahn, Daniel; Knepper, Thomas P; Frömel, Tobias

    2018-03-01

    Analysis of polar organic chemicals in the aquatic environment is exacerbated by the lack of suitable and widely applicable enrichment methods. In this work, we assessed the suitability of a novel combination of well-known solid-phase extraction (SPE) materials in one cartridge as well as an evaporation method and for the enrichment of 26 polar model substances (predominantly log D evaporation method were investigated for the recovery and matrix effects of the model substances and analyzed with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS). In total, 65% of the model substances were amenable (> 10% recovery) to the mlSPE method with a mean recovery of 76% while 73% of the model substances were enriched with the evaporation method achieving a mean recovery of 78%. Target and non-target screening comparison of both methods with a frequently used reversed-phase SPE method utilizing "hydrophilic and lipophilic balanced" (HLB) material was performed. Target analysis showed that the mlSPE and evaporation method have pronounced advantages over the HLB method since the HLB material retained only 30% of the model substances. Non-target screening of a ground water sample with the investigated enrichment methods showed that the median retention time of all detected features on a HILIC system decreased in the order mlSPE (3641 features, median t R 9.7 min), evaporation (1391, 9.3 min), HLB (4414, 7.2 min), indicating a higher potential of the described methods to enrich polar analytes from water compared with HLB-SPE. Graphical abstract Schematic of the method evaluation (recovery and matrix effects) and method comparison (target and non-target analysis) of the two investigated enrichment methods for very polar chemicals in aqueousmatrices.

  15. Washboard Terrain on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; White, Oliver L.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnon, William B.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Lauer, Tod R.; Cheng, Andrew F.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Washboard texture or patterning consists of fields of parallel to sub-parallel ridges typically spaced 1-2 km crest to crest and a few 100 m in amplitude (Fig. 4a in Moore et al., 2016, Science, 351, 1284-1293). For the most part, underlying topography can be easily discerned. We will refer to discrete, well-bounded patches of these landforms as Washboard Terrain (WT). WT is observed to occur along the rim, and just beyond the rim, of Sputnik basin from the West to NNW. Where it is seen in high-resolution data, it has clearly defined limits, beyond which it would be able to be seen if it were there. WT doesn't occur at very low latitudes or very high latitudes (ranging from 22degN to 62degN). WT seems to occur most conspicuously on relatively level, gently sloping terrain. It is restricted to elevations between approximately 2 km to less than +1.5 km (i.e. not at high elevations). The most noticeable regional aspect of the area in which WT occurs is the sinuous valley network, which is suspected to have been formed, or at least substantially modified, by glaciation. WT also appears to occur mainly on an intermediate-albedo reddish material, where seen in enhanced color data. Where it occurs in level terrain, WT tends to trend ENE - there doesn't seem to be a strong local control of its orientation in response to valley drainage directions. WT can display a greater range of orientations where it occurs in higher-relief (not higher elevation) settings such as spurs. WT appears superposed on very ancient landscapes, but is itself cratered locally by clusters of small (approximately 1-3 km) craters, which may be secondaries. This implies that WT may be intermediate in age. Of several working hypotheses, we currently provisionally favor that WT may be akin to terrestrial recessional moraines (or de Geer moraines) associated with the retreat of a higher stand of N2 glaciation that once overfilled Sputnik basin. These putative moraine features may owe their spacing to

  16. Polygonal terrains on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of water ice on Mars is well established. Some featureson the planet point to the occurrence of processes similar to those that take place in periglacial areas of Earth. One of the clues for this is the existence of small-scale polygonal terrains. In this paper, we present a methodology that aims at the automated identification of polygonal patterns on high-spatial resolution images of the surface of Mars. In the context of the research project TERPOLI, this step will be complemented with a full characterization, in both geometric and topological terms, of thenetworks detected. In this manner, we hope to collect data that will lead to a better understanding of the conditions of formation of the polygons, and of their temporal evolution; namely, we intend to identify different groups of polygons and to compare them with terrestrial examples.

  17. BIG1 is required for the survival of deep layer neurons, neuronal polarity, and the formation of axonal tracts between the thalamus and neocortex in developing brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Jie Teoh

    Full Text Available BIG1, an activator protein of the small GTPase, Arf, and encoded by the Arfgef1 gene, is one of candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy. To know the involvement of BIG1 in epileptic encephalopathy, we analyzed BIG1-deficient mice and found that BIG1 regulates neurite outgrowth and brain development in vitro and in vivo. The loss of BIG1 decreased the size of the neocortex and hippocampus. In BIG1-deficient mice, the neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs and the interneurons were unaffected. However, Tbr1+ and Ctip2+ deep layer (DL neurons showed spatial-temporal dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis gradually progressed from the piriform cortex (PIR, peaked in the neocortex, and then progressed into the hippocampus from embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5 to E17.5. The upper layer (UL and DL order in the neocortex was maintained in BIG1-deficient mice, but the excitatory neurons tended to accumulate before their destination layers. Further pulse-chase migration assay showed that the migration defect was non-cell autonomous and secondary to the progression of apoptosis into the BIG1-deficient neocortex after E15.5. In BIG1-deficient mice, we observed an ectopic projection of corticothalamic axons from the primary somatosensory cortex (S1 into the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN. The thalamocortical axons were unable to cross the diencephalon-telencephalon boundary (DTB. In vitro, BIG1-deficient neurons showed a delay in neuronal polarization. BIG1-deficient neurons were also hypersensitive to low dose glutamate (5 μM, and died via apoptosis. This study showed the role of BIG1 in the survival of DL neurons in developing embryonic brain and in the generation of neuronal polarity.

  18. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  19. Spectral Induced Polarization of Low-pH Concrete. Influence of the Electrical Double Layer and Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, P. G.; Gaboreau, S.; Zimmermann, E.; Hoerdt, A.; Claret, F.; Huisman, J. A.; Tournassat, C.

    2017-12-01

    Low-pH concretes are foreseen to be used in nuclear waste disposal. Understanding their reactivity upon the considered host-rock is a key point. Evolution of mineralogy, porosity, pore size distribution and connectivity can be monitored in situ using geophysical methods such as induced polarization (IP). This electrical method consists of injecting an alternating current and measuring the resulting voltage in the porous medium. Spectral IP (SIP) measurements in the 10 mHz to 10 kHz frequency range were carried out on low-pH concrete and cement paste first in equilibrium and then in contact with a CO2 enriched and diluted water. We observed a very high resistivity of the materials (> 10 kOhm m) and a strong phase shift between injected current and measured voltage (superior to 40 mrad and above 100 mrad for frequencies > 100 Hz). These observations were modelled by considering membrane polarization with ion exclusion in nanopores whose surface electrical properties were computed using a basic Stern model of the cement/water interface. Pore size distribution was deduced from SIP and was compared to the measured ones. In addition, we observed a decrease of the material resistivity due to the dissolution of cement in contact with external water. Our results show that SIP may be a valuable method to monitor the mineralogy and the petrophysical and transport properties of cements.

  20. Structural Analysis and Geodynamic Implications of Tessera Terrain, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, V. L.; Willis, J. J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding processes of tessera formation is fundamental to Venus tectonic and geodynamic models. We examined tessera terrain in Ishtar Terra, crustal plateaus, and as inliers within the plains using high-resolution Magellan SAR imagery. We describe several major types of tesseraeeach found in specific geologic or geomorphic regions. Fold and S-C tessera terrain are found only in Ishtar Terra; lava flow and basin-and-dome terrains reside within the interior of crustal plateaus, whereas folded ribbon terrain and extended folded terrain comprise margins of crustal plateaus; and star terrain lies within central Phoebe. Inliers are divisible into fracture-dominated and graben-dominated tesserae, which may represent ancient flooded coronae-chasmata and crustal plateaus, respectively. Thus tesserae might form in several tectonic environments, including as a result of (1) subsurface flow in Ishtar Terra, (2) as sequences of surface-layer extension and contraction in crustal plateaus, (3) as highly-extended, previously-deformed crustal plateaus which have deflated or sunken, and become flooded and thus preserved as large plains inliers, and (4) as densely-fractured surface layersfractured as a result of corona and chasma formationwhich have since sunken and become flooded, and thus preserved as isolated, scattered, highly-fractured inliers. If these models of formation are correct, tesserae would not form a global onion skin; they would not represent a globally synchronous unit; they would not record a single period of deformation; and it would not infer a single mechanism for tesserae formation.

  1. Determination of Net Martian Polar Dust Flux from MGS-TES Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Using atmospheric dust abundance and atmospheric temperature observation data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), the net flux of dust into and out of the Martian polar regions will be examined. Mars polar regions possess layered terrain , believed to be comprised of a mixture of ice and dust, with the different layers possibly representing different past climate regimes. These changes in climate may reflect changes in the deposition of dust and volatiles through impacts, volcanism, changes in resources of ice and dust, and response to Milankovitch type cycles (changes in eccentricity of orbit, obliquity and precession of axis). Understanding how rapidly such layers can be generated is an important element to understanding Mars climate history. This study uses the observed vertical temperature data and dust content measurements from TES to analyze the sign (gain or loss) of dust at high latitudes.

  2. Conversion of terahertz wave polarization at the boundary of a layered superconductor due to the resonance excitation of oblique surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averkov, Yu O; Yakovenko, V M; Yampol'skii, V A; Nori, Franco

    2012-07-13

    We predict a complete TM↔TE transformation of the polarization of terahertz electromagnetic waves reflected from a strongly anisotropic boundary of a layered superconductor. We consider the case when the wave is incident on the superconductor from a dielectric prism separated from the sample by a thin vacuum gap. The physical origin of the predicted phenomenon is similar to the Wood anomalies known in optics and is related to the resonance excitation of the oblique surface waves. We also discuss the dispersion relation for these waves, propagating along the boundary of the superconductor at some angle with respect to the anisotropy axis, as well as their excitation by the attenuated-total-reflection method.

  3. Temporal and spectral cloud screening of polar winter aerosol optical depth (AOD: impact of homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds and crystal layers on climatological-scale AODs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. O'Neill

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared star-photometry-derived, polar winter aerosol optical depths (AODs, acquired at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, and Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, with GEOS-Chem (GC simulations as well as ground-based lidar and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals over a sampling period of two polar winters. The results indicate significant cloud and/or low-altitude ice crystal (LIC contamination which is only partially corrected using temporal cloud screening. Spatially homogeneous clouds and LICs that remain after temporal cloud screening represent an inevitable systematic error in the estimation of AOD: this error was estimated to vary from 78 to 210 % at Eureka and from 2 to 157 % at Ny-Ålesund. Lidar analysis indicated that LICs appeared to have a disproportionately large influence on the homogeneous coarse-mode optical depths that escape temporal cloud screening. In principle, spectral cloud screening (to yield fine-mode or submicron AODs reduces pre-cloud-screened AODs to the aerosol contribution if one assumes that coarse-mode (super-micron aerosols are a minor part of the AOD. Large, low-frequency differences between these retrieved values and their GC analogue appeared to be often linked to strong, spatially extensive planetary boundary layer events whose presence at either site was inferred from CALIOP profiles. These events were either not captured or significantly underestimated by the GC simulations. High-frequency AOD variations of GC fine-mode aerosols at Ny-Ålesund were attributed to sea salt, while low-frequency GC variations at Eureka and Ny-Ålesund were attributable to sulfates. CALIOP profiles and AODs were invaluable as spatial and temporal redundancy support (or, alternatively, as insightful points of contention for star photometry retrievals and GC estimates of AOD.

  4. Polar boundary layer bromine explosion and ozone depletion events in the chemistry–climate model EMAC v2.52: implementation and evaluation of AirSnow algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Falk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion events (ODEs in the polar boundary layer have been observed frequently during springtime. They are related to events of boundary layer enhancement of bromine. Consequently, increased amounts of boundary layer volume mixing ratio (VMR and vertical column densities (VCDs of BrO have been observed by in situ observation, ground-based as well as airborne remote sensing, and from satellites. These so-called bromine explosion (BE events have been discussed serving as a source of tropospheric BrO at high latitudes, which has been underestimated in global models so far. We have implemented a treatment of bromine release and recycling on sea-ice- and snow-covered surfaces in the global chemistry–climate model EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry based on the scheme of Toyota et al. (2011. In this scheme, dry deposition fluxes of HBr, HOBr, and BrNO3 over ice- and snow-covered surfaces are recycled into Br2 fluxes. In addition, dry deposition of O3, dependent on temperature and sunlight, triggers a Br2 release from surfaces associated with first-year sea ice. Many aspects of observed bromine enhancements and associated episodes of near-complete depletion of boundary layer ozone, both in the Arctic and in the Antarctic, are reproduced by this relatively simple approach. We present first results from our global model studies extending over a full annual cycle, including comparisons with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite BrO VCDs and surface ozone observations.

  5. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of high quality, high indium composition N-polar InGaN layers for tunnel devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cory; Romanczyk, Brian; Catalano, Massimo; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Wenjun; DiGiovanni, Domenic; Kim, Moon J.; Fay, Patrick; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Keller, Stacia

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the growth of high quality N-polar InGaN films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented with a focus on growth process optimization for high indium compositions and the structural and tunneling properties of such films. Uniform InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well stacks with indium compositions up to 0.46 were grown with local compositional analysis performed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within a scanning transmission electron microscope. Bright room-temperature photoluminescence up to 600 nm was observed for films with indium compositions up to 0.35. To study the tunneling behavior of the InGaN layers, N-polar GaN/In0.35Ga0.65N/GaN tunnel diodes were fabricated which reached a maximum current density of 1.7 kA/cm2 at 5 V reverse bias. Temperature-dependent measurements are presented and confirm tunneling behavior under reverse bias.

  6. An Ultra-Wideband, Microwave Radar for Measuring Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Mapping Near-Surface Internal Layers in Polar Firn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Ben; Gomez-Garcia, Daniel; Leuschen, Carl; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Patel, Azsa; Markus, Thorsten; Holt, Benjamin; Gogineni, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is generally covered with snow, which can vary in thickness from a few centimeters to >1 m. Snow cover acts as a thermal insulator modulating the heat exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, and it impacts sea-ice growth rates and overall thickness, a key indicator of climate change in polar regions. Snow depth is required to estimate sea-ice thickness using freeboard measurements made with satellite altimeters. The snow cover also acts as a mechanical load that depresses ice freeboard (snow and ice above sea level). Freeboard depression can result in flooding of the snow/ice interface and the formation of a thick slush layer, particularly in the Antarctic sea-ice cover. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an ultra-wideband, microwave radar capable of operation on long-endurance aircraft to characterize the thickness of snow over sea ice. The low-power, 100mW signal is swept from 2 to 8GHz allowing the air/snow and snow/ ice interfaces to be mapped with 5 c range resolution in snow; this is an improvement over the original system that worked from 2 to 6.5 GHz. From 2009 to 2012, CReSIS successfully operated the radar on the NASA P-3B and DC-8 aircraft to collect data on snow-covered sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic for NASA Operation IceBridge. The radar was found capable of snow depth retrievals ranging from 10cm to >1 m. We also demonstrated that this radar can be used to map near-surface internal layers in polar firn with fine range resolution. Here we describe the instrument design, characteristics and performance of the radar.

  7. TERRAIN, OVERTON COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, STEWART COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, HOUSTON COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, SHELBY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, SEBASTIAN COUNTY, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographical data that were used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, Webster COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, WALKER COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, BIBB COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, Ohio USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, OWEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, TALLAPOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, SCOTT COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, MARSHALL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, CHILTON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. Terrain Adaptive Reconfiguration of Mobility

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an algorithm (and software) to automatically adapt a reconfigurable robot to different types of terrains for improved mobility, that compared to SOA:...

  4. TERRAIN, TANEY COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, HENRY COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, BARREN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, MUHLENBERG COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, NATCHITOCHES PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, BUFFALO COUNTY, WISCONSIN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, LOWNDES COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, ELMORE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, GADSDEN COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, CLARKE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, FAYETTE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, MARENGO COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, HARRISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN Submission for CHICKASAW, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, LOGAN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, HART COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, BRADFORD COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, MONROE COUNTY, Michigan USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, UNION COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, LEWIS COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, NICHOLAS COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, GRANT COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, HENDERSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, CHOCTAW COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, LEVY COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, ALLENDALE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Terrain-Adaptive Navigation Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, Daniel M.; Angelova, Anelia; Matthies, Larry H.; Helmick, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    A navigation system designed for a Mars rover has been designed to deal with rough terrain and/or potential slip when evaluating and executing paths. The system also can be used for any off-road, autonomous vehicles. The system enables vehicles to autonomously navigate different terrain challenges including dry river channel systems, putative shorelines, and gullies emanating from canyon walls. Several of the technologies within this innovation increase the navigation system s capabilities compared to earlier rover navigation algorithms.

  16. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over a variety of types of complex terrain: on tops of hills and escarpments, over land downstream of a water surface, and over rolling terrain. Differences between spectra over many types of complex terrain, and over uniform terrain, can be explained by these hypothese...

