WorldWideScience

Sample records for polar cap ionosphere

  1. Polar cap hot patches: Enhanced density structures different from the classical patches in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.-H.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Moen, J.; Lockwood, M.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Foster, J. C.; Zhang, S.-R.; Wang, Y.; Themens, D. R.; Zhang, B.-C.; Xing, Z. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Based on in situ and ground-based observations, a new type of "polar cap hot patch" has been identified that is different from the classical polar cap enhanced density structure (cold patches). Comparing with the classical polar cap patches, which are transported from the dayside sunlit region with dense and cold plasma, the polar cap hot patches are associated with particle precipitations (therefore field-aligned currents), ion upflows, and flow shears. The hot patches may have the same order of density enhancement as classical patches in the topside ionosphere, suggesting that the hot patches may be produced by transported photoionization plasma into flow channels. Within the flow channels, the hot patches have low-energy particle precipitation and/or ion upflows associated with field-aligned currents and flow shears. Corresponding Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal scintillation measurements indicate that hot patches may produce slightly stronger radio signal scintillation in the polar cap region than classical patches. A new type of polar cap patches, "polar cap hot patches," is identified to differentiate enhanced density structures from classical patches. Hot patches are associated with particle precipitations, ion upflows, field-aligned currents, and shear flows in the polar cap. Hot patches may lead to slightly stronger ionospheric scintillations of GNSS signals in the polar cap region than classical patches.

  2. A new method to reconstruct the ionospheric convection patterns in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Israelevich

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method to reconstruct the instantaneous convection pattern in the Earth's polar ionosphere is suggested. Plasma convection in the polar cap ionosphere is described as a hydrodynamic incompressible flow. This description is valid in the region where the electric currents are field aligned (and hence, the Lorentz body force vanishes. The problem becomes two-dimensional, and may be described by means of stream function. The flow pattern may be found as a solution of the boundary value problem for stream function. Boundary conditions should be provided by measurements of the electric field or plasma velocity vectors along the satellite orbits. It is shown that the convection pattern may be reconstructed with a reasonable accuracy by means of this method, by using only the minimum number of satellite crossings of the polar cap. The method enables us to obtain a reasonable estimate of the convection pattern without knowledge of the ionospheric conductivity.Key words. Ionosphere (modelling and forecasting; plasma convection; polar ionosphere

  3. A new method to reconstruct the ionospheric convection patterns in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Israelevich

    Full Text Available A new method to reconstruct the instantaneous convection pattern in the Earth's polar ionosphere is suggested. Plasma convection in the polar cap ionosphere is described as a hydrodynamic incompressible flow. This description is valid in the region where the electric currents are field aligned (and hence, the Lorentz body force vanishes. The problem becomes two-dimensional, and may be described by means of stream function. The flow pattern may be found as a solution of the boundary value problem for stream function. Boundary conditions should be provided by measurements of the electric field or plasma velocity vectors along the satellite orbits. It is shown that the convection pattern may be reconstructed with a reasonable accuracy by means of this method, by using only the minimum number of satellite crossings of the polar cap. The method enables us to obtain a reasonable estimate of the convection pattern without knowledge of the ionospheric conductivity.

    Key words. Ionosphere (modelling and forecasting; plasma convection; polar ionosphere

  4. Rocket Measurements Within a Polar Cap Arc: Ionospheric Modelling,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-19

    References Aarons, Jules , Global morphology of ionospheric scintillations, Proc. IEEE, 70, 360, 1982. Banks, P.M., Chapell, C.R., and A.F. Nagy, A new model...penetration of soft electrons into the ionosphere, Planet. Space Sci., 24, 409, 1975. Mantas, George P., Carlson, Herbert C. Jr., and Caesar H. LaHoz

  5. Polar cap arcs from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere: kinetic modelling and observations by Cluster and TIMED

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    R. Maggiolo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available On 1 April 2004 the GUVI imager onboard the TIMED spacecraft spots an isolated and elongated polar cap arc. About 20 min later, the Cluster satellites detect an isolated upflowing ion beam above the polar cap. Cluster observations show that the ions are accelerated upward by a quasi-stationary electric field. The field-aligned potential drop is estimated to about 700 V and the upflowing ions are accompanied by a tenuous population of isotropic protons with a temperature of about 500 eV. The magnetic footpoints of the ion outflows observed by Cluster are situated in the prolongation of the polar cap arc observed by TIMED GUVI. The upflowing ion beam and the polar cap arc may be different signatures of the same phenomenon, as suggested by a recent statistical study of polar cap ion beams using Cluster data. We use Cluster observations at high altitude as input to a quasi-stationary magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI coupling model. Using a Knight-type current-voltage relationship and the current continuity at the topside ionosphere, the model computes the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons at the top of the ionosphere corresponding to the generator electric field observed by Cluster. The MI coupling model provides a field-aligned potential drop in agreement with Cluster observations of upflowing ions and a spatial scale of the polar cap arc consistent with the optical observations by TIMED. The computed energy spectrum of the precipitating electrons is used as input to the Trans4 ionospheric transport code. This 1-D model, based on Boltzmann's kinetic formalism, takes into account ionospheric processes such as photoionization and electron/proton precipitation, and computes the optical and UV emissions due to precipitating electrons. The emission rates provided by the Trans4 code are compared to the optical observations by TIMED. They are similar in size and intensity. Data and modelling results are consistent with the scenario of quasi

  6. The response of ionospheric convection in the polar cap to substorm activity

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    M. Lester

    Full Text Available We report multi-instrument observations during an isolated substorm on 17 October 1989. The EISCAT radar operated in the SP-UK-POLI mode measuring ionospheric convection at latitudes 71°λ-78°λ. SAMNET and the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross provide information on the timing of substorm expansion phase onset and subsequent intensifications, as well as the location of the field aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the substorm current wedge. IMP-8 magnetic field data are also included. Evidence of a substorm growth phase is provided by the equatorward motion of a flow reversal boundary across the EISCAT radar field of view at 2130 MLT, following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. We infer that the polar cap expanded as a result of the addition of open magnetic flux to the tail lobes during this interval. The flow reversal boundary, which is a lower limit to the polar cap boundary, reached an invariant latitude equatorward of 71°λ by the time of the expansion phase onset. A westward electrojet, centred at 65.4°λ, occurred at the onset of the expansion phase. This electrojet subsequently moved poleward to a maximum of 68.1°λ at 2000 UT and also widened. During the expansion phase, there is evidence of bursts of plasma flow which are spatially localised at longitudes within the substorm current wedge and which occurred well poleward of the westward electrojet. We conclude that the substorm onset region in the ionosphere, defined by the westward electrojet, mapped to a part of the tail radially earthward of the boundary between open and closed magnetic flux, the "distant" neutral line. Thus the substorm was not initiated at the distant neutral line, although there is evidence that it remained active during the expansion phase. It is not obvious whether the electrojet mapped to a near-Earth neutral line, but at its most poleward, the expanded electrojet does not reach the estimated latitude of the polar cap

  7. Method to locate the polar cap boundary in the nightside ionosphere and application to a substorm event

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    A. T. Aikio

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a new method to be used for the polar cap boundary (PCB determination in the nightside ionosphere by using the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR field-aligned measurements by the 42-m antenna and southward directed low-elevation measurements by the ESR 32 m antenna or northward directed low-elevation measurements by the EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø. The method is based on increased electron temperature (Te caused by precipitating particles on closed field lines. Since the Svalbard field-aligned measurement provides the reference polar cap Te height profile, the method can be utilised only when the PCB is located between Svalbard and the mainland. Comparison with the Polar UVI images shows that the radar-based method is generally in agreement with the PAE (poleward auroral emission boundary from Polar UVI. The new technique to map the polar cap boundary was applied to a substorm event on 6 November 2002. Simultaneous measurements by the MIRACLE magnetometers enabled us to put the PCB location in the framework of ionospheric electrojets. During the substorm growth phase, the polar cap expands and the region of the westward electrojet shifts gradually more apart from the PCB. The substorm onset takes place deep within the region of closed magnetic field region, separated by about 6–7° in latitude from the PCB in the ionosphere. We interpret the observations in the framework of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL model of substorms. After the substorm onset, the reconnection at the NENL reaches within 3 min the open-closed field line boundary and then the PCB moves poleward together with the poleward boundary of the substorm current wedge. The poleward expansion occurs in the form of individual bursts, which are separated by 2–10 min, indicating that the reconnection in the magnetotail neutral line is impulsive. The poleward expansions of the PCB are followed by latitude dispersed intensifications in the westward electrojet

  8. Plasma Irregularity Production in the Polar Cap F-Region Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Leslie

    Plasma in the Earth's ionosphere is highly irregular on scales ranging between a few centimeters and hundreds of kilometers. Small-scale irregularities or plasma waves can scatter radio waves resulting in a loss of signal for navigation and communication networks. The polar region is particularly susceptible to strong disturbances due to its direct connection with the Sun's magnetic field and energetic particles. In this thesis, factors that contribute to the production of decameter-scale plasma irregularities in the polar F region ionosphere are investigated. Both global and local control of irregularity production are studied, i.e. we consider global solar control through solar illumination and solar wind as well as much more local control by plasma density gradients and convection electric field. In the first experimental study, solar control of irregularity production is investigated using the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar at McMurdo, Antarctica. The occurrence trends for irregularities are analyzed statistically and a model is developed that describes the location of radar echoes within the radar's field-of-view. The trends are explained through variations in background plasma density with solar illumination affecting radar beam propagation. However, it is found that the irregularity occurrence during the night is higher than expected from ray tracing simulations based on a standard ionospheric density model. The high occurrence at night implies an additional source of plasma density and it is proposed that large-scale density enhancements called polar patches may be the source of this density. Additionally, occurrence maximizes around the terminator due to different competing irregularity production processes that favor a more or less sunlit ionosphere. The second study is concerned with modeling irregularity characteristics near a large-scale density gradient reversal, such as those expected near polar patches, with a particular focus on

  9. A multi-satellite study of accelerated ionospheric ion beams above the polar cap

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    R. Maggiolo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of nearly field-aligned outflowing ion beams observed on the Cluster satellites over the polar cap. Data are taken at geocentric radial distances of the order of 5–9 RE. The distinction is made between ion beams originating from the polar cusp/cleft and beams accelerated almost along the magnetic field line passing by the spacecraft. Polar cusp beams are characterized by nearly field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with an energy ratio EO+ / EH+, of the order of 3 to 4, due to the ion energy repartition inside the source and to the latitudinal extension of the source. Rapid variations in the outflowing ion energy are linked with pulses/modifications of the convection electric field. Cluster data allow one to show that these perturbations of the convection velocity and the associated ion structures propagate at the convection velocity. In contrast, polar cap local ion beams are characterized by field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with similar energies. These beams show the typical inverted V structures usually observed in the auroral zone and are associated with a quasi-static converging electric field indicative of a field-aligned electric field. The field-aligned potential drop fits well the ion energy profile. The simultaneous observation of precipitating electrons and upflowing ions of similar energies at the Cluster orbit indicates that the spacecraft are crossing the mid-altitude part of the acceleration region. In the polar cap, the parallel electric field can thus extend to altitudes higher than 5 Earth radii. A detailed analysis of the distribution functions shows that the ions are heated during their parallel acceleration and that energy is exchanged between H+ and O+. Furthermore, intense electrostatic waves are observed simultaneously. These observations could be due to an ion-ion two-stream instability.

  10. A multi-satellite study of accelerated ionospheric ion beams above the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of nearly field-aligned outflowing ion beams observed on the Cluster satellites over the polar cap. Data are taken at geocentric radial distances of the order of 5–9 RE. The distinction is made between ion beams originating from the polar cusp/cleft and beams accelerated almost along the magnetic field line passing by the spacecraft. Polar cusp beams are characterized by nearly field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with an energy ratio EO+ / EH+, of the order of 3 to 4, due to the ion energy repartition inside the source and to the latitudinal extension of the source. Rapid variations in the outflowing ion energy are linked with pulses/modifications of the convection electric field. Cluster data allow one to show that these perturbations of the convection velocity and the associated ion structures propagate at the convection velocity.

    In contrast, polar cap local ion beams are characterized by field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with similar energies. These beams show the typical inverted V structures usually observed in the auroral zone and are associated with a quasi-static converging electric field indicative of a field-aligned electric field. The field-aligned potential drop fits well the ion energy profile. The simultaneous observation of precipitating electrons and upflowing ions of similar energies at the Cluster orbit indicates that the spacecraft are crossing the mid-altitude part of the acceleration region. In the polar cap, the parallel electric field can thus extend to altitudes higher than 5 Earth radii. A detailed analysis of the distribution functions shows that the ions are heated during their parallel acceleration and that energy is exchanged between H+ and O+. Furthermore, intense electrostatic waves are observed simultaneously. These observations could be due to an ion-ion two-stream instability.

  11. The thermospheric effects of a rapid polar cap expansion

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    D. W. Idenden

    Full Text Available In a previous publication we used results from a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere-plasmasphere model to illustrate a new mechanism for the formation of a large-scale patch of ionisation arising from a rapid polar cap expansion. Here we describe the thermospheric response to that polar cap expansion, and to the ionospheric structure produced. The response is dominated by the energy and momentum input at the dayside throat during the expansion phase itself. These inputs give rise to a large-scale travelling atmospheric disturbance (TAD that propagates both antisunward across the polar cap and equatorward at speeds much greater than both the ion drifts and the neutral winds. We concentrate only on the initially poleward travelling disturbance. The disturbance is manifested in the neutral temperature and wind fields, the height of the pressure level surfaces and in the neutral density at fixed heights. The thermospheric effects caused by the ionospheric structure produced during the expansion are hard to discern due to the dominating effects of the TAD.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere · atmosphere interaction; modeling and forecasting; plasma convection.

  12. The thermospheric effects of a rapid polar cap expansion

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    D. W. Idenden

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available In a previous publication we used results from a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere-plasmasphere model to illustrate a new mechanism for the formation of a large-scale patch of ionisation arising from a rapid polar cap expansion. Here we describe the thermospheric response to that polar cap expansion, and to the ionospheric structure produced. The response is dominated by the energy and momentum input at the dayside throat during the expansion phase itself. These inputs give rise to a large-scale travelling atmospheric disturbance (TAD that propagates both antisunward across the polar cap and equatorward at speeds much greater than both the ion drifts and the neutral winds. We concentrate only on the initially poleward travelling disturbance. The disturbance is manifested in the neutral temperature and wind fields, the height of the pressure level surfaces and in the neutral density at fixed heights. The thermospheric effects caused by the ionospheric structure produced during the expansion are hard to discern due to the dominating effects of the TAD.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere · atmosphere interaction; modeling and forecasting; plasma convection.

  13. Unusual Ionospheric Echoes with Velocity and Very Low Special Width Observed by the SuperDARN Radars in the Polar Cap During High Geomagnetic Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nishitani, Nozomu

    2004-01-01

    ...) They have a close correlation with geomagnetic activity such that as the Dst index decreases, the radars tend to observe ionospheric echoes with high Doppler velocity and very low spectral width more frequently. (2...

  14. Polar cap index as a proxy for hemispheric Joule heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, F.K.; Knipp, D.J.; McHarg, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    input into the polar cap, we propose to use PC as a proxy for the hemispheric Joule heat production rate (JH). In this study, JH is estimated from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure. We fit hourly PC values to hourly averages of JH. Using a data base approximately...... is as equally accurate. Thus the single station PC index appears to provide a quick estimate of, and is an appropriate proxy for, the hemispheric Joule heating rate....

  15. Edge of polar cap patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  16. Multi-instrument probing of the polar ionosphere under steady northward IMF

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    S. E. Pryse

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations are presented of the polar ionosphere under steady, northward IMF. The measurements, made by six complementary experimental techniques, including radio tomography, all-sky and meridian scanning photometer optical imaging, incoherent and coherent scatter radars and satellite particle detection, reveal plasma parameters consistent with ionospheric signatures of lobe reconnection. The optical green-line footprint of the reconnection site is seen to lie in the sunward plasma convection of the lobe cells. Downstream in the region of softer precipitation the reverse energy dispersion of the incoming ions can be identified. A steep latitudinal density gradient at the equatorward edge of the precipitation identifies the general location of an adiaroic boundary, separating the open field lines of polar lobe cells from the closed field of viscous-driven cells. Enhancements in plasma density to the south of the gradient are interpreted as ionisation being reconfigured as it is thrust against the boundary by the antisunward flow of the viscous cells near noon. Each of the instruments individually provides valuable information on certain aspects of the ionosphere, but the paper demonstrates that taken together the different experiments complement each other to give a consistent and comprehensive picture of the dayside polar ionosphere..Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere · Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; polar cap phenomena

  17. Multi-instrument probing of the polar ionosphere under steady northward IMF

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    S. E. Pryse

    Full Text Available Observations are presented of the polar ionosphere under steady, northward IMF. The measurements, made by six complementary experimental techniques, including radio tomography, all-sky and meridian scanning photometer optical imaging, incoherent and coherent scatter radars and satellite particle detection, reveal plasma parameters consistent with ionospheric signatures of lobe reconnection. The optical green-line footprint of the reconnection site is seen to lie in the sunward plasma convection of the lobe cells. Downstream in the region of softer precipitation the reverse energy dispersion of the incoming ions can be identified. A steep latitudinal density gradient at the equatorward edge of the precipitation identifies the general location of an adiaroic boundary, separating the open field lines of polar lobe cells from the closed field of viscous-driven cells. Enhancements in plasma density to the south of the gradient are interpreted as ionisation being reconfigured as it is thrust against the boundary by the antisunward flow of the viscous cells near noon. Each of the instruments individually provides valuable information on certain aspects of the ionosphere, but the paper demonstrates that taken together the different experiments complement each other to give a consistent and comprehensive picture of the dayside polar ionosphere..

    Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere · Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; polar cap phenomena

  18. Central polar cap convection response to short duration southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

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    P. T. Jayachandran

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Central polar cap convection changes associated with southward turnings of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF are studied using a chain of Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosondes (CADI in the northern polar cap. A study of 32 short duration (~1 h southward IMF transition events found a three stage response: (1 initial response to a southward transition is near simultaneous for the entire polar cap; (2 the peak of the convection speed (attributed to the maximum merging electric field propagates poleward from the ionospheric footprint of the merging region; and (3 if the change in IMF is rapid enough, then a step in convection appears to start at the cusp and then propagates antisunward over the polar cap with the velocity of the maximum convection. On the nightside, a substorm onset is observed at about the time when the step increase in convection (associated with the rapid transition of IMF arrives at the polar cap boundary.Key words: Ionosphere (plasma convection; polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (solar wind - magnetosphere interaction

  19. Central polar cap convection response to short duration southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

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    P. T. Jayachandran

    Full Text Available Central polar cap convection changes associated with southward turnings of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF are studied using a chain of Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosondes (CADI in the northern polar cap. A study of 32 short duration (~1 h southward IMF transition events found a three stage response: (1 initial response to a southward transition is near simultaneous for the entire polar cap; (2 the peak of the convection speed (attributed to the maximum merging electric field propagates poleward from the ionospheric footprint of the merging region; and (3 if the change in IMF is rapid enough, then a step in convection appears to start at the cusp and then propagates antisunward over the polar cap with the velocity of the maximum convection. On the nightside, a substorm onset is observed at about the time when the step increase in convection (associated with the rapid transition of IMF arrives at the polar cap boundary.

    Key words: Ionosphere (plasma convection; polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (solar wind - magnetosphere interaction

  20. Fourier analysis of polar cap electric field and current distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of high-latitude electric fields and currents, using analytic Fourier analysis methods, is conducted. A two-dimensional planar model of the ionosphere with an enhanced conductivity auroral belt and field-aligned currents at the edges is employed. Two separate topics are treated. A field-aligned current element near the cusp region of the polar cap is included to investigate the modifications to the convection pattern by the east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field. It is shown that a sizable one-cell structure is induced near the cusp which diverts equipotential contours to the dawnside or duskside, depending on the sign of the cusp current. This produces characteristic dawn-dusk asymmetries to the electric field that have been previously observed over the polar cap. The second topic is concerned with the electric field configuration obtained in the limit of perfect shielding, where the field is totally excluded equatorward of the auroral oval. When realistic field-aligned current distributions are used, the result is to produce severely distorted, crescent-shaped equipotential contours over the cap. Exact, analytic formulae applicable to this case are also provided.

  1. Polar ionospheric responses to solar wind IMF changes

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    Y. Zhang

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Auroral and airglow emissions over Eureka (89° CGM during the 1997-98 winter show striking variations in relation to solar wind IMF changes. The period January 19 to 22, 1998, was chosen for detailed study, as the IMF was particularly strong and variable. During most of the period, Bz was northward and polar arcs were observed. Several overpasses by DMSP satellites during the four day period provided a clear picture of the particle precipitation producing the polar arcs. The spectral character of these events indicated excitation by electrons of average energy 300 to 500 eV. Only occasionally were electrons of average energy up to ~1 keV observed and these appeared transitory from the ground optical data. It is noted that polar arcs appear after sudden changes in IMF By, suggesting IMF control over arc initiation. When By is positive there is arc motion from dawn to dusk, while By is negative the motion is consistently dusk to dawn. F-region (anti-sunward convections were monitored through the period from 630.0 nm emissions. The convection speed was low (100-150 m/s when Bz was northward but increased to 500 m/s after Bz turned southward on January 20.Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora - Ionosphere (particle precipitation - Magnetospheric Physics (polar cap phenomena

  2. Polar ionospheric responses to solar wind IMF changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    Full Text Available Auroral and airglow emissions over Eureka (89° CGM during the 1997-98 winter show striking variations in relation to solar wind IMF changes. The period January 19 to 22, 1998, was chosen for detailed study, as the IMF was particularly strong and variable. During most of the period, Bz was northward and polar arcs were observed. Several overpasses by DMSP satellites during the four day period provided a clear picture of the particle precipitation producing the polar arcs. The spectral character of these events indicated excitation by electrons of average energy 300 to 500 eV. Only occasionally were electrons of average energy up to ~1 keV observed and these appeared transitory from the ground optical data. It is noted that polar arcs appear after sudden changes in IMF By, suggesting IMF control over arc initiation. When By is positive there is arc motion from dawn to dusk, while By is negative the motion is consistently dusk to dawn. F-region (anti-sunward convections were monitored through the period from 630.0 nm emissions. The convection speed was low (100-150 m/s when Bz was northward but increased to 500 m/s after Bz turned southward on January 20.

    Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora - Ionosphere (particle precipitation - Magnetospheric Physics (polar cap phenomena

  3. Polar cap deflation during magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. J.; Siscoe, G. L.; Heelis, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The expanding/contracting polar cap model has been used to simulate DE-2 ion drift data during substorms as determined using the AL index. Of the 39 cases modeled, 57 percent required the opening of a nightside gap which maps to where reconnection occurs in the tail; 75 percent of the 16 recovery phase cases required a nightside gap, while only 29 percent of the 17 expansion phase cases required a nightside gap. On the basis of this result, it is concluded that if a nightside gap implies tail reconnection, then reconnection probably occurs after expansion phase onset and continues throughout most of the recovery phase of a substorm.

  4. GPS scintillations associated with cusp dynamics and polar cap patches

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    Jin Yaqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relative scintillation level associated with cusp dynamics (including precipitation, flow shears, etc. with and without the formation of polar cap patches around the cusp inflow region by the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR and two GPS scintillation receivers. A series of polar cap patches were observed by the ESR between 8:40 and 10:20 UT on December 3, 2011. The polar cap patches combined with the auroral dynamics were associated with a significantly higher GPS phase scintillation level (up to 0.6 rad than those observed for the other two alternatives, i.e., cusp dynamics without polar cap patches, and polar cap patches without cusp aurora. The cusp auroral dynamics without plasma patches were indeed related to GPS phase scintillations at a moderate level (up to 0.3 rad. The polar cap patches away from the active cusp were associated with sporadic and moderate GPS phase scintillations (up to 0.2 rad. The main conclusion is that the worst global navigation satellite system space weather events on the dayside occur when polar cap patches enter the polar cap and are subject to particle precipitation and flow shears, which is analogous to the nightside when polar cap patches exit the polar cap and enter the auroral oval.

  5. GPS scintillations associated with cusp dynamics and polar cap patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Spicher, Andres; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Miloch, Wojciech J.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the relative scintillation level associated with cusp dynamics (including precipitation, flow shears, etc.) with and without the formation of polar cap patches around the cusp inflow region by the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) and two GPS scintillation receivers. A series of polar cap patches were observed by the ESR between 8:40 and 10:20 UT on December 3, 2011. The polar cap patches combined with the auroral dynamics were associated with a significantly higher GPS phase scintillation level (up to 0.6 rad) than those observed for the other two alternatives, i.e., cusp dynamics without polar cap patches, and polar cap patches without cusp aurora. The cusp auroral dynamics without plasma patches were indeed related to GPS phase scintillations at a moderate level (up to 0.3 rad). The polar cap patches away from the active cusp were associated with sporadic and moderate GPS phase scintillations (up to 0.2 rad). The main conclusion is that the worst global navigation satellite system space weather events on the dayside occur when polar cap patches enter the polar cap and are subject to particle precipitation and flow shears, which is analogous to the nightside when polar cap patches exit the polar cap and enter the auroral oval.

  6. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

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    C. N. Mitchell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could result in image blurring. This paper presents a Kalman-filter based method that incorporates a forward projection of the solution based on a model plasma drift velocity field. This is the first time that the plasma motion, rather than just integrations of electron density, has been used in an ionospheric imaging algorithm. The motion is derived from the Weimer model of the electric field. It is shown that this novel approach to the implementation of a Kalman filter provides a detailed view of the polar cap ionosphere under severe storm conditions. A case study is given for the October 2003 Halloween storm where verification is provided by incoherent scatter radars.

  7. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

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    Y. Andalsvik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0–4.5 mV m−1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP, Φ (Boyle = 115 kV during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME, choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz By By polarity of the ICME magnetic field, a clear indication of a nightside source.

  8. GPS scintillation effects associated with polar cap patches and substorm auroral activity: direct comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yaqi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We directly compare the relative GPS scintillation levels associated with regions of enhanced plasma irregularities called auroral arcs, polar cap patches, and auroral blobs that frequently occur in the polar ionosphere. On January 13, 2013 from Ny-Ålesund, several polar cap patches were observed to exit the polar cap into the auroral oval, and were then termed auroral blobs. This gave us an unprecedented opportunity to compare the relative scintillation levels associated with these three phenomena. The blobs were associated with the strongest phase scintillation (σϕ, followed by patches and arcs, with σϕ up to 0.6, 0.5, and 0.1 rad, respectively. Our observations indicate that most patches in the nightside polar cap have produced significant scintillations, but not all of them. Since the blobs are formed after patches merged into auroral regions, in space weather predictions of GPS scintillations, it will be important to enable predictions of patches exiting the polar cap.

  9. Representation of the Auroral and Polar Ionosphere in the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    This issue of Advances in Space Research presents a selection of papers that document the progress in developing and improving the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), a widely used standard for the parameters that describe the Earths ionosphere. The core set of papers was presented during the 2010 General Assembly of the Committee on Space Research in Bremen, Germany in a session that focused on the representation of the auroral and polar ionosphere in the IRI model. In addition, papers were solicited and submitted from the scientific community in a general call for appropriate papers.

  10. A snapshot of the polar ionosphere. [satellite observation of F layer and topside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitteker, J. H.; Brace, L. H.; Maier, E. J.; Burrows, J. R.; Dodson, W. H.; Winningham, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a picture of the north polar F layer and topside ionosphere obtained primarily from three satellites (Alouette 2, ISIS 1, ISIS 2) that passed over the region within a time interval of about 50 min on a magnetically quiet day. The horizontal distribution of electron densities at the peak of the F layer is found to be similar to synoptic results from the IGY. Energetic-particle and ionospheric-plasma data are also presented, and the F-layer data are discussed in terms of these measurements as well as in terms of electric-field and neutral N2 density measurements made by other satellites on other occasions. The major feature observed is a tongue of F-region ionization extending from the dayside across the polar cap, which is accounted for by antisunward drift due to magnetospheric convection. In the F layer and topside ionosphere, the main effect of auroral precipitation appears to be heating and expansion of the topside. A region of low F-layer density appears on the morning side of the polar cap, which may be due to convection and possibly also to enhanced N2 densities.

  11. Occurrence Locations, Dipole Tilt Angle Effects, and Plasma Cloud Drift Paths of Polar Cap Neutral Density Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Sutton, E. K.; Huang, C. Y.; Cooke, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    Polar cap neutral density anomaly (PCNDA) with large mass density enhancements over the background has been frequently observed in the polar cap during magnetic storms. By tracing field lines to the magnetosphere from the polar ionosphere, we divide the polar cap into two regions, an open field line (OFL) region with field lines connecting to the magnetopause boundary and a distant tail field line (TFL) region threaded with magnetotail lobe field lines. A statistical study of neutral density observed by the Challenging Minisatellite Payload satellite during major magnetic storms with Dst atmospheric disturbance could be generated in the nightside polar cap. From the PCNDA size and speed of sound at 400 km, we derive an initial energy deposition duration for producing traveling atmospheric disturbance in the range from 0.5 to 2.5 hr.

  12. Influence of geomagnetic energy inputs in the polar cap on the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Sheng, C.; Huang, Y.; Maute, A. I.; Lu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Large Poynting flux has been observed in the polar cap by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites during the main phase of the August 5, 2011 storm, the magnitude of which is comparable to that in the auroral zone. In order to understand the mechanisms for the observed large Poynting flux in the polar cap, the particle precipitation and small-scale electric field variability along DMSP satellite trajectory has been studied. Meanwhile, the global ionosphere-thermosphere model (GITM) has been run to examine the relative contribution of convection pattern and conductance to the polar cap Poynting flux enhancement. The influence of energy inputs in the polar cap including Joule heating related to both large-scale and small-scale electric field and soft particle precipitation on the thermosphere has been examined through the analysis of the GRACE neutral density observations and GITM simulations with different forcings. This study will help to illustrate the mechanisms and impacts of the polar cap energy inputs.

  13. A simplified model of polar cap electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, N.

    1977-01-01

    A simple-minded 'model' is used in order to visualize the gross features of polar cap electric fields, in particular the 'diode' effect which had emerged already from earlier observations and the asymmetry between the electric fields observed on the dawn and dusk sides of the polar cap, which depends on Bsub(y)

  14. Polarization of Narrowband VLF Transmitter Signals as an Ionospheric Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. C.; Cohen, M. B.; Said, R. K.; Gołkowski, M.

    2018-01-01

    Very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) transmitter remote sensing has long been used as a simple yet useful diagnostic for the D region ionosphere (60-90 km). All it requires is a VLF radio receiver that records the amplitude and/or phase of a beacon signal as a function of time. During both ambient and disturbed conditions, the received signal can be compared to predictions from a theoretical model to infer ionospheric waveguide properties like electron density. Amplitude and phase have in most cases been analyzed each as individual data streams, often only the amplitude is used. Scattered field formulation combines amplitude and phase effectively, but does not address how to combine two magnetic field components. We present polarization ellipse analysis of VLF transmitter signals using two horizontal components of the magnetic field. The shape of the polarization ellipse is unchanged as the source phase varies, which circumvents a significant problem where VLF transmitters have an unknown source phase. A synchronized two-channel MSK demodulation algorithm is introduced to mitigate 90° ambiguity in the phase difference between the horizontal magnetic field components. Additionally, the synchronized demodulation improves phase measurements during low-SNR conditions. Using the polarization ellipse formulation, we take a new look at diurnal VLF transmitter variations, ambient conditions, and ionospheric disturbances from solar flares, lightning-ionospheric heating, and lightning-induced electron precipitation, and find differing signatures in the polarization ellipse.

  15. Evidence that polar cap arcs occur on open field lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.; Mullen, E.G.; Redus, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of polar cap arc occurrence are reviewed to show that the assumption of a closed magnetospheric magnetic field topology at very high latitudes when the IMF B z is strongly northward is difficult to reconcile with a wide variety of observational and theoretical considerations. In particular, we consider the implications of observations of particle entry for high and low energy electrons, magnetic flux conservation between the near and far tail, the time sequencing in polar cap arcs events, and the hemispherical differences in polar cap arc observations. These points can be explained either by excluding the need for a major topological magnetic field change from explanations of polar cap arc dynamics, or by assuming a long-tailed magnetosphere for all IMF orientations in which magnetic field lines eventually merge with solar wind field lines in either a smooth or a patchy fashion. (author)

  16. The polar cliff in the morning sector of the ionosphere

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    G. W. Prölss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available By "polar cliff" we mean the steep increase in the ionization density observed in the morning sector of the polar ionosphere. Here the properties of this remarkable feature are investigated. The data set consists of electron density and temperature measurements obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite. Only data recorded in the Northern Hemisphere winter are considered (solar zenith angle ≥ 90°. We find that for moderately disturbed conditions, the foot of the polar cliff is located below 60° invariant latitude. Here, within about 4°, the density increases by a factor of 4, on average. The actual location of the polar cliff depends primarily on the level of geomagnetic activity, its associated density increase on geographic longitude and altitude. As to the longitudinal variations, they are attributed to asymmetries in the background ionization density at middle latitudes. Using a superposed epoch type of averaging procedure, mean latitudinal profiles of the polar cliff and the associated electron temperature changes are derived. Since these differ significantly from those derived for the afternoon/evening sector, we conclude that the subauroral ionospheric trough does not extend into the morning sector. As to the origin of the polar cliff in the morning sector, local auroral particle precipitation should play only a secondary role.

  17. A study of the relationship between interplanetary parameters and large displacements of the nightside polar cap boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, M.; Freeman, M.P.; Southwood, D.J.; Waldock, J.A.; Singer, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    On July 14, 1982 the Sweden and Britain Radar-Aurora Experiment (SABRE) observed the ionospheric flow reversal boundary at ∼ 0400 MLT to move equatorward across the radar field of view and then later to return poleward. The polar cap appeared to be considerably inflated at this time. Concurrent observations by ISEE-3 at the L1 libration point of the solar wind speed and density, and of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) indicated that the solar wind conditions were unusual throughout the interval under consideration. A mapping of the solar wind parameters from the L1 point to the subsolar magnetopause and thence to the SABRE local time sector indicates that the equatorward motion of the polar cap boundary was controlled by a southward turning of the IMF. The inference of a concomitant increase in open magnetic flux is supported by a comparison of the magnetopause location observed by ISEE-1 on an inbound pass in the 2,100 MLT sector with a magnetopause model based upon the solar wind measurements made by ISEE-3. Some 20 minutes after the expansion of the polar cap boundary was first seen by SABRE, there was a rapid contraction of the boundary, the casue of which was independent of the INF and solar wind parameters, and which had a poleward velocity component in excess of 1,900 m s -1 . the boundary as it moved across the radar field of view was highly structured and oriented at a large angle to the ionospheric footprints of the magnetic L shells. Observations in the premidnight sector by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL) magnetometer array indicate that the polar cap contraction is caused by substorm draining of the polar cap flux and occurs without a clearly associated trigger in the interplanetary medium. The response time in the early morning local time sector to the substorm onset switch is approximately 20 minutes, equivalent to an ionospheric azimuthal phase velocity of some 5 km s -1

  18. The ionospheric impact on GPS performance in southern polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, C.-K.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D. A.; Arslan, N.; Willis, M.; Hothem, L.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to present the results of the study of the effects of varying ionospheric conditions on the GPS signal tracking in the southern polar region. In the first stage of this study, the data collected by the OSU/USGS team in October-November 2003 within the TAMDEF (Transantarctic Mountains Deformation) network were used together with some IGS Antarctic stations to study the effect of severe ionospheric storms on GPS hardware. Note that TAMDEF is a joint USGS/OSU project with the primary objective of measuring crustal motion in the Transantarctic Mountains of Southern Victoria Land using GPS techniques. This study included ten Antarctic stations equipped with different dual-frequency GPS hardware, and the data were evaluated for two 24-hour periods of severe ionospheric storm (2003/10/29) and moderate ionospheric conditions (minor storm of 2003/11/11). The results of this study were presented at the LAG Assembly in Cairns, Australia (Grejner-Brzezinska et al., 2005). Additional tests, in a more controlled environment, were carried out at the US Antarctic station, McMurdo, between January 10 and February 6, 2006, under varying ionospheric conditions, where several different types of receivers were connected to the same antenna located on the rooftop of the Crary Laboratory (the primary test site). In this scenario, each antenna was subject to identical ionospheric effects during each day of the test, and no spatial decorrelation effects were present, as seen in the previous study, due to the spatial separation of the receivers tested. It should be noted, however, that no moderate or severe ionospheric storms occurred during the experiment, so, unfortunately, this type of conditions was not tested here. The test was repeated with different receivers connected to different antenna types; a total of four 5-day sessions were carried out. The following receiver types were used at the primary site: Trimble 5700, Ashtech Z-Surveyor, JNS Euro

  19. On the possible role of cusp/cleft precipitation in the formation of polar-cap patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Walker

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The work describes experimental observations of enhancements in the electron density of the ionospheric F-region created by cusp/cleft particle precipitation at the dayside entry to the polar-cap convection flow. Measurements by meridian scanning photometer and all-sky camera of optical red-line emissions from aurora are used to identify latitudinally narrow bands of soft-particle precipitation responsible for structured enhancements in electron density determined from images obtained by radio tomography. Two examples are discussed in which the electron density features with size scales and magnitudes commensurate with those of patches are shown to be formed by precipitation at the entry region to the anti-sunward flow. In one case the spectrum of the incoming particles results in ionisation being created, for the most part below 250 km, so that the patch will persist only for minutes after convecting away from the auroral source region. However in a second example, at a time when the plasma density of the solar wind was particularly high, a substantial part of the particle-induced enhancement formed above 250 km. It is suggested that, with the reduced recombination loss in the upper F-region, this structure will retain form as a patch during passage in the anti-sunward flow across the polar cap.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; particle precipitation; polar ionosphere

  20. 24/7 Solar Minimum Polar Cap and Auroral Ion Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Jan J.; Nicolls, Michael; van Eyken, Anthony; Heinselman, Craig; Bilitza, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    During the International Polar Year (IPY) two Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISRs) achieved close to 24/7 continuous observations. This presentation describes their data sets and specifically how they can provide the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) a fiduciary E- and F-region ionosphere description for solar minimum conditions in both the auroral and polar cap regions. The ionospheric description being electron density, ion temperature and electron temperature profiles from as low as 90 km extending to several scale heights above the F-layer peak. The auroral location is Poker Flat in Alaska at 65.1 N latitude, 212.5 E longitude where the NSF s new Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) is located. This location during solar minimum conditions is in the auroral region for most of the day but is at midlatitudes, equator ward of the cusp, for about 4-8 h per day dependent upon geomagnetic activity. In contrast the polar location is Svalbard, at 78.2 N latitude, 16.0 E longitude where the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) is located. For most of the day the ESR is in the Northern Polar Cap with a noon sector passage often through the dayside cusp. Of unique relevance to IRI is that these extended observations have enabled the ionospheric morphology to be distinguished between quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. During the IPY year, 1 March 2007 - 29 February 2008, about 50 solar wind Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) impacted geospace. Each CIR has a two to five day geomagnetic disturbance that is observed in the ESR and PFISR observations. Hence, this data set also enables the quiet-background ionospheric climatology to be established as a function of season and local time. These two separate climatologies for the ion temperature at an altitude of 300 km are presented and compared with IRI ion temperatures. The IRI ion temperatures are about 200-300 K hotter than the observed values. However, the MSIS neutral temperature at 300 km compares favorably

  1. Dynamical changes of the polar cap potential structure: an information theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Coco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some features, such as vortex structures often observed through a wide spread of spatial scales, suggest that ionospheric convection is turbulent and complex in nature. Here, applying concepts from information theory and complex system physics, we firstly evaluate a pseudo Shannon entropy, H, associated with the polar cap potential obtained from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN and, then, estimate the degree of disorder and the degree of complexity of ionospheric convection under different Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF conditions. The aforementioned quantities are computed starting from time series of the coefficients of the 4th order spherical harmonics expansion of the polar cap potential for three periods, characterised by: (i steady IMF Bz > 0, (ii steady IMF Bz < 0 and (iii a double rotation from negative to positive and then positive to negative Bz. A neat dynamical topological transition is observed when the IMF Bz turns from negative to positive and vice versa, pointing toward the possible occurrence of an order/disorder phase transition, which is the counterpart of the large scale convection rearrangement and of the increase of the global coherence. This result has been confirmed by applying the same analysis to a larger data base of about twenty days of SuperDARN data, allowing to investigate the role of IMF By too.

  2. Automated identification and tracking of polar-cap plasma patches at solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Burston

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A method of automatically identifying and tracking polar-cap plasma patches, utilising data inversion and feature-tracking methods, is presented. A well-established and widely used 4-D ionospheric imaging algorithm, the Multi-Instrument Data Assimilation System (MIDAS, inverts slant total electron content (TEC data from ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers to produce images of the free electron distribution in the polar-cap ionosphere. These are integrated to form vertical TEC maps. A flexible feature-tracking algorithm, TRACK, previously used extensively in meteorological storm-tracking studies is used to identify and track maxima in the resulting 2-D data fields. Various criteria are used to discriminate between genuine patches and "false-positive" maxima such as the continuously moving day-side maximum, which results from the Earth's rotation rather than plasma motion. Results for a 12-month period at solar minimum, when extensive validation data are available, are presented. The method identifies 71 separate structures consistent with patch motion during this time. The limitations of solar minimum and the consequent small number of patches make climatological inferences difficult, but the feasibility of the method for patches larger than approximately 500 km in scale is demonstrated and a larger study incorporating other parts of the solar cycle is warranted. Possible further optimisation of discrimination criteria, particularly regarding the definition of a patch in terms of its plasma concentration enhancement over the surrounding background, may improve results.

  3. Water Ice Albedo Variations on the Martian Northern Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2003-01-01

    The Viking Orbiters determined that the surface of Mars northern residual cap is water ice. Many researchers have related observed atmospheric water vapor abundances to seasonal exchange between reservoirs such as the polar caps, but the extent to which the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere remains uncertain. Early studies of the ice coverage and albedo of the northern residual Martian polar cap using Mariner 9 and Viking images reported that there were substantial internannual differences in ice deposition on the polar cap, a result which suggested a highly variable Martian climate. However, some of the data used in these studies were obtained at differing values of heliocentric solar longitude (L(sub s)). Reevaluation of this dataset indicated that the residual cap undergoes seasonal brightening throughout the summer, and indicated that this process repeats from year to year. In this study we continue to compare Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter imaging observations and thermal data of the north residual polar cap to data acquired with Mars Global Surveyor s Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) instrument. In the current study, our goal is to examine all released data from MGS MOC in the northern summer season, along with applicable TES data in order to better understand the albedo variations in the northern summer and their implications on water transport. To date, work has focused primarily on the MOC dataset. In 1999, data acquisition of the northern polar regions began at L(sub s) = 107, although there was little north polar data acquired from L(sub s)= 107 to L(sub s) = 109. We examined a total of 409 images from L(sub s) = 107 to L(sub s)=148. We have also examined data from 2000 from L(sub s)= 93 to L(sub s)= 110; additional progress is ongoing. Here we present a progress report of our observations, and continue to determine their implications for the Martian water cycle.

  4. Motion of the dayside polar cap boundary during substorm cycles: II. Generation of poleward-moving events and polar cap patches by pulses in the magnetopause reconnection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data from the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter VHF and CUTLASS (Co-operative UK Twin-Located Auroral Sounding System HF radars, we study the formation of ionospheric polar cap patches and their relationship to the magnetopause reconnection pulses identified in the companion paper by Lockwood et al. (2005. It is shown that the poleward-moving, high-concentration plasma patches observed in the ionosphere by EISCAT on 23 November 1999, as reported by Davies et al. (2002, were often associated with corresponding reconnection rate pulses. However, not all such pulses generated a patch and only within a limited MLT range (11:00-12:00 MLT did a patch result from a reconnection pulse. Three proposed mechanisms for the production of patches, and of the concentration minima that separate them, are analysed and evaluated: (1 concentration enhancement within the patches by cusp/cleft precipitation; (2 plasma depletion in the minima between the patches by fast plasma flows; and (3 intermittent injection of photoionisation-enhanced plasma into the polar cap. We devise a test to distinguish between the effects of these mechanisms. Some of the events repeat too frequently to apply the test. Others have sufficiently long repeat periods and mechanism (3 is shown to be the only explanation of three of the longer-lived patches seen on this day. However, effect (2 also appears to contribute to some events. We conclude that plasma concentration gradients on the edges of the larger patches arise mainly from local time variations in the subauroral plasma, via the mechanism proposed by Lockwood et al. (2000.

  5. Polar cap patches observed during the magnetic storm of November 2003: observations and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Valladares

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-instrumented measurements and multi-technique analysis of polar cap patches observed early during the recovery phase of the major magnetic storm of 20 November 2003 to investigate the origin of the polar cap patches. During this event, the Qaanaaq imager observed elongated polar cap patches, some of which containing variable brightness; the Qaanaaq digisonde detected abrupt NmF2 fluctuations; the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar (ISR measured patches placed close to but poleward of the auroral oval–polar cap boundary; and the DMSP-F13 satellite intersected topside density enhancements, corroborating the presence of the patches seen by the imager, the digisonde, and the Sondrestrom ISR. A 2-D cross-correlation analysis was applied to series of two consecutive red-line images, indicating that the magnitude and direction of the patch velocities were in good agreement with the SuperDARN convection patterns. We applied a back-tracing analysis to the patch locations and found that most of the patches seen between 20:41 and 21:29 UT were likely transiting the throat region near 19:41 UT. Inspection of the SuperDARN velocities at this time indicates spatial and temporal collocation of a gap region between patches and large (1.7 km s−1 line-of-sight velocities. The variable airglow brightness of the patches observed between 20:33 and 20:43 UT was investigated using the numerical Global Theoretical Ionospheric Model (GTIM driven by the SuperDARN convection patterns and a variable upward/downward neutral wind. Our numerical results indicate that variations in the airglow intensity up to 265 R can be produced by a constant 70 m s−1 downward vertical wind.

  6. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

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    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  7. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  8. On determining the noon polar cap boundary from SuperDARN HF radar backscatter characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pinnock

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that ionospheric HF radar backscatter in the noon sector can be used to locate the footprint of the magnetospheric cusp particle precipitation. This has enabled the radar data to be used as a proxy for the location of the polar cap boundary, and hence measure the flow of plasma across it to derive the reconnection electric field in the ionosphere. This work used only single radar data sets with a field of view limited to ~2 h of local time. In this case study using four of the SuperDARN radars, we examine the boundary determined over 6 h of magnetic local time around the noon sector and its relationship to the convection pattern. The variation with longitude of the latitude of the radar scatter with cusp characteristics shows a bay-like feature. It is shown that this feature is shaped by the variation with longitude of the poleward flow component of the ionospheric plasma and may be understood in terms of cusp ion time-of-flight effects. Using this interpretation, we derive the time-of-flight of the cusp ions and find that it is consistent with approximately 1 keV ions injected from a subsolar reconnection site. A method for deriving a more accurate estimate of the location of the open-closed field line boundary from HF radar data is described.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; plasma convection · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers

  9. Estimation of Polar Cap Potential and the Role of PC Index

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    Ga-Hee Moon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Polar cap potential has long been considered as an indicator for the amount of energy flowing in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Thus, the estimation of polar cap potential is important to understand the physical process of the magnetosphere. To estimate the polar cap potential in the Northern Hemisphere, merging electric field by Kan & Lee (1979 is adopted. Relationships between the PC index and calculated merging electric field (E* are examined during full-time and storm-time periods separately. For this purpose Dst, AL, and PC indices and solar wind data are utilized during the period from 1996-2003. From this linear relationship, polar cap potential (Φ* is estimated using the formula by Doyle & Burke (1983. The values are represented as 58.1 ± 26.9 kV for the full-time period and 123.7 ± 84.1 kV for a storm-time period separately. Considering that the average value of polar cap potential of Doyle & Burke (1983 is about 47 kV during moderately quiet intervals with the S3-2 measurements, these results are similar to such. The monthly averaged variation of Dst, AL, and PC indices are then compared. The Dst and AL indices show distinct characteristics with peaks during equinoctial season whereas the average PC index according to the month shows higher values in autumn than in spring. The monthly variations of the linear correlation coefficients between solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices are also examined. The PC-AL linear correlation coefficient is highest, being 0.82 with peaks during the equinoctial season. As with the AL index, the PC index may also prove useful for predicting the intensity of an auroral substorm. Generally, the linear correlation coefficients are shown low in summer due to conductance differences and other factors. To assess the role of the PC index during the recovery phase of a storm, the relation between the cumulative PC index and the duration is examined. Although the correlation coefficient lowers

  10. Determining polar ionospheric electrojet currents from Swarm satellite constellation magnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakjær, Cecilie Drost; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We determine the strength and location of the ionospheric currents responsible for the polar electrojets from magnetic data collected by the Swarm satellite constellation on an orbit-by-orbit basis. The ionospheric currents are modelled using a simple, yet robust, method by a series of line...

  11. High Frequency Backscatter from the Polar and Auroral E-Region Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Victoriya V.

    The Earth's ionosphere contains collisional and partially-ionized plasma. The electric field, produced by the interaction between the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, drives the plasma bulk motion, also known as convection, in the F-region of the ionosphere. It can also destabilize the plasma in the E-region, producing irregularities or waves. Intermediate-scale waves with wavelengths of hundreds of meters can cause scintillation and fading of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals, whereas the small-scale waves (lambda processes that generate small-scale plasma waves, and experimentally, by analyzing data collected with the newly-deployed high-southern-latitude radars within the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). The theoretical part of this work focuses on symmetry properties of the general dispersion relation that describes wave propagation in the collisional plasma in the two-stream and gradient-drift instability regimes. The instability growth rate and phase velocity are examined under the presence of a background parallel electric field, whose influence is demonstrated to break the spatial symmetry of the wave propagation patterns. In the observational part of this thesis, a novel dual radar setup is used to examine E-region irregularities in the magnetic polar cap by probing the E-region along the same line from opposite directions. The phase velocity analysis together with raytracing simulations demonstrated that, in the polar cap, the radar backscatter is primarily controlled by the plasma density conditions. In particular, when the E-region layer is strong and stratified, the radar backscatter properties are controlled by the convection velocity, whereas for a tilted E-layer, the height and aspect angle conditions are more important. Finally, the fundamental dependence of the E-region irregularity phase velocity on the component of the plasma convection is investigated using two new SuperDARN radars at high southern

  12. Present situation of researches on polar ionosphere by C.C.I.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Saburo

    1974-01-01

    Various subjects of studies made by the sixth research committee of C.C.I.R. (International Radio Consultative Committee) are reported. The C.C.I.R. has not any definite study programme and question concerning polar ionosphere, because it studies and delivers opinion on the techniques and operation of radio communication especially in developing countries. The subjects of study programme by the sixth research committee are as follows: estimation of the intensity and transmission loss of space wave electric field in a zone between 1.5 and 40 MHz, observation of the ionosphere of oblique entrance, scattering propagation of ionosphere, back scattering, fading of signal transmitted through ionosphere, transmission of space waves in the zone between 150 and 1,500 kHz, and effect of ionosphere on space communication. In addition, the following fourteen reports are cited: confirmation of prodromal phenomena of ionosphere disturbances, observation of the ionosphere of oblique entrance, remote propagation with supermode, basic information on forecast, back scattering, side scattering from the ground surface and ionosphere, Esub(s) propagation, scattering propagation, Esub(s) forecast, fading, effect of ionosphere on the transmission between the earth and space, radio noise produced in and above ionosphere, and propagation of standard broadcast wave. (Iwakiri, K.)

  13. Large-scale irregularities of the winter polar topside ionosphere according to data from Swarm satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova, R. Yu.; Bogoutdinov, Sh. R.

    2017-11-01

    An analysis of the electron density measurements ( Ne) along the flyby trajectories over the high-latitude region of the Northern Hemisphere under winter conditions in 2014 and 2016 has shown that the main large-scale structure observed by Swarm satellites is the tongue of ionization (TOI). At the maximum of the solar cycle ( F 10.7 = 160), the average value of Ne in the TOI region at an altitude of 500 km was 8 × 104 cm-3. Two years later, at F 10.7 = 100, Ne 5 × 104 cm-3 and Ne 2.5 × 104 cm-3 were observed at altitudes of 470 and 530 km, respectively. During the dominance of the azimuthal component of the interplanetary magnetic field, the TOI has been observed mainly on the dawn or dusk side depending on the sign of B y . Simultaneous observations of the convective plasma drift velocity in the polar cap show the transpolar flow drift to the dawn ( B y y generation of large-scale irregularities in the polar ionosphere.

  14. Polar cap absorption events of November 2001 at Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Polar cap absorption (PCA events recorded during November 2001 are investigated by observations of ionospheric absorption of a 30MHz riometer installed at Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica, and of solar proton flux, monitored by the NOAA-GOES8 satellite in geo-synchronous orbit. During this period three solar proton events (SPE on 4, 19 and 23 November occurred. Two of these are among the dozen most intense events since 1954 and during the current solar cycle (23rd, the event of 4 November shows the greatest proton flux at energies >10MeV. Many factors contribute to the peak intensity of the two SPE biggest events, one is the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME speed, other factors are the ambient population of SPE and the shock front due to the CME. During these events absorption peaks of several dB (~20dB are observed at Terra Nova Bay, tens of minutes after the impact of fast halo CMEs on the geomagnetic field.

    Results of a cross-correlation analysis show that the first hour of absorption is mainly produced by 84–500MeV protons in the case of the 4 November event and by 15–44MeV protons for the event of 23 November, whereas in the entire event the contribution to the absorption is due chiefly to 4.2–82MeV (4 November and by 4.2–14.5MeV (23 November. Good agreement is generally obtained between observed and calculated absorption by the empirical flux-absorption relationship for threshold energy E0=10MeV. From the residuals one can argue that other factors (e.g. X-ray increases and geomagnetic disturbances can contribute to the ionospheric absorption.

    Key words. Ionosphere (Polar Ionosphere, Particle precipitation – Solar physics (Flares and mass ejections

  15. Possibility of Ionospheric Cause of FACs and Convection Field in the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere System: The Harang Reversal, Premidnight Upward-FAC, and the Ionospheric Hall Polarization Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamizo, A.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Whereas it is generally thought that Birkeland Currents (FACs) are generated in the magnetosphere and that the ionospheric convection reflects the magnetospheric convection, we present a possibility that the ionosphere drives FACs and the convection field in the M-I system. We apply this idea to the Harang Reversal (HR) for demonstration. By using an ionospheric potential solver we calculate the electrostatic field for given distributions of FACs and conductance. The result shows that a conspicuous structure resembling HR is generated even for a symmetric distribution of the R1-type FACs and that the Hall polarization field is produced at the equatorward boundary of the auroral region as the primary currents diverge/converge at the conductance gradient there, which causes the potential deformation (HR). Conventionally HR has been considered to be of the magnetospheric origin, and a ring current model actually produces the corresponding structure in the magnetosphere [e.g., Erickson et al., 1991]. Observationally the divE equivalent to HR is consistent with the premidnight upward-FAC seen in Iijima and Potemra's diagram. A recent theoretical study [Ohtani et al., 2016] proposes that HR is a required structure for the interchange stability of the magnetotail in the presence of the R1 and R2-FAC systems including a premidnight upward-FAC. Returning to our result, the important point is that HR is reproduced at the conductance edge by the ionospheric polarization field, for which the primary field originates from the R1-FACs distributed far from that region. We also suggest: (i) In a more realistic finite ΣA, the total ionospheric polarization is partly released by a FAC, which may be a part of the premidnight upward-FAC. (ii) However, existing simulation models do not allow this type of current closure, and accordingly they may enhance the HR structure in the magnetosphere. This discussion should hold generally and would promote the global M-I coupling studies to the

  16. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flows and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere which are implied by a three-component picture of large-scale magnetospheric flow driven both by planetary rotation and the solar wind interaction. With increasing radial distance in the equatorial plane, these components consist of a region dominated by planetary rotation where planetary plasma sub-corotates on closed field lines, a surrounding region where planetary plasma is lost down the dusk tail by the stretching out of closed field lines followed by plasmoid formation and pinch-off, as first described for Jupiter by Vasyliunas, and an outer region driven by the interaction with the solar wind, specifically by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause and in the dawn tail, first discussed for Earth by Dungey. The sub-corotating flow on closed field lines in the dayside magnetosphere is constrained by Voyager plasma observations, showing that the plasma angular velocity falls to around half of rigid corotation in the outer magnetosphere, possibly increasing somewhat near the dayside magnetopause, while here we provide theoretical arguments which indicate that the flow should drop to considerably smaller values on open field lines in the polar cap. The implied ionospheric current system requires a four-ring pattern of field-aligned currents, with distributed downward currents on open field lines in the polar cap, a narrow ring of upward current near the boundary of open and closed field lines, and regions of distributed downward and upward current on closed field lines at lower latitudes associated with the transfer of angular momentum from the planetary atmosphere to the sub-corotating planetary magnetospheric plasma. Recent work has shown that the upward current associated with sub-corotation is not sufficiently intense to produce significant auroral acceleration and emission. Here we suggest that the observed auroral oval at Saturn instead corresponds to the ring of upward

  17. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flows and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere which are implied by a three-component picture of large-scale magnetospheric flow driven both by planetary rotation and the solar wind interaction. With increasing radial distance in the equatorial plane, these components consist of a region dominated by planetary rotation where planetary plasma sub-corotates on closed field lines, a surrounding region where planetary plasma is lost down the dusk tail by the stretching out of closed field lines followed by plasmoid formation and pinch-off, as first described for Jupiter by Vasyliunas, and an outer region driven by the interaction with the solar wind, specifically by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause and in the dawn tail, first discussed for Earth by Dungey. The sub-corotating flow on closed field lines in the dayside magnetosphere is constrained by Voyager plasma observations, showing that the plasma angular velocity falls to around half of rigid corotation in the outer magnetosphere, possibly increasing somewhat near the dayside magnetopause, while here we provide theoretical arguments which indicate that the flow should drop to considerably smaller values on open field lines in the polar cap. The implied ionospheric current system requires a four-ring pattern of field-aligned currents, with distributed downward currents on open field lines in the polar cap, a narrow ring of upward current near the boundary of open and closed field lines, and regions of distributed downward and upward current on closed field lines at lower latitudes associated with the transfer of angular momentum from the planetary atmosphere to the sub-corotating planetary magnetospheric plasma. Recent work has shown that the upward current associated with sub-corotation is not sufficiently intense to produce significant auroral acceleration and emission. Here we suggest that the observed auroral oval at Saturn instead corresponds to the ring of

  18. Identifications of the polar cap boundary and the auroral belt in the high-altitude magnetosphere: a model for field-aligned currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, M.

