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Sample records for poker jim ridge

  1. Poker Phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Ole

    2011-01-01

    The subject of the article is the history of poker. It explores how different structural variations of the game have evolved and how different types of poker have been dominant at different periods in history. There are three main forms of poker: Draw, Stud and Hold’Em. In the article......, it is demonstrated how the three forms emerge and become the most popular form of poker at three different periods in history. It identifies structural homologies between the historical development of poker and key elements in the manifestation of capitalism at different times in history...

  2. Are online poker problem gamblers sensation seekers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaire, Céline

    2018-03-31

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between sensation seeking and online poker gambling in a community sample of adult online poker players, when controlling for age, gender, anxiety and depression. In total, 288 online poker gamblers were recruited. Sociodemographic data, gambling behavior (CPGI), sensation seeking (SSS), depression and anxiety (HADS) were evaluated. Problem online poker gamblers have higher sensation seeking scores (total, thrill and adventure, disinhibition and boredom susceptibility subscores) and depression scores than non-problem online poker gamblers. Being male, with total sensation seeking, disinhibition and depression scores are factors associated with online poker problem gambling. These findings are interesting in terms of harm reduction. For example, because disinhibition could lead to increased time and money spent, protective behavioral strategies like setting time and monetary limits should be encouraged in poker online gamblers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Profiling Online Poker Players: Are Executive Functions Correlated with Poker Ability and Problem Gambling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavella, Mauro; Pelagatti, Matteo; Westin, Jerker; Lepore, Gabriele; Cherubini, Paolo

    2018-01-12

    Poker playing and responsible gambling both entail the use of the executive functions (EF), which are higher-level cognitive abilities. This study investigated if online poker players of different ability showed different performances in their EF and if so, which functions were the most discriminating for their playing ability. Furthermore, it assessed if the EF performance was correlated to the quality of gambling, according to self-reported questionnaires (PGSI, SOGS, GRCS). Three poker experts evaluated anonymized poker hand history files and, then, a trained professional administered an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Data analysis determined which variables of the tests correlated with poker ability and gambling quality scores. The highest correlations between EF test results and poker ability and between EF test results and gambling quality assessment showed that mostly different clusters of executive functions characterize the profile of the strong(er) poker player and those ones of the problem gamblers (PGSI and SOGS) and the one of the cognitions related to gambling (GRCS). Taking into consideration only the variables overlapping between PGSI and SOGS, we found some key predictive factors for a more risky and harmful online poker playing: a lower performance in the emotional intelligence competences (Emotional Quotient inventory Short) and, in particular, those grouped in the Intrapersonal scale (emotional self-awareness, assertiveness, self-regard, independence and self-actualization).

  4. Strategic Style in Pared-Down Poker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kevin

    This chapter deals with the manner of making diagnoses and decisions, called strategic style, in a gambling game called Pared-down Poker. The approach treats style as a mental mode in which choices are constrained by expected utilities. The focus is on two classes of utility, i.e., money and effort, and how cognitive styles compare to normative strategies in optimizing these utilities. The insights are applied to real-world concerns like managing the war against terror networks and assessing the risks of system failures. After "Introducing the Interactions" involved in playing poker, the contents are arranged in four sections, as follows. "Underpinnings of Utility" outlines four classes of utility and highlights the differences between them: economic utility (money), ergonomic utility (effort), informatic utility (knowledge), and aesthetic utility (pleasure). "Inference and Investment" dissects the cognitive challenges of playing poker and relates them to real-world situations of business and war, where the key tasks are inference (of cards in poker, or strength in war) and investment (of chips in poker, or force in war) to maximize expected utility. "Strategies and Styles" presents normative (optimal) approaches to inference and investment, and compares them to cognitive heuristics by which people play poker--focusing on Bayesian methods and how they differ from human styles. The normative strategy is then pitted against cognitive styles in head-to-head tournaments, and tournaments are also held between different styles. The results show that style is ergonomically efficient and economically effective, i.e., style is smart. "Applying the Analysis" explores how style spaces, of the sort used to model individual behavior in Pared-down Poker, might also be applied to real-world problems where organizations evolve in terror networks and accidents arise from system failures.

  5. Poker E-Sports Reflection Cover

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The paper will reflect on Stefan Karlsson’s process of developing the business plan Poker E-­‐‑ Sports. This paper is intended to be read by (1) nascent entrepreneurs, (2) students in the end of their education whom is about to create a link between the academic learning’s and the first job, (3) university personnel involved in this development process and (4) stakeholders whom are about to read the business plan Poker E-­‐‑Sports. This reflection will chronology describe the development proc...

  6. The New Jim Crow

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Phillip; Brem, Florian; Andersen, Kristoffer; Möckl, Justin; Andreassen, Toke

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the project we have worked on a comparison between what we consider old and modern jim crow laws. whereas the old jim crow laws were targeted towards the negro minority, the modern variant targets felons in the US. penal system, ‘coincidentally’ the majority of the felons today are also black. We argue through the use of a mix of General Strain Theory, Labeling Theory and Stigma Theory, that these modern laws may not be beneficial, but may instead cause strain that then leads to re...

  7. Psychopathology of Online Poker Players: Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Axelle; Chabrol, Henri; Chauchard, Emeline

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Online Texas Hold'em poker has become a spectacular form of entertainment in our society, and the number of people who use this form of gambling is increasing. It seems that online poker activity challenges existing theoretical concepts about problem gambling behaviors. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a current overview about the population of online poker players. Methods To be selected, articles had to focus on psychopathology in a sample of online poker players, be written in English or French, and be published before November 2015. A total of 17 relevant studies were identified. Results In this population, the proportion of problematic gamblers was higher than in other forms of gambling. Several factors predicting excessive gambling were identified such as stress, internal attribution, dissociation, boredom, negative emotions, irrational beliefs, anxiety, and impulsivity. The population of online poker players is largely heterogeneous, with experimental players forming a specific group. Finally, the validity of the tools used to measure excessive or problematic gambling and irrational beliefs are not suitable for assessing online poker activity. Discussion and conclusions Future studies need to confirm previous findings in the literature of online poker games. Given that skills are important in poker playing, skill development in the frames of excessive use of online poker should be explored more in depth, particularly regarding poker experience and loss chasing. Future research should focus on skills, self-regulation, and psychopathology of online poker players.

  8. Poker as a skill game: rational versus irrational behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2015-03-01

    In many countries poker is one of the most popular card games. Although each variant of poker has its own rules, all involve the use of money to make the challenge meaningful. Nowadays, in the collective consciousness, some variants of poker are referred to as games of skill, others as gambling. A poker table can be viewed as a psychology lab, where human behavior can be observed and quantified. This work provides a preliminary analysis of the role of rationality in poker games, using a stylized version of Texas Hold'em. In particular, we compare the performance of two different kinds of players, i.e. rational versus irrational players, during a poker tournament. Results show that these behaviors (i.e. rationality and irrationality) affect both the outcomes of challenges and the way poker should be classified.

  9. EPITAPH FOR JIM CROW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PETTIGREW, THOMAS F.

    BASED ON A SERIES OF FILMS PRODUCED BY WGBH-TV, BOSTON UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL RELATIONS, HARVARD UNIVERSITY, "EPTITAPH FOR JIM CROW" PRESENTED DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF THE NEGRO PROBLEM IN AMERICA. THE FIRST CHAPTER, "A TALE OF TWO LADIES," EMPHASIZED A KNOWLEDGE OF THE NEGRO ROLE IN AMERICA'S SOCIAL AND…

  10. Measuring Consumer Preferences Using Conjoint Poker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Toubia; M.G. de Jong (Martijn); D. Stieger; J.H. Fuller (John)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe develop and test an incentive-compatible Conjoint Poker (CP) game. The preference data collected in the context of this game are comparable to incentive-compatible choice-based conjoint (CBC) analysis data. We develop a statistical efficiency measure and an algorithm to construct

  11. Is poker a skill game? New insights from statistical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2015-06-01

    During last years poker has gained a lot of prestige in several countries and, besides being one of the most famous card games, it represents a modern challenge for scientists belonging to different communities, spanning from artificial intelligence to physics and from psychology to mathematics. Unlike games like chess, the task of classifying the nature of poker (i.e., as “skill game” or gambling) seems really hard and it also constitutes a current problem, whose solution has several implications. In general, gambling offers equal winning probabilities both to rational players (i.e., those that use a strategy) and to irrational ones (i.e., those without a strategy). Therefore, in order to uncover the nature of poker, a viable way is comparing performances of rational vs. irrational players during a series of challenges. Recently, a work on this topic revealed that rationality is a fundamental ingredient to succeed in poker tournaments. In this study we analyze a simple model of poker challenges by a statistical physics approach, with the aim to uncover the nature of this game. As main result we found that, under particular conditions, few irrational players can turn poker into gambling. Therefore, although rationality is a key ingredient to succeed in poker, also the format of challenges has an important role in these dynamics, as it can strongly influence the underlying nature of the game. The importance of our results lies on the related implications, as for instance in identifying the limits within which poker can be considered as a “skill game” and, as a consequence, which kind of format must be chosen to devise algorithms able to face humans.

  12. An interview with Jim Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maartens, Aidan

    2017-08-01

    Jim Smith is Director of Science at the Wellcome Trust and a group leader at the Francis Crick Institute, where he was formerly Director of Research. A Fellow of both the Royal Society and the Academy of Medical Sciences, he was knighted for his services to medical research and science education in 2016. His lab works on mesoderm induction in the early vertebrate embryo. We met Jim in the Crick to hear about his life in science, his visions for the Crick and the Wellcome Trust, and his advice for early career scientists. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Jim Dine-Inspired Valentines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, April

    2011-01-01

    Jim Dine was born in 1935 in Cincinnati. He earned a BFA from Ohio University in 1957 and then moved to New York in 1959, where he fell in with a group of artists that included Claes Oldenburg. Dine is best known as a Pop innovator, whose paintings, sculptures, and prints were layered with everyday objects, including ties, tools, and even a…

  14. Identifying risk and mitigating gambling-related harm in online poker

    OpenAIRE

    Parke, A; Griffiths, MD

    2016-01-01

    The present paper conducts a critical analysis of the potential for gambling-related harm in relation to online poker participation, and a theoretical evaluation of current responsible gambling strategies employed to mitigate harm in online gambling and applies the evaluation of these strategies specifically to online poker gambling. Theoretically, the primary risk for harm in online poker is the rapid and continuous nature of poker provisions online, and has been demonstrated to be associate...

  15. Anxiety, Depression and Emotion Regulation Among Regular Online Poker Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrault, Servane; Bonnaire, Céline; Herrmann, Florian

    2017-12-01

    Poker is a type of gambling that has specific features, including the need to regulate one's emotion to be successful. The aim of the present study is to assess emotion regulation, anxiety and depression in a sample of regular poker players, and to compare the results of problem and non-problem gamblers. 416 regular online poker players completed online questionnaires including sociodemographic data, measures of problem gambling (CPGI), anxiety and depression (HAD scale), and emotion regulation (ERQ). The CPGI was used to divide participants into four groups according to the intensity of their gambling practice (non-problem, low risk, moderate risk and problem gamblers). Anxiety and depression were significantly higher among severe-problem gamblers than among the other groups. Both significantly predicted problem gambling. On the other hand, there was no difference between groups in emotion regulation (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression), which was linked neither to problem gambling nor to anxiety and depression (except for cognitive reappraisal, which was significantly correlated to anxiety). Our results underline the links between anxiety, depression and problem gambling among poker players. If emotion regulation is involved in problem gambling among poker players, as strongly suggested by data from the literature, the emotion regulation strategies we assessed (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) may not be those involved. Further studies are thus needed to investigate the involvement of other emotion regulation strategies.

  16. Online Poker Gambling in University Students: Further Findings from an Online Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark; Parke, Jonathan; Wood, Richard; Rigbye, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Online poker is one of the fastest growing forms of online gambling yet there has been relatively little research to date. This study comprised 422 online poker players (362 males and 60 females) and investigated some of the predicting factors of online poker success and problem gambling using an online questionnaire. Results showed that length of…

  17. Beyond chance? The persistence of performance in online poker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier J D Potter van Loon

    Full Text Available A major issue in the widespread controversy about the legality of poker and the appropriate taxation of winnings is whether poker should be considered a game of skill or a game of chance. To inform this debate we present an analysis into the role of skill in the performance of online poker players, using a large database with hundreds of millions of player-hand observations from real money ring games at three different stakes levels. We find that players whose earlier profitability was in the top (bottom deciles perform better (worse and are substantially more likely to end up in the top (bottom performance deciles of the following time period. Regression analyses of performance on historical performance and other skill-related proxies provide further evidence for persistence and predictability. Simulations point out that skill dominates chance when performance is measured over 1,500 or more hands of play.

  18. Judgments under competition and uncertainty : empirical evidence from online poker

    OpenAIRE

    Engelbergs, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Playing poker has many aspects in common with the making of business decisions. Agents act in a strategically rich, dynamic environment, where they are repeatedly facing competition under uncertain prospects. Their main goal is to maximize their resources. However simple this goal is put down, it is difficult to fulfill. As vast and rich research has shown, heuristics and biases affect human decision-making. This work adds to these findings by providing empirical evidence for behavioral patte...

  19. Poker, Sports Betting, and Less Popular Alternatives: Status, Friendship Networks, and Male Adolescent Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCicco-Bloom, Benjamin; Romer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that the recent increase in poker play among adolescent males in the United States was primarily attributable to high-status male youth who are more able to organize "informal" gambling games (e.g., poker and sports betting) than are low-status male youth who are left to gamble on "formal" games (e.g., lotteries and slot…

  20. Image Encryption Performance Evaluation Based on Poker Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast development of image encryption requires performance evaluation metrics. Traditional metrics like entropy do not consider the correlation between local pixel and its neighborhood. These metrics cannot estimate encryption based on image pixel coordinate permutation. A novel effectiveness evaluation metric is proposed in this paper to address the issue. The cipher text image is transformed to bit stream. Then, Poker Test is implemented. The proposed metric considers the neighbor correlations of image by neighborhood selection and clip scan. The randomness of the cipher text image is tested by calculating the chi-square test value. Experiment results verify the efficiency of the proposed metrics.

  1. Online and live regular poker players: Do they differ in impulsive sensation seeking and gambling practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrault, Servane; Varescon, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Online gambling appears to have special features, such as anonymity, speed of play and permanent availability, which may contribute to the facilitation and increase in gambling practice, potentially leading to problem gambling. The aims of this study were to assess sociodemographic characteristics, gambling practice and impulsive sensation seeking among a population of regular poker players with different levels of gambling intensity and to compare online and live players. Methods 245 regular poker players (180 online players and 65 live players) completed online self-report scales assessing sociodemographic data, pathological gambling (SOGS), gambling practice (poker questionnaire) and impulsive sensation seeking (ImpSS). We used SOGS scores to rank players according to the intensity of their gambling practice (non-pathological gamblers, problem gamblers and pathological gamblers). Results All poker players displayed a particular sociodemographic profile: they were more likely to be young men, executives or students, mostly single and working full-time. Online players played significantly more often whereas live players reported significantly longer gambling sessions. Sensation seeking was high across all groups, whereas impulsivity significantly distinguished players according to the intensity of gambling. Discussion Our results show the specific profile of poker players. Both impulsivity and sensation seeking seem to be involved in pathological gambling, but playing different roles. Sensation seeking may determine interest in poker whereas impulsivity may be involved in pathological gambling development and maintenance. Conclusions This study opens up new research perspectives and insights into preventive and treatment actions for pathological poker players. PMID:28092187

  2. Cognitive distortions, anxiety, and depression among regular and pathological gambling online poker players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrault, Servane; Varescon, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    The aims were to assess cognitive distortions and psychological distress (anxiety and depression) among online poker players of different levels of gambling intensity (non-pathological gamblers [NPG], problem gamblers [PbG], and pathological gamblers [PG]), and to examine the relationship between these variables and gambling pathology. Overall, 245 regular online poker players recruited on an Internet forum completed online self-report scales assessing pathological gambling (South Oaks Gambling Screen [SOGS]), psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]) and cognitive distortions (Gambling-Related Cognition Scale). Based on their SOGS scores, poker players were ranked into three groups: NPG (n=146), PbG (n=55), and PG (n=44). All poker players appeared to be more anxious than depressive. PG exhibited higher levels of depression and anxiety than did PbG and NPG. Cognitive distortions also significantly discriminated PG from PbG and NPG. A regression model showed that the perceived inability to stop gambling, the illusion of control, depression (HADS D), and anxiety were good predictors for pathological gambling among poker players. Our results suggest that cognitive distortions play an important role in the development and maintenance of gambling pathology. This study also underlines the role of anxiety and depression in pathological gambling among poker players. It seems relevant to take these elements into account in the research, prevention, and treatment of pathological gambling poker players.

  3. Cognitive and Performance Enhancing Medication Use to Improve Performance in Poker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Joshua; Ownby, Raymond L; Rey, Jose A; Clauson, Kevin A

    2016-09-01

    Use of neuroenhancers has been studied in groups ranging from students to surgeons; however, use of cognitive and performance enhancing medications (CPEMs) to improve performance in poker has remained largely overlooked. To assess the use of CPEMs to improve poker performance, a survey of poker players was conducted. Participants were recruited via Internet poker forums; 198 completed the online survey. Approximately 28 % of respondents used prescription CPEMs, with the most commonly used including: amphetamine/dextroamphetamine (62 %), benzodiazepines (20 %), and methylphenidate (20 %). CPEMs were used in poker to focus (73 %), calm nerves (11 %), and stay awake (11 %). Caffeine (71 %), as well as conventionally counter-intuitive substances like marijuana (35 %) and alcohol (30 %) were also reported to enhance poker performance. Non-users of CPEMs were dissuaded from use due to not knowing where to get them (29 %), apprehension about trying them (26 %), and legal or ethical concerns (16 %). Respondents most frequently acquired CPEMs via friends/fellow poker players (52 %), or prescription from physician (38 %). Additionally, greater use of CPEMs was associated with living outside the United States (p = 0.042), prior use of prescription medications for improving non-poker related performance (p < 0.001), and amateur and semi-professional player status (p = 0.035). Unmonitored use of pharmacologically active agents and their methods of acquisition highlight safety concerns in this cohort of poker players, especially among non-professional players. The current state of guidance from national organizations on CPEM use in healthy individuals could impact prescribing patterns.

  4. Jim Virdee, the new spokesperson of CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Jim Virdee and Michel Della Negra. On 21 June Tejinder 'Jim'Virdee was elected by the CMS collaboration as its new spokesperson, his 3-year term of office beginning in January 2007. He will take over from Michel Della Negra, who has been CMS spokesperson since its formalization in 1992. Three distinguished physicists stood as candidates for this election: Dan Green from Fermilab, programme manager of the US-CMS collaboration and coordinator of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter project; Jim Virdee from Imperial College London and CERN, deputy spokesperson of CMS since 1993; Gigi Rolandi from the University of Trieste and CERN, ex-Aleph spokesperson and currently involved in the preparations of the physics analyses to be done with CMS. On the early evening of 21 June, 141 of the 142 members of the CMS collaboration board, some represented by proxies, took part in a secret ballot. After two rounds of voting Jim Virdee was elected as spokesperson with a clear majority. Jim thanked the CMS collaboration 'for putting conf...

  5. 76 FR 9349 - Jim Woodruff Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Southeastern Power Administration Jim Woodruff Project AGENCY: Southeastern Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rate Adjustment. SUMMARY: Southeastern proposes a new rate schedule JW-1-J to replace Wholesale Power Rate Schedules JW-1-I for a five-year period from...

  6. The human biology of Jim Tanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Noël

    2012-09-01

    In 1940, during his second year of medical training, Jim Tanner expressed the desire to work, 'where physiology, psychology and sociology meet'. His subsequent exposure to the breadth of an American medical education and to the social and economic environment of post-war Europe distilled his belief in the importance of viewing the human in a broad context. Following his visits to the American longitudinal growth studies in 1948. Jim's dreams of a broad scientific discipline that incorporated both the biology and ecology of the human were strengthened by an inspirational group of embryonic human biologists with whom he developed '… the new Human Biology …' from the '… Physical Anthropology of old…'. With Jo Weiner, Derek Roberts, Geoffrey Harrison, Arthur Mourant, Nigel Barnicot and Kenneth Oakley, Jim was to form the Society for the Study of Human Biology in 1958. The development of human biology over the next 50 years was shaped by the expertise and diversity of that group of visionary scientists who conceived the scientific discipline of 'human biology' in which biology, behaviour and social context define the human species.

  7. DeepStack: Expert-level artificial intelligence in heads-up no-limit poker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravčík, Matej; Schmid, Martin; Burch, Neil; Lisý, Viliam; Morrill, Dustin; Bard, Nolan; Davis, Trevor; Waugh, Kevin; Johanson, Michael; Bowling, Michael

    2017-05-05

    Artificial intelligence has seen several breakthroughs in recent years, with games often serving as milestones. A common feature of these games is that players have perfect information. Poker, the quintessential game of imperfect information, is a long-standing challenge problem in artificial intelligence. We introduce DeepStack, an algorithm for imperfect-information settings. It combines recursive reasoning to handle information asymmetry, decomposition to focus computation on the relevant decision, and a form of intuition that is automatically learned from self-play using deep learning. In a study involving 44,000 hands of poker, DeepStack defeated, with statistical significance, professional poker players in heads-up no-limit Texas hold'em. The approach is theoretically sound and is shown to produce strategies that are more difficult to exploit than prior approaches. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. The American Serialization of Lord Jim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Donovan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents the discovery of the American serialization of Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim in New York’s Evening Telegram in 1903. This ‘lost’ serialization, it argues, invites a new perspective on Conrad’s early career by foregrounding the role of newspaper serialization and syndication in establishing his literary standing. After surveying the principal differences in the respective reading experiences of the periodical versus the book, it concludes by proposing that the prominence of women among Conrad’s first audiences requires us to reassess the basis for his success in North America and elsewhere.

  9. Purification and Characterization of Hemagglutinating Proteins from Poker-Chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria and Corbicula Clam (Corbicula fluminea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Fu Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemagglutinating proteins (HAPs were purified from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea using gel-filtration chromatography on a Sephacryl S-300 column. The molecular weights of the HAPs obtained from Poker-chip Venus and Corbicula clam were 358 kDa and 380 kDa, respectively. Purified HAP from Poker-chip Venus yielded two subunits with molecular weights of 26 kDa and 29 kDa. However, only one HAP subunit was purified from Corbicula clam, and its molecular weight was 32 kDa. The two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed hemagglutinating ability (HAA for erythrocytes of some vertebrate animal species, especially tilapia. Moreover, HAA of the HAP purified from Poker-chip Venus was higher than that of the HAP of Corbicula clam. Furthermore, Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA at a pH higher than 7.0. When the temperature was at 4°C–10°C or the salinity was less than 0.5‰, the two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA compared with that of Corbicula clam.

  10. Purification and characterization of hemagglutinating proteins from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chin-Fu; Hung, Shao-Wen; Chang, Yung-Chung; Chen, Ming-Hui; Chang, Chen-Hsuan; Tsou, Li-Tse; Tu, Ching-Yu; Lin, Yu-Hsing; Liu, Pan-Chen; Lin, Shiun-Long; Wang, Way-Shyan

    2012-01-01

    Hemagglutinating proteins (HAPs) were purified from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea) using gel-filtration chromatography on a Sephacryl S-300 column. The molecular weights of the HAPs obtained from Poker-chip Venus and Corbicula clam were 358 kDa and 380 kDa, respectively. Purified HAP from Poker-chip Venus yielded two subunits with molecular weights of 26 kDa and 29 kDa. However, only one HAP subunit was purified from Corbicula clam, and its molecular weight was 32 kDa. The two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed hemagglutinating ability (HAA) for erythrocytes of some vertebrate animal species, especially tilapia. Moreover, HAA of the HAP purified from Poker-chip Venus was higher than that of the HAP of Corbicula clam. Furthermore, Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA at a pH higher than 7.0. When the temperature was at 4°C-10°C or the salinity was less than 0.5‰, the two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA compared with that of Corbicula clam.

  11. Effect on the Grain Size Distribution when Preparing Sand Using Poker Vibrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Dam

    2017-01-01

    At Aalborg University and other research institutions, model tests are performed on small -scale foundations. These foundations are often installed in sand which has to be prepared in a reproductive way. At Aalborg University the preparation is done by using poker vibrators. This paper investigat...

  12. Strategic Alliance Poker: Demonstrating the Importance of Complementary Resources and Trust in Strategic Alliance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, Christopher R.; Worthington, William J.; Collins, Jamie D.

    2012-01-01

    Strategic Alliance Poker (SAP) provides instructors with an opportunity to integrate the resource based view with their discussion of strategic alliances in undergraduate Strategic Management courses. Specifically, SAP provides Strategic Management instructors with an experiential exercise that can be used to illustrate the value creation…

  13. Selling Internet Gambling: Advertising, New Media and the Content of Poker Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, John L.; Kervin, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the web design and engineering, advertising and marketing, and pedagogical features present at a random sample of 71 international poker sites obtained from the Casino City directory in the summer of 2009. We coded for 22 variables related to access, appeal, player protection, customer services, on-site security, use of images,…

  14. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  15. Is poker a game of skill or chance? A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gerhard; von Meduna, Marc; Brosowski, Tim; Hayer, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    Due to intensive marketing and the rapid growth of online gambling, poker currently enjoys great popularity among large sections of the population. Although poker is legally a game of chance in most countries, some (particularly operators of private poker web sites) argue that it should be regarded as a game of skill or sport because the outcome of the game primarily depends on individual aptitude and skill. The available findings indicate that skill plays a meaningful role; however, serious methodological weaknesses and the absence of reliable information regarding the relative importance of chance and skill considerably limit the validity of extant research. Adopting a quasi-experimental approach, the present study examined the extent to which the influence of poker playing skill was more important than card distribution. Three average players and three experts sat down at a six-player table and played 60 computer-based hands of the poker variant "Texas Hold'em" for money. In each hand, one of the average players and one expert received (a) better-than-average cards (winner's box), (b) average cards (neutral box) and (c) worse-than-average cards (loser's box). The standardized manipulation of the card distribution controlled the factor of chance to determine differences in performance between the average and expert groups. Overall, 150 individuals participated in a "fixed-limit" game variant, and 150 individuals participated in a "no-limit" game variant. ANOVA results showed that experts did not outperform average players in terms of final cash balance. Rather, card distribution was the decisive factor for successful poker playing. However, expert players were better able to minimize losses when confronted with disadvantageous conditions (i.e., worse-than-average cards). No significant differences were observed between the game variants. Furthermore, supplementary analyses confirm differential game-related actions dependent on the card distribution, player status

  16. Purification and Characterization of Hemagglutinating Proteins from Poker-Chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula Clam (Corbicula fluminea)

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chin-Fu; Hung, Shao-Wen; Chang, Yung-Chung; Chen, Ming-Hui; Chang, Chen-Hsuan; Tsou, Li-Tse; Tu, Ching-Yu; Lin, Yu-Hsing; Liu, Pan-Chen; Lin, Shiun-Long; Wang, Way-Shyan

    2012-01-01

    Hemagglutinating proteins (HAPs) were purified from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea) using gel-filtration chromatography on a Sephacryl S-300 column. The molecular weights of the HAPs obtained from Poker-chip Venus and Corbicula clam were 358 kDa and 380 kDa, respectively. Purified HAP from Poker-chip Venus yielded two subunits with molecular weights of 26 kDa and 29 kDa. However, only one HAP subunit was purified from Corbicula clam, and its molecul...

  17. "To Bluff like a Man or Fold like a Girl?" - Gender Biased Deceptive Behavior in Online Poker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Palomäki

    Full Text Available Evolutionary psychology suggests that men are more likely than women to deceive to bolster their status and influence. Also gender perception influences deceptive behavior, which is linked to pervasive gender stereotypes: women are typically viewed as weaker and more gullible than men. We assessed bluffing in an online experiment (N = 502, where participants made decisions to bluff or not in simulated poker tasks against opponents represented by avatars. Participants bluffed on average 6% more frequently at poker tables with female-only avatars than at tables with male-only or gender mixed avatars-a highly significant effect in games involving repeated decisions. Nonetheless, participants did not believe the avatar genders affected their decisions. Males bluffed 13% more frequently than females. Unlike most economic games employed exclusively in research contexts, online poker is played for money by tens of millions of people worldwide. Thus, gender effects in bluffing have significant monetary consequences for poker players.