  17. Complete Scene Recovery and Terrain Classification in Textured Terrain Meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyhyun Um

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrain classification allows a mobile robot to create an annotated map of its local environment from the three-dimensional (3D and two-dimensional (2D datasets collected by its array of sensors, including a GPS receiver, gyroscope, video camera, and range sensor. However, parts of objects that are outside the measurement range of the range sensor will not be detected. To overcome this problem, this paper describes an edge estimation method for complete scene recovery and complete terrain reconstruction. Here, the Gibbs-Markov random field is used to segment the ground from 2D videos and 3D point clouds. Further, a masking method is proposed to classify buildings and trees in a terrain mesh.

  18. Atmospheric stability and complex terrain: comparing measurements and CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Berg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    -neutral atmospheric flow over complex terrain including physical processes like stability and Coriolis force. We examine the influence of these effects on the whole atmospheric boundary layer using the DTU Wind Energy flow solver EllipSys3D. To validate the flow solver, measurements from Benakanahalli hill, a field...... experiment that took place in India in early 2010, are used. The experiment was specifically designed to address the combined effects of stability and Coriolis force over complex terrain, and provides a dataset to validate flow solvers. Including those effects into EllipSys3D significantly improves......For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface layer. So far, physical processes that are specific to the atmospheric boundary layer, for example the Coriolis force...

  19. Processing Terrain Point Cloud Data

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald

    2013-01-10

    Terrain point cloud data are typically acquired through some form of Light Detection And Ranging sensing. They form a rich resource that is important in a variety of applications including navigation, line of sight, and terrain visualization. Processing terrain data has not received the attention of other forms of surface reconstruction or of image processing. The goal of terrain data processing is to convert the point cloud into a succinct representation system that is amenable to the various application demands. The present paper presents a platform for terrain processing built on the following principles: (i) measuring distortion in the Hausdorff metric, which we argue is a good match for the application demands, (ii) a multiscale representation based on tree approximation using local polynomial fitting. The basic elements held in the nodes of the tree can be efficiently encoded, transmitted, visualized, and utilized for the various target applications. Several challenges emerge because of the variable resolution of the data, missing data, occlusions, and noise. Techniques for identifying and handling these challenges are developed. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  20. Contrasting atmospheric boundary layer chemistry of methylhydroperoxide (CH3OOH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 above polar snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Friel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric hydroperoxides (ROOH were measured at Summit, Greenland (72.97° N, 38.77° W in summer 2003 (SUM03 and spring 2004 (SUM04 and South Pole in December 2003 (SP03. The two dominant hydroperoxides were H2O2 and CH3OOH (from here on MHP with average (±1σ mixing ratios of 1448 (±688 pptv, 204 (±162 and 278 (±67 for H2O2 and 578 (±377 pptv, 139 (±101 pptv and 138 (±89 pptv for MHP, respectively. In early spring, MHP dominated the ROOH budget and showed night time maxima and daytime minima, out of phase with the diurnal cycle of H2O2, suggesting that the organic peroxide is controlled by photochemistry, while H2O2 is largely influenced by temperature driven exchange between the atmosphere and snow. Highly constrained photochemical box model runs yielded median ratios between modeled and observed MHP of 52%, 148% and 3% for SUM03, SUM04 and SP03, respectively. At Summit firn air measurements and model calculations suggest a daytime sink of MHP in the upper snow pack, which decreases in strength through the spring season into the summer. Up to 50% of the estimated sink rates of 1–5×1011 molecules m−3 s−1 equivalent to 24–96 pptv h−1 can be explained by photolysis and reaction with the OH radical in firn air and in the quasi-liquid layer on snow grains. Rapid processing of MHP in surface snow is expected to contribute significantly to a photochemical snow pack source of formaldehyde (CH2O. Conversely, summer levels of MHP at South Pole are inconsistent with the prevailing high NO concentrations, and cannot be explained currently by known photochemical precursors or transport, thus suggesting a missing source. Simultaneous measurements of H2O2, MHP and CH2O allow to constrain the NO background today and potentially also in the past using ice cores, although it seems less likely that MHP is preserved in firn and ice.

  1. Geological Mapping of Tectonized Terrains in the Trailing Hemisphere of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow-Willard, E. N.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2009-05-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus has a currently active South Polar Terrain (SPT) that is intensely tectonized. Other portions of the surface of Enceladus, specifically the trailing hemisphere, have also been intensely tectonized, inviting comparisons to the SPT. Through geological mapping, we recognize seven different geological units and their relative ages on the trailing hemisphere. From oldest to youngest, they are: (1) heavily cratered terrain, at the northern edge of the tectonized region; (2) moderately cratered terrain, to the northeast and northwest of the tectonized region; (3) finely striated ridge and trough terrain, which make up the bulk of Sarandib and Diyar Planitiae; (4) boundary curved terrain, which is similar in shape to the southern curved terrain that comprises the northern edge of the SPT, but with more subdued topography, and is composed of Samarkand, Hamah, and Harran Sulci; (5) ridged terrain, composed of the Cufa Dorsa and Ebony Dorsum, which probably formed through deformation of older finely striated ridge and trough terrain; (6) terrain with linear, widely spaced, smooth depressions, comprising the southern portion of the trailing hemisphere's tectonized region; (7) southern curved terrain of Cashmere Sulci, which forms the northern boundary of the SPT. Fractures that are younger than or contemporaneous with the SPT's southern curved terrain (including Labtayt Sulci and Khorasan Fossa) cut across the trailing hemisphere. We will present a geological map of the region, along with interpretations of the stratigraphy and geological history that our mapping implies. We will address geological and age comparisons relative to the SPT, with implications for whether similar or different processes have shaped the SPT and the tectonized trailing hemisphere.

  2. Complex terrain and wind lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, F.

    2009-08-15

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar can be of the order of 3-4% in moderately-complex terrain and up to 10% in complex terrain. The findings were based on experiments involving collocated lidars and meteorological masts, together with flow calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to approx6h. At the forest edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17 deg.. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method. The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be

  3. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sculpting Mountains: Interactive Terrain Modeling Based on Subsurface Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Guillaume; Cani, Marie-Paule; Benes, Bedrich; Braun, Jean; Galin, Eric

    2018-05-01

    Most mountain ranges are formed by the compression and folding of colliding tectonic plates. Subduction of one plate causes large-scale asymmetry while their layered composition (or stratigraphy) explains the multi-scale folded strata observed on real terrains. We introduce a novel interactive modeling technique to generate visually plausible, large scale terrains that capture these phenomena. Our method draws on both geological knowledge for consistency and on sculpting systems for user interaction. The user is provided hands-on control on the shape and motion of tectonic plates, represented using a new geologically-inspired model for the Earth crust. The model captures their volume preserving and complex folding behaviors under collision, causing mountains to grow. It generates a volumetric uplift map representing the growth rate of subsurface layers. Erosion and uplift movement are jointly simulated to generate the terrain. The stratigraphy allows us to render folded strata on eroded cliffs. We validated the usability of our sculpting interface through a user study, and compare the visual consistency of the earth crust model with geological simulation results and real terrains.

  5. Treinta y Tres stratigraphic terrain: ex Cuchilla Dionisio terrain. Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, J.

    2010-01-01

    From 1998 we are discussing if the eastern area of ZCSB is an allochtonous block named TCD or if it belongs to Dom Feliciano belt with an age of 500 - 700 Ma. This crustal block is difficult to study because Laguna Merin Graben cut it in two around 4000 k m2 crustal fragments distant s more de 100 km between them. Southern block which was named T PE by Masquelín (2006) was demonstrated as allochtonous by Bossi and Gaucher (2004) destroying the Cdf model but seriously complicating the stratigraphic terminology. It is proposed to do some changes in order to profit the general agreement about allochtomy. The CDT with change by Treinta y Tres terrane; T PE become sub - terrain Punta del Este; sub - terrain Cuchilla Dionisio for the septetrional block. From 1998 we are discussing if the eastern area of ZCSB is an allochtonous block named TCD or if it belongs to Dom Feliciano belt with an age of 500 - 700 Ma. This crustal block is difficult to study because Laguna Merín Graben cut it in two around 4000 k m2 crustal fragments distant s more de 100 km between them. Southern block which was named T PE by Masquelín (2006) was demonstrated as allochtonous by Bossi and Gaucher (2004) destroying the CDF model but seriously complicating the stratigraphic terminology. It is proposed to do some changes in order to profit the general agreement about allochtomy. The CDT with change by Treinta y Tres terrain; TPE become sub - terrain Punta del Este; sub - terrain Cuchilla Dionisio for the septetrional block

  6. Influence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (< 0.001 wt %) and/or zwitter-ionic phospholipid (SOPC) surface layer on the behaviour of the gradient flexoelectric and surface induced polarization domains arising in a homeotropic E7 (a mixture of 5CB, 7CB, 8OCB and 5CT) nematic layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinov, H P; Pavlic, J I; Marinov, Y G; Petrov, A G; Sridevi, S; Rafailov, P M; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U

    2010-01-01

    The influence has been studied of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a concentration between 0.0001 and 0.001 wt % and a dried zwitter-ionic phospholipid (SOPC: l-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) layer of thickness, smaller than 0.5 μm, deposited only on a half of one of the two glass plates, on the behaviour of the gradient flexoelectric and surface polarization induced domains arising in a homeotropic nematic E7 (a mixture of 5CB, 7CB, 8OCB and 5CT) layer. We have observed for the first time different polar on/off formation of the surface polarization induced domains in the region of the liquid crystal cell without surface deposited lipid SOPC layer. On the other hand, the SOPC layer strongly decreases the gradient of the electric field thus leading to less-pronounced flexoelectric domains. However, the SOPC layer does not influence the creation of surface polarization induced domains and of injection induced domains arising at voltages above 4V. Appropriate dynamic light transmitted curves have been recorded and typical microphotographs have been taken.

  7. Tectonized Terrains of Enceladus: The Same but Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Crow-Willard, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has now imaged Enceladus sufficiently well to recognize details of the satellite’s three distinct large-scale quasi-circular regions of tectonic deformation. In addition to the well-known “south polar terrain” (SPT), Enceladus also displays tectonically deformed terrains that we refer to as “trailing hemisphere terrain” (THT) and “leading hemisphere terrain” (LHT). Global geological mapping shows that each of the three terrains has a central region of tectonic deformation that is framed by units of curvilinear ridges and troughs, and all have comparable areal extent (the SPT being the smallest). Initial mapping by Porco et al. (Science 311, 1393, 2006) shows that the SPT has a central region which contains the distinctive subparallel “tiger stripes” and is wrapped by curvilinear terrain displaying outward-pointed Y-shaped zones of deformation that transition into radiating fracture zones. In its central region, the THT contains relatively old striated plains (Diyar and Sarandib Planitiae). These striated units are transected by ridged terrain, characterized by large ridges (the unusual “dorsa”), which are inferred to have formed by contraction and thrust faulting. The THT contains a unit consisting of smooth materials and long shallow troughs that is nearly identical to materials of the central SPT and with similar orientation. The LHT also contains a disorganized network of troughs similar to the central terrain of the SPT. The LHT contains polygons of sub-parallel troughs, suggestive of shearing. Neither the THT nor the LHT displays long individual and subparallel tectonic fractures that resemble the tiger stripes, and neither displays radiating fracture zones like those of the SPT. The gross similarities in shape and dimension of the tectonized terrains of Enceladus suggest similar formational processes, plausibly representing deformation above large-scale regions of warm ice. However, differences in morphological

  8. Profiling of Saharan dust from the Caribbean to western Africa – Part 1: Layering structures and optical properties from shipborne polarization/Raman lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rittmeister

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present final and quality-assured results of multiwavelength polarization/Raman lidar observations of the Saharan air layer (SAL over the tropical Atlantic. Observations were performed aboard the German research vessel R/V Meteor during the 1-month transatlantic cruise from Guadeloupe to Cabo Verde over 4500 km from 61.5 to 20° W at 14–15° N in April–May 2013. First results of the shipborne lidar measurements, conducted in the framework of SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol–Cloud Interaction Experiment, were reported by Kanitz et al.(2014. Here, we present four observational cases representing key stages of the SAL evolution between Africa and the Caribbean in detail in terms of layering structures and optical properties of the mixture of predominantly dust and aged smoke in the SAL. We discuss to what extent the lidar results confirm the validity of the SAL conceptual model which describes the dust long-range transport and removal processes over the tropical Atlantic. Our observations of a clean marine aerosol layer (MAL, layer from the surface to the SAL base confirm the conceptual model and suggest that the removal of dust from the MAL, below the SAL, is very efficient. However, the removal of dust from the SAL assumed in the conceptual model to be caused by gravitational settling in combination with large-scale subsidence is weaker than expected. To explain the observed homogenous (height-independent dust optical properties from the SAL base to the SAL top, from the African coast to the Caribbean, we have to assume that the particle sedimentation strength is reduced and dust vertical mixing and upward transport mechanisms must be active in the SAL. Based on lidar observations on 20 nights at different longitudes in May 2013, we found, on average, MAL and SAL layer mean values (at 532 nm of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio of 17±5 sr (MAL and 43±8 sr (SAL, of the particle

  9. Profiling of Saharan dust from the Caribbean to western Africa - Part 1: Layering structures and optical properties from shipborne polarization/Raman lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmeister, Franziska; Ansmann, Albert; Engelmann, Ronny; Skupin, Annett; Baars, Holger; Kanitz, Thomas; Kinne, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    We present final and quality-assured results of multiwavelength polarization/Raman lidar observations of the Saharan air layer (SAL) over the tropical Atlantic. Observations were performed aboard the German research vessel R/V Meteor during the 1-month transatlantic cruise from Guadeloupe to Cabo Verde over 4500 km from 61.5 to 20° W at 14-15° N in April-May 2013. First results of the shipborne lidar measurements, conducted in the framework of SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment), were reported by Kanitz et al.(2014). Here, we present four observational cases representing key stages of the SAL evolution between Africa and the Caribbean in detail in terms of layering structures and optical properties of the mixture of predominantly dust and aged smoke in the SAL. We discuss to what extent the lidar results confirm the validity of the SAL conceptual model which describes the dust long-range transport and removal processes over the tropical Atlantic. Our observations of a clean marine aerosol layer (MAL, layer from the surface to the SAL base) confirm the conceptual model and suggest that the removal of dust from the MAL, below the SAL, is very efficient. However, the removal of dust from the SAL assumed in the conceptual model to be caused by gravitational settling in combination with large-scale subsidence is weaker than expected. To explain the observed homogenous (height-independent) dust optical properties from the SAL base to the SAL top, from the African coast to the Caribbean, we have to assume that the particle sedimentation strength is reduced and dust vertical mixing and upward transport mechanisms must be active in the SAL. Based on lidar observations on 20 nights at different longitudes in May 2013, we found, on average, MAL and SAL layer mean values (at 532 nm) of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) of 17±5 sr (MAL) and 43±8 sr (SAL), of the particle linear depolarization ratio of 0

  10. Handling Massive and Dynamic Terrain Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbæk, Morten

    models are increasingly being updated as a result of new data collection or editing done by users. This transforms a terrain model into a dynamic object, and presents a set of new algorithmic challenges. In this thesis we consider some of the above challenges. To enable analysis of massive terrain data...... we develop so-called I/O-efficient algorithms for a set of well-known terrain analysis problems. First, we present an I/O-efficient algorithm for terrain model simplification. This algorithm can be used in connection with terrain analysis to reduce the topological complexity of a detailed terrain...... model before performing the actual analysis. Then we present an I/O-efficient algorithm for extracting simplified yet precise contour maps from detailed terrain models. Finally, we present an I/O-efficient algorithm for estimating the flood risk from water collecting in basins of a terrain model during...

  11. Sodar detection of mixing height in flat and mountainous terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennemuth, B [Consulting Meteorologist, Hamburg (Germany); Kirtzel, H-Juergen [METEK GmbH, Elmshorn (Germany)], E-mail: barbara.hennemuth@zmaw.de

    2008-05-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer plays an important role in air pollution and dispersion problems because the transport processes are managed within this layer and its top limits the vertical exchange of pollutants. A method for the derivation of the mixing height from measurements of sodar, RASS and sonic anemometer-thermometer is presented for flat terrain. It does not only use vertical profiles of measured parameters but also bulk information like histograms and time evolution. Results from a two-years period are verified by radiosonde-derived mixing height values and show the potential of the combination of the three systems to monitor the mixing height. Difficulties arise at locations in mountainous terrain where thermal wind regimes dominate which are highly non-local. An additional problem is a strong local heat source at an industrial site where even the definition of the mixing height is unclear.

  12. F-16 MMC Strafe in Mountainous Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 Background ...identification by analyzing the geometry of the two attack options against various degrees of rising terrain. Background On 27 November 2007...Operating in “mountainous” terrain requires the pilot to execute different IFR terrain clearance. Air Force Instruction 11-202 volume 3 defines

  13. Numerical simulation of flow over bariers in complex terrain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bodnár, Tomáš; Beneš, L.; Kozel, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 31, 5-6 (2008), s. 619-632 ISSN 1124-1896 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400760405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : boundary layer * complex terrain * finite difference Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.277, year: 2008 http://prometeo.sif.it:8080/papers/?pid=ncc9331

  14. Prediction models in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti, I.; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the work is to investigatethe performance of HIRLAM in complex terrain when used as input to energy production forecasting models, and to develop a statistical model to adapt HIRLAM prediction to the wind farm. The features of the terrain, specially the topography, influence...... the performance of HIRLAM in particular with respect to wind predictions. To estimate the performance of the model two spatial resolutions (0,5 Deg. and 0.2 Deg.) and different sets of HIRLAM variables were used to predict wind speed and energy production. The predictions of energy production for the wind farms...... are calculated using on-line measurements of power production as well as HIRLAM predictions as input thus taking advantage of the auto-correlation, which is present in the power production for shorter pediction horizons. Statistical models are used to discribe the relationship between observed energy production...