    1975-01-01

    By means of the Ogo 5 Goddard Space Flight Center fluxgate magnetometer data the polar cap boundary is identified in the high-altitude magnetosphere by a sudden transition from a dipolar field to a more taillike configuration. It is inferred that there exists a field-aligned-current layer at the polar cap boundary. In the night side magnetosphere the polar cap boundary is identified as the high-latitude boundary of the plasma sheet. The field-aligned current flows downward to the ionosphere on the morning side of the magnetosphere and upward from the ionosphere on the afternoon side. The basic pattern of the magnetic field variations observed during the satellite's traversal of the auroral belt is presented. Currents flow in opposite directions in the two field-aligned-current layers. The current directions in these layers as observed by Ogo 5 in the high-altitude magnetosphere are the same as those observed at low altitudes by the polar-orbiting Triad satellite (Armstrong and Zmuda, 1973). The magnetic field in the region where the lower-latitude field-aligned-current layer is situated is essentially meridional. A model is presented in which two field-aligned-current systems, one at the polar cap boundary and the other on the low-latitude part of the auroral belt, are main []y connected by ionospheric currents flowing across the auroral belt. The existence of field-aligned currents deduced from the Ogo 5 observations is a permanent feature of the magnetosphere. Intensifications of the field-aligned currents and occurrences of multiple pairs of field-aligned-current layers characterize the disturbed conditions of these regions

  19. Magnetospheric convection and current system in the dayside polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, A.; Mukai, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Hayakawa, H.

    1992-01-01

    Field and particle observations on EXOS-D (Akebono) have yielded new information on convection and current system in the dayside polar cap. Convection patterns are distinctly different depending upon whether IMF B z is northward or southward. The number of convection cells is two when B z is southward but four when B z is northward. Lobe cells in which plasma flows sunward in the region of open field lines are observed as a pair (of which one is in the dawn and the other in the dusk sector) for any polarity of IMF B y and B z . Ions in the keV range precipitate not only in the dayside cusp region but also along the sunward directed streamlines of the dawn and dusk lobe cells. These observations require reconsideration on the position and the extent of the reconnection region on the magnetopause. They also suggest that the magnetotail plays a vital role in some phenomena which have been ascribed to dayside magnetopause processes. We have not been able to find evidence to prove the presence of the viscous cell under southward IMF

  20. A technique for accurately determining the cusp-region polar cap boundary using SuperDARN HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    Full Text Available Accurately measuring the location and motion of the polar cap boundary (PCB in the high-latitude ionosphere can be crucial for studies concerned with the dynamics of the polar cap, e.g. the measurement of reconnection rates. The Doppler spectral width characteristics of backscatter received by the SuperDARN HF radars have been previously used for locating and tracking the PCB in the cusp region. The boundary is generally observed in meridional beams of the SuperDARN radars and appears as a distinct change between low spectral width values observed equatorward of the cusp region, and high, but variable spectral width values observed within the cusp region. To identify the spectral width boundary (SWB between these two regions, a simple algorithm employing a spectral width threshold has often been applied to the data. However, there is not, as yet, a standard algorithm, or spectral width threshold, which is universally applied. Nor has there been any rigorous assessment of the accuracy of this method of boundary determination. This study applies a series of threshold algorithms to a simulated cusp-region spectral width data set, to assess the accuracy of different algorithms. This shows that simple threshold algorithms correctly identify the boundary location in, at the most, 50% of the cases and that the average boundary error is at least ~ 1–2 range gates (~ 1° latitude. It transpires that spatial and temporal smoothing of the spectral width data (e.g. by median filtering, before application of a threshold algorithm can increase the boundary determination accuracy to over 95% and the average boundary error to much less than a range gate. However, this is sometimes at the cost of temporal resolution in the motion of the boundary location. The algorithms are also applied to a year’s worth of spectral width data from the cusp ionosphere, measured by the Halley SuperDARN radar in Antarctica. This analysis highlights the increased accuracy of

  1. A technique for accurately determining the cusp-region polar cap boundary using SuperDARN HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurately measuring the location and motion of the polar cap boundary (PCB in the high-latitude ionosphere can be crucial for studies concerned with the dynamics of the polar cap, e.g. the measurement of reconnection rates. The Doppler spectral width characteristics of backscatter received by the SuperDARN HF radars have been previously used for locating and tracking the PCB in the cusp region. The boundary is generally observed in meridional beams of the SuperDARN radars and appears as a distinct change between low spectral width values observed equatorward of the cusp region, and high, but variable spectral width values observed within the cusp region. To identify the spectral width boundary (SWB between these two regions, a simple algorithm employing a spectral width threshold has often been applied to the data. However, there is not, as yet, a standard algorithm, or spectral width threshold, which is universally applied. Nor has there been any rigorous assessment of the accuracy of this method of boundary determination. This study applies a series of threshold algorithms to a simulated cusp-region spectral width data set, to assess the accuracy of different algorithms. This shows that simple threshold algorithms correctly identify the boundary location in, at the most, 50% of the cases and that the average boundary error is at least ~ 1–2 range gates (~ 1° latitude. It transpires that spatial and temporal smoothing of the spectral width data (e.g. by median filtering, before application of a threshold algorithm can increase the boundary determination accuracy to over 95% and the average boundary error to much less than a range gate. However, this is sometimes at the cost of temporal resolution in the motion of the boundary location. The algorithms are also applied to a year’s worth of spectral width data from the cusp ionosphere, measured by the Halley SuperDARN radar in Antarctica. This analysis highlights the increased accuracy of

  2. Diurnal Albedo Variations of the Martian North Polar Water Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, R. F.; Bass, D.

    2002-01-01

    Presentation of findings regarding diurnal variations in the north polar water ice cap of Mars as part of a larger study of the interannual and seasonal variations of the Martian north polar water ice cap. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. An Index (PC) Aimed at Monitoring the (P)olar (C)ap for Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PC is an index for magnetic activity in the (P)olar (C)ap. It is based on data from a single nearpole station, and aimed to monitor the polar cap magnetic activity...

  4. Pulsar bi-drifting: implications for polar cap geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoff; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    For many years it has been considered puzzling how pulsar radio emission, supposedly created by a circulating carousel of sub-beams, can produce the drift bands demonstrated by PSR J0815+0939, and more recently PSR B1839-04, which simultaneously drifts in opposing directions. Here, we suggest that the carousels of these pulsars, and hence their beams, are not circular but elliptical with axes tilted with respect to the fiducial plane. We show that certain relatively unusual lines of sight can cause bi-drifting to be observed, and a simulation of the two known exemplars is presented. Although bi-drifting is rare, non-circular beams may be common among pulsars and reveal themselves by having profile centroids displaced from the fiducial plane identified by polarization position angle swings. They may also result in profiles with asymmetric- and frequency-dependent component evolution. It is further suggested that the carousels may change their tilt by specific amounts and later reverse them. This may occur suddenly, accompanying a mode change (e.g. PSR B0943+10), or more gradually and short lived as in `flare' pulsars (e.g. PSR B1859+07). A range of pulsar behaviour (e.g. the shifting drift patterns of PSRs B0818-41 and B0826-34) may also be the result of non-circular carousels with varying orientation. The underlying nature of these carousels - whether they are exclusively generated by polar cap physics or driven by magnetospheric effects - is briefly discussed.

  5. Research on Polarization Cancellation of Nonstationary Ionosphere Clutter in HF Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingpeng Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oblique projection polarization filter (OPPF can be applied as an effective approach for interference cancellation in high-frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR and other systems. In order to suppress the nonstationary ionosphere clutter further, a novel OPPF based clutter suppressing scheme is proposed in this paper. The polarization and nonstationary characteristic of the clutter are taken into account in the algorithms referred to as range-Doppler domain polarization suppression (RDDPS and the range-time domain polarization suppression (RTDPS method, respectively. The RDDPS is designed for weak ionosphere clutter and implemented in the range-Doppler domain directly, whereas the RTDPS algorithm is designed to suppress the powerful ionosphere clutter with a multisegment estimation and suppression scheme. About 15–23 dB signal to interference ratio (SIR improvement can be excepted when using the proposed method, whereas the targets can be more easily detected in the range-Doppler map. Experimental results demonstrate that the scheme proposed is effective for nonstationary ionosphere clutter and is proven to be a practical interference cancellation technique for HFSWR.

  6. South polar permanent CO2 ice cap presentation in the Global Mars Multiscale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel-Rastgar, Farahnaz

    2018-02-01

    The atmospheric influence caused by the Martian permanent south CO2 ice cap is examined to improve the Global Mars Multiscale Model (GM3) to see if it can significantly improve the representation of south polar meteorology. However, the seasonal carbon dioxide ice in the polar regions is presented in the surface ice simulation by the Global Mars Multiscale Model but the model does not produce a permanent south CO2 ice cap, and the physics code must modify to capture the realistic physical such as ice process detail; probably makes a bias in terms of total CO2 ice and meteorological processes in the model aside from ice formation. The permanent south CO2 ice cap in the model can significantly improve the representation of south polar meteorology for example in predicted surface temperatures, surface pressures, horizontal and zonal winds over the south cap and possible initiation of dust storms at south polar region during the southern summer period.

  7. The Mars water cycle at other epochs - Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model is presented of the integrated role of seasonal water cycle on the evolution of polar deposits on Mars over the last 10 million years. From the model, it is concluded that the only major difference between the polar caps which affects their long-term behavior is ultimately the difference in their elevations. Because of that difference, there is a preference for CO2 frost to stay longer on the northern polar cap. The average difference in sublimation at the caps results in a net south-to-north transport of water ice over long time scales. Superimposed on any long-term behavior is a transfer of water ice between the caps on the 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr time scales. The amount of water exchanged is small compared to the total ice content of the polar deposits.

  8. Inclined Pulsar Magnetospheres in General Relativity: Polar Caps for the Dipole, Quadrudipole, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Philippov, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    In the canonical model of a pulsar, rotational energy is transmitted through the surrounding plasma via two electrical circuits, each connecting to the star over a small region known as a “polar cap.” For a dipole-magnetized star, the polar caps coincide with the magnetic poles (hence the name), but in general, they can occur at any place and take any shape. In light of their crucial importance to most models of pulsar emission (from radio to X-ray to wind), we develop a general technique for determining polar cap properties. We consider a perfectly conducting star surrounded by a force-free magnetosphere and include the effects of general relativity. Using a combined numerical-analytical technique that leverages the rotation rate as a small parameter, we derive a general analytic formula for the polar cap shape and charge-current distribution as a function of the stellar mass, radius, rotation rate, moment of inertia, and magnetic field. We present results for dipole and quadrudipole fields (superposed dipole and quadrupole) inclined relative to the axis of rotation. The inclined dipole polar cap results are the first to include general relativity, and they confirm its essential role in the pulsar problem. The quadrudipole pulsar illustrates the phenomenon of thin annular polar caps. More generally, our method lays a foundation for detailed modeling of pulsar emission with realistic magnetic fields.

  9. Effects of geomagnetic storm on low latitude ionospheric total ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    netospheric polar cap region causes a disturbance in geomagnetic field. As a result of this distur- bance, the energy inputs from the magnetosphere to the upper atmosphere can cause a dramatic change in electron density of the F region of the ionosphere. Geomagnetic storms produce large and. Keywords. Ionospheric ...

  10. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: History of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric water cycle at the present epoch involves summertime sublimation of water from the north polar cap, transport of water through the atmosphere, and condensation on one or both winter CO2 caps. Exchange with the regolith is important seasonally, but the water content of the atmosphere appears to be controlled by the polar caps. The net annual transport through the atmosphere, integrated over long timescales, must be the driving force behind the long-term evolution of the polar caps; clearly, this feeds back into the evolution of the layered terrain. We have investigated the behavior of the seasonal water cycle and the net integrated behavior at the pole for the last 10 exp 7 years. Our model of the water cycle includes the solar input, CO2 condensation and sublimation, and summertime water sublimation through the seasonal cycles, and incorporates the long-term variations in the orbital elements describing the Martian orbit.

  11. Long-term analysis of ionospheric polar patches based on CHAMP TEC data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noja, M.; Stolle, Claudia; Park, J.

    2013-01-01

    Total electron content (TEC) from LEO satellites offers great possibility to sound the upper ionosphere and plasmasphere. This paper describes a method to derive absolute TEC observations aboard CHAMP considering multipath effects and receiver differential code bias. The long-term data set of 9...... that enhanced TEC at midlatitudes and low latitudes during December solstice provides a greater possibility to transport high-density plasma to the polar region through the buildup of TOIs. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved....

  12. A climatological morphology of ionospheric disturbances at high and polar latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris N. Fotiadis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After a historical introduction on the first well-documented observations of ionospheric phenomena and a review of the current, state-of-the art polar ionospheric studies, a climatological morphology of the irregular F-region plasma structures at high and polar latitudes is being presented, following a feature-aided pattern recognition method. Using the available in three solar cycles hourly foF2 data from 18 ionosonde stations, an ionospheric definition of disturbed conditions, independent of any causative mechanism, is being applied and positive/negative disturbances of duration smaller than 24 hours are sorted out. No latitudinal/longitudinal bins or seasons are defined and disturbances in each month and station are handled separately while four local time intervals of storm commencement are considered, according to solar zenith angle. A median profile per disturbance is produced only when a minimum occurrence probability is satisfied. Non-systematic features are excluded from this analysis by careful selection of the time window under morphological investigation. First, the median profiles of disturbance patterns are fitted to standard distributions and then, if they fail, they are grouped according to their major characteristic features and are described by a dynamic variation envelope along with their distribution in space and time. The present model, while being a non-conditional stand-alone model of ionospheric storms at high and polar latitudes offered to radio users, may complement existing empirical models. Finally, the present model may ultimately reveal cause-effect relationships with geomagnetic field or interplanetary parameters after further correlation studies undertaken in the future.

  13. Perennial water ice identified in the south polar cap of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Poulet, François; Gendrin, Aline; Gondet, Brigitte; Berthé, Michel; Soufflot, Alain; Drossart, Pierre; Combes, Michel; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Moroz, Vassili; Mangold, Nicolas; Schmitt, Bernard

    2004-04-08

    The inventory of water and carbon dioxide reservoirs on Mars are important clues for understanding the geological, climatic and potentially exobiological evolution of the planet. From the early mapping observation of the permanent ice caps on the martian poles, the northern cap was believed to be mainly composed of water ice, whereas the southern cap was thought to be constituted of carbon dioxide ice. However, recent missions (NASA missions Mars Global Surveyor and Odyssey) have revealed surface structures, altimetry profiles, underlying buried hydrogen, and temperatures of the south polar regions that are thermodynamically consistent with a mixture of surface water ice and carbon dioxide. Here we present the first direct identification and mapping of both carbon dioxide and water ice in the martian high southern latitudes, at a resolution of 2 km, during the local summer, when the extent of the polar ice is at its minimum. We observe that this south polar cap contains perennial water ice in extended areas: as a small admixture to carbon dioxide in the bright regions; associated with dust, without carbon dioxide, at the edges of this bright cap; and, unexpectedly, in large areas tens of kilometres away from the bright cap.

  14. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Offset Polar Cap Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan; Miller, M. Coleman

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres, used to model high-energy light curves have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profile. We find that. corn pared to the profile:-; derived from :-;ymmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines. increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission. formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces greatly improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, which show very little off-peak emIssIon.

  15. General solution for calculating polarization electric fields in the auroral ionosphere and application examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amm, O.; Fujii, R.; VanhamäKi, H.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ieda, A.

    2013-05-01

    We devise an approach to calculate the polarization electric field in the ionosphere, when the ionospheric conductances, the primary (modeled) or the total (measured) electric field, and the Cowling efficiency are given. In contrast to previous studies, our approach is a general solution which is not limited to specific geometrical setups, and all parameters may have any kind of spatial dependence. The solution technique is based on spherical elementary current (vector) systems (SECS). This way, we avoid the need to specify explicit boundary conditions for the searched polarization electric field of its potential which would be required if the problem was solved in a differential equation approach. Instead, we solve an algebraic matrix equation, and the implicit boundary condition that the divergence of the polarization electric field vanishes outside our analysis area is sufficient. In order to illustrate our theory, we then apply it to two simple models of auroral electrodynamic situations, the first being a mesoscale strong conductance enhancement in the early morning sector within a relatively weak southward primary electric field, and a morning sector auroral arc with only a weak conductance enhancement, but a large southward primary electric field at the poleward flank of the arc. While the significance of the polarization electric field for maximum Cowling efficiency is large for the first case, it is rather minor for the second one. Both models show that the polarization electric field effect may not only change the magnitude of the current systems but also their overall geometry. Furthermore, the polarization electric field may extend into regions where the primary electric field is small, thus even dominating the total electric field in these regions. For the first model case, the total Joule heating integrated over the analysis area decreases by a factor of about 4 for maximum Cowling efficiency as compared to the case of vanishing Cowling efficiency

  16. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The Martian polar caps and layered terrain presumably evolves by the deposition and removal of small amounts of water and dust each year, the current cap attributes therefore represent the incremental transport during a single year as integrated over long periods of time. The role was studied of condensation and sublimation of water ice in this process by examining the seasonal water cycle during the last 10(exp 7) yr. In the model, axial obliquity, eccentricity, and L sub s of perihelion vary according to dynamical models. At each epoch, the seasonal variations in temperature are calculated at the two poles, keeping track of the seasonal CO2 cap and the summertime sublimation of water vapor into the atmosphere; net exchange of water between the two caps is calculated based on the difference in the summertime sublimation between the two caps (or on the sublimation from one cap if the other is covered with CO2 frost all year). Results from the model can help to explain (1) the apparent inconsistency between the timescales inferred for layer formation and the much older crater retention age of the cap and (2) the difference in sizes of the two residual caps, with the south being smaller than the north.

  17. First modulation of high-frequency polar mesospheric summer echoes by radio heating of the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Rietveld, M. T.; Scales, W. A.; Kosch, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    The first high-frequency (HF, 8 MHz) observations of the modulation of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) by artificial radio heating of the ionosphere are presented and compared to observations at 224 MHz and model predictions. The experiments were performed at the European Incoherent Scatter facility in northern Norway. It is shown that model results are in qualitative and partial quantitative agreement with the observations, supporting the prediction that with certain ranges of ice particle radii and concentration, PMSE at HF radar wavelengths can be enhanced by heating due to the dominance of dust charging over plasma diffusion.

  18. IR SPECTRAL MAPPING OF THE MARTIAN SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP USING CRISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Campbell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are considered to be important in theories of abiogenesis (Allamandola, 2011 . There is evidence that PAHs have been detected on two icy Saturnian satellites using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS on the Cassini spacecraft (Cruikshank et al., 2007. The hypothesised presence of PAHs in Mars south polar cap has not been systematically examined even though the Mars south polar cap may allow the preservation of organic molecules that are typically destroyed at the Martian surface by UV radiation (Dartnell et al. 2012. This hypothesis is supported by recent analyses of South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC structural evolution (Thomas et al., 2009 that suggest the possibility that seasonal and long term sublimation may excavate dust particles from within the polar ice. Periodic sublimation is believed to be responsible for the formation of so-called “Swiss Cheese Terrain”, a unique surface feature found only in the Martian south polar residual cap consisting of flat floored, circular depressions (Byrne, 2009. We show the first examples of work towards the detection of PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain, using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM, on board NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO. CRISM is designed to search for mineralogical indications of past and present water, thus providing extensive coverage of the south polar cap. In this work, we discuss whether CRISM infrared spectra can be used to detect PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain and demonstrate a number of maps showing shifts in spectral profiles over the SPRC.

  19. Mars seasonal polar caps as a test of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal polar caps of Mars can be used to test the equivalence principle in general relativity. The north and south caps, which are composed of carbon dioxide, wax and wane with the seasons. If the ratio of the inertial (passive) to gravitational (active) masses of the caps differs from the same ratio for the rest of Mars, then the equivalence principle fails, Newton's third law fails, and the caps will pull Mars one way and then the other with a force aligned with the planet's spin axis. This leads to a secular change in Mars's along-track position in its orbit about the Sun, and to a secular change in the orbit's semimajor axis. The caps are a poor Eoetvoes test of the equivalence principle, being 4 orders-of-magnitude weaker than laboratory tests and 7 orders-of-magnitude weaker than that found by lunar laser ranging; the reason is the small mass of the caps compared to Mars as a whole. The principal virtue of using Mars is that the caps contain carbon, an element not normally considered in such experiments. The Earth with its seasonal snow cover can also be used for a similar test.

  20. Mars Seasonal Polar Caps as a Test of the Equivalence Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, Daivd Parry

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal polar caps of Mars can be used to test the equivalence principle in general relativity. The north and south caps, which are composed of carbon dioxide, wax and wane with the seasons. If the ratio of the inertial to gravitational masses of the caps differs from the same ratio for the rest of Mars, then the equivalence principle fails, Newton's third law fails, and the caps will pull Mars one way and then the other with a force aligned with the planet's spin axis. This leads to a secular change in Mars's along-track position in its orbit about the Sun, and to a secular change in the orbit's semimajor axis. The caps are a poor E6tv6s test of the equivalence principle, being 4 orders-of-magnitude weaker than laboratory tests and 7 orders-of-magnitude weaker than that found by lunar laser ranging; the reason is the small mass of the caps compared to Mars as a whole. The principal virtue of using Mars is that the caps contain carbon, an element not normally considered in such experiments. The Earth with its seasonal snow cover can also be used for a similar test.

  1. Case-study of the evolution of polar-cap currents and auroral electrojets during polar geomagnetic disturbances with IMS magnetometer data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, T.; Kim, J.S. (State Univ. of New York, Albany (USA). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center); Sugiura, M. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center)

    1984-06-01

    By using 1 min average data from the US-Canada IMS network stations (Alaska, east-west and Fort Churchill chains) and also standard magnetograms from stations in the polar-cap region and in the auroral zone, we have examined the development of polar-cap currents and the relationship of their development to the evolution of auroral electrojets during individual polar geomagnetic disturbances. Characteristics that have been determined are reported and discussed.

  2. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  3. The theta aurora and ionospheric flow convection: Polar ultraviolet imager and SuperDARN radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, K.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Newell, P. T.; Meng, C. I.

    2003-12-01

    We report results from a case study of the theta aurora that occurred during a magnetic cloud event on November 8, 2000. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was strongly northward for more than 12 hours, while the y-component of IMF changed signs several times. Auroral images from the Ultraviolet Imager on board the Polar satellite show clear instances of theta auroras during the prolonged northward IMF period. This event provides a good opportunity for testing current models of theta aurora generation and evolution. We examine in situ particle data from the DMSP satellites to find magnetospheric source regions responsible for the theta auroras. We also examine ionospheric plasma flow convection data from the SuperDARN radar network to study relationships between the ionospheric plasma flow pattern and the location of the theta auroras. Our results clearly indicate that the theta aurora bar, at least on nightside, was located in a region of anti-sunward convecting flow. This is not consistent with the current view that theta auroras reside in regions of closed field lines and hence in regions of sunward convecting flow. Implication of the new findings will be discussed.

  4. Statistical Patterns of Ionospheric Convection Derived From Mid-Latitude, High-Latitude, and Polar SuperDARN HF Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E. G.; Shepherd, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Global patterns of ionospheric convection have been widely studied in terms of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude and orientation in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres using observations from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). The dynamic range of driving conditions under which existing SuperDARN statistical models are valid is currently limited to periods when the high-latitude convection pattern remains above about 60° geomagnetic latitude. Cousins and Shepherd [2010] found this to correspond to intervals when the solar wind electric field Esw 0) the high-latitude radars often experience difficulties in measuring convection above about 85° geomagnetic latitude. In this presentation, we introduce a new statistical model of ionospheric convection which is valid for much more dominant IMF Bz conditions than was previously possible by including velocity measurements from the newly constructed tiers of radars in the Northern Hemisphere at midlatitudes and in the polar cap. This new model (TS17) is compared to previous statistical models derived from high-latitude SuperDARN observations (RG96, PSR10, CS10) and its impact on instantaneous Map Potential solutions is examined.

  5. Wave disturbances in the polar ionosphere after a Vitim meteorite burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, V. D.; Ogloblina, O. F.; Tereshchenko, V. A.; Chernyakov, S. M.

    On September 24th, 2002, at 16:49 UT in the Mamsko-Chuisk region of the Irkutsk oblast of Russia it was a fall of a big meteorite. The fall was accompanied with light, acoustic, geomagnetic, seismic and mechanical phenomena which were recorded by ground and space means of observations. The meteorite has burst in the air at the altitude of 30 km with coordinates of the burst: 58.23 N, 113.46 E. After 17:00 UT there was recorded a sequence of small disturbances of the geomagnetic field and wavelike changes of amplitude of medium wave radioreflections at heights from 47 till 129 km in Tumanny (Murmansk oblast, Russia; 69.0 N, 35.7 E) which was situated at a distance of 4000 km from a place of the burst. It was gotten that after the burst three types of waves (magnetoacoustic, acoustic-gravitational and infraacoustic) spread in the polar mesosphere and lower ionosphere. Observable disturbances had periods of oscillations about 3-4, 5-6 and more than 9-10 minutes. A similarity characteristics of the wave indignations with analogous ones which were gotten earlier during investigations of effects of the Tungusk meteorite and the American space station "Skylab" falls and also a fact of a registration of a pressure wave on a net of microbarographs of PGI in Apatity permit to maintain that the source of the indignations in the polar ionosphere is the meteorite explosion. The hypothesis about wavequide spreading of atmospheric waves to large distance was confirmed.

  6. Mars Water Ice and Carbon Dioxide Seasonal Polar Caps: GCM Modeling and Comparison with Mars Express Omega Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Levrard, B.; Montmessin, F.; Schmitt, B.; Doute, S.; Langevin, Y.; Bibring, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the behavior of the Mars CO2 ice seasonal polar caps, and in particular interpret the the Mars Express Omega observations of the recession of the northern seasonal cap, we present some simulations of the Martian Climate/CO2 cycle/ water cycle as modeled by the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) global climate model.

  7. High-altitude chemical-release systems for Project BIME (Brazilian Ionospheric Modification Experiments) Project IMS (Ionospheric Modification Studies) Project PIIE (Polar Ionospheric Irregularities Experiment) Project Polar Arcs. Final report, 30 September 1981-30 June 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, C.S.; Murphy, W.J.

    1987-07-31

    Project BIME, a Spread-F observation program involved the launching of two Nike-Black Brant rockets each containing a payload containing Ammonium Nitrate Fuel Oil (ANFO). The rockets were launched from Barriera Do Inferno Launch Site in Natal, Brazil in August of 1982. Project IMS, an F-layer modification experiment involved three launch vehicles. A Nike-Tomahawk and two Sonda III rockets. The Nike-Tomahawk carried a sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) payload. One of the Sonda III rockets carried a payload that consisted of an SF/sub 6/ canister and a samarium/strontium thermite canister. The remaining Sonda III carried a payload that consisted of a trifluorobromo methane (CF/sub 3/Br) canister and a samarium thermite canister. The rockets were launched from Wallops Island Launch Facility, Virginia in November of 1984. Project PIIE and Polar Arcs, a program to investigate polar ionospheric irregularities, involved the launch of a Nike-Black Brant rocket which housed one samarium thermite canister and six barium canisters. An attempted launch of the payload was returned in March of 1985, however, launch criteria could not be met and the payload was returned to FRC for storage and refurbishment for launch in 1987. The rocket was launched successfully from Sondrestrom Air Base, Greenland in March of 1987.

  8. The Effect of Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) on Ionosphere and Thermosphere during 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm: Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM) Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Deng, Y.; Zhang, D.; Lu, Y.; Sheng, C.

    2017-12-01

    Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) are incorporated into the non-hydrostatic Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM), revealing the complex effects on neutral dynamics and ion-neutral coupling processes. The intense westward ion stream could enhance the neutral zonal wind within the SAPS channel. Through neutral dynamics the neutrals then divide into two streams, one turns poleward and the other turns equatorward, forming a two-cell pattern in the SAPS-changed wind. The significant Joule heating induced by SAPS also leads to traveling atmospheric disturbances (TAD) accompanied by traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID), increasing the total electron content (TEC) by 2-8 TECu in the mid-latitude ionosphere. We investigate the potential causes of the reported poleward wind surge during the St. Patrick's Day storm in 2015. It is confirmed that Coriolis force on the westward zonal wind can contribute the poleward wind during post-SAPS interval. In addition, the simulations imply that the sudden decrease of heating rate within auroral oval could result in a TAD propagating equatorward, which could also be responsible for the sudden poleward wind surge. This study highlights the complicated effects of SAPS on ion-neutral coupling and neutral dynamics.

  9. Drifting field-aligned density structures in the night-side polar cap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Pickett, J. S.; Maršálek, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 32, - (2005), L06106-1 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0832; GA MŠk ME 650; GA MŠk 1P05ME811 Grant - others: NASA (US) NAG5-9974; NASA (US) NNG04GB98G; NSF(US) 0307319; ESA PECS(XE) 98025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Magnetospheric Physics * Plasma convection * Plasma waves and instabilities * Polar cap phenomena * Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.491, year: 2005

  10. Ionospheric topside sounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W

    1966-10-14

    Over the past few years, the satellite topside sounders have significantly contributed to the understanding of the upper ionosphere. A great quantity of radio echo data has been accumulated, from which the ionospheric electrondensity distribution can be determined. The topside measurements of electron density essentially agree with similar measurements from the ground, except for an occasional 10-percent discrepancy near the peak of the ionosphere. While horizontal non-uniformity is a likely cause, this discrepancy has not yet been adequately explained. The electron-density scale heights measured at a constant altitude indicate both a higher temperature and a heavier mean ion mass at high latitudes. At low latitudes the topside measurements have shown the detailed latitudinal structure of the equatorial anomaly, demonstrating control by the geomagnetic field. A variety of electron-density irregularities have been studied. Most are greatly elongated along the magnetic field, and produce echoes either by lateral scattering, if they are thin, or by longitudinal ducting, if they are thick. Some of the thick irregularities are continuous between the hemispheres and support conjugate echo propagation. The topside sounders have revealed the complex structure of the ionosphere near the auroral zone and at higher latitudes. At night an east-west trough of greatly reduced electron density occurs equatorward of the auroral zone. At the auroral zone itself the electron density is high and quite variable, both in space and time. The electron density at the polar cap within the auroral zone is often uniform and smooth. Ionospheric irregularities are common in the area of the trough and the auroral zone. Among other satellites, the topside sounders have been used in various plasma studies involving the excitation and propagation of waves. These studies suggest that the ionosphere is an appropriate region for future plasma physics investigations, especially with rocket and

  11. The 1997 Spring Regression of the Martian South Polar Cap: Mars Orbiter Camera Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P.B.; Cantor, B.A.; Malin, M.C.; Edgett, K.; Carr, M.H.; Danielson, G.E.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Davies, M.E.; Hartmann, W.K.; McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter cameras (MOC) on Mars Global Surveyor observed the south polar cap of Mars during its spring recession in 1997. The images acquired by the wide angle cameras reveal a pattern of recession that is qualitatively similar to that observed by Viking in 1977 but that does differ in at least two respects. The 1977 recession in the 0o to 120o longitude sector was accelerated relative to the 1997 observations after LS = 240o; the Mountains of Mitchel also detached from the main cap earlier in 1997. Comparison of the MOC images with Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter data shows that the Mountains of Mitchel feature is controlled by local topography. Relatively dark, low albedo regions well within the boundaries of the seasonal cap were observed to have red-to-violet ratios that characterize them as frost units rather than unfrosted or partially frosted ground; this suggests the possibility of regions covered by CO2 frost having different grain sizes.

  12. Plasma Irregularities on the Leading and Trailing Edges of Polar Cap Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, L. J.; Varney, R. H.; Gillies, R.; Chartier, A.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma irregularities in the polar cap have often been attributed to the gradient drift instability (GDI). Traditional fluid theories of GDI predicts irregularity growth only on the trailing edge of polar patches, where the plasma density gradient is parallel to the plasma drift velocity, however many observations show irregularities also form on the leading edge of patches. We consider decameter-scale irregularities detected by polar-latitude SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) radars with any relationship between the background density gradients and drift velocity. Global electron density from the Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS), a GPS tomography routine, is used to provide context for where irregularities are observed relative to polar patches and finer-scale background density gradients are found from 3D imaging from both the North and Canada faces of the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radars (RISR-N and RISR-C) jointly. Shear-based instabilities are considered as mechanisms by which plasma irregularities could form on the leading edge of patches. Theoretical predictions of instability growth from both GDI and shear instabilities are compared with irregularity observations for the October 13, 2016 storm.

  13. Plasma drifts associated with a system of sun-aligned arcs in the polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, S.B.; Doolittle, J.H.; Robinson, R.M.; Vondrak, R.R.; Rich, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    A series of four sun-aligned arcs passed over Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, on the night of the 17th and 18th of February, 1985. Observations of these arcs were made using the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and an intensified all-sky imaging TV system that was operated at the radar site. The first of the four arcs crossed the Sondre Stromfjord meridian just before local midnight moving westward, and the other three arcs followed at approximately half-hour intervals. When we account for the earth's rotation, the arc drift in an inertial frame was eastward, or dusk to dawn. The half-hour interval between meridian crossings of the arcs implies that the mean spacing between the arcs was 180 km. A Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F6 satellite pass at 0110 UT revealed the presence of highly structured electron and ion precipitation throughout the polar cap. The DMSP visible imager detected a single, sun-aligned arc associated with the largest peak in precipitating electron flux. This arc was also observed at Thule, Greenland, with an intensified film camera. These observations suggest that at least one of the arcs that were observed at Sondre Stromfjord extended across a large part of the polar cap. The radar at Sondre Stromfjord measured electron density and ion drift velocities associated with the four arcs. The radar drift measurements were superimposed on the all-sky video images to determine the location of the measurements relative to the arcs. Plasma drifts outside the arcs were found to be both sunward and antisunward, while within the arcs the drifts were predominantly antisunward. The variability of the drifts in the direction parallel to the arcs indicates that the electric fields were highly structured even though the configuration and motion of the arcs were well behaved

  14. Multi-site observations of the association between aurora and plasma convection in the cusp/polar cap during a southeastward(By ~ |Bz| IMF orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available In a case study we demonstrate the spatiotemporal structure of aurora and plasma convection in the cusp/polar cap when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz < 0 and By ~ | Bz | (clock angle in GSM Y - Z plane: ~ 135°. This IMF orientation elicited a response different from that corresponding to strongly northward and southward IMF. Our study of this "intermediate state" is based on a combination of ground observations of optical auroral emissions and ionospheric plasma convection. Utilizing all-sky cameras at NyAlesund, Svalbard and Heiss Island (Russian arctic, we are able to monitor the high-latitude auroral activity within the ~10:00–15:00 MLT sector. Information on plasma convection is obtained from the SuperDARN radars, with emphasis placed on line of sight observations from the radar situated in Hankasalmi, Finland (Cutlass. A central feature of the auroral observations in the cusp/polar cap region is a ~ 30-min long sequence of four brightening events, some of which consists of latitudinally and longitudinally separated forms, which are found to be associated with pulsed ionospheric flows in merging and lobe convection cells. The auroral/convection events may be separated into different forms/cells and phases, reflecting a spatiotem-poral evolution of the reconnection process on the dayside magnetopause. The initial phase consists of a brightening in the postnoon sector (~ 12:00–14:00 MLT at ~ 73° MLAT, accompanied by a pulse of enhanced westward convection in the postnoon merging cell. Thereafter, the event evolution comprises two phenomena which occur almost simultaneously: (1 westward expansion of the auroral brightening (equatorward boundary intensification across noon, into the ~ 10:00–12:00 MLT sector, where the plasma convection subsequently turns almost due north, in the convection throat, and where classical poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs are observed; and (2 auroral brightening at slightly higher latitudes

  15. Multi-instrument observation of two different types of polar cap aurora occurring simultaneously during northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, J. A.; Fear, R. C.; Lanchester, B. S.; Whiter, D. K.; Kavanagh, A. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Polar cap aurora are a phenomena associated with periods of northwards IMF. By studying their appearance and formation, we can gain valuable information on the configuration of Earth's magnetosphere during the less understood `quiet' periods that occur approximately half of the time. Observations of high latitude aurora from multiple instruments on 19 January 2008 are presented, including almost simultaneous observations of the northern and southern auroral regions from the Special Sensor Ultra-violet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI) instruments on board Defence Meteorological Satellite Programme (DMSP) spacecraft F16 and F17. SuperDARN flows are also explored in both hemispheres during the event. In the northern hemisphere, two high latitude structures were seen on opposite sides of the polar cap during the same interval. The energies of the precipitating electrons above the structure on the duskside was estimated to vary between 2-11 keV using the Auroral Structure and Kinetics (ASK) instrument in conjunction with the Southampton ion chemistry model. Further analysis of this structure revealed it to be formed on closed field lines that had protruded into the polar cap, consistent with the mechanism proposed for transpolar arcs. However this structure did not cross the entire polar cap but remained, in the northern hemisphere, at approximately 80° magnetic latitude for at least 40 minutes. This protrusion is hence suggested to be an example of a `failed transpolar arc'. The structure seen on the dawnside of the northern polar cap was analysed using DMSP particle spectrograph data. It was found to be associated with electron precipitation energies lower than 1 keV and no ion signature were present. Hence it is suggested that this sun-aligned structure is consistent with the common low intensity arcs formed by accelerated polar rain. The study shows there are at least two types of high latitude aurora occurring simultaneously during northwards IMF.

  16. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  17. Multi-station basis for Polar Cap (PC) indices: ensuring credibility and operational reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) indices, PCN (North) and PCS (South) are based on polar geomagnetic observations from Qaanaaq (Thule) and Vostok, respectively, processed to measure the transpolar plasma convection that may seriously affect space weather conditions. To establish reliable space weather forecasts based on PC indices, and also to ensure credibility of their use for scientific analyses of solar wind-magnetosphere interactions, additional sources of data for the PC indices are investigated. In the search for alternative index sources, objective quality criteria are established here to be used for the selection among potential candidates. These criteria are applied to existing PC index series to establish a quality scale. In the Canadian region, the data from Resolute Bay magnetometer are shown to provide alternative PCN indices of adequate quality. In Antarctica, the data from Concordia Dome-C observatory are shown to provide basis for alternative PCS indices. In examples to document the usefulness of these alternative index sources it is shown that PCN indices in a real-time version based on magnetometer data from Resolute Bay could have given 6 h of early warning, of which the last 2 h were "red alert", up to the onset of the strong substorm event on 13 March 1989 that caused power outage in Quebec. The alternative PCS indices based on data from Dome-C have helped to disclose that presently available Vostok-based PCS index values are corrupted throughout most of 2011.

  18. Multi-station basis for Polar Cap (PC indices: ensuring credibility and operational reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stauning Peter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Polar Cap (PC indices, PCN (North and PCS (South are based on polar geomagnetic observations from Qaanaaq (Thule and Vostok, respectively, processed to measure the transpolar plasma convection that may seriously affect space weather conditions. To establish reliable space weather forecasts based on PC indices, and also to ensure credibility of their use for scientific analyses of solar wind-magnetosphere interactions, additional sources of data for the PC indices are investigated. In the search for alternative index sources, objective quality criteria are established here to be used for the selection among potential candidates. These criteria are applied to existing PC index series to establish a quality scale. In the Canadian region, the data from Resolute Bay magnetometer are shown to provide alternative PCN indices of adequate quality. In Antarctica, the data from Concordia Dome-C observatory are shown to provide basis for alternative PCS indices. In examples to document the usefulness of these alternative index sources it is shown that PCN indices in a real-time version based on magnetometer data from Resolute Bay could have given 6 h of early warning, of which the last 2 h were “red alert”, up to the onset of the strong substorm event on 13 March 1989 that caused power outage in Quebec. The alternative PCS indices based on data from Dome-C have helped to disclose that presently available Vostok-based PCS index values are corrupted throughout most of 2011.

  19. The influence of the positronium photoionization rate on the polar cap X-ray luminosity of radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsukov, D. P.; Vorontsov, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the positronium photoionization rate on the polar cap X-ray luminosity of old radio pulsars is considered. It is assumed that the polar cap is heated only by reverse positrons accelerated in the pulsar diode. It is supposed that the pulsar diode is in a stationary state with the lower plate located near the star surface (polar cap model) occupies all the pulsar tube cross section and operates in the regime of steady space charge by the limited electron flow. The influence of a small-scale magnetic field on the electric field inside the pulsar diode is taken into account. The reverse positron current is calculated in the framework of two models: rapid and gradual screening. To calculate the production rate of electron-positron pairs we take into account only the curvature radiation of primary electrons and its absorption in the magnetic field. It is assumed that some fraction of electron-positron pairs is created in a bound state (positronium). Later, such positroniums are photoionized by thermal photons from the polar cap.

  20. Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene-capped porphyrins in polar solvents via ionic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiammengo, R.; Timmerman, P.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Versluis, Kees; Heck, Albert J.R.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene capped porphyrins can be achieved in polar solvents (up to 45% molar fraction of water) via ionic interaction. Thus tetracationic meso-tetrakis(N-alkylpyridinium-3-yl) porphyrins 1a–d and tetra anionic 25,26,27,28-tetrakis(2-ethoxyethoxy)-calix[4]arene

  1. Dayside and nightside contributions to cross-polar cap potential variations: the 20 March 2001 ICME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Andalsvik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the association between temporal-spatial structure of polar cap convection and auroral electrojet intensifications during a 5-h-long interval of strong forcing of the magnetosphere by an ICME/Magnetic cloud on 20 March 2001. We use data from coordinated ground-satellite observations in the 15:00–20:00 MLT sector. We take advantage of the good latitudinal coverage in the polar cap and in the auroral zone of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia and the stable magnetic field conditions in ICMEs. The electrojet events are characterized by a sequence of 10 min-long AL excursions to −1000/−1500 nT followed by poleward expansions and auroral streamers. These events are superimposed on a high disturbance level when the AL index remains around −500 nT for several hours. These signatures are different from those appearing in classical substorms, most notably the absence of a complete recovery phase when AL usually reaches above −100 nT. We concentrate on polar cap convection in both hemispheres (DMSP F13 data in relation to the ICME By conditions, electrojet intensifications, and the global UV auroral configuration obtained from the IMAGE spacecraft. The temporal evolution of convection properties such as the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP drop and flow channels at the dawn/dusk polar cap (PC boundaries around the time of the electrojet events are investigated. This approach allows us to distinguish between dayside (magnetopause reconnection and nightside (magnetotail reconnection sources of the PC convection events within the context of the expanding-contracting model of high-latitude convection in the Dungey cycle. Inter-hemispheric symmetries/asymmetries in the presence of newly-discovered convection channels at the dawn or dusk side PC boundaries are determined.

  2. Precipitation and total power consumption in the ionosphere: Global MHD simulation results compared with Polar and SNOE observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palmroth

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare the ionospheric electron precipitation morphology and power from a global MHD simulation (GUMICS-4 with direct measurements of auroral energy flux during a pair of substorms on 28-29 March 1998. The electron precipitation power is computed directly from global images of auroral light observed by the Polar satellite ultraviolet imager (UVI. Independent of the Polar UVI measurements, the electron precipitation energy is determined from SNOE satellite observations on the thermospheric nitric oxide (NO density. We find that the GUMICS-4 simulation reproduces the spatial variation of the global aurora rather reliably in the sense that the onset of the substorm is shown in GUMICS-4 simulation as enhanced precipitation in the right location at the right time. The total integrated precipitation power in the GUMICS-4 simulation is in quantitative agreement with the observations during quiet times, i.e., before the two substorm intensifications. We find that during active times the GUMICS-4 integrated precipitation is a factor of 5 lower than the observations indicate. However, we also find factor of 2-3 differences in the precipitation power among the three different UVI processing methods tested here. The findings of this paper are used to complete an earlier objective, in which the total ionospheric power deposition in the simulation is forecasted from a mathematical expression, which is a function of solar wind density, velocity and magnetic field. We find that during this event, the correlation coefficient between the outcome of the forecasting expression and the simulation results is 0.83. During the event, the simulation result on the total ionospheric power deposition agrees with observations (correlation coefficient 0.8 and the AE index (0.85.

  3. Climatology of GNSS ionospheric scintillation at high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spogli, L.; Alfonsi, L.; de Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.; Aquino, M.; Dodson, A.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2009-12-01

    GISTM receivers consist of NovAtel OEM4 dual-frequency receivers with special firmware specifically able to compute in near real time the amplitude and the phase scintillation from the GPS L1 frequency signals, and the ionospheric TEC (Total Electron Content) from the GPS L1 and L2 carrier phase signals. From this ground-based network, we are able to capture the dynamics of ionospheric plasma in a wide latitudinal range, from auroral to cusp/cap regions, considering the contribution of both hemispheres, in a bi-polar framework. The data collection started in 2001 and is still in progress. The results, obtained by statistically analyzing a large data sample over a wide period, show the effect of ionospheric disturbances on the GNSS signals, evidencing the different contributions of the auroral and the cusp/cap ionosphere and highlighting possible scintillation scenarios over polar regions.

  4. A polar cap absorption event observed using the Southern Hemisphere SuperDARN radar network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, A.; Morris, R.; Parkinson, M.; Duldig, M.; Dyson, P.

    A large X5 class solar flare and coronal mass ejection were observed emanating from the sun on July 14, 2000. Approximately 10 minutes later a large cosmic ray ground level enhancement was observed using neutron monitors located at Mawson station (70.5°S CGM), Antarctica; Large increases in proton flux were also observed using satellites during this time. This marked the start of a large polar cap absorption event with cosmic noise absorption peaking at 30 dB, as measured by a 30 MHz riometer located at Casey station (80.4°S CGM), Antarctica. The spatial evolution of this event and its subsequent recovery were studied using the Southern Hemisphere SuperDARN radar network, including the relatively low latitude observation provided by the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER) located on Bruny Island (54.6°S GGM), Tasmania. When the bulk of the CME arrived at the Earth two days later it triggered an intense geomagnetic storm. This paper presents observations of the dramatic sequence of events.

  5. Hyperspectral characterisation of the Martian south polar residual cap using CRISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. D.; Sidiropoulos, P.; Muller, J.-P.

    2017-09-01

    We present our research on hyperspectral characterization of the Martian South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC), with a focus on the detection of organic signatures within the dust content of the ice. The SPRC exhibits unique CO2 ice sublimation features known colloquially as 'Swiss Cheese Terrain' (SCT). These flat floored, circular depressions are highly dynamic, and may expose dust particles previously trapped within the ice in the depression walls and partially on the floors. Here we identify suitable regions for potential dust exposure on the SPRC, and utilise data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) satellite to examine infrared spectra of dark regions to establish their mineral composition, to eliminate the effects of ices on sub-pixel dusty features, and to assess whether ther might be signatures indicative of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). Spectral mapping has identified compositional differences between depression rims and the majority of the SPRC and CRISM spectra have been corrected to minimise the influence of CO2 and H2O ice. Whilst no conclusive evidence for PAHs has been found, depression rims are shown to have higher water content than regions of featureless ice, and there are indications of magnesium carbonate within the dark, dusty regions.

  6. Low-frequency electrostatic turbulence in the polar cap E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecseli, H.L.; Primdahl, F.; Bahnsen, A.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic turbulent fluctuations in a broad frequency band were observed in the polar cap E region over Greenland by an instrumented rocket payload. The fluctuations were detected by potential-difference measurements on two sets of boom-mounted spherical probes. The direction and magnitude of the phase velocity of the fluctuations are determined by standard correlation techniques. The driving mechanism for the turbulence is identified as the Farley-Buneman instability. A characteristic velocity close to the sound speed is deduced while the direction of propagation deviates slightly from the E 0 x B 0 direction. A correlation time of 20-150 ms along the rocket trajectory is determined, indicating that the fluctuations are essentially statistically independent for altitude separations of >50 m. A conditional analysis of the signals indicates that to a good approximation they can be described by Gaussian statistics. The data exclude the possibility of wave steepening as a saturation mechanism for the linear instability. It is thus unlikely that wave energy is cascaded toward short wavelengths to be dissipated there

  7. Assessment of HRSC Digital Terrain Models Produced for the South Polar Residual Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    The current Digital Terrain Models available for Mars consist of NASA MOLA (Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter) Digital Terrain Models with an average resolution of 112 m/ pixel (512 pixels/degree) for the polar region. The ESA/DLR High Resolution Stereo Camera is currently orbiting Mars and mapping its surface, 98% with resolution of ≤100 m/pixel and better and 100% at lower resolution [1]. It is possible to produce Digital Terrain Models from HRSC images using various methods. In this study, the method developed on Kim and Muller [2] which uses the VICAR open source program together with photogrammetry sofrware from DLR (Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt) with image matching based on the GOTCHA (Gruen-Otto-Chau) algorithm [3]. Digital Terrain Models have been processed over the South Pole with emphasis on areas around South Polar Residual Cap from High Resolution Stereo Camera images [4]. Digital Terrain Models have been produced for 31 orbits out of 149 polar orbits available. This study analyses the quality of the DTMs including an assessment of accuracy of elevations using the MOLA MEGDR (Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records) which has roughly 42 million MOLA PEDR (Precision Experiment Data Records) points between latitudes of 78 o -90 o S. The issues encountered in the production of Digital Terrain Models will be described and the statistical results and assessment method will be presented. The resultant DTMs will be accessible via http://i-Mars.eu/web-GIS References: [1] Neukum, G. et. al, 2004. Mars Express: The Scientific Payload pp. 17-35. [2] Kim, J.-R. and J.-P. Muller. 2009. PSS vol. 57, pp. 2095-2112. [3] Shin, D. and J.-P. Muller. 2012. Pattern Recognition, 45(10), 3795 -3809. [4] Putri, A.R. D., et al., Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B4, 463-469 Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received partial funding from the STFC "MSSL Consolidated Grant" ST/K000977/1 and partial support from the

  8. Separation of O/X Polarization Modes on Oblique Ionospheric Soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. J.; Cervera, M. A.; Pederick, L. H.; Quinn, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    The oblique-incidence sounder (OIS) is a well-established instrument for determining the state of the ionosphere, with several advantages over vertical-incidence sounders (VIS). However, the processing and interpretation of OIS ionograms is more complicated than that of VIS ionograms. Due to the Earth's magnetic field, the ionosphere is birefringent at radio frequencies and a VIS or OIS will typically see two distinct ionospheric returns, known as the O and X modes. The separation of these two modes on a VIS, using a polarimetric receive antenna, is a well-established technique. However, this process is more complicated on an OIS due to a variable separation in the phase difference between the two modes, as measured between the two arms of a polarimetric antenna. Using a polarimetric antenna that can be rotated and tilted, we show that this variation in phase separation within an ionogram is caused by the variation in incidence angle, with some configurations leading to greater variation in phase separation. We then develop an algorithm for separating O and X modes in oblique ionograms that can account for the variation in phase separation, and we demonstrate successful separation even in relatively difficult cases. The variation in phase separation can also be exploited to estimate the incident elevation, a technique which may be useful for other applications of HF radio.

  9. Stabilization of atmospheric pressure and seasonal variations of polar caps in the model of chemically inhomogeneous atmosphere of Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    It is shownthat in the model Martian atmosphere, consisting of pure carbon dioxide, the pressure falls to 1 mBar, due to gradual freezing of CO 2 . A small admixture of noncondensing gases alters the situation considerably. The mean atmospheric pressure is thereby stabilized at the level close to 6 mBar. At the end of the winter, a snow bank is formed at the edge of the polar cap. The temperature near the poles in winter falls down to 120 K. As a result of the condensation of carbon dioxide, in polar regions enrichment of the air by noncondensing components occurs

  10. High-latitude ionospheric response to a sudden impulse event during northward IMF conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Ridley, A.J.; Engebretson, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A high-density structure under northward interplanetary magnetic field B-z conditions is identified at the Wind and IMP 8 satellites, both in the solar wind on August 22, 1995. A compression of the magnetosphere is observed by the GOES 7 magnetometer within a few minutes of the pressure increase......-latitude ionospheric potential patterns by means of the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics technique. Convection cells in the polar cap are formed and disappear on minute timescales in accordance with previous results. However, the high-latitude ionospheric ground magnetic signature does not match...... the interpretation as events of traveling convection vortices, as has been suggested by past studies....

  11. The effect of magnetospheric erosion on mid- and high-latitude ionospheric flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, M.P.; Southwood, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    We describe simple quasi-global models of ionospheric flow with the aim of elucidating the potential signatures of magnetopause erosion and allied phenomena at ionospheric heights. Erosion implies the addition of flux to the polar cap and consequently a reduction in the latitude of the polar cap boundary. We consider here the possibility of localized erosion over part of the dayside. Systematic turning of the mid-latitude flow can result to the West and East of the erosion region. After erosion, the boundary must eventually return poleward as stress is released on the nightside. We examine the pattern associated with polar cap boundary reconfiguration. This can give rise to substantial equatorward and tailward flows on closed field lines. We conclude by showing data from the SABRE radar system during a period in which spacecraft measurements have shown erosion is occurring. Various features shown in our models are seen. (author)

  12. Assessing Zones of Low Radar Reflectivity Across the South Polar Cap of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzig, N. E.; Smith, I. B.; Whitten, J. L.; Campbell, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar (SHARAD) revealed near-surface zones of low radar reflectivity (reflection-free zones, RFZs) in many areas of Planum Australe (Phillips et al., 2011, Science 332). The most poleward, RFZ3, corresponds geographically to geologic unit AA3 (Tanaka et al., 2007, 7th Int'l Mars Conf. abs. 3276) that exhibits sublimation features. Geometric considerations demonstrated that RFZ3 consists of three distinct layers of CO2 ice, preserved from earlier periods of atmospheric collapse (Bierson et al., 2016, GRL 43). However, the nature of other RFZs at lower latitudes remains undetermined, with none of the SHARAD observations examined to date providing definitive geometric constraints on their composition. While CO2-ice composition has not been ruled out, these RFZs differ in important ways from RFZ3. Surface imagery in the vicinity of the outlying RFZs does not generally exhibit sublimation features similar to those seen in AA3, SHARAD reflectivity exhibits a lower contrast with surrounding materials relative to RFZ3, and there are no indications of distinct layering within the outlying RFZs as there are in RFZ3. In addition, climate modeling of atmospheric collapse episodes (Wood et al., 2016, LPSC abs. 3074) suggests that CO2 accumulation is highly concentrated at the highest latitudes. An alternative explanation for the outlying RFZs is that they consist of nearly pure water ice deposited during times when atmospheric dust was nearly absent. Such conditions may occur coeval with eras of CO2 accumulation at the higher latitudes. To test these possibilities, we are working to constrain the composition of the outlying RFZs, using the recently produced 3-D SHARAD data volume that encompasses the entire Martian south polar ice cap (Foss et al., 2017, The Leading Edge, 36). Work is ongoing, but we expect that the geometric corrections and improvements to the overall signal-to-noise ratio provided by the 3-D radar imaging processing may

  13. Polar Plasma at Ganymede: Ionospheric outflow and discovery of the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G.; Paterson, W.; Dorelli, J.; Glocer, A.; Sarantos, M.; Wilson, R. J.; Bard, C.

    2017-12-01

    On the 27th of June 1996, the NASA Galileo spacecraft made humanities first flyby of Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, discovering that it is unique to science in being the only moon known to possess an internally generated magnetic dynamo field. Although Galileo carried a plasma spectrometer, the Plasma Subsystem (PLS), converting its highly complex raw data stream into meaningful plasma moments (density, temperature, velocity) is extremely challenging, and was only ever performed for the second (out of six) Ganymede flybys. Resurrecting the original Galileo PLS data analysis software, we processed the raw PLS data from G01, and for the first time present the properties of plasmas encountered. Dense, cold ions were observed outflowing from the moon's north pole (presumed to be dominated by H+ from the icy surface), with more diffuse, warmer field-aligned outflows in the lobes. Dropouts in plasma density combined with velocity perturbations either side of this suggest that Galileo briefly crossed the cusps onto closed magnetic field lines. PLS observations show that upon entry into the magnetosphere, Galileo crossed through the plasma sheet, observing plasma flows consistent with reconnection-driven convection, highly energized 105 eV ions, and a reversal in the magnetic field. The densities of plasmas flowing upwards from Ganymede's ionosphere were higher on open "lobe" field lines than on closed field lines, suggesting that the ionospheric source of these plasmas may be denser at the poles, there may be additional acceleration mechanisms at play, or the balance of ions were outside the energy range of PLS.