  18. "To Bluff like a Man or Fold like a Girl?" - Gender Biased Deceptive Behavior in Online Poker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomäki, Jussi; Yan, Jeff; Modic, David; Laakasuo, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary psychology suggests that men are more likely than women to deceive to bolster their status and influence. Also gender perception influences deceptive behavior, which is linked to pervasive gender stereotypes: women are typically viewed as weaker and more gullible than men. We assessed bluffing in an online experiment (N = 502), where participants made decisions to bluff or not in simulated poker tasks against opponents represented by avatars. Participants bluffed on average 6% more frequently at poker tables with female-only avatars than at tables with male-only or gender mixed avatars-a highly significant effect in games involving repeated decisions. Nonetheless, participants did not believe the avatar genders affected their decisions. Males bluffed 13% more frequently than females. Unlike most economic games employed exclusively in research contexts, online poker is played for money by tens of millions of people worldwide. Thus, gender effects in bluffing have significant monetary consequences for poker players.

  19. Dialoog läbi seina / Mart Kangro, Jim Ashilevi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kangro, Mart, 1974-

    2016-01-01

    Videoblogidest ehk vlogidest, internetist, videomeediumist, distantsist esineja ja publiku vahel, verbaalsest eneseväljandusest, lavastusprotsessist, füüsilisest teatrist ja muust. Mart Kangro ja Jim Ashilevi vestlus

  20. Tracking online poker problem gamblers with player account-based gambling data only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquiens, Amandine; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; Benyamina, Amine; Lagadec, Marthylle; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Reynaud, Michel

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to develop and validate an instrument to track online problem poker gamblers with player account-based gambling data (PABGD). We emailed an invitation to all active poker gamblers on the online gambling service provider Winamax. The 14,261 participants completed the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI). PGSI served as a gold standard to track problem gamblers (i.e., PGSI ≥ 5). We used a stepwise logistic regression to build a predictive model of problem gambling with PABGD, and validated it. Of the sample 18% was composed of online poker problem gamblers. The risk factors of problem gambling included in the predictive model were being male, compulsive, younger than 28 years, making a total deposit > 0 euros, having a mean loss per gambling session > 1.7 euros, losing a total of > 45 euros in the last 30 days, having a total stake > 298 euros, having > 60 gambling sessions in the last 30 days, and multi-tabling. The tracking instrument had a sensitivity of 80%, and a specificity of 50%. The quality of the instrument was good. This study illustrates the feasibility of a method to develop and validate instruments to track online problem gamblers with PABGD only. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Jim Thorpe, The Story of an American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reising, Robert

    Fifty years after the death of Black Hawk, the greatest warrior of the Sac and Fox tribe, his great-great-grandson was born: Jim Thorpe, one of the greatest athletes of all time. This biography opens with Black Hawk and a brief history of the Sac and Fox Indians. Then Jim's story begins, in a simple log cabin in Oklahoma, in 1888. Even in his…

  2. Performing Jim Crow: Blackface Performance and Emancipation (Interpretando a Jim Crow: Blackface y emancipación)

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas L. King

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: A nineteenth-century American actor named Thomas Rice was sensationally popular as a blackface character named Jim Crow. His popularity is credited with giving birth to blackface minstrelsy as others began to imitate him in the hope of emulating his success. Rices Jim Crow provided a name for laws and customs designed to repudiate the emancipation of African slaves. Blackface minstrelsy staged an idealized version of slave life on a southern plantation. Paradoxically, as blackface r...

  3. New ridge parameters for ridge regression

    OpenAIRE

    Dorugade, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Hoerl and Kennard (1970a) introduced the ridge regression estimator as an alternative to the ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator in the presence of multicollinearity. In ridge regression, ridge parameter plays an important role in parameter estimation. In this article, a new method for estimating ridge parameters in both situations of ordinary ridge regression (ORR) and generalized ridge regression (GRR) is proposed. The simulation study evaluates the performance of the proposed estimator ...

  4. Increased ventral-striatal activity during monetary decision making is a marker of problem poker gambling severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevers, Damien; Noël, Xavier; He, Qinghua; Melrose, James A; Bechara, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of different neural systems on monetary decision making in frequent poker gamblers, who vary in their degree of problem gambling. Fifteen frequent poker players, ranging from non-problem to high-problem gambling, and 15 non-gambler controls were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). During IGT deck selection, between-group fMRI analyses showed that frequent poker gamblers exhibited higher ventral-striatal but lower dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal activations as compared with controls. Moreover, using functional connectivity analyses, we observed higher ventral-striatal connectivity in poker players, and in regions involved in attentional/motor control (posterior cingulate), visual (occipital gyrus) and auditory (temporal gyrus) processing. In poker gamblers, scores of problem gambling severity were positively associated with ventral-striatal activations and with the connectivity between the ventral-striatum seed and the occipital fusiform gyrus and the middle temporal gyrus. Present results are consistent with findings from recent brain imaging studies showing that gambling disorder is associated with heightened motivational-reward processes during monetary decision making, which may hamper one's ability to moderate his level of monetary risk taking. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Trait Mindfulness, Problem-Gambling Severity, Altered State of Awareness and Urge to Gamble in Poker-Machine Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeith, Charles F A; Rock, Adam J; Clark, Gavin I

    2017-06-01

    In Australia, poker-machine gamblers represent a disproportionate number of problem gamblers. To cultivate a greater understanding of the psychological mechanisms involved in poker-machine gambling, a repeated measures cue-reactivity protocol was administered. A community sample of 38 poker-machine gamblers was assessed for problem-gambling severity and trait mindfulness. Participants were also assessed regarding altered state of awareness (ASA) and urge to gamble at baseline, following a neutral cue, and following a gambling cue. Results indicated that: (a) urge to gamble significantly increased from neutral cue to gambling cue, while controlling for baseline urge; (b) cue-reactive ASA did not significantly mediate the relationship between problem-gambling severity and cue-reactive urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue); (c) trait mindfulness was significantly negatively associated with both problem-gambling severity and cue-reactive urge (i.e., from neutral cue to gambling cue, while controlling for baseline urge); and (d) trait mindfulness did not significantly moderate the effect of problem-gambling severity on cue-reactive urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue). This is the first study to demonstrate a negative association between trait mindfulness and cue-reactive urge to gamble in a population of poker-machine gamblers. Thus, this association merits further evaluation both in relation to poker-machine gambling and other gambling modalities.

  6. A heads-up no-limit Texas Hold'em poker player: Discretized betting models and automatically generated equilibrium-finding programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilpin, Andrew G.; Sandholm, Tuomas; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    We present Tartanian, a game theory-based player for heads-up no-limit Texas Hold'em poker. Tartanian is built from three components. First, to deal with the virtually infinite strategy space of no-limit poker, we develop a discretized betting model designed to capture the most important strategic...

  7. Efficient storage, retrieval and analysis of poker hands: An adaptive data framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorawski Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In online gambling, poker hands are one of the most popular and fundamental units of the game state and can be considered objects comprising all the events that pertain to the single hand played. In a situation where tens of millions of poker hands are produced daily and need to be stored and analysed quickly, the use of relational databases no longer provides high scalability and performance stability. The purpose of this paper is to present an efficient way of storing and retrieving poker hands in a big data environment. We propose a new, read-optimised storage model that offers significant data access improvements over traditional database systems as well as the existing Hadoop file formats such as ORC, RCFile or SequenceFile. Through index-oriented partition elimination, our file format allows reducing the number of file splits that needs to be accessed, and improves query response time up to three orders of magnitude in comparison with other approaches. In addition, our file format supports a range of new indexing structures to facilitate fast row retrieval at a split level. Both index types operate independently of the Hive execution context and allow other big data computational frameworks such as MapReduce or Spark to benefit from the optimized data access path to the hand information. Moreover, we present a detailed analysis of our storage model and its supporting index structures, and how they are organised in the overall data framework. We also describe in detail how predicate based expression trees are used to build effective file-level execution plans. Our experimental tests conducted on a production cluster, holding nearly 40 billion hands which span over 4000 partitions, show that multi-way partition pruning outperforms other existing file formats, resulting in faster query execution times and better cluster utilisation.

  8. Jim Jarmusch : lecturas sobre el insomnio americano (1980-1991)

    OpenAIRE

    Ródenas Cantero, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    La presente tesis doctoral aborda el primer periodo de la filmografía de Jim Jarmusch. La tesis principal es que su cine supone una respuesta cinematográfica al estado de las cosas durante el denominado "Periodo Reagan" y una relectura de la tradición fílmica anterior. ABSTRACT: The present Ph.D. tackles the first period in Jim Jarmusch´s Filmography. The main Thesis is that his Cinema is a reaction to the Status Quo during the so-called "Reagan in-office Period" and a relecture of the p...

  9. Interview with Jim Zellmer of Studentinfosystem.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Phelps

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Weekly from Madison, Wisconsin, Jim Zellmer emails a selection of links to fifty or so education-related news stories, essays, blog posts, and other relevant sources. It's my favorite, and most edifying, source of education information. I wanted to learn more about Mr. Zellmer and his web site schoolinfosystem.org and so requested an interview. Here it is.

  10. Jim, Antonia, and the Wolves: Displacement in Cather's "My Antonia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robin

    2009-01-01

    In one of the most frequently noted incidents in Willa Cather's "My Antonia", Russian immigrant Pavel reveals on his deathbed that, when driving his friend's wedding party sledge, he saved his own life and companion Peter's by throwing the bride and groom to the attacking wolves. Antonia and Jim are fascinated by this story, and readers…

  11. Jim Gray on eScience: A Transformed Scientific Method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 8. Jim Gray on eScience: A Transformed Scientific Method. Classics Volume 21 Issue 8 August 2016 pp 749-763. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/08/0749-0763. Abstract ...

  12. Takin' It to the Hill: A Conversation with Jim Shanley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Jim Shanley (Assiniboine) served as president of Standing Rock Community College (now Sitting Bull College) and later Fort Peck Community College, where he remained for 28 years. He was also one of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium's (AIHEC) early leaders. At the age of 29, he was appointed as AIHEC's executive committee president…

  13. Jim Gray on eScience: A Transformed Scientific Method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 8. Jim Gray on eScience: A Transformed Scientific Method. Classics Volume 21 Issue 8 August 2016 pp 749-763. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/08/0749-0763. Abstract ...

  14. Gambling Motives: Do They Explain Cognitive Distortions in Male Poker Gamblers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Sasha; Barrault, Servane; Brunault, Paul; Varescon, Isabelle

    2018-03-01

    Gambling behavior is partly the result of varied motivations leading individuals to participate in gambling activities. Specific motivational profiles are found in gamblers, and gambling motives are closely linked to the development of cognitive distortions. This cross-sectional study aimed to predict cognitive distortions from gambling motives in poker players. The population was recruited in online gambling forums. Participants reported gambling at least once a week. Data included sociodemographic characteristics, the South Oaks Gambling Screen, the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Financial and the Gambling-Related Cognition Scale. This study was conducted on 259 male poker gamblers (aged 18-69 years, 14.3% probable pathological gamblers). Univariate analyses showed that cognitive distortions were independently predicted by overall gambling motives (34.8%) and problem gambling (22.4%) (p gambling problems, showing a close inter-relationship between gambling motives, cognitive distortions and the severity of gambling. These data are consistent with the following theoretical process model: gambling motives lead individuals to practice and repeat the gambling experience, which may lead them to develop cognitive distortions, which in turn favor problem gambling. This study opens up new research perspectives to understand better the mechanisms underlying gambling practice and has clinical implications in terms of prevention and treatment. For example, a coupled motivational and cognitive intervention focused on gambling motives/cognitive distortions could be beneficial for individuals with gambling problems.

  15. Creativity, alcohol and drug abuse: the pop icon Jim Morrison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Hadulla, Rainer M; Bertolino, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse is frequent among performers and pop musicians. Many of them hope that alcohol and drugs will enhance their creativity. Scientific studies are scarce and conclusions limited for methodological reasons. Furthermore, extraordinary creativity can hardly be grasped by empirical-statistical methods. Thus, ideographic studies are necessary to learn from extraordinarily creative persons about the relationship of creativity with alcohol and drugs. The pop icon Jim Morrison can serve as an exemplary case to investigate the interrelation between alcohol and drug abuse and creativity. Morrison's self-assessments in his works and letters as well as the descriptions by others are analyzed under the perspective of creativity research. In the lyrics of Jim Morrison and in biographical descriptions, we can see how Jim Morrison tried to cope with traumatic events, depressive moods and uncontrolled impulses through creative activities. His talent, skill and motivation to write creatively were independent from taking alcohol and drugs. He used alcohol and drugs to transgress restrictive social norms, to broaden his perceptions and to reinforce his struggle for self-actualization. In short, his motivation to create something new and authentic was reinforced by alcohol and drugs. More important was the influence of a supportive group that enabled Morrison's talents to flourish. However, soon the frequent use of high doses of alcohol and drugs weakened his capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is an exemplary case showing that heavy drinking and the abuse of LSD, mescaline and amphetamines damages the capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is typical of creative personalities like Amy Winehouse, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones and Jimmy Hendrix who burn their creativity in early adulthood through alcohol and drugs. We suppose that the sacrificial ritual of their decay offers some benefits for the excited spectators. One of these is the

  16. Computer science. Heads-up limit hold'em poker is solved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Michael; Burch, Neil; Johanson, Michael; Tammelin, Oskari

    2015-01-09

    Poker is a family of games that exhibit imperfect information, where players do not have full knowledge of past events. Whereas many perfect-information games have been solved (e.g., Connect Four and checkers), no nontrivial imperfect-information game played competitively by humans has previously been solved. Here, we announce that heads-up limit Texas hold'em is now essentially weakly solved. Furthermore, this computation formally proves the common wisdom that the dealer in the game holds a substantial advantage. This result was enabled by a new algorithm, CFR(+), which is capable of solving extensive-form games orders of magnitude larger than previously possible. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  18. Ridge Regression: A Panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joseph M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is an approach to the problem of large standard errors of regression estimates of intercorrelated regressors. The effect of ridge regression on the estimated squared multiple correlation coefficient is discussed and illustrated. (JKS)

  19. Rogers : Hiinat ootab suur tulevik, Venemaad lagunemine / Jim Rogers ; interv. Villu Zirnask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rogers, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Investeerimisguru-maailmarändur Jim Rogers toorainetesse investeerimisest, Venemaa ja Hiina majanduslikust arengust, uue Euroopa aktsiaturgudest ning elustandardist, Türgi võimalikust liitumisest Euroopa Liiduga

  20. Beyond the "Jim Crow" experience: blacks in chiropractic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, G

    1994-06-01

    Although the first chiropractic adjustment was given by D.D. Palmer to a black man in 1895, within two decades attendance at the Palmer School of Chiropractic was forbidden to blacks. Not until mid-century were blacks allowed entrance into the oldest and largest chiropractic college in the United states. Denied entry at the Palmer School, most blacks who entered chirporactic studied in "Jim Crow" schools run by white practitioners in the North. This paper explores the social, historicl and economic factors influencing the exclusion of blacks from medical education, and concludes that chirpractic education is at the stage medical education was twenty-five years ago in its attempts to recruit black students. The author recommends that the Association of Chiropractic Colleges establish a task force on minoritiy recruitment to expand the educational opportunities in chiropractic for blacks and other minorities.

  1. Thriving older African American women: aging after Jim Crow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, D; Zablotsky, D; Croom, M B

    1998-01-01

    This paper is based on the findings of small group discussions with self-defined successful African American women age 60+ in Charlotte, North Carolina. These women, who lived through the Jim Crow era and thrived in spite of the obstacles, continue to seek meaning in their lives through the roles they play in their families, churches, and communities. They feel strongly that there is a core of key values that continue to hold meaning and struggle to impart these values to those whose lives they touch. The key values identified include education, religion, work, and giving back to the community, and illustrate the integration of both traditional and nontraditional definitions of success. Mentoring is proposed as an important concept for understanding the lives of African American women in later life.

  2. Reporting on the Holocaust: the view from Jim Crow Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Dan J

    2011-01-01

    The press in Alabama covered major events taking place in Germany from the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 through the Nuremberg Trials in 1946. Journalists in the state provided extensive coverage, and editors did not hesitate to opine on the persecution of the Jews in Europe. Yet, Alabama’s white-run press failed in the end to explain the events as a singularly Jewish tragedy. The state’s black-run press, for its part, used the news of the mass killings of the Jews to warn against the dangers of conceptions of racial superiority—a primary concern for black southerners living in the Jim Crow South.

  3. Jim Crow and Premature Mortality Among the US Black and White Population, 1960–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent A.; Beckfield, Jason; Kiang, Mathew V.; Waterman, Pamela D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scant research has analyzed the health impact of abolition of Jim Crow (ie, legal racial discrimination overturned by the US 1964 Civil Rights Act). Methods We used hierarchical age–period–cohort models to analyze US national black and white premature mortality rates (death before 65 years of age) in 1960–2009. Results Within a context of declining US black and white premature mortality rates and a persistent 2-fold excess black risk of premature mortality in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states, analyses including random period, cohort, state, and county effects and fixed county income effects found that, within the black population, the largest Jim Crow-by-period interaction occurred in 1960–1964 (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.22), yielding the largest overall period-specific Jim Crow effect MRR of 1.27, with no such interactions subsequently observed. Furthermore, the most elevated Jim Crow-by-cohort effects occurred for birth cohorts from 1901 through 1945 (MRR range = 1.05–1.11), translating to the largest overall cohort-specific Jim Crow effect MRRs for the 1921–1945 birth cohorts (MRR ~ 1.2), with no such interactions subsequently observed. No such interactions between Jim Crow and either period or cohort occurred among the white population. Conclusion Together, the study results offer compelling evidence of the enduring impact of both Jim Crow and its abolition on premature mortality among the US black population, although insufficient to eliminate the persistent 2-fold black excess risk evident in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states from 1960 to 2009. PMID:24825344

  4. "Mr. Database" : Jim Gray and the History of Database Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanwahr, Nils C

    2017-12-01

    Although the widespread use of the term "Big Data" is comparatively recent, it invokes a phenomenon in the developments of database technology with distinct historical contexts. The database engineer Jim Gray, known as "Mr. Database" in Silicon Valley before his disappearance at sea in 2007, was involved in many of the crucial developments since the 1970s that constitute the foundation of exceedingly large and distributed databases. Jim Gray was involved in the development of relational database systems based on the concepts of Edgar F. Codd at IBM in the 1970s before he went on to develop principles of Transaction Processing that enable the parallel and highly distributed performance of databases today. He was also involved in creating forums for discourse between academia and industry, which influenced industry performance standards as well as database research agendas. As a co-founder of the San Francisco branch of Microsoft Research, Gray increasingly turned toward scientific applications of database technologies, e. g. leading the TerraServer project, an online database of satellite images. Inspired by Vannevar Bush's idea of the memex, Gray laid out his vision of a Personal Memex as well as a World Memex, eventually postulating a new era of data-based scientific discovery termed "Fourth Paradigm Science". This article gives an overview of Gray's contributions to the development of database technology as well as his research agendas and shows that central notions of Big Data have been occupying database engineers for much longer than the actual term has been in use.

  5. Performing Jim Crow: Blackface Performance and Emancipation (Interpretando a Jim Crow: Blackface y emancipación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. King

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A nineteenth-century American actor named Thomas Rice was sensationally popular as a blackface character named Jim Crow. His popularity is credited with giving birth to blackface minstrelsy as others began to imitate him in the hope of emulating his success. Rice’s Jim Crow provided a name for laws and customs designed to repudiate the emancipation of African slaves. Blackface minstrelsy staged an idealized version of slave life on a southern plantation. Paradoxically, as blackface revoked the emancipation of slaves on stage, it emancipated the American theatre from its British origins and its audience of recently immigrated laborers from a low social position. It even occasionally performed an ironic reversal of the subaltern status of the very African slaves whose freedom by proclamation and constitutional amendment the performance sought to negate. Contradictions in the history of blackface performance in the United States stage American anxieties about race, class, emancipation, and the very construction of the concepts of blackness and whiteness.Resumen: En el siglo XIX, Thomas Rice, un actor estadounidense, ganó mucha fama haciendo el papel de un personaje cuya cara estaba pintada de negro con el nombre Jim Crow. Se le da crédito a Rice la creación de grupos de actores que se pintaron la cara de negro (un estilo denominado blackface que luego otros se pusieron a imitarlos con la esperanza de emular su éxito. El Jim Crow de Rice dio nombre a una serie de leyes y costumbres diseñadas para repudiar la emancipación de esclavos africanos. Los espectáculos de los actores en blackface representaron una versión idealizada de la vida de los esclavos en una hacienda sureña. Paradójicamente, mientras el blackface revocó la emancipación de los esclavos sobre el escenario, emancipó el teatro estadounidense de sus orígenes británicas y su público que consistía en obreros inmigrantes de baja clase social. De vez en cuando

  6. Effects of alcohol, initial gambling outcomes, impulsivity, and gambling cognitions on gambling behavior using a video poker task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, William R; Cronce, Jessica M

    2017-06-01

    Drinking and gambling frequently co-occur, and concurrent gambling and drinking may lead to greater negative consequences than either behavior alone. Building on prior research on the effects of alcohol, initial gambling outcomes, impulsivity, and gambling cognitions on gambling behaviors using a chance-based (nonstrategic) slot-machine task, the current study explored the impact of these factors on a skill-based (strategic) video poker task. We anticipated larger average bets and greater gambling persistence under alcohol relative to placebo, and expected alcohol effects to be moderated by initial gambling outcomes, impulsivity, and gambling cognitions. Participants (N = 162; 25.9% female) were randomly assigned to alcohol (target BrAC = .08g%) or placebo and were given $10 to wager on a simulated video poker task, which was programmed to produce 1 of 3 initial outcomes (win, breakeven, or lose) before beginning a progressive loss schedule. Despite evidence for validity of the video poker task and alcohol administration paradigm, primary hypotheses were not supported. Individuals who received alcohol placed smaller wagers than participants in the placebo condition, though this effect was not statistically significant, and the direction of effects was reversed in at-risk gamblers (n = 41). These findings contradict prior research and suggest that alcohol effects on gambling behavior may differ by gambling type (nonstrategic vs. strategic games). Interventions that suggest alcohol is universally disinhibiting may be at odds with young adults' lived experience and thus be less effective than those that recognize the greater complexity of alcohol effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Ridge regression revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.C. de Boer (Paul); C.M. Hafner (Christian)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe argue in this paper that general ridge (GR) regression implies no major complication compared with simple ridge regression. We introduce a generalization of an explicit GR estimator derived by Hemmerle and by Teekens and de Boer and show that this estimator, which is more

  8. Jim Peters' collapse in the 1954 Vancouver Empire Games marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noakes, Tim; Mekler, Jackie; Pedoe, Dan Tunstall

    2008-08-01

    On 7 August 1954, the world 42 km marathon record holder, Jim Peters, collapsed repeatedly during the final 385 metres of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games marathon held in Vancouver, Canada. It has been assumed that Peters collapsed from heatstroke because he ran too fast and did not drink during the race, which was held in windless, cloudless conditions with a dry-bulb temperature of 28 degrees C. Hospital records made available to us indicate that Peters might not have suffered from exertional heatstroke, which classically produces a rectal temperature > 42 degrees C, cerebral effects and, usually, a fatal outcome without vigorous active cooling. Although Peters was unconscious on admission to hospital approximately 60 minutes after he was removed from the race, his rectal temperature was 39.4 degrees C and he recovered fully, even though he was managed conservatively and not actively cooled. We propose that Peters' collapse was more likely due to a combination of hyperthermia-induced fatigue which caused him to stop running; exercise-associated postural hypotension as a result of a low peripheral vascular resistance immediately he stopped running; and combined cerebral effects of hyperthermia, hypertonic hypernatraemia associated with dehydration, and perhaps undiagnosed hypoglycaemia. But none of these conditions should cause prolonged unconsciousness, raising the possibility that Peters might have suffered from a transient encephalopathy, the exact nature of which is not understood.

  9. Chasing losses in online poker and casino games: characteristics and game play of Internet gamblers at risk of disordered gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M; Suhonen, Niko; Saastamoinen, Jani

    2014-07-30

    Disordered Internet gambling is a psychological disorder that represents an important public health issue due to the increase in highly available and conveniently accessible Internet gambling sites. Chasing losses is one of the few observable markers of at-risk and problem gambling that may be used to detect early signs of disordered Internet gambling. This study examined loss chasing behaviour in a sample of Internet casino and poker players and the socio-demographic variables, irrational beliefs, and gambling behaviours associated with chasing losses. An online survey was completed by 10,838 Internet gamblers (58% male) from 96 countries. The results showed that Internet casino players had a greater tendency to report chasing losses than poker players and gamblers who reported chasing losses were more likely to hold irrational beliefs about gambling and spend more time and money gambling than those who reported that they were unaffected by previous losses. Gamblers who played for excitement and to win money were more likely to report chasing losses. This study is one of the largest ever studies of Internet gamblers and the results are highly significant as they provide insight into the characteristics and behaviours of gamblers using this mode of access. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Occurrence rate of ion upflow and downflow observed by the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, S.; Lu, J.; Varney, R. H.

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the occurrence rate of ion upflow and downflow events in the auroral ionosphere, using a full 3-year (2011-2013) dataset collected by the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) at 65.5° magnetic latitude. Ion upflow and downflow events are defined if there are three consecutive data points larger/smaller than 100/-100 m/s in the ion field-aligned velocity altitude profile. Their occurrence rates have been evaluated as a function of magnetic local time (MLT), season, geomagnetic activity, solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We found that the ion upflows are twice more likely to occur on the nightside than the dayside, and have slightly higher occurrence rate near Fall equinox. In contrast, the ion downflow events are more likely to occur in the afternoon sector but also during Fall equinox. In addition, the occurrence rate of ion upflows on the nightside increases when the aurora electrojet index (AE) and planetary K index (Kp) increase, while the downflows measured on the dayside clearly increase as the AE and Kp increase. In general, the occurrence rate of ion upflows increases with enhanced solar wind and IMF drivers. This correlation is particularly strong between the upflows on the nightside and the solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF Bz. The lack of correlation of upflows on the dayside with these parameters is due to the location of PFISR, which is usually equatorward of the dayside auroral zone and within the nightside auroral zone under disturbed conditions. The occurrence rate of downflow at all MLTs does not show strong dependence on the solar wind and IMF conditions. However, it occurs much more frequently on the dayside when the IMF By is strongly positive, i.e., >10 nT and the IMF Bz is strongly negative, i.e., < -10 nT. We suggest that the increased occurrence rate of downflows on the dayside is associated with dayside storm-enhanced density and the plume.

  11. Tippjuhi töö on nagu maratoni jooksmine / Jim Scholes

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Scholes, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Tippjuhid ja nende käitumise mõju alluvatele ning organisatsioonikultuurile. Lisa: Juhid ei tea, mis firmas toimub. Artikkel refereeritud Jim Scholesi ettekandest 5.-6. septembril 2002 toimunud Tartu Juhtimiskonverentsil

  12. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  13. Ridge and Furrow Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per Grau

    2016-01-01

    Ridge and furrow is a specific way of ploughing which makes fields of systematic ridges and furrows like a rubbing washboard. They are part of an overall openfield system, but the focus in this paper is on the functionality of the fields. There are many indications that agro-technological reasons...... systems and the establishment of basic structures like villages (with churches) and townships and states (in northern Europe). The fields can be considered as a resilient structure lasting for 800 years, along with the same basic physical structures in society....

  14. Juan Ramón Jiménez and Nietzsche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Devlin

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The young Juan Ramón Jiménez shared the enthusiasm for the writings of Nietzsche prevalent among his contemporaries. More significant are the interest in and affinity with Nietzsche which persisted into the poet's maturity. Jiménez found in Nietzsche not only a man of ideas but a poet who claimed to be a potent spiritual force. Both writers held that the modern age could recover a sense of spiritual integrity through the will of the individual to live and interpret human existence as an aesthetic phenomenon. Nietzsche's views on the nature of art and the role of the artist helped to sustain Jiménez' exalted and elitist view of poetry and the poet's mission. Jiménez felt an ethical kinship with the philosopher who asserted the absolute uniqueness of the creative individual, the end of whose existence was self-realization through his art. Nietzsche's doctrine of heroic vitalism as an antidote to chronic spiritual malaise corresponds to Jiménez' revitalized vision of the poetic word proclaimed in the Diario and elaborated in subsequent verse and prose writings.