  15. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  16. The polar mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Ray; Murphy, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere region, which lies at the edge of space, contains the coldest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, with summer temperatures as low as minus 130 °C. In this extreme environment ice aerosol layers have appeared since the dawn of industrialization—whose existence may arguably be linked to human influence—on yet another layer of the Earth's fragile atmosphere. Ground-based and space-based experiments conducted in the Arctic and Antarctic during the International Polar Year (IPY) aim to address limitations in our knowledge and to advance our understanding of thermal and dynamical processes at play in the polar mesosphere

  17. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  18. Effect of LaInO3 layer thickness on the conductance enhancement at the LaInO3/Ba1-XLaXSnO3 polar interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chulkwon; Kim, Useong; Shin, Juyeon; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Youjung; Char, Kookrin

    We have recently reported on the high performance thin film transistors based on La-doped BaSnO3 (BLSO), which has high electron mobility and thermal stability, with LaInO3 (LIO) gate dielectric. During the course of this research we have observed 104 times enhancement of the sheet conductance of BLSO channel layer, which implies formation of 2DEG, after the interface formation with LIO. Detailed further study revealed that the La concentration in the BLSO channel layer critically affects the enhancement of sheet conductance on the LIO/BSO interface. We investigated the LIO thickness dependence on the conductance of LIO/BSO interface and will discuss the origin of this phenomenon in terms of the intrinsic interface polarization in the LIO layer. This understanding is the first step towards the device application of the perovskite oxide heterostructures and may potentially lead to new interface states.

  19. Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat

    software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow...... edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17º. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method...

  20. Effect of the undoped BaSnO3 space layer on the high mobility LaInO3/Ba1-xLaxSnO3 polar interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Juyeon; Park, Chulkwon; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Youjung; Char, Kookrin

    We have recently reported on the sheet conductance enhancement at the interface between two band insulators: LaInO3 (LIO) and BaSnO3 (BSO). The advantages of the two-dimensional electron gas-like (2DEG) state at the LIO/Ba1-xLaxSnO3 (BLSO) polar interface are its stability, the controllability of the local carrier concentration, and the high electron mobility of BLSO. The origin of enhanced conductance at the interface is still under investigation, but the doping level of BSO is a critical parameter for the polar charge contribution. We have investigated a new structure using an undoped BSO space layer at the LIO/BLSO interface. On one hand, this new structure will improve the mobility of the LIO/BLSO structure by reducing La impurity scattering. On the other hand, through this new structure we can answer the issues related with La diffusion at the LIO/BLSO polar interface and trace the origin of the 2DEG-like charge. This new modified structure of the LIO/BSO polar interface looks promising for higher electron mobility devices.

  1. Terrain Classification of Norwegian Slab Avalanche Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallandvik, Linda; Aadland, Eivind; Vikene, Odd Lennart

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to rely on snow conditions, weather, and human factors when making judgments about avalanche risk because these variables are dynamic and complex; terrain, however, is more easily observed and interpreted. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate (1) the type of terrain in which historical fatal snow avalanche accidents in Norway…

  2. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  3. Quantitative studies of the Martian south polar region using spacecraft images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herkenhoff, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Mariner 9 images were processed for comparison with nearly simultaneous infrared spectra of the south polar cap of Mars. Combined analysis of these observations indicates that the southern residual cap was covered by carbon dioxide frost throughout the summer of 1971-72. Five color/albedo units have been recognized and mapped in the southern layered deposits on Mars. Shadow brightnesses were measured and modeled in order to correct for the effects of atmospheric scattering and quantify the albedo and color of the surface. The layered deposits appear to be mantled by red dust, except where eolian stripping has exposed the darker, less red underlying bedrock. Frost and bare ground are mixed below the resolution of the images in many areas, some of which appear to be younger than the surrounding layered terrain. The available observational data suggest that the layered deposits are composed of bright dust, water ice, and a small amount of dark material. Weathering of the layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the data presented here and previous observations of the north polar deposits. The non-volatile component of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust or sand. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particle upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. Eventual destruction of the particle could allow recycling of the dark dust into the layered deposits via atmospheric suspension

  4. Terrain assessment guidelines : CAGC best practice. Version 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This terrain classification assessment guideline discussed the steps required for personnel to understand terrain hazards present during seismic operations. Maps and other sources must be used to classify terrain steepness and surface conditions using geographical information systems (GIS), LIDAR, or satellite photographs. The impact of managing steep terrain within projects must also be considered when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrains must also be classified according to colours. Secondary terrain assessments must be conducted when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrain management plans should included methods of keeping untrained workers out of areas with classes greater than 3. Methods of entering and exiting steep terrain must be identified. Workers must be trained to work in areas with steep terrains. Methods of rescue and evacuation must also be established. Procedures were outlined for all terrain classes. Footwear, head protection and general safety requirements were outlined. 14 figs.

  5. Platform for Testing Robotic Vehicles on Simulated Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Randel

    2006-01-01

    The variable terrain tilt platform (VTTP) is a means of providing simulated terrain for mobility testing of engineering models of the Mars Exploration Rovers. The VTTP could also be used for testing the ability of other robotic land vehicles (and small vehicles in general) to move across terrain under diverse conditions of slope and surface texture, and in the presence of obstacles of various sizes and shapes. The VTTP consists mostly of a 16-ft-(4.88-m)-square tilt table. The tilt can be adjusted to any angle between 0 (horizontal) and 25 . The test surface of the table can be left bare; can be covered with hard, high-friction material; or can be covered with sand, gravel, and/or other ground-simulating material or combination of materials to a thickness of as much as 6 in. (approx. 15 cm). Models of rocks, trenches, and other obstacles can be placed on the simulated terrain. For example, for one of the Mars- Rover tests, a high-friction mat was attached to the platform, then a 6-in.- ( 15 cm) deep layer of dry, loose beach sand was deposited on the mat. The choice of these two driving surface materials was meant to bound the range of variability of terrain that the rover was expected to encounter on the Martian surface. At each of the different angles at which tests were performed, for some of the tests, rocklike concrete obstacles ranging in height from 10 to 25 cm were placed in the path of the rover (see figure). The development of the VTTP was accompanied by development of a methodology of testing to characterize the performance and modes of failure of a vehicle under test. In addition to variations in slope, ground material, and obstacles, testing typically includes driving up-slope, down-slope, cross-slope, and at intermediate angles relative to slope. Testing includes recording of drive-motor currents, wheel speeds, articulation of suspension mechanisms, and the actual path of the vehicle over the simulated terrain. The collected data can be used to

  6. Key Terrain: Application to the Layers of Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Maintenance System - Enhanced SATCOM satellite communications SCADA supervisory control and data acquisition SLOC sea lines of communication SQL structured...the assessment and update of cyber doctrine as it too is necessary for the success of the U.S. military. Winterfeld (2001), recognizing the speed at...development of cyber IPB doctrine, Winterfeld suggests updated doctrine be integrated into training installations and exercises to ensure leaders are

  7. Human Robotic Systems (HRS): Extreme Terrain Mobility Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During 2014, the Extreme Terrain Mobility project element is developing five technologies:Exoskeleton Development for ISS EvaluationExtreme Terrain Mobility...

  8. Hydrographic Basins Analysis Using Digital Terrain Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaela, Pişleagă; -Minda Codruţa, Bădăluţă; Gabriel, Eleş; Daniela, Popescu

    2017-10-01

    The paper, emphasis the link between digital terrain modelling and studies of hydrographic basins, concerning the hydrological processes analysis. Given the evolution of computing techniques but also of the software digital terrain modelling made its presence felt increasingly, and established itself as a basic concept in many areas, due to many advantages. At present, most digital terrain modelling is derived from three alternative sources such as ground surveys, photogrammetric data capture or from digitized cartographic sources. A wide range of features may be extracted from digital terrain models, such as surface, specific points and landmarks, linear features but also areal futures like drainage basins, hills or hydrological basins. The paper highlights how the use appropriate software for the preparation of a digital terrain model, a model which is subsequently used to study hydrographic basins according to various geomorphological parameters. As a final goal, it shows the link between digital terrain modelling and hydrographic basins study that can be used to optimize the correlation between digital model terrain and hydrological processes in order to obtain results as close to the real field processes.

  9. Terrain identification for RHex-type robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Camilo; Shill, Jacob; Johnson, Aaron; Clark, Jonathan; Collins, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Terrain identification is a key enabling ability for generating terrain adaptive behaviors that assist both robot planning and motor control. This paper considers running legged robots from the RHex family) which the military plans to use in the field to assist troops in reconnaissance tasks. Important terrain adaptive behaviors include the selection of gaits) modulation of leg stiffness) and alteration of steering control laws that minimize slippage) maximize speed and/or reduce energy consumption. These terrain adaptive behaviors can be enabled by a terrain identification methodology that combines proprioceptive sensors already available in RHex-type robots. The proposed classification approach is based on the characteristic frequency signatures of data from leg observers) which combine current sensing with a dynamic model of the leg motion. The paper analyzes the classification accuracy obtained using both a single leg and groups of legs (through a voting scheme) on different terrains such as vinyl) asphalt) grass) and pebbles. Additionally) it presents a terrain classifier that works across various gait speeds and in fact almost as good as an overly specialized classifier.

  10. Polarization of the epithelial layer and apical localization of integrins are required for engulfment of apoptotic cells in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Tracy L; Kleinsorge, Sarah E; Timmons, Allison K; Taylor, Jeffrey D; McCall, Kimberly

    2015-12-01

    Inefficient clearance of dead cells or debris by epithelial cells can lead to or exacerbate debilitating conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Despite the importance of engulfment by epithelial cells, little is known about the molecular changes that are required within these cells. The misregulation of integrins has previously been associated with disease states, suggesting that a better understanding of the regulation of receptor trafficking could be key to treating diseases caused by defects in phagocytosis. Here, we demonstrate that the integrin heterodimer αPS3/βPS becomes apically enriched and is required for engulfment by the epithelial follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary. We found that integrin heterodimer localization and function is largely directed by the α-subunit. Moreover, proper cell polarity promotes asymmetric integrin enrichment, suggesting that αPS3/βPS trafficking occurs in a polarized fashion. We show that several genes previously known for their roles in trafficking and cell migration are also required for engulfment. Moreover, as in mammals, the same α-integrin subunit is required by professional and non-professional phagocytes and migrating cells in Drosophila. Our findings suggest that migrating and engulfing cells use common machinery, and demonstrate a crucial role for integrin function and polarized trafficking of integrin subunits during engulfment. This study also establishes the epithelial follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary as a powerful model for understanding the molecular changes required for engulfment by a polarized epithelium. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Thermal Inertia, Albedo, and MOLA-derived Roughness for Terrains in the Terra Meridiani Area, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Deal, K.; Hynek, B. M.; Seelos, F. P., IV; Snider, N. O.; Mellon, M. T.; Garvin, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Surface properties of layered deposits draped on dissected, cratered terrain in the Terra Meridiani area are analyzed using remote sensing data. The etched plains are cemented and differentially eroded, and the hematite plains are loose and drifting. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  13. Some Observations and Analysis of Wind over Non-Uniform Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, E. W.; Kristensen, Leif; Su, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    Continuous measurements of wind were made throughout a layer extending from the surface to a depth of 12m over a distance along the direction of the wind of about 150 metres. It has been found that the variation in the elevation of the underlying terrain has a profound effect, larger than that of...

  14. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR VOLUSIA COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  15. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR PUTNAM COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  16. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR SHELBY COUNTY, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Lewis County, KY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  18. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR KNOX COUNTY, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Mason County, KY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  20. Fire whirlwind formation over flat terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Haines; Gerald H. Updike

    1971-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that lead to the genesis of fire whirlwinds over flat terrain. Also presented is an estimate of the number of days one might expect to encounter meteorological conditions that permit such formations.

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Woodward, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain for HOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Houston TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Logan, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, UPPER CUMBERLAND WATERSHED, PMR, TENNESSEE, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain for ELBERT County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain for Fannin County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. Terrain Data, Queen Anne's COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN Submission for CHISAGO COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  10. TERRAIN Submission for Forest Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN Submission for Vilas Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. Terrain, CEDAR RAPIDS, LINN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, CERRO GORDO COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Grady, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for WHATCOM COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, VAN BUREN COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Rockland County NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Bark River PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain for Gilmer County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Carter, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain for Williamson County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Lee County MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Mono, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS TERRAIN Submission for STEARNS COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain for Greer County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Angelina County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, CITY OF DALLAS, DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain Submission for Sioux Falls

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Chippewa County, Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. Terrain Sumbission for Howard County NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain for Washington County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN Submission for Outagamie Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Terrain Adaptive Navigation for Mars Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Larry H.; Helmick, Daniel M.; Angelova, Anelia; Livianu, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    A navigation system for Mars rovers in very rough terrain has been designed, implemented, and tested on a research rover in Mars analog terrain. This navigation system consists of several technologies that are integrated to increase the capabilities compared to current rover navigation algorithms. These technologies include: goodness maps and terrain triage, terrain classification, remote slip prediction, path planning, high-fidelity traversability analysis (HFTA), and slip-compensated path following. The focus of this paper is not on the component technologies, but rather on the integration of these components. Results from the onboard integration of several of the key technologies described here are shown. Additionally, the results from independent demonstrations of several of these technologies are shown. Future work will include the demonstration of the entire integrated system described here.

  16. Digital Terrain Submittal for Duval County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Blount County, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Lancaster County, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, UPPER CUMBERLAND WATERSHED, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Winston County, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Crittenden County AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN-FREMONT COUNTY, WY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Ulster County NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Garvin, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain Submission for Nacogdoches County TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Benton County, AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Chariton County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. Automatic terrain modeling using transfinite element analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2010-05-31

    An automatic procedure for modeling terrain is developed based on L2 projection-based interpolation of discrete terrain data onto transfinite function spaces. The function space is refined automatically by the use of image processing techniques to detect regions of high error and the flexibility of the transfinite interpolation to add degrees of freedom to these areas. Examples are shown of a section of the Palo Duro Canyon in northern Texas.

  9. Evaluation of terrain geomorphometric characteristics for ground clearance charts production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko A. Borisov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphometric exploration applied in the military terrain analysis is based on the GIS methodology of spatial analyses and is related primarily to military terrain analyses. It includes relief assessment aiming at producing ground clearance charts for the analysis of terrain maneuverability and its deployment, cover and concealment possibilities. An evaluation analysis of geomorphological parameters was performed for the Avala test area using a few terrain parameters (visibility, terrain aspect and slope as well as some terrain qualitative categories (e.g. vegetation density. Terrain slope Slope and aspect are morphometric terrain parameters that can be derived directly from the DTM using some GIS operations. Slope is the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. Slope is perhaps the most important aspect of the surface form, since surfaces are formed completely of slopes, and slope angles control the gravitational force available for geomorphic work. Mathematically, the tangent of the slope angle is the first derivative of altitude, and it is a tangent or percent slope as this surface parameter is generally referred to. Slope is defined at each point as the slope of a plane tangent to the surface at that point. In practice, however, slope is generally measured over a finite distance, especially when data are obtained from a contour map. Terrain aspect Aspect is also the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. The term aspect is defined as the direction of the biggest slope vector on the tangent plane projected onto the horizontal plane. Aspect is the bearing (or azimuth of the slope direction, and its angle ranges from 0 to 360°. Analyses of terrain slope and ground clearance for military forces The analysis of land assessment of the Avala test area included the definition of relief categories in relation to cover and concealment purposes with the aim to include the geomorphological basis

  10. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi / h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increases. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggests that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional h

  11. Searching for Terrain Softening near Mercury's North Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobian, P. S.; Vilas, F.; Lederer, S. M.; Barlow, N. G.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, following the initial discovery of radar bright craters near both poles of Mercury measured the depth-todiameter (d/D) ratios of 170 impact craters in Mariner 10 images covering four different regions on Mercury s surface. Rapid softening of crater structure, indicated by lower d/D ratios, could indicate the possibility of subsurface water ice in Mercury's terrain originating from an internal source in the planet. Their study included 3 specific radar bright craters suggested to contain ice. They concluded that no terrain softening was apparent, and a rapidly emplaced exogenic water source was the most likely source for the proposed ice in these craters. Recent radar observations of the Mercurian North pole have pinpointed many additional radar bright areas with a resolution 10x better than previous radar measurements, and which correlate with craters imaged by Mariner 10. These craters are correlated with regions that are permanently shaded from direct sunlight, and are consistent with observations of clean water ice. We have expanded the initial study by Barlow et al. to include d/D measurements of 12 craters newly identified as radar bright at latitudes poleward of +80o. The radar reflectivity resemblances to Mars south polar cap and echoes from three icy Galilean satellites suggest that these craters too may have polar ice on Mercury. The effect of subsurface H20 on impact craters is a decrease in its d/D ratio, and softening of crater rims over a period of time. The study of Barlow et al., focused on determining the d/D ratios of 170 impact craters in the Borealis (north polar), Tolstoj (equatorial), Kuiper (equatorial), and Bach (south polar) quadrangles. This work focuses on the newly discovered radar bright craters, investigating their d/D ratios as an expansion of the earlier work..We compare our results to the statistical results from Barlow et al. here. With the upcoming Messenger spacecraft mission to Mercury, this is an especially timely study

  12. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  13. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  14. What can anisotropy tell us about turbulence similarity in terrain of increasing complexity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiperski, I.; Calaf, M.