  14. A model of the plasma flow and current in Saturn's polar ionosphere under conditions of strong Dungey cycle driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Jackman

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple model of the flow and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere. This model is motivated by theoretical reasoning, and guided quantitatively by in situ field and flow data from space missions, ground-based IR Doppler measurements, and Hubble Space Telescope images. The flow pattern consists of components which represent (1 plasma sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere region resulting from plasma pick-up and radial transport from internal sources; (2 the Vasyliunas-cycle of internal plasma mass-loss down the magnetospheric tail at higher latitudes; and (3 the polar Dungey-cycle flow driven by the solar wind interaction. Upstream measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF indicate the occurrence of both extended low-field rarefaction intervals with essentially negligible Dungey-cycle flow, and few-day high-field compression regions in which the Dungey-cycle voltage peaks at a few hundred kV. Here we model the latter conditions when the Dungey-cycle is active, advancing on previous axi-symmetric models which may be more directly applicable to quiet conditions. For theoretical convenience the overall flow pattern is constructed by adding together two components - a purely rotational flow similar to previous axi-symmetric models, and a sun-aligned twin vortex representing the dawn-dusk asymmetry effects associated with the Vasyliunas-and Dungey-cycle flows. We calculate the horizontal ionospheric current associated with the flow and the field-aligned current from its divergence. These calculations show that a sheet of upward-directed field-aligned current flows at the boundary of open field lines which is strongly modulated in local-time by the Dungey-cycle flows. We then consider implications of the field-aligned current for magnetospheric electron acceleration and aurorae using two plasma source populations (hot outer magnetospheric electrons and cool dense magnetosheath electrons. Both sources display a strong dawn

  15. Interannual and seasonal changes in the south seasonal polar cap of Mars: Observations from MY 28-31 using MARCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Cantor, B. A.; James, P. B.

    2017-08-01

    The Mars Color Imager (MARCI) camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provides daily synoptic coverage that allows monitoring of seasonal cap retreat and interannual changes that occur between Mars Years (MY) and over the southern summer. We present the first analysis of this data for the southern seasonal cap evolution observed in MY 28, 29, 30 and 31 (2/2007 to 07/2013). Observation over multiple Mars years allows us to compare changes between years as well as longer-term evolution of the high albedo deposits at the poles. Seasonal cap retreat is similar in all years and to retreats observed in other years by both optical and thermal instruments. The cryptic terrain has a fairly consistent boundary in each year, but numerous small-scale variations occur in each MY observed. Additionally, numerous small dark deposits are identified outside the classically identified cyptic region, including Inca City and other locations not previously noted. The large water ice outlier is observed to retain seasonal frost the longest (outside the polar dome) and is also highly variable in each MY. The development of the cryptic/anti-cryptic hemispheres is inferred to occur due to albedo variations that develop after dust venting starts and may be caused by recondensation of CO2 ice on the brightest and coldest regions controlled by topographic winds. Ground ice may play a role in which regions develop cryptic terrain, as there is no elevation control on either cryptic terrain or the late season brightest deposits.

  16. On magnetospheric electron impact ionisation and dynamics in Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere – a Cassini case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Lewis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present data from the sixth Cassini flyby of Titan (T5, showing that the magnetosphere of Saturn strongly interacts with the moon's ionosphere and exo-ionosphere. A simple electron ionisation model provides a reasonable agreement with the altitude structure of the ionosphere. Furthermore, we suggest that the dense and cold exo-ionosphere (from the exobase at 1430 km and outward to several Titan radii from the surface can be explained by magnetospheric forcing and other transport processes whereas exospheric ionisation by impacting low energy electrons seems to play a minor role.

  17. On a distribution of electric fields caused by the northern component of the interplanetary magnetic field in the absence of longitudinal currents in the winter polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvarov, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Data on the distribution of electric fields, conditioned by the northern component of the interplanetary magnetic field Bsub(z), have been discussed. The problem of electric field excitation is reduced to the solution of equations of continuity for the current in three regions: northern and southern polar caps and region beyond the caps. At the values Bsub(z)>0 in the ranqe of latitudes phi >= 80 deg the localization of convection conversion effect is obtained in calculations for summer cap and it agrees with the data of direct measurements

  18. Influence of Ionospheric Weather on GNSS Radio Occultation Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.; Pedatella, N. M.; Kuo, Y. H.

    2016-12-01

    Transient loss of lock (LOL) is one of the key space weather effects on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations during 2007-2011, we have analyzed the signal cycle slip (CS) occurrence comprehensively and its correlation to the ionospheric weather phenomena such as sporadic E (Es), equatorial F region irregularity (EFI), and the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The high vertical resolution of RO observations enables us to distinguish the CS resulting from different ionospheric layers clearly on a global scale. In the E layer, the CS is dominated by the Es occurrence, while in the F layer, the CS is mainly related to the EIA and EFI at low and equatorial latitudes. In the polar region, the CS is primarily related to polar cap electron density gradients. The overall average CS (> 6 cycles) occurrence is 23% per occultation, with the E (50-150 km) and F (150-600 km) layers contributing 8.3% and 14.7%, respectively. Awareness of the effect of the ionospheric weather on the CS of the low-Earth-orbit (LEO)-based GNSS signal could be beneficial to a variety of applications, including the LEO-based GNSS data processing and the corresponding hardware/firmware design.

  19. Pleistocene reduction of polar ice caps: Evidence from Cariaco Basin marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, R.Z.; Dowsett, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Sea level is projected to rise between 13 and 94 cm over the next 100 yr due to continued climate warming. The sea-level projections assume that polar ice sheets will remain stable or even increase on time scales of centuries, but controversial geologic evidence suggests that current polar ice sheets have been eliminated or greatly reduced during previous Pleistocene interglacials indicating that modern polar ice sheets have become unstable within the natural range of interglacial climates. Sea level may have been more than 20 m higher than today during a presumably very warm interglacial about 400 ka during marine isotope stage 11. Because of the implications for future sea level rise, additional study of the conflicting evidence for warmer conditions and higher sea level during marine isotope stage 11 is needed. Here we present microfossil and isotopic data from marine sediments of the Cariaco Basin supporting the interpretation that global sea level was 10-20 m higher than today during marine isotope stage 11. The increased sea level requires reduction in modern polar ice sheets and is consistent with the interpretation that the West Antarctic ice sheet and the Greenland ice sheet were absent or greatly reduced during marine isotope stage 11. Our results show a warm marine isotope stage 11 interglacial climate with sea level as high as or above modern sea level that lasted for 25 to 30 k.y. Variations in Earth's orbit around the sun (Milankovitch cycles) are considered to be a primary external force driving glacial-interglacial cycles. Current and marine isotope stage 11 Milankovitch forcing are very similar, suggesting that the present interglacial (Holocene) that began ca. 10 ka will continue for another 15 to 20 k.y. Therefore any anthropogenic climate warming will accelerate the natural process toward reduction in polar ice sheets. The potential for increased rates of sea level rise related to polar ice sheet decay should be considered as a potential natural

  20. Effective Area and Various Variations of The Northern Polar Cap Magnetic Activity Index (pcn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, L.; Papitashvili, O.; Popov, V.; Rasmussen, O.

    We investigated the effective area and various variations (universal time, seasonal, and solar cycle) from the PCN time series available since 1975 and derived from cor- relation analyses of ground geomagnetic observations at Qaanaaq (Thule, Greenland) with the "merging" interplanetary electric field. We analyzed solar cycle variations in the normalization coefficients (slope and intercept) and preferred direction of the transpolar ionospheric current (all used for routine calculations of PCN) from 1964 to 1999 combining data monthly for three consecutive years and using a 3-year box- car sliding window. The obtained results show that the solar cycle effect is clearly seen in the studied parameters amounting to 25% of the magnitude change during winter and equinox but increasing to 40% during summer. We calculated similar sets of coefficients and the index for all high-latitude Greenlandic stations, Nord and Resolute Bay stations using data from 1991 to 1999 by the 3-year sliding window. It is concluded that (even a set of normalization coefficients is obtained for a specific station) the "station-based" PC-indices are almost identical only for two most north- ern observatories Thule (THL) and Savissivik (SVS) through an entire UT day; other stations located at lower latitudes produce the index similar to THL and SVS only during few nighttime hours. Thus, we firmly justified that the area where the Northern PC index stably preserves a value is located within 7 distance from the northern geomagnetic pole.

  1. The temporal and spatial variations of low frequency geomagnetic pulsations at polar cusp and cap latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bitterly

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic field measurements at two Antarctic stations are compared during two weeks in the local summer (January 1-15, 1992. Low frequency (0.6-6 mHz pulsations are observed at each station near local magnetic noon. The same wave packets appear in some cases also at the other station, although with a significant attenuation, more clearly in the morning sector; the waves show a near noon reversal of the polarization sense from counter-clockwise in the morning to clockwise in the afternoon indicating a westward and an eastward propagation, respectively.

  2. Effects of Abrupt Variations of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure on the High-Latitude Ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igino Coco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We show the results of a statistical study on the effects in the high-latitude ionosphere of abrupt variations of solar wind dynamic pressure, using Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN data in both hemispheres. We find that, during periods of quiet ionospheric conditions, the amount of radar backscatter increases when a variation in the dynamic pressure occurs, both positive (increase of the pressure and negative (decrease of the pressure. We also investigate the behaviour of the Cross-Polar Cap Potential (CPCP during pressure variations and show preliminary results.

  3. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    an indirect cause of the observed Pc5 pulsations. During the same interval, two flux transfer events were also observed in the magnetosphere near the oscillating magnetopause. Their ground signatures were identified in the CANOPUS data. The time delays of the FTE signatures from the Polar spacecraft to the ground stations enable us to estimate that the longitudinal extent of the reconnection X-line at the magnetopause was ~43° or ~5.2 RE. The coordinated in-situ and ground-based observations suggest that FTEs are produced by transient reconnection taking place along a single extended X-line at the magnetopause, as suggested in the models by Scholer (1988 and Southwood et al. (1988. The observations from this study suggest that the reconnection occurred in two different forms simultaneously in the same general region at the dayside magnetopause: 1 continuous reconnection with a pulsed reconnection rate, and 2 transient reconnection as flux transfer events.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; MHD waves and instabilities

  4. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    indirect cause of the observed Pc5 pulsations. During the same interval, two flux transfer events were also observed in the magnetosphere near the oscillating magnetopause. Their ground signatures were identified in the CANOPUS data. The time delays of the FTE signatures from the Polar spacecraft to the ground stations enable us to estimate that the longitudinal extent of the reconnection X-line at the magnetopause was ~43° or ~5.2 RE. The coordinated in-situ and ground-based observations suggest that FTEs are produced by transient reconnection taking place along a single extended X-line at the magnetopause, as suggested in the models by Scholer (1988 and Southwood et al. (1988. The observations from this study suggest that the reconnection occurred in two different forms simultaneously in the same general region at the dayside magnetopause: 1 continuous reconnection with a pulsed reconnection rate, and 2 transient reconnection as flux transfer events. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; MHD waves and instabilities

  5. An unusual giant spiral arc in the polar cap region during the northward phase of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rosenqvist

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The shock arrival of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME at ~09:50 UT on 22 November 1997 resulted in the development of an intense (Dst<−100 nT geomagnetic storm at Earth. In the early, quiet phase of the storm, in the sheath region of the ICME, an unusual large spiral structure (diameter of ~1000 km was observed at very high latitudes by the Polar UVI instrument. The evolution of this structure started as a polewardly displaced auroral bulge which further developed into the spiral structure spreading across a large part of the polar cap. This study attempts to examine the cause of the chain of events that resulted in the giant auroral spiral. During this period the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF was dominantly northward (Bz>25 nT with a strong duskward component (By>15 nT resulting in a highly twisted tail plasma sheet. Geotail was located at the equatorial dawnside magnetotail flank and observed accelerated plasma flows exceeding the solar wind bulk velocity by almost 60%. These flows are observed on the magnetosheath side of the magnetopause and the acceleration mechanism is proposed to be typical for strongly northward IMF. Identified candidates to the cause of the spiral structure include a By induced twisted magnetotail configuration, the development of magnetopause surface waves due to the enhanced pressure related to the accelerated magnetosheath flows aswell as the formation of additional magnetopause deformations due to external solar wind pressure changes. The uniqeness of the event indicate that most probably a combination of the above effects resulted in a very extreme tail topology. However, the data coverage is insufficient to fully investigate the physical mechanism behind the observations.

  6. Polarization characteristics of standing wave electromagnetic fields at the ionospheric Alfvén resonator lower harmonics: altitude profiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prikner, Karel; Feygin, F. Z.; Raita, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2014), s. 338-341 ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : ionospheric Alfvén resonator * EMIC waves * EISCAT measurements Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.806, year: 2014

  7. Diurnal and seasonal occurrence of polar patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rodger

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the diurnal and seasonal variation of polar patches, as identified in two years of HF-radar data from Halley, Antarctica during a period near sunspot maximum, shows that there is a broad maximum in occurrence centred about magnetic noon, not local noon. There are minima in occurrence near midsummer and midwinter, with maxima in occurrence between equinox and winter. There are no significant correlations between the occurrence of polar patches and the corresponding hourly averages of the solar wind and IMF parameters, except that patches usually occur when the interplanetary magnetic field has a southward component. The results can be understood in terms of UT and seasonal differences in the plasma concentration being convected from the dayside ionosphere into the polar cap. In summer and winter the electron concentrations in the polar cap are high and low, respectively, but relatively unstructured. About equinox, a tongue of enhanced ionisation is convected into the polar cap; this tongue is then structured by the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field, but these Halley data cannot be used to separate the various competing mechanisms for patch formation. The observed diurnal and seasonal variation in the occurrence of polar patches are largely consistent with predictions of Sojka et al. (1994 when their results are translated into the southern hemisphere. However, the ionospheric effects of flux transfer events are still considered essential in their formation, a feature not yet included in the Sojka et al. model.

  8. Understanding Transient Forcing with Plasma Instability Model, Ionospheric Propagation Model and GNSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, K.; Zettergren, M. D.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fluctuations in the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals observed as amplitude and phase scintillations are produced by plasma density structures in the ionosphere. Phase scintillation events in particular occur due to structures at Fresnel scales, typically about 250 meters at ionospheric heights and GNSS frequency. Likely processes contributing to small-scale density structuring in auroral and polar regions include ionospheric gradient-drift instability (GDI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which result, generally, from magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions (e.g. reconnection) associated with cusp and auroral zone regions. Scintillation signals, ostensibly from either GDI or KHI, are frequently observed in the high latitude ionosphere and are potentially useful diagnostics of how energy from the transient forcing in the cusp or polar cap region cascades, via instabilities, to small scales. However, extracting quantitative details of instabilities leading to scintillation using GNSS data drastically benefits from both a model of the irregularities and a model of GNSS signal propagation through irregular media. This work uses a physics-based model of the generation of plasma density irregularities (GEMINI - Geospace Environment Model of Ion-Neutral Interactions) coupled to an ionospheric radio wave propagation model (SIGMA - Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere) to explore the cascade of density structures from medium to small (sub-kilometer) scales. Specifically, GEMINI-SIGMA is used to simulate expected scintillation from different instabilities during various stages of evolution to determine features of the scintillation that may be useful to studying ionospheric density structures. Furthermore we relate the instabilities producing GNSS scintillations to the transient space and time-dependent magnetospheric phenomena and further predict characteristics of scintillation in different geophysical

  9. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth: Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, M.P.; Farrugia, C.J.; Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P.; Hairston, M.R.; Greenspan, M.E.; Ruohoniemi, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second of three papers which study a large interplanetary magnetic cloud, and its interaction with the earth's magnetosphere. Here the authors study flows within the ionosphere during the passage of the magnetic cloud on Jan 13-15, 1988. This is the first study of ionospheric convections during prolonged periods of stable and different IMF orientations, which result from the stable, but spatially varying field structure within the magnetic cloud. Data from IMP-8 and DMSP-F8 are analyzed for this work. This observation gave information on ionospheric responses to greater than 10 hour period of northward and southward IMF, with a gradual change from one to the other. Issues studied included strengths of peak flows for north and south IMF; changes in cross polar cap potential with IMF B z ; types and variations of convective patterns vs IMF; variations in size of the polar cap; etc

  10. The Influence of Magnetosheath Beta and Ionospheric Conductivity in the Structure of the Lobes Near Solstice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, F. D.; Eriksson, S.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The saturation of the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP) is an unexplained phenomenon in magnetosphere-ionosphere system science. In the present study, we expand upon the Alfvén Wing model of CPCP saturation by investigating its impact on the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system, particularly the cusp-mantle dynamo associated with lobe field lines. In this expansion of the Alfven wing model, the ability of open flux tubes to deform in response to the fluid stress from the magnetosheath is governed by the magnetosheath plasma beta, which in turn reduces the Maxwell stress imposed on the ionospheric plasma to accelerate it against ion-neutral collisional drag. We perform 32 simulations using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model with varying solar wind density and IMF strength, as well as a dipole tilt of 25 degrees to investigate the relative importance of both magnetosheath plasma beta and ionospheric conductivity in the formation of Alfvén wing-like structures and the saturation of the CPCP. We find that the plasma beta in the magnetosheath is different in each hemisphere and dependent on the stagnation point location. We also show that the lobes become more bent in the summer hemisphere with higher ionospheric conductivity. We find that higher ionospheric conductivity also makes the summer hemisphere lobes more sensitive to changes in the magnetosheath beta.

  11. Characterizing GPS radio occultation loss of lock due to ionospheric weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Pedatella, Nicholas M.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Transient loss of lock is one of the key space weather effects on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations during 2007-2011, we have analyzed the signal cycle slip (CS) occurrence comprehensively and its correlation to the ionospheric weather phenomena such as sporadic E (Es), equatorial F region irregularity (EFI), and the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The high vertical resolution of RO observations enables us to distinguish the CS resulting from different ionospheric layers clearly on a global scale. In the E layer, the CS is dominated by the Es occurrence, while in the F layer, the CS is mainly related to the EIA and EFI at low and equatorial latitudes. In the polar region, the CS is primarily related to polar cap electron density gradients. The overall average CS (>6 cycles) occurrence is ~23% per occultation, with the E (50-150 km) and F (150-600 km) layers contributing ~8.3% and ~14.7%, respectively. Awareness of the effect of the ionospheric weather on the CS of the low Earth orbit (LEO)-based GNSS signal could be beneficial to a variety of applications, including the LEO-based GNSS data processing and the corresponding hardware/firmware design.

  12. Statistics of Joule heating in the auroral zone and polar cap using Astrid-2 satellite Poynting flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We make a statistical study of ionospheric Joule heating with the Poynting flux method using six months of Astrid-2/EMMA electric and magnetic field data during 1999 (solar maximum year. For the background magnetic field we use the IGRF model. Our results are in agreement with earlier statistical satellite studies using both the ΣPE2 method and the Poynting flux method. We present a rather comprehensive set of fitted Joule heating formulas expressing the Joule heating in given magnetic local time (MLT and invariant latitude (ILAT range under given solar illumination conditions as a function of the Kp index, the AE index, the Akasofu epsilon parameter and the solar wind kinetic energy flux. The study thus provides improved and more detailed estimates of the statistical Joule heating. Such estimates are necessary building blocks for future quantitative studies of the power budget in the magnetosphere and in the nightside auroral region. Key words. Ionosphere (electric fields and currents; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions – Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  13. The Ionospheric-Thermospheric Component of the LWS-Geospace Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    The Geospace Mission Definition Team report made a persuasive case for investigating the ionosphere-thermosphere system with both LEO in situ instruments and GEO ionospheric imaging. The GMDT science objectives were derived from the Living With a Star Science Architecture Team's consideration of space weather effects that concern society. The two highest priority ionospheric objectives are "Determine the effects of the long and short term variability of the Sun on the global-scale behavior of the ionospheric electron density" and "Determine the solar and geospace causes of small scale density irregularities in the 100-1000 km altitude range". These general objectives were then focused on specific science questions such as "How does the ionosphere-thermosphere system vary in response to changing fluxes of solar extreme ultraviolet radiation?", How does the mid- and low-latitude ionosphere-thermosphere system respond to geomagnetic storms?", and "What are the sources and characteristics of ionospheric irregularities at mid-latitudes?". Since the submission of the GMDT report to NASA, the case for investigating the disturbed mid-latitude ionosphere has become even more compelling. Society has become more vulnerable to ionospheric storms through augmented GPS systems for aviation. The ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms has been shown to extend from the equator through mid-latitudes and across the polar caps and from the F region to the equatorial plane. The total electron content from the peak of the positive-phase to the minima of the negative phase varies by up to one order of magnitude. Simulations have demonstrated that thermospheric transport can carry disturbed O/N2 ratios from the auroral zone to the equator. Density irregularities have been discovered with scale lengths of 100 km to the GPS signal Fresnel length (~ 400m). The GMDT developed a strategy to characterize and understand these phenomena. At low altitudes, within the thermosphere, two

  14. A model of the plasma flow and current in Saturn's polar ionosphere under conditions of strong Dungey cycle driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Jackman

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple model of the flow and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere. This model is motivated by theoretical reasoning, and guided quantitatively by in situ field and flow data from space missions, ground-based IR Doppler measurements, and Hubble Space Telescope images. The flow pattern consists of components which represent (1 plasma sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere region resulting from plasma pick-up and radial transport from internal sources; (2 the Vasyliunas-cycle of internal plasma mass-loss down the magnetospheric tail at higher latitudes; and (3 the polar Dungey-cycle flow driven by the solar wind interaction. Upstream measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF indicate the occurrence of both extended low-field rarefaction intervals with essentially negligible Dungey-cycle flow, and few-day high-field compression regions in which the Dungey-cycle voltage peaks at a few hundred kV. Here we model the latter conditions when the Dungey-cycle is active, advancing on previous axi-symmetric models which may be more directly applicable to quiet conditions. For theoretical convenience the overall flow pattern is constructed by adding together two components - a purely rotational flow similar to previous axi-symmetric models, and a sun-aligned twin vortex representing the dawn-dusk asymmetry effects associated with the Vasyliunas-and Dungey-cycle flows. We calculate the horizontal ionospheric current associated with the flow and the field-aligned current from its divergence. These calculations show that a sheet of upward-directed field-aligned current flows at the boundary of open field lines which is strongly modulated in local-time by the Dungey-cycle flows. We then consider implications of the field-aligned current for magnetospheric electron acceleration and aurorae using two plasma source populations (hot outer magnetospheric electrons and cool dense magnetosheath electrons. Both sources display a

  15. VISIONS: Remote Observations of a Spatially-Structured Filamentary Source of Energetic Neutral Atoms near the Polar Cap Boundary During an Auroral Substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, D.; Clemmons, J.; Keller, J. W.; Klenzing, J.; Kujawski, J.; McLain, J.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Zettergren, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report initial results from the VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm (VISIONS) rocket that flew through and near several regions of enhanced auroral activity and also sensed regions of ion outflow both remotely and directly. The observed neutral atom fluxes were largest at the lower energies and generally higher in the auroral zone than in the polar cap. In this paper, we focus on data from the latter half of the VISIONS trajectory when the rocket traversed the polar cap region. During this period, many of the energetic neutral atom spectra show a peak at 100 electronvolts. Spectra with peaks around 100 electronvolts are also observed in the Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) data consistent with these ions comprising the source population for the energetic neutral atoms. The EIA observations of this low energy population extend only over a few tens of kilometers. Furthermore, the directionality of the arriving energetic neutral atoms is consistent with either this spatially localized source of energetic ions extending from as low as about 300 kilometers up to above 600 kilometers or a larger source of energetic ions to the southwest.

  16. Polar cap mesosphere wind observations: comparisons of simultaneous measurements with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a field-widened Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G M; Killeen, T L; Wu, Q; Reeves, J M; Hays, P B; Gault, W A; Brown, S; Shepherd, G G

    2000-08-20

    Polar cap mesospheric winds observed with a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a circle-to-line interferometer optical (FPI/CLIO) system have been compared with measurements from a field-widened Michelson interferometer optimized for E-region winds (ERWIN). Both instruments observed the Meinel OH emission emanating from the mesopause region (approximately 86 km) at Resolute Bay, Canada (74.9 degrees N, 94.9 degrees W). This is the first time, to our knowledge, that winds measured simultaneously from a ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer and a ground-based Michelson interferometer have been compared at the same location. The FPI/CLIO and ERWIN instruments both have a capability for high temporal resolution (less than 10 min for a full scan in the four cardinal directions and the zenith). Statistical comparisons of hourly mean winds for both instruments by scatterplots show excellent agreement, indicating that the two optical techniques provide equivalent observations of mesopause winds. Small deviations in the measured wind can be ascribed to the different zenith angles used by the two instruments. The combined measurements illustrate the dominance of the 12-h wave in the mesopause winds at Resolute Bay, with additional evidence for strong gravity wave activity with much shorter periods (tens of minutes). Future operations of the two instruments will focus on observation of complementary emissions, providing a unique passive optical capability for the determination of neutral winds in the geomagnetic polar cap at various altitudes near the mesopause.

  17. Positive and negative ionospheric storms occurring during the 15 May 2005 geomagnetic superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-09-01

    This study focuses on the 15 May 2005 geomagnetic superstorm and aims to investigate the global variation of positive and negative storm phases and their development. Observations are provided by a series of global total electron content maps and multi-instrument line plots. Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe) simulations are also employed. Results reveal some sunward streaming plumes of storm-enhanced density (SED) over Asia and a well-developed midlatitude trough over North America forming isolated positive and negative storms, respectively. The simultaneous development of positive and negative storms over North America is also shown. Then, some enhanced auroral ionizations maintained by strong equatorward neutral winds appeared in the depleted nighttime ionosphere. Meanwhile, the northern nighttime polar region became significantly depleted as the SED plume plasma could not progress further than the dayside cusp. Oppositely, a polar tongue of ionization (TOI) developed in the daytime southern polar region. According to CTIP simulations, solar heating locally maximized (minimized) over the southern (northern) magnetic pole. Furthermore, strong upward surges of molecular-rich air created O/N2 decreases both in the auroral zone and in the trough region, while some SED-related downward surges produced O/N2 increases. From these results we conclude for the time period studied that (1) composition changes contributed to the formation of positive and negative storms, (2) strengthening polar convection and increasing solar heating of the polar cap supported polar TOI development, and (3) a weaker polar convection and minimized solar heating of the polar cap aided the depletion of polar plasma.

  18. High resolution spectroscopy of the Martian atmosphere - Study of seasonal variations of CO, O3, H2O, and T on the north polar cap and a search for SO2, H2O2, and H2CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Chakrabarti, S.; Larson, H.; Sandel, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of an observational campaign which will measure (1) the seasonal variations of the CO mixing ratio on the Martian polar cap due to accumulation and depletion of CO during the condensation and evaporation of CO2, as well as (2) the early spring ozone and water vapor of the Martian north polar cap, and (3) the presence of H2CO, H2O2, and SO2. The lines of these compounds will be measured by a combined 4-m telescope and Fourier-transform spectrometer 27097.

  19. Planck intermediate results: XLIV. Structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I R; Arzoumanian, D.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the Planck satellite, we study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitudes around the south pole (b < −60°). Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a modelling framework of the...... is an important step towards a model that can be used to assess the accuracy of component-separation methods in present and future CMB experiments designed to search the B mode CMB polarization from primordial gravity waves....

  20. Effects of electrojet turbulence on a magnetosphere-ionosphere simulation of a geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltberger, M.; Merkin, V.; Zhang, B.; Toffoletto, F.; Oppenheim, M.; Wang, W.; Lyon, J. G.; Liu, J.; Dimant, Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Stephens, G. K.

    2017-05-01

    Ionospheric conductance plays an important role in regulating the response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to solar wind driving. Typically, models of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling include changes to ionospheric conductance driven by extreme ultraviolet ionization and electron precipitation. This paper shows that effects driven by the Farley-Buneman instability can also create significant enhancements in the ionospheric conductance, with substantial impacts on geospace. We have implemented a method of including electrojet turbulence (ET) effects into the ionospheric conductance model utilized within geospace simulations. Our particular implementation is tested with simulations of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere model coupled with the Rice Convection Model of the inner magnetosphere. We examine the impact of including ET-modified conductances in a case study of the geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2013. Simulations with ET show a 13% reduction in the cross polar cap potential at the beginning of the storm and up to 20% increases in the Pedersen and Hall conductance. These simulation results show better agreement with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program observations, including capturing features of subauroral polarization streams. The field-aligned current (FAC) patterns show little differences during the peak of storm and agree well with Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) reconstructions. Typically, the simulated FAC densities are stronger and at slightly higher latitudes than shown by AMPERE. The inner magnetospheric pressures derived from Tsyganenko-Sitnov empirical magnetic field model show that the inclusion of the ET effects increases the peak pressure and brings the results into better agreement with the empirical model.

  1. Extreme ion heating in the dayside ionosphere in response to the arrival of a coronal mass ejection on 12 March 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of the polar ionosphere with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT ultra high frequency (UHF radar at Tromsø and the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR at Longyearbyen were made during 07:00–12:00 UT on 12 March 2012. During the period, the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE spacecraft observed changes in the solar wind which were due to the arrival of coronal mass ejection (CME effects associated with the 10 March M8.4 X-ray event. The solar wind showed two-step variations which caused strong ionospheric heating. First, the arrival of shock structures in the solar wind with enhancements of density and velocity, and a negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF-Bz component caused strong ionospheric heating around Longyearbyen; the ion temperature at about 300 km increased from about 1100 to 3400 K over Longyearbyen while that over Tromsø increased from about 1050 to 1200 K. After the passage of the shock structures, the IMF-Bz component showed positive values and the solar wind speed and density also decreased. The second strong ionospheric heating occurred after the IMF-Bz component showed negative values again; the negative values lasted for more than 1.5 h. This solar wind variation caused stronger heating of the ionosphere in the lower latitudes than higher latitudes, suggesting expansion of the auroral oval/heating region to the lower latitude region. This study shows an example of the CME-induced dayside ionospheric heating: a short-duration and very large rise in the ion temperature which was closely related to the polar cap size and polar cap potential variations as a result of interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere.

  2. Effects of polar field-aligned currents on the distribution of the electric field and current in the middle and low latitudes ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Koichiro

    1978-01-01

    According to the analysis of the magnetic records from the Triad satellite, it has been found that there are two regions of the field-aligned current of magnetospheric origin along the auroral oval; Region 1 in higher latitude and Region 2 in lower latitude. These currents seem to have important effect on the distribution of electric field and current in the ionosphere, in addition to the Sq electric field and current of ionospheric origin. The global current systems generated by the field-aligned current were calculated, using some simplified ionospheric models. The effect of the field-aligned current on the distribution of electric field and current of the ionosphere at middle and low latitudes was investigated. (Yoshimori, M.)

  3. Spatial structure of summertime ionospheric plasma near magnetic noon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Sims

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a multi-instrument study of the spatial distribution of the summertime, polar ionospheric electron density under conditions of relatively stable IMF Bz<0. The EISCAT Svalbard radar revealed a region of enhanced densities near magnetic noon that, when comparing radar scans from different local times, appeared to be spatially confined in longitude. This was identified as the tongue-of-ionisation (TOI that comprised photoionisation of sub-auroral origin that is drawn poleward into the polar cap by the anti-sunward flow of the high-latitude convection. The TOI was bounded in longitude by high-latitude troughs; the pre-noon trough on the morning side with a minimum near 78° N and the post-noon trough on the afternoon side with a minimum at 80° N. Complementary measurements by radio tomography, the SuperDARN radars, and a DMSP satellite, together with comparisons with earlier modelling work, provided supporting evidence for the interpretation of the density structuring, and highlighted the role of plasma convection in the formation of summertime plasma distribution. Soft particle precipitation played only a secondary role in the modulation of the large summertime densities entering the polar cap.

  4. Spatial structure of summertime ionospheric plasma near magnetic noon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Sims

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a multi-instrument study of the spatial distribution of the summertime, polar ionospheric electron density under conditions of relatively stable IMF Bz<0. The EISCAT Svalbard radar revealed a region of enhanced densities near magnetic noon that, when comparing radar scans from different local times, appeared to be spatially confined in longitude. This was identified as the tongue-of-ionisation (TOI that comprised photoionisation of sub-auroral origin that is drawn poleward into the polar cap by the anti-sunward flow of the high-latitude convection. The TOI was bounded in longitude by high-latitude troughs; the pre-noon trough on the morning side with a minimum near 78° N and the post-noon trough on the afternoon side with a minimum at 80° N. Complementary measurements by radio tomography, the SuperDARN radars, and a DMSP satellite, together with comparisons with earlier modelling work, provided supporting evidence for the interpretation of the density structuring, and highlighted the role of plasma convection in the formation of summertime plasma distribution. Soft particle precipitation played only a secondary role in the modulation of the large summertime densities entering the polar cap.

  5. Multi-Instrument Observations of Physical Processes in the Arctic Ionosphere and Derived Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durgonics, Tibor

    these errors. Specifically, ionospheric electron density and scintillation forecasting would significantly improve reliability of navigation and positioning systems. This Ph.D. thesis is primarily concerned with the physical processes in the terrestrial Arctic upper atmosphere. Additionally to this, two...... roughness, surface wind speed, and direction. (4) 4-year long regional electron density observations from Thule, Greenland revealed a series of findings: strong correlation with solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance that is related to solar rotation and sunspot numbers, increased electron...... density variability during equinoxes that is related to the Russell-McPherron effect, and a strong influence of ambipolar diffusion as a function of ionospheric E layer conductivity. (5) The polar cap index rate of change showed significant differences during ICME and HSS-induced storms. This indicates...

  6. Ionospheric convection during the magnetic storm of 20-21 March 1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the response of high-latitude ionospheric convection during the magnetic storm of March 20-21 1990. IMP-8 measurements of solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, ionospheric convection flow measurements from the Wick and Goose Bay coherent radars, EISCAT, Millstone Hill and Sondrestrom incoherent radars and three digisondes at Millstone Hill, Goose Bay and Qaanaaq are presented. Two intervals of particular interest have been identified. The first starts with a storm sudden commencement at 2243 UT on March 20 and includes the ionospheric activity in the following 7 h. The response time of the ionospheric convection to the southward turning of the IMF in the dusk to midnight local times is found to be approximately half that measured in a similar study at comparable local times during more normal solar wind conditions. Furthermore, this response time is the same as those previously measured on the dayside. An investigation of the expansion of the polar cap during a substorm growth phase based on Faraday's law suggests that the expansion of the polar cap was nonuniform. A subsequent reconfiguration of the nightside convection pattern was also observed, although it was not possible to distinguish between effects due to possible changes in By and effects due to substorm activity. The second interval, 1200-2100 UT 21 March 1990, included a southward turning of the IMF which resulted in the Bz component becoming -10 nT. The response time on the dayside to this change in the IMF at the magnetopause was approximately 15 min to 30 min which is a factor of ~2 greater than those previously measured at higher latitudes. A movement of the nightside flow reversal, possibly driven by current systems associated with the substorm expansion phases, was observed, implying that the nightside convection pattern can be dominated by substorm activity.

  7. Solar zenith angle dependence of plasma density and temperature in the polar cap ionosphere and low-altitude magnetosphere during geomagnetically quiet periods at solar maximum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kitamura, N.; Ogawa, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Terada, N.; Ono, T.; Shinbori, A.; Kumamoto, A.; Truhlík, Vladimír; Šmilauer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2011), A08227/1-A08227/13 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/2086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : MASS-SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS * ELECTRON-TEMPERATURE * HIGH-LATITUDE * ION OUTFLOWS * F-REGION Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011JA016631.shtml

  8. Assessment of ionospheric Joule heating by GUMICS-4 MHD simulation, AMIE, and satellite-based statistics: towards a synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palmroth

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the Northern Hemisphere Joule heating from several observational and computational sources with the purpose of calibrating a previously identified functional dependence between solar wind parameters and ionospheric total energy consumption computed from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulation (Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling Simulation, GUMICS-4. In this paper, the calibration focuses on determining the amount and temporal characteristics of Northern Hemisphere Joule heating. Joule heating during a substorm is estimated from global observations, including electric fields provided by Super Dual Auroral Network (SuperDARN and Pedersen conductances given by the ultraviolet (UV and X-ray imagers on board the Polar satellite. Furthermore, Joule heating is assessed from several activity index proxies, large statistical surveys, assimilative data methods (AMIE, and the global MHD simulation GUMICS-4. We show that the temporal and spatial variation of the Joule heating computed from the GUMICS-4 simulation is consistent with observational and statistical methods. However, the different observational methods do not give a consistent estimate for the magnitude of the global Joule heating. We suggest that multiplying the GUMICS-4 total Joule heating by a factor of 10 approximates the observed Joule heating reasonably well. The lesser amount of Joule heating in GUMICS-4 is essentially caused by weaker Region 2 currents and polar cap potentials. We also show by theoretical arguments that multiplying independent measurements of averaged electric fields and Pedersen conductances yields an overestimation of Joule heating.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Modeling and forecasting; Electric fields and currents

  9. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km.

    The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  10. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km. The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  11. Large plasma density enhancements occurring in the northern polar region during the 6 April 2000 superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2014-06-01

    We focus on the ionospheric response of northern high-latitude region to the 6 April 2000 superstorm and aim to investigate how the storm-enhanced density (SED) plume plasma became distributed in the regions of auroral zone and polar cap plus to study the resultant ionospheric features and their development. Multi-instrument observational results combined with model-generated, two-cell convection maps permitted identifying the high-density plasma's origin and the underlying plasma transportation processes. Results show the plasma density feature of polar cap enhancement (PCE; 600 × 103 i+/cm3) appearing for 7 h during the main phase and characterized by increases reaching up to 6 times of the quiet time values. Meanwhile, strong westward convections ( 17,500 m/s) created low plasma densities in a wider region of the dusk cell. Oppositely, small ( 750 m/s) but rigorous westward drifts drove the SED plume plasma through the auroral zone, wherein plasma densities doubled. As the SED plume plasma traveled along the convection streamlines and entered the polar cap, a continuous enhancement of the tongue of ionization (TOI) developed under steady convection conditions. However, convection changes caused slow convections and flow stagnations and thus segmented the TOI feature by locally depleting the plasma in the affected regions of the auroral zone and polar cap. From the strong correspondence of polar cap potential drop and subauroral polarization stream (SAPS), we conclude that the SAPS E-field strength remained strong, and under its prolonged influence, the SED plume provided a continuous supply of downward flowing high-density plasma for the development and maintenance of PCEs.

  12. The electric wind of Venus: A global and persistent "polar wind"-like ambipolar electric field sufficient for the direct escape of heavy ionospheric ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Fedorov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; Khazanov, George; Nordheim, Tom A.; Mitchell, David; Moore, Thomas E.; Peterson, William K.; Winningham, John D.; Zhang, Tielong L.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an "ambipolar" electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earth's similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an "electric wind" must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  13. The Electric Wind of Venus: A global and persistent "polar wind" like ambipolar electric field sufficient for the direct escape of heavy ionospheric ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G.; Frahm, R.; Glocer, A.; Coates, A. J.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Barbash, S.; Fedorov, A.; Futaana, Y.; Gilbert, L.; Khazanov, G. V.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Nordheim, T.; Mitchell, D. L.; Moore, T. E.; Peterson, W.; Winningham, D.; Zhang, T.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an "ambipolar" electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earth's similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres, and such an "electric wind" must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system

  14. The Electric Wind of Venus: A Global and Persistent Polar Wind -Like Ambipolar Electric Field Sufficient for the Direct Escape of Heavy Ionospheric Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Federov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an ambipolar electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earths similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an electric wind must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  15. First detection of global dawn-dusk ionospheric current intensities using Ampere's integral law on Orsted orbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauning, P.; Primdahl, Fritz

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic measurements by the Orsted satellite in noon-midnight orbits have enabled the derivation of the global dawn-dusk oriented ionospheric currents from an Ampere's law closed loop line integral of the geomagnetic vector field along the satellite track. The globally integrated dawn......-to-dusk ionospheric current is found to be proportional to the gee-effective solar wind electric field and is around 1 million ampere for a typical solar wind electric field of 2 mV/m. Dividing the Ampere integral into semi-orbit parts has enabled us to show that the hemispherical total current intensities depend...... on the respective polar cap conductivities, which relate to the daily and seasonally varying solar illumination. The more illuminated hemisphere conveys up to three times more current from dawn to dusk than does the less illuminated....

  16. The Effect of an Offset Polar Cap Dipolar Magnetic Field on the Modeling of the Vela Pulsar’s γ-Ray Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, M.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    We performed geometric pulsar light curve modeling using static, retarded vacuum, and offset polar cap (PC) dipole B-fields (the latter is characterized by a parameter ɛ), in conjunction with standard two-pole caustic (TPC) and outer gap (OG) emission geometries. The offset-PC dipole B-field mimics deviations from the static dipole (which corresponds to ɛ =0). In addition to constant-emissivity geometric models, we also considered a slot gap (SG) E-field associated with the offset-PC dipole B-field and found that its inclusion leads to qualitatively different light curves. Solving the particle transport equation shows that the particle energy only becomes large enough to yield significant curvature radiation at large altitudes above the stellar surface, given this relatively low E-field. Therefore, particles do not always attain the radiation-reaction limit. Our overall optimal light curve fit is for the retarded vacuum dipole field and OG model, at an inclination angle α ={78}-1+{1^\\circ } and observer angle \\zeta ={69}-1+{2^\\circ }. For this B-field, the TPC model is statistically disfavored compared to the OG model. For the static dipole field, neither model is significantly preferred. We found that smaller values of ɛ are favored for the offset-PC dipole field when assuming constant emissivity, and larger ɛ values favored for variable emissivity, but not significantly so. When multiplying the SG E-field by a factor of 100, we found improved light curve fits, with α and ζ being closer to best fits from independent studies, as well as curvature radiation reaction at lower altitudes.

  17. The Effect of an Offset Polar Cap Dipolar Magnetic Field on the Modeling of the Vela Pulsar's Gamma-Ray Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, M.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    We performed geometric pulsar light curve modeling using static, retarded vacuum, and offset polar cap (PC) dipole B-fields (the latter is characterized by a parameter epsilon), in conjunction with standard two-pole caustic (TPC) and outer gap (OG) emission geometries. The offset-PC dipole B-field mimics deviations from the static dipole (which corresponds to epsilon equals 0). In addition to constant-emissivity geometric models, we also considered a slot gap (SG) E-field associated with the offset-PC dipole B-field and found that its inclusion leads to qualitatively different light curves. Solving the particle transport equation shows that the particle energy only becomes large enough to yield significant curvature radiation at large altitudes above the stellar surface, given this relatively low E-field. Therefore, particles do not always attain the radiation-reaction limit. Our overall optimal light curve fit is for the retarded vacuum dipole field and OG model, at an inclination angle alpha equals 78 plus or minus 1 degree and observer angle zeta equals 69 plus 2 degrees or minus 1 degree. For this B-field, the TPC model is statistically disfavored compared to the OG model. For the static dipole field, neither model is significantly preferred. We found that smaller values of epsilon are favored for the offset-PC dipole field when assuming constant emissivity, and larger epsilon values favored for variable emissivity, but not significantly so. When multiplying the SG E-field by a factor of 100, we found improved light curve fits, with alpha and zeta being closer to best fits from independent studies, as well as curvature radiation reaction at lower altitudes.

  18. Effects of energetic electrons on the electrodynamics in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aksnes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available From the observations by the PIXIE and UVI cameras on board the Polar satellite, we derive global maps of the precipitating electron energy spectra from less than 1keV to 100keV. Based on the electron spectra, we generate instantaneous global maps of Hall and Pedersen conductances. The UVI camera provides good coverage of the lower electron energies contributing most to the Pedersen conductance, while PIXIE captures the high energy component of the precipitating electrons affecting the Hall conductance. By characterizing the energetic electrons from some tens of keV and up to about 100keV using PIXIE X-ray measurements, we will, in most cases, calculate a larger electron flux at higher energies than estimated from a simple extrapolation of derived electron spectra from UVI alone. Instantaneous global conductance maps derived with and without inclusion of PIXIE data have been implemented in the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE procedure, to study the effects of energetic electrons on electrodynamical parameters in the ionosphere. We find that the improved electron spectral characterization using PIXIE data most often results in a larger Hall conductance and a smaller inferred electric field. In some localized regions the increase in the Hall conductance can exceed 100%. On the contrary, the Pedersen conductance remains more or less unaffected by the inclusion of the PIXIE data. The calculated polar cap potential drop may decrease more than 10%, resulting in a reduction of the estimated Joule heating integrated over the Northern Hemisphere by up to 20%. Locally, Joule heating may decrease more than 50% in some regions. We also find that the calculated energy flux by precipitating electrons increases around 5% when including the PIXIE data. Combined with the reduction of Joule heating, this results in a decrease in the ratio between Joule heating and energy flux, sometimes exceeding 25%. An investigation of the relationship

  19. Seasonal effects in the ionosphere-thermosphere response to the precipitation and field-aligned current variations in the cusp region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal effects in the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to the precipitating electron flux and field-aligned current variations, of the order of an hour in duration, in the summer and winter cusp regions have been investigated using the global numerical model of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Two variants of the calculations have been performed both for the IMF By < 0. In the first variant, the model input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken as geomagnetically symmetric and equal to those used earlier in the calculations for the equinoctial conditions. It has been found that both ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances are more intensive in the winter cusp region due to the lower conductivity of the winter polar cap ionosphere and correspondingly larger electric field variations leading to the larger Joule heating effects in the ion and neutral gas temperature, ion drag effects in the thermospheric winds and ion drift effects in the F2-region electron concentration. In the second variant, the calculations have been performed for the events of 28–29 January, 1992 when precipitations were weaker but the magnetospheric convection was stronger than in the first variant. Geomagnetically asymmetric input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken from the patterns derived by combining data obtained from the satellite, radar and ground magnetometer observations for these events. Calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection and thermospheric circulation have been compared with observations and it has been established that calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection for both winter and summer hemispheres are in a good agreement with the observations. Calculated patterns of the thermospheric circulation are in a good agreement with the average circulation for the Southern (summer Hemisphere obtained from DE-2 data for IMF

  20. Correcting ionospheric Faraday rotation for ASKAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Gaensler, Bryan; Landecker, Tom L.; Willis, Tony

    2012-10-01

    Next-generation polarisation surveys, such as the POSSUM survey on ASKAP, aim to measure weak, statistical, cosmological effects associated with weak magnetic fields, and so will require unprecedented accuracy and stability for measuring polarisation vectors and their Faraday rotation measures (RMs). Ionospheric Faraday rotation (IFR) corrupts polarization observations and cannot be ignored at mid to low frequencies. In aperture-synthesis polarimetry IFR rotates individual visibilities and leads to a loss of coherence and accuracy of polarization angle determination. Through the POSSUM survey science team we have been involved in developing detailed ionospheric prediction software (POSSUM memos #10a,b) that will be used to correct the observed visibilities on ASKAP before imaging to obtain sufficiently accurate polarization and RM data. To provide a stringent test of this software, we propose a continuous 24 hr observing block using the 1.1-3.1 GHz band to monitor the variations caused by the time-variable ionosphere in the polarization angle and RM of a strongly polarized calibrator source, PKS B1903-802. We request a total of 96 hrs (4 x 24 hrs) to monitor the changes in the ionosphere every 3 to 6 months until BETA/ASKAP-12 is taking reliable polarization data.

  1. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateev Lachezar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the study during COST Action ES0803 of effects due to cosmic rays (CR and solar energetic particles (SEP in the ionosphere and atmosphere is presented. Models CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Ionosphere and Atmosphere and application of CORSIKA (COsmic Ray SImulations for KAscade code are considered. They are capable to compute the cosmic ray ionization profiles at a given location, time, solar and geomagnetic activity. Intercomparison of the models, as well as comparison with direct measurements of the atmospheric ionization, validates their applicability for the entire atmosphere and for the different levels of the solar activity. The effects of CR and SEP can be very strong locally in the polar cap regions, affecting the physical-chemical and electrical properties of the ionosphere and atmosphere. Contributions here were also made by the anomalous CR, whose ionization is significant at high geomagnetic latitudes (above 65°–70°. Several recent achievements and application of CR ionization models are briefly presented. This work is the output from the SG 1.1 of the COST ES0803 action (2008–2012 and the emphasis is given on the progress achieved by European scientists involved in this collaboration.

  2. A statistical approach for identifying the ionospheric footprint of magnetospheric boundaries from SuperDARN observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lointier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and tracking the projection of magnetospheric regions on the high-latitude ionosphere is of primary importance for studying the Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system and for space weather applications. By its unique spatial coverage and temporal resolution, the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provides key parameters, such as the Doppler spectral width, which allows the monitoring of the ionospheric footprint of some magnetospheric boundaries in near real-time. In this study, we present the first results of a statistical approach for monitoring these magnetospheric boundaries. The singular value decomposition is used as a data reduction tool to describe the backscattered echoes with a small set of parameters. One of these is strongly correlated with the Doppler spectral width, and can thus be used as a proxy for it. Based on this, we propose a Bayesian classifier for identifying the spectral width boundary, which is classically associated with the Polar Cap boundary. The results are in good agreement with previous studies. Two advantages of the method are: the possibility to apply it in near real-time, and its capacity to select the appropriate threshold level for the boundary detection.

  3. Cervical Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... p020041. Accessed Nov. 11, 2014. Cervical cap About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  4. Cervical Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things That Help Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes ... Because the cap has to be placed properly, women who use one should be comfortable feeling for ...

  5. Cervical Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weeks after delivery Can be inserted hours before sex and remain in place for up to 48 hours Doesn't require a partner's cooperation Poses few if any side effects The cervical cap isn't appropriate for everyone, ...

  6. The Quiet Time Ionospheric Source of Ring Current Plasmas in Boundary Related Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W.; Andersson, L.; Collin, H.; Scudder, J.

    2007-05-01

    Almost all of the ring current plasma comes from the plasma sheet, which is in turn supplied by the ionosphere and solar wind. We know that O+ ions from the ionosphere are present in all regions of the magnetosphere at low levels even during geomagnetically quiet intervals. We also know heavy ionospheric ions such as O+ play a role in the evolution of geomagnetic storms, but we are not sure exactly what that role is. Large-scale modeling efforts constrained by observations provide the fastest path forward to increasing our understanding. One of the obstacles to effectively using the extensive information about ion outflow to constrain large-scale magnetospheric models has been the lack of information about the distribution of the ion outflow in relation to large-scale magnetospheric features such as the auroral oval. We have used data from the Polar satellite to determine the average number and energy fluxes of escaping energetic (15 eV < E/q < 33 keV) H+ and O+ ions in boundary related coordinates during geomagnetically quiet times (Dst < -50). The characteristic energy of escaping ions is determined from the ratio of energy and number fluxes. During quiet times, we found that the characteristic energies in the dayside and nightside auroral regions were moderately uniform. Characteristic O+ energies in the dayside and night side auroral zones are 120 and 700 eV respectively. For H+ the energies are 280 eV and 1.2 keV respectively. We found the most energetic and variable characteristic energies in the polar cap region. Comparison with other observations, including those of thermal O+ from Akebono show that the escaping energetic fluxes in the polar cap are a small fraction (2-3%) of those escaping from the auroral zone. If energization processes acting on auroral field lines above our 1 RE observational altitude are important only during geomagnetic storm intervals, the data presented here almost completely characterize the magnetosphere's ionospheric plasma

  7. Ionospheric Digital Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ionosphere is that part of the Earth's atmosphere that results mainly from the photo ionization of the upper atmosphere. Traditionally, the following ionospheric...

  8. The evolution of the englacial temperature distribution in the superimposed ice zone of a polar ice cap during a summer season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuell, W.; Oerlemans, J.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to provide more insight into the processes affecting the evolution of the englacial temperature distribution at a non-temperate location on a glacier. Measurements were made in the top 10 m of the ice at the summit of Laika Ice Cap (Canadian Arctic)

  9. Comparing Penetration Electric Fields Using the Tsyganenko R1 and R2 Models and the Hill-Siscoe Polar Cap Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Paul; Jasperse, John

    Tsyganenko and co-workers have developed empirical models (labeled here as TR1, TR2) for the Region-1 (R1) and Region-2 (R2) currents. These models offer the advantage of being analyti-cally simple and solar-wind driven as well as giving the parallel current distributions in latitude and longitude . A study will be performed that uses the TR1 and TR2 models as inputs into our SWAGE (Solar Wind Acting on the Geophysical Environment) model that determines the global ionospheric electric field. Comparisons will be made between the Tsyganenko approach and that derived from the Hill-Siscoe model for the same solar wind parameters. Both current models will be used as inputs into a global ionospheric potential solver for the current continu-ity equation with the resulting equatorial penetration electric fields being compared with those measured via the vertical drift at Jicamarca, Peru. It is anticipated that such an approach will lead to an improved, solar-wind dependent , empirical model for R1 and, possibly, for R2 that will useful as near-term forecast tool.

  10. Relationships between the Birkeland currents, ionospheric currents, and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleuler, E.; Li, C.H.; Nisbet, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations are made of the currents and electric fields in the ionosphere by using a global model of the electron densities including conjugate coupling along field lines. Incoherent scatter and rocket measurements of high-latitude electron densities have been used to derive realistic variations of the polar conductivities as a function of magnetic activity. The Birkeland currents have been specified in terms of three indices, the total current into and out of the hemisphere, the ratio of the magnitudes of the currents in the AM and PM sectors, R/sub ap/ , and R 12 , the ratio of the magnitudes of the currents in region 1 and 2. The relationship between these parameters of the Birkeland current systems and the auroral electrojet indices AE, AL, and AU is examined as well as the polar cap potential and the electric field at lower latitudes. The cusp currents have been modeled in relation to the interplanetary magnetic field and calculations are given of their effect on electric field and current patterns. One aim of this study is to produce a mathematical model of the currents, electric fields and energy inputs produced by field aligned currents that is consistent with, and specifiable in terms of, measured geophysical indices

  11. Upper ionosphere and magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzano, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    After a presentation of the ionospheric physics and of the earth magnetosphere morphology, generation and dynamics, the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in quiet and perturbed conditions is discussed. Some summary information about other planetary magnetospheres, particularly Venus and Jupiter magnetospheres, are finally given. 41 refs, 24 figs

  12. Characterizing the Meso-scale Plasma Flows in Earth's Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielse, C.; Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Gallardo-Lacourt, B.; Deng, Y.; McWilliams, K. A.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Heliophysics Decadal Survey put forth several imperative, Key Science Goals. The second goal communicates the urgent need to "Determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and atmosphere and their response to solar and terrestrial inputs...over a range of spatial and temporal scales." Sun-Earth connections (called Space Weather) have strong societal impacts because extreme events can disturb radio communications and satellite operations. The field's current modeling capabilities of such Space Weather phenomena include large-scale, global responses of the Earth's upper atmosphere to various inputs from the Sun, but the meso-scale ( 50-500 km) structures that are much more dynamic and powerful in the coupled system remain uncharacterized. Their influences are thus far poorly understood. We aim to quantify such structures, particularly auroral flows and streamers, in order to create an empirical model of their size, location, speed, and orientation based on activity level (AL index), season, solar cycle (F10.7), interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) inputs, etc. We present a statistical study of meso-scale flow channels in the nightside auroral oval and polar cap using SuperDARN. These results are used to inform global models such as the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) in order to evaluate the role of meso-scale disturbances on the fully coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. Measuring the ionospheric footpoint of magnetospheric fast flows, our analysis technique from the ground also provides a 2D picture of flows and their characteristics during different activity levels that spacecraft alone cannot.

  13. Electromagnetic energy deposition rate in the polar upper thermosphere derived from the EISCAT Svalbard radar and CUTLASS Finland radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available From simultaneous observations of the European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR and the Cooperative UK Twin Located Auroral Sounding System (CUTLASS Finland radar on 9 March 1999, we have derived the height distributions of the thermospheric heating rate at the F region height in association with electromagnetic energy inputs into the dayside polar cap/cusp region. The ESR and CUTLASS radar observations provide the ionospheric parameters with fine time-resolutions of a few minutes. Although the geomagnetic activity was rather moderate (Kp=3+~4, the electric field obtained from the ESR data sometimes shows values exceeding 40 mV/m. The estimated passive energy deposition rates are also larger than 150 W/kg in the upper thermosphere over the ESR site during the period of the enhanced electric field. In addition, enhancements of the Pedersen conductivity also contribute to heating the upper thermosphere, while there is only a small contribution for thermospheric heating from the direct particle heating due to soft particle precipitation in the dayside polar cap/cusp region. In the same period, the CUTLASS observations of the ion drift show the signature of poleward moving pulsed ionospheric flows with a recurrence rate of about 10–20 min. The estimated electromagnetic energy deposition rate shows the existence of the strong heat source in the dayside polar cap/cusp region of the upper thermosphere in association with the dayside magnetospheric phenomena of reconnections and flux transfer events.

  14. Electromagnetic energy deposition rate in the polar upper thermosphere derived from the EISCAT Svalbard radar and CUTLASS Finland radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available From simultaneous observations of the European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR and the Cooperative UK Twin Located Auroral Sounding System (CUTLASS Finland radar on 9 March 1999, we have derived the height distributions of the thermospheric heating rate at the F region height in association with electromagnetic energy inputs into the dayside polar cap/cusp region. The ESR and CUTLASS radar observations provide the ionospheric parameters with fine time-resolutions of a few minutes. Although the geomagnetic activity was rather moderate (Kp=3+~4, the electric field obtained from the ESR data sometimes shows values exceeding 40 mV/m. The estimated passive energy deposition rates are also larger than 150 W/kg in the upper thermosphere over the ESR site during the period of the enhanced electric field. In addition, enhancements of the Pedersen conductivity also contribute to heating the upper thermosphere, while there is only a small contribution for thermospheric heating from the direct particle heating due to soft particle precipitation in the dayside polar cap/cusp region. In the same period, the CUTLASS observations of the ion drift show the signature of poleward moving pulsed ionospheric flows with a recurrence rate of about 10–20 min. The estimated electromagnetic energy deposition rate shows the existence of the strong heat source in the dayside polar cap/cusp region of the upper thermosphere in association with the dayside magnetospheric phenomena of reconnections and flux transfer events.