  15. Ridge: a computer program for calculating ridge regression estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald E. Hilt; Donald W. Seegrist

    1977-01-01

    Least-squares coefficients for multiple-regression models may be unstable when the independent variables are highly correlated. Ridge regression is a biased estimation procedure that produces stable estimates of the coefficients. Ridge regression is discussed, and a computer program for calculating the ridge coefficients is presented.

  16. Cue-Reactive Altered State of Consciousness Mediates the Relationship Between Problem-Gambling Severity and Cue-Reactive Urge in Poker-Machine Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricker, Christopher; Rock, Adam J; Clark, Gavin I

    2016-06-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of the nature of poker-machine problem-gambling, a community sample of 37 poker-machine gamblers (M age = 32 years, M PGSI = 5; PGSI = Problem Gambling Severity Index) were assessed for urge to gamble (responses on a visual analogue scale) and altered state of consciousness (assessed by the Altered State of Awareness dimension of the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory) at baseline, after a neutral cue, and after a gambling cue. It was found that (a) problem-gambling severity (PGSI score) predicted increase in urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue, controlling for baseline; sr (2) = .19, p = .006) and increase in altered state of consciousness (from neutral cue to gambling cue, controlling for baseline; sr (2) = .57, p gambling cue) mediated the relationship between problem-gambling severity and increase in urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue; κ(2) = .40, 99 % CI [.08, .71]). These findings suggest that cue-reactive altered state of consciousness is an important component of cue-reactive urge in poker-machine problem-gamblers.

  17. Calculating a Stepwise Ridge Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Although methods for using ordinary least squares regression computer programs to calculate a ridge regression are available, the calculation of a stepwise ridge regression requires a special purpose algorithm and computer program. The correct stepwise ridge regression procedure is given, and a parallel FORTRAN computer program is described.…

  18. Ibridismo è ideologia Alcune considerazioni sul poema in prosa di Jiménez.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Grasso

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Le raccolte Platero y yo e Diario de un poeta reciencasado nate, come ricorda lo stesso Jiménez, da reali occasioni autobiografiche, e pubblicate nello stesso anno (1917 costituiscono uno snodo importante non solo nella produzione lirica del grande poeta di Moguer. In esse la novità è anzitutto di tipo formale: sperimentando con sempre maggiore consapevolezza il genere del poema in prosa, e contaminandolo, come si vede in modo particolare nel Diario, con la versificazione libera, Jiménez avvia una seconda fase della sua ricerca poetica. A quale tradizione lirica, in primo luogo ispanica, e poi europea, è possibile ascrivere l’ibridazione dei generi poetici sperimentata da Jiménez? Quale finalità lirica esorta il poeta ad adoperare il poema in prosa per narrare di personali esperienze biografiche? Che tipo di soggettività veicola questo genere-non genere della modernità? E più in generale: è possibile che l’autore andaluso attribuisca al poema in prosa, oltre che una funzione lirico-narrativa, precipui contenuti metapoetici? Nel presente studio si proverà a rispondere a tali interrogativi a partire dallo studio delle due opere menzionate, che hanno il vantaggio di definirsi come due campioni pressocché coevi dell’ibridismo del poeta. L’ipotesi è che in Platero e nel Diario Jiménez si faccia portavoce di una sorta di personale bilancio, non solo rispetto alla tradizione modernista ispanica, ma anche a quella europea. In controtendenza con quest’ultima, che trova il suo archetipo negli Spleen baudelairiani, per l’autore andaluso l’ibridazione dei generi lirici non è una modalità di rappresentazione della disarticolazione del moderno, ma al contrario, e piuttosto in linea con la generazione lirica ispanica a cui egli appartiene, di affermazione di una visione di un mondo coeso e denso di ethos.} Jiménez’s collections of poems Platero y yo and Diario de un poeta reciencasado, written after real

  19. Ridge regression processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Current navigation requirements depend on a geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) criterion. As long as the GDOP stays below a specific value, navigation requirements are met. The GDOP will exceed the specified value when the measurement geometry becomes too collinear. A new signal processing technique, called Ridge Regression Processing, can reduce the effects of nearly collinear measurement geometry; thereby reducing the inflation of the measurement errors. It is shown that the Ridge signal processor gives a consistently better mean squared error (MSE) in position than the Ordinary Least Mean Squares (OLS) estimator. The applicability of this technique is currently being investigated to improve the following areas: receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), coverage requirements, availability requirements, and precision approaches.

  20. Los hombres. Juan Ramón Jiménez y Jaime Robledo Uribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico Banco de la República

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available En el documento se realiza sendas notas de conmemoración  del fallecimiento de don Juan Ramón Jiménez  y don Jaime Robledo Uribe. Esta pequeña nota tiene como fin realizar un homenaje a tan reputados miembros del círculo cultural del país.

  1. USA investeerimisguru Jim Rogers : ärge kartke investeerida tooraineturule / Romet Kreek

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreek, Romet, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 9. märts lk. 25. Varajane huvi tooraineturule investeerimise vastu mängis suurt rolli Jim Rogersi edus hedge fond'i Quantum kaasjuhina. Lisa: Lõigake kasu Hiina kasvust; Kuue aasta eest külastas Eestit

  2. What Preservice Teachers Can Learn from One Jim Crow Community Engagement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    The discriminatory practices against African Americans during the Jim Crow era in St. Louis, Missouri did not deter Dr. Ruth Harris, the first African American female president of Stowe Teachers College (STC) in St. Louis, from accepting the challenge of leading the African American teachers' college from 1940 to 1954. Her appointment to President…

  3. A Bus Ride across the Mason-Dixon Line during Jim Crow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In this classroom simulation, students travel back in time to 1945, when racism was institutionalized in many states through segregation. Though students cannot literally travel back to the Jim Crow era, teachers can create a situation that brings home the point of injustice and the choices individuals are faced with in such situations. Suddenly,…

  4. What Jim Crow's Teachers Could Do: Educational Capital and Teachers' Work in Under-Resourced Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Hilton

    2010-01-01

    This article explains how Jim Crow's teachers--former teachers of legally segregated schools for blacks--prepared and motivated disadvantaged students in spite of funding and resource deprivation. According to the author, black teachers fashioned situated pedagogies for the acquisition of educational capital that could be used in exchange for…

  5. Jim Crow Goes Global : Segregationist Politics in the Aftermath of World War II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, Maarten

    2018-01-01

    Segregationist politicians from the U.S. South played key roles in devising plans for the reconstruction of Germany, the Marshall Plan and the drafting of displaced persons legislation. My article discusses how Jim Crow ideology calibrated the global and domestic order that emerged from the ashes of

  6. TV Star Jim Parsons Shines Light on NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parsons Shines Light on NIH Research Follow us TV Star Jim Parsons Shines Light on NIH Research Documentary highlights key sickle cell and cancer trials Photo: Courtesy of Discovery 'First in Human,' a three-part documentary series from the Discovery Channel, follows four patients at ...

  7. Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, Andrew R.; Erickson, Ansley T.

    2015-01-01

    Popular understandings of segregation often emphasize the Jim Crow South before the 1954 "Brown" decision and, in many instances, explain continued segregation in schooling as the result of segregated housing patterns. The case of Flint, Michigan, complicates these views, at once illustrating the depth of governmental commitment to…

  8. El acontecimiento en el cuento: nueva lectura de José Jiménez Lozano

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Illán, A. (Antonio)

    2010-01-01

    Se reseña un libro que estudia como un todo los cuentos de Jiménez Lozano publicados hasta la fecha (y, en particular, La Piel de los tomates) a la luz de una teoría del cuento desde la categoría del acontecimiento.

  9. Imaging of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes with the 450 MHz Poker Flat Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.; Hope, E. A.; Ranjan, S.; Kelley, M. C.; Kelly, J. D.

    2007-10-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) occur near the mesopause during the polar summer months. PMSE are primarily studied at VHF, however there have been some detections at higher frequencies. Here, we report on some of the first detections of PMSE with the 450 MHz (67 cm) Poker Flat Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). Echoes were observed with volume reflectivities (radar scattering cross section per unit volume) near 2-3 × 10-17 m-1. On 11 June 2007, PFISR was operating in a 26-beam position mode, with look directions spread over an approximately 80 by 80 km2 region at 85 km altitude with elevation angles as low as ~50°. The measurements showed patchy (tens of kilometer) irregularity regions drifting in from the north, in addition to smaller, more localized structures. There was no evidence for strong aspect sensitivity of these UHF echoes, as PMSE was observed in all look directions with relatively uniform intensity. The observations indicate the presence of fossilized irregularities drifting with the background wind field as well as areas of developing irregularities possibly associated with the presence of active neutral air turbulence.

  10. Lecture notes on ridge regression

    OpenAIRE

    van Wieringen, Wessel N.

    2015-01-01

    The linear regression model cannot be fitted to high-dimensional data, as the high-dimensionality brings about empirical non-identifiability. Penalized regression overcomes this non-identifiability by augmentation of the loss function by a penalty (i.e. a function of regression coefficients). The ridge penalty is the sum of squared regression coefficients, giving rise to ridge regression. Here many aspect of ridge regression are reviewed e.g. moments, mean squared error, its equivalence to co...

  11. Dampak Jim Crow Laws Terhadap Orang-orang Kulit Hitam Yang Digambarkan Dalam Novel the Help Karya Kathryn Stockett

    OpenAIRE

    Wonua, Indah Dewi Sartika

    2015-01-01

    This skripsi which is entitled “Dampak Jim Crow Laws Terhadap Orang-Orang Kulit Hitam yang Digambarkan dalam Novel The Help Karya Kathryn Stockett” is a study about the social life of American People in 1960 through the characters in the novel. There are two questions to be answered in this research: Howis Jim Crow Laws reflected in the novel andwhat is the effect of the laws to black people. The aims of this research are to analyze the reflection of the Jim Crow Laws in the novel, and to an...

  12. Comparing Free-Free and Shaker Table Model Correlation Methods Using Jim Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristow, James; Smith, Kenneth Wayne, Jr.; Johnson, Nathaniel; Kinney, Jackson

    2018-01-01

    Finite element model correlation as part of a spacecraft program has always been a challenge. For any NASA mission, the coupled system response of the spacecraft and launch vehicle can be determined analytically through a Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA), as it is not possible to test the spacecraft and launch vehicle coupled system before launch. The value of the CLA is highly dependent on the accuracy of the frequencies and mode shapes extracted from the spacecraft model. NASA standards require the spacecraft model used in the final Verification Loads Cycle to be correlated by either a modal test or by comparison of the model with Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) obtained during the environmental qualification test. Due to budgetary and time constraints, most programs opt to correlate the spacecraft dynamic model during the environmental qualification test, conducted on a large shaker table. For any model correlation effort, the key has always been finding a proper definition of the boundary conditions. This paper is a correlation case study to investigate the difference in responses of a simple structure using a free-free boundary, a fixed boundary on the shaker table, and a base-drive vibration test, all using identical instrumentation. The NAVCON Jim Beam test structure, featured in the IMAC round robin modal test of 2009, was selected as a simple, well recognized and well characterized structure to conduct this investigation. First, a free-free impact modal test of the Jim Beam was done as an experimental control. Second, the Jim Beam was mounted to a large 20,000 lbf shaker, and an impact modal test in this fixed configuration was conducted. Lastly, a vibration test of the Jim Beam was conducted on the shaker table. The free-free impact test, the fixed impact test, and the base-drive test were used to assess the effect of the shaker modes, evaluate the validity of fixed-base modeling assumptions, and compare final model correlation results between these

  13. Chemistry and Biophysics. Conversation with Jesús Jiménez-Barbero

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado Benito, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry and Biophysics need, and embrace, multidisciplinarity. They both look at problems from many different perspectives. However, while we should not hide behind the walls of disciplines, we cannot ambition to be experts on everything. "We are not in Leonardo's times. Collaboration is essential, as the way to reach far outside our own background knowledge". From his intense career dedicated biomolecular interactions, Jiménez-Barbero knows well how important it is for a chemist working cl...

  14. Measuring mandibular ridge reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, W.H.A.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis investigates the mandibular reduction in height of complete denture wearers and overdenture wearers. To follow this reduction in the anterior region as well as in the lateral sections of the mandible, an accurate and reproducible measuring method is a prerequisite. A radiologic technique offers the best chance. A survey is given of the literature concerning the resorption process after the extraction of teeth. An oblique cephalometric radiographic technique is introduced as a promising method to measure mandibular ridge reduction. The reproducibility and the accuracy of the technique are determined. The reproducibility in the positioning of the mandible is improved by the introduction of a mandibular support which permits a precise repositioning of the edentulous jaw, even after long periods of investigation. (Auth.)

  15. The Performance of a Cult of the Senses: A Feast of Fans at Jim Morrison's Grave in Paris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margry, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the different ways fans commemorate and venerate the American rock star and poet Jim Morrison (1943-1971), at his grave at Pere Lachaise cemetary in Paris and for which the senses play an important role.

  16. Iiri režissöör Jim Sheridan tuleb "Pimedate ööde" festivalile

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Pimedate Ööde VII filmifestivali keskus asub sel aastal Coca-Cola Plazas. Festivali avab 28. nov. Morten Tyldumi mängufilm "Buddy" ja lõpetab 6. dets. iirlase Jim Sheridani "Ameerikas" ("In America")

  17. Ridges on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This is the highest resolution picture ever taken of the Jupiter moon, Europa. The area shown is about 5.9 by 9.9 miles (9.6 by 16 kilometers) and the smallest visible feature is about the size of a football field. In this view, the ice-rich surface has been broken into a complex pattern by cross-cutting ridges and grooves resulting from tectonic processes. Sinuous rille-like features and knobby terrain could result from surface modifications of unknown origins. Small craters of possible impact origin range in size from less than 330 feet (100 meters) to about 1300 feet (400 meters) across are visible.This image was taken by the solid state imaging television camera aboard the Galileo during its fourth orbit around Jupiter, at a distance of 2060 miles (3340 kilometers). The picture is centered at 325 degrees West, 5.83 degrees North. North is toward the top of this image, with the sun shining from the right.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  18. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Johnson, A.M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  19. Ridge regression and its degrees of freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Theo K.

    2014-01-01

    For ridge regression the degrees of freedom are commonly calculated by the trace of the matrix that transforms the vector of observations on the dependent variable into the ridge regression estimate of its expected value. For a fixed ridge parameter this is unobjectionable. When the ridge parameter

  20. Air pollution in China, with Junfeng (Jim) Zhang by Ashley Ahearn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng Jim

    2011-06-01

    Air pollution in China, one of the world’s oldest civilizations, reflects a combination of traditional and modern-day factors. Severe air pollution in Chinese cities is the result of rapid industrialization, urbanization, and growth in vehicle use. At the same time, traditional indoor burning of solid fuels such as coal and dung presents acute, severe exposures to pollutants including particulate matter, carbon monoxide, arsenic, and mercury. In this podcast, Junfeng (Jim) Zhang tells host Ashley Ahearn about some of the factors that make air pollution a significant problem in China.

  1. ‘Unequal Justice': Colonial Law and the Shooting of Jim Crow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Patton

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the extent of frontier violence in the Port Phillip District (as Victoria was called before it became a separate colony in 1851, deaths of Aboriginal people only proceeded to full murder trials on two occasions. The first, involving three Western District settlers accused of shooting dead three women and a child in February 1842 in what became known as the Muston’s Creek massacre, is somewhat better known. The second, lesser-known trial concerned three policemen charged with murdering an Aboriginal man called Jim Crow, who they had been ordered to arrest, in the Wimmera area in October 1843. Although the shooting of Jim Crow has been mentioned by other authors, there has been no detailed discussion of the events. This essay examines the case throughout, from the issuing of arrest warrants and policing practices to prosecution and presentation of evidence. It considers how the processes of Anglo-Australian colonial law skewed a supposedly impartial legal system to favour Europeans over Aboriginal inhabitants, despite their nominal equality as British subjects. It argues that in the frontier conflict over land, the application of colonial law supported settlers’ interests and posed significant obstacles for Aboriginal complaints to be heard, particularly in evidence. In so doing, the law denied Aboriginal subjects substantive legal protection, exacerbating frontier violence.

  2. Tourism and the Hispanicization of race in Jim Crow Miami, 1945-1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chanelle N

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how Miami's significant presence of Anglo Caribbean blacks and Spanish-speaking tourists critically influenced the evolution of race relations before and after the watershed 1959 Cuban Revolution. The convergence of people from the American South and North, the Caribbean, and Latin America created a border culture in a city where the influx of Bahamian blacks and Spanish-speakers, especially tourists, had begun to alter the racial landscape. To be sure, Miami had many parallels with other parts of the South in regard to how blackness was understood and enforced by whites during the first half of the twentieth century. However, I argue that the city's post-WWII meteoric tourist growth, along with its emergence as a burgeoning Pan-American metropolis, complicated the traditional southern black-white dichotomy. The purchasing power of Spanish-speaking visitors during the postwar era transformed a tourist economy that had traditionally catered to primarily wealthy white transplanted Northerners. This significant change to the city's tourist industry significantly influenced white civic leaders' decision to occasionally modify Jim Crow practices for Latin American vacationers. In effect, Miami's early Latinization had a profound impact on the established racial order as speaking Spanish became a form of currency that benefited Spanish-speaking tourists—even those of African descent. Paradoxically, this ostensibly peculiar racial climate aided the local struggle by highlighting the idiosyncrasies of Jim Crow while perpetuating the second-class status of native-born blacks.

  3. José Miguel Jiménez receives Order of Alfonso X the Wise

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2016-01-01

    On 12 July 2016, José Miguel Jiménez, Head of CERN Technology Department, has been awarded a spanish civil decoration — an encomienda — of the Order of Alfonso X the Wise (see here), for his outstanding experience in the field of research and scientific management in particle physics.   The ceremony took place at the National Library of Spain, in Madrid, on 12 July. From left: Marcial Marín Hellín, Secretary of State for Education, Professional training and Universities; José María Lassalle Ruiz, Secretary of State for Culture; Íñigo Méndez de Vigo y Montojo, Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport; José Miguel Jiménez, Head of CERN Technology Department; Carmen Vela Olmo, Secretary of State for Investigation, Development and Innovation. (Photo: ©Javier Martínez de la Torre, M...

  4. Constraints on ocean ridge basalt generation from Gakkel Ridge basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P.; Standish, J.; Goldstein, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge that traverses the Arctic Ocean from Greenland to Siberia provides five "natural experiments" with respect to our understanding of melt generation and delivery at ocean ridges. (1) It is the deepest of the ocean ridges, and tests the global correlations of basalt chemistry with axial depth and the origin of such correlations. (2) It is the slowest spreading ridge, and tests the influence of ultra-slow spreading on magma generation without the complexity of oblique spreading or multiple transform offsets. (3) The samples are both on- and off-axis, allowing tests of the similarity of on- and off-axis volcanism. (4) It provides a test of the veined mantle disequilibrium melting hypothesis for MORB, since both ultra-slow spreading rate and great depth suggest minimum extents of melting, with the extent of melting decreasing progressively towards the east. (5) It tests segmentation models, because there are no transform offsets along the ridge, and the slow spreading rates should lead to maximum melt focusing along strike. The comprehensive major element, trace element and isotopic data set for the rocks obtained on the AMORE cruise allows investigation of all of these issues. (1) The Gakkel fits global depth-chemistry correlations, and major and trace element data as well as crustal thickness suggest small extents of melting in this region, decreasing towards the east. (2)Ultra-slow spreading leads to a thicker lithospheric lid and more garnet influence towards the east. The effects of thick lithosphere and mantle temperature on melting can be clearly distinguished in this region, and contrast with global systematics. This suggests that lithosphere variations are of minor importance in controlling the global array. (3) Off-axis samples are more diverse than on-axis samples, confirming the importance of off-axis volcanism at ultra-slow ridges. (4) Trace element data do not show an increase in a "veined component" towards the east as spreading rate

  5. Tropic and race. Miguel Jiménez López and the Japanese Immigration in Colombia, 1920-1929

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Fernando Martínez Martín

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the debate on immigration in Colombia, specifically focusing on Japanese immigration, an problem, by being so far from the desired European immigration. Likewise, the important role played by the psychiatrist and conservative Colombian politician Miguel Jiménez Lopez and his theory of degeneration of the Colombian race. Jiménez Lopez is the author of "The yellow immigration in the America", a publication of the National Academy of Medicine, written in response to the Ministry of Industries about the question for the possible impact of a Japanese immigration in the eastern plains. Jiménez Lopez maintains the problem from medicalization and biology, using more arguments from geographical determinism and racism that from eugenics, to justify that a Japanese immigration to Colombia was not advisable, because it jeopardizes the progressive bleaching managed —with the passage of time— by the Colombian race.

  6. Las “Historias ilustrativas de la violencia” de Edilberto Jiménez: narrativa, testimonio y memoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cairati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to analyse the cultural contents and aesthetic position of Edilberto Jiménez Quispe’s illustrations of the age of violence, presented in Chungui: violencia y trazos de memoria (Lima, 2009. Jiménez, through the plastic and figurative traditional style, makes public the concealed and denied memory of the Internal Armed Conflict. The combination of testimonies and paintings is concerned as an emotional significance of memory: a space of re-established dialogue after the age of violence, in the direction of the elaboration of identity in the region of Ayacucho.

  7. The “Privileged Dago”?: Race, Citizenship and Sicilians in the Jim Crow Gulf South, 1870-1924

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Jessica Barbata

    2017-01-01

    Although the Jim Crow South is usually considered a story of the black/white color line, it is also an immigration story. This dissertation recovers a history of immigrants in the South who were not totally “white” but who were not “black” either. Where did they fit? And on which side of the color line were Italians relegated when southern states started imposing their Jim Crow laws, like voting restrictions and interracial marriage bans? While not barred from officially naturalizing as U.S. ...

  8. "There Were Rapes!": Sexual Assaults of African American Women and Children in Jim Crow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Miller, Ruth; Picca, Leslie H

    2016-07-03

    Using data from 92 interviews, this article examines the narratives of African Americans' experiences as children and young adults during Jim Crow in the Southeast and Southwest. It gives voice to the realities of sexual assaults committed by ordinary White men who systematically terrorized African American families with impunity after the post-Reconstruction south until the 1960s. The interviewees discuss the short- and long-term impact of physical, mental, emotional, and sexual assaults in their communities. We discuss the top four prevalent themes that emerged related to sexual assault, specifically (a) the normalization of sexual assaults, (b) protective measures to avoid White violence, (c) the morality of African American women, and (d) the long-term consequences of assaults on children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Jim Crow and premature mortality among the US Black and White population, 1960-2009: an age-period-cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T; Coull, Brent A; Beckfield, Jason; Kiang, Mathew V; Waterman, Pamela D

    2014-07-01

    Scant research has analyzed the health impact of abolition of Jim Crow (ie, legal racial discrimination overturned by the US 1964 Civil Rights Act). We used hierarchical age-period-cohort models to analyze US national black and white premature mortality rates (death before 65 years of age) in 1960-2009. Within a context of declining US black and white premature mortality rates and a persistent 2-fold excess black risk of premature mortality in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states, analyses including random period, cohort, state, and county effects and fixed county income effects found that, within the black population, the largest Jim Crow-by-period interaction occurred in 1960-1964 (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval = 1.09-1.22), yielding the largest overall period-specific Jim Crow effect MRR of 1.27, with no such interactions subsequently observed. Furthermore, the most elevated Jim Crow-by-cohort effects occurred for birth cohorts from 1901 through 1945 (MRR range = 1.05-1.11), translating to the largest overall cohort-specific Jim Crow effect MRRs for the 1921-1945 birth cohorts (MRR ~ 1.2), with no such interactions subsequently observed. No such interactions between Jim Crow and either period or cohort occurred among the white population. Together, the study results offer compelling evidence of the enduring impact of both Jim Crow and its abolition on premature mortality among the US black population, although insufficient to eliminate the persistent 2-fold black excess risk evident in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states from 1960 to 2009.

  10. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 with the mission of standing up a supercomputer 100 times...

  11. Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed

  12. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are…

  13. InRidge program: Preliminary results from the first cruise

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.

    The first cruise under India's own Ridge research initiative, InRidge collected new data on bathymetry, free-air gravity and magnetic anomalies across the ridge axis between the Vema and Zhivago transform faults in the Central Indian Ridge...

  14. Crustal structure along Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Aursch, M. C.; Jokat, W.

    2003-04-01

    Relationships between melt generation, crustal thicknesses and spreading rates are well-known for fast- and intermediate- to slow-spreading midoceanic ridges. But for very-slow-spreading ridges with full spreading rates smaller than 20 mm/yr only few data have been available yet. Therefore, the 1800 km long ultra-slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge with full spreading rates between 13 mm/yr near Greenland and 6 mm/yr in the Laptev Sea was investigated by the joint AMORE expedition in summer 2001. The two research icebreakers RV Polarstern and USCGC Healy conducted several petrological and geophysical programs. Seismic refraction experiments with receivers deployed on ice floes and a 24 l airgun array towed behind one ship were performed along the rift valley during the cruise. Gravity measurements onboard revealed additional information on the crustal structure. A helicopter-based magnetic survery gave evidence for long term focused magmatism along the ridge. Forward modelling of the wide-angle seismic data with raytracing yields an exceptional thin crust with thicknesses well below 3 km. Crustal seismic velocities not higher than 6.4 km/s indicate a missing or not resolvable oceanic layer 3. Refracted mantle waves with seismic velocities up to 7.8 km/s give constraints on the crustal thickness. First results of a 3D forward gravity modelling based on the 5-minute-grid of the Arctic Gravity Project and shipboard data will also be shown. They extend the knowledge of crustal thickness and upper mantle structure to areas off-axis Gakkel Ridge and the parts along the rift valley not covered by deep seismic data.

  15. Retórica y novela de tesis: una lectura de Pepita Jiménez, de Juan Valera

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Bustamante Mourier, Ana Sofía

    1994-01-01

    Análisis de "Pepita Jiménez", la obra maestra de Juan Valera, a la luz de la retórica clásica, y de la imposibilidad de ésta de dar cuenta no ya del género narrativo sino de una obra cuya eficacia se basa en la ironía infinita.

  16. From the Cotton Fields to the Ties That Bind: Jim Pusack's Enduring Impact on Today's CALL Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    From 1981 to today, the encouragement Jim Pusack and his colleague Sue Otto gave faculty to develop and/or implement CALL into the curriculum has been vital to our L2 teaching evolution. This article describes how their efforts evolved over the last two and a half decades and the ties that bind their efforts with today's CALL development.

  17. GENESIS AND DEVELOPMENT OF A “NONPARTISAN” POLITICAL ACTOR: The Formation of the Jama’ah Islah Malaysia (JIM and its Roots in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Lemiere

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the genesis and development of the Jama’ah Islah Malaysia (JIM, a modernist-reformist Islamist organisation that today has played a vital and visible role in the political landscape of Malaysian politics. Little is known about the early genesis of JIM, and how it began in the 1970s and 1980s as a student-based cadre organisation, created by Malaysian Muslim students studying abroad in Europe and North America. JIM’s roots therefore lie in the Islamic Representative Council (IRC that was a semi-underground student-cadre movement that was created outside Malaysia, and which aimed to bring about the Islamisation of Malaysian society through the process of social and political mobilisation. Working through the archives of JIM today and interviewing the foundermembers of JIM and the IRC, this paper is the first historical account of the formation and development of IRC and JIM to be published. 

  18. Enfermedad y muerte de Don Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Serpa Florez

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available

    La lepra es una enfermedad que se caracteriza por la insidia de su presencia, su lenta evolución y la progresiva incapacidad que en sus víctimas causa.

    Esto y el temor que ha infundido desde tiempos bíblicos, han hecho que ante ella se haya mantenido una actitud ambivalente de negación hasta donde es posible y de rechazo irracional a quien la padece, por temor al contagio.

    Ejemplo de ello es el aura de sagrado misterio que envuelve la leyenda de los padecimientos del Adelantado don Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada (1509-1579, conquistador del Nuevo Reino de Granada y fundador de Santafé de Bogotá en el año de 1538, muerto a la edad, avanzada para la época, de setenta años.

    No se puede afirmar, en forma definitiva, que el conquistador fuera leproso. Se acepta, acogiendo el argumento de autoridad que tiene el primer historiador médico entre nosotros, don Pedro María Ibáñez, quien escribió en 1884, en las Memorias para la Historia de la Medicina en Santa Fe, que en “1579 falleció en la ciudad de Mariquita, y de mal de lepra o elefancía de los

    Coincide ello con lo que consigna don José María Vergara y Vergara en su Cuadro Cronológico de la Nueva Granada (hoi Estados Unidos de Colombia, desde los cipas hasta nuestros días (se ha conservado la ortografía usada a mediados del siglo XIX, preconizada por don Andrés Bello, estudio publicado en 1866, en que informa que a poco de posesionarse el tercer Presidente del Nuevo Reino, don Lope Díez Aux de Armendáriz: “ocurrió la muerte del adelantado Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada que tuvo lugar en Mariquita el 16 de febrero de 1579, a la edad de ochenta años no cumplidos (sic, i de enfermedad de lepra (…” (2.