    2017-12-01

    One of the great remaining challenges of numerical weather prediction lies close to the surface, where unresolved boundary layer processes and surface momentum and energy exchanges require parameterizations. These parameterizations, however, still rely on the similarity theory developed over flat and horizontally homogeneous terrain even when making predictions over highly complex surfaces such as mountainous areas. This is despite the fact that experimental datasets obtained over progressively complex surfaces have shown large deviations from the curves proposed by similarity theory on horizontally homogeneous and flat terrain. Even over flat terrain, horizontal velocity variances are eluding scaling due to large scatter, and under very stable stratification lack of scaling is generally attributed to non-Kolmogorov turbulence and influence of non-turbulent submeso motions. Within this work we employ anisotropy of the Reynolds stress tensor as a means of examining the character of turbulence and its response to growing terrain complexity. The validity of similarity relationships and the cause of their failure are examined in light of turbulence topology (isotropic, two component axisymmetric and one component turbulence) from multiple experimental campaigns ranging from flat to highly complex terrain. Results illustrate that different states of anisotropy correspond to different similarity relations. Experimental data with isotropic turbulence match local scaling relationships well for all the datasets. On the other hand, strongly anisotropic turbulence significantly deviates from the traditional scaling relations. These limiting states of anisotropy can furthermore be connected with different governing parameters that help identify conditions in which different topologies occur.

  15. Selection method of terrain matching area for TERCOM algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qieqie; Zhao, Long

    2017-10-01

    The performance of terrain aided navigation is closely related to the selection of terrain matching area. The different matching algorithms have different adaptability to terrain. This paper mainly studies the adaptability to terrain of TERCOM algorithm, analyze the relation between terrain feature and terrain characteristic parameters by qualitative and quantitative methods, and then research the relation between matching probability and terrain characteristic parameters by the Monte Carlo method. After that, we propose a selection method of terrain matching area for TERCOM algorithm, and verify the method correctness with real terrain data by simulation experiment. Experimental results show that the matching area obtained by the method in this paper has the good navigation performance and the matching probability of TERCOM algorithm is great than 90%

  16. Secondary chaotic terrain formation in the higher outflow channels of southern circum-Chryse, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Kargel, J.S.; Tanaka, K.L.; Crown, D.A.; Berman, D.C.; Fairen, A.G.; Baker, V.R.; Furfaro, R.; Candelaria, P.; Sasaki, S.

    2011-01-01

    Higher outflow channel dissection in the martian region of southern circum-Chryse appears to have extended from the Late Hesperian to the Middle Amazonian Epoch. These outflow channels were excavated within the upper 1. km of the cryolithosphere, where no liquid water is expected to have existed during these geologic epochs. In accordance with previous work, our examination of outflow channel floor morphologies suggests the upper crust excavated by the studied outflow channels consisted of a thin (a few tens of meters) layer of dry geologic materials overlying an indurated zone that extends to the bases of the investigated outflow channels (1. km in depth). We find that the floors of these outflow channels contain widespread secondary chaotic terrains (i.e., chaotic terrains produced by the destruction of channel-floor materials). These chaotic terrains occur within the full range of outflow channel dissection and tend to form clusters. Our examination of the geology of these chaotic terrains suggests that their formation did not result in the generation of floods. Nevertheless, despite their much smaller dimensions, these chaotic terrains are comprised of the same basic morphologic elements (e.g., mesas, knobs, and smooth deposits within scarp-bound depressions) as those located in the initiation zones of the outflow channels, which suggests that their formation must have involved the release of ground volatiles. We propose that these chaotic terrains developed not catastrophically but gradually and during multiple episodes of nested surface collapse. In order to explain the formation of secondary chaotic terrains within zones of outflow channel dissection, we propose that the regional Martian cryolithosphere contained widespread lenses of volatiles in liquid form. In this model, channel floor collapse and secondary chaotic terrain formation would have taken place as a consequence of instabilities arising during their exhumation by outflow channel dissection

  17. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  18. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  19. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  20. The Mysteries and Curiosities of Mars: A Tour of Unusual and Unexplained Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, L.

    2017-12-01

    The large amount of data available from orbiting satellites around Mars has provided a wealth of information about the Martian surface and geological history. The published literature tends to focus on regions of Mars for which there are ready explanations; however, many regions of Mars remain mysterious. In this contribution, we present some of the strangest and least explained terrains on Mars: The Taffy Terrain: This complex terrain, consisting of swirling layers with variably sized bands, is present mostly at the bottom of Hellas Basin, but versions of it can also be found on the floor of Melas Chasma and in the Medusae Fossae Formation near Apollinaris Sulci. While little has been written about the taffy terrain, hypotheses include "glacial features" and salt domes. The taffy terrain bears some resemblance to submarine salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico, glacial deposits with mixed ash and ice in Iceland, or chalk formations in Egypt's White Desert. The Fishscale Terrain: At the northern edge of Lucus Planum, the friable Medusae Fossae Formation transitions into a chaos-like terrain with hundreds of mesas forming a pattern like the scales of a fish. While chaos terrains are mysterious in general, this morphologically fresh, near-equatorial chaos is especially unusual. Polygonal Ridges in Gordii Dorsum: Also a part of the Medusae Fossae Formation, the ridges in Gordii Dorsum represent a negative image of the fishscale terrain—a intricate lattice of slender black ridges. These are thought to form via the embayment of the fishscale terrain with lava and the subsequent erosion of the original mesas. Horseshoe Features: These geomorphological features look like inverted barchan dunes, but they are actually pits eroded into the surface of the Medusae Fossae Formation. Channels surrounding Elysium Mons: These channel systems are among the most complex on Mars, but they appear on a young Amazonian lava surface. The channels cut through topography, anastomose, and

  1. Processes Modifying Cratered Terrains on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The July encounter with Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft permitted imaging of its cratered terrains with scales as high as approximately 100 m/pixel, and in stereo. In the initial download of images, acquired at 2.2 km/pixel, widely distributed impact craters up to 260 km diameter are seen in the near-encounter hemisphere. Many of the craters appear to be significantly degraded or infilled. Some craters appear partially destroyed, perhaps by erosion such as associated with the retreat of scarps. Bright ice-rich deposits highlight some crater rims and/or floors. While the cratered terrains identified in the initial downloaded images are generally seen on high-to-intermediate albedo surfaces, the dark equatorial terrain informally known as Cthulhu Regio is also densely cratered. We will explore the range of possible processes that might have operated (or still be operating) to modify the landscape from that of an ancient pristinely cratered state to the present terrains revealed in New Horizons images. The sequence, intensity, and type of processes that have modified ancient landscapes are, among other things, the record of climate and volatile evolution throughout much of the Pluto's existence. The deciphering of this record will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  2. Terrain mapping camera for Chandrayaan-1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) on India's first satellite for lunar exploration, Chandrayaan-1, is for generating high-resolution 3-dimensional maps of the Moon. With this instrument, a complete topographic map of the Moon with 5 m spatial resolution and 10-bit quantization will be available for scientific studies.

  3. Declarative terrain modeling for military training games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Tutenel, T.; Kraker, J.K.. de; Bidarra, R.

    2010-01-01

    Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain

  4. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Mølhave, Thomas; Revsbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of maintaining the contour tree T of a terrain Sigma, represented as a triangulated xy-monotone surface, as the heights of its vertices vary continuously with time. We characterize the combinatorial changes in T and how they relate to topological changes in Sigma. We present ...

  5. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Menke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large...

  6. Vehicle Sprung Mass Estimation for Rough Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    a vehicle driving on rough terrain. An accurate onboard estimate of vehicle mass is valuable to active safety systems as well as chassis and... Automobile Eng., Vol. 214, No. 8, pp. 851-864. Kubus, D., Kröger, T, and Wahl, F.M., (2008), „On-line estimation of inertial parameters using a

  7. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  8. Artificial anisotropy and polarizing filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, François; Escoubas, Ludovic; Lazaridès, Basile

    2002-06-01

    The calculated spectral transmittance of a multilayer laser mirror is used to determine the effective index of the single layer equivalent to the multilayer stack. We measure the artificial anisotropy of photoresist thin films whose structure is a one-dimensional, subwavelength grating obtained from interference fringes. The limitation of the theory of the first-order effective index homogenization is discussed. We designed normal-incidence, polarizing coating and a polarization rotator by embedding anisotropic films in simple multilayer structures.

  9. The Boeing Delta II rocket with Mars Polar Lander aboard lifts off at Pad 17B, CCAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Amid clouds of exhaust, a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle with NASA's Mars Polar Lander clears Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, after launch at 3:21:10 p.m. EST. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south polar cap, which consists of carbon dioxide ice. The lander will study the polar water cycle, frosts, water vapor, condensates and dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is equipped with a robotic arm to dig beneath the layered terrain at the polar cap. In addition, Deep Space 2 microprobes, developed by NASA's New Millennium Program, are installed on the lander's cruise stage. After crashing into the planet's surface, they will conduct two days of soil and water experiments up to 1 meter (3 feet) below the Martian surface, testing new technologies for future planetary descent probes. The lander is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  10. Latitude-energy structure of multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS data in plasma sheet boundary layer and boundary plasma sheet below 6 RE radial distance: basic properties and statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Velocity dispersed ion signatures (VDIS occurring at the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL are a well reported feature. Theory has, however, predicted the existence of multiple ion beamlets, similar to VDIS, in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, i.e. at latitudes below the PSBL. In this study we show evidence for the multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS ion data and basic properties of the ion beamlets will be presented. Statistics of the occurrence frequency of ion multiple beamlets show that they are most common in the midnight MLT sector and for altitudes above 4 RE, while at low altitude (≤3 RE, single beamlets at PSBL (VDIS are more common. Distribution functions of ion beamlets in velocity space have recently been shown to correspond to 3-dimensional hollow spheres, containing a large amount of free energy. We also study correlation with ~100 Hz waves and electron anisotropies and consider the possibility that ion beamlets correspond to stable auroral arcs.

  11. Influence of absorption in linear polarization imaging of melanoma tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongzhi Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The contrast mechanism of different polarization imaging techniques for melanoma in mouse skin is studied using both experiments and Monte Carlo simulations. Total intensity, linear polarization difference imaging (DPI, degree of polarization imaging (DOPI and rotating linear polarization imaging (RLPI are applied and the relative contrasts of these polarization imaging methods between the normal and cancerous tissues are compared. A two-layer absorption-scattering model is proposed to explain the contrast mechanism of the polarization imaging for melanoma. By taking into account of both scattering of symmetrical and asymmetrical scatterers and absorption of inter-scatterer medium, the two-layer model reproduces the relative contrasts for polarization images observed in experiments. The simulation results also show that, the parameters of polarization imaging change more dramatically with the variation of absorption in the bottom layer than the top layer.

  12. EARTHWORK VOLUME CALCULATION FROM DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANIĆ Milorad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of cut and fill volume has an essential importance in many fields. This article shows a new method, which has no approximation, based on Digital Terrain Models. A relatively new mathematical model is developed for that purpose, which is implemented in the software solution. Both of them has been tested and verified in the praxis on several large opencast mines. This application is developed in AutoLISP programming language and works in AutoCAD environment.

  13. Mapping the Human Terrain in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    attention when one must cover the entire gamut of possible considerations. This paper seeks to focus on a few key items that serve as enablers for the main...forensic discipline. Human terrain analysis ( HTA ) is defined as a process that is part of the intelligence cycle that should shape pre-deployment...colleagues detailed the HTTs, their deliverables to the Brigade Combat Team (BCT), and their reachback capability, but also drew appropriate attention to the

  14. Craters and Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    11 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some typical relations between impact craters and light-toned, layered rock on Mars. The larger circular feature at the north (top) end of the image marks the location of a filled, buried crater on intermountain terrain north of Hellas Planitia. The larger crater at the southeast (lower right) corner formed by meteor impact into the layered material in which the buried crater is encased. The layered rock, in this case, has a light tone similar to the sedimentary rocks being explored by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, thousands of kilometers away in Sinus Meridiani. Location near: 24.9oS, 299.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  15. Mobility versus terrain: a game theoretic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, David; Muench, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Mobility and terrain are two sides of the same coin. You cannot describe mobility unless you describe the terrain. For example, if my world is trench warfare, the tank may be the ideal vehicle. If my world is urban warfare, clearing buildings and such, the tank may not be an ideal vehicle, perhaps an anthropomorphic robot would be better. We seek a general framework for mobility that captures the relative value of different mobility strategies. Game theory is positively the right way to analyze the interactions of rational players who behave strategically. In this paper, we will describe the interactions between a mobility player, who is trying to make it from point A to point B with one chance to refuel, and a terrain player who is trying to minimize that probability by placing an obstacle somewhere along the path from A to B. In previous work [1], we used Monte Carlo methods to analyze this mobility game, and found optimal strategies for a discretized version of the game. Here we show the relationship of this game to a classic game of timing [2], and use solution methods from that literature to solve for optimal strategies in a continuous version of this mobility game.

  16. Determination of Terrain Serviceability of Military Vehicles by GIS Relief Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Pahernik

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses capabilities of terrain serviceability ofvehicles in regards to the ground features. Two key relief attributesrelated to the slope inclination are defined, as well as reliefforms quantitatively defined as deviations of height above sea-level. As the secondary attribute, the topographic wetness indexis estimated, which, in correlation with the drainage coefficientyields the wetness value index as an essential factor of passablenessin the conditions of harder and more intensive precipitations,that is to say, sudden snow melting. By application ofGIS analysis, based on the digital model of space heights alongthe Kupa River from Pisarovina to SiSinec, the values of primaryand secondary relief attributes have been calculated, andthe analysis of Landsat satellite images has been used to definethe values of vegetation cover. Based on these values and dataon the soil type, the layer of ground wetness has been estimated.Cross Country Mobility Program of ESRI company, withinGIS program package Arc View 3.3. has been used to set themarginal values of the defined relief parameters and to estimatethe levels of mobility for single vehicles in different terrain conditions.The comparison of the obtained results clearly indicatesa possible application of the defined data in the analysisof terrain serviceability of military vehicles, with regard to therelief features of the terrain. For full applicability of the model itis also necessary to define other attributes of mobility related tohydrographical, vegetation, pedological, anthropogenic andother ground features.

  17. Cooperative terrain model acquisition by two point-robots in planar polygonal terrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.V.; Protopopescu, V.

    1994-11-29

    We address the model acquisition problem for an unknown terrain by a team of two robots. The terrain may be cluttered by a finite number of polygonal obstacles with unknown shapes and positions. The robots are point-sized and equipped with visual sensors which acquire all visible parts of the terrain by scanning from their locations. The robots communicate with each other via wireless connection. The performance is measured by the number of the sensor (scan) operations which are assumed to be the most time-consuming/expensive of all the robot operations. We employ the restricted visibility graph methods in a hierarchiacal setup. For terrains with convex obstacles, the sensing time can be halved compared to a single robot implementation. For terrains with concave corners, the performance of the algorithm depends on the number of concave regions and their depths. A hierarchical decomposition of the restricted visibility graph into 2-connected components and trees is considered. Performance for the 2-robot team is expressed in terms of sizes of 2-connected components, and the sizes and diameters of the trees. The proposed algorithm and analysis can be applied to the methods based on Voronoi diagram and trapezoidal decomposition.

  18. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  19. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  20. Geologic history of the polar regions of Mars based on Mars Global survey data. I. Noachian and Hesperian Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.L.; Kolb, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    may represent the only Noachian geologic record exposed in the north polar region. Most of the north polar region was buried by water- or debris-ocean sediments during the Hesperian Period, originating from uplands areas and perhaps knobby terrains in the northern plains. The sediments either mantle or were deformed by wrinkle ridges radial and concentric to Utopia basin and concentric to northern Tharsis. Sources of stress probably included sediment loading in the northern plains and regional magmatic and loading activity at Tharsis. Polar layered deposits began piling up during the Early Amazonian or later. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science.