  15. Thermal cracking of CO2 slab ice as the main driving force for albedo increase of the martian seasonal polar caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, S.; Schmitt, B.; Beck, P.; Brissaud, O.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the microphysical processes occuring on the Martian seasonal cap is critical since their radiative properties can affect the martian climate. A well documented phenomenom is the albedo increase of the Martian seasonal caps during spring, Fig.1. There are a lot of hypotheses that have been proposed as an explanation for this observation : the decrease of the CO2 grain size [2], a cleaning process of the CO2 slab that would imply either the sinking or the ejection of the dust contained in its volume ([1], [2], [5]), a water-layer accumulation on the top of the slab [5], the role played by aerosols [2] etc ... So far, no experimental simulations have been realized to discriminate between these processes. We designed an experiment to investigate the hypothesis of CO2 ice grain size decrease through thermal cracking as well as that of dust segregation as the possible reasons for albedo increase.

  16. Ionospheric "Volcanology": Ionospheric Detection of Volcano Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, E.; Shults, K.; Lognonne, P. H.; Rakoto, V.

    2016-12-01

    It is known that volcano eruptions and explosions can generate acoustic and gravity waves. These neutral waves further propagate into the atmosphere and ionosphere, where they are detectable by atmospheric and ionospheric sounding tools. So far, the features of co-volcanic ionospheric perturbations are not well understood yet. The development of the global and regional networks of ground-based GPS/GNSS receivers has opened a new era in the ionospheric detection of natural hazard events, including volcano eruptions. It is now known that eruptions with the volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of more than 2 can be detected in the ionosphere, especially in regions with dense GPS/GNSS-receiver coverage. The co-volcanic ionospheric disturbances are usually characterized as quasi-periodic oscillations. The Calbuco volcano, located in southern Chile, awoke in April 2015 after 43 years of inactivity. The first eruption began at 21:04UT on 22 April 2015, preceded by only an hour-long period of volcano-tectonic activity. This first eruption lasted 90 minutes and generated a sub-Plinian (i.e. medium to large explosive event), gray ash plume that rose 15 km above the main crater. A larger second event on 23 April began at 04:00UT (01:00LT), it lasted six hours, and also generated a sub-Plinian ash plume that rose higher than 15 km. The VEI was estimated to be 4 to 5 for these two events. In this work, we first study ionospheric TEC response to the Calbuco volcano eruptions of April 2015 by using ground-based GNSS-receivers located around the volcano. We analyze the spectral characteristics of the observed TEC variations and we estimate the propagation speed of the co-volcanic ionospheric perturbations. We further proceed with the normal mode summation technique based modeling of the ionospheric TEC variations due to the Calbuco volcano eruptions. Finally, we attempt to localize the position of the volcano from the ionospheric measurements, and we also estimate the time of the

  17. Influence of Ionospheric Irregularities on GNSS Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tinin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used numerical simulation to study the effects of ionospheric irregularities on accuracy of global navigation satellite system (GNSS measurements, using ionosphere-free (in atmospheric research and geometry-free (in ionospheric research dual-frequency phase combinations. It is known that elimination of these effects from multifrequency GNSS measurements is handi-capped by diffraction effects during signal propagation through turbulent ionospheric plasma with the inner scale being smaller than the Fresnel radius. We demonstrated the possibility of reducing the residual ionospheric error in dual-frequency GNSS remote sensing in ionosphere-free combination by Fresnel inversion. The inversion parameter, the distance to the virtual screen, may be selected from the minimum of amplitude fluctuations. This suggests the possibility of improving the accuracy of GNSS remote sensing in meteorology. In the study of ionospheric disturbances with the aid of geometry-free combination, the Fresnel inversion eliminates only the third-order error. To eliminate the random TEC component which, like the measured average TEC, is the first-order correction, we should use temporal filtering (averaging.

  18. Coordinated Cluster, ground-based instrumentation and low-altitude satellite observations of transient poleward-moving events in the ionosphere and in the tail lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available During the interval between 8:00–9:30 on 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft were moving from the central magnetospheric lobe, through the dusk sector mantle, on their way towards intersecting the magnetopause near 15:00 MLT and 15:00 UT. Throughout this interval, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen observed a series of poleward-moving transient events of enhanced F-region plasma concentration ("polar cap patches", with a repetition period of the order of 10 min. Allowing for the estimated solar wind propagation delay of 75 ( ± 5 min, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had a southward component during most of the interval. The magnetic footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, mapped to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko T96 model (with input conditions prevailing during this event, was to the east of the ESR beams. Around 09:05 UT, the DMSP-F12 satellite flew over the ESR and showed a sawtooth cusp ion dispersion signature that also extended into the electrons on the equatorward edge of the cusp, revealing a pulsed magnetopause reconnection. The consequent enhanced ionospheric flow events were imaged by the SuperDARN HF backscatter radars. The average convection patterns (derived using the AMIE technique on data from the magnetometers, the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars, and the DMSP satellites show that the associated poleward-moving events also convected over the predicted footprint of the Cluster spacecraft. Cluster observed enhancements in the fluxes of both electrons and ions. These events were found to be essentially identical at all four spacecraft, indicating that they had a much larger spatial scale than the satellite separation of the order of 600 km. Some of the events show a correspondence between the lowest energy magnetosheath electrons detected by the PEACE instrument on Cluster (10–20 eV and the topside ionospheric enhancements seen by the ESR (at 400–700 km. We suggest that a potential barrier at the

  19. Coordinated Cluster, ground-based instrumentation and low-altitude satellite observations of transient poleward-moving events in the ionosphere and in the tail lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available During the interval between 8:00–9:30 on 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft were moving from the central magnetospheric lobe, through the dusk sector mantle, on their way towards intersecting the magnetopause near 15:00 MLT and 15:00 UT. Throughout this interval, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen observed a series of poleward-moving transient events of enhanced F-region plasma concentration ("polar cap patches", with a repetition period of the order of 10 min. Allowing for the estimated solar wind propagation delay of 75 ( ± 5 min, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had a southward component during most of the interval. The magnetic footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, mapped to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko T96 model (with input conditions prevailing during this event, was to the east of the ESR beams. Around 09:05 UT, the DMSP-F12 satellite flew over the ESR and showed a sawtooth cusp ion dispersion signature that also extended into the electrons on the equatorward edge of the cusp, revealing a pulsed magnetopause reconnection. The consequent enhanced ionospheric flow events were imaged by the SuperDARN HF backscatter radars. The average convection patterns (derived using the AMIE technique on data from the magnetometers, the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars, and the DMSP satellites show that the associated poleward-moving events also convected over the predicted footprint of the Cluster spacecraft. Cluster observed enhancements in the fluxes of both electrons and ions. These events were found to be essentially identical at all four spacecraft, indicating that they had a much larger spatial scale than the satellite separation of the order of 600 km. Some of the events show a correspondence between the lowest energy magnetosheath electrons detected by the PEACE instrument on Cluster (10–20 eV and the topside ionospheric enhancements seen by the ESR (at 400–700 km. We suggest that a potential barrier at the

  20. The auroral and ionospheric flow signatures of dual lobe reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Imber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first substantial evidence for the occurrence of dual lobe reconnection from ionospheric flows and auroral signatures. The process of dual lobe reconnection refers to an interplanetary magnetic field line reconnecting with lobe field lines in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Two bursts of sunward plasma flow across the noon portion of the open/closed field line boundary (OCB, indicating magnetic flux closure at the dayside, were observed in SuperDARN radar data during a period of strongly northward IMF. The OCB is identified from spacecraft, radar backscatter, and auroral observations. In order for dual lobe reconnection to take place, we estimate that the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle must be within ±10° of zero (North. The total flux crossing the OCB during each burst is small (1.8% and 0.6% of the flux contained within the polar cap for the two flows. A brightening of the noon portion of the northern auroral oval was observed as the clock angle passed through zero, and is thought to be due to enhanced precipitating particle fluxes due to the occurrence of reconnection at two locations along the field line. The number of solar wind protons captured by the flux closure process was estimated to be ~2.5×1030 (4 tonnes by mass, sufficient to populate the cold, dense plasma sheet observed following this interval.

  1. Low- and mid-latitude ionospheric electric fields during the January 1984 GISMOS campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fejer, B.G.; Kelley, M.C.; Senior, C.; De La Beaujardiere, O.; Holt, J.A.; Tepley, C.A.; Burnside, R.; Abdu, M.A.; Sobral, J.H.A.; Woodman, R.F.; Kamide, Y.; Lepping, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines in detail the electrical coupling between the high-, middle, and low-latitude ionospheres during January 17-19, 1984, using interplanetary and high-latitude magnetic field data together with F region plasma drift measurements from the EISCAT, Sondre Stromfjord, Millstone Hill, Saint-Santin, Arecibo, and Jicamarca incoherent scatter radars. The authors study the penetration of both the zonal and meridional electric field components of high-latitude origin into the low-latitude and the equatorial ionospheres. In the dusk sector, a large perturbation of the zonal equatorial electric field was observed in the absence of similar changes at low and middle latitudes in the same longitudinal sector. The observations in the postmidnight sector are used to compare the longitudinal variation of the zonal perturbation electric field with predictions made from global convection models. The results show that the meridional electric field perturbations are considerably more attenuated with decreasing latitude than the zonal fluctuations. As a result, they conclude that variations in the meridional electric field at low latitudes are largely due to dynamo effects. These observations are used to show that the global convection models reproduce a number of characteristics of low-latitude and equatorial electric fields associated with changes in the polar cap potential drop. In addition, they highlight several areas where there is still substantial disagreement between the electric field data and the theoretical results

  2. Studies of small scale irregularities in the cusp ionosphere using sounding rockets: recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicher, A.; Ilyasov, A. A.; Miloch, W. J.; Chernyshov, A. A.; Moen, J.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Saito, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma irregularities occurring over many scale sizes are common in the ionosphere. Understanding and characterizing the phenomena responsible for these irregularities is not only important from a theoretical point of view, but also in the context of space weather, as the irregularities can disturb HF communication and Global Navigation Satellite Systems signals. Overall, research about the small-scale turbulence has not progressed as fast for polar regions as for the equatorial ones, and for the high latitude ionosphere there is still no agreement nor detailed explanation regarding the formation of irregularities. To investigate plasma structuring at small scales in the cusp ionosphere, we use high resolution measurements from the Investigation of Cusp Irregularities (ICI) sounding rockets, and investigate a region associated with density enhancements and a region characterized by flow shears. Using the ICI-2 electron density data, we give further evidence of the importance of the gradient drift instability for plasma structuring inside the polar cap. In particular, using higher-order statistics, we provide new insights into the nature of the resulting plasma structures and show that they are characterized by intermittency. Using the ICI-3 data, we show that the entire region associated with a reversed flow event (RFE), with the presence of meter-scale irregularities, several flow shears and particle precipitation, is highly structured. By performing a numerical stability analysis, we show that the inhomogeneous-energy-density-driven instability (IEDDI) may be active in relation to RFEs at the rocket's altitude. In particular, we show that the presence of particle precipitation decreases the growth rates of IEDDI and, using a Local Intermittency Measure, we observe a correlation between IEDDI growth rates and electric field fluctuations over several scales. These findings support the view that large-scale inhomogeneities may provide a background for the

  3. Ionospheric sources for molecular ion outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Peterson, W. K.; Blelly, P. F.; Alcayde, D.; Semeter, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mass-resolved satellite observations have established the presence of molecular ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere, outer magnetosphere, and ring current. Associated molecular outflows originate from the auroral zone F-region ionosphere and, while normally several orders of magnitude less intense than the well-known O+ outflow, are perhaps more closely tied to intense geomagnetic disturbances. Molecular outflow is also fundamentally different from O+ outflow, since molecular ions must first be generated in large quantities in the F-region, and then are subject to very short recombination lifetimes as they escape. Owing to observational difficulties, very little detailed information exists on the generation, energization, and upward transport of molecular ions. Furthermore, the basic geographic and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ionospheric source and higher altitude outflow are only loosely constrained. This research synthesizes both observations and models to gain a better understanding of molecular ion generation and upflow, and the basic characteristics of the ionospheric molecular source during geomagnetic storms. To illustrate ionospheric dynamics associated with published satellite observations of molecular upflow, a 2D ionospheric model is driven by boundary conditions consistent with observed field-aligned currents. These simulations provide detailed information about expected species-dependent ion densities, temperatures, fluxes, and associated transients. Similar model results are also compared against PFISR radar estimates of molecular ions generated by auroral arc activity. A detailed case study of the 24-25 Sept. 1998 geomagnetic storm is presented in which the EISCAT ESR and Tromso radars suggested enhancements in F-region molecular ions and Polar satellite simultaneously observed moleculars in the magnetosphere. Finally, data from Sondrestrom and EISCAT radars during multiple storms are combined in an attempt to build a statistical

  4. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Cradle Cap (Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis) KidsHealth / For Parents / Cradle Cap (Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis) What's in this article? About Cradle Cap Causes ...

  5. Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are caused by solar flare enhanced X-rays in the 1 to 10 angstrom range. Solar flares can produce large increases of ionization...

  6. 27 August 2001 substorm: Preonset phenomena, two main onsets, field-aligned current systems, and plasma flow channels in the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, V. M.; Mishin, V. V.; Lunyushkin, S. B.; Wang, J. Y.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    We supplement the results of the 27 August 2001 substorm studied earlier in the series of papers. Described is the plasma flow in the nightside ionosphere from the near-polar region from the polar cap to the auroral oval during the substorm preonset phase and two expansion onsets, EO1 and EO2, produced by reconnection in the closed tail (magnetic reconnection (MR1) and in the open tail lobes (MR2), respectively. We discuss the location of the MR2 region (is it near, middle, and/or distant tail?) and the EO2 trigger mechanism. The upward substorm current wedge field-aligned current (FAC) and the downward FAC in the polar cap dusk sector that were both produced by different types of magnetosphere-ionosphere feedback instability are found to provide the main contribution to the system of FACs during EO1 and EO2. Also, we obtain the estimates for the EO1 and EO2 power and energy. Addressed are the variations in the tail lobe magnetic flux and their (variations) association with EO2. In addition, we describe a 3-D system of mesoscale cells, each of which involves a plasma vortex and a local FAC maximum. The cells of this system in the inner magnetosphere and in the tail lobes intensify one after other within 2 min interval. At last, we substantiate the assumption that the fast plasma flow recorded by the Cluster satellites 7 min prior to EO1 was a bursty bulk flow from the most distant tail.

  7. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 1016 electrons/m2 with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the

  8. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hongping; Xu, Peiliang; Geng, Jianghui; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-02-27

    Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC) semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 10 16 electrons/m²) with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the new proposed

  9. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hongping; Xu, Peiliang; Geng, Jianghui; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC) semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 1016 electrons/m2) with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the new proposed

  10. Spatial Structure of Summertime Ionospheric Plasma Near Magnetic Noon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sims, R. W; Pryse, S. E; Denig, W. F

    2005-01-01

    .... This was identified as the tongue-of-ionisation (TOl) that comprised photoionisation of sub-auroral origin that is drawn poleward into the polar cap by the anti-sunward flow of the high-latitude convection...

  11. Seasonal effects in the ionosphere-thermosphere response to the precipitation and field-aligned current variations in the cusp region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    Full Text Available The seasonal effects in the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to the precipitating electron flux and field-aligned current variations, of the order of an hour in duration, in the summer and winter cusp regions have been investigated using the global numerical model of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Two variants of the calculations have been performed both for the IMF By < 0. In the first variant, the model input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken as geomagnetically symmetric and equal to those used earlier in the calculations for the equinoctial conditions. It has been found that both ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances are more intensive in the winter cusp region due to the lower conductivity of the winter polar cap ionosphere and correspondingly larger electric field variations leading to the larger Joule heating effects in the ion and neutral gas temperature, ion drag effects in the thermospheric winds and ion drift effects in the F2-region electron concentration. In the second variant, the calculations have been performed for the events of 28–29 January, 1992 when precipitations were weaker but the magnetospheric convection was stronger than in the first variant. Geomagnetically asymmetric input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken from the patterns derived by combining data obtained from the satellite, radar and ground magnetometer observations for these events. Calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection and thermospheric circulation have been compared with observations and it has been established that calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection for both winter and summer hemispheres are in a good agreement with the observations. Calculated patterns of the thermospheric circulation are in a good agreement with the average circulation for the Southern (summer Hemisphere obtained

  12. A TIEGCM numerical study of the source and evolution of ionospheric F-region tongues of ionization: Universal time and interplanetary magnetic field dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Burns, Alan; Liu, Libo; McInerney, Joe

    2017-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) has been employed to systematically study the source and evolution of the ionospheric F-region Tongue of Ionization (TOI), which is electron density enhancement in the polar region. The model is run for different Universal Times (UT), season and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions. It is found that: (1) The TOI formation is critically dependent on UT, preferentially near 2000 UT in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and near 1600 UT in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). These are the intervals when the high-latitude ion convection throat is closer to the middle-latitude high plasma density source region, so that more plasma can be directly transported into the polar cap region; (2) this different UT dependence between the two Hemispheres occurs, not only because of the different separation of the magnetic poles from the geographic poles in the two hemispheres, but also because of the UT dependence of the mid-latitude source locations (local time, latitude) and the magnitude of plasma density enhancements; (3) the TOI is generally stronger in the SH than it is in the NH, and in winter than in summer; (4) IMF By operates in the opposite sense in the two hemispheres in terms of the TOI pattern such that positive/negative IMF By tends to deflect the TOI toward the morning/afternoon sector in the NH. The opposite condition occurs in the SH.

  13. Ionospheric travelling convection vortices observed by the Greenland magnetometer chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Stolle, Claudia; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    2013-01-01

    The Greenland magnetometer array continuously provides geomagnetic variometer data since the early eighties. With the polar cusp passing over it almost every day, the array is suitable to detect ionospheric traveling convection vortices (TCVs), which were rst detected by Friis-Christensen et al...

  14. Report from ionospheric science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitt, W.J.; Banks, P.M.; Nagy, A.F.; Chappell, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The general strategy to advance knowledge of the ionospheric component of the solar terrestrial system should consist of a three pronged attack on the problem. Ionospheric models should be refined by utilization of existing and new data bases. The data generated in the future should emphasize spatial and temporal gradients and their relation to other events in the solar terrestrial system. In parallel with the improvement in modeling, it will be necessary to initiate a program of advanced instrument development. In particular, emphasis should be placed on the area of improved imaging techniques. The third general activity to be supported should be active experiments related to a better understanding of the basic physics of interactions occurring in the ionospheric environment. These strategies are briefly discussed

  15. Modeling the Ionosphere with GPS and Rotation Measure Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, J. B.; Taylor, G. B.; White, S. M.; Dowell, J.

    2017-12-01

    Advances in digital processing have created new tools for looking at and examining the ionosphere. We have combined data from dual frequency GPSs, digital ionosondes and observations from The Long Wavelength Array (LWA), a 256 dipole low frequency radio telescope situated in central New Mexico in order to examine ionospheric profiles. By studying polarized pulsars, the LWA is able to very accurately determine the Faraday rotation caused by the ionosphere. By combining this data with the international geomagnetic reference field, the LWA can evaluate ionospheric profiles and how well they predict the actual Faraday rotation. Dual frequency GPS measurements of total electron content, as well as measurements from digisonde data were used to model the ionosphere, and to predict the Faraday rotation to with in 0.1 rad/m2. Additionally, it was discovered that the predicted topside profile of the digisonde data did not accurate predict faraday rotation measurements, suggesting a need to reexamine the methods for creating the topside predicted profile. I will discuss the methods used to measure rotation measure and ionosphere profiles as well as discuss possible corrections to the topside model.

  16. A study of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Atmospheric Gravity Waves using EISCAT Svalbard Radar IPY-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vlasov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs as observed by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR during the continuous IPY-run (March 2007–February 2008 with field-aligned measurements. We have developed a semi-automatic routine for searching and extracting Atmospheric Gravity Wave (AGW activity. The collected data shows that AGW-TID signatures are common in the high-latitude ionosphere especially in the field-aligned ion velocity data (244 cases of AGW-TID signatures in daily records, but they can be observed also in electron density (26 cases, electron temperature (12 cases and ion temperature (26 cases. During the IPY campaign (in solar minimum conditions AGW-TID events appear more frequently during summer months than during the winter months. It remains still as a topic for future studies whether the observed seasonal variation is natural or caused by seasonal variation in the performance of the observational method that we use (AGW-TID signature may be more pronounced in a dense ionosphere. In our AGW-TID dataset the distribution of the oscillation periods has two peaks, one around 0.5–0.7 h and the other around 1.1–1.3 h. The diurnal occurrence rate has a deep minimum in the region of magnetic midnight, which might be partly explained by irregular auroral activity obscuring the TID signatures from our detection routines. As both the period and horizontal phase speed estimates (as derived from the classical AGW dispersion relation show values typical both for large scale TIDs and mesoscale TIDs it is difficult to distinguish whether the generator for high-latitude AGW-TIDs resides typically in the troposphere or in the near-Earth space. The results of our statistical analysis give anyway some valuable reference information for the future efforts to learn more about the dominating TID source mechanisms in polar cap conditions, and to improve AGW simulations.

  17. Ionosphere and Radio Communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The upperionosphere is used for radio communication and navigationas it reflects long, medium, as well as short radio waves. Sincesolar radiation is the main cause of the existence of ionosphere,any variation in the radiations can affect the entireradio communication system. This article attempts to brieflyintroduce the ...

  18. Ionosphere and Radio Communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ionosphere is used for radio communication and navigation as it reflects long, medium, as well as short radio waves. Since solar radiation is the main cause of the existence of iono- sphere, any variation in the radiations can affect the entire radio communication system. This article attempts to briefly introduce the readers to ...

  19. Artificial electron beams in the magnetosphere and ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winckler, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Plasma Diagnostics Payload of the Echo 7 satellite carried TV cameras and photometers by means of which the luminosity around an electron beam in the polar ionosphere could be studied. It was found that, while the beam Larmor spiral could be clearly seen near 100 km, above this only a column due to suprathermal electrons was observable. At high altitudes, the emission of neutral gas both generated powerful luminosity and substantially reduced accelerator potentials. An analysis of conjugate echoes indicates that inferred magnetospheric electric fields do not map well into the ionosphere, as well as the presence of strong pitch-angle scattering. 11 refs

  20. Ionosphere research with a HF/MF cubesat radio instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Esa; Aikio, Anita; Alho, Markku; Fontell, Mathias; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kauristie, Kirsti; Kestilä, Antti; Koskimaa, Petri; Mäkelä, Jakke; Mäkelä, Miika; Turunen, Esa; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Verronen, Pekka

    2017-04-01

    New technology provides new possibilities to study geospace and 3D ionosphere by using spacecraft and computer simulations. A type of nanosatellites, CubeSats, provide a cost effective possibility to provide in-situ measurements in the ionosphere. Moreover, combined CubeSat observations with ground-based observations gives a new view on auroras and associated electromagnetic phenomena. Especially joint and active CubeSat - ground based observation campaigns enable the possibility of studying the 3D structure of the ionosphere. Furthermore using several CubeSats to form satellite constellations enables much higher temporal resolution. At the same time, increasing computation capacity has made it possible to perform simulations where properties of the ionosphere, such as propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the medium frequency, MF (0.3-3 MHz) and high frequency, HF (3-30 MHz), ranges is based on a 3D ionospheric model and on first-principles modelling. Electromagnetic waves at those frequencies are strongly affected by ionospheric electrons and, consequently, those frequencies can be used for studying the plasma. On the other hand, even if the ionosphere originally enables long-range telecommunication at MF and HF frequencies, the frequent occurrence of spatiotemporal variations in the ionosphere disturbs communication channels, especially at high latitudes. Therefore, study of the MF and HF waves in the ionosphere has both a strong science and technology interests. We introduce recently developed simulation models as well as measuring principles and techniques to investigate the arctic ionosphere by a polar orbiting CubeSat whose novel AM radio instrument measures HF and MF waves. The cubesat, which contains also a white light aurora camera, is planned to be launched in late 2017 (http://www.suomi100satelliitti.fi/eng). The new models are (1) a 3D ray tracing model and (2) a 3D full kinetic electromagnetic simulation. We also introduce how combining of the

  1. Chemistry in the Thermosphere and Ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roble, Raymond G.

    1986-01-01

    An informative review which summarizes information about chemical reactions in the thermosphere and ionosphere. Topics include thermal structure, ultraviolet radiation, ionospheric photochemistry, thermospheric photochemistry, chemical heating, thermospheric circulation, auroral processes and ionospheric interactions. Provides suggested followup…

  2. Enhanced ionosphere-magnetosphere data from the DMSP satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, F.J.; Hardy, D.A.; Gussenhoven, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) represent a series of low-altitude (835 km) polar-orbiting satellites. Their primary objective is related to the observation of the tropospheric weather with a high-resolution white light and infrared imaging system. It is also possible to make images of auroras. On a daily basis, information about auroras is used to assist various communication systems which are affected by the ionospheric disturbances associated with auroras. In the past few years, there have been several improvements in the ionospheric monitoring instrumentation. Since the high-latitude ionosphere is connected to the magnetosphere, the DMSP data are used to monitor magnetospheric processes. The instrumentation of the DMSP satellites is discussed, taking into account the data provided by them. 7 references

  3. CDDIS_DORIS_products_ionosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionosphere correction values derived from analysis of Doppler Orbitography by Radiopositioning Integrated on Satellite (DORIS) data. These products are the generated...

  4. SuperDARN HF Scattering and Propagation in the Presence of Polar Patches Imaged Using RISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, R. G.; Perry, G. W.; Varney, R. H.; Gillies, D. M.; Donovan, E.

    2017-12-01

    The global array of High Frequency (HF) Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars continuously monitors ionospheric convection in the middle-to-high latitude region. The radars measure coherent backscatter from decameter scale field-aligned irregularities. One of the main generation mechanisms for these field-aligned irregularities is the gradient drift instability (GDI). The edges of ionospheric density structures, such as polar cap patches, provide ideal locations for GDI growth. The geometry required for GDI growth results in irregularities forming on the trailing edge of polar patches. However, irregularities generated by the non-linear evolution of the GDI can become prevalent throughout the patch within minutes. Modelling the irregularity growth and measurements of backscatter within patches have both confirmed this. One aspect that has often been overlooked in studies of coherent backscatter within patches is the effect of HF propagation on echo location. This study examines HF echo locations in the vicinity of patches that were imaged using the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radars (RISR). The effect of both vertical and lateral refraction of the HF wave on echo location is examined.

  5. Response of the Equatorial Ionosphere to the Geomagnetic DP2 current system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.; Pradipta, R.; Biouele, C. M.; Rabiu, A. B.; Obrou, O.; Bamba, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The response of equatorial ionosphere to the magnetospheric origin DP2 (disturbance polar of the second type) current fluctuations and its impact on the equatorial ionospheric density structure is examined using ground-based multi-instrument observations. The interaction between the solar wind and magnetosphere generates a convection electric field that can penetrate to the ionosphere and cause the DP2 current system. The quasi-periodic DP2 current system, which fluctuates coherently with IMF Bz oscillations, penetrates nearly instantaneously to the dayside equatorial region through the TM0 (zero order transverse magnetic) mode waves in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and modulates the electrodynamics that are responsible for the complicated nature of dayside ionospheric density variations at the equator. In this paper, using multi-instrument (magnetometers, GPS, radar, and ionosonde) observations, we clearly demonstrated that the high-latitude DP2 current system penetrates to the equator and causes the dayside electrodynamics and ionospheric density to fluctuate coherently with the DP2 current as well as with the IMF Bz component. This clearly indicates that understanding of the quasi-periodic DP2 current systems, such as its source, condition of its penetration to the equatorial region, and the impact it can produce onto the ionospheric density distribution is very important information for the ongoing modeling effort to improve the global ionospheric density structure and scintillation forecasting capability.

  6. The spatial distribution of magnetospheric convection electric fields at ionospheric altitudes: a review. 1. Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudal, G.; Blanc, M.

    1983-01-01

    The different techniques used for the study of the large-scale pattern of magnetospheric convection in the auroral zone are reviewed, with particular emphasis on incoherent and coherent scatter radars. For each technique, typical results are presented that illustrate its most important contributions to our knowledge of plasma convection at ionospheric altitudes, and its main advantages, limitations, and typical spatial and temporal coverage are described. Based upon the results gathered to date, the main features of the convection pattern are presented, namely: the double cell system and its asymmetry depending in particular on the Bsub(y) component of the IMF, the Harang discontinuity and its latitudinal dependence, the dayside throat, the attenuation of convection toward lower latitudes and its reversal at the polar cap boundary. The most interesting problems still open include the establishment of a quantitative model of the latitudinal variation of the electric field intensity at the planetary scale. Others entail separating universal time and local time effects in the field variations. Longitude variations have not yet been evaluated, and the characteristic signature of substorms has not been clearly separated from mere global modulations of the intensity of convection. Global coordinated campaigns, taking advantage of the best that each measurement technique has to offer to achieve the spatial and temporal coverage needed, are the only possible way to attack these problems

  7. Long-term prediction of the Arctic ionospheric TEC based on time-varying periodograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Ruizhi; Wang, Zemin; An, Jiachun; Hyyppä, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the polar ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and its future variations is of scientific and engineering relevance. In this study, a new method is developed to predict Arctic mean TEC on the scale of a solar cycle using previous data covering 14 years. The Arctic TEC is derived from global positioning system measurements using the spherical cap harmonic analysis mapping method. The study indicates that the variability of the Arctic TEC results in highly time-varying periodograms, which are utilized for prediction in the proposed method. The TEC time series is divided into two components of periodic oscillations and the average TEC. The newly developed method of TEC prediction is based on an extrapolation method that requires no input of physical observations of the time interval of prediction, and it is performed in both temporally backward and forward directions by summing the extrapolation of the two components. The backward prediction indicates that the Arctic TEC variability includes a 9 years period for the study duration, in addition to the well-established periods. The long-term prediction has an uncertainty of 4.8-5.6 TECU for different period sets.

  8. The dynamics and relationships of precipitation, temperature and convection boundaries in the dayside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A continuous band of high ion temperature, which persisted for about 8h and zigzagged north-south across more than five degrees in latitude in the dayside (07:00-15:00MLT auroral ionosphere, was observed by the EISCAT VHF radar on 23 November 1999. Latitudinal gradients in the temperature of the F-region electron and ion gases (Te and Ti, respectively have been compared with concurrent observations of particle precipitation and field-perpendicular convection by DMSP satellites, in order to reveal a physical explanation for the persistent band of high Ti, and to test the potential role of Ti and Te gradients as possible markers for the open-closed field line boundary. The north/south movement of the equatorward Ti boundary was found to be consistent with the contraction/expansion of the polar cap due to an unbalanced dayside and nightside reconnection. Sporadic intensifications in Ti, recurring on ~10-min time scales, indicate that frictional heating was modulated by time-varying reconnection, and the band of high Ti was located on open flux. However, the equatorward Ti boundary was not found to be a close proxy of the open-closed boundary. The closest definable proxy of the open-closed boundary is the magnetosheath electron edge observed by DMSP. Although Te appears to be sensitive to magnetosheath electron fluxes, it is not found to be a suitable parameter for routine tracking of the open-closed boundary, as it involves case dependent analysis of the thermal balance. Finally, we have documented a region of newly-opened sunward convecting flux. This region is situated between the convection reversal boundary and the magnetosheath electron edge defining the open-closed boundary. This is consistent with a delay of several minutes between the arrival of the first (super-Alfvénic magnetosheath electrons and the response in the ionospheric

  9. The dynamics and relationships of precipitation, temperature and convection boundaries in the dayside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A continuous band of high ion temperature, which persisted for about 8h and zigzagged north-south across more than five degrees in latitude in the dayside (07:00-15:00MLT auroral ionosphere, was observed by the EISCAT VHF radar on 23 November 1999. Latitudinal gradients in the temperature of the F-region electron and ion gases (Te and Ti, respectively have been compared with concurrent observations of particle precipitation and field-perpendicular convection by DMSP satellites, in order to reveal a physical explanation for the persistent band of high Ti, and to test the potential role of Ti and Te gradients as possible markers for the open-closed field line boundary. The north/south movement of the equatorward Ti boundary was found to be consistent with the contraction/expansion of the polar cap due to an unbalanced dayside and nightside reconnection. Sporadic intensifications in Ti, recurring on ~10-min time scales, indicate that frictional heating was modulated by time-varying reconnection, and the band of high Ti was located on open flux. However, the equatorward Ti boundary was not found to be a close proxy of the open-closed boundary. The closest definable proxy of the open-closed boundary is the magnetosheath electron edge observed by DMSP. Although Te appears to be sensitive to magnetosheath electron fluxes, it is not found to be a suitable parameter for routine tracking of the open-closed boundary, as it involves case dependent analysis of the thermal balance. Finally, we have documented a region of newly-opened sunward convecting flux. This region is situated between the convection reversal boundary and the magnetosheath electron edge defining the open-closed boundary. This is consistent with a delay of several minutes between the arrival of the first (super-Alfvénic magnetosheath electrons and the response in the ionospheric convection, conveyed to the ionosphere by the interior Alfvén wave. It represents a candidate footprint of the

  10. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...

  11. Cubesat-Based Dtv Receiver Constellation for Ionospheric Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcivan, H.; Leveque, K.; Doe, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    sort the frequencies and de-trend the phase variations due to spacecraft motion. For a single channel and a spacecraft-DTV transmitter path scan, TEC can be determined from the incremental phase variations for each channel. Determination of the absolute TEC requires knowledge of the absolute phase, i.e., including the number of 2π cycles. The absolute TEC can be determined in the case of multi-channel transmissions from a single tower (most towers house multiple television stations). A CubeSat constellation using DTV transmissions as signals of opportunity is a composite instrument for frontier ionospheric research. It is a novel application of CubeSats to understand the ionospheric response to solar, magnetospheric and upper atmospheric forcing. Combined tomographic measurements of ionospheric density can be used to study the global-scale ionospheric circulation and small-scale ionospheric structures that cause scintillation of trans-ionospheric signals. The data can support a wide range of studies, including Sub-auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS), low latitude plasma instabilities and the generation of equatorial spread F bubbles, and the role of atmospheric waves and layers and sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events in traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID).

  12. Ionospheric scintillation observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakane, V.C.K.

    1982-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillation observations made at Legon, Ghana (5.63 deg. N, 0.19 deg. E, dip angle 8.50) during the year 1979 are reported for two geostationary satellites, Marisat and Sirio, transmitting at 257 MHz and 136 MHz, respectively. The night-time scintillation showed a single peak around 2200-3000 hours local time (GMT). Seasonally, Marisat showed a fast decay of scintillation for the months April-June and June-September from around midnight whilst it persisted for the other months January-March and October-December. (author)

  13. Associating an ionospheric parameter with major earthquake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quasi-static electric field anomaly in the upper ionosphere before an earthquake had been observed as an ionospheric precursor (Gousheva et al. 2009). According to. LAIC model (Lithosphere–Atmosphere–Ionosphere. Coupling model), geochemical, atmospheric and ionospheric parameters are united by a common.

  14. Southern high-latitude Digisonde observations of ionosphere E-region Bragg scatter during intense lacuna conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Monselesan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available During summer months at solar cycle minimum, F-region lacuna and slant-Es conditions (SEC are common features of daytime ionograms recorded around local magnetic noon at Casey, Antarctica. Digisonde measurements of drift velocity height profiles show that the occurrence of lacuna prevents the determination of F-region drift velocities and also affects E-region drift velocity measurements. Unique E-region spectral features revealed as intervals of Bragg scatter superimposed on typical background E-region reflection were observed in Digisonde Doppler spectra during intense lacuna conditions. Daytime E-region Doppler spectra recorded at carrier frequencies from 1.5 to 2.7MHz, below the E-region critical frequency foE, have two side-peaks corresponding to Bragg scatter at approximately ±1-2Hz symmetrically located on each side of a central-peak corresponding to near-zenith total reflections. Angle-of-arrival information and ray-tracing simulations show that echo returns are coming from oblique directions most likely resulting from direct backscatter from just below the total reflection height for each sounding frequency. The Bragg backscatter events are shown to manifest during polar lacuna conditions, and to affect the determination of E-region background drift velocities, and as such must be considered when using standard Doppler-sorted interferometry (DSI techniques to estimate ionospheric drift velocities. Given the Doppler and spatial separation of the echoes determined from high-resolution Doppler measurements, we are able to estimate the Bragg scatter phase velocity independently from the bulk E-region motion. The phase velocity coincides with the ExB direction derived from in situ fluxgate magnetometer records. When ionospheric refraction is considered, the phase velocity amplitudes deduced from DSI are comparable to the ion-acoustic speed expected in the E-region. We briefly consider the plausibility that these previously unreported polar

  15. Southern high-latitude Digisonde observations of ionosphere E-region Bragg scatter during intense lacuna conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Monselesan

    2004-09-01

    previously unreported polar cap E-region Bragg scatter Doppler spectral signatures, observed at Casey in December 1996 during SEC/lacuna conditions may be linked to ionosphere irregularities. These irregularities may possibly be generated by primary plasma waves triggered by current-driven instabilities, that is to say, a hybrid of the "modified two-stream" and "gradient drift" instability mechanisms.

  16. An extended TRANSCAR model including ionospheric convection: simulation of EISCAT observations using inputs from AMIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-L. Blelly

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The TRANSCAR ionospheric model was extended to account for the convection of the magnetic field lines in the auroral and polar ionosphere. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian 13-moment approach was used to describe the dynamics of an ionospheric plasma tube. In the present study, one focuses on large scale transports in the polar ionosphere. The model was used to simulate a 35-h period of EISCAT-UHF observations on 16-17 February 1993. The first day was magnetically quiet, and characterized by elevated electron concentrations: the diurnal F2 layer reached as much as 1012m-3, which is unusual for a winter and moderate solar activity (F10.7=130 period. An intense geomagnetic event occurred on the second day, seen in the data as a strong intensification of the ionosphere convection velocities in the early afternoon (with the northward electric field reaching 150mVm-1 and corresponding frictional heating of the ions up to 2500K. The simulation used time-dependent AMIE outputs to infer flux-tube transports in the polar region, and to provide magnetospheric particle and energy inputs to the ionosphere. The overall very good agreement, obtained between the model and the observations, demonstrates the high ability of the extended TRANSCAR model for quantitative modelling of the high-latitude ionosphere; however, some differences are found which are attributed to the precipitation of electrons with very low energy. All these results are finally discussed in the frame of modelling the auroral ionosphere with space weather applications in mind.

  17. An extended TRANSCAR model including ionospheric convection: simulation of EISCAT observations using inputs from AMIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-L. Blelly

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The TRANSCAR ionospheric model was extended to account for the convection of the magnetic field lines in the auroral and polar ionosphere. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian 13-moment approach was used to describe the dynamics of an ionospheric plasma tube. In the present study, one focuses on large scale transports in the polar ionosphere. The model was used to simulate a 35-h period of EISCAT-UHF observations on 16-17 February 1993. The first day was magnetically quiet, and characterized by elevated electron concentrations: the diurnal F2 layer reached as much as 1012m-3, which is unusual for a winter and moderate solar activity (F10.7=130 period. An intense geomagnetic event occurred on the second day, seen in the data as a strong intensification of the ionosphere convection velocities in the early afternoon (with the northward electric field reaching 150mVm-1 and corresponding frictional heating of the ions up to 2500K. The simulation used time-dependent AMIE outputs to infer flux-tube transports in the polar region, and to provide magnetospheric particle and energy inputs to the ionosphere. The overall very good agreement, obtained between the model and the observations, demonstrates the high ability of the extended TRANSCAR model for quantitative modelling of the high-latitude ionosphere; however, some differences are found which are attributed to the precipitation of electrons with very low energy. All these results are finally discussed in the frame of modelling the auroral ionosphere with space weather applications in mind.

  18. Research to Operations of Ionospheric Scintillation Detection and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Scro, K.; Payne, D.; Ruhge, R.; Erickson, B.; Andorka, S.; Ludwig, C.; Karmann, J.; Ebelhar, D.

    Ionospheric Scintillation refers to random fluctuations in phase and amplitude of electromagnetic waves caused by a rapidly varying refractive index due to turbulent features in the ionosphere. Scintillation of transionospheric UHF and L-Band radio frequency signals is particularly troublesome since this phenomenon can lead to degradation of signal strength and integrity that can negatively impact satellite communications and navigation, radar, or radio signals from other systems that traverse or interact with the ionosphere. Although ionospheric scintillation occurs in both the equatorial and polar regions of the Earth, the focus of this modeling effort is on equatorial scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation model is data-driven in a sense that scintillation observations are used to perform detection and characterization of scintillation structures. These structures are then propagated to future times using drift and decay models to represent the natural evolution of ionospheric scintillation. The impact on radio signals is also determined by the model and represented in graphical format to the user. A frequency scaling algorithm allows for impact analysis on frequencies other than the observation frequencies. The project began with lab-grade software and through a tailored Agile development process, deployed operational-grade code to a DoD operational center. The Agile development process promotes adaptive promote adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, regular collaboration with the customer, and encourage rapid and flexible response to customer-driven changes. The Agile philosophy values individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a rigid plan. The end result was an operational capability that met customer expectations. Details of the model and the process of

  19. Swarm GPS Receiver Performance under the Influence of Ionospheric Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Le; Schön, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission launched on 22 November 2013 is ESA's first constellation of satellites to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with the Earth system. This mission consists of three identical satellites in near-polar orbits , two flying almost side-by-side at an initial altitude of 460 km, the third flying in a higher orbit of about 530 km. Each satellite is equipped with a high precision 8-channels dual-frequency receiver for the precise orbit determination, which is also the essential fundament in order to take full advantage of the data information provided by this constellation, e.g. for the recovery of gravity field. The quality of the final orbit determination depends on the observation data from the receivers. In this contribution, we will analyze the performance of the Swarm on-board receivers, especially under the influence of ionospheric scintillation caused by ionospheric irregularities. This is a prerequisite for high quality satellite positioning as well as a sound study of the ionosphere. Ionospheric scintillation can lead to the phase disturbances, cycle slips or even loss of signal tracking. The RINEX observation data from Swarm Level 1b products are used to analyze the Swarm receiver performance. We will demonstrate the signal strength, code and phase noise, different linear combinations (geometry free, ionosphere free), as well as GDOP values for the 3 Swarm satellites. The first results show that the observation data are severely disturbed and the signals could be lost around the geomagnetic equator and geomagnetic poles where the ionosphere is active. The results also show that the receivers are more stable in those areas after the update in October 2015.

  20. Imaging Ionospheric Disturbances with a Global Array of the Ground-Based GPS TEC Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Coster, A.; Rideout, B.; Immel, T.; Rich, F. J.

    2004-05-01

    A prime example of distributed arrays of small instruments for space science research is found in the use of the existing global array of GPS receivers to provide high spatial/temporal resolution mapping of the total electron electron content (TEC) at equatorial, mid, auroral, and polar latitudes. Particularly dramatic effects are observed during major disturbances when magnetospheric electric fields perturb and redistribute the thermal plasmas of inner magnetosphere (plasmasphere/ionosphere). Enhancement and poleward displacement of the equatorial anomalies (EA), the formation of plasmaspheric drainage plumes which erode the outer plasmasphere and produce significant storm enhanced density and space weather effects at mid latitudes, and tongues of ionization which span the polar caps are all a part of the systematic redistribution of the low-latitude thermal plasma during strong events. The present distribution of GPS receivers permits mapping such features primarily over the land masses of North America and Europe, where 1x1 deg spatial and 30-sec temporal observations of vertical TEC can be achieved. Few receivers currently exist in developing countries and large gaps in coverage exist over the oceans. However, the large and meso-scale characteristics and evolution of these thermal plasma storm effects can be identified in the global maps. We address the cross-calibration of ground-based and space-based techniques to image and sample such features by comparing simultaneous observations of the major features observed during the strong storm on May 30, 2003. GPS TEC mapping observed the rapid enhancement of the EA and the formation of a concentration of enhanced plasma in the Carribean sector. This co-rotating enhancement provided a continuing a source for the dusk-sector plasmaspheric drainage plume. The down-looking IMAGE FUV instrument can map enhancements in the equatorial emissions associated with the EA and observed the spatial extent and evolution of the co

  1. Digital ionospheric sounding in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, B.; Bibl, K.

    1981-01-01

    New ionogram observation techniques were applied at the Goose Bay Ionospheric Observatory (GBIO) in Newfoundland, Canada, and aboard AFGL's Airborne Ionospheric Observatory (AIO), using the Digisonde 128PS system. A receiving array of four crossed-loop antennas at GBIO enabled incidence angle and polarization measurements within the ionogram in addition to the Doppler observations. The Doppler information in the propagation ionograms between the GBIO Digisonde and the moving AIO sounder facilitates the interpreting of different modes of propagation. Software for the AFGL CDC 6600 computer and for a microcomputer was developed for the processing of the digital ionograms. The identification of ordinary and extraordinary echoes in the Goose Bay ionograms greatly simplify the automatic processing of ionograms. Indeed, it became clear that for automatic ionogram trace identification the O and X tagging is a prerequisite. In support of the ESD 414L project an ionogram communicator (ICOM) was added to the GBIO Digisonde providing - via telephone lines - realtime ionogram printouts at the Over-The-Horizon Backscatter Experimental Radar System in Maine. Another Digisonde station was equipped and brought to operation in Keflavik, Iceland, to provide environmental data for the OTH radar operation.

  2. Evidence of L-mode electromagnetic wave pumping of ionospheric plasma near geomagnetic zenith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyser, Thomas B.; James, H. Gordon; Gustavsson, Björn; Rietveld, Michael T.

    2018-02-01

    The response of ionospheric plasma to pumping by powerful HF (high frequency) electromagnetic waves transmitted from the ground into the ionosphere is the strongest in the direction of geomagnetic zenith. We present experimental results from transmitting a left-handed circularly polarized HF beam from the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter association) Heating facility in magnetic zenith. The CASSIOPE (CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer) spacecraft in the topside ionosphere above the F-region density peak detected transionospheric pump radiation, although the pump frequency was below the maximum ionospheric plasma frequency. The pump wave is deduced to arrive at CASSIOPE through L-mode propagation and associated double (O to Z, Z to O) conversion in pump-induced radio windows. L-mode propagation allows the pump wave to reach higher plasma densities and higher ionospheric altitudes than O-mode propagation so that a pump wave in the L-mode can facilitate excitation of upper hybrid phenomena localized in density depletions in a larger altitude range. L-mode propagation is therefore suggested to be important in explaining the magnetic zenith effect.

  3. Evidence of L-mode electromagnetic wave pumping of ionospheric plasma near geomagnetic zenith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Leyser

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The response of ionospheric plasma to pumping by powerful HF (high frequency electromagnetic waves transmitted from the ground into the ionosphere is the strongest in the direction of geomagnetic zenith. We present experimental results from transmitting a left-handed circularly polarized HF beam from the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter association Heating facility in magnetic zenith. The CASSIOPE (CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer spacecraft in the topside ionosphere above the F-region density peak detected transionospheric pump radiation, although the pump frequency was below the maximum ionospheric plasma frequency. The pump wave is deduced to arrive at CASSIOPE through L-mode propagation and associated double (O to Z, Z to O conversion in pump-induced radio windows. L-mode propagation allows the pump wave to reach higher plasma densities and higher ionospheric altitudes than O-mode propagation so that a pump wave in the L-mode can facilitate excitation of upper hybrid phenomena localized in density depletions in a larger altitude range. L-mode propagation is therefore suggested to be important in explaining the magnetic zenith effect.

  4. Ionospheric precursors to scintillation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.J. Spencer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillation is the rapid fluctuation of both phase and amplitude of trans-ionospheric radio waves due to small scale electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Prediction of the occurrence of scintillation at L band frequencies is needed to mitigate the disruption of space-based communication and navigation systems. The purpose of this paper is to present a method of using tomographic inversions of the ionospheric electron density obtained from ground-based GPS data to infer the location and strength of the post-sunset plasma drift vortex. This vortex is related to the pre-reversal enhancement in the eastwards electric field which has been correlated to the subsequent occurrence of scintillation.

  5. Geomagnetic storm effects on the occurrences of ionospheric irregularities over the African equatorial/low-latitude region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, P. O.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Akala, A. O.

    2018-04-01

    The study investigated the effects of intense geomagnetic storms of 2015 on the occurrences of large scale ionospheric irregularities over the African equatorial/low-latitude region. Four major/intense geomagnetic storms of 2015 were analyzed for this study. These storms occurred on 17th March 2015 (-229 nT), 22nd June 2015 (-204 nT), 7th October 2015 (-124 nT), and 20th December 2015 (-170 nT). Total Electron Content (TEC) data obtained from five African Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) stations, grouped into eastern and western sectors were used to derive the ionospheric irregularities proxy indices, e.g., rate of change of TEC (ROT), ROT index (ROTI) and ROTI daily average (ROTIAVE). These indices were characterized alongside with the disturbance storm time (Dst), the Y component of the Interplanetary Electric Field (IEFy), polar cap (PC) index and the H component of the Earth's magnetic field from ground-based magnetometers. Irregularities manifested in the form of fluctuations in TEC. Prompt penetration of electric field (PPEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF) modulated the behaviour of irregularities during the main and recovery phases of the geomagnetic storms. The effect of electric field over both sectors depends on the local time of southward turning of IMF Bz. Consequently, westward electric field inhibited irregularities during the main phase of March and October 2015 geomagnetic storms, while for the June 2015 storm, eastward electric field triggered weak irregularities over the eastern sector. The effect of electric field on irregularities during December 2015 storm was insignificant. During the recovery phase of the storms, westward DDEF suppressed irregularities.

  6. On the Origin of Ionospheric Hiss: A Conjugate Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhima, Zeren; Chen, Lunjin; Xiong, Ying; Cao, Jinbin; Fu, Huishan

    2017-11-01

    We present a conjugate observation on whistler mode electromagnetic hiss from the low Earth orbit satellite Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) and the high-altitude elliptical orbit spacecraft Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS). The conjugate observation was performed at 14:51:10 to 15:12:00 UT on 15 June 2010, when DEMETER was flying across the L shell region from 1.39 to 2.80 at an altitude of 660 km; meanwhile, THEMIS probes were passing through the L shell region from 1.64 to 1.91 at altitudes from 1.6 to 2.0 RE. The conjugated observations demonstrate similar time-frequency structures between the ionospheric hiss ( 350 to 800 Hz) captured by DEMETER and the plasmaspheric hiss ( 350 to 900 Hz) recorded by THEMIS probes, including similar peak frequencies ( 500 to 600 Hz), similar lower cutoff frequencies ( 350 to 400 Hz), and upper cutoff frequencies ( 730 to 800 Hz). The wave vector analyses show that the ionospheric hiss propagates obliquely downward to the Earth and slightly equatorward with right-handed polarization, suggesting that its source comes from higher altitudes. Ray tracing simulations with the constraint of observations verify that the connection between ionospheric and plasmaspheric hiss is physically possible through wave propagation. This study provides direct observational evidence to support the mechanism that high-altitude plasmaspheric hiss is responsible for the generation of low-altitude ionospheric hiss.

  7. World Day ionospheric observations at Millstone Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Holt, J. M.; Loriot, G. B.; Oliver, W. L.

    1985-05-01

    A comprehensive program of multistation observations is being pursued on a regular schedule with the aim to provide an adequate data base for the study and modeling of the global ionosphere. A global network of incoherent scatter radars operates monthly on predetermined radar World Days designated on the International Geophysical Calendar. Fully steerable radars at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, and Millstone Hill, MA, provide coverage at polar, auroral, and subauroral latitudes, while the facilities at Arecibo, PR, and Jicamarca, Peru monitor the low-latitude and equatorial region. A description is given of the observations conducted with the aid of the MIT Millstone Hill radar facility. Questions of data intercomparison and aspects of data availability are also discussed.

  8. Signatures of mesospheric particles in ionospheric data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Friedrich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The state of the ionosphere during the 2007 ECOMA/MASS campaign is described by in-situ observations by three sounding rockets launched from the Andøya Rocket Range and by ground based observations. The ground based measurements included the incoherent scatter radar EISCAT near Tromsø (both on UHF and VHF, as well as an MF radar, a meteor radar and an imaging riometer all located in the close vicinity of the rocket range. The pronounced electron density bite-outs seen by two of the rockets could not be detected from the ground, but the associated PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes provide indirect evidence of pronounced perturbations of mesospheric electron densities.

  9. Interaction of plasma cloud with external electric field in lower ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Dimant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the auroral lower-E and upper-D region of the ionosphere, plasma clouds, such as sporadic-E layers and meteor plasma trails, occur daily. Large-scale electric fields, created by the magnetospheric dynamo, will polarize these highly conducting clouds, redistributing the electrostatic potential and generating anisotropic currents both within and around the cloud. Using a simplified model of the cloud and the background ionosphere, we develop the first self-consistent three-dimensional analytical theory of these phenomena. For dense clouds, this theory predicts highly amplified electric fields around the cloud, along with strong currents collected from the ionosphere and circulated through the cloud. This has implications for the generation of plasma instabilities, electron heating, and global MHD modeling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling via modifications of conductances induced by sporadic-E clouds.

  10. The worldwide ionospheric data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    1989-01-01

    The worldwide ionospheric data base is scattered over the entire globe. Different data sets are held at different institutions in the U.S., U.S.S.R., Australia, Europe, and Asia. The World Data Centers on the different continents archive and distribute part of the huge data base; the scope and cross section of the individual data holdings depend on the regional and special interest of the center. An attempt is made to pull together all the strings that point toward different ionospheric data holdings. Requesters are provided with the information about what is available and where to get it. An attempt is also made to evaluate the reliability and compatibility of the different data sets based on the consensus in the ionospheric research community. The status and accuracy of the standard ionospheric models are also discussed because they may facilitate first order assessment of ionospheric effects. This is a first step toward an ionospheric data directory within the framework of NSSDC's master directory.

  11. Ionospheric response to the partial solar eclipse of March 29, 2006, according to the observations at Nizhni Novgorod and Murmansk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikovich, V. V.; Vyakhirev, V. D.; Kalinina, E. E.; Tereshchenko, V. D.; Chernyakov, S. M.; Tereshchenko, V. A.

    2008-02-01

    The results of observations of the solar eclipse ionospheric effects on March 29, 2006, are presented. The observations were conducted using the partial reflection method near Nizhni Novgorod and the vertical sounding method at the automatic ionospheric station near Murmansk. It has been obtained that the electron density at altitudes of 77 and 91 km decreases by a factor of more than 4; in this case the response of the ionosphere at an altitude of 91 km lags behind the eclipse maximum phase on the Earth by approximately 20 min. It has been established that the eclipse in the E and F1 regions of the polar ionosphere causes a change in the electron density by 15-20%. The delay time of this effect varies from 12 to 24 min depending on the altitude. It has been registered that the reflection virtual altitude at altitudes of the ionospheric F region increases in Murmansk and Nizhni Novgorod.

  12. Modeling ionospheric disturbance features in quasi-vertically incident ionograms using 3-D magnetoionic ray tracing and atmospheric gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M. A.; Harris, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has initiated an experimental program, Spatial Ionospheric Correlation Experiment, utilizing state-of-the-art DSTO-designed high frequency digital receivers. This program seeks to understand ionospheric disturbances at scales < 150 km and temporal resolutions under 1 min through the simultaneous observation and recording of multiple quasi-vertical ionograms (QVI) with closely spaced ionospheric control points. A detailed description of and results from the first campaign conducted in February 2008 were presented by Harris et al. (2012). In this paper we employ a 3-D magnetoionic Hamiltonian ray tracing engine, developed by DSTO, to (1) model the various disturbance features observed on both the O and X polarization modes in our QVI data and (2) understand how they are produced. The ionospheric disturbances which produce the observed features were modeled by perturbing the ionosphere with atmospheric gravity waves.

  13. Improving the Ionospheric Auroral Conductance in a Global Ring Current Model and the Effects on the Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Jordanova, V. K.; McGranaghan, R. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    The ionospheric conductance, height-integrated electric conductivity, can regulate both the ionospheric electrodynamics and the magnetospheric dynamics because of its key role in determining the electric field within the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. State-of-the-art global magnetosphere models commonly adopt empirical conductance calculators to obtain the auroral conductance. Such specification can bypass the complexity of the ionosphere-thermosphere chemistry but on the other hand breaks the self-consistent link within the coupled system. In this study, we couple a kinetic ring current model RAM-SCB-E that solves for anisotropic particle distributions with a two-stream electron transport code (GLOW) to more self-consistently compute the height-dependent electric conductivity, provided the auroral electron precipitation from the ring current model. Comparisons with the traditional empirical formula are carried out. It is found that the newly coupled modeling framework reveals smaller Hall and Pedersen conductance, resulting in a larger electric field. As a consequence, the subauroral polarization streams demonstrate a better agreement with observations from DMSP satellites. It is further found that the commonly assumed Maxwellian spectrum of the particle precipitation is not globally appropriate. Instead, a full precipitation spectrum resulted from wave particle interactions in the ring current accounts for a more comprehensive precipitation spectrum.