    Estos conceptos fueron debatidos por contemporáneos de Vergara y de Ibáñez como el doctor Juan de Dios Carrasquilla aduciendo, entre otros argumentos, que la lepra no fue mencionada por los coetáneos del conquistador. Y que la sífilis, com

  19. Prosthodontic management of ridge deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malament, Kenneth A; Neeser, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The treatment goals in prosthodontics and dental laboratory technology are to provide patients with long-term predictable and esthetic outcomes. The periodontal tissues define the framework that will maintain ridge height, thickness, color, texture, and gingival-tooth frame. The loss of teeth, residual ridge resorption and the loss of gingival tissues continue to affect long-term and esthetic treatment outcomes. Prosthodontic treatment requires consideration of the potential negative tissue effect that time and normal biologic change might have on the completed prosthetic design. This article describes alternative restorative solutions for clinical conditions that have traditionally been managed by surgery, removable prosthodontics, or esthetically compromised fixed restorations. Different clinical conditions for tooth-retained and implant-retained fixed partial dentures as well as the laboratory technology describing construction of these different restorations will be discussed.

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  1. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Altinoluk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  2. Oak Ridge strategy accelerates cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, S.B. II; Boston, H.L.

    1996-01-01

    The strategy of the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program is to accelerate the transition from characterization to remediation by making decisions at the watershed scale based on recommended land uses and historical data. Since the primary means of contaminant transport is via shallow groundwater to surface water, grouping contaminated sites by watersheds for characterization, decision-making, and remediation allows consistency and appropriateness in remedy selection. It also results in cost and schedule savings

  3. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinoluk, Tolga [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Armesto, Néstor, E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Beuf, Guillaume [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Kovner, Alex [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, 2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Lublinsky, Michael [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-12-17

    We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  4. The Literary Criticism and Memoirs of Juan Ramón Jiménez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W. Phillips

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Equally as demanding of others as he was of himself, Juan Ramón Jiménez conceived of literary criticism as a serious and exacting task. The critic and the poet, standing side by side, are devoted to complementary activities of mutual enrichment. However fragmentary and partial the critical opinions of Juan Ramón may be (also outspoken and polemical in nature, they are invaluable as a personal historical and aesthetic guide to about fifty or sixty years of Hispanic literary development (1900-1960. Not to take them into account is to fail to recognize a highly important aspect of his total artistic personality. These varied critical texts are a product of a first rate intelligence and the sensibility of a writer of consummate discrimination who was endowed not only with an excellent memory but also a very special talent for appreciating the authentic. Juan Ramón as a critic is quick to praise (San Juan, Bécquer, Dario, Unamuno and Machado and at the same time strong in his censure of certain contemporaries. Several recently collected volumes of miscellaneous critical materials have resolved the bibliographical muddle for the initial study of this fundamental aspect of the poet, but still particularly important are the expressionistic portraits of Españoles de tres mundos , longer tributes to Valle, Ortega and Villaespesa as well as the extensive lectures delivered in his latter years. Examination of these pages gives us an historical and creative overview of the period in which he lived and worked in addition to original considerations about the evolution of Hispanic poetry. Of course, one of the constant focal points of his literary criticism was the modernist epoch of his early days, a movement or attitude which he considered to be a modern twentieth century renaissance. Together with detailed study of these two areas of historical and aesthetic nature, in the ensuing pages some conclusions are pointed out as to the essence of poetry

  5. Spiess Ridge: An axial high on the slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Neil C.; Livermore, Roy A.

    1998-07-01

    We report recent mapping of Spiess Ridge with the Hawaii-MR1 sidescan sonar. Spiess Ridge is an unusual elongate 90 by 50 km volcanic feature on the slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge near the Bouvet hotspot. The northwest half of the ridge has a narrow ˜7-km neovolcanic zone in MR1 sonar images and a simple magnetic anomaly sequence including possible anomalies C1n and C2n. In contrast, the southeast half shows extrusive volcanism over >40 km with distributed eruption sites, a broadened central magnetic anomaly with no anomaly C2n, and a volcanic ridge radiating from the summit of Spiess Ridge, oblique to the spreading orthogonal trend. The images show no evidence for large-offset normal faults or an axial rift valley typical of slow spreading ridges. Overall, Spiess Ridge has an appearance very unlike that of either fast or slow spreading ridges and more transitional between a spreading ridge and a seamount. We compare the morphology of Spiess Ridge to other large volcanic structures in oceanic rifts. Spiess Ridge and Bouvet Island represent localized zones of excess melting along the Southwest Indian Ridge and we discuss their origin in the light of current ideas on ridge-hotspot interaction.

  6. The Representational Impasse of Post-Apocalyptic Fiction: The Pesthouse by Jim Crace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diletta De Cristofaro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Jim Crace’s The Pesthouse (2007 provides the ideal springboard for a discussion about the apocalypse and representation because the event remains unspecified, a gap in the story, suggesting the presence of epistemological limits. The present article contends that this narrative choice depends on a representational impasse which makes the depiction of the apocalypse and its aftermath impossible and which post-apocalyptic fiction has to address, in order to grant its own existence. The apocalypse is to be considered the ultimate iconoclastic concept, utterly beyond our abilities as image-makers and story-tellers, because it has either to do with the notion of an absolute end or with that of the radical alterity of a new beginning. A theoretical discussion of the impasse, divided, for the purposes of a more detailed analysis, into two dilemmas, is followed by an outline of how The Pesthouse engages with this unrepresentability. On the one hand, the British author deploys what might be defined as the logic of the absent referent, in order to allude to the unrepresentable apocalypse. This remains, in fact, inaccessible to language, and thus absent in the narrative, while several elements point to its absence. On the other hand, Crace uses a typical topos of post-apocalyptic fiction, temporal inversion, namely representing the future as a return to the past, to allude to the radical alterity of the aftermath.

  7. Love stories can be unpredictable: Jules et Jim in the vortex of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercole, Fabio; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Love stories are dynamic processes that begin, develop, and often stay for a relatively long time in a stationary or fluctuating regime, before possibly fading. Although they are, undoubtedly, the most important dynamic process in our life, they have only recently been cast in the formal frame of dynamical systems theory. In particular, why it is so difficult to predict the evolution of sentimental relationships continues to be largely unexplained. A common reason for this is that love stories reflect the turbulence of the surrounding social environment. But we can also imagine that the interplay of the characters involved contributes to make the story unpredictable-that is, chaotic. In other words, we conjecture that sentimental chaos can have a relevant endogenous origin. To support this intriguing conjecture, we mimic a real and well-documented love story with a mathematical model in which the environment is kept constant, and show that the model is chaotic. The case we analyze is the triangle described in Jules et Jim, an autobiographic novel by Henri-Pierre Roché that became famous worldwide after the success of the homonymous film directed by François Truffaut.

  8. Love stories can be unpredictable: Jules et Jim in the vortex of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercole, Fabio; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Love stories are dynamic processes that begin, develop, and often stay for a relatively long time in a stationary or fluctuating regime, before possibly fading. Although they are, undoubtedly, the most important dynamic process in our life, they have only recently been cast in the formal frame of dynamical systems theory. In particular, why it is so difficult to predict the evolution of sentimental relationships continues to be largely unexplained. A common reason for this is that love stories reflect the turbulence of the surrounding social environment. But we can also imagine that the interplay of the characters involved contributes to make the story unpredictable—that is, chaotic. In other words, we conjecture that sentimental chaos can have a relevant endogenous origin. To support this intriguing conjecture, we mimic a real and well-documented love story with a mathematical model in which the environment is kept constant, and show that the model is chaotic. The case we analyze is the triangle described in Jules et Jim, an autobiographic novel by Henri-Pierre Roché that became famous worldwide after the success of the homonymous film directed by François Truffaut.

  9. Obituario. Académico Honorario Alejandro Jiménez Arango (1923-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraim Otero Ruiz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nacido en Bogotá en el hogar del Dr. Miguel Jiménez López (1875-1955, quien fuera no sólo uno de los más importantes Académicos del siglo XX sino senador y ministro de varias carteras, fundador de la cátedra de psiquiatría en la Universidad Nacional e iniciador de la medicina forense científica en el país. Estudió Medicina en la Universidad Nacional. Al iniciar sus estudios universitarios fue Monitor de Física Médica y de Fisiología; y en esta última cátedra (regentada por el Profesor Alfonso Esguerra Gómez obtuvo la Medalla de Fisiología en 1941. Se graduó de médico en 1946, con una tesis con Mención Honorífica (El sistema nervioso autónomo en patología mental y en la terapia de choque

  10. Magnetospheric Plasma Physics : the Impact of Jim Dungey’s Research

    CERN Document Server

    Southwood, David; Mitton, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book makes good background reading for much of modern magnetospheric physics. Its origin was a Festspiel for Professor Jim Dungey, former professor in the Physics Department at Imperial College on the occasion of his 90th birthday, 30 January 2013. Remarkably, although he retired 30 years ago, his pioneering and, often, maverick work in the 50’s through to the 70’s on solar terrestrial physics is probably more widely appreciated today than when he retired. Dungey was a theoretical plasma physicist. The book covers how his reconnection model of the magnetosphere evolved to become the standard model of solar-terrestrial coupling. Dungey’s open magnetosphere model now underpins a holistic picture explaining not only the magnetic and plasma structure of the magnetosphere, but also its dynamics which can be monitored in real time. The book also shows how modern day simulation of solar terrestrial coupling can reproduce the real time evolution of the solar terrestrial system in ways undreamt of in 1961 w...

  11. En memoria de Michael Jiménez (1948-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Archila Neira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available El 1 de septiembre de 2001 murió el historiador Michael Jiménez. Su apellido provenía de España de donde emigró su abuelo en busca de mejor suerte al otro lado del Atlántico. Nacido en el pequeño pueblo de Merced, California (Estados Unidos en agosto de 1948 en el seno de una familia obrera, Michael vivió su infancia en Colombia. A fines de ese año, su padre se desplazó a estas tierras para ser funcionario de la Texas, una multinacional petrolera que tenía sus reales en Puerto Boyacá. Michael estudió en el colegio Nueva Granada -becado por la Texas- hasta los catorce años. En dicho colegio fue compañero de pupitre de Herbert Braun, descendiente a su vez de una familia de emigrantes a Colombia, y con quien la vida lo juntaría de nuevo en las tierras del norte y en oficios similares.

  12. The Irish Phone Home: Reflections of Ireland in Jim Sheridan’s In America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Murphy

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses Jim Sheridan’s film In America (2002, arguing that the American location reflects back imaginary images of Ireland to its Irish audience, in a manner similar to the mechanism described in Lacan’s discussion of his experiment of the inverted bouquet, which he uses to illustrate the three registers of the human psyche. It explores imaginary, symbolic and real dimensions of identity as they are articulated in the film, showing that, as in Lacan’s experiment, the symbolic dimension, which equates with the position of the human subject as social being, is the most powerful structuring force.  In Sheridan’s film, this dimension is embodied in Steven Spielberg’s film ET, a fictional narrative that allows Johnny, the father of the family, to articulate his grief and begin a new life.  Further, Sheridan’s film suggests that America is the imaginary locus of contemporary Irish identity, and that it can be understood as analogous to the spherical mirror of Lacan’s experiment.

  13. Variational Ridging in Sea Ice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, A.; Hunke, E. C.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Maslowski, W.; Kamal, S.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of a new development to make basin-scale sea ice models aware of the shape, porosity and extent of individual ridges within the pack. We have derived an analytic solution for the Euler-Lagrange equation of individual ridges that accounts for non-conservative forces, and therefore the compressive strength of individual ridges. Because a region of the pack is simply a collection of paths of individual ridges, we are able to solve the Euler-Lagrange equation for a large-scale sea ice field also, and therefore the compressive strength of a region of the pack that explicitly accounts for the macro-porosity of ridged debris. We make a number of assumptions that have simplified the problem, such as treating sea ice as a granular material in ridges, and assuming that bending moments associated with ridging are perturbations around an isostatic state. Regardless of these simplifications, the ridge model is remarkably predictive of macro-porosity and ridge shape, and, because our equations are analytic, they do not require costly computations to solve the Euler-Lagrange equation of ridges on the large scale. The new ridge model is therefore applicable to large-scale sea ice models. We present results from this theoretical development, as well as plans to apply it to the Regional Arctic System Model and a community sea ice code. Most importantly, the new ridging model is particularly useful for pinpointing gaps in our observational record of sea ice ridges, and points to the need for improved measurements of the evolution of porosity of deformed ice in the Arctic and Antarctic. Such knowledge is not only useful for improving models, but also for improving estimates of sea ice volume derived from altimetric measurements of sea ice freeboard.

  14. Ricardo Jiménez Oreamuno y una olvidada tradición de reforma electoral en Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Molina Jiménez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the role played by the three times president of the republic, Ricardo Jiménez Oreamuno, in the reform of the Costa Rica’s electoral system. This process, fundamental in reinforcing the position of the electorate as opposed to the parties and the authorities of government, contributed to the democratization of Costa Rican politics between 1900 and 1940.//En este artículo, se analiza en papel jugado por el tres veces Presidente de la República, Ricardo Jiménez Oreamuno, en el impulso de la reforma del sistema electoral de Costa Rica. Este proceso, fundamental para reforzar la posición del electorado frente a los partidos y a las autoridades de gobierno, contribuyó a democratizar la política costarricense en las primeras cuatro décadas del siglo XX

  15. Relativity in Transylvania and Patusan: Finding the roots of Einstein's theories of relativity in "Dracula" and "Lord Jim"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, Brian Shane

    This thesis investigates the similarities in the study of time and space in literature and science during the modern period. Specifically, it focuses on the portrayal of time and space within Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) and Joseph Conrad's Lord Jim (1899-1900), and compares the ideas presented with those later scientifically formulated by Albert Einstein in his special and general theories of relativity (1905-1915). Although both novels precede Einstein's theories, they reveal advanced complex ideas of time and space very similar to those later argued by the iconic physicist. These ideas follow a linear progression including a sense of temporal dissonance, the search for a communal sense of the present, the awareness and expansion of the individual's sense of the present, and the effect of mass on surrounding space. This approach enhances readings of Dracula and Lord Jim, illuminating the fascination with highly refined notions of time and space within modern European culture.

  16. Libertad e inconformismo: sobre la concepción del relato de José Jiménez Lozano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno González, Santiago

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available José Jiménez Lozano is a unique writer in the Hispanic literary scene of these last decades. His work is vast and diverse, and this initial observation does not escape his narrative, which genre the write demonstrates more prolifically. Despite the apparent diversity, there is outstanding unity underlying Jiménez Lozano´s entire work. This unity lies not only on the constant return to the same matters, but also on the approaches or the reasons, from which his literary work begins. The writer reflects over his work and lets his ideas expand through the diverse manifestations of his ideas on prose. It is a talk about the rhetorical writing of this article, valuing the coherent existence between reflection and literary practice.José Jiménez Lozano es un escritor singular dentro del panorama literario hispánico de las últimas décadas. Su obra es vasta y diversa y a esta observación inicial no escapa su narrativa, género en el que el escritor se muestra más prolífico. A pesar de la diversidad aparente, existe una notable unidad subyacente a toda la obra de Jiménez Lozano. Esta unidad reposa no sólo sobre el regreso constante a unos mismos asuntos sino también sobre los planteamientos o fundamentos de los que parte su creación literaria. El escritor reflexiona sobre su labor y deja diseminado, a través de las diversas manifestaciones de su prosa de ideas, un discurso sobre la escritura que este artículo sintetiza, valorando, asimismo, la coherencia existente entre esta reflexión y la praxis literaria.

  17. Pendeteksian Outlier dengan Metode Regresi Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Harini

    2009-01-01

    Dalam analisis regresi linier berganda adanya satu atau lebih pengamatan pencilan (outlier) akan menimbulkan dilema bagi para peneliti. Keputusan untuk menghilangkan pencilan tersebut harus dilandasi alasan yang kuat, karena kadang-kadang pencilan dapat memberikan informasi penting yang diperlukan. Masalah outlier ini dapat diatasi dengan berbagai metode, diantaranya metode regresi ridge (ridge regression). Untuk mengetahui kekekaran regresi ridge perlu melihat nilai-nilai R2, PRESS, serta le...

  18. Inverse regression for ridge recovery I: Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Glaws, Andrew T.; Constantine, Paul G.; Cook, R. Dennis

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the application of sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) to a deterministic function of several variables. In this context, SDR provides a framework for ridge recovery. A ridge function is a function of a few linear combinations of the variables---i.e., a composition of a nonlinear function with a low-dimensional linear transformation. We connect the key feature of SDR---the dimension reduction subspace---to ridge structure in functions, which provides a subspace-based perspecti...

  19. Mid-oceanic ridge system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , leading to the creation of new ocean floor. As two tectonic plates slowly separate, molten material rises up from within the mantle to fill the opening. Thus the rugged volcanic landscape of a mid-ocean ridge is created along the plate boundary... In order to understand how magnetic stripe anomalies support plate tectonics we need to understand (1) the basics of plate tectonic theory, especially the part about sea-floor spreading; (2) how the Earth’s magnetic field behaves, and (3) how magnetic...

  20. Ridge filter design for carbon radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gata-Danil, G.; Parajpan, M.; Timoshenko, G.

    2008-01-01

    The design of a ridge filter intended for forming the uniform spread-out Bragg peak within a tumor at carbon radiotherapy is described. The computation of the ridge filter shape was carried out by an analytical algorithm and tested by MC simulation (GEANT4 code). Two kinds of the ridge filter were considered: stationary and movable. The influence on a ridge filter shape of the carbon beam energy and type of relative biological effectiveness dependence on the carbon ion linear energy transfer in tissue were examined

  1. Pendeteksian Outlier dengan Metode Regresi Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Harini

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dalam analisis regresi linier berganda adanya satu atau lebih pengamatan pencilan (outlier akan menimbulkan dilema bagi para peneliti. Keputusan untuk menghilangkan pencilan tersebut harus dilandasi alasan yang kuat, karena kadang-kadang pencilan dapat memberikan informasi penting yang diperlukan. Masalah outlier ini dapat diatasi dengan berbagai metode, diantaranya metode regresi ridge (ridge regression. Untuk mengetahui kekekaran regresi ridge perlu melihat nilai-nilai R2, PRESS, serta leverage (hii, untuk metode regresi ridge dengan berbagai nilai tetapan bias k yang dipilih.

  2. Geo-Morphological Analyses of the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschel, B.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Eagles, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean and the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Southwest Indian Ocean between Africa and Antarctica are ultraslow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) mid ocean ridges. This type of mid ocean ridge has distinct geo-morphologies that are influenced by the slow rate of plate divergence and by mantle potential temperature, which control the processes (peridotite diapirism and intersticial melt migration) by which material rises to fill the space vacated by plate divergence. These ridges are characterised by non-orthogonal spreading. Transform faults, typical of faster spreading mid ocean ridges, are far less common at ultraslow spreading mid ocean ridges. Thus in return, detailed geo-statistical analyses of the geo-morphology of ultraslow-spreading mid ocean ridges can provide valuable information towards a better understanding of these slowest of spreading ridges. We have generated high resolution bathymetric grids for the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges based on high resolution multibeam echosounder data from various expeditions with RV Polarstern. On the basis of these grids, geo-statistical analyses allow for an assessment of the geo-morphological elements of the ridges on various scales. The results of these analyses show that, approximately 200 km long medium-scale sections of the ridges can be characterised by the lengths and orientations of the short-scale (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres) ridges and troughs. The geomorphologies of short-scale ridges and troughs situated at the junctions between medium scale sections often exhibit a mixture of the geomorphological elements seen in the neighbouring sections. These geo-morphological patterns provide insights into the overall spreading-geometry along the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  3. Ridge split and implant placement in deficient alveolar ridge: Case report and an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reenesh Mechery

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Hilt Tatum 1970s introduced a method of ridge splitting or bone spreading, which over a period have been used in implant dentistry for esthetic rehabilitation and implant site preparation in cases of deficient alveolar ridges to satisfy the basic ideal need of hard tissue augmentation for functional and esthetic outcome of implant. In this case report, we describe a case of horizontal ridge augmentation using ridge split and simultaneous implant placement in esthetic maxillary premolar zone.

  4. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs

  5. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs.

  6. Jim Crow and estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer: US-born black and white non-Hispanic women, 1992-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Jahn, Jaquelyn L; Waterman, Pamela D

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown whether Jim Crow-i.e., legal racial discrimination practiced by 21 US states and the District of Columbia and outlawed by the US Civil Rights Act in 1964-affects US cancer outcomes. We hypothesized that Jim Crow birthplace would be associated with higher risk of estrogen-receptor-negative (ER-) breast tumors among US black, but not white, women and also a higher black versus white risk for ER- tumors. We analyzed data from the SEER 13 registry group (excluding Alaska) for 47,157 US-born black non-Hispanic and 348,514 US-born white non-Hispanic women, aged 25-84 inclusive, diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 2012. Jim Crow birthplace was associated with increased odds of ER- breast cancer only among the black, not white women, with the effect strongest for women born before 1965. Among black women, the odds ratio (OR) for an ER- tumor, comparing women born in a Jim Crow versus not Jim Crow state, equaled 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06, 1.13), on par with the OR comparing women in the worst versus best census tract socioeconomic quintiles (1.15; 95% CI 1.07, 1.23). The black versus white OR for ER- was higher among women born in Jim Crow versus non-Jim Crow states (1.41 [95% CI 1.13, 1.46] vs. 1.27 [95% CI 1.24, 1.31]). The unique Jim Crow effect for US black women for breast cancer ER status underscores why analysis of racial/ethnic inequities must be historically contextualized.

  7. Characteristics and error estimation of stratospheric ozone and ozone-related species over Poker Flat (65° N, 147° W, Alaska observed by a ground-based FTIR spectrometer from 2001 to 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mizutani

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available It is important to obtain the year-to-year trend of stratospheric minor species in the context of global changes. An important example is the trend in global ozone depletion. The purpose of this paper is to report the accuracy and precision of measurements of stratospheric chemical species that are made at our Poker Flat site in Alaska (65° N, 147° W. Since 1999, minor atmospheric molecules have been observed using a Fourier-Transform solar-absorption infrared Spectrometer (FTS at Poker Flat. Vertical profiles of the abundances of ozone, HNO3, HCl, and HF for the period from 2001 to 2003 were retrieved from FTS spectra using Rodgers' formulation of the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM. The accuracy and precision of the retrievals were estimated by formal error analysis. Errors for the total column were estimated to be 5.3%, 3.4%, 5.9%, and 5.3% for ozone, HNO3, HCl, and HF, respectively. The ozone vertical profiles were in good agreement with profiles derived from collocated ozonesonde measurements that were smoothed with averaging kernel functions that had been obtained with the retrieval procedure used in the analysis of spectra from the ground-based FTS (gb-FTS. The O3, HCl, and HF columns that were retrieved from the FTS measurements were consistent with Earth Probe/Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS and HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE data over Alaska within the error limits of all the respective datasets. This is the first report from the Poker Flat FTS observation site on a number of stratospheric gas profiles including a comprehensive error analysis.

  8. The origin and destruction of beach ridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeglas, D.J.

    1955-01-01

    During the Fall of 1945 the author measured daily the micro-topography of a beach profile at Zandvoort, the Netherlands. The daily changes and the movements of the beach ridges have been determined. Several beach ridges came into being and were destroyed during storms. The structure of the deposits

  9. Tectonics and magmatism of ultraslow spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Kokhan, A. V.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The tectonics, structure-forming processes, and magmatism in rift zones of ultraslow spreading ridges are exemplified in the Reykjanes, Kolbeinsey, Mohns, Knipovich, Gakkel, and Southwest Indian ridges. The thermal state of the mantle, the thickness of the brittle lithospheric layer, and spreading obliquety are the most important factors that control the structural pattern of rift zones. For the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges, the following are crucial factors: variations in the crust thickness; relationships between the thicknesses of its brittle and ductile layers; width of the rift zone; increase in intensity of magma supply approaching the Iceland thermal anomaly; and spreading obliquety. For the Knipovich Ridge, these are its localization in the transitional zone between the Gakkel and Mohns ridges under conditions of shear and tensile stresses and multiple rearrangements of spreading; nonorthogonal spreading; and structural and compositional barrier of thick continental lithosphere at the Barents Sea shelf and Spitsbergen. The Mohns Ridge is characterized by oblique spreading under conditions of a thick cold lithosphere and narrow stable rift zone. The Gakkel and the Southwest Indian ridges are distinguished by the lowest spreading rate under the settings of the along-strike variations in heating of the mantle and of a variable spreading geometry. The intensity of endogenic structure-forming varies along the strike of the ridges. In addition to the prevalence of tectonic factors in the formation of the topography, magmatism and metamorphism locally play an important role.

  10. Petrology of tectonically segmented Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Distribution and mineralogy of various rock types along the 4200-km-long slow-spreading Central Indian Ridge, between Owen fracture zone in the north and Indian Ocean triple junction in the south, is studied in the light of ridge segmentation...

  11. Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density | Gungadin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted with an aim to establish a relationship between sex and fingerprint ridge density. The fingerprints were taken from 500 subjects (250 males and 250 females) in the age group of 18-60 years. After taking fingerprints, the ridges were counted in the upper portion of the radial border of each print for all ...

  12. An Interactive Approach to Ridge Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquette, J. F.; Dufala, M. M.

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is an approach to ameliorating the problem of large standard errors of regression estimates when predictor variables are highly intercorrelated. An interactive computer program is presented which allows for investigation of the effects of using various ridge regression adjustment values. (JKS)

  13. An Identity for Kernel Ridge Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhdanov, Fedor; Kalnishkan, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an identity connecting the square loss of ridge regression in on-line mode with the loss of the retrospectively best regressor. Some corollaries about the properties of the cumulative loss of on-line ridge regression are also obtained.

  14. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Deceit and facial expression in children: the enabling role of the poker face child and the dependent personality of the detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marien eGadea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the relation between the facial expression of a group of children when they told a lie and the accuracy in detecting the lie by a sample of adults. To evaluate the intensity and type of emotional content of the children’s faces, we applied an automated method capable of analysing the facial information from the video recordings (FaceReader 5.0 software. The program classified videos as showing a neutral facial expression or an emotional one. There was a significant higher mean of hits for the emotional than for the neutral videos, and a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the neutral expression and the number of hits from the judges. The lies expressed with emotional facial expression were more easily recognized by adults than the lies expressed with a poker face; thus, the less expressive was the child the harder was to guess. The accuracy of the lie detectors was then correlated with their subclinical traits of personality disorders, to find that participants scoring higher in the dependent personality were significantly better lie detectors. A non-significant tendency for women to discriminate better was also found, whereas men tending to be more suspicious than women when judging the children’s veracity. This study is the first to automatically decoding the facial information of the liar child and relating the results with personality characteristics of the lie detectors in the context of deceptive behavior research. Implications for forensic psychology were suggested: to explore whether the induction of an emotion in a child during an interview could be useful to evaluate the testimony during legal trials.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucke, P.C.

    1992-10-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1991 is the 21st in a series that began in 1971. The report documents the annual results of a comprehensive program to estimate the impact of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge operations upon human health and the environment. The report is organized into ten sections that address various aspects of effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, dose assessment, waste management, and quality assurance. A compliance summary gives a synopsis of the status of each facility relative to applicable state and federal regulations. Data are included for the following: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs are intended to serve as effective indicators of contaminant releases and ambient contaminant concentrations that have the potential to result in adverse impacts to human health and the environment

  17. Alveolar ridge preservation immediately after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Bouckaert, M; Lemmer, J

    2013-10-01

    Ridge preservation procedures immediately after tooth extraction, are commonly used with a view to minimising remodelling and shrinkage of the alveolar ridge, associated with socket healing. These procedures may sometimes be effective, but they cannot completely prevent reduction in dimension of the ridge. Certain biomater als used may actually hamper normal deposition of bone within the healing socket, reducing bone trabeculae that can integrate with the implant surface. However, in extraction sockets in alveolar ridges of low bone density, particles of implanted bone substitute incorporated in the healing bone, may enhance the mechanical support for the implant, provided by normal healed bone of low trabecular density alone. This paper reviews biological rationales and procedures for ridge preservation immediately after extraction and comments on their clinical use.