  1. The importance of meteorological scales to forecast air pollution scenarios on coastal complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Palau

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the meteorological approaches commonly considered in urban air pollution models do not take into account the importance of the smaller scales in the meteorology of complex-terrain coastal sites. The aim of this work is to estimate the impact of using the proper meteorological scales when simulating the behaviour of the pollutant concentrations emitted in the lower layers over coastal complex terrain areas. The availability of experimental measurements of a power plant plume near the Castellón conurbation (on the Spanish Mediterranean coast has allowed us to use this plume as a tracer of opportunity of the lower atmosphere to check the results of a simulation exercise using the RAMS mesoscale model coupled to the HYPACT particle model. The results obtained show that in a complex-terrain coastal site, because of the strong effect of the meteorological interactions between the different scales on the integral advection and the turbulent dispersion of pollutants, using an inadequate scale to solve the meteorology can result in a very big gap in the simulation of lower-layer pollutant behaviour at urban scales.

  2. Morphological modeling of terrains and volume data

    CERN Document Server

    Comic, Lidija; Magillo, Paola; Iuricich, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical background behind discrete approaches to morphological analysis of scalar fields, with a focus on Morse theory and on the discrete theories due to Banchoff and Forman. The algorithms and data structures presented are used for terrain modeling and analysis, molecular shape analysis, and for analysis or visualization of sensor and simulation 3D data sets. It covers a variety of application domains including geography, geology, environmental sciences, medicine and biology. The authors classify the different approaches to morphological analysis which are all ba

  3. Partial spin polarization of a conductance in a bi-layer In0.52 Al0.48 As / In0.53 Ga0.47 As heterostructure based nanowire for the rectangular and the smooth lateral confinement potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-03-01

    We simulate the electron transport in a vertical bi-layer nanowire in order to study an influence of the lateral confinement's shape on a spin polarization of wire's conductance. The active part of considered quantum wire constitutes a double inverted heterojunction In0.52 Al0.48 As /In0.53 Ga0.47 As which nanostructure can be fabricated in molecular beam epitaxy process while the lateral confinement potential can be finally formed by means of cleaved overgrowth or surface oxidization methods giving the desired rectangular and smooth lateral confinement. In calculations we take into account interaction between charge carriers using DFT within local spin density approximation. We show that if the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wire axis, the pseudogaps are opened in energy dispersion relation E (k) what in conjunction with spin Zeeman shift of spin-up and spin-down subbands may enhance the spin polarization of conductance with reference to a single layer wire. For nanowire with rectangular lateral confinement potential we found that the electron density has two maximums localized at wire edges in each layers. This modificates strongly all magnetosubbands giving up to four energy minimums in lowest subband and considerably diminishes widths of pseudogaps what translates into low maximal spin polarization of conductance, not exceeding 40%. This drawback is absent in wire with smooth lateral confinement. However, in order to gain a large spin polarization simultaneous tuning of magnetic field as well as the Fermi energies in both layers of nanowire are required.

  4. Stability Index for Biped Robot Moving on Rough Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Sakaino, Sho; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    In this paper, a stability index based on the ZMP (zero-moment point) for biped robots moving on rough terrain is proposed. The proposed method projects a support polygon on to a virtual plane and sets a virtual ZMP on it. In rough terrain, using the proposed method, stability check and trajectory planning are able to be treated as the case of flat terrain. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by some simulations and experiments.

  5. Survivor shielding. Part C. Improvements in terrain shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Kaul, Dean C.; Roberts, James A.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of atomic-bomb survivors were affected by shielding provided by terrain features. These terrain features can be a small hill, affecting one or two houses, or a high mountain that shields large neighborhoods. In the survivor dosimetry system, terrain shielding can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio between the dose with and without the terrain present. The terrain TF typically ranges between 0.1 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, the terrain shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, an improvement in the terrain model was implemented at RERF in the revised DS86 code, but the documentation was not published. It is now presented in this section. The solution to the terrain shielding in front of a house is described in this section. The problem of terrain shielding of survivors behind Hijiyama mountain at Hiroshima and Konpirasan mountain at Nagasaki has also been recognized, and a solution to this problem has been included in DS02. (author)

  6. LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY ARA V NEFIAN*, TAEMIN KIM, MICHAEL BROXTON, AND ZACH MORATTO Abstract. Generating accurate three...

  7. Honeybee odometry: performance in varying natural terrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Tautz

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that honeybees flying through short, narrow tunnels with visually textured walls perform waggle dances that indicate a much greater flight distance than that actually flown. These studies suggest that the bee's "odometer" is driven by the optic flow (image motion that is experienced during flight. One might therefore expect that, when bees fly to a food source through a varying outdoor landscape, their waggle dances would depend upon the nature of the terrain experienced en route. We trained honeybees to visit feeders positioned along two routes, each 580 m long. One route was exclusively over land. The other was initially over land, then over water and, finally, again over land. Flight over water resulted in a significantly flatter slope of the waggle-duration versus distance regression, compared to flight over land. The mean visual contrast of the scenes was significantly greater over land than over water. The results reveal that, in outdoor flight, the honeybee's odometer does not run at a constant rate; rather, the rate depends upon the properties of the terrain. The bee's perception of distance flown is therefore not absolute, but scene-dependent. These findings raise important and interesting questions about how these animals navigate reliably.

  8. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat; Mann, Jakob; Foussekis, Dimitri

    2009-01-01

    Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error ismeasured by collocati.......0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model......Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error ismeasured by collocating...... a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2...

  9. Addressing terrain masking in orbital reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sharad; Cico, Luke

    2012-06-01

    During aerial orbital reconnaissance, a sensor system is mounted on an airborne platform for imaging a region on the ground. The latency between the image acquisition and delivery of information to the end-user is critical and must be minimized. Due to fine ground pixel resolution and a large field-of-view for wide-area surveillance applications, a massive volume of data is gathered and imagery products are formed using a real-time multi-processor system. The images are taken at oblique angles, stabilized and ortho-rectified. The line-of-sight of the sensor to the ground is often interrupted by terrain features such as mountains or tall structures as depicted in Figure1. The ortho-rectification process renders the areas hidden from the line-of sight of the sensor with spurious information. This paper discusses an approach for addressing terrain masking in size, weight, and power (SWaP) and memory-restricted onboard processing systems.

  10. Update of the Polar SWIFT model for polar stratospheric ozone loss (Polar SWIFT version 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2017-07-01

    The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate. To date, climate models often use prescribed ozone fields, since a full stratospheric chemistry scheme is computationally very expensive. Polar SWIFT is based on a set of coupled differential equations, which simulate the polar vortex-averaged mixing ratios of the key species involved in polar ozone depletion on a given vertical level. These species are O3, chemically active chlorine (ClOx), HCl, ClONO2 and HNO3. The only external input parameters that drive the model are the fraction of the polar vortex in sunlight and the fraction of the polar vortex below the temperatures necessary for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Here, we present an update of the Polar SWIFT model introducing several improvements over the original model formulation. In particular, the model is now trained on vortex-averaged reaction rates of the ATLAS Chemistry and Transport Model, which enables a detailed look at individual processes and an independent validation of the different parameterizations contained in the differential equations. The training of the original Polar SWIFT model was based on fitting complete model runs to satellite observations and did not allow for this. A revised formulation of the system of differential equations is developed, which closely fits vortex-averaged reaction rates from ATLAS that represent the main chemical processes influencing ozone. In addition, a parameterization for the HNO3 change by denitrification is included. The rates of change of the concentrations of the chemical species of the Polar SWIFT model are purely chemical rates of change in the new version, whereas in the original Polar SWIFT model, they included a transport effect caused by the

  11. Single-Frame Terrain Mapping Software for Robotic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L.

    2011-01-01

    This software is a component in an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) perception system that builds compact, single-frame terrain maps for distribution to other systems, such as a world model or an operator control unit, over a local area network (LAN). Each cell in the map encodes an elevation value, terrain classification, object classification, terrain traversability, terrain roughness, and a confidence value into four bytes of memory. The input to this software component is a range image (from a lidar or stereo vision system), and optionally a terrain classification image and an object classification image, both registered to the range image. The single-frame terrain map generates estimates of the support surface elevation, ground cover elevation, and minimum canopy elevation; generates terrain traversability cost; detects low overhangs and high-density obstacles; and can perform geometry-based terrain classification (ground, ground cover, unknown). A new origin is automatically selected for each single-frame terrain map in global coordinates such that it coincides with the corner of a world map cell. That way, single-frame terrain maps correctly line up with the world map, facilitating the merging of map data into the world map. Instead of using 32 bits to store the floating-point elevation for a map cell, the vehicle elevation is assigned to the map origin elevation and reports the change in elevation (from the origin elevation) in terms of the number of discrete steps. The single-frame terrain map elevation resolution is 2 cm. At that resolution, terrain elevation from 20.5 to 20.5 m (with respect to the vehicle's elevation) is encoded into 11 bits. For each four-byte map cell, bits are assigned to encode elevation, terrain roughness, terrain classification, object classification, terrain traversability cost, and a confidence value. The vehicle s current position and orientation, the map origin, and the map cell resolution are all included in a header for each

  12. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source with high polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Alley, R.K.; Aoyagi, H.

    1993-04-01

    For the 1992 operating cycle of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the polarized electron source (PES) during its maiden run successfully met the pulse intensity and overall efficiency requirements of the SLC. However, the polarization of the bulk GaAs cathode was low (∼27%) and the pulse-to-pulse stability was marginal. We have shown that adequate charge for the SLC can be extracted from a strained layer cathode having P e ∼80% even though the quantum efficiency (QE) is - beam stability. The performance of the PES during the 1993 SLC operating cycle with these and other improvements is discussed

  13. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars’ southern polar regions: I. Erosion of the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Thomas, N.; Portyankina, G.; McEwen, A.; Becker, T.; Byrne, S.; Herkenhoff, K.; Kieffer, H.; Mellon, M.

    2010-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has imaged the sublimation of Mars' seasonal CO 2 polar cap with unprecedented detail for one complete martian southern spring. In some areas of the surface, beneath the conformal coating of seasonal ice, radially-organized channels are connected in spidery patterns. The process of formation of this terrain, erosion by gas from subliming seasonal ice, has no earthly analog. The new capabilities (high resolution, color, and stereo images) of HiRISE enable detailed study of this enigmatic terrain. Two sites are analyzed in detail, one within an area expected to have translucent seasonal CO 2 ice, and the other site outside that region. Stereo anaglyphs show that some channels grow larger as they go uphill - implicating gas rather than liquid as the erosive agent. Dark fans of material from the substrate are observed draped over the seasonal ice, and this material collects in thin to thick layers in the channels, possibly choking off gas flow in subsequent years, resulting in inactive crisscrossing shallow channels. In some areas there are very dense networks of channels with similar width and depth, and fewer fans emerging later in the season are observed. Subtle variations in topography affect the channel morphology. A new terminology is proposed for the wide variety of erosional features observed.

  14. Thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, C.H.; Kohlhepp, J.T.; Paluskar, P.V.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Jonge, W.J.M. de

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization in Al/AlOx/ferromagnet junctions based on the spin-polarized tunneling technique, in which the Zeeman-split superconducting density of states in the Al electrode is used as a detector for the spin polarization. Thermal robustness of the polarization, which is of key importance for the performance of magnetic tunnel junction devices, is demonstrated for post-deposition anneal temperatures up to 500 o C with Co and Co 90 Fe 10 top electrodes, independent of the presence of an FeMn layer on top of the ferromagnet

  15. Archaean TTG of Vodlozero Terrain, Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulaev, Valery; Arestova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    The Vodlozero terrain is the largest (about 270*240 km) early Archaean fragment of Fennoscandian Shield and composes its eastern part. The granitoids of TTG suite are predominant component of the terrain. The greenstone belts are placed along the margins of the terrain. Several stages of TTG formation can be distinguished in Achaean crust history. (1) The oldest TTG are trondhjemites and tonalities with age of 3240 Ma. They contain rare and small amphibolite inclusions of the same age. These TTG are characterized by high Sr (av. 412 ppm), Sr/Y (70), (La/Yb)n (54) and low Y (av. 7 ppm), Yb (0.32 ppm) and Nb (4 ppm). It was shown (Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., 2000), that the source of these TTG could be basic rocks, having composition similar with TH1 by K.Condie. (2) The tonalities and granodiorites with age of 3150 Ma are disposed near greenstone belts and contain compared to TTG of the first group less Sr (av. 250 ppm), Sr/Y (22), (La/Yb)n (18) and more K, Rb (av. 70 ppm), Ba (470 ppm), Y (11 ppm),Yb (1.16 ppm). TTG of both groups have identical T(DM)Nd (3250-3400 Ma) and differences in composition is evidently connected with lower level of source melting of the second group and also with K-metasomatism. The volcanics of the greenstone belts have age 3020 - 2940 Ma. Dykes of gabbro-amphibolites and andesites with the same age and composition cut TTG of the first and the second groups. The age of the third TTG group is about 2900 Ma ago. These rocks form leucosoma of migmatites within TTG of the second group. The composition of the third TTG and Nd isotope data suppose their origin by the melting of ancient TTG crust simultaneously with greenstone belt emplacement. The fourth TTG group with age 2780-2850 Ma forms a small intrusions, cutting older TTG and greenstone rocks. Their composition is similar to 3150 Ma TTG. Nd isotope data indicate that these TTG have younger (about 2850 Ma) source. Thus there are four TTG groups formed into interval more 400 Ma. The age and

  16. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Wind Tunnel Modeling Of Wind Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, D.; Cochran, B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation will describe the finding of an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel study conducted as part of the Bolund Experiment. This experiment was sponsored by Risø DTU (National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark) during the fall of 2009 to enable a blind comparison of various air flow models in an attempt to validate their performance in predicting airflow over complex terrain. Bohlund hill sits 12 m above the water level at the end of a narrow isthmus. The island features a steep escarpment on one side, over which the airflow can be expected to separate. The island was equipped with several anemometer towers, and the approach flow over the water was well characterized. This study was one of only two only physical model studies included in the blind model comparison, the other being a water plume study. The remainder were computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, including both RANS and LES. Physical modeling of air flow over topographical features has been used since the middle of the 20th century, and the methods required are well understood and well documented. Several books have been written describing how to properly perform ABL wind tunnel studies, including ASCE manual of engineering practice 67. Boundary layer wind tunnel tests are the only modelling method deemed acceptable in ASCE 7-10, the most recent edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers standard that provides wind loads for buildings and other structures for buildings codes across the US. Since the 1970’s, most tall structures undergo testing in a boundary layer wind tunnel to accurately determine the wind induced loading. When compared to CFD, the US EPA considers a properly executed wind tunnel study to be equivalent to a CFD model with infinitesimal grid resolution and near infinite memory. One key reason for this widespread acceptance is that properly executed ABL wind tunnel studies will accurately simulate flow separation

  18. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends. This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view. The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  19. Synthetic SAR Image Generation using Sensor, Terrain and Target Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Anders; Abulaitijiang, Adili; Dall, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    of the object using a CAD-model. The raw measurements are input to a SAR system and terrain model, which models thermal noise, terrain clutter, and SAR focusing to produce synthetic SAR images. Examples of SAR images at 0.3m and 0.1m resolution, and a comparison with real SAR imagery from the MSTAR dataset...

  20. Terrain Perception in a Shape Shifting Rolling-Crawling Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchida Masataka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrain perception greatly enhances the performance of robots, providing them with essential information on the nature of terrain being traversed. Several living beings in nature offer interesting inspirations which adopt different gait patterns according to nature of terrain. In this paper, we present a novel terrain perception system for our bioinspired robot, Scorpio, to classify the terrain based on visual features and autonomously choose appropriate locomotion mode. Our Scorpio robot is capable of crawling and rolling locomotion modes, mimicking Cebrenus Rechenburgi, a member of the huntsman spider family. Our terrain perception system uses Speeded Up Robust Feature (SURF description method along with color information. Feature extraction is followed by Bag of Word method (BoW and Support Vector Machine (SVM for terrain classification. Experiments were conducted with our Scorpio robot to establish the efficacy and validity of the proposed approach. In our experiments, we achieved a recognition accuracy of over 90% across four terrain types namely grass, gravel, wooden deck, and concrete.

  1. Evaluation of topographic index in relation to terrain roughness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    comparing the topographic index surface with respect to reference data (10 m grid spacing topographic index surface). The RMSE and mean error of topographic index surface increases in larger grid spacing and the effect is more in rugged terrain. 1. Introduction. Terrain relief is the first order control on the vari- ous natural ...

  2. 1 Integrating land cover and terrain characteristics to explain plague ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information System (GIS) can provide greater possibility to refine the analysis of land cover and terrain characteristics for ... Regression Tree (BRT) statistical method was used to clarify the relationships between land cover and terrain variables .... shapefile. The training dataset is defined as multiple polygons for each class.

  3. Polymer photovoltaic cells sensitive to the circular polarization of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilot, Jan; Abbel, Robert; Lakhwani, Girish; Meijer, E.W.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Meskers, Stefan C.J. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2010-05-25

    Chiral conjugated polymer is used to construct a photovoltaic cell whose response depends on the circular polarization of the incoming light. The selectivity for left and right polarized light as a function of the thickness of the polymer layer is accounted for by modeling of the optical properties of all layers inside the device. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Polarization effects in silicon-clad optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, R. F.; Batchman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    By changing the thickness of a semiconductor cladding layer deposited on a planar dielectric waveguide, the TE or TM propagating modes may be selectively attenuated. This polarization effect is due to the periodic coupling between the lossless propagating modes of the dielectric slab waveguide and the lossy modes of the cladding layer. Experimental tests involving silicon claddings show high selectivity for either polarization.