  14. Exploring the Cigala/calibra Network Data Base for Ionosphere Monitoring Over Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vani, B. C.; Galera Monico, J. F.; Shimabukuro, M. H.; Pereira, V. A.; Aquino, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    The ionosphere in Brazil is strongly influenced by the equatorial anomaly, therefore GNSS based applications are widely affected by ionospheric disturbances. A network for continuous monitoring of the ionosphere has been deployed over its territory since February/2011, as part of the CIGALA and CALIBRA projects. Through CIGALA (Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America), which was funded by European Commission (EC) in the framework of the FP7-GALILEO-2009-GSA (European GNSS Agency), the first stations were deployed at Presidente Prudente, São Paulo state, in February 2011. CIGALA was finalized in February 2012 with eight stations distributed over the Brazilian territory. Through CALIBRA (Countering GNSS high Accuracy applications Limitations due to Ionospheric disturbances in BRAzil), which is also funded by the European Commission now in the framework of the FP7-GALILEO-2011-GSA, new stations are being deployed. Some of the stations are being specifically placed according to geomagnetic considerations aiming to support the development of a local scintillation and TEC model. CALIBRA started in November 2012 and will have two years of duration, focusing on the development of improved and new algorithms that can be applied to high accuracy GNSS techniques in order to tackle the effects of ionospheric disturbances. PolarRxS-PRO receivers, manufactured by Septentrio, have been deployed at all stations This multi-GNSS receiver can collect data at rates of up to 100 Hz, providing ionospheric TEC, scintillation parameters like S4 and Sigma-Phi, and other signal metrics like locktime for all satellites and frequencies tracked. All collected data (raw and ionosphere monitoring records) is stored at a central facility located at the Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCT/UNESP) in Presidente Prudente. To deal with the large amount of data, an analysis infrastructure has also been established

  15. Satellite and ground measurements of latitude distribution of upper ionosphere parameters in the region of the main trough of ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, V.M.; Alekseev, V.N.; Afonin, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Results of simultaneous complex measurements of subauroral ionosphere structure at observations of charged-particle precipitation at Interkosmos-19 satellite, electron concentration and temperature at Kosmos-900 satellite, ionosphere parameters and plasma convection at Zhigansk (L∼4) and Jakutsk (L∼3) stations and 630.0 mm line luminescence by scanning photometer at Zhigansk station, carried out on the 26 - 27.03.1979, are presented. It is found, that the through polar edge is formed by low-energy electron precipitations in diffuse auroral zone. It is confirmed by spatial coincidence of diffuse precipitations equatorial boundary, determined by satellite and ground optical measurements, with the ionization main through polar edge, determined by ground ionospherical observation and satellite measurements Ne at Kosmos-900 satellite. Results of these complex experiments show as well, that one of the main mechanisms of main ionospherical through formation may be plasma convection peculiarities within F region at subauroral zone widthes

  16. The ionospheric eclipse factor method (IEFM) and its application to determining the ionospheric delay for GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Y.; Tscherning, C.C.; Knudsen, Per

    2006-01-01

    A new method for modeling the ionospheric delay using global positioning system (GPS) data is proposed, called the ionospheric eclipse factor method (IEFM). It is based on establishing a concept referred to as the ionospheric eclipse factor (IEF) lambda of the ionospheric pierce point (IPP...

  17. Ionospheric irregularities at Antarctic using GPS measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Feldstein auroral oval (Feldstein 1963; Holzworth and Meng 1975) for two different levels of magnetic activity (IQ), to investigate the ionospheric regions more affected by scintillation. We choose IQ = 3 as representative of the quiet ionosphere and IQ = 6 for the disturbed ionosphere, and we refer this two ovals as quiet oval ...

  18. Massive Statistics of VLF-Induced Ionospheric Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailoor, N.; Cohen, M.; Golkowski, M.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of lightning of the D-region of the ionosphere has been measured by Very Low Frequency (VLF) remote sensing, and can be seen through the observance of Early-Fast events. Previous research has indicated that several factors control the behavior and occurrence of these events, including the transmitter-receiver geometry, as well as the peak current and polarity of the strike. Unfortunately, since each event is unique due to the wide variety of impacting factors, it is difficult to make broad inferences about the interactions between the lightning and ionosphere. By investigating a large database of lightning-induced disturbances over a span of several years and over a continental-scale region, we seek to quantify the relationship between geometry, lightning parameters, and the apparent disturbance of the ionosphere as measured with VLF transmitters. We began with a set of 860,000 cases where an intense lightning stroke above 150 kA occurred within 300 km of a transmiter-receiver path. To then detect ionospheric disturbances from the large volume of VLF data and lightning incidents, we applied a number of classification methods to the actual VLF amplitude data, and find that the most accurate is a convolutional neural network, which yielded a detection efficiency of 95-98%, and a false positive rate less than 25%. Using this model, we were able to assemble a database of more than 97,000 events, with each event stored with its corresponding time, date, receiver, transmitter, and lightning parameters. Estimates for the peak and slope of each disruption were also calculated. From this data, we were able to chart the relationships between geometry and lightning parameters (peak current and polarity) towards the occurrence probability, perturbation intensity, and recovery time, of the VLF perturbation. The results of this analysis are presented here.

  19. Ionospheric signatures of magnetospheric boundaries in the post-noon sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Berry

    Full Text Available Spatial structures in ionospheric electron density revealed in a tomographic image have been identified with auroral forms and related to their sources in precipitating particles observed by DMSP satellites. The observations of plasma enhancements relate to discrete auroral arcs seen in the post-noon sector, identified by both red- and green-line emissions measured by a meridional scanning photometer. The features lie within a very narrow latitudinal band on L-shells where the satellite detectors observed electron precipitation classified as from the boundary plasma sheet (BPS. The harder particles are identified with an E-region structure, while further north the precipitation is softer, resulting in a localised F-layer blob and 630.0 nm emissions. A steep gradient in plasma density represent a signature in the ionosphere of the central plasma sheet (CPS/BPS boundary. A transition to a less-structured F-layer is found on crossing the convection reversal boundary..

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; polar ionosphere

  20. Ionospheric signatures of magnetospheric boundaries in the post-noon sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Berry

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial structures in ionospheric electron density revealed in a tomographic image have been identified with auroral forms and related to their sources in precipitating particles observed by DMSP satellites. The observations of plasma enhancements relate to discrete auroral arcs seen in the post-noon sector, identified by both red- and green-line emissions measured by a meridional scanning photometer. The features lie within a very narrow latitudinal band on L-shells where the satellite detectors observed electron precipitation classified as from the boundary plasma sheet (BPS. The harder particles are identified with an E-region structure, while further north the precipitation is softer, resulting in a localised F-layer blob and 630.0 nm emissions. A steep gradient in plasma density represent a signature in the ionosphere of the central plasma sheet (CPS/BPS boundary. A transition to a less-structured F-layer is found on crossing the convection reversal boundary..Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; polar ionosphere

  1. Dust Acoustic Solitons in the Dusty Plasma of the Earth's Ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopnin, S.I.; Kosarev, I.N.; Popel, S.I.; Yu, M.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Stratified structures that are observed at heights of 80-95 km in the lower part of the Earth's ionosphere are known as noctilucent clouds and polar mesosphere summer echoes. These structures are thought to be associated with the presence of vast amounts of charged dust or aerosols. The layers in the lower ionosphere where there are substantial amounts of dust are called the dusty ionosphere. The dust grains can carry a positive or a negative charge, depending on their constituent materials. As a rule, the grains are ice crystals, which may contain metallic inclusions. A grain with a sufficiently large metallic content can acquire a positive charge. Crystals of pure ice are charged negatively. The distribution of the dust grains over their charges has a profound impact on the ionizational and other properties of dust structures in the dusty ionosphere. In the present paper, a study is made of the effect of the sign of the dust charge on the properties of dust acoustic solitons propagating in the dusty ionosphere. It is shown that, when the dust charge is positive, dust acoustic solitons correspond to a hill in the electron density and a well in the ion density. When the dust is charged negatively, the situation is opposite. These differences in the properties of dust acoustic solitons can be used to diagnose the plasmas of noctilucent clouds and polar mesosphere summer echoes

  2. Role of the magnetospheric and ionospheric currents in the generation of the equatorial scintillations during geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Z. Biktash

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The equatorial ionosphere parameters, Kp, Dst, AU and AL indices characterized contribution of different magnetospheric and ionospheric currents to the H-component of geomagnetic field are examined to test the geomagnetic activity effect on the generation of ionospheric irregularities producing VLF scintillations. According to the results of the current statistical studies, one can predict near 70% of scintillations from Aarons' criteria using the Dst index, which mainly depicts the magnetospheric ring current field. To amplify Aarons' criteria or to propose new criteria for predicting scintillation characteristics is the question. In the present phase of the experimental investigations of electron density irregularities in the ionosphere new ways are opened up because observations in the interaction between the solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere during magnetic storms have progressed greatly. According to present view, the intensity of the electric fields and currents at the polar regions, as well as the magnetospheric ring current intensity, are strongly dependent on the variations of the interplanetary magnetic field. The magnetospheric ring current cannot directly penetrate the equatorial ionosphere and because of this difficulties emerge in explaining its relation to scintillation activity. On the other hand, the equatorial scintillations can be observed in the absence of the magnetospheric ring current. It is shown that in addition to Aarons' criteria for the prediction of the ionospheric scintillations, models can be used to explain the relationship between the equatorial ionospheric parameters, h'F, foF2, and the equatorial geomagnetic variations with the polar ionosphere currents and the solar wind.

  3. A Review of Ionospheric Scintillation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshi, S

    This is a general review of the existing climatological models of ionospheric radio scintillation for high and equatorial latitudes. Trans-ionospheric communication of radio waves from transmitter to user is affected by the ionosphere which is highly variable and dynamic in both time and space. Scintillation is the term given to irregular amplitude and phase fluctuations of the received signals and related to the electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Key sources of ionospheric irregularities are plasma instabilities; every irregularities model is based on the theory of radio wave propagation in random media. It is important to understand scintillation phenomena and the approach of different theories. Therefore, we have briefly discussed the theories that are used to interpret ionospheric scintillation data. The global morphology of ionospheric scintillation is also discussed briefly. The most important (in our opinion) analytical and physical models of scintillation are reviewed here.

  4. Faraday Rotation of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Signals as a Method of Ionospheric Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushley, A. C.; Kabin, K.; Noël, J.-M.

    2017-10-01

    Radio waves propagating through plasma in the Earth's ambient magnetic field experience Faraday rotation; the plane of the electric field of a linearly polarized wave changes as a function of the distance travelled through a plasma. Linearly polarized radio waves at 1090 MHz frequency are emitted by Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) devices that are installed on most commercial aircraft. These radio waves can be detected by satellites in low Earth orbits, and the change of the polarization angle caused by propagation through the terrestrial ionosphere can be measured. In this manuscript we discuss how these measurements can be used to characterize the ionospheric conditions. In the present study, we compute the amount of Faraday rotation from a prescribed total electron content value and two of the profile parameters of the NeQuick ionospheric model.

  5. Daytime Ionosphere Retrieval Algorithm for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew W.; Korpela, Eric J.; Sirk, Martin M.; England, Scott L.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer Extreme Ultraviolet spectrograph, ICON EUV, will measure altitude profiles of the daytime extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) OII emission near 83.4 and 61.7 nm that are used to determine density profiles and state parameters of the ionosphere. This paper describes the algorithm concept and approach to inverting these measured OII emission profiles to derive the associated O+ density profile from 150-450 km as a proxy for the electron content in the F-region of the ionosphere. The algorithm incorporates a bias evaluation and feedback step, developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory using data from the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) and the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) missions, that is able to effectively mitigate the effects of systematic instrument calibration errors and inaccuracies in the original photon source within the forward model. Results are presented from end-to-end simulations that convolved simulated airglow profiles with the expected instrument measurement response to produce profiles that were inverted with the algorithm to return data products for comparison to truth. Simulations of measurements over a representative ICON orbit show the algorithm is able to reproduce hmF2 values to better than 5 km accuracy, and NmF2 to better than 12% accuracy over a 12-second integration, and demonstrate that the ICON EUV instrument and daytime ionosphere algorithm can meet the ICON science objectives which require 20 km vertical resolution in hmF2 and 18% precision in NmF2.

  6. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  7. Electrostatic potential in the auroral ionosphere derived from Chatanika radar observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.C.; Banks, P.M.; Doupnik, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    A technique is described for determining the latitudinal variation of the electrostatic potential associated with the ionospheric convection electric fields. Using the north-south electric field component derived from radar convection velocity experiments, the integral of Exd1 is taken northward along the magnetic meridian, starting at low latitudes. The radar data consiste of up to 40 independent measurements of plasma convection spanning 15 0 of invariant latitude centered on Chatanika, Alaska (65 0 ν), with half-hour temporal resolution. It has been found that (1) the electric field contributions to the potential at and below 60 0 ν are small under most circumstances and (2) the latitudinal variation of the potential is smooth and regular, permitting the potentials to be contoured across local time. It is found from the experiments that the potential often varies uniformly over 10 0 latitude at dawn and dusk. Electric fields of 50 mV/m are common. It is also noted that the latitude of the greatest negative potential in the premidnight sector coincides with the Harang discontinuity in ionspheric currents. The potentials calculated from the measured plasma drifts exhibit a regular local time variation. Equipotential contours derived from the latitude-local time potential field obtained with the long-duration radar experiments, while not providing a snapshot of the instantaneous pattern, elucidate the large-scale diurnal variation of the electrostatic potential at auroral latitudes. From such contours it is found that a two-cell convection pattern with varying degrees of asymmetry is consistently present at auroral latitudes, that a cross-polar cap potential drop of 70--120 kV is present in moderately disturbed conditions, and that substorms perturb the potential pattern at all local times

  8. Mapping the total electron content over Malaysia using Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, S.; Abdullah, M.; Bouya, Z.; Musa, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    The ionosphere over Malaysia is unique because of her location which is in close proximity to the geomagnetic equator and is in the equatorial regions. In this region, the magnetic field is horizontally oriented from south to north and field aligned direction is in the meridional plane (ExB) which becomes the source of equatorial ionospheric anomaly occurrence such as plasma bubble, fountain effects and others. Until today, there is no model that has been developed over Malaysia to study the ionosphere. Due to that, the main objective of this paper is to develop a new technique for mapping the total electron content (TEC) from GPS measurements. Data by myRTKnet network of GPS receiver over Malaysia were used in this study. A new methodology, based on modified spherical cap harmonic analysis (SCHA), was developed to estimate diurnal vertical TEC over the region using GPS observations. The SCHA model is based on longitudinal expansion in Fourier series and fractional Legendre co-latitudinal functions over a spherical cap-like region. The TEC map with spatial resolution of 0.15 ° x 0.15 ° in latitude and longitude with the time resolution of 30 seconds are derived. TEC maps from the SCHA model were compared with the global ionospheric map and other regional models. Result shows that during low solar activity, SCHA model had a better mapping with the accuracy of less than 1 TECU compared to other regional models.

  9. PICASSO-SLP: a Langmuir probe instrument for monitoring the upper ionosphere on board a pico-satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranvier, Sylvain; Anciaux, Michel; Cardoen, Pepijn; Gamby, Emmanuel; Bonnewijn, Sabrina; De Keyser, Johan; Echim, Marius; Pieroux, Didier

    2016-04-01

    A novel Langmuir probe instrument, which will fly on board the Pico-Satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations (PICASSO), is under development at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy. PICASSO, an ESA in-orbit demonstrator, is a triple unit CubeSat of dimensions 340.5x100x100 mm. The sweeping Langmuir probe (SLP) instrument, which includes four thin cylindrical probes whose electrical potential is swept, is designed to measure both plasma density and electron temperature at an altitude varying from about 400 km up to 700 km from a high inclination orbit. Therefore, the plasma density is expected to fluctuate over a wide range, from about 1e8/m³ at high latitude and high altitude up to several times 1e12/m³ at low/mid latitude and low altitude. The electron temperature is expected to lie between approximately 1.000 K and 10.000 K. Given the high inclination of the orbit, the SLP instrument will allow a global monitoring of the ionosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of the order of 150 m for the electron density and temperature, and up to a few meters for electron density only. The main goals are to study 1) the ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling, 2) the subauroral ionosphere and corresponding magnetospheric features, 3) auroral structures, 4) polar caps, 5) for the density, the multi-scale behaviour, spectral properties and turbulence of processes typical for the auroral regions, and 6) ionospheric dynamics via coordinated observations with EISCAT's heating radar. Along the orbit, the Debye length is expected to vary from a few millimetres up to a few meters. Due to the tight constraints in terms of mass and volume inherent to pico-satellites, the use of long booms, which would guarantee that the probes are outside the sheath of the spacecraft (several Debye lengths away), is not possible. Consequently, the probes might be in the sheath of the spacecraft in polar regions. Extensive modelling and simulations of the sheath effects on the

  10. Ionospheric plasma by VHF waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The auto-correlation functions and power spectra of scintillations predict that the scale length of these irregularities varies from 200–500 m having velocity of movement between 75 m/sec to 200 m/sec. These results agree well with the results obtained by other workers. Keywords. Scintillation; ionospheric irregularities ...

  11. Saltstone Clean Cap Formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2005-04-22

    The current operation strategy for using Saltstone Vault 4 to receive 0.2 Ci/gallon salt solution waste involves pouring a clean grout layer over the radioactive grout prior to initiating pour into another cell. This will minimize the radiating surface area and reduce the dose rate at the vault and surrounding area. The Clean Cap will be used to shield about four feet of Saltstone poured into a Z-Area vault cell prior to moving to another cell. The minimum thickness of the Clean Cap layer will be determined by the cesium concentration and resulting dose levels and it is expected to be about one foot thick based on current calculations for 0.1 Ci Saltstone that is produced in the Saltstone process by stabilization of 0.2 Ci salt solution. This report documents experiments performed to identify a formulation for the Clean Cap. Thermal transient calculations, adiabatic temperature rise measurements, pour height, time between pour calculations and shielding calculations were beyond the scope and time limitations of this study. However, data required for shielding calculations (composition and specific gravity) are provided for shielding calculations. The approach used to design a Clean Cap formulation was to produce a slurry from the reference premix (10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash) and domestic water that resembled as closely as possible the properties of the Saltstone slurry. In addition, options were investigated that may offer advantages such as less bleed water and less heat generation. The options with less bleed water required addition of dispersants. The options with lower heat contained more fly ash and less slag. A mix containing 10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash with a water to premix ratio of 0.60 is recommended for the Clean Cap. Although this mix may generate more than 3 volume percent standing water (bleed water), it has rheological, mixing and flow properties that are similar to previously processed Saltstone. The recommended

  12. Saltstone Clean Cap Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C

    2005-01-01

    The current operation strategy for using Saltstone Vault 4 to receive 0.2 Ci/gallon salt solution waste involves pouring a clean grout layer over the radioactive grout prior to initiating pour into another cell. This will minimize the radiating surface area and reduce the dose rate at the vault and surrounding area. The Clean Cap will be used to shield about four feet of Saltstone poured into a Z-Area vault cell prior to moving to another cell. The minimum thickness of the Clean Cap layer will be determined by the cesium concentration and resulting dose levels and it is expected to be about one foot thick based on current calculations for 0.1 Ci Saltstone that is produced in the Saltstone process by stabilization of 0.2 Ci salt solution. This report documents experiments performed to identify a formulation for the Clean Cap. Thermal transient calculations, adiabatic temperature rise measurements, pour height, time between pour calculations and shielding calculations were beyond the scope and time limitations of this study. However, data required for shielding calculations (composition and specific gravity) are provided for shielding calculations. The approach used to design a Clean Cap formulation was to produce a slurry from the reference premix (10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash) and domestic water that resembled as closely as possible the properties of the Saltstone slurry. In addition, options were investigated that may offer advantages such as less bleed water and less heat generation. The options with less bleed water required addition of dispersants. The options with lower heat contained more fly ash and less slag. A mix containing 10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash with a water to premix ratio of 0.60 is recommended for the Clean Cap. Although this mix may generate more than 3 volume percent standing water (bleed water), it has rheological, mixing and flow properties that are similar to previously processed Saltstone. The recommended

  13. Simulations of the September 1987 lower thermospheric tides with the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesen, C.G.; Roble, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) was used to simulate incoherent scatter radar observations of the lower thermosphere tides during the first Lower Thermosphere Coupling Study (LTCS) campaign, September 21-26, 1987. The TIGCM utilized time-varying histories of the model input fields obtained from the World Data Center for the LTCS period. These model inputs included solar flux, total hemispheric power, solar wind data from which the cross-polar-cap potential was derived, and geomagnetic K p index. Calculations were made for the semidiurnal ion temperatures and horizontal neutral winds at locations representative of Arecibo, Millstone Hill, and Sondrestrom. The diurnal tides at Sondrestrom were also simulated. Tidal inputs to the TIGCM lower boundary were obtained from the middle atmosphere model of Forbes and Vial (1989). The TIGCM tidal structures are in fair general agreement with the observations. The amplitudes tended to be better simulated than the phases, and the mid- and high-latitude locations are simulated better than the low-latitude thermosphere. This may indicate a need to incorporate coupling of the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere with the E region dynamo in the equatorial region to obtain a better representation of low-latitude thermospheric tides. The model simulations were used to investigate the daily variability of the tides due to the geomagnetic activity occurring during this period. In general, the ion temperatures were predicted to be affected more than the winds, and the diurnal components more than the semidiurnal. The effects are typically largest at high latitudes and higher altitudes, but discernible differences were produced at low latitudes

  14. Application of GPS Measurements for Ionospheric and Tropospheric Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra Prasad, P.; Abdu, M. A.; Furlan, Benedito. M. P.; Koiti Kuga, Hélio

    military navigation. The DOD's primary purposes were to use the system in precision weapon delivery and providing a capability that would help reverse the proliferation of navigation systems in military. Subsequently, it was very quickly realized that civil use and scientific utility would far outstrip military use. A variety of scientific applications are uniquely suited to precise positioning capabilities. The relatively high precision, low cost, mobility and convenience of GPS receivers make positioning attractive. The other applications being precise time measurement, surveying and geodesy purposes apart from orbit and attitude determination along with many user services. The system operates by transmitting radio waves from satellites to receivers on the ground, aircraft, or other satellites. These signals are used to calculate location very accurately. Standard Positioning Services (SPS) which restricts access to Coarse/Access (C/A) code and carrier signals on the L1 frequency only. The accuracy thus provided by SPS fall short of most of the accuracy requirements of users. The upper atmosphere is ionized by the ultra violet radiation from the sun. The significant errors in positioning can result when the signals are refracted and slowed by ionospheric conditions, the parameter of the ionosphere that produces most effects on GPS signals is the total number of electrons in the ionospheric propagation path. This integrated number of electrons, called Total Electron Content (TEC) varies, not only from day to night, time of the year and solar flux cycle, but also with geomagnetic latitude and longitude. Being plasma the ionosphere affects the radio waves propagating through it. Effects of scintillation on GPS satellite navigation systems operating at L1 (1.5754 GHz), L2 (1.2276 GHz) frequencies have not been estimated accurately. It is generally recognized that GPS navigation systems are vulnerable in the polar and especially in the equatorial region during the

  15. The INAF/IAPS Plasma Chamber for ionospheric simulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Piero

    2016-04-01

    The plasma chamber is particularly suitable to perform studies for the following applications: - plasma compatibility and functional tests on payloads envisioned to operate in the ionosphere (e.g. sensors onboard satellites, exposed to the external plasma environment); - calibration/testing of plasma diagnostic sensors; - characterization and compatibility tests on components for space applications (e.g. optical elements, harness, satellite paints, photo-voltaic cells, etc.); - experiments on satellite charging in a space plasma environment; - tests on active experiments which use ion, electron or plasma sources (ion thrusters, hollow cathodes, field effect emitters, plasma contactors, etc.); - possible studies relevant to fundamental space plasma physics. The facility consists of a large volume vacuum tank (a cylinder of length 4.5 m and diameter 1.7 m) equipped with a Kaufman type plasma source, operating with Argon gas, capable to generate a plasma beam with parameters (i.e. density and electron temperature) close to the values encountered in the ionosphere at F layer altitudes. The plasma beam (A+ ions and electrons) is accelerated into the chamber at a velocity that reproduces the relative motion between an orbiting satellite and the ionosphere (≈ 8 km/s). This feature, in particular, allows laboratory simulations of the actual compression and depletion phenomena which take place in the ram and wake regions around satellites moving through the ionosphere. The reproduced plasma environment is monitored using Langmuir Probes (LP) and Retarding Potential Analyzers (RPA). These sensors can be automatically moved within the experimental space using a sled mechanism. Such a feature allows the acquisition of the plasma parameters all around the space payload installed into the chamber for testing. The facility is currently in use to test the payloads of CSES satellite (Chinese Seismic Electromagnetic Satellite) devoted to plasma parameters and electric field

  16. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  17. Preface: International Reference Ionosphere - Progress in Ionospheric Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2010-01-01

    The international reference ionosphere (lRI) is the internationally recommended empirical model for the specification of ionospheric parameters supported by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) and recognized by the International Standardization Organization (ISO). IRI is being continually improved by a team of international experts as new data become available and better models are being developed. This issue chronicles the latest phase of model updates as reported during two IRI-related meetings. The first was a special session during the Scientific Assembly of the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR) in Montreal, Canada in July 2008 and the second was an IRI Task Force Activity at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs in May 2009. This work led to several improvements and additions of the model which will be included in the next version, IRI-201O. The issue is divided into three sections focusing on the improvements made in the topside ionosphere, the F-peak, and the lower ionosphere, respectively. This issue would not have been possible without the reviewing efforts of many individuals. Each paper was reviewed by two referees. We thankfully acknowledge the contribution to this issue made by the following reviewers: Jacob Adeniyi, David Altadill, Eduardo Araujo, Feza Arikan, Dieter Bilitza, Jilijana Cander, Bela Fejer, Tamara Gulyaeva, Manuel Hermindez-Pajares, Ivan Kutiev, John MacDougal, Leo McNamara, Bruno Nava, Olivier Obrou, Elijah Oyeyemi, Vadym Paznukhov, Bodo Reinisch, John Retterer, Phil Richards, Gary Sales, J.H. Sastri, Ludger Scherliess, Iwona Stanislavska, Stamir Stankov, Shin-Yi Su, Manlian Zhang, Y ongliang Zhang, and Irina Zakharenkova. We are grateful to Peggy Ann Shea for her final review and guidance as the editor-in-chief for special issues of Advances in Space Research. We thank the authors for their timely submission and their quick response to the reviewer comments and humbly

  18. Developing an ionospheric map for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Okoh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a map of the ionosphere over South Africa is presented in this paper. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI model, South African Bottomside Ionospheric Model (SABIM, and measurements from ionosondes in the South African Ionosonde Network, were combined within their own limitations to develop an accurate representation of the South African ionosphere. The map is essentially in the form of a computer program that shows spatial and temporal representations of the South African ionosphere for a given set of geophysical parameters. A validation of the map is attempted using a comparison of Total Electron Content (TEC values derived from the map, from the IRI model, and from Global Positioning System (GPS measurements. It is foreseen that the final South African ionospheric map will be implemented as a Space Weather product of the African Space Weather Regional Warning Centre.

  19. Ionospheric effects of thunderstorms and lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, Erin H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Tropospheric thunderstorms have been reported to disturb the lower ionosphere (~65-90 km) by convective atmospheric gravity waves and by electromagnetic field changes produced by lightning discharges. However, due to the low electron density in the lower ionosphere, active probing of its electron distribution is difficult, and the various perturbative effects are poorly understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that by using remotely-detected ?me waveforms of lightning radio signals it is possible to probe the lower ionosphere and its fluctuations in a spatially and temporally-resolved manner. Here we report evidence of gravity wave effects on the lower ionosphere originating from the thunderstorm. We also report variations in the nighttime ionosphere atop a small thunderstorm and associate the variations with the storm’s electrical activity. Finally, we present a data analysis technique to map ionospheric acoustic waves near thunderstorms.

  20. Solar Illumination Control of the Polar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, L.; Maggiolo, R.; De Keyser, J.; André, M.; Eriksson, A. I.; Haaland, S.; Li, K.; Poedts, S.

    2017-11-01

    Polar wind outflow is an important process through which the ionosphere supplies plasma to the magnetosphere. The main source of energy driving the polar wind is solar illumination of the ionosphere. As a result, many studies have found a relation between polar wind flux densities and solar EUV intensity, but less is known about their relation to the solar zenith angle at the ionospheric origin, certainly at higher altitudes. The low energy of the outflowing particles and spacecraft charging means it is very difficult to measure the polar wind at high altitudes. We take advantage of an alternative method that allows estimations of the polar wind flux densities far in the lobes. We analyze measurements made by the Cluster spacecraft at altitudes from 4 up to 20 RE. We observe a strong dependence on the solar zenith angle in the ion flux density and see that both the ion velocity and density exhibit a solar zenith angle dependence as well. We also find a seasonal variation of the flux density.

  1. Method for removing strongly adsorbed surfactants and capping agents from metal to facilitate their catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Gong, Kuanping; Cai, Yun; Wong, Stanislaus; Koenigsmann, Christopher

    2016-11-08

    A method of synthesizing activated electrocatalyst, preferably having a morphology of a nanostructure, is disclosed. The method includes safely and efficiently removing surfactants and capping agents from the surface of the metal structures. With regard to metal nanoparticles, the method includes synthesis of nanoparticle(s) in polar or non-polar solution with surfactants or capping agents and subsequent activation by CO-adsorption-induced surfactant/capping agent desorption and electrochemical oxidation. The method produces activated macroparticle or nanoparticle electrocatalysts without damaging the surface of the electrocatalyst that includes breaking, increasing particle thickness or increasing the number of low coordination sites.

  2. Antarctic Peninsula troposphere-stratosphere-ionosphere coupling (APTIC) and conjugate events investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.

    2005-04-01

    Researches of troposphere-stratosphere-ionosphere coupling are based on idea of the strong influence of the long- and short-term solar activity variations on the polar terrestrial climate and the asymmetry in the energy deposition from the magnetosphere into the polar ionospheres. The solar activity variations produce changeable impact on magnetosphere and polar ionosphere in both hemispheres. Results of this impact are (1) differences in the ozone concentrations in the Antarctic and Arctic stratosphere due to different forcing in spring; (2) different planetary wave activity; (3) different gravity wave flux intensity depended on strengths of the weather frontal cyclones activity. The study of upper atmosphere in both hemispheres is necessary to better understand various physical mechanisms responsible for the energy transfer from the Sun into atmosphere and ionosphere as well as reverse flux from troposphere to geospace. A simultaneous consideration of phenomena occurring over both polar regions is very important for understanding of these processes. The solution of the problem of energy exchange between neutral atmosphere and geospace plasma is need in study of industrial EM pollution from Earth surface to geospace. A corresponding work must promote modeling space weather on satellite heights and earthquake prediction using ionosphere parameters changes. A determinative significance of Antarctic Peninsula is caused by following features: (1) Antarctic Peninsula is situated near an extremely cyclonic active region - Drake Passage, (2) only this region in Antarctica is magnetically conjugated to industrial area in Northern hemisphere, and (3) this region contains many Antarctic stations which are good equipped by devices to study weather and climate, ozone layer, ionosphere and magnetic field. Last years weather observations at Vernadsky station show that up to 60 atmospheric frontal cyclones (with pressure variation more 20 millibars) swept over Antarctic

  3. Theoretical study of the seasonal behavior of the global ionosphere at solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    The seasonal behavior of the global ionosphere was studied using a time-dependent three-dimensional physical model (developed by Shunk and his coworkers) of the ionosphere at altitudes between 120 and 800 km. This model accounts for field-aligned diffusion, cross-field electrodynamic drifts both the equatorial region and at high latitudes, interhemispheric flow, thermospheric winds, polar wind escape, energy-dependent chemical reactions, neutral composition changes, ion production due to solar EUV radiation and auroral precipitation, thermal conduction, diffusion-thermal heat flow, and local heating and cooling processes. The model studies were carried out for both June and December solstice conditions at solar maximum and for low geomagnetic activity. The ionospheric features predicted by the model agreed qualitatively with the available measurements.

  4. ionospheric effects on ionospheric effects on gps signal in low gps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The ionospheric errors equations GPS approach can be written as. 1. 2. (1) and α 40.3. ; denotes the free electrons density per cubic meter•µ , is the ionospheric group delat with respect to propagation in vacuumand f is .... analysing different effects on the state of ionospheric disturbances. MS users particularly the GPS ...

  5. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Finlay, Chris; Hesse, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagneticmain field. Observations from...... the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine...

  6. Polar heating in Saturn's thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D numerical global circulation model of the Kronian thermosphere has been used to investigate the influence of polar heating. The distributions of temperature and winds resulting from a general heat source in the polar regions are described. We show that both the total energy input and its vertical distribution are important to the resulting thermal structure. We find that the form of the topside heating profile is particularly important in determining exospheric temperatures. We compare our results to exospheric temperatures from Voyager occultation measurements (Smith et al., 1983; Festou and Atreya, 1982 and auroral H3+ temperatures from ground-based spectroscopic observations (e.g. Miller et al., 2000. We find that a polar heat source is consistent with both the Smith et al. determination of T∞~400 K at ~30° N and auroral temperatures. The required heat source is also consistent with recent estimates of the Joule heating rate at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004. However, our results show that a polar heat source can probably not explain the Festou and Atreya determination of T∞~800 K at ~4° N and the auroral temperatures simultaneously. Keywords. Ionosphere (Planetary ionosphere – Magnetospherica physics (Planetary magnetospheres – Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (Thermospheric dynamics

  7. Ionospheric phenomena before strong earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Silina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of several ionospheric parameters before earthquakes with magnitude M > 5.5 located less than 500 km from an ionospheric vertical sounding station is performed. Ionospheric effects preceding "deep" (depth h > 33 km and "crust" (h 33 km earthquakes were analysed separately. Data of nighttime measurements of the critical frequencies foF2 and foEs, the frequency fbEs and Es-spread at the middle latitude station Dushanbe were used. The frequencies foF2 and fbEs are proportional to the square root of the ionization density at heights of 300 km and 100 km, respectively. It is shown that two days before the earthquakes the values of foF2 averaged over the morning hours (00:00 LT–06:00 LT and of fbEs averaged over the nighttime hours (18:00 LT–06:00 LT decrease; the effect is stronger for the "deep" earthquakes. Analysing the coefficient of semitransparency which characterizes the degree of small-scale turbulence, it was shown that this value increases 1–4 days before "crust" earthquakes, and it does not change before "deep" earthquakes. Studying Es-spread which manifests itself as diffuse Es track on ionograms and characterizes the degree of large-scale turbulence, it was found that the number of Es-spread observations increases 1–3 days before the earthquakes; for "deep" earthquakes the effect is more intensive. Thus it may be concluded that different mechanisms of energy transfer from the region of earthquake preparation to the ionosphere occur for "deep" and "crust" events.

  8. Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmer, Volker; Bernert, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24 Within the framework of the UN International Space Weather Initiative, and building upon the achievements of the International Heliophysical Year, the German project SIMONE (Sun Ionosphere MOnitoring NEtwork) operates several SID monitors provided by the University of Stanford. Here we present an overview of sudden ionospheric disturbances recorded since 2006 at the high school Gymnasium Walsrode until to date. The continous measurements allow a detailed comparison of locally measured SIDs with the general trend of solar activity during the current solar maximum. We further show that the measurements reveal specific information on the variable response of the dayside ionosphere to solar flares.

  9. Complex network description of the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shikun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xihai; Li, Yihong; Niu, Chao; Yang, Xiaoyun; Liu, Daizhi

    2018-03-01

    Complex networks have emerged as an essential approach of geoscience to generate novel insights into the nature of geophysical systems. To investigate the dynamic processes in the ionosphere, a directed complex network is constructed, based on a probabilistic graph of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) from 2012. The results of the power-law hypothesis test show that both the out-degree and in-degree distribution of the ionospheric network are not scale-free. Thus, the distribution of the interactions in the ionosphere is homogenous. None of the geospatial positions play an eminently important role in the propagation of the dynamic ionospheric processes. The spatial analysis of the ionospheric network shows that the interconnections principally exist between adjacent geographical locations, indicating that the propagation of the dynamic processes primarily depends on the geospatial distance in the ionosphere. Moreover, the joint distribution of the edge distances with respect to longitude and latitude directions shows that the dynamic processes travel further along the longitude than along the latitude in the ionosphere. The analysis of small-world-ness indicates that the ionospheric network possesses the small-world property, which can make the ionosphere stable and efficient in the propagation of dynamic processes.

  10. A STUDY ON THE KOREAN IONOSPHERIC VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hee Bae

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The ionosphere in accordance with solar activity can affect the transmission of radio waves. The effect of the ionosphere on the radio wave propagation are scattering of radio waves, attenuation, angle error, ranging error, and time delay. The present study is based on the Korean ionospheirc data obtained at the AnYang Radio Research Laboratory from January 1985 through October 1989. The data are analyzed to show the daily and the annual variations of the ionosphere. The data are also used to simulate the density distribution of the Korean ionosphere following the Chapman law.

  11. Electrodynamics of the Martian Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of the Martian crustal magnetic fields makes a significant modification to the interaction between the solar wind/IMF and the ionosphere of the planet. This paper presents the results of 3-D hybrid simulations of Martian solar wind interaction containing the Martian crustal fields., self-consistent ionospheric chemistry and planetary rotation. It has already been reported that the addition of the crustal fields and planetary rotation makes a significant modification of the ionospheric loss from Mars, Brecht et al., 2016. This paper focuses on two other aspects of the interaction, the electric fields and the current systems created by the solar wind interaction. The results of several simulations will be analyzed and compared. The electric fields around Mars due to its interaction with the solar wind will be examined. Special attention will be paid to the electric field constituents (∇ X B, ∇Pe, ηJ). Regions where the electric field is parallel to the magnetic field will be found and the implications of these regions will be discussed. Current systems for each ion species will be shown. Finally the effects on the electric fields and the current systems due to the rotation of Mars will be examined.

  12. Estimating Parameters for the Earth-Ionosphere Waveguide Using VLF Narrowband Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. C.; Cohen, M.

    2017-12-01

    Estimating the D-region (60 to 90 km altitude) ionospheric electron density profile has always been a challenge. The D-region's altitude is too high for aircraft and balloons to reach but is too low for satellites to orbit at. Sounding rocket measurements have been a useful tool for directly measuring the ionosphere, however, these types of measurements are infrequent and costly. A more sustainable type of measurement, for characterizing the D-region, is remote sensing with very low frequency (VLF) waves. Both the lower ionosphere and Earth's ground strongly reflect VLF waves. These two spherical reflectors form what is known as the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. As VLF waves propagate within the waveguide, they interact with the D-region ionosphere, causing amplitude and phase changes that are polarization dependent. These changes can be monitored with a spatially distributed array of receivers and D-region properties can be inferred from these measurements. Researchers have previously used VLF remote sensing techniques, from either narrowband transmitters or sferics, to estimate the density profile, but these estimations are typically during a short time frame and over a narrow propagation region. We report on an effort to improve the understanding of VLF wave propagation by estimating the commonly known h' and beta two parameter exponential electron density profile. Measurements from multiple narrowband transmitters at multiple receivers are taken, concurrently, and input into an algorithm. The cornerstone of the algorithm is an artificial neural network (ANN), where input values are the received narrowband amplitude and phase and the outputs are the estimated h' and beta parameters. Training data for the ANN is generated using the Navy's Long-Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC) model. Emphasis is placed on profiling the daytime ionosphere, which has a more stable and predictable profile than the nighttime. Daytime ionospheric disturbances, from high solar

  13. Observations of subauroral ionospheric dynamics during SED plume passage at Millstone Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Erickson, P. J.; Coster, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Storm enhanced density (SED) is a characteristic ionospheric storm time structure, with a significant plasma density enhancement in a narrow zone. SED structures often (but not always) span the continental US with a base in the US northeast at the afternoon and dusk sector, extending westward or northwest into the high latitude dayside cusp region. It is a typical and repeatable space weather phenomenon occurring during the main phase of magnetic storms with intensity ranging from active to disturbed levels. Observations of stormtime ionospheric density enhancement at subauroral latitudes have a long history, and were termed the 'dusk effect' until relatively recently, when dense networks of GNSS receivers have allowed us to view this structure with much finer spatial and temporal resolution. The formation of a SED plume is a topic under intensive community investigation, but in general it is believed that stormtime ionospheric dynamics and processes within the coupling magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system are responsible. For instance, poleward and sunward plasma drifts at the edge of the expanded dusk sector high-latitude convection can be important. Subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) are often observed at the poleward edge of the SED plume where ionospheric conductivity is low. SAPS is a huge westward ion flow that can convect ionospheric plasma from the afternoon or evening sector where solar photoionization production is waning, creating low density or density troughs. Stormtime penetration electric fields also exist, creating enhanced low and mid latitude upward ion drifts that move ionospheric plasma upward from the low altitude region where they are produced. This provides another important ionization source to contribute to maintaining the SED plume. This paper will provide analysis of the relative strength of these factors by using joint datasets of current geospace storm events obtained with the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar, GNSS

  14. Magnetotail processes and their ionospheric signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdousi, B.; Raeder, J.; Zesta, E.; Murphy, K. R.; Cramer, W. D.

    2017-12-01

    In-situ observations in the magnetotail are sparse and limited to single point measurements. In the ionosphere, on the other hand, there is a broad range of observations, including magnetometers, auroral imagers, and various radars. Since the ionosphere is to some extent a mirror of plasmasheet processes it can be used as a monitor of magnetotail dynamics. Thus, it is of great importance to understand the coupling between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere in order to properly interpret the ionosphere and ground observations in terms of magnetotail dynamics. For this purpose, the global magnetohydrodynamic model OpenGGCM is used to investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. One of the key processes in magnetotail dynamics are bursty bulk flows (BBFs) which are the major means by which momentum and energy get transferred through the magnetotail and down to the ionosphere. BBFs often manifested in the ionosphere as auroral streamers. This study focuses on mapping such flow bursts from the magnetotail to the ionosphere along the magnetic field lines for three states of the magnetotail: pre-substorm onset through substorm expansion and during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) following the substorm. We find that the orientation of streamers in the ionosphere differes for different local times, and that, for both tail and ionospheric signatures, activity increases during the SCM configutation compared to the pre-onset and quiet times. We also find that the background convection in the tail impacts the direction and deflection of the BBFs and the subsequent orientation of the auroral streamers in the ionosphere.

  15. Present and Future IGS Ionospheric Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krankowski, Andrzej; Wielgosz, Pawel; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel; García-Rigo, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is, on one hand, to show the present performance of the combined final and rapid IGS global ionosphere maps (GIMs), and on the other hand to inform the geodetic community on new product - predicted IGS GIMs. In addition, information on future development of IGS ionospheric products will be also presented. Nowadays, the Ionosphere Working Group of IGS generates three types of ionospheric products: final, rapid and predicted, respectively. There are currently four IGS Associate Analysis Centres (IAACs) for the ionospheric products: CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe, University of Berne, Switzerland), ESA/ESOC (European Space Operations Center of ESA, Darmstadt, Germany), JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, U.S.A) and gAGE/UPC (Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain). These centres provide ionosphere maps computed with different approaches. Their maps are uploaded to IGS Ionosphere Product Coordinator, who computes official IGS combined products. Since January 2008, this coordination is carried out by the GRL/UWM (Geodynamics Research Laboratory of the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland). The IGS GIMs are provided in Ionosphere Exchange (IONEX) format with spatial resolution of 5.0 degrees in longitude and 2.5 degrees in latitude, and temporal resolution of 2 hours. Latency of the final and rapid GIMs is 10 days and 1 day, respectively. In November 2009, the IGS Iono WG started to generate predicted ionospheric products 1 and 2 days in advance (requested for ESA's SMOS mission). These new IGS products are currently based on predicted ionosphere maps prepared by UPC and ESA. During period of more than 10 years of continuous IGS ionosphere operation, the techniques used by the IAACs and the strategies of combination have improved in such a way that the combined IGS GIMs are now significantly more accurate and robust. Future plans include, among others, increasing temporal resolution to 1 hour and

  16. First Observations of GNSS Ionospheric Scintillations From DemoGRAPE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, L.; Cilliers, P. J.; Romano, V.; Hunstad, I.; Correia, E.; Linty, N.; Dovis, F.; Terzo, O.; Ruiu, P.; Ward, J.; Riley, P.

    2016-10-01

    The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia leads an international project funded by the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research, called Demonstrator of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Research and Application for Polar Environment (DemoGRAPE), in partnership with Politecnico di Torino, Istituto Superiore Mario Boella, and with South African National Space Agency and the Brazilian National Institute of Space Physics, as key collaborators. DemoGRAPE is a new prototype of support for the satellite navigation in Antarctica. Besides the scientific interest, the accuracy of satellite navigation in Antarctica is of paramount importance since there is always the danger that people and vehicles can fall into a crevasse during a snowstorm, when visibility is limited and travel is restricted to following specified routes using satellite navigation systems. The variability of ionospheric delay and ionospheric scintillation are two of the primary factors which affect the accuracy of satellite navigation. The project will provide a demonstrator of cutting edge technology for the empirical assessment of the ionospheric delay and ionospheric scintillations in the polar regions. The scope of the project includes new equipment for the recording and dissemination of GNSS data and products installed at the South African and Brazilian bases in Antarctica. The new equipment will facilitate the exchange of software and derived products via the Cloud computing technology infrastructure. The project portal is accessible at www.demogrape.net. We report the first Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal scintillations observed in Antarctica.

  17. ATLAS end-cap detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Three scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Phyiscs at Novossibirsk with one of the end-caps of the ATLAS detector. The end-caps will be used to detect particles produced in the proton-proton collisions at the heart of the ATLAS experiment that are travelling close to the axis of the two beams.

  18. Space weather effects on lower ionosphere: First investigation from Bharati station during 34th Indian scientific expedition to Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Anirban; Saha, Kumarjit; De, Barin Kumar; Subrahmanyam, Kandula Venkata; Shreedevi, P. R.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the solar flare effects on the D-region of the ionosphere with the help of VLF (Very Low Frequency) radio waves using a portable E-field system from Antarctica during the summer period of 34th Indian scientific expedition. Two GPS time synchronized VLF receivers, one located at Bharati, Antarctica (geographical latitude 69.40°S, longitude 76.18°E) and another located at Tripura, India (geographical latitude 23.84°N, longitude 91.28°E) were operated simultaneously to infer common mode changes in the lower ionosphere for a number of solar flares events. The two systems constantly monitored the carrier amplitude and phase of the MSK (Minimum Shift Keying) modulated navy transmitter located in Australia (Callsign: NWC, 19.8 kHz, geographical latitude 21.88°S, longitude 114.13°E), around 5.6 Mm great circle distance from the two receivers. The results are interpreted in terms of Earth-ionosphere wave-guide characteristics. A Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) model study is also performed to infer the changes in the daytime electron density in polar D-region ionosphere during the solar flares. The exponential fit of the modeled electron density change with average X-ray flux change shows an excellent correlation (R2 value 0.95). The exponential fit is utilized to infer the daytime electron density change in the polar ionosphere during solar flare events. The analyses indicate that small solar flares of class 'C' can be very effectively detected with the portable antenna system even if the receiver is located in polar coastal region compared to equatorial region. The expedition results also demonstrate the feasibility of using portable VLF receivers from the coastal stations for monitoring the polar lower ionosphere from Antarctica and open up new opportunities for long term exploration.

  19. Geodetic Space Weather Monitoring by means of Ionosphere Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The term space weather indicates physical processes and phenomena in space caused by radiation of energy mainly from the Sun. Manifestations of space weather are (1) variations of the Earth's magnetic field, (2) the polar lights in the northern and southern hemisphere, (3) variations within the ionosphere as part of the upper atmosphere characterized by the existence of free electrons and ions, (4) the solar wind, i.e. the permanent emission of electrons and photons, (5) the interplanetary magnetic field, and (6) electric currents, e.g. the van Allen radiation belt. It can be stated that ionosphere disturbances are often caused by so-called solar storms. A solar storm comprises solar events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which have different effects on the Earth. Solar flares may cause disturbances in positioning, navigation and communication. CMEs can effect severe disturbances and in extreme cases damages or even destructions of modern infrastructure. Examples are interruptions to satellite services including the global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), communication systems, Earth observation and imaging systems or a potential failure of power networks. Currently the measurements of solar satellite missions such as STEREO and SOHO are used to forecast solar events. Besides these measurements the Earth's ionosphere plays another key role in monitoring the space weather, because it responses to solar storms with an increase of the electron density. Space-geodetic observation techniques, such as terrestrial GNSS, satellite altimetry, space-borne GPS (radio occultation), DORIS and VLBI provide valuable global information about the state of the ionosphere. Additionally geodesy has a long history and large experience in developing and using sophisticated analysis and combination techniques as well as empirical and physical modelling approaches. Consequently, geodesy is predestinated for strongly supporting space weather monitoring via

  20. Ionospheric Modeling for Precise GNSS Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Memarzadeh, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop a procedure for modeling and predicting ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) for high precision differential GNSS applications. As the ionosphere is a highly dynamic medium, we believe that to have a reliable procedure it is necessary to transfer

  1. Associating an ionospheric parameter with major earthquake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With time, ionospheric variation analysis is gaining over lithospheric monitoring in serving precursors for earthquake forecast. The current paper ... Lithospheric disturbances or crust vibrations affecting ionosphere are an established fact .... rupts telecommunication systems leading to signal fadeout or communication gap. 3.

  2. Associating an ionospheric parameter with major earthquake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With time, ionospheric variation analysis is gaining over lithospheric monitoring in serving precursors for earthquake forecast. The current paper highlights the association of major (Ms ≥ 6.0) and medium (4.0 ≤ Ms > 6.0) earthquake occurrences throughout the world in different ranges of the Ionospheric Earthquake ...

  3. Comparative evaluation of NeQuick and IRI models over Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrella, Marco; Nava, Bruno; Pezzopane, Michael; Migoya-Orue, Yenca; Scotto, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the AUSPICIO (AUtomatic Scaling of Polar Ionograms and Cooperative Ionospheric Observations) project, the ionograms recorded at Hobart (middle latitude), Macquarie Island, Livingstone Island and Comandante Ferraz (middle-high latitude) and those recorded at the ionospheric observatories of Casey, Mawson, Davis, and Scott Base (Antarctic Polar Circle), have been taken into account to study the capability of NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models in predicting the behavior of the ionosphere, mainly in the polar region. In particular, the applicability of NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models was evaluated under two different modes: a) as assimilative models ingesting the foF2 and hmF2 measurements obtained from the electron density profiles provided by the Adaptive Ionospheric Profiler (AIP); b) as climatological models taking as input F10.7 solar activity index. The results obtained from the large number of comparisons made for each ionospheric observatory when NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models work according to the two modes above mentioned, reveal that the best description of the ionosphere electron density at the polar regions is provided when peak parameter data are ingested in near-real-time into NeQuick-2 and IRI-2012 models which, indeed, are not always able to represent efficiently the behavior of the ionosphere over the polar regions when operating in long term prediction mode. The statistical analysis results expressed in terms of root mean square errors (r.m.s.e.) for each ionospheric observatory show that, outside the Antarctic Polar Circle (APC), NeQuick-2 performance is better than the IRI-2012 performance; on the contrary, inside the APC IRI-2012 model performs better than NeQuick-2.

  4. Ionospheric Anomaly before Kyushu|Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available GIM data released by IGS is used in the article and a new method of combining the Sliding Time Window Method and the Ionospheric TEC correlation analysis method of adjacent grid points is proposed to study the relationship between pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies and earthquake. By analyzing the abnormal change of TEC in the 5 grid points around the seismic region, the abnormal change of ionospheric TEC is found before the earthquake and the correlation between the TEC sequences of lattice points is significantly affected by earthquake. Based on the analysis of the spatial distribution of TEC anomaly, anomalies of 6 h, 12 h and 6 h were found near the epicenter three days before the earthquake. Finally, ionospheric tomographic technology is used to do tomographic inversion on electron density. And the distribution of the electron density in the ionospheric anomaly is further analyzed.

  5. Good Regulatory Lags for Price Cap and Rolling Cap contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Luis Lima R; Andres Gomez Lobo

    2004-01-01

    Price caps are a popular form of monopoly price regulation. One of its disadvantages is the perverse incentives that regulated firms might have to scamp on cost reducing effort during the last years before a price review. In order to avoid this problem a “rolling cap†contract was introduced in the United Kingdom that overcomes this last problem. In spite of their popularity, there is scant research on the optimal regulatory lag (number of years between price reviews) of a price cap or rol...

  6. Whistlers and related ionospheric phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Helliwell, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of whistlers and related phenomena is a key element in studies of very-low-frequency propagation, satellite communication, the outer ionosphere, and solar-terrestrial relationships. This comprehensive text presents a history of the study of the phenomena and includes all the elements necessary for the calculation of the characteristics of whistlers and whistler-mode signals.An introduction and brief history are followed by a summary of the theory of whistlers and a detailed explanation of the calculation of their characteristics. Succeeding chapters offer a complete atlas of

  7. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere?

  8. Ionospheric modification and parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fejer, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Thresholds and linear growth rates for stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering and for the parametric decay instability are derived by using arguments of energy transfer. For this purpose an expression for the ponderomotive force is derived. Conditions under which the partial pressure force due to differential dissipation exceeds the ponderomotive force are also discussed. Stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering are weakly excited by existing incoherent backscatter radars. The parametric decay instability is strongly excited in ionospheric heating experiments. Saturation theories of the parametric decay instability are therefore described. After a brief discussion of the purely growing instability the effect of using several pumps is discussed as well as the effects of inhomogenicity. Turning to detailed theories of ionospheric heating, artificial spread F is discussed in terms of a purely growing instability where the nonlinearity is due to dissipation. Field-aligned short-scale striations are explained in terms of dissipation of the parametrically excited Langmuir waves (plasma oscillations): they might be further amplified by an explosive instability (except the magnetic equator). Broadband absorption is probably responsible for the 'overshoot' effect: the initially observed level of parametrically excited Langmuir waves is much higher than the steady state level

  9. The Relationship of High-Latitude Thermospheric Wind With Ionospheric Horizontal Current, as Observed by CHAMP Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Lühr, Hermann; Wang, Hui; Xiong, Chao

    2017-12-01

    The relationship between high-latitude ionospheric currents (Hall current and field-aligned current) and thermospheric wind is investigated. The 2-D patterns of horizontal wind and equivalent current in the Northern Hemisphere derived from the CHAMP satellite are considered for the first time simultaneously. The equivalent currents show strong dependences on both interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By and Bz components. However, IMF By orientation is more important in controlling the wind velocity patterns. The duskside wind vortex as well as the antisunward wind in the morning polar cap is more evident for positive By. To better understand their spatial relation in different sectors, a systematic superposed epoch analysis is applied. Our results show that in the dusk sector, the vectors of the zonal wind and equivalent current are anticorrelated, and both of them form a vortical flow pattern for different activity levels. The currents and zonal wind are intensified with the increase of merging electric field. However, on the dawnside, where the relation is less clear, antisunward zonal winds dominate. Plasma drift seems to play a less important role for the wind than neutral forces in this sector. In the noon sector, the best anticorrelation between equivalent current and wind is observed for a positive IMF By component and it is less obvious for negative By. A clear seasonal effect with current intensities increasing from winter to summer is observed in the noon sector. Different from the currents, the zonal wind intensity shows little dependence on seasons. Our results indicate that the plasma drift and the neutral forces are of comparable influence on the zonal wind at CHAMP altitude in the noon sector.

  10. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vanhamäki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field. The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km−1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981.

  11. Ionospheric and thermospheric couplings: vertical, latitudinal and longitudinal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwar, V. B.; Carlson, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    The ionosphere, embedded in and tightly coupled to the thermosphere, is strongly influenced by couplings to other geophysical regions. For example, above it, both the magnetosphere and plasmasphere greatly affect the ionosphere by the precipitation of soft and energetic particles, by heat conduction, and by fluxes of thermal particles. Below, the middle atmosphere affects it with upwardly propagating waves (gravity waves, tides, and planetary waves). All the while, polar and auroral regions greatly affect the mid-latitudes by the equatorward penetration of electric fields and winds, and by the equatorward propagation of waves (traveling ionospheric disturbances or TIDs). Exploring these couplings effectively furthers our understanding of at least the dominant processes and interactions that play such an important role in determining the character of this part of the Earths environment. Significant progress during the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) has demanded that the observational, analytical, and theoretical thrusts of the international scientific community be global in all senses. Observationally, this has led to coordinated measurements from many regions, from the poles to the equator, and from ground- and space-based instruments. It has also led to many different instruments, including new ones, measuring an extensive variety of (related) geophysical parameters. Depending on the instrument, measurements have been made continuously or at appropriate intervals to sample different geomagnetic conditions, and diurnal, seasonal, inter-annual, and solar-cycle variations. Extensive analyses have been carried out on these observations. New empirical models have been developed and old ones improved. Theoretical work has led to new and improved first-principles models that are being used to test our understanding of the observations. Our intent is to review this progress and suggest some future directions. Our approach is to illustrate the broad front of

  12. The North Zealand CAP Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Minna; Ravn, Pernille; Notander Clausen, Lise

    Contect We describe how we developed a monitoring system for community acquired pneumonia (CAP) at North Zealand Regional hospital. We serve 310.000 inhabitants and annually around 3200 patients with CAP are admitted. As part of a program of clinical pathways for common conditions, a pathway...... nurses and two senior doctors. Direct observations of the clinical processes revealed problems of coordination, complex disease trajectories that did not fit with the pneumonia pathway, unclear guidelines and variation in their interpretation. Intervention We designed a measurement system to monitor...... with CAP. We started with 34 audit variables. Through repeated cycles of testing, feedback and discussions, we reduced the number of indicators to 22 and time per audit from 20 to 10 minutes. Strategy for change To link the monitoring system with our patient pathway for CAP we established an improvement...

  13. Magnetospheric Dynamical and Morphological Response to Multi-species Plasma Supply From the Ionosphere:New Comprehensive 3D PIC Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraka, S. M.; Ben-Jaffel, L.

    2015-12-01

    The outflow of thermal plasma from the high latitude ionosphere to the magnetosphere (polar wind) has been under investigation using observations and statistical studies for four decades in the altitude range from 1000km to ~ 10 Re, yet we are still missing a global and consistent three-dimensional time-dependent picture of the wind system at the interface between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Several questions remain unanswered, such as: I) How the ionospheric ions plasma impact the global structure of the magnetosphere. II) What are the energisation processes of that plasma and where they operate (plasma sheet, ring currents). III) What fraction of the supplied plasma returns to the ionosphere and with what properties after a journey in the magnetosphere; etc. Here, we use a spherical symmetric ionospheric model (International reference ionosphere IRI-2007) that we merge with 3D PIC EM Global code to simulate Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Our aim is to investigate the time-dependent content and dynamics of the 3D magnetosphere in response to thermal ions plasma supply from the ionosphere. Following a comprehensive approach, in this first step, we do not consider chemical reactions nor any feedback from the magnetosphere into the ionosphere. Our newly developed 3D PIC model has a finer grid size (0.1-0.2 RE), a H+ to electron mass ratio of up to 100, includes Earth gravity and tilt of the dipole field. Most importantly, the new tool has the capability to consider distinct species with different masses and charges and to follow them in time separately in the simulation box. We present our first results for the content and dynamics of the magnetosphere following H+ and O+ supply from the ionosphere in the conditions of northern IMF of the solar wind.