  18. The Knipovich Ridge segmentation and the comparison with other ultraslow spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, K.; Curewitz, D.; Asada, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2003-04-01

    The ultraslow-spreading Knipovich Ridge is an ~550 km long, transform-free ridge segment linking the Molloy transform fault and the Mohns Ridge in the Arctic Ocean. Discrete volcanic centers marked by large volcanic constructions and accompanying short wavelength mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) lows generally resemble those of the Gakkel Ridge and the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge. These magmatically robust segment centers are regularly spaced about 85-100 km apart along the ridge, and are characterized by accumulated hummocky terrain, high relief, off-axis seamount chains and significant MBA lows. We suggest that these eruptive centers correspond to areas of enhanced magma flux, and that their spacing reflects the geometry of underlying mantle upwelling cells. The large-scale thermal structure of the mantle primarily controls discrete and focused magmatism, and the relatively wide spacing of these segments may reflect cool mantle beneath the ridge. Segment centers along the southern Knipovich Ridge are characterized by lower relief and smaller MBA anomalies than along the northern section of the ridge. This suggests that ridge obliquity is a secondary control on ridge construction on the Knipovich Ridge, as the obliquity changes from 35 to 49 deg. from north to south, respectively, while spreading rate and axial depth remain approximately constant. A comparison of along-axis depths, MBA anomalies and other fundamental parameters of ultraslow spreading ridges based on previous studies shows that the scale of volcanic edifices tends to decrease as obliquity increases. High relief and large MBA characterize the non-oblique segment of the SWIR, while low relief and small MBA characterize the southern Knipovich Ridge (obliquity 49deg.) and the oblique segment of the SWIR (obliquity 45deg.). The increased obliquity may contribute to decreased effective spreading rates, lower upwelling magma velocity and melt formation, and limited horizontal dike propagation near the

  19. Magnetic Anomaly Amplitudes on the Gakkel Ridge: Indicators of Ridge Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, V. A.; Lawver, L. A.; Brozena, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    For most of its length, the Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean's Eurasia Basin is characterized by a discontinuous magnetic signature with regions of missing or low-amplitude central anomalies punctuated by short, high-amplitude segments. The ridge segment in between the Morris Jesup Rise and the Yermak Plateau has an unusually large amplitude central magnetic anomaly that is more than four times the amplitude of the flanking anomalies. This ridge segment is straight, without large offsets, for about 150 km. The difference in character between the central anomaly in this segment and the rest of Gakkel Ridge is striking. The western half of the Gakkel Ridge and the Eurasia Basin were surveyed in 1998-99 by a Naval Research Laboratory aerogeophysical campaign that measured magnetics, gravity, and sea-surface topography. The new magnetic data densify the historical US Navy aeromagnetic data and improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly field in this region. This new field highlights the variability of the Gakkel Ridge over time, showing regions of strong anomalies that are continuous along strike and anomalies that fade away or become discontinuous. In particular, anomalies 15y to 21o show regions of high amplitudes on both sides of the ridge for varying distances along strike. We suggest that these high-amplitude segments were formed at times when the Gakkel Ridge at this location had a high-amplitude central magnetic anomaly like the present day high-amplitude segment or the shorter ones distributed along the ridge. The higher central anomaly amplitudes may be associated with variations in geochemistry and/or melt delivery along the ridge. Recent dredging of zero-aged crust along the Gakkel Ridge showed a good but not perfect correlation of high-amplitude central anomalies and basalt recovery (P. Michael, personal communication). This magnetic data set in conjunction with future dredging provides an opportunity to constrain past ridge variability.

  20. Optimization of ridge parameters in multivariate generalized ridge regression by plug-in methods

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Isamu; Yanagihara, Hirokazu; Satoh, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Generalized ridge (GR) regression for an univariate linear model was proposed simultaneously with ridge regression by Hoerl and Kennard (1970). In this paper, we deal with a GR regression for a multivariate linear model, referred to as a multivariate GR (MGR) regression. From the viewpoint of reducing the mean squared error (MSE) of a predicted value, many authors have proposed several GR estimators consisting of ridge parameters optimized by non-iterative methods. By expanding...

  1. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were...

  2. The beach ridges of India: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Wagle, B.G.

    are distinguished into 4 genetic classes. Finally the utilization of beach ridges in the reconstruction of sea level curve, palaeo-climate and sediment budget histories has been highlighted and scope for future study is discussed...

  3. KINERJA JACKKNIFE RIDGE REGRESSION DALAM MENGATASI MULTIKOLINEARITAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANY DEVITA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordinary least square is a parameter estimations for minimizing residual sum of squares. If the multicollinearity was found in the data, unbias estimator with minimum variance could not be reached. Multicollinearity is a linear correlation between independent variabels in model. Jackknife Ridge Regression(JRR as an extension of Generalized Ridge Regression (GRR for solving multicollinearity.  Generalized Ridge Regression is used to overcome the bias of estimators caused of presents multicollinearity by adding different bias parameter for each independent variabel in least square equation after transforming the data into an orthoghonal form. Beside that, JRR can  reduce the bias of the ridge estimator. The result showed that JRR model out performs GRR model.

  4. Inverse regression for ridge recovery II: Numerics

    OpenAIRE

    Glaws, Andrew; Constantine, Paul G.; Cook, R. Dennis

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the application of sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) to a noiseless data set derived from a deterministic function of several variables. In this context, SDR provides a framework for ridge recovery. In this second part, we explore the numerical subtleties associated with using two inverse regression methods---sliced inverse regression (SIR) and sliced average variance estimation (SAVE)---for ridge recovery. This includes a detailed numerical analysis of the eigenvalues of th...

  5. New data of the Gakkel Ridge seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonovskaya, Galina; Basakina, Irina; Kremenetskaya, Elena

    2016-04-01

    250 earthquakes were recorded in the Gakkel Ridge during the period 2012-2014 by Arkhangelsk seismic network. The magnitude Ml of these earthquakes is 1.5 - 5.7, 70% of them have Ml up to 3.0. Seismic events are arranged along to a narrow center line of the Mid-Arctic Ridge, most of the earthquakes are confined to the southern board of the Ridge. Presumably it's connected with the reflection of spreading processes. The high seismic activity zones, which we associate with the volcano-tectonic processes, have been identified. Have been recorded 13 events per day in the Western Volcanic Zone. The largest number of events (75%) is confined to the Sparsely Magmatic Zone. About 30% of all recorded earthquakes with magnitudes above 2.9 have a T-phase. We divided the Gakkel Ridge's earthquakes into two groups by using spectral-time analysis. The first group: maximum energy of the earthquake is observed from 1.5 to 10 Hz, values of magnitudes Ml 2.50-5.29. Earthquakes are distributed along the Gakkel Ridge. The second group: maximum energy of the earthquake is observed from 1.5 to 20 Hz, clearly expressed a high-frequency component, values of magnitudes Ml 2.3-3.4. Earthquakes 2 groups focused only in the Sparsely Magmatic Zone. The new seismic data shows an unique information about geodynamic processes of the Gakkel Ridge.

  6. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R.

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a ''stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1

  7. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  8. Nanolithography using nanoscale ridge apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang

    There is a continuous effort to develop techniques for nanoscale feature definition below the diffraction limit. Nanolithography has been a key technique because of its precision and cost effective. A sub-wavelength hole in an opaque screen can be used to provide a small light source with the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit in the near field. However, a nanometer-sized hole in circular or square shapes is plagued by low transmission and poor contrast. This drawback limits the nanoscale apertures from being employed in nanolithography applications. Ridge apertures in C, H and bowtie shapes, on the other hand, have been numerically and experimentally demonstrated to show the ability of achieving both enhanced light transmission and sub-wavelength optical resolution down to nanometer domain benefiting from the existence of waveguide propagation mode confined in the gap between the ridges. In this report, the detailed field distributions in contact nanolithography are analyzed using finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. It was found that the high imaging contrast, which is necessary for successful lithography, is achieved close to the mask exit plane and decays quickly with the increase of the distance from the mask exit plane. Simulations are also performed for comparable regular shaped apertures and different shape bowtie apertures. Design rules are proposed to optimize the bowtie aperture for producing a sub-wavelength, high transmission field with high imaging contrast. High resolution contact nanolithography was carried on a home constructed lithography setup. It has been experimentally demonstrated that nanoscale bowtie and C apertures can be used for contact lithography to achieve nanometer scale resolution due to its intrinsic advantages of achieving enhanced optical transmission and concentrating light far beyond the diffraction limit. It also has shown the advantages of bowtie and C apertures over conventional apertures in both

  9. Preliminary results from the first InRidge cruise to the central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.; Ganesan, P.; Rao, A.K.; Suribabu, A.; Ganesh, C.; Naik, G.P.

    stream_size 1 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Inter_Ridge_News_7_40.pdf.txt stream_source_info Inter_Ridge_News_7_40.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  10. Ridge regression in prediction problems: automatic choice of the ridge parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cule, Erika; De Iorio, Maria

    2013-11-01

    To date, numerous genetic variants have been identified as associated with diverse phenotypic traits. However, identified associations generally explain only a small proportion of trait heritability and the predictive power of models incorporating only known-associated variants has been small. Multiple regression is a popular framework in which to consider the joint effect of many genetic variants simultaneously. Ordinary multiple regression is seldom appropriate in the context of genetic data, due to the high dimensionality of the data and the correlation structure among the predictors. There has been a resurgence of interest in the use of penalised regression techniques to circumvent these difficulties. In this paper, we focus on ridge regression, a penalised regression approach that has been shown to offer good performance in multivariate prediction problems. One challenge in the application of ridge regression is the choice of the ridge parameter that controls the amount of shrinkage of the regression coefficients. We present a method to determine the ridge parameter based on the data, with the aim of good performance in high-dimensional prediction problems. We establish a theoretical justification for our approach, and demonstrate its performance on simulated genetic data and on a real data example. Fitting a ridge regression model to hundreds of thousands to millions of genetic variants simultaneously presents computational challenges. We have developed an R package, ridge, which addresses these issues. Ridge implements the automatic choice of ridge parameter presented in this paper, and is freely available from CRAN. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. Ridge trace as a boost to ridge regression estimate in the presence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multicollinearity often causes a huge interpretative problem in linear regression analysis. The ridge estimator is not generally accepted as a vital alternative to the ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator because it depends on unknown parameters. In any specific application of ridges regression, there is no guarantee that ...

  12. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI.

  13. Arctic Ocean: hydrothermal activity on Gakkel Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise

    2004-03-04

    In the hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, sea water penetrates the fractured crust, becomes heated by its proximity to the hot magma, and returns to the sea floor as hot fluids enriched in various chemical elements. In contradiction to earlier results that predict diminishing hydrothermal activity with decreasing spreading rate, a survey of the ultra-slowly spreading Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) by Edmonds et al. and Michael et al. suggests that, instead of being rare, the hydrothermal activity is abundant--exceeding by at least a factor of two to three what would be expected by extrapolation from observation on faster spreading ridges. Here we use helium-3 (3He), a hydrothermal tracer, to show that this abundance of venting sites does not translate, as would be expected, into an anomalous hydrothermal 3He output from the ridge. Because of the wide implications of the submarine hydrothermal processes for mantle heat and mass fluxes to the ocean, these conflicting results call for clarification of the link between hydrothermal activity and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges.

  14. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI

  15. Petrology of Gakkel Ridge Basalts: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Lehnert, K.; Goldstein, S. L.; Michael, P.; Graham, D.; Schramm, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge offers the opportunity for a direct experiment in mantle melting and ridge dynamics. It is the slowest spreading ridge on the Earth, with a progressive change in spreading rate from 15mm/yr at the western end to 7mm/yr at the eastern end. No transform faults disrupt the melting regime, and spreading rate alone would appear to be the primary variable. During the AMORE2001 expedition of USCGC Healy and RV Polarstern, more than one hundred sampling stations were successfully completed mid-way through the cruise, with precise locations on new multibeam bathymetric charts (Kurras et al, Gauger et al, this meeting). More than 100 samples were analyzed on board for major elements, Sr and Ba by direct current plasma spectrometry. Because the cruise track encompasses a double-pass along most of the ridge, the on board data permitted testing of hypotheses formulated on the first pass by further sampling on the second pass. Models for the effect of decreasing spreading rate on melt composition predict progressively smaller extents of melting at greater depths eastward along the ridge. Instead, the ridge contains three distinct tectono-magmatic regimes. In the west, well-defined linear volcanic ridges occupy the center of the rift valley. The basalts exhibit a ''slow spreading local trend'' of negative correlation between Fe8 and Si8 and positive correlation between Na8 and Fe8. There is a well-defined geochemical gradient from more enriched incompatible trace element compositions in the west to depleted compositions in the east. At the eastern terminus of this region there are small volcanic cones with chemical compositions rare or unique among MORB. Samples with high MgO contain high TiO2 and Sr (3% and 200 ppm), and low SiO2 and Ba (46-47% and 20 ppm ). The low SiO2 and exceptionally high FeO (12%) suggest high pressures of melting. The high Sr and TiO2 but very low Ba of these samples suggest they were derived by very low extents of melting of a depleted

  16. Ridge regression for longitudinal biomarker data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliot, Melissa; Ferguson, Jane; Reilly, Muredach P; Foulkes, Andrea S

    2011-01-01

    Technological advances facilitating the acquisition of large arrays of biomarker data have led to new opportunities to understand and characterize disease progression over time. This creates an analytical challenge, however, due to the large numbers of potentially informative markers, the high degrees of correlation among them, and the time-dependent trajectories of association. We propose a mixed ridge estimator, which integrates ridge regression into the mixed effects modeling framework in order to account for both the correlation induced by repeatedly measuring an outcome on each individual over time, as well as the potentially high degree of correlation among possible predictor variables. An expectation-maximization algorithm is described to account for unknown variance and covariance parameters. Model performance is demonstrated through a simulation study and an application of the mixed ridge approach to data arising from a study of cardiometabolic biomarker responses to evoked inflammation induced by experimental low-dose endotoxemia.

  17. Ridge Splitting Technique for Horizontal Augmentation and Immediate Implant Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papathanasiou Ioannis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient width of the alveolar ridge often prevents ideal implant placement. Guided bone regeneration, bone grafting, alveolar ridge splitting and combinations of these techniques are used for the lateral augmentation of the alveolar ridge. Ridge splitting is a minimally invasive technique indicated for alveolar ridges with adequate height, which enables immediate implant placement and eliminates morbidity and overall treatment time. The classical approach of the technique involves splitting the alveolar ridge into 2 parts with use of ostetomes and chisels. Modifications of this technique include the use of rotating instrument, screw spreaders, horizontal spreaders and ultrasonic device.

  18. ORLANDO - Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Fazely, A.; Gabriel, T.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Plasil, F.; Svoboda, R.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a proposal for construction of an Oak Ridge LArge Neutrino DetectOr (ORLANDO) to search for neutrino oscillations at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A 4 MW SNS is proposed to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the first stage to be operative around 2006. It will have two target stations, which makes it possible with a single detector to perform a neutrino oscillation search at two different distances. Initial plans for the placement of the detector and the discovery potential of such a detector are discussed

  19. Alveolar Ridge Carcinoma. Two Cases Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupo Triguero, Raul J; Vivar Bauza, Miriam; Alvarez Infante, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Two cases with alveolar ridge carcinoma due to prosthetist traumatism are discussed in this paper, after 9 and 10 years of using dental prosthesis. Both patients began with disturbance in the alveolar ridge. The clinical examination and biopsy showed a well differenced carcinoma. The treatment was radical surgery and radiotherapy in the first patient, and conservative surgery with radiotherapy in the second case .The patients had xerostomia after radiotherapy and the woman had difficulties with mastication. The advantages and disadvantages of the treatment were discussed, focused on the prevention and treatment for oral

  20. Jim Ashilevi kirjutas näidendi inimese jõust ja jõuetusest paratamatuse ees : auhind / Krista Männa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Männa, Krista

    2005-01-01

    Kõrvuti Jaan Unduski ja Tõnu Kaalepiga võitis Tallinna Ülikooli filmi ja video eriala 3. kursuse tudeng Jim Ashilevi näidendiga "Nagu poisid vihma käes" Eesti Näitemänguagentuuri näidendivõistluse olulisima auhinna

  1. Normalization Ridge Regression in Practice I: Comparisons Between Ordinary Least Squares, Ridge Regression and Normalization Ridge Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcock, J. W.

    The problem of model estimation when the data are collinear was examined. Though the ridge regression (RR) outperforms ordinary least squares (OLS) regression in the presence of acute multicollinearity, it is not a problem free technique for reducing the variance of the estimates. It is a stochastic procedure when it should be nonstochastic and it…

  2. Ridge regression estimator: combining unbiased and ordinary ridge regression methods of estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Damodar Gore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Statistical literature has several methods for coping with multicollinearity. This paper introduces a new shrinkage estimator, called modified unbiased ridge (MUR. This estimator is obtained from unbiased ridge regression (URR in the same way that ordinary ridge regression (ORR is obtained from ordinary least squares (OLS. Properties of MUR are derived. Results on its matrix mean squared error (MMSE are obtained. MUR is compared with ORR and URR in terms of MMSE. These results are illustrated with an example based on data generated by Hoerl and Kennard (1975.

  3. Wrinkle Ridges and Young Fresh Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 May 2002) The Science Wrinkle ridges are a very common landform on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. These ridges are linear to arcuate asymmetric topographic highs commonly found on smooth plains. The origin of wrinkle ridges is not certain and two leading hypotheses have been put forth by scientists over the past 40 years. The volcanic model calls for the extrusion of high viscosity lavas along linear conduits. This thick lava accumulated over these conduits and formed the ridges. The other model is tectonic and advocates that the ridges are formed by compressional faulting and folding. Today's THEMIS image is of the ridged plains of Lunae Planum located between Kasei Valles and Valles Marineris in the northern hemisphere of the planet. Wrinkle ridges are found mostly along the eastern side of the image. The broadest wrinkle ridges in this image are up to 2 km wide. A 3 km diameter young fresh crater is located near the bottom of the image. The crater's ejecta blanket is also clearly seen surrounding the sharp well-defined crater rim. These features are indicative of a very young crater that has not been subjected to erosional processes. The Story The great thing about the solar system is that planets are both alike and different. They're all foreign enough to be mysterious and intriguing, and yet familiar enough to be seen as planetary 'cousins.' By comparing them, we can learn a lot about how planets form and then evolve geologically over time. Crinkled over smooth plains, the long, wavy raised landforms seen here are called 'wrinkle ridges,' and they've been found on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon - that is, on rocky bodies that are a part of our inner solar system. We know from this observation that planets (and large-enough moons) follow similar processes. What we don't know for sure is HOW these processes work. Scientists have been trying to understand how wrinkle ridges form for 40 years, and they still haven't reached a conclusion. That

  4. Ridge Regression: A Regression Procedure for Analyzing correlated Independent Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Ernest A.

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is a technique used to ameliorate the problem of highly correlated independent variables in multiple regression analysis. This paper explains the fundamentals of ridge regression and illustrates its use. (JKS)

  5. Internal doses in Oak Ridge. The Internet beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passchier, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the information, presented by the Radiation Internal Dose Information Center (RIDIC) of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities in Oak Ridge, TN, USA, via Internet (www.orau.gov/ehsd/ridic.htm)

  6. Autocorrelated logistic ridge regression for prediction based on proteomics spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeman, Jelle J

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents autocorrelated logistic ridge regression, an extension of logistic ridge regression for ordered covariates that is based on the assumption that adjacent covariates have similar regression coefficients. The method is applied to the analysis of proteomics mass spectra.

  7. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located {approximately}800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1.

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year

  10. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located ∼800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1

  11. Petrography of basalts from the Carlsberg ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Petrographic characteristics of basalts collected from a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge (lat. 3 degrees 35'N to 3 degrees 41'N; long. 64 degrees 05'E to 64 degrees 09'E) show typical pillow lava zonations with variable concentrations of plagioclase...

  12. Anelastic Semigeostrophic Flow Over a Mountain Ridge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bannon, Peter R; Chu, Pe-Cheng

    1987-01-01

    ...) characterize the disturbance generated by the steady flow of a uniform wind (U0, V0) incident on a mountain ridge of width alpha in an isothermal, uniformly rotating, uniformly stratified, vertically semi-infinite atmosphere. Here mu = h(0)/H(R...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A RIDGE PROFILE WEEDER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1980-03-01

    driven rotating horizontal short shaft which is connected by universal joints to two gangs of rotary hoe weeders. With the short shaft nearly at the bottom of a furrow between two ridges, the gangs of weeders lie on the sides of ...

  14. Elastic Modes of an Anisotropic Ridge Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameya Galinde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A semi-analytical method for finding the elastic modes propagating along the edge of an anisotropic semi-infinite plate is presented. Solutions are constructed as linear combinations of a finite number of the corresponding infinite plate modes with the constraint that they decay in the direction perpendicular to the edge and collectively satisfy the free boundary condition over the edge surface. Such modes that are confined to the edge can be used to approximate solutions of acoustic ridge waveguides whose supporting structures are sufficiently far away from the free edge. The semi-infinite plate or ridge is allowed to be oriented arbitrarily in the anisotropic crystal. Modifications to the theory to find symmetric and antisymmetric solutions for special crystal orientations are also presented. Accuracy of the solutions can be improved by including more plate modes in the series. Numerical techniques to find modal dispersion relations and orientation dependent modal behavior, are discussed. Results for ridges etched in single crystal Silicon are found to be in good agreement with Finite Element simulations. It is found that variations in modal phase velocity with respect to crystal orientation are not significant, suggesting that anisotropy may not be a critical issue while designing ridge waveguides in Silicon.

  15. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were perf...

  16. Predictive efficiency of ridge regression estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have considered the problem of prediction within and outside the sample for actual and average values of the study variables in case of ordinary least squares and ridge regression estimators. Finally, the performance properties of the estimators are analyzed.

  17. Modelling Issues in Kernel Ridge Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Exterkate (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractKernel ridge regression is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts. This paper investigates the influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy. We review several popular

  18. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  19. A preliminary study of tidal current ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenxia; Xia, Dongxing

    1985-06-01

    Tidal current ridges, widely distributed geomorphological phenomena over the continental shelf of the world, are studied. They are formed by tidal current and the trend of their sand bodies runs parallel to the direction of tidal current. There are two types of the plane shapes: the parallel and the fingered. Conditions of forming tidal current ridges are the velocities of tidal current ranging from 1 to 3.5 knots and the supply of abundant sediments. Tidal current ridges often develop in following morphological locations: the bays, estuaries, the mouths of channels, as well as the offshore area with strong tidal current. Tidal current ridges occur generally at a water depth of less than 35 metres. The sediments of tidal current ridges are mainly composed of sand. The grain size of the sediments is uniform and well sorted. The characteristics of grain size of the sand imply that their formation mechanism is similar to that of river sand, that is, both of them are the result of flow movements in a trongth channel controlled by boundary. There is however difference between them that the river sand is formed by one-way flow movement while the tidal current sand by two-way movement. There are two saltation populations in the log-probability curves of tidal current sand, the sorting of first saltation population is better than the second one, and having positive skewness, which differs from beach sand. In the C-M grain size pattern tidal current sand is most found in graded suspension segment. The continental shelves of the Yellow Sea, the East China Sea and the South China Sea have favourable conditions for developing tidal current ridges in massive scale and special shape, such as the tidal current ridges in the offshore of Jiangsu, the Gulf of Korea, the shoal of Liaodong, the east and west mouths of the channel of Qiongzhou, Jiaozhou Bay, the shoal of Taiwan, Lingdingyang, the north branch of Changjiang estuary. The studies of them are of vital significance in

  20. Geophysical studies of aseismic ridges in northern Indian Ocean-crustal structure and isostatic models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.

    The present work consists of a detailed geophysical study of the structure and isostatic compensation mechanisms of three major aseismic ridges; The Comorin Ridge, The 85°E Ridge and Ninety east Ridge of the northeastern Indian Ocean. Various...

  1. Design assessment for the Bethel Valley FFA Upgrades at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the proposed upgrades to Building 3025 and the Evaporator Area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Design assessments, specifications and drawings are provided. Building 3025 is a general purpose research facility utilized by the Materials and Ceramics Division to conduct research on irradiated materials. The Evaporator Area, building 2531, serves as the collection point for all low-level liquid wastes generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  2. Photoclinometric analysis of wrinkle ridges on Lunae Planum, Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plescia, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Wrinkle ridges are common morphologic features on Mars. Both volcanic and tectonic mechanisms were suggested to explain their origin; recent work has focused on a compressional origin. Analysis of terrestrial analogs has greatly influenced and aided the understanding of wrinkle ridge formation. An important aspect necessary to intrepret structure is topography. Topographic profiles across ridges can provide important constraints for models of internal structure and analyzing deformation associated with ridges. Topographic maps of Mars are too coarse to resolve the topography of individual ridges; therefore, monoscopic photoclinometry was used to derive topographic profiles for the ridges. Profiles spaced a few kilometers apart were obtained for each ridge, the number depended on ridge length, morphology, and albedo variation. Photoclinometry relies on pixel brightness variations which results from topography, albedo, or both. Because of the albedo variations, photoclimometric profiles can not be extended across large distances, such as between adjacent ridges (about 20 to 80 km). However, the technique is applicable to shorter distances, such as the distance across typical ridges. Profiles were measured across the ridge and extended a few kilometers on either side, including all visible components of the ridge. The results of these measurements and the use of internal structure and topographic profile models for estimating the shortening due to folding and faulting are discussed

  3. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Carola F.; Morse, Kenneth R.; Lesniak, Bryson P.; Kropf, Eric J.; Tranovich, Michael J.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency.

  4. Radiogenic isotopes in enriched mid-ocean ridge basalts from Explorer Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousens, Brian; Weis, Dominique; Constantin, Marc; Scott, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Extreme gradients in topography related to variations in magma supply are observed on the Southern Explorer Ridge (SER), part of the northern Juan de Fuca ridge system. We report radiogenic isotope (Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf) and geochemical data for twenty-four basalt whole-rock and glass samples collected from the length of the SER and from Explorer Deep, a rift to the north of the SER. Lavas from the SER form a north-south geochemical gradient, dominated by E-MORB at the northern axial high, and range from T-MORB to N-MORB towards the southern deepest part of the ridge. Linear relationships between incompatible element ratios and isotopic ratios in MORB along the ridge are consistent with mixing of magmas beneath the ridge to generate the geographic gradient from E- to N-MORB. The E-MORB have high Sr and Pb, and low Nd and Hf isotopic ratios, typical of enriched mantle that includes a FOZO or HIMU isotopic component. The West Valley and Endeavour segments of the northern Juan de Fuca ridge also include this isotopic component, but the proportion of the FOZO or HIMU component is more extreme in the SER basalts. The FOZO or HIMU component may be garnet-bearing peridotite, or a garnet pyroxenite embedded in peridotite. Recycled garnet pyroxenite better explains the very shallow SER axial high, high Nb/La and La/Sm, and the ;enriched; isotopic compositions.

  5. A New Class of Plate Boundary and Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H.; Lin, J.; Schouten, H.; Michael, P.; Snow, J.; Jokat, W.

    2003-04-01

    While it has long been considered that there are only three types of boundary that enclose the earth's tectonic plates, a new class of plate boundary, amagmatic accretionary ridge segments, has recently been recognized as well as a new class of ocean ridge: ultra-slow spreading. This is the direct consequence of the successful investigations of the very-slow spreading Southwest Indian and Arctic Ridge systems promoted by InterRidge. Amagmatic accretionary ridge segments are a new class of accretionary plate boundary distinct from magmatic accretionary ridge segments. Amagmatic accretionary segments are marked by deep troughs often floored by mantle peridotite, with only thin or scattered basalt flows. They represent plate failure originating near the base of the plate following the zone of lithospheric necking unlike magmatic accretionary segments, where the plate fails from the top. Unlike stable transforms and magmatic accretionary segments, amagmatic accretionary segments may assume any angle to the spreading direction and replace both orthogonal segments and transform faults over large sections of ocean ridge. Magmatic and amagmatic accretionary segments can stably coexist, one connected to the other for many millions of years, or may displace one another as mantle thermal structure, composition, ridge geometry or spreading rate change. Ultra-slow spreading ridges are a new class of ridge that form where the effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling falls below ~12 mm/yr. The ESR is the orthogonal component of the spreading rate measured perpendicular to the ridge trend. Magmas erupted along ultra-slow spreading ridges may be alkaline and/or isotopically and incompatible trace element enriched compared to typical MORB. Ultra-slow spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary segments and are as mechanically, morphologically and petrologically distinct from slow-spreading ridges, as slow-spreading ridges are from fast. The Southwest

  6. Remote sensing evidence of lava-ground ice interactions associated with the Lost Jim Lava Flow, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Emma C.; Hamilton, Christopher W.; Herrick, Robert R.