  5. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bingöl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured by collocating a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2.0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model.

  6. Experiment S-5: Synoptic Terrain Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    The Synoptic Terrain Photography Experiment (S-5) was successfully conducted during the Gemini V mission, the second of the Gemini flights on which it was carried. This report summarizes briefly the methods and results of the experiment. Interpretation of the many excellent pictures obtained is in progress, and a full report is not possible at this time; instead, representative pictures will be presented and described. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain a large number of high-quality color photographs of selected land areas from geologic and geographic study. Southern Mexico, eastern Africa, and Australia were given high priority, but it was stressed that good pictures of any cloud-free land area would be useful. The same camera (Hasselblad 500 C) and film (Ektachrome MS) used on the Gemini III and IV missions were carried on the Gemini V flight.

  7. Crenulated "Brain Terrain" in Arcadia Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N. R.; Hibbard, S. M.; Golombek, M. P.

    2017-12-01

    The plains of Arcadia Planitia on Mars at 40°N and 200°E straddle the southern boundary of a latitude-dependent mantle (LDM) of shallow water-ice that holds key records for the planet's climate. Ice is not stable at mid-latitude surfaces today, but is expected to have precipitated in the past during different obliquities and climatic conditions with remnant excess ice preserved in the subsurface under a veneer of soil partially isolating it from the atmosphere. One indicator of ice in Arcadia is crenulated "brain coral" terrain comprised of alternating sinuous troughs and ridges, clearly resolved in 25 cm/pixel High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images. Similar morphologies have previously been identified in localized deposits within some craters at Utopia Planitia. However, this morphology is widespread in Arcadia - occurring over hundreds of kilometers and it transitions into pitted and more familiar polygonal terrain. It has been interpreted to form by differential sublimation of shallow subsurface ice, but the details of its formation and underlying structure are poorly understood leaving many basic questions unanswered. How much soil overburden is there, and how does soil thickness change from ridge to trough? Is the underlying ice pore-filling or massive? Why do the crenulations have a regular pattern with a consistent wavelength? What causes preferred orientations in some patches? No rocks are visible in the troughs, but are there any other foci that could cause differential sublimation over meter scales? Are there any direct analogs on Earth or icy satellites? And why is this morphology so widespread across the plains of Arcadia, but not elsewhere on Mars? Further analysis may shed light on this weird and wonderful morphology.

  8. Slip estimation methods for proprioceptive terrain classification using tracked mobile robots

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masha, Ditebogo F

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that proprioceptive measurements such as terrain slip can be used for terrain classification. This paper investigates the suitability of four simple slip estimation methods for differentiating between indoor and outdoor terrain...

  9. Deciphering groundwater potential zones in hard rock terrain using geospatial technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Imran A; Sankar, K; Dar, Mithas A

    2011-02-01

    Remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) has become one of the leading tools in the field of groundwater research, which helps in assessing, monitoring, and conserving groundwater resources. This paper mainly deals with the integrated approach of remote sensing and GIS to delineate groundwater potential zones in hard rock terrain. Digitized vector maps pertaining to chosen parameters, viz. geomorphology, geology, land use/land cover, lineament, relief, and drainage, were converted to raster data using 23 m×23 m grid cell size. Moreover, curvature of the study area was also considered while manipulating the spatial data. The raster maps of these parameters were assigned to their respective theme weight and class weights. The individual theme weight was multiplied by its respective class weight and then all the raster thematic layers were aggregated in a linear combination equation in Arc Map GIS Raster Calculator module. Moreover, the weighted layers were statistically modeled to get the areal extent of groundwater prospects with respect to each thematic layer. The final result depicts the favorable prospective zones in the study area and can be helpful in better planning and management of groundwater resources especially in hard rock terrains.

  10. Evolution of Martian polar landscapes - Interplay of long-term variations in perennial ice cover and dust storm intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J. A.; Blasius, K. R.; Roberts, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The discovery of a new type of Martian polar terrain, called undulating plain, is reported and the evolution of the plains and other areas of the Martian polar region is discussed in terms of the trapping of dust by the perennial ice cover. High-resolution Viking Orbiter 2 observations of the north polar terrain reveal perennially ice-covered surfaces with low relief, wavelike, regularly spaced, parallel ridges and troughs (undulating plains) occupying areas of the polar terrain previously thought to be flat, and associated with troughs of considerable local relief which exhibit at least partial annual melting. It is proposed that the wavelike topography of the undulating plains originates from long-term periodic variations in cyclical dust precipitation at the margin of a growing or receding perennial polar cap in response to changes in insolation. The troughs are proposed to originate from areas of steep slope in the undulating terrain which have lost their perennial ice cover and have become incapable of trapping dust. The polar landscape thus appears to record the migrations, expansions and contractions of the Martian polar cap.

  11. A Combined Use of Decomposition and Texture for Terrain Classification of Fully Polarimetric SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, N. V.

    2007-03-01

    This p aper presents two-stag e unsupervised terrain classification of fully polarimetr ic SA R data using Freeman and Durden decomposition based on three simp le scattering mechanisms: surface, volume and double bounce (first step), and textur al features (uncorrelated uniformity , contr ast, inv erse mo men t and entropy) obtained from grey lev el co-occurrence matr ices (GLCM) (second step). Textural f eatures ar e defined in moving w indow 5x5 pixels w ith N=32 (N - number of grey lev els) . This algorith m preserves th e purity of domin ant polarimetric scattering properties and defines textural features in each scatter ing category. It is shown better object discrimin ation after app lying textur e w ith in fix ed scattering category. Speckle r eduction is one of th e main mo ments in imag e interpr etation improvement because of its great influen ce on textur e. Results from unfiltered and Lee filtered polar imetr ic SAR imag es show that the v alues of contrast and en tropy decr ease and th e values of uniformity and inverse moment increase with speckle reduction, that's tru e for all polarizations (HH, VV, HV). Th e d iscr imination b etw een objects increases after speckle f ilter ing. Polar ization influen ce on textur e features is def ined by calculating th e features in SAR images w ith HH , VV and HV polarizations before and after speck le filter ing, and then creating RG B images. It is shown mor e polarization inf luence on textur e features (uniformity , inverse mo ment and entropy) before filtering and less influen ce - after speck le f iltering. I t's not true for contrast wher e polar ization influen ce is not ch anged practically w ith filtering. SIR-C/X-SA R SLC L-band imag es of Moscow r egion are used for illustr ation.

  12. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  13. Terrain aided navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles with coarse maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ling; Cheng, Xianghong; Zhu, Yixian

    2016-01-01

    Terrain aided navigation (TAN) is a form of geophysical localization technique for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) operating in GPS-denied environments. TAN performance on sensor-rich AUVs has been evaluated in sea trials. However, many challenges remain before TAN can be successfully implemented on sensor-limited AUVs, especially with coarse maps. To improve TAN performance over coarse maps, a Gaussian process (GP) is proposed for the modeling of bathymetric terrain and integrated into the particle filter (GP-PF). GP is applied to provide not only the bathymetric value prediction through learning a set of bathymetric data from coarse maps but also the variance of the prediction. As a measurement update, calculated on bathymetric deviation is performed through the PF to obtain absolute and bounded positioning accuracy. Through the analysis of TAN performance on experimental data for two different terrains with map resolutions of 10–50 m, both the ability of the proposed model to represent the actual bathymetric terrain with accuracy and the effect of the GP-PF for TAN on sensor-limited systems in suited terrain are demonstrated. The experiment results further verify that there is an inverse relationship between the coarseness of the map and the overall TAN accuracy in rough terrains, but there is hardly any relationship between them in relatively flat terrains. (paper)

  14. Environmental Impacts of Forest Road Construction on Mountainous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Caliskan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2 and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient. Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas.As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities.

  15. Effectiveness of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Helping Secure a Border Characterized by Rough Terrain and Active Terrorists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Photoshop CS6 software are used to generate layers for different terrain types. The final product is flattened into a BMP image that MANA understands... manipulation , statistical computing, and graphical display. It was developed by John Chambers and his colleagues based on the code written for the S...Available: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-19615995. [11] “Powerful blast rocks eastern Turkish city, seven reportedly killed ( PHOTOS )” [Online

  16. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  17. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  18. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  19. Comparison of ArcToolbox and Terrain Tiles processing procedures for inundation mapping in mountainous terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Andrew; Wise, Richard; Quaranta, John

    2013-01-01

    Floodplain management consists of efforts to reduce flood damage to critical infrastructure and to protect the life and health of individuals from flooding. A major component of this effort is the monitoring of flood control structures such as dams because the potential failure of these structures may have catastrophic consequences. To prepare for these threats, engineers use inundation maps that illustrate the flood resulting from high river stages. To create the maps, the structure and river systems are modeled using engineering software programs, and hydrologic events are used to simulate the conditions leading to the failure of the structure. The output data are then exported to other software programs for the creation of inundation maps. Although the computer programs for this process have been established, the processing procedures vary and yield inconsistent results. Thus, these processing methods need to be examined to determine the functionality of each in floodplain management practices. The main goal of this article is to present the development of a more integrated, accurate, and precise graphical interface tool for interpretation by emergency managers and floodplain engineers. To accomplish this purpose, a potential dam failure was simulated and analyzed for a candidate river system using two processing methods: ArcToolbox and Terrain Tiles. The research involved performing a comparison of the outputs, which revealed that both procedures yielded similar inundations for single river reaches. However, the results indicated key differences when examining outputs for large river systems. On the basis of criteria involving the hydrologic accuracy and effects on infrastructure, the Terrain Tiles inundation surpassed the ArcToolbox inundation in terms of following topography and depicting flow rates and flood extents at confluences, bends, and tributary streams. Thus, the Terrain Tiles procedure is a more accurate representation of flood extents for use by

  20. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundar...

  1. A high resolution complex terrain dispersion study in the Rocky Flats, Colorado vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulos, G.S.; Bossert, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In January/February, 1991 an intensive set of measurements was taken around Rocky Flats near Denver, CO under the auspices of the Department of Energy Atmospheric Studies over Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. This region of the country is known as the Front Range, and is characterized by a transition from the relatively flat terrain of the Great Plains to the highly varied terrain of the Rocky Mountains. One goal of the ASCOT 1991 program was to gain insight into multi-scale meteorological interaction by observing wintertime drainage conditions at the mountain-valley-plains interface. ASCOT data included surface and upper air measurements on approximately a 50km 2 scale. Simultaneously, an SF 6 tracer release study was being conducted around Rocky Flats, a nuclear materials production facility. Detailed surface concentration measurements were completed for the SF 6 plume. This combination of meteorological and tracer concentration data provided a unique data set for comparisons of mesoscale and dispersion modeling results with observations and for evaluating our capability to predict pollutant transport. Our approach is to use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) mesoscale model to simulate atmospheric conditions and the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM), a component of the RAMS system, to model the dispersion of the SF 6 . We have chosen the 4--5 February, 1991 overnight period as our case study. This night was characterized by strong drainage flows from the Rocky Mountains to the west of Rocky Flats, southerly winds in a layer about lkm thick above the drainage flows, and northwesterly winds above that layer extending to the tropopause

  2. Prototyping Tensegrity Lander Systems for Icy Terrain (Year 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate that a tensegrity lander is a low-cost and revolutionary landing concept for exploring icy terrain where landing forces, payload protection and mobility...

  3. VTAC: virtual terrain assisted impact assessment for cyber attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argauer, Brian J.; Yang, Shanchieh J.

    2008-03-01

    Overwhelming intrusion alerts have made timely response to network security breaches a difficult task. Correlating alerts to produce a higher level view of intrusion state of a network, thus, becomes an essential element in network defense. This work proposes to analyze correlated or grouped alerts and determine their 'impact' to services and users of the network. A network is modeled as 'virtual terrain' where cyber attacks maneuver. Overlaying correlated attack tracks on virtual terrain exhibits the vulnerabilities exploited by each track and the relationships between them and different network entities. The proposed impact assessment algorithm utilizes the graph-based virtual terrain model and combines assessments of damages caused by the attacks. The combined impact scores allow to identify severely damaged network services and affected users. Several scenarios are examined to demonstrate the uses of the proposed Virtual Terrain Assisted Impact Assessment for Cyber Attacks (VTAC).

  4. CITY OF RADFORD TERRAIN, CITY OF RADFORD, VA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  5. Classification of Mars Terrain Using Multiple Data Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Classification of Mars Terrain Using Multiple Data Sources Alan Kraut1, David Wettergreen1 ABSTRACT. Images of Mars are being collected faster than they can be...

  6. Laser altimetry and terrain analysis: A revolution in geomorphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.; Seijmonsbergen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Terrain analysis in geomorphology has undergone a serious quantitative revolution over recent decades. Lidar information has been efficiently used to automatically classify discrete landforms, map forest structures, and provide input for models simulating landscape development, e.g. channel incision

  7. TERRAIN, CITY OF SEWARD, KENAI PENINSULA BOROUGH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. LandingNav: Terrain Guided Automated Precision Landing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I effort successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a terrain guided automated precision landing sensor using an innovative multi-field-of-view stereo...

  9. DCS Terrain for Bacon County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Jefferson Davis Parish, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. Optimization of Wind Farm Layout in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Yang, Jianchuan; Li, Chenqi

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic site selection for wind farms in complex terrain is a technological difficulty in the development of onshore wind farms. This paper presented a method for optimizing wind farm layout in complex terrain. This method employed Lissaman and Jensen wake models, took wind velocity distribut......Microscopic site selection for wind farms in complex terrain is a technological difficulty in the development of onshore wind farms. This paper presented a method for optimizing wind farm layout in complex terrain. This method employed Lissaman and Jensen wake models, took wind velocity...... are subject to boundary conditions and minimum distance conditions. The improved genetic algorithm (GA) for real number coding was used to search the optimal result. Then the optimized result was compared to the result from the experienced layout method. Results show the advantages of the present method...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Los Angeles County, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain for Appling County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain for Evans County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain for Treutlen County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain for Johnson County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain for Wheeler County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain for Tattnall County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain for Tift County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Gold Star Canyon Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DIGITAL DCS Terrain Submission for WHATCOM COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submission for La Paz County, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submittal for Spalding County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN submission for Rock River RiskMap DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN submission for Rock River Risk Map, Dane County Portion

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submittal for Washita County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submittal for Dougherty County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for Lewis and Clark County, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain for Bullcoh County GA MAPMOD04-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Mercer County New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submittal for Thomas County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Clay County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DIGITAL TERRAIN DCS DATABASE for ALLEN PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Chippewa County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain for Roscommon County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. Terrain, BIG BLUE RIVER TRIBUTARY NO 44, GAGE COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, CITY OF ANSONIA, NEW HAVEN COUNTY, CONNECTICUT - Levee PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. Terrain Submission for Dickinson County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  19. Cross-coupled control for all-terrain rovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Giulio

    2013-01-08

    Mobile robots are increasingly being used in challenging outdoor environments for applications that include construction, mining, agriculture, military and planetary exploration. In order to accomplish the planned task, it is critical that the motion control system ensure accuracy and robustness. The achievement of high performance on rough terrain is tightly connected with the minimization of vehicle-terrain dynamics effects such as slipping and skidding. This paper presents a cross-coupled controller for a 4-wheel-drive/4-wheel-steer robot, which optimizes the wheel motors' control algorithm to reduce synchronization errors that would otherwise result in wheel slip with conventional controllers. Experimental results, obtained with an all-terrain rover operating on agricultural terrain, are presented to validate the system. It is shown that the proposed approach is effective in reducing slippage and vehicle posture errors.

  20. Cross-Coupled Control for All-Terrain Rovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Reina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robots are increasingly being used in challenging outdoor environments for applications that include construction, mining, agriculture, military and planetary exploration. In order to accomplish the planned task, it is critical that the motion control system ensure accuracy and robustness. The achievement of high performance on rough terrain is tightly connected with the minimization of vehicle-terrain dynamics effects such as slipping and skidding. This paper presents a cross-coupled controller for a 4-wheel-drive/4-wheel-steer robot, which optimizes the wheel motors’ control algorithm to reduce synchronization errors that would otherwise result in wheel slip with conventional controllers. Experimental results, obtained with an all-terrain rover operating on agricultural terrain, are presented to validate the system. It is shown that the proposed approach is effective in reducing slippage and vehicle posture errors.

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Pine County, MN (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain for Dodge County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Santa Cruz,CA - CW (NAVD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submittal for Crenshaw County, Alabama, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. Terrain Submission for Pottawattamie County, IA (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Wilkin County, MN (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain for Montgomery County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, CITY OF GRAND PRAIRIE, DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain for Laurens County GA MAPMOD04-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Bear Creek in Clear Creek County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain for Jenkins County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("Lunar ATV") to assist extra-vehicular activities...

  13. TERRAIN DATA CAPTURE STANDARDS, LUZERNE COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  14. DCS Terrain Submittal for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("LATUV") to assist extra-vehicular activities in...