  14. Doppler Spectral Characteristics of High Latitude Ionospheric Irregularities: Effect on HF Radars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    DAOP (V) =50090 E-FDLDING DISTANCE OF ARRL E-FIELD(OEGREES) =5 LATITUDE OF POTENTIAL MAXIMUM(DEGREES) =70 OVAL OFFSET<DEGREES) a S MEASUREMENT LATITUDE...DOPPLER WIDT14 CROSS POLAR CAP POTENTIAL DAOP (V) =50000 E-FOLDING DISTANCE OF RRORAL E-FIELD(DEGAEES) =5 LATITUDE OF PDTENTIAL" MPXIMUM(DEGREES) = 70 OVAL...60 -Al1l - jiU 4,1 8.53 12.5 16.3 26.5s 24,#* * U *m U 10 tm 4- U U7 Ito oU LOCAL TIME DOPPLER VELOCITY DOPPLER WIDTH CROSS POLAR CAP POTENTIAL DAOP

  15. Supersonic plasma flow between high latitude conjugate ionospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, G.

    1975-01-01

    The polar wind problem has been investigated for closed field lines in situations where one of the two conjugate ionospheric regions is fully illuminated by the sun and the other darkness (solstices at high latitudes). A supersonic flow between hemispheres is possible; the magnetospheric part of this flow must be symmetric with respect to the equator. The daytime fluxes are proportional to the neutral hydrogen density. Fluxes of the order of 10 8 cm -2 sec -1 are only possible with density considerably higher than given by CIRA models. For stationary solutions higher flow speeds are needed on the dark side than provided from the illuminated side. It is concluded that shock waves with upward velocities of about 5 km/sec would form above the dark ionosphere. This implies a reduction by a factor of 3 to 5 of the plasma influx into the dark hemisphere, whereby F-layer densities of only up to 2 x 10 4 cm -3 can be maintained. (orig.) [de

  16. Ionospheric Modelling using GPS to Calibrate the MWA. II: Regional Ionospheric Modelling using GPS and GLONASS to Estimate Ionospheric Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, B. S.; Morgan, J.; Ord, S. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Bell, M.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Hancock, P.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate spatial gradients in the ionosphere using the Global Positioning System and GLONASS (Russian global navigation system) observations, utilising data from multiple Global Positioning System stations in the vicinity of Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory. In previous work, the ionosphere was characterised using a single-station to model the ionosphere as a single layer of fixed height and this was compared with ionospheric data derived from radio astronomy observations obtained from the Murchison Widefield Array. Having made improvements to our data quality (via cycle slip detection and repair) and incorporating data from the GLONASS system, we now present a multi-station approach. These two developments significantly improve our modelling of the ionosphere. We also explore the effects of a variable-height model. We conclude that modelling the small-scale features in the ionosphere that have been observed with the MWA will require a much denser network of Global Navigation Satellite System stations than is currently available at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory.

  17. Faraday rotation of Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) signals as a method of ionospheric characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushley, A. C.; Kabin, K.; Noel, J. M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Radio waves propagating through plasma in the Earth's ambient magnetic field experience Faraday rotation; the plane of the electric field of a linearly polarized wave changes as a function of the distance travelled through a plasma. Linearly polarized radio waves at 1090 MHz frequency are emitted by Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) devices which are installed on most commercial aircraft. These radio waves can be detected by satellites in low earth orbits, and the change of the polarization angle caused by propagation through the terrestrial ionosphere can be measured. In this work we discuss how these measurements can be used to characterize the ionospheric conditions. In the present study, we compute the amount of Faraday rotation from a prescribed total electron content value and two of the profile parameters of the NeQuick model.

  18. NATURE MANAGEMENT, LANDSCAPE AND THE CAP

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, Floor M.; Godeschalk, Frans E.

    2004-01-01

    The integration of nature management, landscape and environmental concerns into the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) has gained momentum with the CAP reforms adopted in June 2003. The report explores instruments and approaches that contribute to the inte-gration of nature conservation and landscape concerns into the CAP. A broader use of the CAP instruments might help to achieve nature types in the Netherlands.

  19. Investigating the polar electrojet using Swarm satellite magnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakjær, Cecilie Drost; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    The aim of this study is to investigate the magnetic perturbations caused by the polar electrojets, which are described by means of a model consisting of a series of infinite line currents placed at the height of the ionosphere along QD latitudes. The method is applied to Swarm magnetic scalar...... of the polar electrojets as well as their temporal evolution. In addition, applying the method to data taken by the Swarm satellites Alpha and Beta allows investigating longitudinal differences of the electrojets....

  20. On the Ionospheric Holes of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G.; Fedorov, A.; Futaana, Y.; Masunaga, K.; Hartle, R. E.; Stenberg, G.; Budnik, E.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Holmstrom, M.; andre, N.; Barabash, S. V.; Zhang, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most intriguing unsolved mysteries that endures from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter is that of ~1000km wide ``Holes" in the nightside Ionosphere. The phenomena remains unexplained, despite their frequent observation during the first three years of the mission, and more than thirty years having elapsed since their first description in the literature. We present new observations by the ESA Venus Express of Ionospheric Holes at very high altitudes, providing us with the opportunity to study this fascinating phenomena with modern instrumentation. We discuss the insight that these new data give us into the effect of Ionospheric Holes on atmospheric escape, and the evidence that suggests that Ionospheric Holes are due to an internal planetary magnetic field.

  1. Space weather. Ionospheric control of magnetotail reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotko, William; Smith, Ryan H; Zhang, Binzheng; Ouellette, Jeremy E; Brambles, Oliver J; Lyon, John G

    2014-07-11

    Observed distributions of high-speed plasma flows at distances of 10 to 30 Earth radii (R(E)) in Earth's magnetotail neutral sheet are highly skewed toward the premidnight sector. The flows are a product of the magnetic reconnection process that converts magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail into plasma kinetic and thermal energy. We show, using global numerical simulations, that the electrodynamic interaction between Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere produces an asymmetry consistent with observed distributions in nightside reconnection and plasmasheet flows and in accompanying ionospheric convection. The primary causal agent is the meridional gradient in the ionospheric Hall conductance which, through the Cowling effect, regulates the distribution of electrical currents flowing within and between the ionosphere and magnetotail. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Intense Harmonic Emissions Observed in Saturn's Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Kurth, W. S.; Persoon, A. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Ye, S.-Y.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Hadid, L. Z.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's first Grand Finale orbit was carried out in April 2017. This set of 22 orbits had an inclination of 63° with a periapsis grazing Saturn's ionosphere, thus providing unprecedented coverage and proximity to the planet. Cassini's Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument repeatedly detected intense electrostatic waves and their harmonics near closest approach in the dayside equatorial topside ionosphere. The fundamental modes were found to both scale and trend best with the H+ plasma or lower hybrid frequencies, depending on the plasma composition considered. The fine-structured harmonics are unlike previous observations, which scale with cyclotron frequencies. We explore their generation mechanism and show strong evidence of their association with whistler mode waves, consistent with theory. The possibility of Cassini's presence in the ionosphere influencing the resonance and harmonics is discussed. Given their link to the lower hybrid frequency, these emissions may offer clues to constraining Saturn's ionospheric properties.

  3. Ionospheric Oblique Incidence Soundings by Satellites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The oblique incidence sweep-frequency ionospheric sounding technique uses the same principle of operation as the vertical incidence sounder. The primary difference...

  4. The Earth's ionosphere plasma physics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Although interesting in its own right, due to the ever-increasing use of satellites for communication and navigation, weather in the ionosphere is of great concern. Every such system uses trans-ionospheric propagation of radio waves, waves which must traverse the commonly turbulent ionosphere. Understanding this turbulence and predicting it are one of the major goals of the National Space Weather program. Acquiring such a prediction capability will rest on understanding the very topics of this book, the plasma physics and electrodynamics of the system. Fully updated to reflect advances in the field in the 20 years since the first edition published Explores the buffeting of the ionosphere from above by the sun and from below by the lower atmosphere Unique text appropriate both as a reference and for coursework.

  5. SHOCK WAVE IN IONOSPHERE DURING EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kuznetsov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud

  6. CDDIS_GNSS_products_ionosphere_predicted

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionosphere Total Electron Content (TEC) grids derived from analysis of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data. These products are the generated by analysis...

  7. CDDIS_GNSS_products_ionosphere_rapid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionosphere Total Electron Content (TEC) grids derived from analysis of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data. These products are the generated by analysis...

  8. An Ionospheric Metric Study Using Operational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Harris, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    One of the outstanding challenges in upgrading ionospheric operational models is quantifying their improvement. This challenge is not necessarily an absolute accuracy one, but rather answering the question, "Is the newest operational model an improvement over its predecessor under operational scenarios?" There are few documented cases where ionospheric models are compared either with each other or against "ground truth". For example a CEDAR workshop team, PRIMO, spent almost a decade carrying out a models comparison with ionosonde and incoherent scatter radar measurements from the Millstone Hill, Massachusetts location [Anderson et al.,1998]. The result of this study was that all models were different and specific conditions could be found when each was the "best" model. Similarly, a National Space Weather Metrics ionospheric challenge was held and results were presented at a National Space Weather meeting. The results were again found to be open to interpretation, and issues with the value of the specific metrics were raised (Fuller-Rowell, private communication, 2003). Hence, unlike the tropospheric weather community, who have established metrics and exercised them on new models over many decades to quantify improvement, the ionospheric community has not yet settled on a metric of both scientific and operational value. We report on a study in which metrics were used to compare various forms of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), the Ionospheric Forecast Model (IFM), and the Utah State University Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements Model (USU-GAIM) models. The ground truth for this study was a group of 11 ionosonde data sets taken between 20 March and 19 April 2004. The metric parameter was the ionosphere's critical frequency. The metric was referenced to the IRI. Hence, the study addressed the specific question what improvement does IFM and USU-GAIM have over IRI. Both strengths (improvements) and weaknesses of these models are discussed

  9. Digital processing of ionospheric electron content data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Ionospheric electron content data contain periodicities that are produced by a diversity of sources including hydromagnetic waves, gravity waves, and lunar tides. Often these periodicities are masked by the strong daily variation in the data. Digital filtering can be used to isolate the weaker components. The filtered data can then be further processed to provide estimates of the source properties. In addition, homomorphic filtering may be used to identify nonlinear interactions in the ionosphere.

  10. Ionospheric disturbances under low solar activity conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Laštovička, Jan; Hejda, Pavel; Bochníček, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2014), s. 185-196 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1908 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : ionosphere * solar minimum * magnetic storms * ionospheric variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Science s, Meteorology; DG - Athmosphere Science s, Meteorology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2014 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S027311771400221X

  11. LIFDAR: A Diagnostic Tool for the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, O. E.; Rodgers, C. T.; Batholomew, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    ITT Corporation proposes a novel system to measure and monitor the ion species within the Earth's ionosphere called Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection and Ranging (LIFDAR). Unlike current ionosphere measurements that detect electrons and magnetic field, LIFDAR remotely measures the major contributing ion species to the electron plasma. The LIFDAR dataset has the added capability to demonstrate stratification and classification of the layers of the ionosphere to ultimately give a true tomographic view. We propose a proof of concept study using existing atmospheric LIDAR sensors combined with a mountaintop observatory for a single ion species that is prevalent in all layers of the atmosphere. We envision the LIFDAR concept will enable verification, validation, and exploration of the physics of the magneto-hydrodynamic models used in ionosphere forecasting community. The LIFDAR dataset will provide the necessary ion and electron density data for the system wide data gap. To begin a proof of concept, we present the science justification of the LIFDAR system based on the model photon budget. This analysis is based on the fluorescence of ionized oxygen within the ionosphere versus altitude. We use existing model abundance data of the ionosphere during normal and perturbed states. We propagate the photon uncertainties from the laser source through the atmosphere to the plasma and back to the collecting optics and detector. We calculate the expected photon budget to determine signal to noise estimates based on the targeted altitude and detection efficiency. Finally, we use these results to derive a LIFDAR observation strategy compatible with operational parameters.

  12. Ionospheric convection response to changes of interplanetary magnetic field B-z component during strong B-y component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, C.S.; Murr, D.; Sofko, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    enough, the B-z reorientation causes changes in the flow intensity but not in the shape of the convection pattern. The results show the characteristics of ionospheric convection response during strong B-y and suggest that the convection reconfiguration is not only determined by the changing B-z but also...... the dawn-dusk meridian plane, which is interpreted as propagation or expansion of newly generated convection cells in the cusp region. Other studies showed that the change in convection pattern in response to IMF reorientations is spatially fixed. In this paper, we investigate the ionospheric convection...... response to IMF Bz changes during strong IMF BZ. On March 23, 1995, B-x was small, B-y was strongly positive (7-11 nT), and the B-z polarity changed several times after 1300 UT. The dayside ionospheric convection is dominated by a large clockwise convection cell. The cell focus (the "eye" of the convection...

  13. Southern European ionospheric TEC maps based on Kriging technique to monitor ionosphere behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Bouza, Marta; Paparini, Claudia; Otero, Xurxo; Herraiz, Miguel; Radicella, Sandro M.; Abe, Oladipo E.; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia

    2017-10-01

    Global or regional Maps of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) are an efficient tool to monitor the delay introduced by the ionosphere in the satellite signals. Ionospheric disturbance periods are of particular interest because these conditions can strongly affect satellite navigation range measurements. This work presents post-processing regional vertical TEC maps over Southern Europe ([35°N-50°N] latitude) obtained by applying Kriging interpolation to GPS derived TEC over more than 100 Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations. These maps are used to study the behavior of the ionosphere during space weather events and their effects. To validate these maps, hereafter called Southern European Ionospheric Maps (SEIMs), their TEC values have been compared with those obtained from EGNOS Message Server (EMS) and with direct experimental TEC data from GNSS stations. Ionospheric space weather events related to geomagnetic storms of March 17th, 2013, February 19th, 2014 and March 17th, 2015 have been selected. To test the methodology, one period of quiet days has been also analyzed. TEC values obtained by SEIMs in the Ionospheric Grid Points (IGPs) defined by EGNOS are very close to those given by EMS and in the period of major geomagnetic storms the difference does not exceed 6 TEC units. These results confirm the good performance of the technique used for obtaining the SEIMs that can be a useful tool to study the ionosphere behavior during geomagnetic storms and their effects in the region of interest.

  14. Improving the Nightside Mid-latitude Ionospheric Density in the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C.; Ridley, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The ionosphere and plasmasphere interact with each other through upwelling of plasma into the plasmasphere during the day and downwelling of the plasma into the ionosphere during the night. The storage of ion density in the plasmasphere and subsequent downwelling maintains the ion density in the nighttime mid-latitude ionosphere. Global models of the upper atmosphere that do not contain a plasmasphere, but are limited in altitude, such as the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics Global Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model(GITM) need a boundary condition that allows for some sort of downwelling to occur. In the TIEGCM, this has been set to a constant downward flux, while GITM has had no downwelling specification at all, which has caused the nighttime mid-latitude densities to be much too low. We present a new boundary condition in GITM, where there is downward ion flux from the upper boundary, allowing the ionosphere to be maintained during the night. This new boundary condition is dependent on the the Disturbance Storm Time (Dst), since, as the activity level increases (i.e., Dst decreases), the plasmasphere is eroded and will not serve to supply the ionosphere at night. Various quiet time and active time comparisons to ionosonde electron density and total electron content data will be presented that show that the ionospheric density in GITM is improved due to this new boundary condition.

  15. Three Dimensional Structure of the Mars North Polar Basal Unit from MARSIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, A.; Orosei, R.; Cartacci, M.; Cicchetti, A.; Mitri, G.; Giuppi, S.; Noschese, R.; Picardi, G.; Plaut, J.

    2012-04-01

    Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) is an orbital subsurface sounder aboard ESA's Mars Express spacecraft . It transmits a low-frequency radar pulse that is capable of penetrating below the surface, and is reflected by subsurface dielectric discontinuities. MARSIS has been used to probe both the south and the north polar caps of Mars, revealing their thickness and structure. We report on the results of a campaign of observations of the north polar ice cap of Mars that took place between May and December 2011 in uniquely favorable conditions and produced data of unprecedented quality. The focus of this work is the so-called Basal Unit, a dark, ice-rich, complexely layered geologic unit lying stratigraphically between the polar layered deposits and the Vastitas Borealis Formation, and extending beneath most of Planum Boreum and Olympia Planitia. The objective of this work is the to study the full three dimensional structure of the Northern Polar Deposit and in particular of the Basal Unit (BU). It was recently found that the BU consists of two markedly different units, called the Rupes Tenuis unit and the Planum Boreum cavi unit. The Rupes Tenuis unit appears to be older, horizontally layered, and lacking erosional contacts. It has been thus interpreted as the result of precipitation and cold-trapping of dust-laden volatiles. The Planum Boreum cavi unit displays cross-bedding, indicating dune accumulation. Bright layers within it are interpreted as being made of ice-cemented dust, while dark layers should consist of weathered basalt fines. It seems likely that, in places, the Planum Boreum cavi unit rests directly on the Vastitas Borealis, without the Rupes Tenuis unit in between. Because the two units in the BU have formed much earlier than the north polar layered deposits, and at some interval from each other, they bear evidence of past climatic conditions that were very different from present, so that they "could potentially be a

  16. Ionospheric Correction in Using ALOS PALSAR InSAR Data for Monitoring Permafrost Subsidence associated with an Arctic Tundra Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H.; Meyer, F. J.; Liu, L.

    2017-12-01

    Tundra fires have important ecological impacts on vegetation succession, carbon cycling, and permafrost dynamics. Recent research has demonstrated that SAR Interferometry (InSAR) is a useful tool for quantifying surface subsidence caused by permafrost degradation and tundra fires. Many of these studies have relied on L-band SAR data due to its ability to remain relatively high coherence in the changing Arctic environment. L-band SAR data, however, are susceptive to ionospheric effects. Traditionally, permafrost-related InSAR studies dealt with ionospheric artifacts by either throwing away ionosphere-contaminated data or by fitting and removing low-order polynomial surfaces from affected images. Discarding data samples is always luxurious and risky, as the number of SAR images is limited and the incurred reduction of temporal sampling might hinder the retrieval of important short-term dynamics in active layer and permafrost. Baseline fitting relies on the assumption that ionospheric signals large spatial scales, an assumption that is often violated in polar regions. To improve upon this situation, we propose the integration of the split-spectrum ionospheric correction technique into permafrost-related InSAR processing workflows. We demonstrate its performance for correcting L-band SAR data in permafrost zones. For the Anaktuvuk River fire area, Alaska, 6 out of 15 ALOS-1 PALSAR scenes used by Liu et al. 2014 were found to be contaminated by ionospheric signals. We extracted the ionospheric phase screens for all contaminated data. We derive their power spectra and provide information on the typical magnitudes and spatial structures of identified phase screens. With the ionosphere corrected data we revisit a model that was developed by Liu et.al (2014) to estimate pre-fire and post-fire thaw-season subsidence for the Anaktuvuk River fire region. We will demonstrate that for our area of interest ionospheric correction leads to improvements of the InSAR-based permafrost

  17. Comparative ionospheres: Terrestrial and giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendillo, Michael; Trovato, Jeffrey; Moore, Luke; Müller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2018-03-01

    The study of planetary ionospheres within our solar system offers a variety of settings to probe mechanisms of photo-ionization, chemical loss, and plasma transport. Ionospheres are a minor component of upper atmospheres, and thus their mix of ions observed depends on the neutral gas composition of their parent atmospheres. The same solar irradiance (x-rays and extreme-ultra-violet vs. wavelength) impinges upon each of these atmospheres, with solar flux magnitudes changed only by the inverse square of distance from the Sun. If all planets had the same neutral atmosphere-with ionospheres governed by photochemical equilibrium (production = loss)-their peak electron densities would decrease as the inverse of distance from the Sun, and any changes in solar output would exhibit coherent effects throughout the solar system. Here we examine the outer planet with the most observations of its ionosphere (Saturn) and compare its patterns of electron density with those at Earth under the same-day solar conditions. We show that, while the average magnitudes of the major layers of molecular ions at Earth and Saturn are approximately in accord with distance effects, only minor correlations exist between solar effects and day-to-day electron densities. This is in marked contrast to the strong correlations found between the ionospheres of Earth and Mars. Moreover, the variability observed for Saturn's ionosphere (maximum electron density and total electron content) is much larger than found at Earth and Mars. With solar irradiance changes far too small to cause such effects, we use model results to explore the roles of other agents. We find that water sources from Enceladus at low latitudes, and 'ring rain' at middle latitudes, contribute substantially to variability via water ion chemistry. Thermospheric winds and electrodynamics generated at auroral latitudes are suggested causes of high latitude ionospheric variability, but remain inconclusive due to the lack of relevant

  18. Explaining polarization reversals in STEREO wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, Breneman et al. (2011) reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only right-hand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by ±200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo (1984) whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by ˜200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al. (2008).

  19. The CuSPED Mission: CubeSat for GNSS Sounding of the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Electron Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jason N.; Keesee, Amy M.; Christian, John A.; Gu, Yu; Scime, Earl; Komjathy, Attila; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Pollock, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    The CubeSat for GNSS Sounding of Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Electron Density (CuSPED) is a 3U CubeSat mission concept that has been developed in response to the NASA Heliophysics program's decadal science goal of the determining of the dynamics and coupling of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and atmosphere and their response to solar and terrestrial inputs. The mission was formulated through a collaboration between West Virginia University, Georgia Tech, NASA GSFC and NASA JPL, and features a 3U CubeSat that hosts both a miniaturized space capable Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver for topside atmospheric sounding, along with a Thermal Electron Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TECHS) for the purpose of in situ electron precipitation measurements. These two complimentary measurement techniques will provide data for the purpose of constraining ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling models and will also enable studies of the local plasma environment and spacecraft charging; a phenomenon which is known to lead to significant errors in the measurement of low-energy, charged species from instruments aboard spacecraft traversing the ionosphere. This paper will provide an overview of the concept including its science motivation and implementation.

  20. Capping Drugs: Development of Prodrugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 2. Capping Drugs: Development of Prodrugs. H Surya Prakash Rao. General Article Volume 8 Issue 2 February 2003 pp 19-27. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/02/0019-0027 ...

  1. From Blogs to Bottle Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Ted

    2012-01-01

    There is a wonderful community of art educators connecting a once-isolated profession through blogging. Art educators around the world are sharing ideas and communicating with their peers through this amazing resource. In this article, the author describes the bottle cap mural at Tulip Grove Elementary School which was inspired by this exchange of…

  2. The lower ionosphere response to its disturbances by powerful radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmetieva, N. V.; Frolov, V. L.; Vyakhirev, V. D.; Kalinina, E. E.; Akchurin, A. D.; Zykov, E. Yu.

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents data from some campaigns at Sura heating facility in 2011-1016. The experiments on probing of the artificial disturbed region of the lower ionosphere were carried out at two observation sites. One of them was located near Vasil'sursk 1 km from Sura facility (56.1°N; 46.1°E) and the other site was located at the Observatory (55.85°N; 48.8°E) of Kazan State University, 170 km to the East. Investigation of the features of the disturbed region of the lower ionosphere based on its diagnostics by the methods of the vertical sounding and oblique backscattering is the main goal of this paper. Ionosphere disturbance was fulfilled by the effect of the powerful radio wave of the ordinary or extraordinary polarization emitted by transmitters of the Sura facility with effective radiated power ERP = 50-120 MW at the frequency of 4.3, 4.7 and 5.6 MHz. Pumping waves were emitted with period from 30 s to 15 min. The disturbed region of the ionosphere in Vasil'sursk was probed by the vertical sounding technique using the partial reflexion radar at the frequency of 2.95 and 4.7 MHz. For the oblique sounding of the disturbed region the modified ionosonde Cyclon-M, operating at ten frequencies from 2.01 to 6.51 MHz was used at the Observatory site. On many heating sessions simultaneous variations of the probing partial reflection signals in Vasil'sursk and backscattered signals in Observatory were observed at the height at 40-100 km below the reflection height of the pumping wave. These observations were correlated with the pumping periods of the Sura facility. Possible mechanisms of the appearance of the disturbance in the lower ionosphere and its effect on the probing radio waves are discussed.

  3. Ionospheric foF2 anomalies during some intense geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kane

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The global evolutions of foF2 anomalies were examined for three very intense geomagnetic storms, namely the Halloween events of October-November 2003 (Event X, 29–30 October 2003, Dst –401 nT; Event Y, 20–21 November 2003, Dst –472 nT, and the largest Dst storm (Event Z, 13–14 March 1989, Dst –589 nT. For Event X, troughs (negative storms were clearly seen for high northern and southern latitudes. For northern midlatitudes as well as for low latitudes, there were very strong positive effects on 29 October 2003, followed by negative effects the next day. For Event Y, there were no troughs in NH high latitudes for morning and evening hours but there were troughs for night. For midlatitudes and low latitudes, some longitudes showed strong negative effects in the early morning as expected, but some longitudes showed strong positive effects at noon and in the evening hours. Thus, there were many deviations from the model patterns. The deviations were erratic, indicating considerable local effects superposed on general patterns. A disconcerting feature was the presence of strong positive effects during the 24 h before the storm commencement. Such a feature appears only in the 24 h before the geomagnetic storm commencement but not earlier. If genuine, these could imply a prediction potential with a 24-h antecedence. For Event Z (13–14 March 1989, equinox, all stations (all latitudes and longitudes showed a very strong "negative storm" in the main phase, and no positive storms anywhere. Keywords. Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphereIonospheric disturbances – Mid-latitude IonospherePolar ionosphere

  4. Quantitative modelling of the closure of meso-scale parallel currents in the nightside ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchaudon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available On 12 January 2000, during a northward IMF period, two successive conjunctions occur between the CUTLASS SuperDARN radar pair and the two satellites Ørsted and FAST. This situation is used to describe and model the electrodynamic of a nightside meso-scale arc associated with a convection shear. Three field-aligned current sheets, one upward and two downward on both sides, are observed. Based on the measurements of the parallel currents and either the conductance or the electric field profile, a model of the ionospheric current closure is developed along each satellite orbit. This model is one-dimensional, in a first attempt and a two-dimensional model is tested for the Ørsted case. These models allow one to quantify the balance between electric field gradients and ionospheric conductance gradients in the closure of the field-aligned currents. These radar and satellite data are also combined with images from Polar-UVI, allowing for a description of the time evolution of the arc between the two satellite passes. The arc is very dynamic, in spite of quiet solar wind conditions. Periodic enhancements of the convection and of electron precipitation associated with the arc are observed, probably associated with quasi-periodic injections of particles due to reconnection in the magnetotail. Also, a northward shift and a reorganisation of the precipitation pattern are observed, together with a southward shift of the convection shear. Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  5. Comparison of global and regional ionospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranner, H.-P.; Krauss, S.; Stangl, G.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling of the Earth's ionosphere means the description of the variability of the vertical TEC (Total Electron Content) in dependence of geographic latitude and longitude, height, diurnal and seasonal variation as well as solar activity. Within the project GIOMO (next Generation near real-time IOnospheric MOdels) the objectives are the identification and consolidation of improved ionospheric modelling technologies. The global models Klobuchar (GPS) and NeQuick (currently in use by EGNOS, in future used by Galileo) are compared to the IGS (International GNSS Service) Final GIM (Global Ionospheric Map). Additionally a RIM (Regional Ionospheric Map) for Europe provided by CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) is investigated. Furthermore the OLG (Observatorium Lustbühel Graz) regional models are calculated for two test beds with different latitudes and extensions (Western Austria and the Aegean region). There are three different approaches, two RIMs are based on spherical harmonics calculated either from code or phase measurements and one RIM is based on a Taylor series expansion around a central point estimated from zero-difference observations. The benefits of regional models are the local flexibility using a dense network of GNSS stations. Near real-time parameters are provided within ten minutes after every clock hour. All models have been compared according to their general behavior, the ability to react upon extreme solar events and the robustness of estimation. A ranking of the different models showed a preference for the RIMs while the global models should be used within a fall-back strategy.

  6. Observing and modelling F-region ionospheric dynamics using the OII 7320A emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Limb-scan observations of Doppler line profiles from the (OII) lambda 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2) spacecraft, were analyzed to provide measurements of the meridional component of the ion convection velocity along the instrument line-of-sight. The DE-2 results presented demonstrate the first spaceborne use of the remote-sensing Doppler technique for measurements of ionospheric convection. The FPI meridional ion drift measurements were compared with nearly simultaneous in situ ion drift measurements from the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) on DE-2. Once allowance is made for the temporal lag between the in situ and remote measurements, the results from the two techniques are found to be in good agreement, within specified experimental errors, giving confidence in the FPI measurements. The spaceborne interferometric technique has future utility for 2-dimensional imaging of polar ionospheric convection. Results from a simulated space-based observing platform, based on the DE-2 technique and an extension of a 7320A aeronomical model, are presented to demonstrate that a large fraction of the entire polar ionospheric convection pattern can be monitored from space during approximately 16-minute polar passes of a suitably-instrumented satellite. In the simulation, the polar-orbiting satellite's FPI system views the 7320A emission at various tangent point altitudes at +/- 45 deg and +/- 135 deg to the satellite velocity vector. By adjusting the horizon scan angle, several swaths of vectors at different horizontal spacing from the satellite can be recovered. Doppler line profiles from the (OII) 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the FPI at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, were analyzed to provide ion drift vectors and temperatures

  7. An ionospheric index suitable for estimating the degree of ionospheric perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Volker; Kriegel, Martin; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens

    2018-03-01

    Space weather can strongly affect trans-ionospheric radio signals depending on the used frequency. In order to assess the strength of a space weather event from its origin at the sun towards its impact on the ionosphere a number of physical quantities need to be derived from scientific measurements. These are for example the Wolf number sunspot index, the solar flux density F10.7, measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field, the proton density, the solar wind speed, the dynamical pressure, the geomagnetic indices Auroral Electrojet, Kp, Ap and Dst as well as the Total Electron Content (TEC), the Rate of TEC, the scintillation indices S4 and σ(ϕ) and the Along-Arc TEC Rate index index. All these quantities provide in combination with an additional classification an orientation in a physical complex environment. Hence, they are used for brief communication of a simplified but appropriate space situation awareness. However, space weather driven ionospheric phenomena can affect many customers in the communication and navigation domain, which are still served inadequately by the existing indices. We present a new robust index, that is able to properly characterize temporal and spatial ionospheric variations of small to medium scales. The proposed ionospheric disturbance index can overcome several drawbacks of other ionospheric measures and might be suitable as potential driver for an ionospheric space weather scale.

  8. Electromagnetic fields of ionospheric point dipoles in the earthionosphere waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybachek, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of excitation of the spherical earth-anisotropic ionosphere waveguide by ionospheric dipole sources. The solution obtained is based on a generalized reciprocity theorem which provides a relationship to the problem of finding electromagnetic fields in the ionosphere created by sources located in the waveguide. Some results of the calculations are presented

  9. Ionospheric correction for spaceborne single-frequency GPS based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1972a, b) and. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. (Rawer et al. 1978; Bilitza 1986, 2001; Bilitza and .... studies need to be done on the Klobuchar model for GPS onboard GRACE. SLM mapping functions for ... The concept of the ionospheric single layer model. (SLM) is usually used in ionosphere research, i.e.,.

  10. Calibration of regional ionospheric delay with uncombined precise ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trons in the Earth's ionosphere are concentrated on the ionospheric shell at an altitude H(typically chosen as 350, 400 or 450 km) over the Earth's surface. Meanwhile, sTEC values are mapped to the vertical TEC (vTEC) at the ionospheric pierce point (IPP). The corresponding equation can be expressed as (Chang et al.

  11. Characteristics of low latitude ionospheric E-region irregularities ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    154°E, dip angle = 37.3°, sub-ionospheric dip = 34°) have been analyzed to study the behaviour of ionospheric E-region irregularities during the active solar and magnetic periods. The autocorrelation functions, power spectral densities, signal de-correlation times are computed to study the temporal features of ionospheric ...

  12. Ionospheric artifacts in simultaneous L-band InSAR and GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, H. A.; Chen, J.; Chen, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    Current (ALOS) and planned (ALOS II, NASA DESDynI) InSAR satellite systems operate at 24-cm wavelength (L-band) to increase temporal and spatial correlation. These phase data are 16 times more sensitive to ionospheric path delays than those acquired by existing C-band (6 cm wavelength) systems. We analyze here ionosphere-induced phase artifacts that translate into apparent surface deformations and corrupt data interpretation. We examine dual frequency GPS data acquired at the same time as the radar interferograms and solve for the dispersive ionospheric phase directly from the carrier phases, which we then relate to artifacts in the interferograms. Since the carrier phase measurements are cycle-ambiguous, we solve for the ambiguity by fitting the carrier phase to the predicted path length as a function of time, which depends on elevation angle and oblique path through the ionosphere. The unambiguous phase histories acquired on both days of the interferogram show a difference signature that gives the statistics of the ionospheric delay. Typical midlatitude results range from 1-way propagation delay differences of several mm to a cm or two, usually much less than one “fringe.” For some acquisitions, especially at high latitudes, the gradient of ionospheric path delay leads to a significant along-track shift of output pixels in an image. This leads to decorrelation artifacts in the interferograms, even though the total delay is still quite small. Gradients of 10 cm over the 20 km SAR aperture length shift the pixel locations by a full resolution element and lead to complete decorrelation. However, this shift is easily measured during the interferogram formation and we show that it is readily corrected in the data products. The shift would be observed in split frequency or other wideband radar implementations and could be corrected a priori, but spectrum limitations imply that the correction would be only approximate. The ionospheric signature is also observable in

  13. The D-Region Ionospheric Response to the 2017 Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; McCormick, J.; Gross, N. C.; Higginson-Rollins, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    VLF/LF radio remote sensing (0.5-500 kHz) is an effective means for quantifying the D-region ionosphere (60-90 km altitude). Disturbances in the ionospheric electron density induce changes in the propagation of VLF/LF signals, so a network of transmitters and receivers can effectively "image" a disturbed region. VLF/LF signals can all be detected from 100s-1000s of km away. We utilize Georgia Tech's network of highly-sensitive VLF/LF receivers to quantify the lower ionospheric response to the "Great American Eclipse". Nine of these were deployed and operational across the Continental US, Alaska and Puerto Rico all operated successfully. Each receiver synchronously recorded the full radio spectrum between 0.5-470 kHz. The included figure shows the eclipse track at 80 km altitude with a green swath. The nine operational receivers are shown with blue stars, and operational VLF/LF transmitters in dark red. Gray lines are shown for each great-circle path linking a VLF/LF transmitter to a receiver. This constellation forms a dense spider's-web grid of radio links, with which we can effectively image the disturbed patch of the D-region ionosphere as it moves across the country. In addition, shown in yellow are NDGPS transmitters which lie between 285-325 kHz. The red dots are the 230,000 geolocated lightning strokes during the 90-mintue eclipse pass, each of which emitted an intense VLF/LF impulse. These are also detected by our receivers. We present our observations and comparison with a theoretical model, using a combination of three techniques established by a series of three 2017 journal papers: (1) Polarization measurements of VLF/LF transmitter signals, (2) Lightning-generated VLF sferics detected 1000s of km away, and (3) NDGPS beacons near 300 kHz for shorter-range sounding of a small patch of the ionosphere. We find evidence of large scale ionospheric changes which affect the D-region over the entire continental region with a slowly-varying signal perturbation

  14. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  15. Characterization of Mars' seasonal caps using neutron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Feldman, W.C.; Titus, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    Mars' seasonal caps are characterized during Mars years 26 and 27 (April 2002 to January 2006) using data acquired by the 2001 Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer. Time-dependent maps of the column abundance of seasonal CO 2 surface ice poleward of 60?? latitude in both hemispheres are determined from spatially deconvolved, epithermal neutron counting data. Sources of systematic error are analyzed, including spatial blurring by the spectrometer's broad footprint and the seasonal variations in the abundance of noncondensable gas at high southern latitudes, which are found to be consistent with results reported by Sprague et al. (2004, 2007). Corrections for spatial blurring are found to be important during the recession, when the column abundance of seasonal CO2 ice has the largest latitude gradient. The measured distribution and inventory of seasonal CO2 ice is compared to simulations by a general circulation model (GCM) calibrated using Viking lander pressure data, cap edge functions determined by thermal emission spectroscopy, and other nuclear spectroscopy data sets. On the basis of the amount of CO2 cycled through the caps during years 26 and 27, the gross polar energy balance has not changed significantly since Viking. The distribution of seasonal CO2 ice is longitudinally asymmetric: in the north, deposition rates of CO2 ice are elevated in Acidalia, which is exposed to katabatic winds from Chasma Borealis; in the south, CO2 deposition is highest near the residual cap. During southern recession, CO 2 ice is present longer than calculated by the GCM, which has implications for the local polar energy balance. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding

    2017-05-01

    Previous investigations on ionospheric responses to solar flares focused mainly on the photoionization caused by the increased X-rays and extreme ultraviolet irradiance. However, little attention was paid to the related electrodynamics. In this letter, we explored the equatorial electric field (EEF) and electrojet (EEJ) in the ionosphere at Jicamarca during flares from 1998 to 2008. It is verified that solar flares increase dayside eastward EEJ but decrease dayside eastward EEF, revealing a negative correlation between EEJ and EEF. The decreased EEF weakens the equatorial fountain effect and depresses the low-latitude electron density. During flares, the enhancement in the Cowling conductivity may modulate ionospheric dynamo and decrease the EEF. Besides, the decreased EEF is closely related to the enhanced ASY-H index that qualitatively reflects Region 2 field-aligned current (R2 FAC). We speculated that solar flares may also decrease EEF through enhancing R2 FAC that leads to an overshielding-like effect.

  17. Ionospheric irregularities in periods of meteorological disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchevkina, O. P.; Karpov, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    The results of observations of the total electron content (TEC) in periods of storm disturbances of meteorological situation are presented in the paper. The observational results have shown that a passage of a meteorological storm is accompanied by a substantial decrease in values of TEC and critical frequencies of the ionospheric F2 region. The decreases in values of these ionospheric parameters reach 50% and up to 30% in TEC and critical frequency of the F2 layer, respectively, as compared to meteorologically quiet days. Based on qualitative analysis, it is found that the processes related to formation of local regions of thermospheric heating due to a dissipation of AGW coming into the upper atmosphere from the region of the meteorological disturbance in the lower atmosphere are a possible cause of these ionospheric disturbances.

  18. CAP binding proteins associated with the nucleus.

    OpenAIRE

    Patzelt, E; Blaas, D; Kuechler, E

    1983-01-01

    Cap binding proteins of HeLa cells were identified by photo-affinity labelling using the cap analogue gamma-[32P]-[4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido]-7-methylguanosine-5'- triphosphate. Photoreaction with whole cell homogenates resulted in specific labelling of five major polypeptides. The small molecular weight polypeptide appeared to be identical to the 24 000 to 26 000 dalton cap binding protein previously identified in initiation factors. A cap binding protein of 37 000 dalton was found in in...

  19. Numerical modeling of ionospheric effects in the middle- and low-latitude F region during geomagnetic storm sequence of 9-14 September 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Jesus, R.; de Abreu, A. J.; Vesnin, A. M.

    2011-06-01

    This study presents the Global Self-Consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) numerical simulations of the 9-14 September 2005 geomagnetic storm effects in the middle- and low-latitude ionosphere. Recent modifications to the GSM TIP model include adding an empirical model of high-energy electron precipitation and introducing a high-resolution (1 min) calculation of region 2 field-aligned currents and a cross-cap potential difference. These modifications resulted in better representation of such effects as penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field to lower latitudes and the overshielding. The model also includes simulation of solar flare effects. Comparison of model results with observational data at Millstone Hill (42.6°N, 71.5°W, USA), Arecibo (18.3°N, 66.8°W, Puerto Rico), Jicamarca (11.9°S, 76.9°W, Peru), Palmas (10.2°S, 48.2°W, Brazil), and San Jose Campos (23.2°S, 45.9°W, Brazil) shows good agreement of ionospheric disturbances caused by this storm sequence. In this paper we consider in detail the formation mechanism of the additional layers in an equatorial ionosphere during geomagnetic storms. During geomagnetic storms, the nonuniform in height zonal electric field is generated at the geomagnetic equator. This electric field forms the additional layers in the F region of equatorial ionosphere.

  20. VHF Scintillation in an Artificially Heated Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Layne, J.; Light, M. E.; Pigue, M. J.; Rivera, L.

    2017-12-01

    As part of an ongoing project to characterize very-high-frequency (VHF) radio wave propagation through structured ionospheres, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been conducting a set of experiments to measure the scintillation effects of VHF transmissions under a variety of ionospheric conditions. Previous work (see 2015 Fall AGU poster by D. Suszcynsky et al.) measured the S4 index and ionospheric coherence bandwidth in the 32 - 44 MHz frequency range under naturally scintillated conditions in the equatorial region at Kwajalein Atoll during three separate campaigns centered on the 2014 and 2015 equinoxes. In this paper, we will present preliminary results from the February and September, 2017 High Altitude Auroral Research Project (HAARP) Experimental Campaigns where we are attempting to make these measurements under more controlled conditions using the HAARP ionospheric heater in a twisted-beam mode. Two types of measurements are made by transmitting VHF signals through the heated ionospheric volume to the Radio Frequency Propagation (RFProp) satellite experiment. The S4 scintillation index is determined by measuring the power fluctuations of a 135-MHz continuous wave signal and the ionospheric coherence bandwidth is simultaneously determined by measuring the delay spread of a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) signal in the 130 - 140 MHz frequency range. Additionally, a spatial Fourier transform of the CW time series is used to calculate the irregularity spectral density function. Finally, the temporal evolution of the time series is used to characterize spread-Doppler clutter effects arising from preferential ray paths to the satellite due to refraction off of isolated density irregularities. All results are compared to theory and scaled for comparison to the 32 - 44 MHz Kwajalein measurements.

  1. Ionospheric Impacts on UHF Space Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's atmosphere contains regions of ionized plasma caused by the interaction of highly energetic solar radiation. This region of ionization is called the ionosphere and varies significantly with altitude, latitude, local solar time, season, and solar cycle. Significant ionization begins at about 100 km (E layer) with a peak in the ionization at about 300 km (F2 layer). Above the F2 layer, the atmosphere is mostly ionized but the ion and electron densities are low due to the unavailability of neutral molecules for ionization so the density decreases exponentially with height to well over 1000 km. The gradients of these variations in the ionosphere play a significant role in radio wave propagation. These gradients induce variations in the index of refraction and cause some radio waves to refract. The amount of refraction depends on the magnitude and direction of the electron density gradient and the frequency of the radio wave. The refraction is significant at HF frequencies (3-30 MHz) with decreasing effects toward the UHF (300-3000 MHz) range. UHF is commonly used for tracking of space objects in low Earth orbit (LEO). While ionospheric refraction is small for UHF frequencies, it can cause errors in range, azimuth angle, and elevation angle estimation by ground-based radars tracking space objects. These errors can cause significant errors in precise orbit determinations. For radio waves transiting the ionosphere, it is important to understand and account for these effects. Using a sophisticated radio wave propagation tool suite and an empirical ionospheric model, we calculate the errors induced by the ionosphere in a simulation of a notional space surveillance radar tracking objects in LEO. These errors are analyzed to determine daily, monthly, annual, and solar cycle trends. Corrections to surveillance radar measurements can be adapted from our simulation capability.

  2. Travelling ionospheric disturbance over California mid 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hawarey

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the GPS data collected by more than 130 permanent GPS stations that belong to the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN around the launch of a Minuteman-II missile on 8 July 2000 (UTC is processed to reveal traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID all over the network on average 15 min after the launch. This TID was initially perceived to be excited by the launch itself, but this conclusion is challenged by the propagation direction. This is because this TID seems to travel towards the air force base from where the launch took place, not far away from it. This challenge is based on the assumption that TID is occurring at one single ionospheric altitude. While the nature of ionosphere supports such horizontally-guided propagation, multi-altitude ionospheric pierce points are hypothesized, which would support the suggestion that detected TID is excited by the missile launch itself, despite the apparent reverse direction of propagation. The overall analysis rules out any extra-terrestrial sources like solar flares, or seismic sources like earthquakes, which confirms the conclusion of TID excitation by the launch. There is apparent coherence of the TID for about 45 min and the propagation speed of TID within the layer of ionosphere is calculated to be approximately equal to 1230 m/s. While the usual assumption for TID is that they occur around an altitude of 350 km, such sound speed can only occur at much higher altitudes. Further research is recommended to accurately pinpoint the ionospheric pierce points and develop an algorithm to locate the source of TID in case it is totally unknown.

  3. Model of traveling ionospheric disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorenko Yury P.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A multiscale semi-empirical model of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs is developed. The model is based on the following assumptions: (1 TIDs are generated by acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs and propagate as pressure waves; (2 time intervals between adjacent extrema of atmospheric pressure oscillations in a disturbance source are constant; (3 the pressure extrema propagate from the source up to ~14 000 km at a constant horizontal velocity; (4 the velocity of each extremum is determined only by its number in a TID train. The model was validated using literature data on disturbances generated by about 20 surface and high-altitude nuclear explosions, two volcano explosions, one earthquake and by energetic proton precipitation events in the magnetospheric cusp of the northern hemisphere. Model tests using literature data show that the spatial and temporal TID periods may be predicted with an accuracy of 12%. Adequacy of the model was also confirmed by our observations collected using transionospheric sounding. The following TID parameters: amplitudes, horizontal spatial periods, and a TID front inclination angle in a vertical plane are increasing as the distance between an AGW and the excitation source is increasing. Diurnal and seasonal variability of the TID occurrence, defined as ratio of TID events to the total number of observations for the corresponding period, is not observed. However, the TID occurrence was growing from ~50% in 1987 to ~98% in 2010. The results of other studies asserting that the TID occurrence does not depend on the number of sunspots and magnetic activity are confirmed. The TID occurrence has doubled over the period from 1987 to 2010 indicating increasing solar activity which is not associated with sunspot numbers. The dynamics of spatial horizontal periods was studied in a range of 150–35 000 km.

  4. Diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1000 and 1300 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from eight close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Although there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ˜700 cm-3 below ˜1300 km. Such a plateau is a combined result of significant depletion of light ions and modest depletion of heavy ones on Titan's nightside. We propose that the distinctions between the diurnal variations of light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through “fast” ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through “slow” electron dissociative recombination. The strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes suggests a scenario in which the ions created on Titan's dayside may survive well to the nightside. The observed asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles also supports such an interpretation. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effect of ion survival associated with solid body rotation alone as well as superrotating horizontal winds. For long-lived ions, the predicted diurnal variations have similar general characteristics to those observed. However, for short-lived ions, the model densities on the nightside are significantly lower than the observed values. This implies that electron precipitation from Saturn's magnetosphere may be an additional and important contributor to the densities of the short-lived ions observed on Titan's nightside.

  5. Analyses of hydraulic performance of velocity caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Degn Eskesen, Mark Chr.; Buhrkall, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic performance of a velocity cap has been investigated. Velocity caps are often used in connection with offshore intakes. CFD (computational fluid dynamics) examined the flow through the cap openings and further down into the intake pipes. This was combined with dimension analyses...

  6. Inferring Polar Ion Outflows from Topside Ionograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Rice, D. D.; Eccles, V.; Schunk, R. W.; David, M.; Benson, R. F.; James, H. G.

    2017-12-01

    The high-latitude topside ionosphere is dominated by O+ ions from the F-region peak around 300 km to over 1000 km altitude. The O+ profile shape provides information on the thermal structure, field aligned plasma dynamics, and outflows into the magnetosphere. Topside electron density profiles (EDP) are either obtained from topside sounders or Incoherent Scatter Radars. There is a large archive of topside sounder ionograms and hand scaled EDPs from the Alouette and ISIS satellites between 1962 and 1990. Recent NASA data enhancement efforts have augmented these EDP archives by producing digital topside ionograms both from the 7-track analog telemetry tapes and from 35 mm topside film ionograms. Rice et al [2017] in their 35 mm ionogram recovery emphasized high latitude ionograms taken during disturbed conditions. The figure below contrasts ISIS-II EDPs extracted from 35 mm films before and during a major storm (Dst -200nT) on 9 April 1972 (left panel: quiet period before the storm; right panel: during the peak of the storm). Both satellite passes used for these EDPs were centered on the Resolute Bay location that in 1972 was close to the magnetic pole. They begin at auroral latitudes around 2100 MLT and end on the dayside around 0900MLT. We will present results of how ionospheric models replicate both the quiet and disturbed conditions shown in the figure. Three types of models will be contrasted: an empirical ionosphere (IRI), a physics based ionospheric model (TDIM), and a fluid-based polar-wind model (PW). During the storm pass, when it is expected that substantial heating is present, the ISIS-II topside EDPs provide severe constraints on the usage of these models. These constraints enable estimates of the outflow fluxes as well as the heating that has occurred. The comparisons with the empirical model establish how well the pre-storm topside is modeled and identifies the challenges as the storm magnitude increases. The physics-based TDIM does have storm drivers

  7. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  8. First Experimental Demonstration of Coherent CAP for 300-Gb/s Metropolitan Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estaran Tolosa, Jose Manuel; Iglesias Olmedo, Miguel; Zibar, Darko

    2014-01-01

    We report on high - capacity coherent links employing dual polarization 2D - CAP modulation, allowing for signal design in 8 - dimensional space. Successful demodulation of 221 Gb/s (7.5 b/s/Hz) and 336 Gb/s (7.8 b/s/Hz) after 225 km and 451 km of standard single - mode fiber (SSMF) is achieved....

  9. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  10. Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System (WIOBSS) for the investigation of midlatitude ionospheric irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhou, Xiaoming; Qiao, Lei; Gong, Wanlin

    2018-03-01

    An upgrade of Wuhan Ionospheric Backscattering Sounding System (WIOBSS) was developed in 2015. Based on the Universal Serial Bus (USB), and a high performance FPGA, the newly designed WIOBSS has a completely digital structure, which makes it portable and flexible. Two identical WIOBSSs, which were situated at Mile (24.31°N, 103.39°E) and Puer (22.74°N, 101.05°E) respectively, were used to investigate the ionospheric irregularities. The comparisons of group distance, Doppler shift and width between Mile-Puer and Puer-Mile VHF ionospheric propagation paths indicate that the reciprocity of the irregularities is satisfied at midlatitude region. The WIOBSS is robust in the detection of ionospheric irregularities.

  11. Longitudinal Differences in the Low-latitude Ionosphere and in the Ionospheric Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Liu, H.; Tsugawa, T.; Batista, I. S.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of longitudinal differences in ionospheric parameters can illuminate variety of mechanisms responsible for ionospheric variability. In this study, we aim to 1) quantitatively describe major features of longitudinal differences in peak electron density in the low-latitude ionosphere; 2) examine differences in ionospheric variability at different longitude sectors, and 3) illustrate longitudinal differences in ionospheric response to a large disturbance event, sudden stratospheric warming of 2016. We examine NmF2 observations by a network of ionosondes in the American (30-80W) and Asian (110-170E) longitudinal sectors. Selected instruments are located in the vicinity of EIA troughs (Jicamarca, Sao Luis, Guam, Kwajalein), northern and southern crests of EIA (Boa Vista, Tucuman, Cachoeira Paulista, Okinawa), and beyond EIA crests (Ramey, Yamagawa, Kokubunji). To examine main ionospheric features at each location, we use long-term datasets collected at each site to construct empirical models that describe variations in NmF2 as a function of local time, season, solar flux, and geomagnetic activity. This set of empirical models can be used to accurately describe background ionospheric behavior and serve as a set of observational benchmarks for global circulation models. It reveals, for example, higher NmF2 in the EIA trough in the Asian sector as compared to the American sector. Further, we quantitatively describe variability in NmF2 as a difference between local observations and local empirical model, and find that American sector's EIA trough has overall higher variability that maximizes for all local times during wintertime, while Asian sector trough variability does not change significantly with season. Additionally, local empirical models are used to isolate ionospheric features resulting from dynamical disturbances of different origin (e.g. geomagnetic storms, convective activity, sudden stratospheric warming events, etc.). We illustrate this approach with

  12. Coupled storm-time magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere simulations including microscopic ionospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkin, V. G.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Zhang, B.; Liu, J.; Wang, W.; Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.; Lyon, J.

    2017-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system becomes activated in ways that are unique to disturbed conditions. This leads to emergence of physical feedback loops that provide tighter coupling between the system elements, often operating across disparate spatial and temporal scales. One such process that has recently received renewed interest is the generation of microscopic ionospheric turbulence in the electrojet regions (electrojet turbulence, ET) that results from strong convective electric fields imposed by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. ET leads to anomalous electron heating and generation of non-linear Pedersen current - both of which result in significant increases in effective ionospheric conductances. This, in turn, provides strong non-linear feedback on the magnetosphere. Recently, our group has published two studies aiming at a comprehensive analysis of the global effects of this microscopic process on the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. In one study, ET physics was incorporated in the TIEGCM model of the ionosphere-thermosphere. In the other study, ad hoc corrections to the ionospheric conductances based on ET theory were incorporated in the conductance module of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetosphere model. In this presentation, we make the final step toward the full coupling of the microscopic ET physics within our global coupled model including LFM, the Rice Convection Model (RCM) and TIEGCM. To this end, ET effects are incorporated in the TIEGCM model and propagate throughout the system via thus modified TIEGCM conductances. The March 17, 2013 geomagnetic storm is used as a testbed for these fully coupled simulations, and the results of the model are compared with various ionospheric and magnetospheric observatories, including DMSP, AMPERE, and Van Allen Probes. Via these comparisons, we investigate, in particular, the ET effects on the global magnetosphere indicators such as the

  13. On polar daily geomagnetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola De Michelis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the nature of the daily magnetic field perturbations produced by ionospheric and magnetospheric currents at high latitudes. We analyse the hourly means of the X and Y geomagnetic field components recorded by a meridian chain of permanent geomagnetic observatories in the polar region of the Northern Hemisphere during a period of four years (1995-1998 around the solar minimum. We apply a mathematical method, known as natural orthogonal component (NOC, which is capable of characterizing the dominant modes of the geomagnetic field daily variability through a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs. Using the first two modes we reconstruct a two-dimensional equivalent current representation of the ionospheric electric currents, which contribute substantially to the geomagnetic daily variations. The obtained current structures resemble the equivalent current patterns of DP2 and DP1. We characterize these currents by studying their evolution with the geomagnetic activity level and by analysing their dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. The obtained results support the idea of a coexistence of two main processes during all analysed period although one of them, the directly driven process, represents the dominant component of the geomagnetic daily variation.

  14. Differences in cap formation between invasive Entamoeba histolytica and non-invasive Entamoeba dispar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Castañón, Guadalupe; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2012-07-01

    The rapid redistribution of surface antigen-antibody complexes in trophozoites of the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, in a process known as capping, has been considered as a means of the parasite to evade the host immune response. So far, capping has been documented in the invasive E. histolytica, whereas the mobility of surface components in the non-invasive Entamoeba dispar is not known. E. dispar does not induce liver lesions in rodent experimental models, in contrast to the liver abscesses produced by E. histolytica in the same animal model. We have therefore analyzed the mobility of surface receptors to the lectin concanavalin A and of Rab11, a membrane-associated protein, in both species of Entamoebae by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The great majority of E. histolytica trophozoites became morphologically polarized through the formation of well-defined caps at the posterior pole of the parasite. Actin colocalized with the lectin caps. Antibodies against the membrane protein Rab 11 also produced capping. In striking contrast, in E. dispar, the mobility of concanavalin A surface receptors was restricted to the formation of irregular surface patches that did no progress to constitute well-defined caps. Also, anti-Rab 11 antibodies did not result in capping in E. dispar. Whether the failure of E. dispar to efficiently mobilize surface molecules in response to lectin or antibodies as shown in the present results is related to its non-invasive character represents an interesting hypothesis requiring further analysis.

  15. Data ingestion and assimilation in ionospheric models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Nava, B.; Galkin, I.; Angling, M.; Stankov, S. M.; Coisson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3/4 (2009), s. 235-253 ISSN 1593-5213 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1356; GA MŠk OC 091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : ionosphere * models * data assimilation * data ingestion Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.548, year: 2009

  16. Ionospheric error analysis in gps measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pugliano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of the ionosphere on GPS positioning applications are presented in this paper. Specifically, the study, based upon a differential approach, was conducted utilizing GPS measurements acquired by various receivers located at increasing inter-distances. The experimental research was developed upon the basis of two groups of baselines: the first group is comprised of "short" baselines (less than 10 km; the second group is characterized by greater distances (up to 90 km. The obtained results were compared either upon the basis of the geometric characteristics, for six different baseline lengths, using 24 hours of data, or upon temporal variations, by examining two periods of varying intensity in ionospheric activity respectively coinciding with the maximum of the 23 solar cycle and in conditions of low ionospheric activity. The analysis revealed variations in terms of inter-distance as well as different performances primarily owing to temporal modifications in the state of the ionosphere.