    2017-12-01

    Thermokarst terrains develop when ice-bearing permafrost melts and causes the overlying surface to subside or collapse. This process occurs widely throughout Arctic regions due to environmental and climatological factors, but can also be induced by localized melting of ground ice by active lava flows. The Lost Jim Lava Flow (LJLF) on the Seward Peninsula of Alaska provides evidence of former lava-ground ice interactions. Associated geomorphic features, on the scale of meters to tens of meters, were identified using satellite orthoimages and stereo-derived digital terrain models. The flow exhibits positive- and mixed-relief features, including tumuli ( N = 26) and shatter rings ( N = 4), as well as negative-relief features, such as lava tube skylights ( N = 100) and irregularly shaped topographic depressions ( N = 1188) that are interpreted to include lava-rise pits and lava-induced thermokarst terrain. Along the margins of the flow, there are also clusters of small peripheral pits that may be the products of meltwater or steam escape. On Mars, we observed morphologically similar pits near lava flow margins in northeastern Elysium Planitia, which suggests a common formation mechanism. Investigating the LJLF may therefore help to elucidate processes of lava-ground ice interaction on both Earth and Mars.

  7. Portugal in the Works of Bartolomé Jiménez Patón (1569-1640

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Garau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout his works, Bartolomé Jiménez Patón mentions Portugal and some of its writers on a number of occasions. In the books that have been recovered of his Comentarios de erudición (1621, he cites authors such as Fernando López de Castañeda or Joao de Barros, who are associated with the popular vogue of the period for portentous works, of which the Spanish Humanist was so fond of. A large number of his commentaries concerning Portugal center on justifying dynastic unity, based on his interpretation of the history of Gregorio López Madera, who he admired so much, which has as its background the image of Hispania. To a certain extent, the new government of Olivares would try to carry out this policy. Of no less interest is his description of the city of Lisbon in which he presents the idea of ‘exemplariness’, a notion he has in common with other descriptions by Mateo Alemán, Cervantes or Tirso, although in Patón’s, such exemplariness appears in contrast with the picturesque depiction of the rogues of the Rua Nova.

  8. Immediate effects of tooth extraction on ridge integrity and dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebicioglu, Binnaz; Hegde, Rachana; Yildiz, Vedat O; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to assess possible immediate post-extraction changes in ridge integrity and width. Tooth extractions (53 teeth in 30 adults) were performed following atraumatic techniques. Root trunk and ridge width were measured at the crest level in buccolingual direction. Similarly, socket width and buccal plate thickness were also determined. Pre- and post-extraction buccal plate dehiscence, fenestration, or fracture was recorded. Diameter and length of extracted tooth root were also measured. Multinomial logistic regression was used to reveal relationships between ridge outcome (expanded, stable, or collapsed groups) and assessed tooth/site parameters. Post-extraction, buccal plate fracture developed in 5 (9%), dehiscence in 15 (28%), and complete buccal plate loss in 2 sites (4%). Following extraction, ridge width was expanded in 30 (57%), collapsed in 12 (23%), and remained unchanged in 11 (21%) sites. In most sites (72%), post-extraction socket size was wider than pre-extraction root trunk width (p ridge outcome (expansion or collapse compared to stable) (p ridge integrity is uncommon, while ridge width expansion is a common finding immediately following tooth extraction. The significance of such expansion compared to integrity of socket walls remains to be established. Tooth extraction approaches that preserve ridge integrity are accompanied by mainly ridge expansion in ridge width. The significance of such immediate changes for the long-term ridge outcomes (i.e., effect on bone remodeling especially in relation to buccal bone integrity) needs further investigation.

  9. Effect of Micro Ridges on Orientation of Cultured Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of micro ridges on orientation of cultured cells has been studied in vitro. Several patterns of micro ridges have been fabricated on a transparent polydimethylsiloxane disk with the photo lithography technique. The ridges consist of several lines of rectangular column: the width of 0.003 mm, the interval of 0.007 mm. Variation has been made on the height of the ridge between 0.0003 mm and 0.0035 mm. C2C12 (mouse myoblast cell line originated with cross-striated muscle of C3H mouse was cultured on the disk with the micro ridges for one week and was observed with an inverted phase contrast microscope. The experimental results show that cells adhere on the top of the ridge and align to the longitudinal direction of the micro ridges with the height between 0.0015 mm and 0.0025 mm.

  10. Petrology of gabbros from Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; von der Handt, A.; Dick, H.; Hoefs, J.

    2003-04-01

    Major element geochemistry of constituent minerals in the gabbros from Gakkel Ridge has been investigated by electron microprobe. In contrast to the abundant recovery of basalt and peridotite along the ridge, gabbros were only recovered from a few locations. This is consistent with geophysical evidence that the gabbro layer is very thin or even absent beneath the Gakkel Ridge. The recovered gabbros are mainly olivine bearing and olivine gabbro, together with some troctolite and microgabbro. Compared with the relatively fresh nature of the Hole735B (SWIR) gabbro, most Gakkel gabbros are characterized by greenschist facies alteration. At the same time, most gabbros have well-developed brittle fractures, which are filled with low temperature alteration products (abundant smectite and carbonate). Electron probe measurements were performed on the freshest central part of the minerals. Except for one drop-stone, in general Gakkel gabbros are more primitive than those recovered from EPR (Hess Deep), and even are more primitive than Hole 735B gabbros. All gabbros have a very narrow crystallization temperature from 1100-1150°C, based on the olivine-pyroxene Mg-Fe-exchange geothermometer. This indicates that measured mineral compositions represent their original magmatic signature, although most minerals had been affected by a series of alterations. The more primitive nature of Gakkel gabbro suggests that the melt from which they were crystallized was only fractionated to a very low degree. This may reflect a different mechanism of aggregation, which is related to the ultra-slow spreading rate of the Gakkel Ridge. Such as the melting degree is too low to maintain a magma chamber for extensive fractionation.

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented

  12. ORNL [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] 89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory

  13. Marker-assisted selection using ridge regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, J C; Thompson, R; Denham, M C

    2000-04-01

    In cross between inbred lines, linear regression can be used to estimate the correlation of markers with a trait of interest; these marker effects then allow marker assisted selection (MAS) for quantitative traits. Usually a subset of markers to include in the model must be selected: no completely satisfactory method of doing this exists. We show that replacing this selection of markers by ridge regression can improve the mean response to selection and reduce the variability of selection response.

  14. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory.

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  16. Processing of Oak Ridge Mixed Waste Labpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, C. H.; Franco, P.; Bisaria, A.

    2002-02-26

    The Oak Ridge Site Treatment Plan (STP) issued under a Tennessee Commissioner's Order includes a compliance milestone related to treatment of mixed waste labpacks on the Oak Ridge sites. The treatment plan was written and approved in Fiscal Year 1997. The plan involved approximately 1,100 labpacks and 7,400 on-the-shelf labpackable items stored at three Department of Energy (DOE) sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The labpacks and labpack items consist of liquids and solids with various chemical constituents and radiological concerns. The waste must be processed for shipment to a commercial hazardous waste treatment facility or treatment utilizing a Broad Spectrum mixed waste treatment contract. This paper will describe the labpack treatment plan that was developed as required by the Site Treatment Plan and the operations implemented to process the labpack waste. The paper will discuss the labpack inventory in the treatment plan, treatment and disposal options, processing strategies, project risk assessment, and current project status.

  17. Volcanism and hydrothermalism on a hotspot-influenced ridge: Comparing Reykjanes Peninsula and Reykjanes Ridge, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałgan, Dominik; Devey, Colin W.; Yeo, Isobel A.

    2017-12-01

    Current estimates indicate that the number of high-temperature vents (one of the primary pathways for the heat extraction from the Earth's mantle) - at least 1 per 100 km of axial length - scales with spreading rate and should scale with crustal thickness. But up to present, shallow ridge axes underlain by thick crust show anomalously low incidences of high-temperature activity. Here we compare the Reykjanes Ridge, an abnormally shallow ridge with thick crust and only one high-temperature vent known over 900 km axial length, to the adjacent subaerial Reykjanes Peninsula (RP), which is characterized by high-temperature geothermal sites confined to four volcanic systems transected by fissure swarms with young (Holocene) volcanic activity, multiple faults, cracks and fissures, and continuous seismic activity. New high-resolution bathymetry (gridded at 60 m) of the Reykjanes Ridge between 62°30‧N and 63°30‧N shows seven Axial Volcanic Ridges (AVR) that, based on their morphology, geometry and tectonic regime, are analogues for the volcanic systems and fissure swarms on land. We investigate in detail the volcano-tectonic features of all mapped AVRs and show that they do not fit with the previously suggested 4-stage evolution model for AVR construction. Instead, we suggest that AVR morphology reflects the robust or weak melt supply to the system and two (or more) eruption mechanisms may co-exist on one AVR (in contrast to 4-stage evolution model). Our interpretations indicate that, unlike on the Reykjanes Peninsula, faults on and around AVRs do not cluster in orientation domains but all are subparallel to the overall strike of AVRs (orthogonal to spreading direction). High abundance of seamounts shows that the region centered at 62°47‧N and 25°04‧W (between AVR-5 and -6) is volcanically robust while the highest fault density implies that AVR-1 and southern part of AVR-6 rather undergo period of melt starvation. Based on our observations and interpretations we

  18. The Influence of Ridge Geometry at Ultraslow Spreading Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H. J.; Standish, J.

    2004-12-01

    Ridges spreading at ultraslow rate less than 20 mm/yr have been identified as a unique class of ocean ridge as different from slow spreading as slow spreading are from fast 1. Ridge characteristics, such as the presence or absence of amagmatic accretionary segments, transform faults, axial valleys or axial rises, however, are not a simple function of spreading rate, and it is therefore difficult to define precisely ridge classes simply on this criterion. Ridge morphology, tectonics, and geochemistry are also largely a function of mantle thermal structure, upwelling rate, fertility, and ridge geometry. However, examination of ridge crustal structure with spreading rate clearly shows a sharp break, with seismic measurements of crustal thickness indicating highly variable, generally thin crust associated with spreading rates below 20 mm/yr. In contrast, crust formed at spreading rates greater than 20 mm/yr is generally thicker and less variable thickness, averaging between 6 and 7 km, without a clear relationship to spreading rate. The generally accepted explanation is the influence of conductive heat loss and the formation of a thick axial lithosphere due to slow mantle upwelling rates, thereby limiting melt production at ultraslow spreading rates 2. Comparatively, the influence of conductive heat loss at spreading rates greater than 20 mm/yr is likely negligible except near major large offset transforms. The latter effect is predicted by modeling to increase sharply with decreasing spreading rate below 20 mm/yr. Thus perturbations in ridge geometry that would otherwise have a negligible effect, can dramatically influence melt production and ridge tectonics at ultraslow spreading rates. Investigation of the SW Indian Ridge and along the Gakkel Ridge, for example, shows that where the effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling, which ridge obliquity, falls below ~12 mm/yr, long amagmatic accretionary ridge segments form and replace both magmatic accretionary ridge

  19. Jim Crow, Indian Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, Orlan J.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews history of voting rights for Indians and discusses a 1986 decision calling for election reform in Big Horn County, Montana, to eliminate violations of the voting rights of the county's Indian citizens. Notes that positive effects--such as election of the county's first Indian commissioner--co-exist with enduring anti-Indian sentiment. (JHZ)

  20. Dynamical instability produces transform faults at mid-ocean ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, Taras

    2010-08-27

    Transform faults at mid-ocean ridges--one of the most striking, yet enigmatic features of terrestrial plate tectonics--are considered to be the inherited product of preexisting fault structures. Ridge offsets along these faults therefore should remain constant with time. Here, numerical models suggest that transform faults are actively developing and result from dynamical instability of constructive plate boundaries, irrespective of previous structure. Boundary instability from asymmetric plate growth can spontaneously start in alternate directions along successive ridge sections; the resultant curved ridges become transform faults within a few million years. Fracture-related rheological weakening stabilizes ridge-parallel detachment faults. Offsets along the transform faults change continuously with time by asymmetric plate growth and discontinuously by ridge jumps.

  1. Nonlinear Forecasting with Many Predictors using Kernel Ridge Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Exterkate; Patrick J.F. Groenen; Christiaan Heij; Dick van Dijk

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation of the predictive regression model is based on a shrinkage estimator to avoid overfitting. We extend the kernel ridge regression methodology to enable its use for economic time-series forecasting, by ...

  2. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, David A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site

  3. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncinski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    The two volumes of this report present data and supporting narratives regarding the impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on its environs and the public during 1992. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a ''stand-alone'' report for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1992 data for the ORR. This volume (volume 2) includes the detailed data in formats that ensure all the environmental data are presented. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2

  4. Gakkel Ridge: A window to ancient asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J.; Hellebrand, E.; Dick, H.; Liu, C.; Stracke, A.

    2008-12-01

    We are accustomed to thinking of the ambient mantle as being a well-stirred reservoir, which contains at most regions of stored subducted slabs and "plums" containing lithophile trace element enrichments. What is forgotten in all of this is that the main process of formation of heterogeneities is a negative one - generating 10x more depleted mantle at any given moment than it does oceanic crust. Because the volume of lithosphere subducted over Earth history is so large, it has always been assumed that the process of subduction and convective mixing re-homogenizes the depleted and enriched reservoirs about as fast as it produces them. What if it doesn't? Our primary means of studying mantle heterogeneity however is basalts. Direct study of the mantle entails observations on xenoliths, ophiolites and orogenic lherzolites, and abyssal peridotites. The latter have the inherent problems of being melting residues, associated with fracture zones, are highly serpentinized and rare. The arctic ridge system gives us a unique perspective on the mantle, and samples we have recovered there are relatively free from these problems. Due to the slow spreading rate, which apparently severely limits the melt productivity, the thickest crust in the Arctic ridge system is approximately "normal". The most common crust is about half thickness and there are large expanses with no crust at all, in the sense of Hess, 1962, exposing mantle peridotite in the floor of extensive rift zones. We have shown Os isotopic evidence for the survival of ancient depletion signatures in Gakkel abyssal peridotites that apparently were not destroyed by subduction, convective stirring or resetting during magma genesis (Liu, et al., 2008). Additionally, preliminary Nd isotopic evidence suggests at least a 400Ma intact prehistory for these samples. Apparently, the low melt productivity on Gakkel Ridge has allowed the Gakkel mantle rocks to escape significant resetting due to melt interaction. This implies a

  5. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncinski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    The two volumes of this report present data and supporting narratives regarding the impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on its environs and the public during 1992. This Volume (Volume 1) includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a ''stand-alone'' report for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1992 data for the ORR. Volume 2 includes the detailed data in formats that ensure all the environmental data are represented. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2

  6. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Position Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Hill, Jason J [ORNL; Thach, Kevin G [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the business, administration, reliability, and usability aspects of storage systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The OLCF has developed key competencies in architecting and administration of large-scale Lustre deployments as well as HPSS archival systems. Additionally as these systems are architected, deployed, and expanded over time reliability and availability factors are a primary driver. This paper focuses on the implementation of the Spider parallel Lustre file system as well as the implementation of the HPSS archive at the OLCF.

  7. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucke, P.C.

    1992-10-01

    The first two volumes of this report present data and supporting narratives regarding the impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on its surrounding environs and the public during 1991. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a ''stand-alone'' report for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1991 data for the ORR. This volume, Volume 2, includes the detailed data formats that ensure all the environmental data are represented. Narratives are not included. The information in Vol. 2 is addressed and analyzed in Vol. 1

  8. Comprehensive integrated planning: A process for the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Oak Ridge Comprehensive Integrated Plan is intended to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel in implementing a comprehensive integrated planning process consistent with DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management and Oak Ridge Operations Order 430. DOE contractors are charged with developing and producing the Comprehensive Integrated Plan, which serves as a summary document, providing information from other planning efforts regarding vision statements, missions, contextual conditions, resources and facilities, decision processes, and stakeholder involvement. The Comprehensive Integrated Plan is a planning reference that identifies primary issues regarding major changes in land and facility use and serves all programs and functions on-site as well as the Oak Ridge Operations Office and DOE Headquarters. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a valuable national resource and is managed on the basis of the principles of ecosystem management and sustainable development and how mission, economic, ecological, social, and cultural factors are used to guide land- and facility-use decisions. The long-term goals of the comprehensive integrated planning process, in priority order, are to support DOE critical missions and to stimulate the economy while maintaining a quality environment.

  9. Removal action report on the Building 3001 canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a federal facility managed by Lockheed Martin C, Energy Research, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ORNL on the Oak Ridge Reservation in East Tennessee at the Anderson and Roane County lines, approximately 38 km (24 miles) west of Knoxville, Tennessee, and 18 km (11 miles) southwest of downtown Oak Ridge. The Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and its storage and transfer canal are located in Bldg. 3001 in the approximate center of Waste Area Grouping I in the ORNL main complex. 4:1 The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal is an L-shaped, underground, reinforced-concrete structure running from the back and below the Graphite Reactor in Bldg. 3001 to a location beneath a hot cell in the adjacent Bldg. 3019. The Graphite Reactor was built in 1943 to produce small quantities of plutonium and was subsequently used to produce other isotopes for medical research before it was finally shut down in 1963. The associated canal was used to transport, under water, spent fuel slugs and other isotopes from the back of the reactor to the adjacent Bldg. 31319 hot cell for further processing. During its operation and years subsequent to operation, the canal's concrete walls and floor became contaminated with radioisotopes from the water.This report documents the activities involved with replacing the canal water with a solid, controlled, low-strength material (CLSM) in response to a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action

  10. Comprehensive integrated planning: A process for the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    The Oak Ridge Comprehensive Integrated Plan is intended to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel in implementing a comprehensive integrated planning process consistent with DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management and Oak Ridge Operations Order 430. DOE contractors are charged with developing and producing the Comprehensive Integrated Plan, which serves as a summary document, providing information from other planning efforts regarding vision statements, missions, contextual conditions, resources and facilities, decision processes, and stakeholder involvement. The Comprehensive Integrated Plan is a planning reference that identifies primary issues regarding major changes in land and facility use and serves all programs and functions on-site as well as the Oak Ridge Operations Office and DOE Headquarters. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a valuable national resource and is managed on the basis of the principles of ecosystem management and sustainable development and how mission, economic, ecological, social, and cultural factors are used to guide land- and facility-use decisions. The long-term goals of the comprehensive integrated planning process, in priority order, are to support DOE critical missions and to stimulate the economy while maintaining a quality environment

  11. US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management Public Involvement Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This document was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements for writing community relations plans. It includes information on how the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office prepares and executes Environmental Management Community relations activities. It is divided into three sections: the public involvement plan, public involvement in Oak Ridge, and public involvement in 1995. Four appendices are also included: environmental management in Oak Ridge; community and regional overview; key laws, agreements, and policy; and principal contacts

  12. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2017-06-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  13. Ridge Orientations of the Ridge-Forming Unit, Sinus Meridiani, Mars-A Fluvial Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M. Justin; Herridge, A.

    2013-01-01

    Imagery and MOLA data were used in an analysis of the ridge-forming rock unit (RFU) exposed in Sinus Meridiani (SM). This unit shows parallels at different scales with fluvial sedimentary bodies. We propose the terrestrial megafan as the prime analog for the RFU, and likely for other members of the layered units. Megafans are partial cones of fluvial sediment, with radii up to hundreds of km. Although recent reviews of hypotheses for the RFU units exclude fluvial hypotheses [1], inverted ridges in the deserts of Oman have been suggested as putative analogs for some ridges [2], apparently without appreciating The wider context in which these ridges have formed is a series of megafans [3], a relatively unappreciated geomorphic feature. It has been argued that these units conform to the megafan model at the regional, subregional and local scales [4]. At the regional scale suites of terrestrial megafans are known to cover large areas at the foot of uplands on all continents - a close parallel with the setting of the Meridiani sediments at the foot of the southern uplands of Mars, with its incised fluvial systems leading down the regional NW slope [2, 3] towards the sedimentary units. At the subregional scale the layering and internal discontinuities of the Meridiani rocks are consistent, inter alia, with stacked fluvial units [4]. Although poorly recognized as such, the prime geomorphic environment in which stream channel networks cover large areas, without intervening hillslopes, is the megafan [see e.g. 4]. Single megafans can reach 200,000 km2 [5]. Megafans thus supply an analog for areas where channel-like ridges (as a palimpsest of a prior landscape) cover the intercrater plains of Meridiani [6]. At the local, or river-reach scale, the numerous sinuous features of the RFU are suggestive of fluvial channels. Cross-cutting relationships, a common feature of channels on terrestrial megafans, are ubiquitous. Desert megafans show cemented paleo-channels as inverted

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented

  15. Alveolar ridge preservation in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ronald E; Ioannidis, Alexis; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2018-02-27

    In the esthetic zone, in the case of tooth extraction, the clinician is often confronted with a challenge regarding the optimal decision-making process for providing a solution using dental implants. This is because, after tooth extraction, alveolar bone loss and structural and compositional changes of the covering soft tissues, as well as morphological alterations, can be expected. Ideally, the therapeutic plan starts before tooth extraction and it offers three options: spontaneous healing of the extraction socket; immediate implant placement; and techniques for preserving the alveolar ridge at the site of tooth removal. The decision-making process mainly depends on: (i) the chosen time-point for implant placement and the ability to place a dental implant; (ii) the quality and quantity of soft tissue in the region of the extraction socket; (iii) the remaining height of the buccal bone plate; and (iv) the expected rates of implant survival and success. Based on scientific evidence, three time-periods for alveolar ridge preservation are described in the literature: (i) soft-tissue preservation with 6-8 weeks of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the soft tissues); (ii) hard- and soft-tissue preservation with 4-6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard and soft tissues); and (iii) hard-tissue preservation with > 6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard tissues). © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Tubular Initial Conditions and Ridge Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Borysova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2D azimuth and rapidity structure of the two-particle correlations in relativistic A+A collisions is altered significantly by the presence of sharp inhomogeneities in superdense matter formed in such processes. The causality constraints enforce one to associate the long-range longitudinal correlations observed in a narrow angular interval, the so-called (soft ridge, with peculiarities of the initial conditions of collision process. This study's objective is to analyze whether multiform initial tubular structures, undergoing the subsequent hydrodynamic evolution and gradual decoupling, can form the soft ridges. Motivated by the flux-tube scenarios, the initial energy density distribution contains the different numbers of high density tube-like boost-invariant inclusions that form a bumpy structure in the transverse plane. The influence of various structures of such initial conditions in the most central A+A events on the collective evolution of matter, resulting spectra, angular particle correlations and vn-coefficients is studied in the framework of the hydrokinetic model (HKM.

  17. Effects of ridge and furrow rainfall harvesting system on Elymus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARL

    2012-05-10

    May 10, 2012 ... A ridge-furrow rainfall harvesting system (RFRHS) was designed to increase the available soil water for .... The solar energy passed through the plastic-film and heated up the air and the surface soil of ridge and then the heat was trapped by the greenhouse effect (Zhou et al., 2009). Meanwhile, the.

  18. Some improved classification-based ridge parameter of Hoerl and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a linear regression model, it is often assumed that the explanatory variables are independent. This assumption is often violated and Ridge Regression estimator introduced by [2]has been identified to be more efficient than ordinary least square (OLS) in handling it. However, it requires a ridge parameter, K, of which many ...

  19. Some Improved Classification-Based Ridge Parameter Of Hoerl And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a linear regression model, it is often assumed that the explanatory variables are independent. This assumption is often violated and Ridge Regression estimator introduced by [2]has been identified to be more efficient than ordinary least square (OLS) in handling it. However, it requires a ridge parameter, K, of which many ...

  20. Nonlinear Forecasting With Many Predictors Using Kernel Ridge Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Heij, Christiaan

    This paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation of the predi...

  1. 60 Years of Great Science (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This issue of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review (vol. 36, issue 1) highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  2. Site characterization of the West Chestnut Ridge site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelle, R.H.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of investigations performed to date on the West Chestnut Ridge Site, on the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation. The investigations performed include geomorphic observations, areal geologic mapping, surficial soil mapping, subsurface investigations, soil geochemical and mineralogical analyses, geohydrologic testing, groundwater fluctuation monitoring, and surface water discharge and precipitation monitoring. 33 references, 32 figures, 24 tables

  3. Effect of Alveolar Ridge Preservation after Tooth Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Ortiz, G.; Elangovan, S.; Kramer, K.W.O.; Blanchette, D.; Dawson, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation strategies are indicated to minimize the loss of ridge volume that typically follows tooth extraction. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect that socket filling with a bone grafting material has on the prevention of postextraction alveolar ridge volume loss as compared with tooth extraction alone in nonmolar teeth. Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized clinical trials that fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Literature screening and article selection were conducted by 3 independent reviewers, while data extraction was performed by 2 independent reviewers. Outcome measures were mean horizontal ridge changes (buccolingual) and vertical ridge changes (midbuccal, midlingual, mesial, and distal). The influence of several variables of interest (i.e., flap elevation, membrane usage, and type of bone substitute employed) on the outcomes of ridge preservation therapy was explored via subgroup analyses. We found that alveolar ridge preservation is effective in limiting physiologic ridge reduction as compared with tooth extraction alone. The clinical magnitude of the effect was 1.89 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41, 2.36; p preservation. PMID:24966231

  4. One Piece Orbitozygomatic Approach Based on the Sphenoid Ridge Keyhole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiriev, Toma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kåre

    2016-01-01

    The one-piece orbitozygomatic (OZ) approach is traditionally based on the McCarty keyhole. Here, we present the use of the sphenoid ridge keyhole and its possible advantages as a keyhole for the one-piece OZ approach. Using transillumination technique the osteology of the sphenoid ridge was exami...

  5. Dielectrophoresis device and method having insulating ridges for manipulating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Eric B [Livermore, CA; Fiechtner, Gregory J [Livermore, CA

    2008-03-25

    Embodiments of the present invention provide methods and devices for manipulating particles using dielectrophoresis. Insulating ridges and valleys are used to generate a spatially non-uniform electrical field. Particles may be concentrated, separated, or captured during bulk fluid flow in a channel having insulating ridges and valleys.

  6. Fingerprint Ridge Count: A Polygenic Trait Useful in Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Gordon; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of the polygenic trait of total fingerprint ridge count in the classroom as a laboratory investigation. Presents information on background of topic, fingerprint patterns which are classified into three major groups, ridge count, the inheritance model, and activities. Includes an example data sheet format for fingerprints. (RT)

  7. Effects of Employing Ridge Regression in Structural Equation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuitty, Shaun

    1997-01-01

    LISREL 8 invokes a ridge option when maximum likelihood or generalized least squares are used to estimate a structural equation model with a nonpositive definite covariance or correlation matrix. Implications of the ridge option for model fit, parameter estimates, and standard errors are explored through two examples. (SLD)

  8. Validity Shrinkage in Ridge Regression: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Vivian; Bobko, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Ridge regression offers advantages over ordinary least squares estimation when a validity shrinkage criterion is considered. Comparisons of cross-validated multiple correlations indicate that ridge estimation is superior when the predictors are multicollinear, the number of predictors is large relative to sample size, and the population multiple…

  9. The Incidence of Finger Ridge Counts among the Christian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was attempted to obtain the occurrence total and absolute finger ridge counts from 102 unrelated Christian populations (60 males and 42 females) of Mysore city, Karnataka state of India. Data were collected by biometric scanner (USB finger print reader). The mean values of Total finger ridge count and ...

  10. Site characterization of the West Chestnut Ridge site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelle, R H; Huff, D D

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of investigations performed to date on the West Chestnut Ridge Site, on the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation. The investigations performed include geomorphic observations, areal geologic mapping, surficial soil mapping, subsurface investigations, soil geochemical and mineralogical analyses, geohydrologic testing, groundwater fluctuation monitoring, and surface water discharge and precipitation monitoring. 33 references, 32 figures, 24 tables.

  11. A relook into the crustal architecture of Laxmi Ridge, northeastern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    derived free-air gravity (FAG) data to derive the crustal structure of Laxmi Ridge and adjacent areas. 2D and 3D crustal modelling suggests that the high resolution FAG low associated with the ridge is due to underplating and that it is of ...