  16. DCS Terrain Submission for Monmouth County, New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. Exploration of Extreme Terrain Using a Polyhedral Rover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Exploring celestial bodies with extreme terrains in our solar system, like Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and asteroids, are of great importance to NASA because these...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for McCook County, SD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain submission for Washoe County NV PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. Mechanisms initiating deep convection over complex terrain during COPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kottmeier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Precipitating convection in a mountain region of moderate topography is investigated, with particular emphasis on its initiation in response to boundary-layer and mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing mechanisms. The data used in the study are from COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study that took place in southwestern Germany and eastern France in the summer of 2007. It is found that the initiation of precipitating convection can be roughly classified as being due to either: (i surface heating and low-level flow convergence; (ii surface heating and moisture supply overcoming convective inhibition during latent and/or potential instability; or (iii mid-tropospheric dynamical processes due to mesoscale convergence lines and forced mean vertical motion. These phenomena have to be adequately represented in models in order to improve quantitative precipitation forecast. Selected COPS cases are analysed and classified into these initiation categories. Although only a subset of COPS data (mainly radiosondes, surface weather stations, radar and satellite data are used here, it is shown that convective systems are captured in considerable detail by sensor synergy. Convergence lines were observed by Doppler radar in the location where deep convection is triggered several hours later. The results suggest that in many situations, observations of the location and timing of convergence lines will facilitate the nowcasting of convection. Further on, forecasting of the initiation of convection is significantly complicated if advection of potentially convective air masses over changing terrain features plays a major role. The passage of a frontal structure over the Vosges - Rhine valley - Black Forest orography was accompanied by an intermediate suppression of convection over the wide Rhine valley. Further downstream, an intensification of convection was observed over the Black Forest due to differential surface heating, a convergence line

  1. CONTEXT-BASED URBAN TERRAIN RECONSTRUCTION FROM IMAGES AND VIDEOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bulatov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of buildings and vegetation, and even more reconstruction of urban terrain from sequences of aerial images and videos is known to be a challenging task. It has been established that those methods that have as input a high-quality Digital Surface Model (DSM, are more straight-forward and produce more robust and reliable results than those image-based methods that require matching line segments or even whole regions. This motivated us to develop a new dense matching technique for DSM generation that is capable of simultaneous integration of multiple images in the reconstruction process. The DSMs generated by this new multi-image matching technique can be used for urban object extraction. In the first contribution of this paper, two examples of external sources of information added to the reconstruction pipeline will be shown. The GIS layers are used for recognition of streets and suppressing false alarms in the depth maps that were caused by moving vehicles while the near infrared channel is applied for separating vegetation from buildings. Three examples of data sets including both UAV-borne video sequences with a relatively high number of frames and high-resolution (10 cm ground sample distance data sets consisting of (few spatial-temporarily diverse images from large-format aerial frame cameras, will be presented. By an extensive quantitative evaluation of the Vaihingen block from the ISPRS benchmark on urban object detection, it will become clear that our procedure allows a straight-forward, efficient, and reliable instantiation of 3D city models.

  2. Climate, atmosphere, and volatile inventory evolution: polar processes, climate records, volatile inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Climate change on Mars was driven by long term changes in the solar luminosity, variations in the partitioning of volatiles between the atmosphere and near-surface reservoirs, and astronomical variations in axial and orbital properties. There are important parallels between these drives for Mars and comparable ones for Earth. In the early history of the solar system, the Sun's luminosity was 25 to 30 percent lower than its current value. It is suggested that an early benign climate on Earth was due to the presence of much more carbon dioxide in its atmosphere at these early times than currently resides there. Such a partitioning of carbon dioxide, at the expense of the carbonate rock reservoir, may have resulted from a more vigorous tectonic and volcanic style at early times. Such a line of reasoning may imply that much more carbon dioxide was present in the Martian atmosphere during the planet's early history than resides there today. It is now widely recognized that astronomical variations of the Earth's axial and orbital characteristics have played a dominant role in causing the succession of glacial and interglacial periods characterizing the last several million years. The magnitude of the axial and eccentricity variations are much larger for Mars than for Earth. Such changes on Mars could result in sizeable variations in atmospheric pressure, dust storm activity, and the stability of perennial carbon dioxide and water ice polar caps. These quasi-periodic climate changes occur on periods of 100,000 to 1,000,000 years and may be recorded in the sedimentary layers of the polar layered terrain

  3. Object Georeferencing in UAV-Based SAR Terrain Images

    OpenAIRE

    Łabowski Michał; Kaniewski Piotr; Serafin Piotr; Wajszczyk Bronisław

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radars (SAR) allow to obtain high resolution terrain images comparable with the resolution of optical methods. Radar imaging is independent on the weather conditions and the daylight. The process of analysis of the SAR images consists primarily of identifying of interesting objects. The ability to determine their geographical coordinates can increase usability of the solution from a user point of view. The paper presents a georeferencing method of the radar terrain images. ...

  4. Calibrated L-Band Terrain Measurements and Analysis Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    space of these three parameters, points corresponding to samples from different terrain types will be well separated. And not only will points for...different terrain types be quite distinct, but also dif- ferent regions of the three-parameter space will characterize differ- ent surface types. The...planned to examine goodness of fit of both the IG and log- 4-4 normal distributions to histograms based on various samples, using 86 the Kolmogoroff -Smirnov

  5. A virtual environment for the accurate geologic analysis of Martian terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Christoph; Paar, Gerhard; Gupta, Sanjeev; Hesina, Gerd; Sander, Kathrin; Barnes, Rob; Nauschnegg, Bernhard; Muller, Jan-Peter; Tao, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Remote geology on planetary surfaces requires immersive presentation of the environment to be investigated. Three-dimensional (3D) processing of images from rovers and satellites enables to reconstruct terrain in virtual space on Earth for scientific analysis. In this paper we present a virtual environment that allows to interactively explore 3D-reconstructed Martian terrain and perform accurate measurements on the surface. Geologists do not only require line-of-sight measurements between two points but much more the projected line-of-sight on the surface between two such points. Furthermore the tool supports to define paths of several points. It is also important for geologists to annotate the terrain they explore, especially when collaborating with colleagues. The path tool can also be used to separate geological layers or surround areas of interest. They can be linked with a text label directly positioned in 3D space and always oriented towards the viewing direction. All measurements and annotations can be maintained by a graphical user interface and used as landmarks, i.e. it is possible to fly to the corresponding locations. The virtual environment is fed with 3D vision products from rover cameras, placed in the 3D context gained from satellite images (digital elevations models and corresponding ortho images). This allows investigations in various scales from planet to microscopic level in a seamless manner. The modes of exploitation and added value of such an interactive means are manifold. The visualisation products enable us to map geological surfaces and rock layers over large areas in a quantitative framework. Accurate geometrical relationships of rock bodies especially for sedimentary layers can be reconstructed and the relationships between superposed layers can be established. Within sedimentary layers, we can delineate sedimentary faces and other characteristics. In particular, inclination of beds which may help ascertain flow directions can be

  6. terrain analysis in the course curricula of the south african army

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a_lodi

    ensuring that terrain is utilised and employed to the benefit of the South African. Army.5 Military terrain analysis ... terrain to determine the manoeuvre potential, ways to reduce natural and enemy obstacles, and how they ... working relationship with the military intelligence staff and the engineer terrain warrant officer. For the ...

  7. South Polar Region of Mars: Topography and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The polar layered deposits of Mars represent potentially important volatile reservoirs and tracers for the planet's geologically recent climate history. Unlike the north polar cap, the uppermost surface of the bright residual south polar deposit is probably composed of carbon dioxide ice. It is unknown whether this ice extends through the entire thickness of the deposit. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL), launched in January 1999, is due to arrive in December 1999 to search for water and carbon dioxide on layered deposits near the south pole (SP) of Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Improving Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimation over Complex Terrain in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2017-12-01

    A recent study by the State of California's Department of Water Resources has emphasized that the San Francisco Bay Area is at risk of catastrophic flooding. Therefore, accurate quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) and forecast (QPF) are critical for protecting life and property in this region. Compared to rain gauge and meteorological satellite, ground based radar has shown great advantages for high-resolution precipitation observations in both space and time domain. In addition, the polarization diversity shows great potential to characterize precipitation microphysics through identification of different hydrometeor types and their size and shape information. Currently, all the radars comprising the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) network are operating in dual-polarization mode. Enhancement of QPE is one of the main considerations of the dual-polarization upgrade. The San Francisco Bay Area is covered by two S-band WSR-88D radars, namely, KMUX and KDAX. However, in complex terrain like the Bay Area, it is still challenging to obtain an optimal rainfall algorithm for a given set of dual-polarization measurements. In addition, the accuracy of rain rate estimates is contingent on additional factors such as bright band contamination, vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) correction, and partial beam blockages. This presentation aims to improve radar QPE for the Bay area using advanced dual-polarization rainfall methodologies. The benefit brought by the dual-polarization upgrade of operational radar network is assessed. In addition, a pilot study of gap fill X-band radar performance is conducted in support of regional QPE system development. This paper also presents a detailed comparison between the dual-polarization radar-derived rainfall products with various operational products including the NSSL's Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor (MRMS) system. Quantitative evaluation of various rainfall products is achieved

  9. Reversible Polarization Rotation in Epitaxial Ferroelectric Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Guangqing; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Hsin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    large-scale polarization rotation switching (≈60 μC cm−2) and an effective d 33 response 500% (≈250 pm V−1) larger than the PZT-R layer alone. Furthermore, this enhancement is stable for more than 107 electrical switching cycles. These bilayers present a simple and highly controllable means to design...... and optimize rotational polar systems as an alternate to traditional composition-based approaches. The precise control of the subtle interface-driven interactions between the lattice and the external factors that control polarization opens a new door to enhanced—or completely new—functional properties....

  10. Direct injection of spin-polarized carriers across YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 5-6. Direct injection of spin-polarized ... from the CMR layer is 38 mA. This clearly shows that spin-polarized quasiparticles injected from the CMR layer into the YBCO layer suppress the critical current of the superconductor via the pair-breaking phenomena.

  11. Atmosphere-surface interactions over polar oceans and heterogeneous surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vihma, T.

    1995-12-31

    Processes of interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the planetary surface have been studied with special emphasis on polar ocean surfaces: the open ocean, leads, polynyas and sea ice. The local exchange of momentum, heat and moisture has been studied experimentally both in the Weddell Sea and in the Greenland Sea. Exchange processes over heterogeneous surfaces are addressed by modelling studies. Over a homogeneous surface, the local turbulent fluxes can be reasonably well estimated using an iterative flux-profile scheme based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In the Greenland Sea, the near-surface air temperature and the generally small turbulent fluxes over the open ocean were affected by the sea surface temperature fronts. Over the sea ice cover in the Weddell Sea, the turbulent sensible heat flux was generally downwards, and together with an upward oceanic heat flux through the ice it compensated the heat loss from the surface via long-wave radiation. The wind dominated on time scales of days, while the current became important on longer time scales. The drift dynamics showed apparent spatial differences between the eastern and western regions, as well as between the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the rest of the Weddell Sea. Inertial motion was present in regions of low ice concentration. The surface heterogeneity, arising e.g. from roughness or temperature distribution, poses a problem for the parameterization of surface exchange processes in large-scale models. In the case of neutral flow over a heterogeneous terrain, an effective roughness length can be used to parameterize the roughness effects

  12. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  13. Integrated terrain mapping with digital Landsat images in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Mapping with Landsat images usually is done by selecting single types of features, such as soils, vegetation, or rocks, and creating visually interpreted or digitally classified maps of each feature. Individual maps can then be overlaid on or combined with other maps to characterize the terrain. Integrated terrain mapping combines several terrain features into each map unit which, in many cases, is more directly related to uses of the land and to methods of land management than the single features alone. Terrain brightness, as measured by the multispectral scanners in Landsat 1 and 2, represents an integration of reflectance from the terrain features within the scanner's instantaneous field of view and is therefore more correlatable with integrated terrain units than with differentiated ones, such as rocks, soils, and vegetation. A test of the feasibilty of the technique of mapping integrated terrain units was conducted in a part of southwestern Queensland, Australia, in cooperation with scientists of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The primary purpose was to test the use of digital classification techniques to create a 'land systems map' usable for grazing land management. A recently published map of 'land systems' in the area (made by aerial photograph interpretation and ground surveys), which are integrated terrain units composed of vegetation, soil, topography, and geomorphic features, was used as a basis for comparison with digitally classified Landsat multispectral images. The land systems, in turn, each have a specific grazing capacity for cattle (expressed in beasts per km 2 ) which is estimated following analysis of both research results and property carrying capacities. Landsat images, in computer-compatible tape form, were first contrast-stretched to increase their visual interpretability, and digitally classified by the parallelepiped method into distinct spectral classes to determine their correspondence to the land systems classes and

  14. Complex terrain influences ecosystem carbon responses to temperature and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, W. M.; Epstein, H. E.; Li, X.; McGlynn, B. L.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Emanuel, R. E.

    2017-08-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem responses to temperature and precipitation have major implications for the global carbon cycle. Case studies demonstrate that complex terrain, which accounts for more than 50% of Earth's land surface, can affect ecological processes associated with land-atmosphere carbon fluxes. However, no studies have addressed the role of complex terrain in mediating ecophysiological responses of land-atmosphere carbon fluxes to climate variables. We synthesized data from AmeriFlux towers and found that for sites in complex terrain, responses of ecosystem CO2 fluxes to temperature and precipitation are organized according to terrain slope and drainage area, variables associated with water and energy availability. Specifically, we found that for tower sites in complex terrain, mean topographic slope and drainage area surrounding the tower explained between 51% and 78% of site-to-site variation in the response of CO2 fluxes to temperature and precipitation depending on the time scale. We found no such organization among sites in flat terrain, even though their flux responses exhibited similar ranges. These results challenge prevailing conceptual framework in terrestrial ecosystem modeling that assumes that CO2 fluxes derive from vertical soil-plant-climate interactions. We conclude that the terrain in which ecosystems are situated can also have important influences on CO2 responses to temperature and precipitation. This work has implications for about 14% of the total land area of the conterminous U.S. This area is considered topographically complex and contributes to approximately 15% of gross ecosystem carbon production in the conterminous U.S.

  15. Boundary layer physics over snow and ice

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, P. S.; Neff, W. D.

    2008-01-01

    Observations of the unique chemical environment over snow and ice in recent decades, particularly in the polar regions, have stimulated increasing interest in the boundary layer processes that mediate exchanges between the ice/snow interface and the atmosphere. This paper provides a review of the underlying concepts and examples from recent field studies in polar boundary layer meteorology, which will generally apply to atmospheric flow over snow and ice surfaces. It forms a companion paper t...

  16. Characteristics of pebble and cobble-sized clasts along the Curiosity rover traverse from sol 100 to 750: Terrain types, potential sources, and transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Cropper, K.; Gupta, S.; Kah, L. C.; Williams, R. M. E.; Blank, J.; Calef, F.; Hamilton, V. E.; Lewis, K.; Shechet, J.; McBride, M.; Bridges, N.; Frias, J. Martinez; Newsom, H.

    2016-12-01

    We combine the results of orbitally-derived morphologic and thermal inertia data with in situ observations of abundance, size, morphologic characteristics, and distribution of pebble- to cobble-sized clasts along the Curiosity rover traverse. Our goals are to characterize rock sources and transport history, and improve our ability to predict upcoming terrain. There are ten clast types, with nine types interpreted as sedimentary rocks. Only Type 3 clasts had morphologies indicative of significant wear through transport; thus, most clast types are indicative of nearby outcrops or prior presence of laterally extensive sedimentary rock layers, consistent with the erosional landscape. A minor component may reflect impact delivery of more distant material. Types 1 and 4 are heavily-cemented sandstones, likely associated with a ;caprock; layer. Types 5 and 6 (and possibly 7) are pebble-rich sandstones, with varying amounts of cement leading to varying susceptibility to erosion/wear. Type 3 clasts are rounded pebbles likely transported and deposited alluvially, then worn out of pebbly sandstone/conglomerate. Types 9 and 10 are poorly-sorted sandstones, with Type 9 representing fragments of Square Top-type layers, and Type 10 deriving from basal or other Mt. Sharp layers. Types 2, 8 and 9 are considered exotics. There are few clear links between clast type and terrain surface roughness (particularly in identifying terrain that is challenging for the rover to navigate). Orbital data may provide a reasonable prediction of certain end-member terrains but the complex interplay between variables that contribute to surface characteristics makes discriminating between terrain types from orbital data problematic. Prediction would likely be improved through higher-resolution thermal inertia data.