  17. Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation. S Ram. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v12i1.15563 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  18. Ionospheric precursors for crustal earthquakes in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Crustal earthquakes with magnitude 6.0>M≥5.5 observed in Italy for the period 1979–2009 including the last one at L'Aquila on 6 April 2009 were considered to check if the earlier obtained relationships for ionospheric precursors for strong Japanese earthquakes are valid for the Italian moderate earthquakes. The ionospheric precursors are based on the observed variations of the sporadic E-layer parameters (h'Es, fbEs and foF2 at the ionospheric station Rome. Empirical dependencies for the seismo-ionospheric disturbances relating the earthquake magnitude and the epicenter distance are obtained and they have been shown to be similar to those obtained earlier for Japanese earthquakes. The dependences indicate the process of spreading the disturbance from the epicenter towards periphery during the earthquake preparation process. Large lead times for the precursor occurrence (up to 34 days for M=5.8–5.9 tells about a prolong preparation period. A possibility of using the obtained relationships for the earthquakes prediction is discussed.

  19. Ionospheric TEC Weather Map Over South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Wrasse, C. M.; Denardini, C. M.; Pádua, M. B.; de Paula, E. R.; Costa, S. M. A.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Monico, J. F. Galera; Ivo, A.; Sant'Anna, N.

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric weather maps using the total electron content (TEC) monitored by ground-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers over South American continent, TECMAP, have been operationally produced by Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais's Space Weather Study and Monitoring Program (Estudo e Monitoramento Brasileiro de Clima Especial) since 2013. In order to cover the whole continent, four GNSS receiver networks, (Rede Brasileiro de Monitoramento Contínuo) RBMC/Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics, Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network, International GNSS Service, and Red Argentina de Monitoreo Satelital Continuo, in total 140 sites, have been used. TECMAPs with a time resolution of 10 min are produced in 12 h time delay. Spatial resolution of the map is rather low, varying between 50 and 500 km depending on the density of the observation points. Large day-to-day variabilities of the equatorial ionization anomaly have been observed. Spatial gradient of TEC from the anomaly trough (total electron content unit, 1 TECU = 1016 el m-2 (TECU) 80) causes a large ionospheric range delay in the GNSS positioning system. Ionospheric plasma bubbles, their seeding and development, could be monitored. This plasma density (spatial and temporal) variability causes not only the GNSS-based positioning error but also radio wave scintillations. Monitoring of these phenomena by TEC mapping becomes an important issue for space weather concern for high-technology positioning system and telecommunication.

  20. Ionosphere and its Influence on Radio Communications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dynamics. R S Dabas. 1. Discovery of Ionosphere. In 1882, the Scottish physicist Balfour Stewart suggested that the continuous but minor variations in Earth's magnetic field might be caused by the ..... and magnetic storms. Varying solar activity ... long-term (11 years) periodicity in the solar activity. In general, it has been ...

  1. A new ionospheric tomographic algorithm – constrained ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the above algorithms. Finally, the new method is applied to reconstruct the IED distributions using the regional GNSS observation (i.e., GPS) over. China. 2. Tomographic formulation. As is well known, one measurable parameter of the ionosphere is the total electron content (TEC), which is the line integral of IED along ray ...

  2. (VTEC) in the Ionosphere for GPS Observations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... artificial intelligence for establishing correction models of ionospheric delay. For instance,. Habarulena et al., (2007) used backpropagation neural network to establish a VTEC model of a region comprised of various observations stations. Hu et al., (2014) proposed a hybrid VTEC prediction technique of ...

  3. Ionospheric irregularities at Antarctic using GPS measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    receiver is modified high performance NOVATEL. OEM4 dual frequency GPS C/A code .... purpose of TEC analysis, ionospheric data is con- sidered above 20. ◦ elevation of ... Contour of occurrence of amplitude scintillation (left panel) and phase scintillation (right panel) at Maitri during. March 2008. Maps are overlapped ...

  4. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  5. On the relation between ionospheric winter anomalies and solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumi, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    There are two different winter anomalies. A small one that appears in connection with ionization at relatively low latitudes in the bottom of the D-region of the ionosphere. There, the electron densities in the winter happen to be less than should be expected. On the other hand, the classic winter anomaly is present when in the winter the upper D-region, again at relatively low latitudes, has more ionization than should be expected. Both these effects are due to the slant compression of the geomagnetic field produced by the solar wind in the wind in the winter season (which is, of course, the summer season when reference is made to events in the other hemisphere). It is shown that the small winter anomaly is a consequence of a hemispheric imbalance in the flux of galactic cosmic rays determined by the obliquely distorted geomagnetic field. It is shown that the standard winter anomaly can be ascribed to the influx of a super solar wind, which penetrates into the Earth's polar atmosphere down to E-region, heights and, duly concentrated through a funneling action at the winter pole of the distorted geomagnetic field, slows down the winter polar vortex. An equatorward motion of the polar air with its content of nitric oxide brings about the excess of ionization in the upper D-region at lower latitudes. The experimentally observed rhythmic recurrence of the upper winter anomaly is correlated to a possible rhythmic recurrence of the super solar wind. The actual detection of the upper winter anomaly could yield some information on the velocity of the basic solar wind. A by-product of the present analysis, the determination of Γ, the coefficient of collisional detachment of the electrons from the O 2 - ions, is presented in the Appendix

  6. Shocklike soliton because of an impinge of protons and electrons solar particles with Venus ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslem, W. M.; Rezk, S.; Abdelsalam, U. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    This paper introduces an investigation of shocklike soliton or small amplitude Double Layers (DLs) in a collisionless plasma, consisting of positive and negative ions, nonthermal electrons, as well as solar wind streaming protons and electrons. Gardner equation is derived and its shocklike soliton solution is obtained. The model is employed to recognize a possible nonlinear wave at Venus ionosphere. The results indicate that the number densities and velocities of the streaming particles play crucial role to determine the polarity and characteristic features (amplitude and width) of the shocklike soliton waves. An electron streaming speed modifies a negative shocklike wave profile, while an ion streaming speed modulates a positive shocklike wave characteristic.

  7. Modeling the UT effect in global distribution of ionospheric electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukianova, R.; Christiansen, Freddy

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for modeling the global distribution of ionospheric electric potentials utilizing high-precision maps of field-aligned currents (FACs) derived from measurements by the Orsted and Magsat satellites as input to a comprehensive numerical scheme is presented. We simulate the universal...... an increase of the daily variation in the cross-polar potential drop (U-PC) at the equinoxes and a decrease at the solstices. Under equinoctial and zero IMF conditions the U-PC can vary by a factor of two, while the convection cells keep their shape. The model predicts that the summer U-PC can be smaller...

  8. Computer simulations of ionospheric electric fields and currents - final report of the IMS magnetometer project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamide, Y.; Kroehl, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report summarizes the major results of a five-year research project initiated by the authors who collaborated with as many as 100 scientists from many countries. In this project a numerical algorithm has been developed and improved from which one estimates the global distribution of electric fields and currents in the horizontal ionosphere as well as field-aligned vertical currents in the polar region from ground-based geomagnetic records and a model of ionospheric conductivity. As an important byproduct of the inversion scheme, we infer the distribution of Joule heat production from the ionospheric currents. Crucial tests of the method in accurately reproducing the large-scale measured patterns of electrodynamic parameters in the earth's environment have proved that the method will accurately reproduce inputs (e.g., ground magnetic perturbation vectors) within the numerical limitations of the most probable solutions of second-order differential equations. As these tests proved successful, the scheme was applied to the extensive geomagnetic data sets which were collected as part of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) to determine the instantaneous electric field and current patterns which agreed with those obtained by more direct methods, such as radar and satellite measurements.

  9. Effects of the Ionosphere on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Abaham, Saji; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Among the remote sensing applications currently being considered from space is the measurement of sea surface salinity. The salinity of the open ocean is important for understanding ocean circulation and for modeling energy exchange with the atmosphere. Passive microwave remote sensors operating near 1.4 GHz (L-band) could provide data needed to fill the gap in current coverage and to complement in situ arrays being planned to provide subsurface profiles in the future. However, the dynamic range of the salinity signal in the open ocean is relatively small and propagation effects along the path from surface to sensor must be taken into account. In particular, Faraday rotation and even attenuation/emission in the ionosphere can be important sources of error. The purpose or this work is to estimate the magnitude of these effects in the context of a future remote sensing system in space to measure salinity in L-band. Data will be presented as a function of time location and solar activity using IRI-95 to model the ionosphere. The ionosphere presents two potential sources of error for the measurement of salinity: Rotation of the polarization vector (Faraday rotation) and attenuation/emission. Estimates of the effect of these two phenomena on passive remote sensing over the oceans at L-band (1.4 GHz) are presented.

  10. Titan's ionosphere in the magnetosheath: Cassini RPWS results during the T32 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Garnier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cassini mission has provided much information about the Titan environment, with numerous low altitude encounters with the moon being always inside the magnetosphere. The only encounter taking place outside the magnetopause, in the magnetosheath, occurred the 13 June 2007 (T32 flyby. This paper is dedicated to the analysis of the Radio and Plasma Wave investigation data during this specific encounter, in particular with the Langmuir probe, providing a detailed picture of the cold plasma environment and of Titan's ionosphere with these unique plasma conditions. The various pressure terms were also calculated during the flyby. The comparison with the T30 flyby, whose geometry was very similar to the T32 encounter but where Titan was immersed in the kronian magnetosphere, reveals that the evolution of the incident plasma has a significant influence on the structure of the ionosphere, with in particular a change of the exo-ionospheric shape. The electrical conductivities are given along the trajectory of the spacecraft and the discovery of a polar plasma cavity is reported.

  11. Titan's ionosphere in the magnetosheath: Cassini RPWS results during the T32 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Garnier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cassini mission has provided much information about the Titan environment, with numerous low altitude encounters with the moon being always inside the magnetosphere. The only encounter taking place outside the magnetopause, in the magnetosheath, occurred the 13 June 2007 (T32 flyby. This paper is dedicated to the analysis of the Radio and Plasma Wave investigation data during this specific encounter, in particular with the Langmuir probe, providing a detailed picture of the cold plasma environment and of Titan's ionosphere with these unique plasma conditions. The various pressure terms were also calculated during the flyby. The comparison with the T30 flyby, whose geometry was very similar to the T32 encounter but where Titan was immersed in the kronian magnetosphere, reveals that the evolution of the incident plasma has a significant influence on the structure of the ionosphere, with in particular a change of the exo-ionospheric shape. The electrical conductivities are given along the trajectory of the spacecraft and the discovery of a polar plasma cavity is reported.

  12. Possible recent and ancient glacial ice flow in the south polar region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.

    Martian polar science began almost as soon as small telescopes were trained on the planet. The seasonal expansion and contraction of the polar caps and their high albedoes led most astronomers to think that water ice is the dominant constituent. In 1911 Lowell perceived a bluish band around the retreating edge of the polar caps, and interpreted it as water from melting polar ice and seasonal snow. An alternative idea in his time was that the polar caps consist of frozen carbonic acid. Lowell rejected the carbonic acid hypothesis on account of his blue band. He also pointed out that carbonic acid would sublimate rather than melt at confining pressures near and below one bar, hence, carbonic acid could not account for the blue band. In comparing Lowell's theories with today's knowledge, it is recognized that (1) sublimation is mainly responsible for the growth and contraction of Mars' polar caps, (2) carbon dioxide is a major component of the southern polar cap, and (3) Lowell's blue band was probably seasonal dust and/or clouds. Geomorphic evidence that glacial ice and glacial melt waters once flowed over broad areas of the southern polar region. Two aspects of the south polar region suggest possible glacial processes during two distinct eras in Mars' history.

  13. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  14. Propagation of magnetosonic and whistler-mode waves from the magnetosphere and atmosphere into the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Chum, J.; Nemec, F.

    2009-04-01

    We summarize observations of the DEMETER spacecraft in the top-side ionosphere related to the lightning activity, to the downward propagating magnetospheric chorus emissions and to the magnetosonic harmonic ELF emissions close to the geomagnetic equator. At the 707 km altitude of DEMETER, we have observed 3D electric and magnetic field waveforms of fractional-hop whistlers. We identify corresponding source lightning strokes and we perform multidimensional analysis of the measurements and obtain detailed information on wave polarization characteristics and propagation directions. This allows us for the first time to combine these measurements with ray tracing simulation in order to directly characterize how the radiation penetrates through the ionosphere. We also interpret observations of low-altitude electromagnetic ELF hiss observed on the dayside at subauroral latitudes. These waves propagate with downward directed wave vectors which are slightly equatorward inclined at lower magnetic latitudes and slightly poleward inclined at higher latitudes. Reverse ray tracing indicates a possible source region near the geomagnetic equator at a radial distance between 5 and 7 Earth radii and we find that low-altitude ELF hiss contains discrete time-frequency structures resembling wave packets of whistler mode chorus. The reverse raypaths of ELF hiss are consistent with the hypothesis that the frequently observed dayside ELF hiss is a low-altitude manifestation of natural magnetospheric emissions of whistler mode chorus. Finally, we analyze waves that propagate in the extraordinary magnetosonic mode to the ionosphere from larger radial distances close to the plane of the geomagnetic equator. These waves show a characteristic harmonic structure very similar to previously reported observations of equatorial noise in the magnetosphere. The observed mode structure is influenced by the presence of multiple ions in the plasma of the top-side ionosphere but the spectral and

  15. Ionospheric plasma density structures associated with magnetopause motion: a case study using the Cluster spacecraft and the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pitout

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available On 5 January 2003, the footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, then orbiting in the dayside magnetosphere near the magnetopause, was in the close vicinity of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR in the dayside afternoon sector. This configuration made possible the study of the magnetopause motion and its direct consequences on the ionospheric plasma at high latitude. Cluster observed multiple magnetopause crossings despite its high latitude, while on the ground the magnetic activity was very low, whereas the ionospheric plasma sounded by the ESR exhibited poleward moving plasma density structures. In this paper, we compare the satellite and radar data, in order to show that the plasma density structures are directly related to the magnetopause motion and its associated pulsed ionospheric flow. We propose that the variations in electric field make the convection velocity vary enough to alter the electron population by accelerating the chemistry in the F-region and act as a source of electron depletion. The magnetopause motion is in this case, a source of plasma density structures in the polar dayside ionosphere.

  16. Study of midlatitude ionospheric irregularities and E- and F-region coupling based on rocket and radar observations from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have been studying ionspheric irregularities in mid-latitude region by using radars, sounding rockets, etc. The mid-latitude ionosphere was considered much stable than those in the equatorial or polar region in the past, but our studies for years have revealed that there are much active variabilities. We found variety of wave-like structures that are specific in the mid-latitudes. One of the phenomena is quasi-periodic echoes (QP echoes) first observed by the MU radar that reflects horizontal plasma-density structures associated to sporadic-E layers. Another phenomenon is medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID) in the F-region. In the generation mechanism we think that Ionospheric E- and F-region coupling process is important. In this presentation, we will discuss nature of mid-latitude ionosphere based on our observations; the MU radar, sounding rocket campaigns of SEEK-1/2, and recent MSTID rocket experiment from JAXA Uchinoura Space Center in July 2013.

  17. Derivation of a planetary ionospheric storm index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary ionospheric storm index, Wp, is deduced from the numerical global ionospheric GPS-IONEX maps of the vertical total electron content, TEC, for more than half a solar cycle, 1999–2008. The TEC values are extracted from the 600 grid points of the map at latitudes 60° N to 60° S with a step of 5° and longitudes 0° to 345° E with a step of 15° providing the data for 00:00 to 23:00 h of local time. The local effects of the solar radiant energy are filtered out by normalizing of the TEC in terms of the solar zenith angle χ at a particular time and the local noon value χ0. The degree of perturbation, DTEC, is computed as log of TEC relative to quiet reference median for 27 days prior to the day of observation. The W-index map is generated by segmentation of DTEC with the relevant thresholds specified earlier for foF2 so that 1 or −1 stands for the quiet state, 2 or −2 for the moderate disturbance, 3 or −3 for the moderate ionospheric storm, and 4 or −4 for intense ionospheric storm at each grid point of the map. The planetary ionospheric storm Wp index is obtained from the W-index map as a latitudinal average of the distance between maximum positive and minimum negative W-index weighted by the latitude/longitude extent of the extreme values on the map. The threshold Wp exceeding 4.0 index units and the peak value Wpmax≥6.0 specify the duration and the power of the planetary ionosphere-plasmasphere storm. It is shown that the occurrence of the Wp storms is growing with the phase of the solar cycle being twice as much as the number of the magnetospheric storms with Dst≤−100 nT and Ap≥100 nT.

  18. Derivation of a planetary ionospheric storm index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary ionospheric storm index, Wp, is deduced from the numerical global ionospheric GPS-IONEX maps of the vertical total electron content, TEC, for more than half a solar cycle, 1999–2008. The TEC values are extracted from the 600 grid points of the map at latitudes 60° N to 60° S with a step of 5° and longitudes 0° to 345° E with a step of 15° providing the data for 00:00 to 23:00 h of local time. The local effects of the solar radiant energy are filtered out by normalizing of the TEC in terms of the solar zenith angle χ at a particular time and the local noon value χ0. The degree of perturbation, DTEC, is computed as log of TEC relative to quiet reference median for 27 days prior to the day of observation. The W-index map is generated by segmentation of DTEC with the relevant thresholds specified earlier for foF2 so that 1 or −1 stands for the quiet state, 2 or −2 for the moderate disturbance, 3 or −3 for the moderate ionospheric storm, and 4 or −4 for intense ionospheric storm at each grid point of the map. The planetary ionospheric storm Wp index is obtained from the W-index map as a latitudinal average of the distance between maximum positive and minimum negative W-index weighted by the latitude/longitude extent of the extreme values on the map. The threshold Wp exceeding 4.0 index units and the peak value Wpmax≥6.0 specify the duration and the power of the planetary ionosphere-plasmasphere storm. It is shown that the occurrence of the Wp storms is growing with the phase of the solar cycle being twice as much as the number of the magnetospheric storms with Dst≤−100 nT and Ap≥100 nT.

  19. Evolution of ionospheric disturbances excited by earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, Elvira; Heki, Kosuke; Afraimovich, Edward; Kiryushkin, Vladislav; Shalimov, Sergei

    Earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere. Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) measurements we studied ionosphere response to the Kuril Islands Earthquakes of 04 October 1994 (M8.1) and 15 November 2006 (M7.9). High spatial resolution of the Japanese dense GPS array (GEONET) allowed us to analyze the dynamical characteristics of the observed traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in detail. This provided us more information about the processes of an atmospheric wave propagation and transformation from the ground to the ionosphere (i.e. transformation of acoustic waves to shock-acoustic waves, SAW) and then to TIDs propagating for more than 1800 km. Such observations of the evolution of disturbances in the ionosphere have been performed for the first time. The observed TIDs appeared in TEC records of the closest to the epicenter GPS receivers 10 min after the quake in the form of N-type wave as a response to propagation of SAW. The amplitude of the signal is about 0.6 TEC units for the records in the near-field ( 100-200 km) of the suspected TIDs source, and about 1 TEC units at a distance of 200-350 km. Within first 600 km the propagation velocity was about 1.3 km/s. Our results coincide with previous results of SAW investigations. We managed to track the subsequent evolution of the propagating TIDs: starting from 400- 500 km out of the source the wave seems to divide into two separate waves, which henceforth propagate with different velocities - about 1.7 km/s and 600 m/s. We suggest that the TEC response in the far field of the TIDs source is a mixture of the damping SAW (the "fast" wave) and TIDs propagating in the atmospheric waveguide (the "slow" wave). Other possibility is that the record shows a separation of the positive (the "fast" wave) and

  20. Radio Tomography of Ionospheric Structures (probably) due to Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Nesterov, I.; Andreeva, E.; Rekenthaler, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric radio-tomography (RT) utilizes radio signals transmitted from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS), including low-orbiting (LO) navigational systems such as Transit, Tsikada, etc., and high-orbiting (HO) navigational systems such as GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou, etc. The signals that are transmitted from the LO navigational satellites and recorded by ground receiving chains can be inverted for almost instantaneous (5-8 min) 2D snapshots of electron density. The data from the networks of ground receivers that record the signals of the HO satellites are suitable for implementing high-orbital RT (HORT), i.e. reconstructing the 4D distributions of the ionospheric electron density (one 3D image every 20-30 min). In the regions densely covered by the GNSS receivers, it is currently possible to get a time step of 2-4 min. The LORT and HORT approaches have a common methodical basis: in both these techniques, the integrals of electron density along the ray between the satellite and the receiver are measured, and then the tomographic procedures are applied to reconstruct the distributions of electron density. We present several examples of the experiments on the ionospheric RT, which are related to the Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (USAI) coupling. In particular, we demonstrate examples of RT images of the ionosphere after industrial explosions, rocket launches, and modification of the ionosphere by high-power radio waves. We also show RT cross sections reflecting ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquakes (EQ) and tsunami waves. In these cases, there is an evident cause-and-effect relationship. The perturbations are transferred between the geospheres predominantly by acoustic gravity waves (AGW), whose amplitudes increase with increasing height. As far as EQ are concerned, the cause of the USAI coupling mechanism is not obvious. It is clear, however, that the regular RT studies can promote the solution of this challenging problem

  1. Ionospheric responses during equinox and solstice periods over Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatay, Secil; Cinar, Ali; Arikan, Feza

    2017-11-01

    Ionospheric electron density is the determining variable for investigation of the spatial and temporal variations in the ionosphere. Total Electron Content (TEC) is the integral of the electron density along a ray path that indicates the total variability through the ionosphere. Global Positioning System (GPS) recordings can be utilized to estimate the TEC, thus GPS proves itself as a useful tool in monitoring the total variability of electron distribution within the ionosphere. This study focuses on the analysis of the variations of ionosphere over Turkey that can be grouped into anomalies during equinox and solstice periods using TEC estimates obtained by a regional GPS network. It is observed that noon time depletions in TEC distributions predominantly occur in winter for minimum Sun Spots Numbers (SSN) in the central regions of Turkey which also exhibit high variability due to midlatitude winter anomaly. TEC values and ionospheric variations at solstice periods demonstrate significant enhancements compared to those at equinox periods.

  2. A clear link connecting the troposphere and ionosphere: ionospheric reponses to the 2015 Typhoon Dujuan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Xu, Yahui; Kuo, Chungyen; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Lei; Zhai, Changzhi

    2017-09-01

    The global navigation satellite system (GNSS) total electron content (TEC) sequences were used to capture the arrival time and location of the ionosphere disturbances in response to the 2015 Typhoon Dujuan. After removing the de-trended TEC variation, the clear ionosphere disturbances on the typhoon landing day could be distinguished, and these disturbances disappeared from the TEC sequences before and after the typhoon landing day. The foF2 data observed by Xiamen ionosonde station also show ionosphere disturbances. Based on the advantages of GNSS multi-point observations, the disturbances horizontal velocity in the ionosphere were estimated according to the linear theory for a dispersion relation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in an isothermal atmosphere. The average horizontal velocity (˜ 240 m/s) and the radial velocity (˜ 287 m/s) were used in the two-dimensional grid search for the origin point on the Earth's surface. The origin area was determined to be on the eastern side of Taiwan. Lastly, a possible physical mechanism is discussed in this study. When typhoons land on Taiwan, the severe convective storms and the drag effect from the Central Mountains create an ideal location for development of AGWs. Topographic conditions, like the high lapse rate, contribute to the formation of AGWs, which then propagates into the ionosphere altitude.

  3. Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer: TIEGCM-ICON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, Astrid

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection explorer (ICON) will study the coupling between the thermosphere and ionosphere at low- and mid-latitudes by measuring the key parameters. The ICON mission will also employ numerical modeling to support the interpretation of the observations, and examine the importance of different vertical coupling mechanisms by conducting numerical experiments. One of these models is the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model-ICON (TIEGCM-ICON) which will be driven by tidal perturbations derived from ICON observations using the Hough Mode Extension method (HME) and at high latitude by ion convection and auroral particle precipitation patterns from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE). The TIEGCM-ICON will simulate the thermosphere-ionosphere (TI) system during the period of the ICON mission. In this report the TIEGCM-ICON is introduced, and the focus is on examining the effect of the lower boundary on the TI-system to provide some guidance for interpreting future ICON model results.

  4. Solar cycle variations in the ionosphere of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Cano, B.; Lester, M.; Witasse, Ol; Blelly, P.L.; Cartacci, M.; Radicella, S.M.; Herraiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    Solar cycle variations in solar radiation create notable changes in the Martian ionosphere, which have been analysed with Mars Express plasma datasets in this paper. In general, lower densities and temperatures of the ionosphere are found during the low solar activity phase, while higher densities and temperatures are found during the high solar activity phase. In this paper, we assess the degree of influence of the long term solar flux variations in the ionosphere of Mars. (Author)

  5. Towards 400GBASE 4-lane Solution Using Direct Detection of MultiCAP Signal in 14 GHz Bandwidth per Lane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Olmedo, Miguel; Tianjian, Zuo; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of 102 Gbit/s transmission over a 15km single wavelength and polarization fiber link with 14GHz 3dB bandwidth. Novel multiband CAP signaling allows for a 4-lane 400GBASE long reach solution.......We report on an experimental demonstration of 102 Gbit/s transmission over a 15km single wavelength and polarization fiber link with 14GHz 3dB bandwidth. Novel multiband CAP signaling allows for a 4-lane 400GBASE long reach solution....

  6. A Model for Negative Ion Chemistry in Titan’s Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Vrinda; Bhardwaj, Anil

    2018-04-01

    We developed a one-dimensional photochemical model for the dayside ionosphere of Titan for calculating the density profiles of negative ions under steady-state photochemical equilibrium condition. We concentrated on the T40 flyby of the Cassini orbiter and used the in situ measurements from instruments on board Cassini as input to the model. Using the latest available reaction rate coefficients and dissociative electron attachment cross sections, the densities of 10 anions are calculated. Our study shows CN‑ as the dominant anion, followed by C3N‑, which agrees with the results of previous calculations. We suggest that H‑ could be an important anion in Titan’s ionosphere and is the second most abundant anion at altitudes greater than 1200 km. The main production channel of the major ion CN‑ is the reaction of H‑ with HCN. The H‑ also play a major role in the production of anions C2H‑, C6H‑, and OH‑. We present a comparison of the calculated ion density profiles with the relative density profiles derived using recently reported Cassini CAPS/ELS observations.

  7. PRECURSORS OF EARTHQUAKES: VLF SIGNALSIONOSPHERE IONOSPHERE RELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ULAS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available lot of people have died because of earthquakes every year. Therefore It is crucial to predict the time of the earthquakes reasonable time before it had happed. This paper presents recent information published in the literature about precursors of earthquakes. The relationships between earthquakes and ionosphere are targeted to guide new researches in order to study further to find novel prediction methods.

  8. Investigation of ionospheric irregularities by radio holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, E. D.; Popov, A. A.; Tereshchenko, A. D.; Khudukon, B. Z.

    Methodological aspects of the design of a radio-holography experiment for the investigation of ionospheric irregularities are considered on the basis of a theoretical examination of the formation of a diffraction field by two coherent satellite signals. The equipment needed to implement such an experiment is described, and results of first observations performed at high latitudes (in the Murmansk region) on February 8, 1978 are examined.

  9. Energetics of the dayside ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobe, Zoltan; Nagy, Andrew F.; Brace, Larry H.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    1993-01-01

    A reanalysis of the Pioneer Venus electron temperature data base showed a strong correlation between elevated electron temperatures and induced magnetic fields in the dayside ionosphere above about 200 km. These results suggest, although not conclusively, that the elevated temperatures are the result of reduced vertical conductivities caused by the horizontal, induced fields with a possible contribution from energy deposition by magnetosheath electrons moving along the field from the tail region.

  10. Ionospheric Irregularities at Mars Probed by MARSIS Topside Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kopf, A. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Ruhunusiri, S.

    2018-01-01

    The upper ionosphere of Mars contains a variety of perturbations driven by solar wind forcing from above and upward propagating atmospheric waves from below. Here we explore the global distribution and variability of ionospheric irregularities around the exobase at Mars by analyzing topside sounding data from the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) instrument on board Mars Express. As irregular structure gives rise to off-vertical echoes with excess propagation time, the diffuseness of ionospheric echo traces can be used as a diagnostic tool for perturbed reflection surfaces. The observed properties of diffuse echoes above unmagnetized regions suggest that ionospheric irregularities with horizontal wavelengths of tens to hundreds of kilometers are particularly enhanced in the winter hemisphere and at high solar zenith angles. Given the known inverse dependence of neutral gravity wave amplitudes on the background atmospheric temperature, the ionospheric irregularities probed by MARSIS are most likely associated with plasma perturbations driven by atmospheric gravity waves. Though extreme events with unusually diffuse echoes are more frequently observed for high solar wind dynamic pressures during some time intervals, the vast majority of the diffuse echo events are unaffected by varying solar wind conditions, implying limited influence of solar wind forcing on the generation of ionospheric irregularities. Combination of remote and in situ measurements of ionospheric irregularities would offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the ionospheric dynamics at Mars.

  11. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, W.C.; Mahoney, M.J.; Jacobson, A.R.; Knowles, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities. 10 references

  12. Ionospheric Measurements in the Wake of Solar Maximum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreasen, Angela

    2004-01-01

    .... The measurements were performed using a variety of radiowave techniques, most involving transionospheric radio propagation, and included observations of ionospheric perturbations via high-power...

  13. Ionosphere monitoring and forecast activities within the IAG working group "Ionosphere Prediction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Mainul; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Erdogan, Eren; Cueto Santamaría, Marta; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Schmidt, Michael; Wilken, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Ionospheric disturbances can affect technologies in space and on Earth disrupting satellite and airline operations, communications networks, navigation systems. As the world becomes ever more dependent on these technologies, ionospheric disturbances as part of space weather pose an increasing risk to the economic vitality and national security. Therefore, having the knowledge of ionospheric state in advance during space weather events is becoming more and more important. To promote scientific cooperation we recently formed a Working Group (WG) called "Ionosphere Predictions" within the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) under Sub-Commission 4.3 "Atmosphere Remote Sensing" of the Commission 4 "Positioning and Applications". The general objective of the WG is to promote the development of ionosphere prediction algorithm/models based on the dependence of ionospheric characteristics on solar and magnetic conditions combining data from different sensors to improve the spatial and temporal resolution and sensitivity taking advantage of different sounding geometries and latency. Our presented work enables the possibility to compare total electron content (TEC) prediction approaches/results from different centers contributing to this WG such as German Aerospace Center (DLR), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Technische Universität München (TUM) and GMV. DLR developed a model-assisted TEC forecast algorithm taking benefit from actual trends of the TEC behavior at each grid point. Since during perturbations, characterized by large TEC fluctuations or ionization fronts, this approach may fail, the trend information is merged with the current background model which provides a stable climatological TEC behavior. The presented solution is a first step to regularly provide forecasted TEC services via SWACI/IMPC by DLR. UPC forecast model is based on applying linear regression to a temporal window of TEC maps in the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) domain

  14. Space weather: Modeling and forecasting ionospheric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzadilla Mendez, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Space weather is the set of phenomena and interactions that take place in the interplanetary medium. It is regulated primarily by the activity originating in the Sun and affects both the artificial satellites that are outside of the protective cover of the Earth's atmosphere as the rest of the planets in the solar system. Among the phenomena that are of great relevance and impact on Earth are the auroras and geomagnetic storms , these are a direct result of irregularities in the flow of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field . Given the high complexity of the physical phenomena involved (magnetic reconnection , particle inlet and ionizing radiation to the atmosphere) one of the great scientific challenges today is to forecast the state of plasmatic means either the interplanetary medium , the magnetosphere and ionosphere , for their importance to the development of various human activities such as radio , global positioning , navigation, etc. . It briefly address some of the international ionospheric modeling methods and contributions and participation that currently has the space group of the Institute of Geophysics Geophysics and Astronomy (IGA) in these activities of modeling and forecasting ionospheric. (author)

  15. Ionospheric climatology and weather disturbances: A tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.

    The ionosphere can have a detrimental effect on both civilian and military systems, including OTH radars, HF communications, surveillance, and navigation systems that use GPS satellites. In an attempt to mitigate the adverse effects, specification and forecast models are being developed that are based on sophisticated data assimilation techniques. However, the model development represents a significant challenge because the ionosphere is known to display a marked variation with altitude, latitude, longitude, universal time, season, solar cycle, and geomagnetic activity. This variation results from the couplings, time delays, and feedback mechanisms that are inherent in the system as well as from the effects of solar, interplanetary, magnetospheric, and mesospheric processes. The various processes act in concert to define both a background state (climatology) and a disturbed state (weather), which are described in this tutorial. First, a brief description of the background ionospheric state and the physical processes that are responsible for establishing this state is given. The tutorial then focuses on a discussion of weather disturbances and features, the causes of weather, and the status of weather modeling.

  16. Fate of Ice Grains in Saturn's Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamil, O.; Cravens, T. E.; Reedy, N. L.; Sakai, S.

    2018-02-01

    It has been proposed that the rings of Saturn can contribute both material (i.e., water) and energy to its upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Ionospheric models require the presence of molecular species such as water that can chemically remove ionospheric protons, which otherwise are associated with electron densities that greatly exceed those from observation. These models adopt topside fluxes of water molecules. Other models have shown that ice grains from Saturn's rings can impact the atmosphere, but the effects of these grains have not been previously studied. In the current paper, we model how ice grains deposit both material and energy in Saturn's upper atmosphere as a function of grain size, initial velocity (at the "top" of the atmosphere, defined at an altitude above the cloud tops of 3,000 km), and incident angle. Typical grain speeds are expected to be roughly 15-25 km/s. Grains with radii on the order of 1-10 nm deposit most of their energy in the altitude range of 1,700-1,900 km, and can vaporize, depending on initial velocity and impact angle, contributing water mass to the upper atmosphere. We show that grains in this radius range do not significantly vaporize in our model at initial velocities lower than about 20 km/s.

  17. Equinoctial transitions in the ionosphere and thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    Full Text Available Equinoctial summer/winter transitions in the parameters of the F2-region are analyzed using ground-based ionosonde and incoherent scatter observations. Average transition from one type of diurnal NmF2 variation to another takes 20–25 days, but cases of very fast (6–10 days transitions are observed as well. Strong day-time NmF2 deviations of both signs from the monthly median, not related to geomagnetic activity, are revealed for the transition periods. Both longitudinal and latitudinal variations take place for the amplitude of such quiet time NmF2 deviations. The summer-type diurnal NmF2 variation during the transition period is characterized by decreased atomic oxygen concentration [O] and a small equatorward thermospheric wind compared to winter-type days with strong poleward wind and increased [O]. Molecular N2 and O2 concentrations remain practically unchanged in such day-to-day transitions. The main cause of the F2-layer variations during the transition periods is the change of atomic oxygen abundance in the thermosphere related to changes of global thermospheric circulation. A possible relationship with an equinoctial transition of atomic oxygen at the E-region heights is discussed.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (thermosphere – composition and chemistry – Ionosphere (ionosphere- atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances

  18. Statistical properties of ionospheric stimulated electromagnetic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Karlsson

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed the statistical properties of the stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE spectral features in the steady state, reached after a long period of continuous HF pumping of the ionosphere in experiments performed at the Sura ionospheric radio research facility in Russia. Using a digital filter bank method, we have been able to analyse complex valued signals within narrow frequency bands. Each of the SEE spectral features are thereby separated into a number of narrow spectral components. Statistical tests were performed for all these spectral components and the distributions of the spectral amplitudes and phases were evaluated. Also, a test for sinusoidal components was performed. These tests showed that all observed SEE features were indistinguishable from coloured Gaussian noise. The test results exclude that the SEE features can be the result of a single isolated coherent process, but does not rule out that there could be many statistically independent parametric wave-wave processes taking place simultaneously at various parts of the HF-pumped ionosphere, as long as the superposition from all these is incoherent. Furthermore, from the test results, we cannot exclude the possibility that the waveforms of some, or all, of the SEE features may be chaotic.

  19. Equinoctial transitions in the ionosphere and thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Equinoctial summer/winter transitions in the parameters of the F2-region are analyzed using ground-based ionosonde and incoherent scatter observations. Average transition from one type of diurnal NmF2 variation to another takes 20–25 days, but cases of very fast (6–10 days transitions are observed as well. Strong day-time NmF2 deviations of both signs from the monthly median, not related to geomagnetic activity, are revealed for the transition periods. Both longitudinal and latitudinal variations take place for the amplitude of such quiet time NmF2 deviations. The summer-type diurnal NmF2 variation during the transition period is characterized by decreased atomic oxygen concentration [O] and a small equatorward thermospheric wind compared to winter-type days with strong poleward wind and increased [O]. Molecular N2 and O2 concentrations remain practically unchanged in such day-to-day transitions. The main cause of the F2-layer variations during the transition periods is the change of atomic oxygen abundance in the thermosphere related to changes of global thermospheric circulation. A possible relationship with an equinoctial transition of atomic oxygen at the E-region heights is discussed.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (thermosphere – composition and chemistry – Ionosphere (ionosphere- atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances

  20. Stormtime dynamics of the global thermosphere and equatorial ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms the development of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs and distributions of thermospheric densities are strongly influenced by the histories of imposed magnetospheric electric (εM fields. Periods of intense EPB activity driven by penetration εM fields in the main phase are followed by their worldwide absence during recovery. A new method is applied to estimate global thermospheric energy (Eth budgets from orbit-averaged densities measured by accelerometers on polar-orbiting satellites. During the main phase of storms Eth increases as long as the stormtime εM operates, then exponentially decays toward quiet-time values during early recovery. Some fraction of the energy deposited at high magnetic latitudes during the main phase propagates into the subauroral ionosphere-thermosphere where it affects chemical and azimuthal-wind dynamics well into recovery. We suggest a scenario wherein fossils of main phase activity inhibit full restoration of quiet-time dayside dynamos and pre-reversal enhancements of upward plasma drifts near dusk denying bottomside irregularities sufficient time to grow into EPBs.

  1. Stormtime dynamics of the global thermosphere and equatorial ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms the development of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs and distributions of thermospheric densities are strongly influenced by the histories of imposed magnetospheric electric (εM fields. Periods of intense EPB activity driven by penetration εM fields in the main phase are followed by their worldwide absence during recovery. A new method is applied to estimate global thermospheric energy (Eth budgets from orbit-averaged densities measured by accelerometers on polar-orbiting satellites. During the main phase of storms Eth increases as long as the stormtime εM operates, then exponentially decays toward quiet-time values during early recovery. Some fraction of the energy deposited at high magnetic latitudes during the main phase propagates into the subauroral ionosphere-thermosphere where it affects chemical and azimuthal-wind dynamics well into recovery. We suggest a scenario wherein fossils of main phase activity inhibit full restoration of quiet-time dayside dynamos and pre-reversal enhancements of upward plasma drifts near dusk denying bottomside irregularities sufficient time to grow into EPBs.

  2. A Study on the Ionosphere and Thermosphere Interaction Based on NCAR-TIEGCM: Dependence of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF on the Momentum Forcing in the High-Latitude Lower Thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sil Kwak

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available To understand the physical processes that control the high-latitude lower thermospheric dynamics, we quantify the forces that are mainly responsible for maintaining the high-latitude lower thermospheric wind system with the aid of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR-TIEGCM. Momentum forcing is statistically analyzed in magnetic coordinates, and its behavior with respect to the magnitude and orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF is further examined. By subtracting the values with zero IMF from those with non-zero IMF, we obtained the difference winds and forces in the high-latitude lower thermosphere( 0.8 |bar{B}_z| or negative(B_y 0.3125 |bar{B}_y| or negative(B_z 125 km the primary forces that determine the variations of the neutral winds are the pressure gradient, Coriolis and rotational Pedersen ion drag forces; however, at various locations and times significant contributions can be made by the horizontal advection force. On the other hand, at lower altitudes(108-125 km the pressure gradient, Coriolis and non-rotational Hall ion drag forces determine the variations of the neutral winds. At lower altitudes(<108 km it tends to generate a geostrophic motion with the balance between the pressure gradient and Coriolis forces. The northward component of IMF bar{B}_y-dependent average momentum forces act more significantly on the neutral motion except for the ion drag. At lower altitudes(108-125 km for negative IMF-bar{B}_y condition the ion drag force tends to generate a warm clockwise circulation with downward vertical motion associated with the adiabatic compress heating in the polar cap region. For positive IMF-bar{B}_y condition it tends to generate a cold anticlockwise circulation with upward vertical motion associated with the adiabatic expansion cooling in the polar cap region. For negative IMF-bar{B}_z the ion drag force tends to generate a

  3. Observations of Global and Regional Ionospheric Irregularities and Scintillation Using GNSS Tracking Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Valant-Spaight, Bonnie; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Romans, Larry J.; Skone, Susan; Sparks, Lawrence; Hall, G. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The rate of TEC index (ROTI) is a measurement that characterizes ionospheric irregularities. It can be obtained from standard GNSS dual-frequency phase data collected using a geodetic type of GNSS receiver. By processing GPS data from ground-based networks of International GNSS Service and Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS), ROTI maps have been produced to observe global and regional scintillation activities. A major mid-latitude scintillation event in the contiguous United States is reported here that was captured in ROTI maps produced using CORS GPS data collected during a space weather storm. The analyses conducted in this work and previously by another group indicate that ROTI is a good occurrence indicator of both amplitude and phase scintillations of GPS L-band signals, even though the magnitudes of ROTI, S4, and sigma(sub phi) can be different. For example, our analysis indicates that prominent ROTI and the L1 phase scintillation (sigma(sub phi)) are well correlated temporally in the polar region while L1 amplitude scintillation rarely occurs. The differences are partially attributed to physics processes in different latitude regions, such as high-speed plasma convection in the polar region that can suppress the amplitude scintillation. An analysis of the impact of ionospheric scintillation on precise positioning, which requires use of dual-frequency phase data, is also conducted. The results indicate that significant (more than an order of magnitude) positioning errors can occur under phase scintillation conditions.

  4. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  5. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  6. Radio wave propagation in the Martian polar deposits: models and implications for radar sounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    In the present study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in the northern polar ice sheet of Mars is considered Several different scenarios of the structure of the polar deposits and composition of the ice compatible with previously published observational data are proposed Both analytical and numerical simulations of ultra wide band chirp radar pulse propagating through the cap are performed Approximate approach based on the non-coherent theory of the radiative transfer in layered media has been applied to the problem of the propagation of radar pulses in the polar caps Both 1D and 2D and 3D geometry applicable to the orbital and landed radar instruments are studied The side clutter and phase distortions of the signal are also addressed analyzed The possibilities of retrieval of the geological information depending on transparency of the polar cap for radio waves are discussed If the polar cap is relatively transparent the echo from the base of the sheet should be clearly distinctive and interpretable in terms of basal topography of the cap In the case of moderate optical thickness coherent basal echo is corrupted by strong multiple scattering in the layered structure However some conclusions about basal conditions could be made from the signals for example the subglacial lakes may be detected Finally optically thick polar caps prevent any sounding of the base so only the medium itself can be characterized by GPR measurements e g the impurity content in the ice can be found Ilyushin Y A R Seu

  7. Temporal distribution characteristics of GNSS ionospheric occultation data and its effects in earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal distribution characteristics of COSMIC occultation data are analyzed in detail, and the limitations in earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection caused by the temporal distribution characteristics of COSMIC occultation data are discussed using the example of the Wenchuan earthquake. The results demonstrate that there is no fixed temporal resolution for COSMIC occultation data when compared with other ionospheric observation techniques. Therefore, occultation data cannot currently be independently utilized in research studies but can only be used as a complement to other ionospheric observation techniques for applications with high temporal resolution demands, such as earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection.

  8. South Polar Region of Mars: Topography and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The polar layered deposits of Mars represent potentially important volatile reservoirs and tracers for the planet's geologically recent climate history. Unlike the north polar cap, the uppermost surface of the bright residual south polar deposit is probably composed of carbon dioxide ice. It is unknown whether this ice extends through the entire thickness of the deposit. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL), launched in January 1999, is due to arrive in December 1999 to search for water and carbon dioxide on layered deposits near the south pole (SP) of Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. General method for calculating polarization electric fields produced by auroral Cowling mechanism and application examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhamäki, Heikki; Amm, Olaf; Fujii, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Aki; Ieda, Aki

    2013-04-01

    The Cowling mechanism is characterized by the generation of polarization space charges in the ionosphere in consequence of a partial or total blockage of FAC flowing between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Thus a secondary polarization electric field builds up in the ionosphere, which guarantees that the whole (primary + secondary) ionospheric current system is again in balance with the FAC. In the Earth's ionosphere the Cowling mechanism is long known to operate in the equatorial electrojet, and several studies indicate that it is important also in auroral current systems. We present a general method for calculate the secondary polarization electric field, when the ionospheric conductances, the primary (modeled) or the total (measured) electric field, and the Cowling efficiency are given. Here the Cowling efficiency is defined as the fraction of the divergent Hall current canceled by secondary Pedersen current. In contrast to previous studies, our approach is a general solution which is not limited to specific geometrical setups (like an auroral arc), and all parameters may have any kind of spatial dependence. The solution technique is based on spherical elementary current (vector) systems (SECS). This way, we avoid the need to specify explicit boundary conditions for the searched polarization electric field or its potential, which would be required if the problem was solved in a differential equation approach. Instead, we solve an algebraic matrix equation, for which the implicit boundary condition that the divergence of the polarization electric field vanishes outside our analysis area is sufficient. In order to illustrate the effect of Cowling mechanism on ionospheric current systems, we apply our method to two simple models of auroral electrodynamic situations: 1) a mesoscale strong conductance enhancement in the early morning sector within a relatively weak southward primary electric field, 2) a morning sector auroral arc with only a weak conductance

  10. Durability of Capped Wood Plastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Mankowski; Mark J. Manning; Damien P. Slowik

    2015-01-01

    Manufacturers of wood plastic composites (WPCs) have recently introduced capped decking to their product lines. These new materials have begun to take market share from the previous generation of uncapped products that possessed a homogenous composition throughout the thickness of their cross-section. These capped offerings have been introduced with claims that the...

  11. Does uncertainty justify intensity emission caps?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirion, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Environmental policies often set 'relative' or 'intensity' emission caps, i.e. emission limits proportional to the polluting firm's output. One of the arguments put forth in favour of relative caps is based on the uncertainty on business-as-usual output: if the firm's production level is higher than expected, so will be business-as-usual emissions, hence reaching a given level of emissions will be more costly than expected. As a consequence, it is argued, a higher emission level should be allowed if the production level is more important than expected. We assess this argument with a stochastic analytical model featuring two random variables: the business-as-usual emission level, proportional to output, and the slope of the marginal abatement cost curve. We compare the relative cap to an absolute cap and to a price instrument, in terms of welfare impact. It turns out that in most plausible cases, either a price instrument or an absolute cap yields a higher expected welfare than a relative cap. Quantitatively, the difference in expected welfare is typically very small between the absolute and the relative cap but may be significant between the relative cap and the price instrument. (author)

  12. Hybrid revenue caps and incentive regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, Bjoern [School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg University, Box 610, 40530 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2008-05-15

    This paper analyzes the incentive effects of a hybrid revenue cap on a regulated monopolistic firm using non-discriminatory two-part pricing. It is shown that the fixed and the variable part of the cap have different meanings in terms of regulation - the fixed part of a hybrid revenue cap should be used to control the profit level of the regulated firm while the variable part should be used to control the social efficiency level. Since detailed information about the firm's cost function is required to determine the revenue cap parameters, the overall conclusion is that revenue caps are a rather bad idea in the area of incentive regulation. (author)

  13. Explaining Polarization Reversals in STEREO Wave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L, B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently Breneman et al. reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (Lpaper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by +/-200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by 200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al.

  14. Preseismic Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Masashi

    Preseismic atmospheric and ionospheric disturbances besides preseismic geo-electric potential anomalies and ultra-low-frequency (ULF) geomagnetic variations observed on the ground have been reported. Both the phenomena have been found since the 1980s and a number of papers have been published. Since most of the reported phenomena transiently appear with accompanying quiescence before the mainshock, this prevents us to intuitively recognize a correlation between the anomaly appearance and the earthquake occurrence. Some of them, however, showed that anomalies monotonically grew into the mainshock, of which a variation supports the concept of seismic nucleation process under the pre-earthquake state. For example, Heki [GRL, 2011] reported that ionospheric electron density monotonically enhanced tens of minutes prior to the subduction mega-earthquake. However, this preseismic enhancement is apparent variation attributed to tsunamigenic ionospheric hole [Kakinami and Kamogawa et al, GRL, 2012], namely wide and long-duration depression of ionospheric electron after tsunami-excited acoustic waves reach the ionosphere. Since the tsunamigenic ionospheric hole could be simulated [Shinagawa et al., GRL, 2013], the reported variations are high-possibly pseudo phenomena [Kamogawa and Kakinami, JGR, 2013]. Thus, there are barely a few reports which show the preseismic monotonic variation supported by the concept of the seismic nucleation process. As far as we discuss the preseismic geoelectromagnetical and atmospheric-ionospheric anomalies, preseismic transient events from a few weeks to a few hours prior to the mainshock are paid attention to for the precursor study. In order to identify precursors from a number of anomalies, one has to show a statistical significance of correlation between the earthquake and the anomalies, to elucidate the physical mechanism, or to conduct both statistical and physical approach. Since many speculation of the physical mechanism have been

  15. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC are associated with

  16. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC

  17. Bayesian estimation for ionospheric calibration in radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Tol, S.

    2009-01-01

    Radio astronomical observations at low frequencies (< 250 MHz), can be severely distorted by fluctuations in electron density in the ionosphere. The free electrons cause a phase change of electromagnetic waves traveling through the ionosphere. This effect increases for lower frequencies. For this

  18. The F-Region Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics Drifts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ionospheric plasma drift is one of the most essential parameters for understanding the dynamics of ionospheric F-region. F-region electromagnetic drifts are calculated for three seasonal conditions from ionosonde observations acquired during quiet period of a typical year of high and low solar activity at Ibadan (7.4oN, ...

  19. Estimation of ionospheric energy dissipation for the year 2012 using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, data for the electron precipitation energy(ep) and joule heating energy(jh) have been used in the computation of both mean daily and hourly ionospheric ... with 90% confidence level, which indicates that ionospheric energy dissipation is the dominant channel of energy transfer in that year from the solar wind.

  20. A Study of Ionospheric Storm Association with Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    The bulk association between ionospheric storms and geomagnetic storms have been studied. Hemispheric features of seasonal variation of ionospheric storms in the mid-latitude were also investigated. 188 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤100nT) that occurred during solar cycle 22 and 23 were considered, of which 143 were observed to be identified with an ionospheric storm. Individual ionospheric storms were identified as maximum deviations of the F2 layer peak electron density from quiet time values. Only ionospheric storms that could clearly be associated with the peak of a geomagnetic storms were considered. Data from two mid-latitude ionosonde stations; one in the northern hemisphere (i.e Moscow) and the other in the southern hemisphere (Grahamstown) were used to study ionospheric condition at the time of the individual geomagnetic storms. Results show hemispheric and latitudinal differences in the intensity and nature of ionospheric storms association with different types of geomagnetic storms. These results are significant for our present understanding of the mechanisms which drive the changes in electron density during different types of ionospheric storms.

  1. Study of ionospheric anomalies due to impact of typhoon using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and image processing are used to determine Total Electron Content. (TEC) anomalies in the F-layer of the ionosphere relating to Typhoon Nakri for 29 May, 2008 (UTC). PCA and image processing are applied to the global ionospheric map (GIM) with transforms conducted for the time ...

  2. Study of ionospheric anomalies due to impact of typhoon using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ionospheric parameters; Geofisica Pura e Applicata 40. 235–240. Bishop R L and Straus P R 2006 Characterizing ionospheric variations in the vicinity of hurricanes and typhoons using GPS occultation measurements, AGU Fall Meet- ing (San Francisco, Dec. 11–15, 2006); EOS Transactions,. American Geophysical Union ...

  3. Study of ionospheric anomalies due to impact of typhoon using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and image processing are used to determine Total Electron Content (TEC) anomalies in the F-layer of the ionosphere relating to Typhoon Nakri for 29 May, 2008 (UTC). PCA and image processing are applied to the global ionospheric map (GIM) with transforms conducted for the time ...

  4. estimation of ionospheric energy dissipation for the year 2012 using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    both mean daily and hourly ionospheric energy dissipation using Østgaard's empirical relation. The computation has been ... energy dissipation is the dominant channel of energy transfer in that year from the solar wind. This is consistent with many ..... converted to thermal energy for dissipation in the ionosphere (Kallio, et ...

  5. Comparison of two views on the structure of ionospheric currents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are two views on the structure of ionospheric currents, here symbolized as VIEW 1 and VIEW 2. The essential difference between them is that VIEW I supports the existence of two ionospheric current layers in the dip equatorial zone as measured by many rockets (Onwumechili,1992b,c). Contrary to the rocket ...

  6. GPS-based ionospheric tomography with a constrained adaptive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Fredman and Nickisch 2001; Kunitsyn et al. 2010). At present, GPS-based ionospheric tomography is the research focus in the fields of space geodesy and space physics since it can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional variation information of the ionosphere. This is very useful for the develop- ment of GNSS such ...

  7. A study of the ionospheric signature of ion supply from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loranc, M.A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the ionosphere as a source of magnetospheric plasma; in particular, the observations of upwelling ions (UWI) by the DE-1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer have illustrated the significance of low-energy ion supply to the magnetosphere. The composition of the UWI implies an ionospheric source, and the Dynamics Explorer dual satellite mission provides an opportunity to search for the ionospheric signature of UWI. Magnetometer data from both satellites are used to determine magnetic conjunctions of the satellites; these conjunctions are searched for correlated observations of UWI and upward flowing thermal ion (UFI) events. Four cases of correlated observations are presented as proof of that the UFI are indeed the ionospheric signature of UWI; it is found from these examples that the event are associated with intense field-aligned currents at both satellites and with anti-sunward convection, enhanced fluxes of low-energy precipitating electrons from the boundary plasma sheet, and upward thermal ion fluxes in excess of 10 9 cm -2 s -1 at DE-2. While USI are primarily a dayside phenomena, UFI are found in all local time sectors sampled by DE-2

  8. Ionospheric Electron Densities at Mars: Comparison of Mars Express Ionospheric Sounding and MAVEN Local Measurement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Fowler, C.M.; Kopf, A.J.; Andersson, L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Andrews, D.J.; Truhlík, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 12 (2017), s. 12393-12405 E-ISSN 2169-9402 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Mars * ionosphere * MARSIS * Mars Express * MAVEN * radar sounding Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024629/full

  9. A statistical comparison of SuperDARN spectral width boundaries and DMSP particle precipitation boundaries in the morning sector ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining reliable proxies for the ionospheric signature of the open-closed field line boundary (OCB is crucial for making accurate ionospheric measurements of many magnetospheric processes (e.g. magnetic reconnection. This study compares the latitudes of Spectral Width Boundaries (SWBs, identified in the morning sector ionosphere using the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN, with Particle Precipitation Boundaries (PPBs determined using the low-altitude Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP spacecraft, in order to determine whether the SWB represents a good proxy for the ionospheric projection of the OCB. The latitudes of SWBs and PPBs were identified using automated algorithms applied to 5 years (1997-2001 of data measured in the 00:00-12:00 Magnetic Local Time (MLT range. A latitudinal difference was measured between each PPB and the nearest SWB within a ±10min Universal Time (UT window and within a ±1h MLT window. The results show that the SWB represents a good proxy for the OCB close to midnight (~00:00-02:00 MLT and noon (~08:00-12:00 MLT, but is located some distance (~2°-4° equatorward of the OCB across much of the morning sector ionosphere (~02:00-08:00 MLT. On the basis of this and other studies we deduce that the SWB is correlated with the poleward boundary of auroral emissions in the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield ``Long" (LBHL UV emission range and hence, that spectral width is inversely correlated with the energy flux of precipitating electrons. We further conclude that the combination of two factors may explain the spatial distribution of spectral width values in the polar ionospheres. The small-scale structure of the convection electric field leads to an enhancement in spectral width in regions close to the OCB, whereas increases in ionospheric conductivity (relating to the level of incident electron energy flux lead to a reduction in spectral width in regions just equatorward of the OCB.

  10. Estimation of Ion temperatures in the Ionosphere using Swarm Langmuir Probe data and a Physics-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomidze, L.; Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Kouznetsov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Ion temperature is one of the key parameters that provides insight into the thermal balance of the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere system. Together with the temperatures of neutral and electron gases it controls various physical and chemical processes in the upper atmosphere. These include the ion-neutral collision frequencies, chemical reaction rates and plasma scale height, all of which affect the variation and distribution of the electron density. Yet, the modeling of ionospheric ion temperature has received relatively little attention compared to other parameters. The Electric Field Instruments on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) polar orbiting Swarm satellites consist of a pair of Thermal Ion Imagers (TII) and a pair of Langmuir probes (LP) measuring ionospheric plasma parameters at around 500 km. The TII was designed to image ion velocity distribution functions and provide ionospheric electric fields and ion temperatures along the satellites' orbits. Currently, the TII instruments are operating only during limited time intervals, while the measurements of ionospheric electron temperatures and densities are carried out continuously. In this work we estimate the ion temperatures along the orbits of Swarm satellites at low and middle latitudes using a heat balance equation for the ions gas under steady-state conditions. The physics-based ion temperature model assumes ions are heated by the hotter electron gas through elastic Coulomb collisions and cooled by resonance charge transfer collisions with the parent atoms and by elastic collisions with unlike atoms and molecules. The corrected Swarm LP data represent key input parameters for the model. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, we perform two types of analysis. The first is based on the synthetic (model-generated) inputs by a physics-based ionosphere model which solves the complete ion heat balance equation. In another, the estimates of ion temperatures are obtained using actual data for those

  11. Impact of the CO2 and H2O clouds of the Martian polar hood on the polar energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Francois; Pollack, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Clouds covering extensive areas above the martian polar caps have regularly been observed during the fall and winter seasons of each hemisphere. These 'polar hoods' are thought to be made of H2O and CO2. In particular, the very cold temperatures observed during the polar night by Viking and Mariner 9 around both poles have been identified as CO2 clouds and several models, including GCM, have indicated that the CO2 can condense in the atmosphere at all polar latitudes. Estimating the impact of the polar hood clouds on the energy balance of the polar regions is necessary to model the CO2 cycle and address puzzling problems like the polar caps assymetry. For example, by altering the thermal radiation emitted to space, CO2 clouds alter the amount of CO2 that condenses during the fall and winter season. The complete set of Viking IRTM data was analyzed to define the spatial and temporal properties of the polar hoods, and how their presence affects the energy radiated by the atmosphere/caps system to space was estimated. The IRTM observations provide good spatial and temporal converage of both polar regions during fall, winter, and spring, when a combination of the first and the second Viking year is used. Only the IRTM brightness temperatures at 11, 15, and 20 microns are reliable at martian polar temperatures. To recover the integrated thermal fluxes from the IRTM data, a simple model of the polar hood, thought to consist of 'warm' H2O clouds lying above colder and opaque CO2 clouds was developed. Such a model is based on the analysis of the IRIS spectra, and is consistent with the IRTM data used.