  12. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration

  13. Effects of ridge and furrow rainfall harvesting system on Elymus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted during the growth seasons in 2008 to 2010 to evaluate the effects of the RFRH system on soil temperature, soil water content and the yield of E. sibiricus. Specifically, the following three systems were investigated: ridge width 60 cm and furrow width 30 cm (MR60), ridge width 30 cm and ...

  14. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration.

  15. Nonlinear Forecasting with Many Predictors using Kernel Ridge Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Exterkate (Peter); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); C. Heij (Christiaan); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation of

  16. Retorno de un cruzado, by José Jiménez Lozano. Creation, Intertextuality and Originality of a Writing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Arbona Abascal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the writing process of José Jiménez Lozano’s Retorno de un cruzado (2013, his 24th novel. First, taking into account the author’s comments about the creation of the text, it presents the different versions and the literary reasons for his final choice. Second, literary intertextualities found in the novel are examined. Finally, the condition of the main character as storyteller is identified as the novel’s major source of originality.

  17. On the mean squared error of the ridge estimator of the covariance and precision matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieringen, Wessel N.

    2017-01-01

    For a suitably chosen ridge penalty parameter, the ridge regression estimator uniformly dominates the maximum likelihood regression estimator in terms of the mean squared error. Analogous results for the ridge maximum likelihood estimators of covariance and precision matrix are presented.

  18. Pristine MORB mantle from Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.

    2010-12-01

    Fresh mantle rocks (Total ~300Kg) have been recovered from three dredge hauls on Gakkel Ridge. Most of the fresh material (~275 Kg) is from a single dredge haul (PS66-238) from PFS POLARSTERN ARK XX/2 in 2004 (not from the AMORE expedition). The samples from this group comprise extremely fresh protogranular lherzolites that have clearly defined 1-2 cm orange weathering rinds. The weathered material seems to be mostly discoloration along grain boundaries, as bulk weathering (e.g. Snow and Dick, 1995) cannot be detected in bulk analyses. The fresh cores are largely devoid of serpentine that can be identified in hand sample or SEM. The samples show a bimodal grain size distribution and abundant polygonization of olivine, but little stretching of pyroxene grains, suggesting that they have not been subject to intense deformation that has been seen in many mid-ocean ridge peridotites. Currently, 14 of the 208 discrete samples have been studied. The major element compositions of these samples range from relatively fertile spinel lherzolites to moderately depleted cpx-bearing harzburgites, both in their bulk chemistry and in the compositions of major minerals. The average Cr# (Dick and Bullen, 1984) of spinel ranges from 0.15 to 0.28, suggesting 5-12% melt extraction (Hellebrand et al. 2001). Trace elements measured by SIMS and LA-ICPMS reveal metasomatism and refertilization of the LREE. Os isotopes vary from 187Os/188Os of 0.128 to 0.114, revealing an ancient component that can be interpreted either as a fertile ambient mantle with a highly depleted ancient exotic block or as a single mantle domain variably depleted in an ancient melting event (Liu et al., 2008). Bulk Li isotopic data correspond to estimates of the MORB mantle, however mineral separates show significant isotopic heterogeneity that appears to be caused by diffusion caused by Li redistribution during uplift and cooling (Gao et al., accepted). The altered samples have radically different textures. These

  19. The Gakkel Ridge: Crustal Accretion at Extremely Slow Spreading Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. R.; Kurras, G. J.; Edwards, M. H.; Coakley, B. J.

    2002-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge, in the Arctic Ocean, is the slowest spreading portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system. Total spreading rates range from 12.7 mm/a near Greenland to 6.0 mm/a where the ridge disappears beneath the Laptev Shelf. Swath-bathymetry and gravity data for an 850-km-long section of the Gakkel Ridge from 5° E to 97° E were obtained from the U.S. Navy submarine USS Hawkbill during the SCICEX program. The ridge axis is very deep, generally 4700-5300 m, within a well-developed rift valley. The topography is primarily tectonic in origin, characterized by linear rift-parallel ridges and fault-bounded troughs with up to 2 km of relief. Evidence of extrusive volcanic activity is limited and confined to specific locations. East of 32° E, isolated discrete volcanoes are observed at 25-95 km intervals along the axis. Abundant small-scale volcanism characteristic of the MAR is absent; it appears that the amount of melt generated is insufficient to maintain a continuous magmatic spreading axis. Instead, melt is erupted on the seafloor at a set of distinct locations where multiple eruptions have built up central volcanoes and covered adjacent areas with low relief lava flows. Between 5° E and 32° E, almost no volcanic activity is observed except near 19° E. The ridge axis shoals rapidly by 1500 m over a 30 km wide area at 19° E that coincides with a high-standing axis-perpendicular bathymetric high. Bathymetry and sidescan data show the presence of numerous small volcanic features and flow fronts in the axial valley on the upper portions of the 19° E along-axis high. Gravity data imply up to 3 km of crustal thickening under the 19° E axis-perpendicular ridge. The 19° E magmatic center may result from interaction of the ridge with a passively imbedded mantle inhomogeneity. Away from 19° E, the crust appears thin and patchy and may consist of basalt directly over peridotite. The ridge axis is continuous with no transform offset. However, sections of the

  20. Ultraslow Ridges through Binoculars: Teleseismic Earthquake Characteristics Illuminate Accretion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, V.; Laederach, C.; Korger, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridges with full spreading rates global mid-ocean ridge system, yet 85% of these ridges are still unexplored. Understanding the structure and dynamics of crustal production and the associated hydrothermal systems including their biota has become a major challenge of modern mid-ocean ridge research. The complex interplay between tectonic, magmatic and hydrothermal processes that governs lithospheric accretion at ultraslow-spreading ridges is so poorly investigated because their main representatives, the Arctic ridge system and the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), are situated in remote areas with difficult working conditions. While local seismicity studies with ocean bottom seismometers on slow and fast spreading ridges have greatly contributed to our understanding of active accretion processes, comparable studies are lacking for ultraslow spreading ridges forcing to fall back on studies of larger earthquakes recorded on land. Using teleseismic data from the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre between the years 1976 and 2010, we performed a systematic analysis of the ridge related seismicity (M > 4) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic ridge system and the SWIR. These ridges were divided in 11 sections of uniform seismological, topographic and geological characteristics, totalling a length of 7200 km with the rift axis defined as a multisegment line along the topographic low of the rift valley. Only events within 30 km of the rift axis were included in our study. We found that magmatic and amagmatic accretion sections cannot be distinguished neither by event rate, moment release rate, maximum earthquake magnitude, nor by the b-value. Yet using single link cluster analysis for identification of swarms of 8 or more earthquakes, small clusters of 2-7 earthquakes and single events, we found that sections with amagmatic accretion lack swarms and show consistently a high percentage of single events, while teleseismic swarms occur only in

  1. Petrological systematics of mid-ocean ridge basalts: Constraints on melt generation beneath ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, Charles H.; Klein, Emily M.; Plank, Terry

    Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are a consequence of pressure-release melting beneath ocean ridges, and contain much information concerning melt formation, melt migration and heterogeneity within the upper mantle. MORB major element chemical systematics can be divided into global and local aspects, once they have been corrected for low pressure fractionation and interlaboratory biases. Regional average compositions for ridges unaffected by hot spots ("normal" ridges) can be used to define the global correlations among normalized Na2O, FeO, TiO2 and SiO2 contents, CaO/Al2O3 ratios, axial depth and crustal thickness. Back-arc basins show similar correlations, but are offset to lower FeO and TiO2 contents. Some hot spots, such as the Azores and Galapagos, disrupt the systematics of nearby ridges and have the opposite relationships between FeO, Na2O and depth over distances of 1000 km. Local variations in basalt chemistry from slow- and fast-spreading ridges are distinct from one another. On slow-spreading ridges, correlations among the elements cross the global vector of variability at a high angle. On the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR), correlations among the elements are distinct from both global and slow-spreading compositional vectors, and involve two components of variation. Spreading rate does not control the global correlations, but influences the standard deviations of axial depth, crustal thickness, and MgO contents of basalts. Global correlations are not found in very incompatible trace elements, even for samples far from hot spots. Moderately compatible trace elements for normal ridges, however, correlate with the major elements. Trace element systematics are significantly different for the EPR and the mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Normal portions of the MAR are very depleted in REE, with little variability; hot spots cause large long wavelength variations in REE abundances. Normal EPR basalts are significantly more enriched than MAR basalts from normal

  2. Perspectives on Ocean Ridge Basalts from the Segment to the Global Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the influences on ridge basalt chemistry, through analysis of their major and trace element and isotopic composition at scales ranging from individual ridge segments to the entire length of the ridge system. Local-scale studies of basalts along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge shed light on crustal accretion at slow-spreading ridges, and on the nature of plume-ridge interaction in this region. We show that segments must have multiple supplies of magma delivered along their length, ...

  3. Hydrothermal activity at the Arctic mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Nygård, Tor Eivind; Lilley, Marvin D.; Kelley, Deborah S.

    Over the last 10 years, hydrothermal activity has been shown to be abundant at the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridges (AMOR). Approximately 20 active and extinct vent sites have been located either at the seafloor, as seawater anomalies, or by dredge sampling hydrothermal deposits. Decreasing spreading rates and decreasing influence of the Icelandic hot spot toward the north along the AMOR result in a north-south change from a shallow and magmatically robust to a deep and magmatically starved ridge system. This contrast gives rise to large variability in the ridge geology and in the nature of the associated hydrothermal systems. The known vent sites at the southern part of the ridge system are either low-temperature or white smoker fields. At the deep, northern parts of the ridge system, a large black smoker field has been located, and seawater anomalies and sulfide deposits suggest that black smoker-type venting is common. Several of these fields may be peridotite-hosted. The hydrothermal activity at parts of the AMOR exceeds by a factor of 2 to 3 what would be expected by extrapolating from observations on faster spreading ridges. Higher fracture/fault area relative to the magma volume extracted seems a likely explanation for this. Many of the vent fields at the AMOR are associated with axial volcanic ridges. Strong focusing of magma toward these ridges, deep rifting of the ridges, and subsequent formation of long-lived detachment faults that are rooted below the ridges may be the major geodynamic mechanisms causing the unexpectedly high hydrothermal activity.

  4. The Influence of Ridge Geometry at the Ultraslow-Spreading Southwest Indiean Ridge (9 deg - 25 deg E): Basalt Composition Sensitivity to Variations in Source and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Gakkel Ridge [Jokat et al., 2003] both support theoretical studies suggesting diminished melt production on ridges spreading at rates < 20 mm/yr [Bown...be measured disequilibria from Gakkel Ridge basalts plot, as the half spreading rate along this ridge is also ultraslow. 6. Conclusions Our...chemistry at ultraslow- spreading rates (Southwest Indian Ridge from 9°-25°E): A tectonomagmatic model for origin of non-hotspot E-MORB, (submitted

  5. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, N.L.

    1989-05-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1988. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a ''stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1988 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Volume 2. The tables in Volume 2 are addressed in Volume 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Volume 1

  6. Late Vendian postcollisional leucogranites of Yenisei Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozhkin, A. D.; Likhanov, I. I.; Reverdatto, V. V.; Bayanova, T. B.; Zinoviev, S. V.; Kozlov, P. S.; Popov, N. V.; Dmitrieva, N. V.

    2017-06-01

    The Late Vendian (540-550 Ma) U-Pb zircon age of postcollisional granitoids in the Osinovka Massif was obtained for the first time. The Osinovka Massif is located in rocks of the island-arc complex of the Isakovka Terrane, in the northwestern part of the Sayany-Yenisei accretion belt. These events stand for the final stage of the Neoproterozoic history of the Yenisei Ridge, related to the completing accretion of the oceanic crust fragments and the beginning of the Caledonian orogenesis. The petrogeochemical composition and the Sm-Nd isotopic characteristics support the fact that the granitoid melt originated from a highly differentiated continental crust of the southwestern margin of the Siberian Craton. Hence, the granite-bearing Late Riphean island-arc complexes were thrust over the craton margin at a distance considerably exceeding the dimensions of the Osinovka Massif.

  7. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1989. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1989 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2. The tables in Vol. 2 are addressed in Vol. 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Vol. 1. 16 figs., 194 tabs.

  8. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities

  9. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  10. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

  11. Oak Ridge Health Studies phase 1 report, Volume 1: Oak Ridge Phase 1 overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, M.I.; Van Cleave, M.L.; Turri, P.; Daniel, J.

    1993-09-01

    In July 1991, the State of Tennessee initiated the Health Studies Agreement with the United States Department of Energy to carry out independent studies of possible adverse health effects in people living in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Reservation. The health studies focus on those effects that could have resulted or could result from exposures to chemicals and radioactivity released at the Reservation since 1942. The major focus of the first phase was to complete a Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. This study was designed to find out if enough data exist about chemical and radionuclide releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation to conduct a second phase. The second phase will lead to estimates of the actual amounts or the ``doses`` of various contaminants received by people as a result of off-site releases. Once the doses of various contaminants have been estimated, scientists and physicians will be better able to evaluate whether adverse health effects could have resulted from the releases.

  12. Oak Ridge Health Studies phase 1 report, Volume 1: Oak Ridge Phase 1 overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbrough, M.I.; Van Cleave, M.L.; Turri, P.; Daniel, J.

    1993-09-01

    In July 1991, the State of Tennessee initiated the Health Studies Agreement with the United States Department of Energy to carry out independent studies of possible adverse health effects in people living in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Reservation. The health studies focus on those effects that could have resulted or could result from exposures to chemicals and radioactivity released at the Reservation since 1942. The major focus of the first phase was to complete a Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. This study was designed to find out if enough data exist about chemical and radionuclide releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation to conduct a second phase. The second phase will lead to estimates of the actual amounts or the ''doses'' of various contaminants received by people as a result of off-site releases. Once the doses of various contaminants have been estimated, scientists and physicians will be better able to evaluate whether adverse health effects could have resulted from the releases

  13. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete

  14. Advances in dose reconstruction at Oak Ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.O.; Widner, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction has seven tasks: (1) releases of radionuclides from X-10 radiolanthanum processing, (2) atmospheric and aquatic discharges of mercury from Y-12, (3) releases of PCB's from all facilities, (4) aquatic releases of radionuclides from X-10 into the Clinch River, (5) a systematic search for classified and unclassified records of past releases (6) releases of uranium from all facilities, and (7) screening of contaminants and release events not previously evaluated in the study. The contaminants, exposure pathways, and release events requiring the most intensive analysis are identified first through screening level calculations and then through an iterative assessment approach based on a preliminary uncertainty analysis of more realistic sets of models and assumptions. Subjective probability distributions are developed for uncertain model components, reflecting the present state of knowledge about true but unknown values, and these uncertainties are propagated through to estimates of dose and health risk using Monte Carlo simulation. This procedure is effective in identifying the components of the dose reconstruction model of dominant importance. Efforts are focused on the review and improvement of the set of preliminary assumptions that may significantly impact the overall uncertainty in the final result. The results of the screening calculations and the preliminary uncertainty analysis are compared against established decision criteria to identify the need for resource re-allocation among tasks. To date, a 10 -4 life-time incidence of cancer incidence and a hazard index of one have been proposed as a decision criterion. Decisions about reallocation of resources among Tasks will be made by the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel and the Tennessee Department of Health, which actively seek public involvement and participation

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D ampersand D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D ampersand D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D ampersand D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2

  17. Tiger team assessment of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1990-02-01

    This document contains findings identified during the Tiger Team Compliance Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Y-12 Plant Tiger Team Compliance Assessment is comprehensive in scope. It covers the Environmental, Safety, and Health (including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance), and Management areas and determines the plant's compliance with applicable federal (including DOE), state, and local regulations and requirements. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Ridge preservation after ridge expansion with simultaneous guided bone regeneration: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Andres; Fleiner, Jonathan; Stübinger, Stefan; Fleiner, Henrik; Buser, Daniel; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate ridge preservation after ridge splitting with simultaneous implant placement and guided bone regeneration (GBR) in a miniature pig model. In miniature pigs, the mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted together with removal of the interdental and buccal bone. Three months later, ridge splitting and expansion of the buccal plate were performed with simultaneous placement of two titanium implants per quadrant. On the test side, access by a mucoperiosteal flap followed by GBR with a biphasic calcium phosphate and a collagen membrane was performed. On the contralateral control side, a mucosal flap (MF), leaving the periosteum attached to the buccal bone, was elevated. After healing periods of 6 and 12 weeks, eight and four animals, respectively, were sacrificed for histological and histometric evaluation. In the MF group, all 16 implants were osseointegrated, while in the GBR group, one bone fracture occurred, and six of 16 implants were lost. After 6 weeks, significantly higher bone crest levels were found for the GBR group than for the MF group both buccally and lingually (P bone thickness was greater in the GBR group than in the MF group (P bone was significantly higher in the GBR group compared to the MF group. Furthermore, buccal bone thickness in the GBR group was 0.93, 4.5, and 5.94 mm at, and 2 and 4 mm apical to the IS, respectively. The corresponding values in the MF group were greatly reduced (0, 0.21, and 2.56 mm). Bone loss on the buccal side compared to the lingual side was significantly greater only in the MF group. In this ridge expansion model in miniature pigs, the buccal bone volume was significantly better preserved with GBR when compared to a mucosal access flap, provided that soft tissue healing occurred complication free. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Parker, A.F.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides summary information on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) sites as listed in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), dated January 1, 1992, Appendix C. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory was built in 1943 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project. The original mission of ORNL was to produce and chemically separate the first gram-quantities of plutonium as part of the national effort to produce the atomic bomb. The current mission of ORNL is to provide applied research and development in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in nuclear fusion and fission, energy conservation, fossil fuels, and other energy technologies and to perform basic scientific research in selected areas of the physical, life, and environmental sciences. ER is also tasked with clean up or mitigation of environmental impacts resulting from past waste management practices on portions of the approximately 37,000 acres within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Other installations located within the ORR are the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25) and the Y-12 plant. The remedial action strategy currently integrates state and federal regulations for efficient compliance and approaches for both investigations and remediation efforts on a Waste Area Grouping (WAG) basis. As defined in the ORR FFA Quarterly Report July - September 1995, a WAG is a grouping of potentially contaminated sites based on drainage area and similar waste characteristics. These contaminated sites are further divided into four categories based on existing information concerning whether the data are generated for scoping or remedial investigation (RI) purposes. These areas are as follows: (1) Operable Units (OU); (2) Characterization Areas (CA); (3) Remedial Site Evaluation (RSE) Areas; and (4) Removal Site Evaluation (RmSE) Areas.

  20. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  1. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program

  2. Microgravity survey of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, R.D.

    1996-05-01

    Karst features are known to exist within the carbonate bedrock of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and may play an important role in groundwater flow and contaminant migration. This report discusses the results of a microgravity survey of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The main objective of the survey is to identify areas containing bedrock cavities. Secondary objectives included correlating the observed gravity to the geology and to variations in overburden thickness. The analysis includes 11 profile lines that are oriented perpendicular to the geologic strike and major structures throughout the K-25 Site. The profile lines are modeled in an effort to relate gravity anomalies to karst features such as concentrations of mud-filled cavities. Regolith thickness and density data provided by boreholes constrain the models. Areally distributed points are added to the profile lines to produce a gravity contour map of the site. In addition, data from the K-901 area are combined with data from previous surveys to produce a high resolution map of that site. The K-25 Site is located in an area of folded and faulted sedimentary rocks within the Appalachian Valley and Ridge physiographic province. Paleozoic age rocks of the Rome Formation, Knox Group, and Chickamauga Supergroup underlie the K-25 Site and contain structures that include the Whiteoak Mountain Fault, the K-25 Fault, a syncline, and an anticline. The mapped locations of the rock units and complex structures are currently derived from outcrop and well log analysis

  3. Kinematic and tectonic peculiarities of ultra-slow spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny; Grokholsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    This paper is dedicated to ultra-slow spreading ridges. They are distinguished as ridges with spreading velocities less than 2 cm/year. As it was shown by recent studies, these ridges are characterized by significant peculiarities of deep structure, topography and accretion mechanisms different from ridges with higher velocities. They are located in North Atlantic (Reikjanes, Kolbeynsey, Mohns, Knipovich), Arctic (Gakkel ridge, Lena trough), and southern part of the Indian Ocean (South-Western Indian ridge (SWIR)). Ridges located near hotspots (Reikjanes, Kolbeynsey ridge, central part of SWIR) show structure changing with increase of proximity of hotspots. Far from hotspots axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are short, high and offset by large non-transform offsets (NTOs) located in axial valley. Near hotspots the ridges are characterized by axial rise with long AVRs offset by small NTOs located on axial rise. These features are explained by influence of mantle flow from hotspots initiating the increase of mantle temperature. It results in decrease of lithospheric brittle layer with approaching to hotspot and subsequent change in accretion mechanisms, faulting patterns and lithosphere rheology. Several segments of ridges (16-25° E SWIR, 8° W-3° E) are characterized by structure similar with slow spreading Mid-Atlantic ridge (MAR). The rift valley is occupied by regularly spaced AVRs offset by small NTOs. Basalts prevail in dredges. Flanks of the ridges have the similar structure with MAR. The most significant portion of ultra-slow spreading ridges is characterized by unique segmentation (eastern and central part of Gakkel ridge, Knipovich, Mohns ridges, Lena trough segments in the eastern and western parts of SWIR) comprised of magmatic and amagmatic segments. The first ones are short centers of focused magmatic activity structurally resembling central parts of segments of MAR. The second ones are 35-150 km long portions with reduced or almost absent volcanic

  4. Oblique And Orthogonal Amagmatic Accretionary Ridges: Improbable Fault Geometries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H. J.

    2006-12-01

    Amagmatic accretionary segments, where the mantle is directly emplaced to the seafloor, constitute the third class of stable plate boundary structure, along with transforms and magmatic ridge segments at ocean ridges. While transforms extend plate boundaries in the direction of plate spreading and magmatic accretionary segments extend them sub-perpendicular to it, amagmatic accretionary segments can assume any orientation to the plate spreading direction; locally replacing both transform faults and magmatic ridge segments. The primary terrain-forming boundary faults along amagmatic segments form at improbable dips and strikes to the plate spreading direction; likely representing the end-member case for plate failure from the base rather than the top. Where the tectonic plates are thin, as at the fast spreading EPR, first-order ridge segments trend perpendicular to the spreading direction, indicating plate failure from the top. At slow ridges, first-order segments are often oblique to the spreading direction, as along the Reykjanes Ridge. There, individual second-order segments arrange themselves en-echelon, sub-perpendicular to the spreading direction, linking with the oblique boundary faults parallel the rift to form one integrated set of faults and fissures to accommodate extension. This reflects plate failure influenced by plate weakening along the zone of lithospheric necking at the base of the plate, as well as brittle failure at the top. At ultraslow ridges (spreading rate is less than ~12 mm/yr, and the weakening influence of melt in the lithosphere is nearly absent, oblique amagmatic spreading segments form, linking to magmatic segments to locally form curvilinear plate boundaries. High-angle normal faults are abundant, but form independent of low-angle boundary faults, becoming prominent terrain-forming features only at the magmatic segments. Linking of amagmatic and magmatic segments resembles ridge-transform intersections, with hooked volcanic ridges and

  5. Geomorphological investigation of multiphase glacitectonic composite ridge systems in Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Harold; Benn, Douglas I.; Lukas, Sven; Spagnolo, Matteo; Cook, Simon J.; Swift, Darrel A.; Clark, Chris D.; Yde, Jacob C.; Watts, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Some surge-type glaciers on the High-Arctic archipelago of Svalbard have large glacitectonic composite ridge systems at their terrestrial margins. These have formed by rapid glacier advance into proglacial sediments during the active surge phase, creating multicrested moraine complexes. Such complexes can be formed during single surge advances or multiple surges to successively less-extensive positions. The few existing studies of composite ridge systems have largely relied on detailed information on internal structure and sedimentology to reconstruct their formation and links to surge processes. However, natural exposures of internal structure are commonly unavailable, and the creation of artificial exposures is often problematic in fragile Arctic environments. To compensate for these issues, we investigate the potential for reconstructing composite ridge system formation based on geomorphological evidence alone, focusing on clear morphostratigraphic relationships between ridges within the moraine complex and relict meltwater channels/outwash fans. Based on mapping at the margins of Finsterwalderbreen (in Van Keulenfjorden) and Grønfjordbreen (in Grønfjorden), we show that relict meltwater channels that breach outer parts of the composite ridge systems are in most cases truncated upstream within the ridge complex by an inner pushed ridge or ridges at their ice-proximal extents. Our interpretation of this relationship is that the entire composite ridge system is unlikely to have formed during the same glacier advance but is instead the product of multiple advances to successively less-extensive positions, whereby younger ridges are emplaced on the ice-proximal side of older ridges. This indicates that the Finsterwalderbreen composite ridge system has been formed by multiple separate advances, consistent with the cyclicity of surges. Being able to identify the frequency and magnitude of former surges is important as it provides insight into the past behaviour of

  6. Preliminary Analysis of the Knipovich Ridge Segmentation - Influence of Focused Magmatism and Ridge Obliquity on an Ultraslow Spreading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, K.; Curewitz, D.; Asada, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2002-12-01

    Bathymetry, gravity and deep-tow sonar image data are used to define the segmentation of a 400 km long portion of the ultraslow-spreading Knipovich Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Discrete volcanic centers marked by large volcanic constructions and accompanying short wavelength mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) lows generally resemble those of the Gakkel Ridge and the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). These magmatically robust segment centers are regularly spaced about 85-100 km apart along the ridge, and are characterized by accumulated hummocky terrain, high relief, off-axis seamount chains and significant MBA lows. We suggest that these eruptive centers correspond to areas of enhanced magma flux, and that their spacing reflects the geometry of underlying mantle upwelling cells. The large-scale thermal structure of the mantle primarily controls discrete and focused magmatism, and the relatively wide spacing of these segments may reflect cool mantle beneath the ridge. Segment centers along the southern Knipovich Ridge are characterized by lower relief and smaller MBA anomalies than along the northern section of the ridge. This suggests that ridge obliquity is a secondary control on ridge construction on the Knipovich Ridge, as the obliquity changes from 35° to 49° from north to south, respectively, while spreading rate and axial depth remain approximately constant. The increased obliquity may contribute to decreased effective spreading rates, lower upwelling magma velocity and melt formation, and limited horizontal dike propagation near the surface. We also identify small, magmatically weaker segments with low relief, little or no MBA anomaly, and no off axis expression. We suggest that these segments are either fed by lateral melt migration from adjacent magmatically stronger segments or represent smaller, discrete mantle upwelling centers with short-lived melt supply.

  7. Preliminary analysis of the Knipovich Ridge segmentation: influence of focused magmatism and ridge obliquity on an ultraslow spreading system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, Kyoko; Curewitz, Daniel; Asada, Miho; Tamaki, Kensaku; Vogt, Peter; Crane, Kathleen

    2002-09-01

    Bathymetry, gravity and deep-tow sonar image data are used to define the segmentation of a 400 km long portion of the ultraslow-spreading Knipovich Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Discrete volcanic centers marked by large volcanic constructions and accompanying short wavelength mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) lows generally resemble those of the Gakkel Ridge and the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge. These magmatically robust segment centers are regularly spaced about 85-100 km apart along the ridge, and are characterized by accumulated hummocky terrain, high relief, off-axis seamount chains and significant MBA lows. We suggest that these eruptive centers correspond to areas of enhanced magma flux, and that their spacing reflects the geometry of underlying mantle upwelling cells. The large-scale thermal structure of the mantle primarily controls discrete and focused magmatism, and the relatively wide spacing of these segments may reflect cool mantle beneath the ridge. Segment centers along the southern Knipovich Ridge are characterized by lower relief and smaller MBA anomalies than along the northern section of the ridge. This suggests that ridge obliquity is a secondary control on ridge construction on the Knipovich Ridge, as the obliquity changes from 35° to 49° from north to south, respectively, while spreading rate and axial depth remain approximately constant. The increased obliquity may contribute to decreased effective spreading rates, lower upwelling magma velocity and melt formation, and limited horizontal dike propagation near the surface. We also identify small, magmatically weaker segments with low relief, little or no MBA anomaly, and no off-axis expression. We suggest that these segments are either fed by lateral melt migration from adjacent magmatically stronger segments or represent smaller, discrete mantle upwelling centers with short-lived melt supply.