  17. Generating color terrain images in an emergency response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric release of radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of graphical images of the terrain surface in the vicinity of the accident site. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data. This data is then used as input to a collection of graphics programs which create and display realistic color images of the terrain. The graphics system currently has the capability of generating color shaded relief images from both overhead and perspective viewpoints within minutes. These images serve to quickly familiarize ARAC assessors with the terrain near the release location, and thus permit them to make better informed decisions in modeling the behavior of the released material. 7 refs., 8 figs

  18. On the vertical exchange of heat, mass and momentum over complex, mountainous terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Walter Rotach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL in the atmosphere-climate system is the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between ‘the earth’s surface’ and the atmosphere. Traditionally, it is understood that turbulent transport is responsible for this exchange and hence the understanding and physical description of the turbulence structure of the boundary layer is key to assess the effectiveness of earth-atmosphere exchange. This understanding is rooted in the (implicit assumption of a scale separation or spectral gap between turbulence and mean atmospheric motions, which in turn leads to the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF surface as a reference, for which both physical understanding and model parameterizations have successfully been developed over the years. Over mountainous terrain, however, the ABL is generically inhomogeneous due to both thermal (radiative and dynamic forcing. This inhomogeneity leads to meso-scale and even sub-meso-scale flows such as slope and valley winds or wake effects. It is argued here that these (submeso-scale motions can significantly contribute to the vertical structure of the boundary layer and hence vertical exchange of heat and mass between the surface and the atmosphere. If model grid resolution is not high enough the latter will have to be parameterized (in a similar fashion as gravity wave drag parameterizations take into account the momentum transport due to gravity waves in large-scale models. In this contribution we summarize the available evidence of the contribution of (submeso-scale motions to vertical exchange in mountainous terrain from observational and numerical modeling studies. In particular, a number of recent simulation studies using idealized topography will be summarized and put into perspective – so as to identify possible limitations and areas of necessary future research.

  19. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  20. The Improved Kriging Interpolation Algorithm for Local Underwater Terrain Based on Fractal Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interpolation-reconstruction of local underwater terrain using the underwater digital terrain map (UDTM is an important step for building an underwater terrain matching unit and directly affects the accuracy of underwater terrain matching navigation. The Kriging method is often used in terrain interpolation, but, with this method, the local terrain features are often lost. Therefore, the accuracy cannot meet the requirements of practical application. Analysis of the geographical features is performed on the basis of the randomness and self-similarity of underwater terrain. We extract the fractal features of local underwater terrain with the fractal Brownian motion model, compensating for the possible errors of the Kriging method with fractal theory. We then put forward an improved Kriging interpolation method based on this fractal compensation. Interpolation-reconstruction tests show that the method can simulate the real underwater terrain features well and that it has good usability.

  1. ISOSTATICALLY DISTURBED TERRAIN OF NORTHWESTERN ANDES MOUNTAINS FROM SPECTRALLY CORRELATED FREE-AIR AND GRAVITY TERRAIN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández P Orlando

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently revised models on global tectonics describe the convergence of the North Andes, Nazca, Caribbean and South American Plates and their seismicity, volcanism, active faulting and extreme
    topography. The current plate boundaries of the area are mainly interpreted from volcanic and seismic datasets with variable confidence levels. New insights on the isostatic state and plate boundaries of
    the northwestern Andes Mountains can be obtained from the spectral analysis of recently available gravity and topography data.
    Isostatically disturbed terrain produces free-air anomalies that are highly correlated with the gravity effects of the terrain. The terrain gravity effects (TGE and free air gravity anomalies (FAGA of the
    Andes mountains spectral correlation data confirms that these mountains are isostatically disturbed. Strong negative terrain-correlated FAGA along western South America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles are consistent with anomalously deepened mantle displaced by subducting oceanic plates.

    Inversion of the compensated terrain gravity effects (CTGE reveals plate subduction systems with alternating shallower and steeper subduction angles. The gravity modeling highlights crustal
    deformation from plate collision and subduction and other constraints on the tectonism of the plate boundary zones for the region.

  2. Irregular Morphing for Real-Time Rendering of Large Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kalem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The following paper proposes an alternative approach to the real-time adaptive triangulation problem. A new region-based multi-resolution approach for terrain rendering is described which improves on-the-fly the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile after selecting appropriate Level-Of-Detail by an adaptive sampling. This proposed approach organizes the heightmap into a QuadTree of tiles that are processed independently. This technique combines the benefits of both Triangular Irregular Network approach and region-based multi-resolution approach by improving the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile. Our technique morphs the initial regular grid of the tile to deformed grid in order to minimize approximation error. The proposed technique strives to combine large tile size and real-time processing while guaranteeing an upper bound on the screen space error. Thus, this approach adapts terrain rendering process to local surface characteristics and enables on-the-fly handling of large amount of terrain data. Morphing is based-on the multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The use of the D2WT multi-resolution analysis of the terrain height-map speeds up processing and permits to satisfy an interactive terrain rendering. Tests and experiments demonstrate that Haar B-Spline wavelet, well known for its properties of localization and its compact support, is suitable for fast and accurate redistribution. Such technique could be exploited in client-server architecture for supporting interactive high-quality remote visualization of very large terrain.

  3. Freely tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-02-18

    A freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband terahertz waves is demonstrated using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized terahertz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. This low-cost, high-efficiency, and freely tunable device has potential applications as material analysis, wireless communication, and THz imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hydrogen Distribution in the Lunar Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Bakhtin, B. N.; Bodnarik, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Harshmann, K.; Fedosov, F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a method of conversion of the lunar neutron counting rate measured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument collimated neutron detectors, to water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) in the top approximately 1 m layer of lunar regolith. Polar maps of the Moon’s inferred hydrogen abundance are presented and discussed.

  5. Synthetic SAR Image Generation using Sensor, Terrain and Target Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Anders; Abulaitijiang, Adili; Dall, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    A tool to generate synthetic SAR images of objects set on a clutter background is described. The purpose is to generate images for training Automatic Target Recognition and Identification algorithms. The tool employs a commercial electromagnetic simulation program to calculate radar cross sections...... of the object using a CAD-model. The raw measurements are input to a SAR system and terrain model, which models thermal noise, terrain clutter, and SAR focusing to produce synthetic SAR images. Examples of SAR images at 0.3m and 0.1m resolution, and a comparison with real SAR imagery from the MSTAR dataset...

  6. Terrain dependant hop count selection for transparent relay transmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibile K. Kanjirathumkal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this Letter, the selection of the best hop count for a particular topography, in the context of enhanced connectivity using multi-hop transparent relay communication is addressed. Based on the coefficient of variation and the terrain specific fading severity factor of the distribution, it is possible to estimate the optimal hop count that can provide the required performance at detector. Two distribution models, which can adequately characterise the terrain fading effects on empirical data are considered for performance comparison. The results are useful in selecting branches, with low variability and optimal hop count for connectivity, in multi-stream switched diversity combining systems.

  7. Terrain Mapping and Obstacle Detection Using Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Massaro, Alessandro Salvatore; Bayramoglu, Enis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic method for extracting terrain maps from a scene and use the information to detect potential navigation obstacles within it. The method uses Gaussian process regression (GPR) to predict an estimate function and its relative uncertainty. To test the new...... methods, we have arranged two setups: an artificial flat surface with an object in front of the sensors and an outdoor unstructured terrain. Two sensor types have been used to determine the point cloud fed to the system: a 3D laser scanner and a stereo camera pair. The results from both sensor systems...

  8. Are Titan's radial Labyrinth terrains surface expressions of large laccoliths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmeier, L.; Dombard, A. J.; Malaska, M.; Radebaugh, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Labyrinth terrain unit may be the one of the best examples of the surface expression of Titan's complicated history. They are characterized as highly eroded, dissected, and elevated plateaus and remnant ridges, with an assumed composition that is likely organic-rich based on radar emissivity. How these features accumulated organic-rich sediments and formed topographic highs by either locally uplifting or surviving pervasive regional deflation or erosion is an important question for understanding the history of Titan. There are several subsets of Labyrinth terrains, presumably with differing evolutionary histories and formation processes. We aim to explain the formation of a subset of Labyrinth terrain units informally referred to as "radial Labyrinth terrains." They are elevated and appear dome-like, circular in planform, have a strong radial dissection pattern, are bordered by Undifferentiated Plains units, and are found in the mid-latitudes. Based on their shape, clustering, and dimensions, we suggest that they may be the surface expression of large subsurface laccoliths. A recent study by Manga and Michaut (Icarus, 2017) explained Europa's lenticulae (pits, domes, spots) with the formation of saucer-shaped sills that form laccoliths around the brittle-ductile transition depth within the ice shell (1-5 km). Here, we apply the same scaling relationships and find that the larger size of radial labyrinth terrains with Titan's higher gravity implies deeper intrusion depths of around 20-40 km. This intrusion depth matches the expected brittle-ductile transition on Titan based on our finite element simulations and yield strength envelope analyses. We hypothesize that Titan's radial labyrinth terrains formed as cryovolcanic (water) intrusions that rose to the brittle-ductile transition within the ice shell where they spread horizontally, and uplifted the overlying ice. The organic-rich sedimentary cover also uplifted, becoming more susceptible to pluvial and fluvial

  9. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  10. Supervised Autonomy for Exploration and Mobile Manipulation in Rough Terrain with a Centaur-like Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Schwarz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Planetary exploration scenarios illustrate the need for autonomous robots that are capable to operate in unknown environments without direct human interaction. At the DARPA Robotics Challenge, we demonstrated that our Centaur-like mobile manipulation robot Momaro can solve complex tasks when teleoperated. Motivated by the DLR SpaceBot Cup 2015, where robots should explore a Mars-like environment, find and transport objects, take a soil sample, and perform assembly tasks, we developed autonomous capabilities for Momaro. Our robot perceives and maps previously unknown, uneven terrain using a 3D laser scanner. Based on the generated height map, we assess drivability, plan navigation paths, and execute them using the omnidirectional drive. Using its four legs, the robot adapts to the slope of the terrain. Momaro perceives objects with cameras, estimates their pose, and manipulates them with its two arms autonomously. For specifying missions, monitoring mission progress, on-the-fly reconfiguration, and teleoperation, we developed a ground station with suitable operator interfaces. To handle network communication interruptions and latencies between robot and ground station, we implemented a robust network layer for the ROS middleware. With the developed system, our team NimbRo Explorer solved all tasks of the DLR SpaceBot Camp 2015. We also discuss the lessons learned from this demonstration.

  11. Effect on tracer concentrations of ABL depth models in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galmarini, S.; Salin, P. [Joint Research Center Ispra (Italy); Anfossi, D.; Trini-Castelli, S. [CNR-ICGF, Turin (Italy); Schayes, G. [Univ. Louvain-la-Neuve, Louvain (Belgium)

    1997-10-01

    In the present preliminary study we use different ABL (atmospheric boundary layer) depth formulations to study atmospheric dispersion in complex-terrain conditions. The flow in an Alpine valley during the tracer experiment TRANSALP is simulated by means of a mesoscale model and a tracer dispersion is reproduced using a Lagrangian particle model. The ABL dept enters as key parameter in particle model turbulent-dispersion formulation. The preliminary results reveal that the ABL depth parameter can influence the dispersion process but that in the case of a dispersion in a valley-daytime flow the results depend much more strongly on the model horizontal and vertical resolution. A relatively coarse horizontal resolution implies a considerable smoothing of the topography that largely affects the dispersion characteristics. The vertical resolution does not allow on to resolve with sufficient details the rapid and large variation of the flow characteristic as the terrain feature vary. Two of the methods used to determine the ABL depth depend strongly on the resolution. The method that instead depends only on surface parameters like heat flux and surface based stability allowed us to obtain results to be considered satisfactory for what concerns the dispersion process, quite consistent with the flow model results, less numeric dependent and more physically sound. (LN)

  12. SPATIAL RESOLUTION EFFECTS OF DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS ON LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Chang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study are to identify the maximum number of correlated factors for landslide susceptibility mapping and to evaluate landslide susceptibility at Sihjhong river catchment in the southern Taiwan, integrating two techniques, namely certainty factor (CF and artificial neural network (ANN. The landslide inventory data of the Central Geological Survey (CGS, MOEA in 2004-2014 and two digital elevation model (DEM datasets including a 5-meter LiDAR DEM and a 30-meter Aster DEM were prepared. We collected thirteen possible landslide-conditioning factors. Considering the multi-collinearity and factor redundancy, we applied the CF approach to optimize these thirteen conditioning factors. We hypothesize that if the CF values of the thematic factor layers are positive, it implies that these conditioning factors have a positive relationship with the landslide occurrence. Therefore, based on this assumption and positive CF values, seven conditioning factors including slope angle, slope aspect, elevation, terrain roughness index (TRI, terrain position index (TPI, total curvature, and lithology have been selected for further analysis. The results showed that the optimized-factors model provides a better accuracy for predicting landslide susceptibility in the study area. In conclusion, the optimized-factors model is suggested for selecting relative factors of landslide occurrence.

  13. Enhanced method for multiscale wind simulations over complex terrain for wind resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Maradiaga, A.; Benoit, R.; Masson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the natural variability of the wind, it is necessary to conduct thorough wind resource assessments to determine how much energy can be extracted at a given site. Lately, important advancements have been achieved in numerical methods of multiscale models used for high resolution wind simulations over steep topography. As a contribution to this effort, an enhanced numerical method was devised in the mesoscale compressible community (MC2) model of the Meteorological Service of Canada, adapting a new semi-implicit scheme with its imbedded large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for mountainous terrain. This implementation has been verified by simulating the neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain and a Gaussian ridge. These preliminary results indicate that the enhanced MC2-LES model reproduces efficiently the results reported by other researchers who use similar models with more sophisticated sub-grid scale turbulence schemes. The proposed multiscale method also provides a new wind initialization scheme and additional utilities to improve numerical accuracy and stability. The resulting model can be used to assess the wind resource at meso- and micro-scales, reducing significantly the wind speed overestimation in mountainous areas.

  14. PSI: Very slow polarized muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    At the 'pion factory' of the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute, a collaboration of PSI, Heidelberg and Zurich (ETH) has recently produced intense beams of positive muons which have kinetic energies as low as 10 eV and with complete polarization (spin orientation). The new results were achieved at a surface muon channel, transporting positive muons from the decay of positive pions stopped at the surface of a pion production target. Surface muons with 4 MeV kinetic energy were transported by a conventional secondary beam channel and partially stopped in a moderator consisting of a layer of solidified noble gas deposited on a cold metallic substrate

  15. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyren, K. [Ericsson EriSoft AB, Umeaa (Sweden); Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We present a nomogram that provide information about the general behaviour of the mixed layer at a given location. The nomogram is meant to be a practical and easy to use tool to determine the height of the mixed layer for i.e. weather forecaster, air pollution studies and planning of meteorological experiments. Use of the nomogram is restricted to flat, relatively homogeneous terrain. Inhomogeneous terrain with patch scales of 10 km or more might create organised circulation like i.e. lake breezes. The data represented in the nomogram is computed using a meteorological preprocessor and climatological temperature data for the location. The nomogram is simplified but retain main physical processes that control the evolution of the mixed layer and can be easily constructed for any chosen location on land. Nomogram of the mixed layer behavior at the location of Cabauw, the Netherlands is shown and discussed. (au)

  16. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  17. Major hazard risk assessment over non-flat terrain. Part I: continuous releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Robin K. S.

    Liquefied gases, such as chlorine or ammonia, are stored in large quantities on industrial sites. If released accidentally, they can form a heavy gas cloud that has the potential to kill or injure large numbers of people. The dispersion of such a cloud is thus of interest to the risk assessment community. This is the first of a two-part paper. Here, the risk (probability) of being exposed to a continuously released toxic gas cloud, given a release, is considered; probability language is needed because wind direction is assumed to be a random variable. Part II considers instantaneous releases. Risk is considered in terms of RC, the probability at any point of receiving a non-zero dose given a continuous release. For flat ground, simple analytical techniques show that R C≃ 3 2/3/2πF2/3·r -1/3·u -1·Q 1/3 for a uniform windrose (windspeed u) at radius r due to a continuous release of buoyancy flux Q. Here F is the front Froude number. This paper shows how the risk of being exposed to heavy gas from a steady continuous release is affected by non-flat terrain, using the established shallow layer model TWODEE (Journal of Hazardous Materials 66(3) (1999a) 211). Results from both simple slopes and real terrain are presented. A range of windspeeds and slopes are considered. For a steady 44 kg s -1 continuous release under a windspeed of 1 m s -1, groundslopes as low as 2% can substantially affect the risk in the sense that the predicted risk contours are far from circularly symmetric. The real terrain data used is from Little Barrier Island, New Zealand (latitude 36°11'S, longitude 175°4'E), chosen on account of its being uninhabited, and having steep slopes and complex topography. As the windspeed increases from 1 to 10 m s -1, risk contours become less affected by terrain in that their complexity is reduced.

  18. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  19. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top. This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  20. Natural melanin composites by layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Taesik; Shim, Bong Sub

    2015-04-01

    Melanin is an electrically conductive and biocompatible material, because their conjugated backbone structures provide conducting pathways from human skin, eyes, brain, and beyond. So there is a potential of using as materials for the neural interfaces and the implantable devices. Extracted from Sepia officinalis ink, our natural melanin was uniformly dispersed in mostly polar solvents such as water and alcohols. Then, the dispersed melanin was further fabricated to nano-thin layered composites by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. Combined with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), the melanin nanoparticles behave as an LBL counterpart to from finely tuned nanostructured films. The LBL process can adjust the smart performances of the composites by varying the layering conditions and sandwich thickness. We further demonstrated the melanin loading degree of stacked layers, combination nanostructures, electrical properties, and biocompatibility of the resulting composites by UV-vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), multimeter, and in-vitro cell test of PC12, respectively.