  12. A Study on the Radio Propagation in the Korean Ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hee Bae

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the ionosphere on the radio wave propagation are scattering of radio waves, attenuation, angle error, ranging error, and time delay. If ionospheric conditions are suitable, the charged particles can remove energy from radio waves and thus attenuate the signal. Also, a radio wave traveling a path along which the electron density is not constant undergoes changes in direction, position and time of propagation. The present study is based on Korean ionospheric data obtained at the AnYong Radio Research Institute from Jan. 1985 through Oct. 1989. The data are used to simulate the Korean ionosphere following the Chapman law. The effects of the model ionosphere on the radio wave propagation, such as the angle, position error, time delay, and the attenuation, are studies for the various cases of the wave frequency and the altitude.

  13. Ionospheric Cycle Slip Processing in Triple-frequency GNSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Lingyong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method based on three linear independence geometry-free and ionosphere-free (GIF combinations to detect and repair cycle-slip is advanced to finishing the cycle slip processing under the higher ionospheric activity. In order to ensure that the cycle slip correction is accurate, the repair value is validated by a second-order, time-difference phase ionospheric residual (STPIR combination. And then, this method is validated and analyzed by using the triple-frequency data with higher ionospheric error. The experiment results show that this method can nearly detect and repair all the cycle slip except several insensitive cycle slip under high ionospheric activity. So this method can be used to cycle slip procession in triple-frequency precise point position and other un-differenced dynamic navigation and position.

  14. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsugeki, Ryuji; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of...

  15. Polarization Characteristics Inferred From the Radio Receiver Instrument on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, Donald W.; Hussey, Glenn C.; Gillies, Robert G.; James, H. Gordon; Fairbairn, David T.; Yau, Andrew W.

    2018-02-01

    The Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) on the CAScade, Smallsat, and Ionospheric Polar Explorer/enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (CASSIOPE/e-POP) satellite was used to receive continuous wave and binary phase shift keyed transmissions from a high-frequency transmitter located in Ottawa, ON, Canada during April 2016 to investigate how the ionosphere affects the polarization characteristics of transionospheric high-frequency radio waves. The spacecraft orientation was continuously slewed to maintain the dipole orientation in a plane perpendicular to the direction toward the transmitter, enabling the first in situ planar polarization determination for continuous wave and binary phase shift keyed modulated radio waves from space at times when the wave frequency is at least 1.58 times the plasma frequency. The Stokes parameters and polarization characteristics were derived from the measured data and interpreted using an existing ray tracing model. For the southern part of the passes, the power was observed to oscillate between the two dipoles of RRI, which was attributed to Faraday rotation of the radio waves. For the first time, a reversal in the rate of change of orientation angle was observed where the minimum in modeled Faraday rotation occurred. The reversal point was poleward of the point of closest approach between the satellite and transmitter; this was explained by the variations of total electron content and component of magnetic field along the direction of propagation. The received signals show both quasi-longitudinal (QL) and quasi-transverse characteristics. South of the transmitter the QL regime is dominant. Around the reversal point, a combination of QL and quasi-transverse nature was observed.

  16. Present and Future IGS Ionosphere Working Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krankowski, Andrzej

    Nowadays the Ionosphere Working Group of the International GNSS Service (IGS) generates two types of ionospheric products: final and rapid, respectively. This IGS Iono WG started the routine generation of ionosphere vertical total electron content (TEC) maps in June 1998. There are currently four IGS Associate Analysis Centres (IAACs) for ionosphere products: CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe, University of Berne, Switzerland), ESA/ESOC (European Space Operations Center of ESA, Darmstadt, Germany), JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, U.S.A), and gAGE/UPC (Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain). These centres provide products computed with different approaches. The products are transmitted to an IGS Ionosphere Product Coordinator, who produces a weighted combined product. Presently the weights are defined by the IAAC global TEC maps evaluation carried out by 1 UPC center. From January 2008, this coordination is carried out by the GRL/UWM (Geodynamics Research Laboratory of the University of the Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland). The IGS produces a Final Ionosphere product in IONEX format with resolution of 5 degrees in longitude and 2.5 degrees in latitude with a latency of 10 days, and a rapid solution with a latency of 1 day. During a period of about 10 years of continuous IGS ionosphere operation, the techniques used by the IAACs and the strategies of combination have improved in such a way that the combined IGS Ionosphere TEC maps are now significantly more accurate and robust. The purpose of this paper is, on one hand, to show the present performance of the combined final and rapid IGS Ionosphere TEC maps, and on the other hand to summarize the present and future related activities within the IGS Ionosphere WG.

  17. Diagnostic study of coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics in D-region ionosphere via VLF signal propagation characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic disturbances and storms are known to produce significant global disturbances in the ionosphere, including the middle atmosphere and troposphere. There is little understanding about the mechanism and dynamics that drive these processes in lower ionosphere. The ionosphere is also thought to be sensitive to seismic events, and it is believed that it exhibits precursory characteristics as reported in studies via characteristic anomalies in VLF signal. However, distinguishing or separating seismically induced ionospheric fluctuations from those of other origins (e.g., Solar activity, planetary and tidal waves, stratospheric warming etc.) remain vital to robust conclusion, and challenging too. The unique propagation characteristic of VLF radio signal makes it an ideal tool for the study and diagnosis of variability of D-region ionosphere. In this work, we present the analysis of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling dynamics in D-region ionosphere using VLF signal characteristics, and performed an investigation of previously reported 'ionospheric precursors' to understand the true origins of measured anomalies.

  18. Ice Caps and Ice Belts: The Effects of Obliquity on Ice−Albedo Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Brian E. J. [Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University at Albany (State University of New York), 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222 (United States); Cronin, Timothy W. [Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bitz, Cecilia M., E-mail: brose@albany.edu [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, MS 351640, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1640 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Planetary obliquity determines the meridional distribution of the annual mean insolation. For obliquity exceeding 55°, the weakest insolation occurs at the equator. Stable partial snow and ice cover on such a planet would be in the form of a belt about the equator rather than polar caps. An analytical model of planetary climate is used to investigate the stability of ice caps and ice belts over the widest possible range of parameters. The model is a non-dimensional diffusive Energy Balance Model, representing insolation, heat transport, and ice−albedo feedback on a spherical planet. A complete analytical solution for any obliquity is given and validated against numerical solutions of a seasonal model in the “deep-water” regime of weak seasonal ice line migration. Multiple equilibria and unstable transitions between climate states (ice-free, Snowball, or ice cap/belt) are found over wide swaths of parameter space, including a “Large Ice-Belt Instability” and “Small Ice-Belt Instability” at high obliquity. The Snowball catastrophe is avoided at weak radiative forcing in two different scenarios: weak albedo feedback and inefficient heat transport (favoring stable partial ice cover), or efficient transport at high obliquity (favoring ice-free conditions). From speculative assumptions about distributions of planetary parameters, three-fourths to four-fifths of all planets with stable partial ice cover should be in the form of Earth-like polar caps.

  19. Ice Caps and Ice Belts: The Effects of Obliquity on Ice-Albedo Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brian E. J.; Cronin, Timothy W.; Bitz, Cecilia M.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary obliquity determines the meridional distribution of the annual mean insolation. For obliquity exceeding 55°, the weakest insolation occurs at the equator. Stable partial snow and ice cover on such a planet would be in the form of a belt about the equator rather than polar caps. An analytical model of planetary climate is used to investigate the stability of ice caps and ice belts over the widest possible range of parameters. The model is a non-dimensional diffusive Energy Balance Model, representing insolation, heat transport, and ice-albedo feedback on a spherical planet. A complete analytical solution for any obliquity is given and validated against numerical solutions of a seasonal model in the “deep-water” regime of weak seasonal ice line migration. Multiple equilibria and unstable transitions between climate states (ice-free, Snowball, or ice cap/belt) are found over wide swaths of parameter space, including a “Large Ice-Belt Instability” and “Small Ice-Belt Instability” at high obliquity. The Snowball catastrophe is avoided at weak radiative forcing in two different scenarios: weak albedo feedback and inefficient heat transport (favoring stable partial ice cover), or efficient transport at high obliquity (favoring ice-free conditions). From speculative assumptions about distributions of planetary parameters, three-fourths to four-fifths of all planets with stable partial ice cover should be in the form of Earth-like polar caps.

  20. Medical Malpractice Damage Caps and Provider Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, Andrew I

    2017-01-01

    A common state legislative maneuver to combat rising healthcare costs is to reform the tort system by implementing caps on noneconomic damages awardable in medical malpractice cases. Using the implementation of caps in several states and large database of private insurance claims, I estimate the effect of damage caps on the amount providers charge to insurance companies as well as the amount that insurance companies reimburse providers for medical services. The amount providers charge insurers is unresponsive to tort reform, but the amount that insurers reimburse providers decreases for some procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Troposphere - ionosphere interaction during tropospheric MCC events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzano, J.R.; Zossi Artigas, M.M. de; Filippi Manzano, A.N. de; Cosio Ragone, A.H. de

    1995-09-01

    The present paper describes the investigation of possible effects of the type of large meteorological events known as Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCC) on the F-region of the ionosphere over Argentina. These warm-season weather systems of huge size are present in the United States (Maddox, 1980) and in South Americal (Velasco and Fritsch, 1987). Their extension can be as large as 1,300,000 Km 2 and they tend to move in different directions over the earth surface. It is expected that these meteorological events should leave its signature in the upper region of the atmosphere. 13 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  2. The pharmaceutical vial capping process: Container closure systems, capping equipment, regulatory framework, and seal quality tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Buettiker, Jean-Pierre; Roehl, Holger; Lam, Philippe; Brown, Helen; Luemkemann, Joerg; Adler, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Streubel, Alexander; Mohl, Silke

    2016-02-01

    Parenteral drug products are protected by appropriate primary packaging to protect against environmental factors, including potential microbial contamination during shelf life duration. The most commonly used CCS configuration for parenteral drug products is the glass vial, sealed with a rubber stopper and an aluminum crimp cap. In combination with an adequately designed and controlled aseptic fill/finish processes, a well-designed and characterized capping process is indispensable to ensure product quality and integrity and to minimize rejections during the manufacturing process. In this review, the health authority requirements and expectations related to container closure system quality and container closure integrity are summarized. The pharmaceutical vial, the rubber stopper, and the crimp cap are described. Different capping techniques are critically compared: The most common capping equipment with a rotating capping plate produces the lowest amount of particle. The strength and challenges of methods to control the capping process are discussed. The residual seal force method can characterize the capping process independent of the used capping equipment or CCS. We analyze the root causes of several cosmetic defects associated with the vial capping process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mid-latitude Plasma Irregularities During Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N.; Loper, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    Geomagnetic storming impacts the ionosphere in different ways at different latitudes. In the mid latitudes, Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) may trigger a redistribution of plasma leading to the creation of ionospheric troughs, storm enhanced density plumes, and acceleration of sub-auroral ion drifts. Solar cycle data, real time space weather satellite data, and radar data will be analyzed to study mid-latitude plasma densities and characterize the plasma anomalies SAPS create in order to increase short-term mid-latitude space weather forecasting.

  4. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repetto, Daniele; Aramu, Simona; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation). p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes...

  5. Recessed floating pier caps for highway bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Presented are alternate designs for two existing bridges in Virginia - one with steel beams and the other with prestressed concrete beams - whereby the pier caps are recessed within the depth of the longitudinal beams. The purpose of this recession i...

  6. Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS) contains over 100 data sets pertaining to permafrost and frozen ground topics. It also contains detailed...

  7. The ATLAS TRT end-cap detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLAS TRT Collaboration; Abat, E.; Addy, T. N.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Alison, J.; Anghinolfi, F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Baker, O. K.; Banas, E.; Baron, S.; Bault, C.; Becerici, N.; Beddall, A.; Beddall, A. J.; Bendotti, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bertelsen, H.; Bingul, A.; Blampey, H.; Bocci, A.; Bochenek, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Catinaccio, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chandler, T.; Chritin, R.; Cwetanski, P.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Danilevich, E.; David, E.; Degenhardt, J.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, N.; Dobos, D.; Dogan, O. B.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Egede, U.; Egorov, K.; Evans, H.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fowler, A. J.; Fratina, S.; Froidevaux, D.; Fry, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Ghodbane, N.; Godlewski, J.; Goulette, M.; Gousakov, I.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grognuz, J.; Hajduk, Z.; Hance, M.; Hansen, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hare, G. A.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hauviller, C.; High, A.; Hulsbergen, W.; Huta, W.; Issakov, V.; Istin, S.; Jain, V.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A. S.; Katounine, S.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Khabarova, E.; Khristachev, A.; Kisielewski, B.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Kline, C.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klopov, N. V.; Ko, B. R.; Koffas, T.; Kondratieva, N. V.; Konovalov, S. P.; Koperny, S.; Korsmo, H.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; LeBihan, A.-C.; LeGeyt, B. C.; Levterov, K.; Lichard, P.; Lindahl, A.; Lisan, V.; Lobastov, S.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lokwitz, S.; Long, M. C.; Lucas, S.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lundberg, B.; Mackeprang, R.; Maleev, V. P.; Manara, A.; Mandl, M.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, F. F.; Mashinistov, R.; Mayers, G. M.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mialkovski, V.; Mills, B. M.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Muir, A. M.; Munar, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitin, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Novodvorski, E. G.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olivito, D.; Olszowska, J.; Ostrowicz, W.; Passmore, M. S.; Patrichev, S.; Penwell, J.; Perez-Gomez, F.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Poblaguev, A.; Pons, X.; Price, M. J.; hne, O. Rø; Reece, R. D.; Reilly, M. B.; Rembser, C.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Söderberg, M.; Savenkov, A.; Saxon, J.; Scandurra, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, C.; Sedykh, E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Sivoklokov, S.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sprachmann, G.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sulin, V. V.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Tartarelli, G.; Thomson, E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tipton, P.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Wagner, P.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Whittington, D.; Williams, H. H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhukov, K.

    2008-10-01

    The ATLAS TRT end-cap is a tracking drift chamber using 245,760 individual tubular drift tubes. It is a part of the TRT tracker which consist of the barrel and two end-caps. The TRT end-caps cover the forward and backward pseudo-rapidity region 1.0 < |η| < 2.0, while the TRT barrel central η region |η| < 1.0. The TRT system provides a combination of continuous tracking with many measurements in individual drift tubes (or straws) and of electron identification based on transition radiation from fibers or foils interleaved between the straws themselves. Along with other two sub-system, namely the Pixel detector and Semi Conductor Tracker (SCT), the TRT constitutes the ATLAS Inner Detector. This paper describes the recently completed and installed TRT end-cap detectors, their design, assembly, integration and the acceptance tests applied during the construction.

  8. Corrective action program (CAP) in United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Kobayashi, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    The Corrective Action Process (CAP) is one of the most important key issues on the Nuclear Reactor Safety. The experiences on the nuclear power plant operations, including safety culture, maintenance, and so on, should be continuously evaluated and influenced to the KAIZEN (improvement) of the NPP operations. The review of the CAP system in US will be useful for the NPP safety in Japan. (author)

  9. First tomographic image of ionospheric outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Dyson, P. L.; Fraser, B. J.; Morley, S.

    2006-10-01

    An image of the dayside low-energy ion outflow event that occurred on 16 December 2003 was constructed with ground- and space-based GPS (Global Positioning System) Total Electron Content (TEC) data and ion drift meter data from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program). A tomographic reconstruction technique has been applied to the GPS TEC data obtained from the GPS receiver on the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite FedSat. The two dimensional tomographic image of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere reveals a spectacular beam-like dayside ion outflow emanating from the cusp region. The transverse components of the magnetic field in FedSat's NewMag data show the presence of field aligned current (FAC) sheets, indicating the existence of low-energy electron precipitation in the cusp region. The DMSP ion drift data show upward ion drift velocities and upward fluxes of low-energy ions and electrons at the orbiting height of the DMSP spacecraft in the cusp region. This study presents the first tomographic image of the flux tube structure of ionospheric ion outflows from 0.13 Re up to 3.17 Re altitude.

  10. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. A nucleation theory of cell surface capping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Wester, M.J.; Perelson, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new theory of cell surface capping based on the principles of nucleation. When antibody interacts with cell surface molecules, the molecules initially form small aggregates called patches that later coalesce into a large aggregate called a cap. While a cap can form by patches being pulled together by action of the cell''s cytoskeleton, in the case of some molecules, disruption of the cytoskeleton does not prevent cap formation. Diffusion of large aggregates on a cell surface is slow, and thus we propose that a cap can form solely through the diffusion of small aggregates containing just one or a few cell surface molecules. Here we consider the extreme case in which single molecules are mobile, but aggregates of all larger sizes are immobile. We show that a set of patches in equilibrium with a open-quotes seaclose quotes of free cell surface molecules can undergo a nucleation-type phase transition in which the largest patch will bind free cell surface molecules, deplete the concentration of such molecules in the open-quotes seaclose quotes and thus cause the other patches to shrink in size. We therefore show that a cap can form without patches having to move, collide with each other, and aggregate

  12. Performance Analysis of Different NeQuick Ionospheric Model Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Ningbo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Galileo adopts NeQuick model for single-frequency ionospheric delay corrections. For the standard operation of Galileo, NeQuick model is driven by the effective ionization level parameter Az instead of the solar activity level index, and the three broadcast ionospheric coefficients are determined by a second-polynomial through fitting the Az values estimated from globally distributed Galileo Sensor Stations (GSS. In this study, the processing strategies for the estimation of NeQuick ionospheric coefficients are discussed and the characteristics of the NeQuick coefficients are also analyzed. The accuracy of Global Position System (GPS broadcast Klobuchar, original NeQuick2 and fitted NeQuickC as well as Galileo broadcast NeQuickG models is evaluated over the continental and oceanic regions, respectively, in comparison with the ionospheric total electron content (TEC provided by global ionospheric maps (GIM, GPS test stations and JASON-2 altimeter. The results show that NeQuickG can mitigate ionospheric delay by 54.2%~65.8% on a global scale, and NeQuickC can correct for 71.1%~74.2% of the ionospheric delay. NeQuick2 performs at the same level with NeQuickG, which is a bit better than that of GPS broadcast Klobuchar model.

  13. Application of generalized singular value decomposition to ionospheric tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bhuyan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The electron density distribution of the low- and mid-latitude ionosphere has been investigated by the computerized tomography technique using a Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (GSVD based algorithm. Model ionospheric total electron content (TEC data obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere 2001 and slant relative TEC data measured at a chain of three stations receiving transit satellite transmissions in Alaska, USA are used in this analysis. The issue of optimum efficiency of the GSVD algorithm in the reconstruction of ionospheric structures is being addressed through simulation of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA, in addition to its application to investigate complicated ionospheric density irregularities. Results show that the Generalized Cross Validation approach to find the regularization parameter and the corresponding solution gives a very good reconstructed image of the low-latitude ionosphere and the EIA within it. Provided that some minimum norm is fulfilled, the GSVD solution is found to be least affected by considerations, such as pixel size and number of ray paths. The method has also been used to investigate the behaviour of the mid-latitude ionosphere under magnetically quiet and disturbed conditions.

  14. A very bright SAR arc: implications for extreme magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Baumgardner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the polar aurora visible during geomagnetic storms, stable auroral red (SAR arcs offer a sub-visual manifestation of direct magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I coupling at midlatitudes. The SAR arc emission at 6300 Å is driven by field-aligned magnetospheric energy transport from ring current/plasmapause locations into the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The first SAR arc was observed at the dawn of the space age (1956, and the typical brightness levels and occurrence patterns obtained from subsequent decades of observations appear to be consistent with the downward heat conduction theory, i.e., heated ambient F-layer electrons excite oxygen atoms to produce a spectrally pure emission. On very rare occasions, a SAR arc has been reported to be at brightness levels visible to the naked eye. Here we report on the first case of a very bright SAR arc (~13 kilo-Rayleighs observed by four diagnostic systems that sampled various aspects of the sub-auroral domain near Millstone Hill, MA, on the night of 29 October 1991: an imaging spectrograph, an all-sky camera, an incoherent scatter radar (ISR, and a DMSP satellite. Simulations of emission using the ISR and DMSP data with the MSIS neutral atmosphere succeed in reproducing the brightness levels observed. This provides a robust confirmation of M-I coupling theory in its most extreme aeronomic form within the innermost magnetosphere (L~2 during a rare superstorm event. The unusually high brightness value appears to be due to the rare occurrence of the heating of dense ionospheric plasma just equatorward of the trough/plasmapause location, in contrast to the more typical heating of the less dense F-layer within the trough.

  15. A very bright SAR arc: implications for extreme magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Baumgardner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the polar aurora visible during geomagnetic storms, stable auroral red (SAR arcs offer a sub-visual manifestation of direct magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I coupling at midlatitudes. The SAR arc emission at 6300 Å is driven by field-aligned magnetospheric energy transport from ring current/plasmapause locations into the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The first SAR arc was observed at the dawn of the space age (1956, and the typical brightness levels and occurrence patterns obtained from subsequent decades of observations appear to be consistent with the downward heat conduction theory, i.e., heated ambient F-layer electrons excite oxygen atoms to produce a spectrally pure emission. On very rare occasions, a SAR arc has been reported to be at brightness levels visible to the naked eye. Here we report on the first case of a very bright SAR arc (~13 kilo-Rayleighs observed by four diagnostic systems that sampled various aspects of the sub-auroral domain near Millstone Hill, MA, on the night of 29 October 1991: an imaging spectrograph, an all-sky camera, an incoherent scatter radar (ISR, and a DMSP satellite. Simulations of emission using the ISR and DMSP data with the MSIS neutral atmosphere succeed in reproducing the brightness levels observed. This provides a robust confirmation of M-I coupling theory in its most extreme aeronomic form within the innermost magnetosphere (L~2 during a rare superstorm event. The unusually high brightness value appears to be due to the rare occurrence of the heating of dense ionospheric plasma just equatorward of the trough/plasmapause location, in contrast to the more typical heating of the less dense F-layer within the trough.

  16. Predicting ionospheric scintillation: Recent advancements and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. A.; Currie, J. L.; Terkildsen, M.; Bouya, Z.; Parkinson, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Society greatly benefits from space-based infrastructure and technology. For example, signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are used across a wide range of industrial sectors; including aviation, mining, agriculture and finance. Current trends indicate that the use of these space-based technologies is likely to increase over the coming decades as the global economy becomes more technology-dependent. Space weather represents a key vulnerability to space-based technology, both in terms of the space environment effects on satellite infrastructure and the influence of the ionosphere on the radio signals used for satellite communications. In recent decades, the impact of the ionosphere on GNSS signals has re-ignited research interest into the equatorial ionosphere, particularly towards understanding Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). EPBs are a dominant source of nighttime plasma irregularities in the low-latitude ionosphere, which can cause severe scintillation on GNSS signals and subsequent degradation on GNSS product quality. Currently, ionospheric scintillation event forecasts are not being routinely released by any space weather prediction agency around the world, but this is likely to change in the near future. In this contribution, an overview of recent efforts to develop a global ionospheric scintillation prediction capability within Australia will be given. The challenges in understanding user requirements for ionospheric scintillation predictions will be discussed. Next, the use of ground- and space-based datasets for the purpose of near-real time ionospheric scintillation monitoring will be explored. Finally, some modeling that has shown significant promise in transitioning towards an operational ionospheric scintillation forecasting system will be discussed.

  17. Considering the potential of IAR emissions for ionospheric sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A. S.; Polyushkina, T. N.; Tsegmed, B.; Oinats, A. V.; Pashinin, A. Yu.; Edemskiy, I. K.; Mylnikova, A. A.; Ratovsky, K. G.

    2017-11-01

    Knowledge of the ionospheric state allows us to adjust the forecasts of radio wave propagation, specify the environment models, and follow the changes of space weather. At present, probing of the ionosphere is produced by radio sounding with ground ionosondes, as well as by raying signals from satellites. We want to draw attention to the possibility of the diagnosis of the ionospheric parameters by detecting ultra-low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic emission generated in the so-called ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR). To do this, we present observations of the IAR emission made simultaneously for the first time at three stations using identical induction magnetometers. The stations are within one-hour difference of local time, two of them are mid-latitudinal; the third one is situated in the auroral zone. We compare frequency and frequency difference between adjacent harmonics of the observed multi-band emission with ionospheric parameters measured at the stations using ionosondes and GPS-observations. Diurnal variations of the ionospheric and ULF emission characteristics are also compared. The results show that there is quite a stable correlation between the resonant frequencies of the resonator bands and the critical frequency of the F2 layer of the ionosphere, namely, the frequency of the IAR emission varies inversely as the critical frequency of the ionosphere. This is due to the fact that the frequency of oscillation captured in the resonator is primarily determined by the Alfvén velocity (which depends on the plasma density) in the ionospheric F2 layer. The correlation is high; it varies at different stations, but is observed distinctly along the whole meridian. However, coefficients of a regression equation that connects the ionosphere critical frequency with DSB frequency vary significantly from day to day at all stations. The reason for such a big spread of the regression parameters is not clear and needs further investigation before we are able to

  18. Whistler Wave Propagation Through the Ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Invernón, F. J.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Luque, A.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the attenuation of whistler waves generated by hypotetical Venusian lightning occurring at the altitude of the cloud layer under different ionospheric conditions. We use the Stanford full-wave method for stratified media of Lehtinen and Inan (2008) to model wave propagation through the ionosphere of Venus. This method calculates the electromagnetic field created by an arbitrary source in a plane-stratified medium (i.e., uniform in the horizontal direction). We see that the existence of holes in electronic densities and the magnetic field configuration caused by solar wind play an important role in the propagation of electromagnetic waves through the Venusian ionosphere.

  19. Electrodynamical Coupling of Earth's Atmosphere and Ionosphere: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical processes occurring in the atmosphere couple the atmosphere and ionosphere, because both DC and AC effects operate at the speed of light. The electrostatic and electromagnetic field changes in global electric circuit arise from thunderstorm, lightning discharges, and optical emissions in the mesosphere. The precipitation of magnetospheric electrons affects higher latitudes. The radioactive elements emitted during the earthquakes affect electron density and conductivity in the lower atmosphere. In the present paper, we have briefly reviewed our present understanding of how these events play a key role in energy transfer from the lower atmosphere to the ionosphere, which ultimately results in the Earth's atmosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  20. Ionospheric Cycle Slip Processing in Triple-frequency GNSS

    OpenAIRE

    HUANG Lingyong; ZHAI Guojun; OUYANG Yongzhong; XU Guangxiu; LI Kaifeng; HUANG Xianyuan; FAN Long

    2015-01-01

    A new method based on three linear independence geometry-free and ionosphere-free (GIF) combinations to detect and repair cycle-slip is advanced to finishing the cycle slip processing under the higher ionospheric activity. In order to ensure that the cycle slip correction is accurate, the repair value is validated by a second-order, time-difference phase ionospheric residual (STPIR) combination. And then, this method is validated and analyzed by using the triple-frequency data with higher ion...

  1. Study of the Ionospheric D Layer using Partial Reflections at the Middle Latitudes and in the Auroral Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikovich, V. V.; Vyakhirev, V. D.; Kalinina, E. E.; Tereshshenko, V. D.; Ogloblina, O. F.; Tereshshenko, V. A.

    2003-03-01

    Using the measuring facilities located in different latitudinal regions: in Vasil'sursk near Nizhny Novgorod (56.1° N and 46.1° E) and in Tumanny (Murmansk region, 69.0° N and 35.7° E), we study the ionospheric D layer by the partial-reflection technique. Quantitative estimates are obtained for the electron density in the polar and mid-latitude D layer, distinctions of these values are revealed, and the possible reasons for latitudinal variations in the electron density at the D-layer altitudes are discussed.

  2. Modeling of the global distribution of ionospheric electric fields based on realistic maps of field-aligned currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukianova, R.; Christiansen, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    [1] A new approach for modeling the global distribution of ionospheric electric potentials utilizing high-precision maps of FACs derived from measurements by the Orsted and Champ satellites as input to a comprehensive numerical scheme is presented. The boundary conditions provide a correct...... predicts that the summer cross-polar potentials are smaller than the winter potentials. The value of the ratio depends on the combination of season/IMF B-Y sign. The ratio is found to be greater for the combination of B-Y > 0/southern summer and B-Y value is obtained...

  3. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes in the Ionospheric Trough Region During Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, S.; Moldwin, M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Coster, A. J.; Yizengaw, E.; Lyons, L. R.; Donovan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric troughs are regions of remarkable electron density depression at the subauroral and auroral latitudes, and are categorized into the mid-latitude trough or high-latitude trough, depending on their relative location to the auroral oval. Substorms are one fundamental element of geomagnetic activity, during which structured field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection flows develop in the subauroral and auroral ionosphere. The auroral/trough region is expected to experience severe electron density variations during substorms. Accurate specification of the trough dynamics during substorms and understanding its relationship with the structured FACs and convection flows are of important practical purpose, including providing observational foundations for assessing the attendant impact on navigation and communication. In addition, troughs are important since they map to magnetospheric boundaries allowing the remote sensing of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this talk, we discuss the dynamics of the mid-latitude and high-latitude troughs during substorms based on multi-instrument observations. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) data, we characterize the location and width of the mid-latitude trough through the substorm lifecycle and compare them with existing trough empirical models. Using a combination of incoherent scattering radar (ISR), GPS TEC, auroral imager and a data assimilative model, we investigate the relationship between the high-latitude trough and FACs as well as convection flows. The high-latitude trough is found to be collocated with a counter-clockwise convection flow vortex east of the Harang reversal region, and downward FACs as part of the substorm current system are suggested to be responsible for the high-latitude trough formation. In addition, complex ionospheric electron temperature within the high-latitude trough is found, i.e., increase in the E region while decrease in the F region. We discuss possible

  4. Coupled Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere System by QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    shoot to Sun from the center of Galaxy. The dynamic balance of forces on the solar surface plasma at once is broken and the plasma will upwards eject as the solar wind with redundant negative charge, at the same time, the solar surface remain a cavity as a sunspot whorl with the positive electric potential relative to around. The whorl caused by that the reaction of plasma eject front and upwards with the different velocity at different latitude of solar rotation, leads to the cavity around in the downwards and backwards helix movement. The solar rotation more slow, when the cavity is filled by around plasma in the reverse turn direction, the Jupiter at front had been produced a new cavity, so that we had observe the sunspot pair with different whorl directions and different magnetic polarity. Jupiter possess half mass of all planets in solar system, its action to stop net nuν _{0} flux is primary, so that Jupiter’s period of 11.8 sidereal years accord basically with the period of sunspot eruptions. The solar wind is essentially the plasma with additional electrons flux ejected from the solar surface: its additional electrons come from the ionosphere again eject into the ionosphere and leads to the direct connect between the solar wind and the ionosphere; its magnetism from its redundant negative charge and leads to the connect between the solar wind and the magnetosphere; it possess the high temperature of the solar surface and ejecting kinetic energy leads to the thermo-exchange connect between the solar wind and the thermosphere. Through the solar wind ejecting into and cross over the outside atmosphere carry out the electromagnetic, particles material and thermal exchanges, the Coupled Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere System to be came into being. This conclusion is inferred only by QFT.

  5. Saturn's Magnetosphere Interaction with Titan for T9 Encounter: 3D Hybrid Modeling and Comparison with CAPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Global dynamics of ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Titan plays an important role in the interaction of Saturn s magnetosphere with Titan. Several hybrid simulations of this problem have already been done (Brecht et al., 2000; Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Modolo and Chanteur, 2008). Observational data from CAPS for the T9 encounter (Sittler et al., 2009) indicates an absence of O(+) heavy ions in the upstream that change the models of interaction which were discussed in current publications (Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Ma et al., 2007; Szego et al., 2007). Further analysis of the CAPS data shows very low density or even an absence of H(+) ions in upstream. In this paper we discuss two models of the interaction of Saturn s magnetosphere with Titan: (A) high density of H(+) ions in the upstream flow (0.1/cu cm), and (B) low density of H(+) ions in the upstream flow (0.02/cu cm). The hybrid model employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas a particle approach is used for ions. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. The model atmosphere includes exospheric H(+), H(2+), N(2+)and CH(4+) pickup ion production as well as an immobile background ionosphere and a shell distribution for active ionospheric ions (M(sub i)=28 amu). The hybrid model allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of Alfven wing-like structures. The results of the ion dynamics in Titan s environment are compared with Cassini T9 encounter data (CAPS).

  6. Common origin of positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and the geomagnetic activity effect at low latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proelss, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    The author looks for a correlation between two different atmospheric effects. They are a positive atmospheric storm (an anomalous increase in the F2 region ionization density), observed at middle latitudes, and the geomagnetic activity effect (the anomalous changes of temperature and gas density seen in the thermosphere), observed at low latitudes. A temporal correlation is sought to test the argument that both of these effects are the result of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TAD). A TAD is a pulselike atmospheric wave thought to be generated by substorm activity, and to propagate with high velocity (600 m/s) from polar latitudes toward equatorial latitudes. The author looks at data from five separate events correlating magnetic, ionospheric, and neutral atmospheric measurements. The conclusion is that there is a positive correlation between magnetic substorm activity at high latitudes, and positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and geomagnetic activity at low latitudes. The time correlations are consistent with high propagation speeds between these events. The author also presents arguments which indicate that the middle latitude positive ionospheric storms are not the result of electric field effects

  7. Determination of polar cusp position by low-energy particle measurements made aboard AUREOLE satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, V.A.; Jorjio, M.V.; Shuiskaya, F.K.; Crasnier, J.; Sauvaud, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    The Franco-Soviet experiment ARCAD, launched aboard the satellite AUREOLE December 27, 1971, has verified the existence of a particle penetration from the transition zone up to ionospheric altitudes across the polar cusp. The polar cusp is characterized by proton fluxes >10 7 particles/(cm 2 .s.sr.KeV) at 0.5KeV, with energy spectra similar to those in the transition zone. The position and form of the polar cusp are studied from measurements of protons in the range 0.4 to 30KeV during geomagnetically quiet periods (Kp [fr

  8. A thermoelectric cap for seafloor hydrothermal vents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yu; Wu, Shi-jun; Yang, Can-jun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a thermoelectric cap (TC) to harvest hydrothermal energy. • The TC was deployed at a hydrothermal vent site near Kueishantao islet, Taiwan. • The TC monitored the temperature of the hydrothermal fluids during the field test. • The TC could make the thermal energy of hydrothermal fluids a viable power source. - Abstract: Long-term in situ monitoring is crucial to seafloor scientific investigations. One of the challenges of operating sensors in seabed is the lifespan of the sensors. Such sensors are commonly powered by batteries when other alternatives, such as tidal or solar energy, are unavailable. However, the batteries have a limited lifespan and must be recharged or replaced periodically, which is costly and impractical. A thermoelectric cap, which harvests the thermal energy of hydrothermal fluids through a conduction pipe and converts the heat to electrical energy by using thermoelectric generators, was developed to avoid these inconveniences. The thermoelectric cap was combined with a power and temperature measurement system that enables the thermoelectric cap to power a light-emitting diode lamp, an electronic load (60 Ω), and 16 thermocouples continuously. The thermoelectric cap was field tested at a shallow hydrothermal vent site near Kueishantao islet, which is located offshore of northeastern Taiwan. By using the thermal gradient between hydrothermal fluids and seawater, the thermoelectric cap obtained a sustained power of 0.2–0.5 W during the field test. The thermoelectric cap successfully powered the 16 thermocouples and recorded the temperature of the hydrothermal fluids during the entire field test. Our results show that the thermal energy of hydrothermal fluids can be an alternative renewable power source for oceanographic research.

  9. Artificial periodic irregularities in the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Rietveld

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial periodic irregularities (API are produced in the ionospheric plasma by a powerful standing electromagnetic wave reflected off the F region. The resulting electron-density irregularities can scatter other high-frequency waves if the Bragg scattering condition is met. Such measurements have been performed at mid-latitudes for two decades and have been developed into a useful ionospheric diagnostic technique. We report here the first measurements from a high-latitude station, using the EISCAT heating facility near Tromsø, Norway. Both F-region and lower-altitude ionospheric echoes have been obtained, but the bulk of the data has been in the E and D regions with echoes extending down to 52-km altitude. Examples of API are shown, mainly from the D region, together with simultaneous VHF incoherent-scatter-radar (ISR data. Vertical velocities derived from the rate of phase change during the irregularity decay are shown and compared with velocities derived from the ISR. Some of the API-derived velocities in the 75–115-km height range appear consistent with vertical neutral winds as shown by their magnitudes and by evidence of gravity waves, while other data in the 50–70-km range show an unrealistically large bias. For a comparison with ISR data it has proved difficult to get good quality data sets overlapping in height and time. The initial comparisons show some agreement, but discrepancies of several metres per second do not yet allow us to conclude that the two techniques are measuring the same quantity. The irregularity decay time-constants between about 53 and 70 km are compared with the results of an advanced ion-chemistry model, and height profiles of recorded signal power are compared with model estimates in the same altitude range. The calculated amplitude shows good agreement with the data in that the maximum occurs at about the same height as that of the measured amplitude. The calculated time-constant agrees very well with the

  10. Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances triggered by Super Typhoon Nepartak (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M. Y.; Lin, C. C. H.; Yue, J.; Chang, L. C.; Tsai, H. F.; Chen, C. H.

    2017-12-01

    Two remarkable typhoon-induced traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) with concentric andnorthwest-southeast (NW-SE) alignments, respectively, associated with concentric gravity waves (CGWs) andionospheric instabilities possibly seeded by CGWs, were observed in total electron content (TEC) derived fromground-based Global Navigation Satellite System networks in Taiwan and Japan when the Category 5 SuperTyphoon Nepartak approached Taiwan on 7 July 2016. The concentric TIDs (CTIDs) first appear withhorizontal phase velocities of 161-200 m/s, horizontal wavelengths of 160-270 km, and periods of 15-22 min during 08:00-11:20 UT. Following the CTIDs, the NW-SE aligned nighttime medium-scale TIDs(MSTIDs) are formed on the west edge of the CTIDs over the Taiwan Strait during 11:30-14:00 UT. It issuggested that the MSTIDs are produced by the electrodynamical coupling of Perkins instability andCGW-induced polarization electric fields. This study proposes connections of typhoon-induced CTIDs andsubsequently occurring MSTIDs in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  11. Spherical Slepian as a new method for ionospheric modeling in arctic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadfard, Hossein; Hossainali, Masoud Mashhadi

    2016-03-01

    From the perspective of the physical, chemical and biological balance in the world, the Arctic has gradually turned into an important region opening ways for new researchers and scientific expeditions. In other words, various researches have been funded in order to study this frozen frontier in details. The current study can be seen in the same milieu where researchers intend to propose a set of new base functions for modeling ionospheric in the Arctic. As such, to optimize the Spherical Harmonic (SH) functions, the spatio-spectral concentration is applied here using the Slepian theory that was developed by Simons. For modeling the ionosphere, six International GNSS Service (IGS) stations located in the northern polar region were taken into account. Two other stations were left out for assessing the accuracy of the proposed model. The adopted GPS data starts at DOY 69 (Day of Year) and ends at DOY 83 (totally 15 successive days) in 2013. Three Spherical Slepian models respectively with the maximal degrees of K=15, 20 & 25 were used. Based on the results, K=15 is the optimum degree for the proposed model. The accuracy and precision of the Slepian model are about 0.1 and 0.05 TECU, respectively (TEC Unit=1016 electron/m2). To understand the advantage of this model, it is compared with polynomial and trigonometric series which are developed using the same set of measurements. The accuracy and precision of trigonometric and polynomial models are at least 4 times worse than the Slepian one.

  12. Storm-enhanced plasma density and polar tongue of ionization development during the 15 May 2005 superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the ionosphere's global response to the 15 May 2005 superstorm in terms of storm evolution and ionospheric electrodynamics. Our aim is to study the global distribution of plasma and the resultant large-scale ionospheric features including the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), storm-enhanced density (SED), and polar tongue of ionization (TOI). We have combined multi-instrument ionospheric data, solar and terrestrial magnetic data, and polar convection maps. Results reveal the prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric field to the polar region and then to the equator with a dusk-to-dawn polarity during the initial phase and with a dawn-to-dusk polarity during the main phase. This drove during the initial phase a weak eastward equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in the American sector at nighttime and a weak westward EEJ in the Indian-Australian sector at daytime. During the main phase, these EEJs intensified and changed polarities. SED and polar TOI development was observed prior to and during the initial phase at evening-premidnight hours over North America and during the main phase in the south at afternoon-evening hours in the Australian sector. During the main phase and early in the recovery phase, the EIA-SED structure was well formed in the Asian longitude sector. Then, polar TOI development was absent in the north because of the long distance from the magnetic pole but was supported in the south because of the closeness of daytime cusp and magnetic pole. Thus, the EIA-SED-TOI structure developed twice but each time in a different longitude sector and with different characteristics.

  13. 75 FR 49527 - Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as Caps Group Acquisition, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as... Adjustment Assistance on June 24, 2010, applicable to workers of Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot..., Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot Group, formerly known as Caps Group Acquisition, LLC...

  14. Magnetosphere - Ionosphere - Thermosphere (MIT) Coupling at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, J. N.; Ray, L. C.; Achilleos, N.

    2017-12-01

    Jupiter's upper atmospheric temperature is considerably higher than that predicted by Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) heating alone. Simulations incorporating magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling effects into general circulation models have, to date, struggled to reproduce the observed atmospheric temperatures under simplifying assumptions such as azimuthal symmetry and a spin-aligned dipole magnetic field. Here we present the development of a full three-dimensional thermosphere model coupled in both hemispheres to an axisymmetric magnetosphere model. This new coupled model is based on the two-dimensional MIT model presented in Yates et al., 2014. This coupled model is a critical step towards to the development of a fully coupled 3D MIT model. We discuss and compare the resulting thermospheric flows, energy balance and MI coupling currents to those presented in previous 2D MIT models.

  15. HF Radio Wave Production of Artificial Ionospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Herbert

    In 1993 it was predicted that artificial ionospheres would be produced by high power HF radio waves, once HF transmitters approached a GWatt ERP. When that threshold was very recently achieved, such production was indeed detected and published at two high latitude high power HF facilities. Here we review: the first-principles logic behind that prediction, which aspects of such production are critically dependent on magnetic latitude, and which aspects of such production depend only on physical parameters independent of latitude. These distinctions follow directly from decomposition of the problem of ionization production into its components of: radio-wave propagation, wave-particle interactions, electron transport, and quantitative elastic/inelastic cross-sections. We outline this analysis to show that, within the context of early observations, the production of ionization is inevitable, and only a question of competing instability thresholds, and scale of ionization production. This illustrates complimentary aeronomy and plasma physics to advance understanding of both.

  16. Magnetic and solar effects on ionospheric absorption at high latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pietrella

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Some periods of intense solar events and of strong magnetic storms have been selected and their effects on the ionospheric D region have been investigated on the basis of ionospheric absorption data derived from riometer measurements made at the Italian Antarctic Base of Terra Nova Bay (geographic coordinates: 74.69 S, 164.12 E; geomagnetic coordinates: 77.34 S, 279.41 E. It was found that sharp increases in ionospheric absorption are mainly due to solar protons emission with an energy greater than 10 MeV. Moreover, the day to night ratios of the ionospheric absorption are greater than 2 in the case of strong events of energetic protons emitted by the Sun, while during magnetic storms, these ratios range between 1 and 2.

  17. The Shock Wave in the ionosphere during an Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud.

  18. The Near Real Time Ionospheric Model of Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaļinka, M.; Zvirgzds, J.; Dobelis, D.; Lazdāns, E.; Reiniks, M.

    2015-11-01

    A highly accurate ionosphere model is necessary to enable a fast and reliable coordinate determination with GNSS in real time. It is a partially ionized atmospheric region ranging up to 1,000 km height, affected by spatial variations, space weather, seasonal and solar cycle dependence. New approaches and algorithms of modelling techniques are sought to provide better solutions in the territory of Latvia. Ionospheric TEC value has large differences in Western Latvia and Eastern Latvia. Actual ionospheric map should be calculated and delivered to the surveyors near real time and published on the WEB. Delivering actual map to rover GNSS devices in a field will provide the surveyors with ionospheric conditions and allow choosing best time for surveying and making geodetic measurements with higher accuracy and reliability.

  19. CAT scanning of the ionosphere: Pros and cons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Excellent Spatial coverage. Excellent Spatial coverage. Snapshots of the large scale features (km-scale) of the ionosphere. bottomside and topside. Information on remote and inaccessible regions. Inexpensive.

  20. Basic theory and model calculations of the Venus ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, A. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Gombosi, T. I.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of current understanding of the physical and chemical processes that control Venus's ionospheric behavior, in view of the data that has been made available by the Venera and Pioneer Venus missions. Attention is given to the theoretical framework used in general planetary ionosphere studies, especially to the equations describing the controlling physical and chemical processes, and to the current status of the ion composition, density and thermal structure models developed to reproduce observed ionospheric behavior. No truly comprehensive and successful model of the nightside ionosphere has been published. Furthermore, although dayside energy balance calculations yield electron and ion temperature values that are in close agreement with measured values, the energetics of the night side eludes understanding.

  1. ADAPTIVE MODEL REFINEMENT FOR THE IONOSPHERE AND THERMOSPHERE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ADAPTIVE MODEL REFINEMENT FOR THE IONOSPHERE AND THERMOSPHERE ANTHONY M. D’AMATO∗, AARON J. RIDLEY∗∗, AND DENNIS S. BERNSTEIN∗∗∗ Abstract. Mathematical models of...

  2. The MITRA as a solar and ionospheric instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeharry, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    The MITRA is an international/pan-African radioastronomy project which aims to do extremely wide field imaging with heterogeneous non coplanar arrays. It can be used for solar and ionospheric studies.

  3. SAMI3_ICON: Model of the Ionosphere/Plasmasphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huba, J. D.; Maute, A.; Crowley, G.

    2017-10-01

    The NRL ionosphere/plasmasphere model SAMI3 has been modified to support the NASA ICON mission. Specifically, SAMI3_ICON has been modified to import the thermospheric composition, temperature, and winds from TIEGCM-ICON and the high-latitude potential from AMIE data. The codes will be run on a daily basis during the ICON mission to provide ionosphere and thermosphere properties to the science community. SAMI3_ICON will provide ionospheric and plasmaspheric parameters such as the electron and ion densities, temperatures, and velocities, as well as the total electron content (TEC), peak ionospheric electron density (NmF2) and height of the F layer at NmF2 (hmF2).

  4. Measurements of the Absorptive Properties of the Ionosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Absorption of radio waves occurs when electrons responding to the wave fields collide with and transfer energy to the neutral particles. A study of ionospheric...

  5. Low ionospheric reactions on tropical depressions prior hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Aleksandra; Radovanović, Milan; Milovanović, Boško; Kovačević, Andjelka; Bajčetić, Jovan; Popović, Luka Č.

    2017-10-01

    We study the reactions of the low ionosphere during tropical depressions (TDs) which have been detected before the hurricane appearances in the Atlantic Ocean. We explore 41 TD events using very low frequency (VLF) radio signals emitted by NAA transmitter located in the USA and recorded by VLF receiver located in Belgrade (Serbia). We found VLF signal deviations (caused ionospheric turbulence) in the case of 36 out of 41 TD events (88%). Additionally, we explore 27 TDs which have not been developed in hurricanes and found similar low ionospheric reactions. However, in the sample of 41 TDs which are followed by hurricanes the typical low ionosphere perturbations seem to be more frequent than other TDs.

  6. MGS RS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 5600 ionospheric electron density profiles (EDS files) derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data. The profiles were...

  7. Global GPS Ionospheric Modelling Using Spherical Harmonic Expansion Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Kyu Choi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a global ionosphere model based on measurements from a worldwide network of global positioning system (GPS. The total number of the international GPS reference stations for development of ionospheric model is about 100 and the spherical harmonic expansion approach as a mathematical method was used. In order to produce the ionospheric total electron content (TEC based on grid form, we defined spatial resolution of 2.0 degree and 5.0 degree in latitude and longitude, respectively. Two-dimensional TEC maps were constructed within the interval of one hour, and have a high temporal resolution compared to global ionosphere maps which are produced by several analysis centers. As a result, we could detect the sudden increase of TEC by processing GPS observables on 29 October, 2003 when the massive solar flare took place.

  8. Global scale ionospheric irregularities associated with thunderstorm activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulinets, Sergey A.; Depuev, Victor H.

    2003-01-01

    The potential difference near 280 kV exists between ground and ionosphere. This potential difference is generated by thunderstorm discharges all over the world, and return current closes the circuit in the areas of fair weather (so-called fair weather current). The model calculations and experimental measurements clearly demonstrate non-uniform latitude-longitude distribution of electric field within the atmosphere. The recent calculations show that the strong large scale vertical atmospheric electric field can penetrate into the ionosphere and create large scale irregularities of the electron concentration. To check this the global distributions of thunderstorm activity obtained with the satellite monitoring for different seasons were compared with the global distributions of ionosphere critical frequency (which is equivalent to peak electron concentration) obtained with the help of satellite topside sounding. The similarity of the obtained global distributions clearly demonstrates the effects of thunderstorm electric fields onto the Earth's ionosphere. (author)

  9. Modelling the Main Ionospheric Trough Across the Northern Hemisphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Cathryn

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking University of Bath as follows: The contractor will investigate disturbances in the Northern Hemisphere ionosphere using a Multi-instrument data analysis (MIDAS) imaging algorithm...

  10. Workshop on the Polar Regions of Mars: Geology, Glaciology, and Climate History, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, S. M. (Editor); Howard, A. D. (Editor); Paterson, W. S. B. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers and abstract of papers presented at the workshop are presented. Some representative titles are as follows: Glaciation in Elysium; Orbital, rotational, and climatic interactions; Water on Mars; Rheology of water-silicate mixtures at low temperatures; Evolution of the Martian atmosphere (the role of polar caps); Is CO2 ice permanent; Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes; Mars observer radio science (MORS) observations in polar regions; and Wind transport near the poles of Mars (timescales of changes in deposition and erosion).

  11. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  12. COMPARISON OF COSEISMIC IONOSPHERIC DISTURBANCE WAVEFORMS REVISITED: STRIKE-SLIP, NORMAL, AND REVERSE FAULT EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Nur Cahyadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using Total Electron Content (TEC measurements with Global Positioning System we studied ionospheric responses to three large earthquakes with difference focal mechanism that occurred in the Sumatra Andaman 26 December 2004, North off Sumatra 11 April 2012, and North Japan 7 December 2012. These earthquakes have different focal mechanisms, i.e. high-angle reverse, strike-slip, and normal faulting, respectively. TEC responses to the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and north Japan 2012 events initiated with positive changes. On the other hand, the initial TEC changes in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake showed both positive and negative polarities depending on the azimuth around the focal area. Such a variety may reflect differences in coseismic vertical crustal displacements, which are dominated by uplift and subsidence in the Sumatra 2012 event. This phenomena has same characteristic with 1994 Kuril Arch earthquake. There are three different propagation velocity in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake, within the first 300 km until 430 km, the CID propagation velocity was ~3 km/s, which is equal to the secod sound speed at the height of the ionospheric F-layer. Starting from 380 km until 750 km out from the epicenter, the disturbance seems to divide into two separate perturbations, with each propagating at a different velocity, about 1 km/s for the one and about 0.4 m/s for the other. The apparent velocity in the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and Japan 2012 propagated ~ 1 km/s and ~ 0.3 km/s, consistent with the sound speed at the ionospheric F layer height and internal gravity wave respectively. Resonant oscillation of TEC with a frequency of ~ 3.7 mHZ and ~4.4 mHz have been found in the Sumatra 2012 and Sumatra Andaman 2004 events. Those earthquakes, which occurred during a period of quiet geomagnetic activity, also showed clear preseismic TEC anomalies similar to those before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki and 2007 Bengkulu earthquake.   The positive anomalies started 30-60 minutes

  13. The properties of ULF/VLF signals generated by the SURA facility without ionospheric currents modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotik, D. S.; Raybov, A. V.; Ermakova, E. N.

    2012-12-01

    During the last three years the comprehensive study of ionospheric generation of the artificial signals in ULF/VLF band was carried out at SURA facility. This research was stimulated by successive HAARP experiments on detection the low frequency signals genreated due the action of the ponderomotive forces. Two experimental campaigns under different ionospheric, geomagnetic and facility operation mode conditions was undertaken every year from 2010 to 2012. Here we are summarizing the main features of the artificial ULF/VLF signals observed in vicinity the SURA site. The signals in the 2-20 Hz band were observed in the small area around the facility with the radius approximately 15 km. It was not signal detection at the 30 km distance. The maximum of the amplitude was detected in the nearest receiving point about 3 km away from the transmitting array. The amplitude increased about 3 times when the beam was inclined on16 degrees to the south so the footprint of the geomagnetic field line comes close to the point of observation. The ULF signals increased slightly when the SURA operating frequency overlaps the critical foF2 frequency. As a rule the daytime signals are smaller then nighttime one. No any correlation was observed with geomagnetic disturbances. The time delay of the ionospheric ULF signals measured by phase method was estimated as 300-400 ms. Polarization of the ULF signals has a pronounced elliptical character. Sometimes it was linear. The part of measurements in June 2012 was coincide with magnetic storm (June 16-18, Kp=6). It was observed broadening of the signal line at frequencies of 11 and 17 Hz up to 0.2 Hz at the recovery stage of the storm at June 18 (see the figure). This fact can be interpreted as the result of the signal interaction with the radiation belt protons appeared over there during the storm time. In 2012 campaigns it was firstly observed at SURA signals on frequencies of several kilohertz at nightime which could not be explained by

  14. Ionospheric data available on CD-ROM and on NDADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilitza, D.

    1996-01-01

    Information is provided on two CD-ROMs (for PCs) with ionospheric data: the ionosonde CD issued by NGDC/WDC-A-STP/NOAA/Boulder and the Atmosphere Explorer CD produced by NSSDC/WDC-A-R and S/NASA/Greenbelt. We also briefly describe the ionospheric/thermospheric data available through NSSDC's automated mail retrieval system (NDADS) and explain the procedure for obtaining NDADS data. (author). 3 figs

  15. Effect of the Ionosphere on Space and Terrestrial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    of the ionospheric conditions along the path. shown schematically in Figure 1. The energetic par- ticle data were obtained by the Space Sciences Labor ...Adaptive tures, of difficult inclusion in clima - Ionospheric Range Error Correction for tological models. To accommodate then High Accuracy Radars, URSI...that size and a consistent identification in clima - are effervescent from hour to hour. tology, such as the nighttime trough and the plasmapause

  16. Far-field coseismic ionospheric disturbances of Tohoku earthquake

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasnov, V. M.; Drobzheva, Ya. V.; Chum, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 135, December (2015), s. 12-21 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-07281J Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : earthquake * infrasonic waves * ionospheric disturbances * infrasound triggered by the earthquake * co-seismic ionospheric perturbations * modeling * remote sensing Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682615300584

  17. Satellite observations of ionosphere disturbance prior to large earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    小山, 孝一郎; 児玉, 哲哉; Oyama, Koichiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports ionosphere disturbance which is observed by satellite before large earthquakes. Ionosphere disturbance caused by large earthquakes shows different features, depending on local time, height, epicenter location, and distance from the epicenter. When satellite altitude is high, the effect of large earthquakes does not appear right over the epicenter, but appears over geomagnetic equator and in higher latitude. While the identification of the epicenter location and day of earth...

  18. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  19. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.

    Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  20. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS): Descriptive analysis of 500 patients from the International CAPS Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pintó, Ignasi; Moitinho, Marta; Santacreu, Irene; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Erkan, Doruk; Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of patients with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) from the "CAPS Registry". The demographic, clinical and serological features of 500 patients included in the website-based "CAPS Registry" were analyzed. Frequency distribution and measures of central tendency were used to describe the cohort. Comparison between groups regarding qualitative variables was undertaken by chi-square or Fisher exact test while T-test for independent variables was used to compare groups regarding continuous variables. 500 patients (female: 343 [69%]; mean age 38±17) accounting for 522 episodes of CAPS were included in the analysis. Forty percent of patients had an associated autoimmune disease, mainly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (75%). The majority of CAPS episodes were triggered by a precipitating factor (65%), mostly infections (49%). Clinically, CAPS was characterized by several organ involvement affecting kidneys (73%), lungs (60%), brain (56%), heart (50%), and skin (47%). Lupus anticoagulant, IgG anticardiolipin and IgG anti-β2-glycprotein antibodies were the most often implicated antiphospholipid antibodies (83%, 81% and 78% respectively). Mortality accounted for 37% of episodes of CAPS. Several clinical differences could be observed based on the age of presentation and its association to SLE. Those cases triggered by a malignancy tended to occur in older patients, while CAPS episodes in young patients were associated with an infectious trigger and peripheral vessels involvement. Additionally, CAPS associated with SLE were more likely to have severe cardiac and brain involvement leading to a higher mortality (48%). Although the presentation of CAPS is characterized by multiorgan thrombosis and failure, clinical differences among patients exist based on age and underlying chronic diseases, e.g. malignancy and SLE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.