  8. Bathymetry, controlled source seismic and gravity observations of the Mendeleev ridge; implications for ridge structure, origin, and regional tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Dayton; Coakley, Bernard; Hopper, John; Kristoffersen, Yngve

    2010-11-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS), seismic refraction, and gravity data collected down the flank of the Chukchi Plateau, but predominantly over the Mendeleev Ridge have been processed and interpreted to describe the crustal style of the ridge, as well as the structural history. These results provide constraints on the origin of the ridge, and the tectonic evolution of the Amerasian Basin. MCS images reveal two primary sediment sequences separated by an unconformity that persists across the entire Mendeleev Ridge. The basement and lower sediment sequence exhibit pervasive normal faulting. The upper sequence is laterally conformable and not effected by faulting, thus the regional unconformity dividing the two sequences is interpreted to mark the end of extensional deformation. Modeling of sonobuoy seismic refraction data reveals upper crustal P-wave velocities ranging from 3.5 to 6.4kms-1 approximately 5km into the basement. The velocity structure of the Mendeleev Ridge is consistent with either a volcanic rifted continental margin, or an oceanic plateau origin. Observed gravity anomalies over the ridge are reproduced by a model consisting of bathymetry, sediment and basement horizons from the MCS data and a single crustal layer of 2.86gcm-3. This result is consistent with homogeneous, mafic crust. The similar velocity and density structures of the Mendeleev and Alpha ridges is consistent with a model where the two ridges are contiguous and share a common geological origin. Gravity modelling over the transition between the Chukchi Plateau and the Mendeleev Ridge suggests the two features have differing compositions and distinct emplacement histories. Three tectonic models are presented for the origin of the Alpha Mendeleev Ridge (AMR) that satisfy constraints set by this and previous studies: (1) a rifted volcanic continental margin, (2) an oceanic plateau formed at a spreading centre-perpendicular to the AMR and (3) an oceanic plateau formed at a spreading centre

  9. Homenaje de los Institutos de Derecho Constitucional y Derechos Humanos a Justino Jiménez de Aréchaga en el centenario de su nacimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pérez Pérez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nació hace cien años, pero su pensamiento sigue plenamente vigente.Su gran obra – verdadero tratado de Derecho Constitucional Uruguayo aunque él no le haya dado ese nombre –terminó de publicarse hace casi seis décadas, pero sigue siendo imprescindible obra de consulta para todos los juristas de nuestro país.Falleció en 1980, pero aún hoy – y sin duda por mucho tiempo más – no hay estudio serio de su especialidad que no comience por indagar lo que él pensaba al respecto.Ése es Justino Jiménez de Aréchaga, la grande, inmensa personalidad uruguaya de cuyo nacimiento se cumplen hoy cien años.Los Institutos de Derecho Constitucional y Derechos Humanos, que me honro en dirigir, le rinden hoy un merecidísimo homenaje, que podemos sintetizar en cuatro afirmaciones:I.Justino Jiménez de Aréchaga hizo una obra maestraII.Fue un Maestro del Derecho y de la vida en democraciaIII.Como verdadero Maestro, también nos enseñó/incitó a tratar de continuar su obraIV.El homenaje que le debemos al Maestro Aréchaga consiste, precisamente, no en palabras sino en obras que lo honren.

  10. The unique impact of abolition of Jim Crow laws on reducing inequities in infant death rates and implications for choice of comparison groups in analyzing societal determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T; Coull, Brent; Waterman, Pamela D; Beckfield, Jason

    2013-12-01

    We explored associations between the abolition of Jim Crow laws (i.e., state laws legalizing racial discrimination overturned by the 1964 US Civil Rights Act) and birth cohort trends in infant death rates. We analyzed 1959 to 2006 US Black and White infant death rates within and across sets of states (polities) with and without Jim Crow laws. Between 1965 and 1969, a unique convergence of Black infant death rates occurred across polities; in 1960 to 1964, the Black infant death rate was 1.19 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18, 1.20) in the Jim Crow polity than in the non-Jim Crow polity, whereas in 1970 to 1974 the rate ratio shrank to and remained at approximately 1 (with the 95% CI including 1) until 2000, when it rose to 1.10 (95% CI = 1.08, 1.12). No such convergence occurred for Black-White differences in infant death rates or for White infants. Our results suggest that abolition of Jim Crow laws affected US Black infant death rates and that valid analysis of societal determinants of health requires appropriate comparison groups.

  11. Strategies for alveolar ridge reconstruction and preservation for implant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Chihiro; Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Mukaibo, Taro; Kondo, Yusuke; Hosokawa, Ryuji

    2015-10-01

    In dental implant treatment, ridge preservation and immediate or early implant placement are recommended to minimize bone resorption after tooth extraction and achieve esthetic outcomes. However, there is no consensus concerning the efficacy of this surgical method. There is also no consensus on the efficacy of bone and soft tissue grafts and surgical methods for alveolar ridge reconstruction. This paper reports ridge alteration in the anterior maxilla after tooth extraction, and summarizes the efficacy of various ridge preservation methods and immediate or early implant placement as alveolar ridge preservation methods to minimize bone resorption after tooth extraction. The advantages and complications of alveolar ridge reconstruction methods, and the efficacy and surgical method of soft tissue graft are reviewed. The anterior maxilla is in the esthetic zone, and the thickness of the bone on the labial side around the natural tooth is less than 1mm in many cases. Therefore, it is impossible to prevent bone resorption completely, even if ridge preservation and immediate or early implant placement are performed after tooth extraction. It is necessary to obtain stable and long-term esthetics by combining connective tissue and free gingival grafts, in addition to hard tissue augmentation. It is important to consider the burden and level of satisfaction of patients, such as in terms of donor site morbidity in hard and soft tissue grafting, and to pay attention to appropriate indications to avoid overtreatment. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Determinants of alveolar ridge preservation differ by anatomic location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebicioglu, Binnaz; Salas, Mabel; Ort, Yirae; Johnson, Ashley; Yildiz, Vedat O; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Agarwal, Sudha; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2013-04-01

    To investigate and compare outcomes following alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) in posterior maxilla and mandible. Twenty-four patients (54 ± 3 years) with single posterior tooth extraction were included. ARP was performed with freeze-dried bone allograft and collagen membrane. Clinical parameters were recorded at extraction and re-entry. Harvested bone cores were analysed by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. In both jaws, ARP prevented ridge height loss, but ridge width was significantly reduced by approximately 2.5 mm. Healing time, initial clinical attachment loss and amount of keratinized tissue at extraction site were identified as determinants of ridge height outcome. Buccal plate thickness and tooth root length were identified as determinants of ridge width outcome. In addition, initial ridge width was positively correlated with ridge width loss. Micro-CT revealed greater mineralization per unit volume in new bone compared with existing bone in mandible (p < 0.001). Distributions of residual graft, new cellular bone and immature tissue were similar in both jaws. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate that in different anatomic locations different factors may determine ARP outcomes. Further studies are needed to better understand determinants of ARP outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI

  14. Melt generation beneath Arctic Ridges: Implications from U decay series disequilibria in the Mohns, Knipovich, and Gakkel Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, L. J.; Sims, K. W. W.; Prytulak, J.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Elliott, T.; Blusztajn, J.; Fretzdorff, S.; Reagan, M.; Haase, K.; Humphris, S.; Schilling, J.-G.

    2014-02-01

    We present new 238U-230Th-226Ra-210Pb, 235U-231Pa, and Nd, Sr, Hf, and Pb isotope data for the slow- to ultraslow-spreading Mohns, Knipovich, and Gakkel Ridges. Combined with previous work, our data from the Arctic Ridges cover the full range of axial depths from the deep northernmost Gakkel Ridge shallowing upwards to the Knipovich, Mohns, and Kolbeinsey Ridges north of Iceland. Age-constrained samples from the Mohns and Knipovich Ridges have (230Th/238U) activity ratios ranging from 1.165 to 1.30 and 1.101 to 1.225, respectively. The high 230Th excesses of Kolbeinsey, Mohns, and Knipovich mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are erupted from ridges producing relatively thin (Mohns, Knipovich) to thick (Kolbeinsey) oceanic crust with evidence for sources ranging from mostly peridotite (Kolbeinsey) to eclogite-rich mantle (Mohns, Knipovich). Age-constrained lavas from 85°E on the Gakkel Ridge, on the other hand, overlie little to no crust and range from small (˜5%) 230Th excesses to small 238U excesses (˜5%). The strong negative correlation between (230Th/238U) values vs. axial ridge depth among Arctic ridge basalts is controlled not only by solidus depth influence on 238U-230Th disequilibria, but also by variations in mantle source lithology and depth to the base of the lithosphere, which is expected to vary at ultra-slow spreading ridges. Small 231Pa excesses (65% excess) in age-constrained basalts support the presence of eclogite in the mantle source for this region. Conversely, the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge basalts are homogeneous, with Sr, Nd, and Hf radiogenic isotopic signatures indicative of a long time-averaged depleted mantle source. The Gakkel samples have minimum (226Ra/230Th) ratios ranging from 3.07 to 3.65 ± 3%, which lie along and extend the global negative correlation between 226Ra and 230Th excesses observed in MORB. The new 230Th-226Ra data support a model for global MORB production in which deep melts record interaction with shallower

  15. Crush Testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic crush test is required in the certification testing of some small Type B transportation packages. International Atomic Energy Agency regulations state that the test article must be 'subjected to a dynamic crush test by positioning the specimen on the target so as to suffer maximum damage.' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Transportation Technologies Group performs testing of Type B transportation packages, including the crush test, at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee (United States). This paper documents ORNL's experiences performing crush tests on several different Type B packages. ORNL has crush tested five different drum-type package designs, continuing its 60 year history of RAM package testing. A total of 26 crush tests have been performed in a wide variety of package orientations and crush plate CG alignments. In all cases, the deformation of the outer drum created by the crush test was significantly greater than the deformation damage caused by the 9 m drop test. The crush test is a highly effective means for testing structural soundness of smaller nondense Type B shipping package designs. Further regulatory guidance could alleviate the need to perform the crush test in a wide range of orientations and crush plate CG alignments.

  16. Adaptive ridge regression for rare variant detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimao Zhan

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that both common and rare variants contribute to the risks of common diseases or complex traits and the cumulative effects of multiple rare variants can explain a significant proportion of trait variances. Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies allow us to genotype rare causal variants and investigate the effects of such rare variants on complex traits. We developed an adaptive ridge regression method to analyze the collective effects of multiple variants in the same gene or the same functional unit. Our model focuses on continuous trait and incorporates covariate factors to remove potential confounding effects. The proposed method estimates and tests multiple rare variants collectively but does not depend on the assumption of same direction of each rare variant effect. Compared with the Bayesian hierarchical generalized linear model approach, the state-of-the-art method of rare variant detection, the proposed new method is easy to implement, yet it has higher statistical power. Application of the new method is demonstrated using the well-known data from the Dallas Heart Study.

  17. Adaptive ridge regression for rare variant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haimao; Xu, Shizhong

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that both common and rare variants contribute to the risks of common diseases or complex traits and the cumulative effects of multiple rare variants can explain a significant proportion of trait variances. Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies allow us to genotype rare causal variants and investigate the effects of such rare variants on complex traits. We developed an adaptive ridge regression method to analyze the collective effects of multiple variants in the same gene or the same functional unit. Our model focuses on continuous trait and incorporates covariate factors to remove potential confounding effects. The proposed method estimates and tests multiple rare variants collectively but does not depend on the assumption of same direction of each rare variant effect. Compared with the Bayesian hierarchical generalized linear model approach, the state-of-the-art method of rare variant detection, the proposed new method is easy to implement, yet it has higher statistical power. Application of the new method is demonstrated using the well-known data from the Dallas Heart Study.

  18. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A.R. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the public about the impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the public and the environment. It describes the environmental surveillance and monitoring activities conducted at and around the DOE facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Preparation and publication of this report is in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1. The order specifies a publication deadline of June of the following year for each calendar year of data. The primary objective of this report is to summarize all information collected for the previous calendar year regarding effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and estimates of radiation and chemical dose to the surrounding population. When multiple years of information are available for a program, trends are also evaluated. The first seven sections of Volume 1 of this report address this objective. The last three sections of Volume 1 provide information on solid waste management, special environmental studies, and quality assurance programs.

  19. Ferrobasalts from the Spiess Ridge segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roex, A. P.; Dick, H. J. B.; Reid, A. M.; Erlank, A. J.

    1982-10-01

    Highly vesicular, microporphyritic basaltic rocks have been dredged from the slow-spreading Spiess Ridge segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge. All the samples recovered are hyalocrystalline with plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine as phenocryst and microphenocryst phases. Titanomagnetite occurs as euhedral microphenocrysts in some of the more evolved samples. In terms of bulk rock and quench glass chemistry the lavas are characterised by highly evolved compositions(e.g. FeO*=10.3-14.2%;TiO 2=2.0-3.4%;K 2O=0.50-1.1%;MgO=6.0-3.5%;Zr=160-274ppm;Nb=14-32ppm) and can be classified as ferrobasalts. Isotopic and incompatible element ratios of the lavas(e.g. 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70325-0.70333;Zr/Nb=8.4-11.3;Y/Nb=2.3-1.4) indicate their strongly "enriched" nature (see also Dickey et al. [6]). Quantitative major and trace element modelling indicates that most of the compositional variations observed can be attributed to low-pressure fractional crystallisation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and minor olivine and titanomagnetite. The range in composition can be accounted for by up to 65% fractional crystallisation. We suggest that the extreme differentiation of the Spiess Ridge lavas is related not to spreading rate, but to rate of magma supply. The basaltic melts appear to have evolved in a newly established zone of magmatic activity, associated with the most recent northward jump of the Bouvet triple junction, where they were effectively isolated from significant admixture of primitive magmas.

  20. Oak Ridge low-level waste disposal facility designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Jones, L.S.

    1991-01-01

    The strategic planning process that culuminates in the identification, selection, construction, and ultimate operation of treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for all types of low-level waste (LLW) generated on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted under the Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration (LLWDDD) Program. This program considered management of various concentrations of short half-life radionuclides generated principally at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and long half-life radionuclides (principally uranium) generated at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant. The LLWDDD Program is still ongoing and involves four phases: (1) alternative identification and evaluation, (2) technology demonstration, (3) limited operational implementation, and (4) full operational implementation. This document provides a discussion of these phases

  1. Continuous separation of micropaticles by size in ridged microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenbin; Wang, Gonghao; Sulchek, Todd A.; Alexeev, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Size-based separation and sorting are widely used for biomedical research and clinical application. We design a microfluidic channel with periodically arranged diagonal ridges that separate micrometer-sized particles by size. We use a hybrid numerical method that combines the lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) and lattice spring model (LSM) to examine the dynamics of suspended particles in such channels. Our simulations reveal that particles with different sizes follow distinct trajectories and separate in the lateral direction inside ridged microchannels. The trajectories are determined by the particle equilibrium position in narrow constrictions formed diagonal ridges. We characterize the separation performance by analyzing the effects of ridge geometry and compare our simulation results with experimental data. This microfluidic system can be employed for high throughput sorting and separation of biological cells and synthetic microcapsules.

  2. February 2007 Multibeam Mapping of Pulley Ridge, southwest Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This disk or set of disks contain high-resolution multibeam and backscatter maps of the Pulley Ridge Area, near the Tortugas, in the Gulf of Mexico. It includes the...

  3. [Mandibular ridge augmentation with hydroxylapatite and its extension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Mercier, P

    1996-01-01

    The results of 5 years follow-up of 84 cases of mandibular residual ridge augmented with hydroxlapatite (HA), followed by ridge extension, are reported. The first surgical procedures, subperiosteal HA insertion, and the second stage of total lowering of the floow of the mouth, vestibuloplasty and skin graft are detailedly described. The ridge is augmented by the first surgery, disturbance of the fraenums of the lip, buccal and tongue and muscles are eliminated by the second surgery, to increase denture retention and stability, improve wear resisting of tissue covered over the artifical ridge and eliminate pain and uncomfort when wearing denture. The results of five years follow-up show that two stages reconstruction are better than HA insertion only. HA is a kind of ideal material of bone replacement, which is not resorbed in most cases.

  4. Technical Evaluation of Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kriskovich, J R

    2002-01-01

    Two evaluations of the Oak Ridge Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Facility (FTF) were performed on December 11 and 12, 2001, and consisted of a quality assurance and a technical evaluation. This report documents results of the technical evaluation.

  5. Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, H.

    1980-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a large (5300 people), US-government-funded laboratory, which performs research in many disciplines and in many technological areas. Programs and organization of ORNL are described for the People's Republic of China

  6. 60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-01-01

    This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  7. Miocene phosphorites from the Murray Ridge, northwestern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Hegner, E.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Kessarkar, P.M.; Ahmad, S.M.; Raju, D.S.

    Phosphorites from the Murray Ridge, NW Arabian Sea comprise nodules, bioclasts, and bone fragments. The nodules are made up of a homogeneous, light-colored phosphate nucleus consisting of Rivulariacean filamentous cyanobacteria and a thin dark...

  8. Landslide hazard on the slopes of Dabicho Ridge, Wondo Genet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-06-18

    Landslide hazard on the slopes of Dabicho Ridge, Wondo Genet area: the case of June 18, 1996 event. Berhanu Temesgen, Mohammed Umer, Asfawossen Asrat, Ogbaghebriel Berakhi, Abayneh Ayele, Dramis Francesco, Metasebia Demissie ...

  9. Technical specifications for the Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    Information is presented concerning the Oak Ridge Research Reactor in the areas of: safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of effluents

  10. Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.; Carpenter, P.J.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Carr, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void

  11. Project plan for the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The Background Soil characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents

  12. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The

  13. Project plan for the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The Background Soil characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents.

  14. The Northern Central Indian Ridge: Geology and tectonics of fracture zones-dominated spreading ridge segments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Drolia, R.K.; Iyer, S.D.; Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.; Ray, Dwijesh; Misra, S.; Andrade, R.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Rajasekhar, R.P.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    and temporal rates as other enviro n- mental variables, as these are key factors to dec i pher the dynamics of marine ecosystems. Such a study also helps to under stand the role of biology in modifying climate via air ? sea flux of carbon dioxide. Nine chain... xides. ? A deep central plumbing system, fed by distinctive mantle sources, may have supplied magma as uprising diapirs to several small discontinuous buoyant cha m- bers situated at shallow depths along the ridge crest or else the melt surfaced...

  15. Large fault fabric of the Ninetyeast Ridge implies near-spreading ridge formation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sager, W.W.; Paul, C.F.; Krishna, K.S.; Pringle, M.S.; Eisin, A.E.; Frey, F.A.; Rao, D.G.; Levchenko, O.V.

    and faulting history has been developed. Faults on the NER are little surprise because it 55 formed at or near a spreading ridge and is currently at the nexus of diffuse intraplate deformation 56 of the Indo-Australian plate (Fig. 1). Earthquakes occur...]. Untangling the 124 history of faulting on NER is beyond the scope of this report and we rely here on the observation 125 that the features causing gravity gradient lineations are large horsts and grabens (Figs. 2, 3). 126 Although seismic profiles often...

  16. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report; Reports of the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction, Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widner, Thomas E.; email = twidner@jajoneses.com

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel of individuals appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The panel requested that the principal investigator for the project prepare the following report, ''Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report,'' to serve the following purposes: (1) summarize in a single, less technical report, the methods and results of the various investigations that comprised the Phase II of the dose reconstruction; (2) describe the systematic searching of classified and unclassified historical records that was a vital component of the project; and (3) summarize the less detailed, screening-level assessments that were performed to evaluate the potential health significance of a number of materials, such a uranium, whose priority did not require a complete dose reconstruction effort. This report describes each major step of the dose reconstruction study: (1) the review of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility; (2) estimation of the quantity and timing of releases of radioiodines from X-10, of mercury from Y-12, of PCB's from all facilities, and of cesium-137 and other radionuclides from White Oak Creek; (3) evaluation of the routes taken by these contaminants through the environment to nearby populations; and (4) estimation of doses and health risks to exposed groups. Calculations found the highest excess cancer risks for a female born in 1952 who drank goat milk; the highest non-cancer health risk was for children in a farm family exposed to PCBs in and near East Fork Poplar Creek. More detailed

  17. Europan double ridge morphometry as a test of formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameron, Ashley C.; Burr, Devon M.

    2018-05-01

    Double ridges on the Jovian satellite Europa consist of two parallel ridges with a central trough. Although these features are nearly ubiquitous on Europa, their formation mechanism(s) is (are) not yet well-understood. Previous hypotheses for their formation can be divided into two groups based on 1) the expected interior slope angles and 2) the magnitude of interior/exterior slope symmetry. The published hypotheses in the first ("fracture") group entail brittle deformation of the crust, either by diapirism, shear heating, or buckling due to compression. Because these mechanisms imply uplift of near-vertical fractures, their predicted interior slopes are steeper than the angle of repose (AOR) with shallower exterior slopes. The second ("flow") group includes cryosedimentary and cryovolcanic processes - explosive or effusive cryovolcanism and tidal squeezing -, which are predicted to form ridge slopes at or below the AOR. Explosive cryovolcanism would form self-symmetric ridges, whereas effusive cryolavas and cryo-sediments deposited during tidal squeezing would likely not exhibit slope symmetry. To distinguish between these two groups of hypothesized formation mechanisms, we derived measurements of interior slope angle and interior/exterior slope symmetry at multiple locations on Europa through analysis of data from the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera. Two types of data were used: i) elevation data from five stereo-pair digital elevation models (DEMs) covering four ridges (580 individual measurements), and ii) ridge shadow length measurements taken on individual images over 40 ridges (200 individual measurements). Our results shows that slopes measured on our DEMs, located in the Cilix and Banded Plains regions, typically fall below the AOR, and slope symmetry is dominant. Two different shadow measurement techniques implemented to calculate interior slopes yielded slope angles that also fall below the AOR. The shallow interior slopes derived from both

  18. “La fotografía es la misma muerte”: Ruina, espectro y testimonio de Antonio Machado en Guerra en España de Juan Ramón Jiménez

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre Oteiza, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    From 1936 to 1954 poet, editor, translator, critic, and Nobel laureate Juan Ramón Jiménez (Spain, 1881 – Puerto Rico, 1958) assembled an archive of heterogeneous texts and documents produced by him and others: photographs, journal entries, newspaper clippings, letters, poems, lectures, interviews, and aphorisms. Published in Spain in 1985 as Guerra en España, this corpus was Jiménez’s transatlantic testimony of his pro-Republican activities during the Spanish Civil War and his long exile in ...

  19. Emerging diversity of hydrothermal systems on slow spreading ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Peter A.

    The development of seafloor hydrothermal research has followed a classic scientific progression in which discoveries were initially interpreted as special cases until further exploration revealed their more general significance. The first high-temperature seafloor hydrothermal system was found at the Atlantis II Deep of the slow spreading Red Sea in 1963. At that time, the hydrothermal activity was largely discounted as an anomaly associated with continental rifting rather than as part of an early stage of opening of an ocean basin that could continue with the development of ocean ridges as in the Atlantic. When high-temperature black smoker hydrothermal venting was found on the East Pacific Rise in 1979, the scientific consensus then held that the relatively high rate of magma supply at intermediate to fast spreading rates was required for such activity. Accordingly, high-temperature hydrothermal activity could not occur on the slow spreading half of the global ocean ridge system. High-temperature black smokers like those on the East Pacific Rise were first discovered on a slow spreading ocean ridge at the TAG hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in 1985. The scientific consensus then ruled out the possibility for such activity on the ultraslow portion of the ocean ridge system. Plumes indicative of active high-temperature black smokers were found on the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic in 2001, and active black smokers were found on the Southwest Indian Ridge in 2006. A diversity of high-temperature hydrothermal systems remains to be found on ocean ridges, particularly at slow spreading rates.

  20. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared and published each year to inform the public of the environmental activities that take place on the reservation and in the surrounding areas. It is written to comply with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. This document has been prepared to present the highlights of the Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2007 in an easy-to-read, summary format.

  1. A Risk Comparison of Ordinary Least Squares vs Ridge Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Dhillon, Paramveer S.; Foster, Dean P.; Kakade, Sham M.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2011-01-01

    We compare the risk of ridge regression to a simple variant of ordinary least squares, in which one simply projects the data onto a finite dimensional subspace (as specified by a Principal Component Analysis) and then performs an ordinary (un-regularized) least squares regression in this subspace. This note shows that the risk of this ordinary least squares method is within a constant factor (namely 4) of the risk of ridge regression.

  2. Alveolar Ridge Split Technique Using Piezosurgery with Specially Designed Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Moro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with atrophic ridge who need prosthetic rehabilitation is a common problem in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Among the various techniques introduced for the expansion of alveolar ridges with a horizontal bone deficit is the alveolar ridge split technique. The aim of this article is to give a description of some new tips that have been specifically designed for the treatment of atrophic ridges with transversal bone deficit. A two-step piezosurgical split technique is also described, based on specific osteotomies of the vestibular cortex and the use of a mandibular ramus graft as interpositional graft. A total of 15 patients were treated with the proposed new tips by our department. All the expanded areas were successful in providing an adequate width and height to insert implants according to the prosthetic plan and the proposed tips allowed obtaining the most from the alveolar ridge split technique and piezosurgery. These tips have made alveolar ridge split technique simple, safe, and effective for the treatment of horizontal and vertical bone defects. Furthermore the proposed piezosurgical split technique allows obtaining horizontal and vertical bone augmentation.

  3. A Case Report of Ridge Augmentation using Onlay Interpositional Graft: An Approach to Improve Prosthetic Prognosis of a Deficit Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanand Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal therapy has developed beyond the scope of the treatment of periodontal pathoses. Periodontal plastic surgery consists of the reconstructive procedures designed to enhance the both function and esthetics. Deficient ridges pose a severe problem to the restorative dentist in restoring the natural form, function and esthetics of the prosthesis replacing the natural dentition. Depending upon the severity, location of these defects and the prosthetic option chosen, hard and soft tissue ridge augmentation or non-surgical approach or a combination may help to address them. The present clinical report describes a soft tissue ridge augmentation of a localized ridge defect in maxillary aesthetic region using onlay interpositional graft followed by fixed partial denture.

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents data and information related to remedial investigation studies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information is included on a soil gas survey, surface radiological investigations of waste areas, and well installation for ground water monitoring

  5. A STUDY ON JOSEPH CONRAD’S HEART OF DARKNESS, LORD JIM AND NOSTROMO İN A NEW HISTORICIST PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    ZENGİN, Mevlüde

    2008-01-01

    ÖZET Bu doktora tezinin amacı Joseph Conrad’ın Heart of Darkness (Karanlığın Yüreği) (1898), Lord Jim (1901) ve Nostromo (1904) adlı romanlarını Yeni Tarihselcilik (New Historicism) bağlamında incelemektir. Bu çalışma, adı geçen romanlarla tarihsel bağlam arasındaki ilişkiyi incelemek üzere romanların öncelikle Conrad’ın yaşamı ile daha sonra ise romanların emperyalizm döneminin söylemleri içindeki yerini belirlemek üzere, yazıldığı tarihsel dönem ve aynı dönemde yazılan yazınsal olmayan meti...

  6. Itinerario lírico entre Juan Ramón Jiménez y Federico García

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Rico Escobar

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available Si he intitulado estas páginas con el descoyuntado nombre que las precede, es sólo porque aspiro a colocar frente a esa España lírica de todos los tiempos, a los poetas que, procedentes de Juan Ramón Jiménez, con tangencia en el postmodernismo y adentrándose por los lindes ultraístas, arriban a nuestra época. Fácil es comprender que las escuelas literarias se entrelazan de tal modo y con tan disimulada manera, que llegan a confundirse, esquivando a los críticos advertir el vacío, que establece entre ellas, ese "eslabón perdido" que llamamos la transición.

  7. Alarma sobre el aplastamiento de la persona en la sociedad contemporánea: José Jiménez Lozano en la prensa regional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Merino Bobillo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades de la sociedad contemporánea son descritas, con lucidez y brillantez literaria, por el periodista y escritor José Jiménez Lozano, en las entregas periodísticas al Grupo Promecal. Los nacionalismos, la movida y el botellón, la violencia de género, el lenguaje sexista, etc. son retazos de la actualidad que su mirada atraviesa y dimensiona. Sus artículos traspasan la contingencia de lo periodístico para convertirse en propuestas culturales con tonalidad universal. No se quedan en la crítica de los sucesos concretos sino que, apoyándose en ellos, derivan en reflexiones de corte antropológico y ofrecen pensamientos válidos para los lectores de hoy y de mañana.

  8. Characterization plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Area-Wide Groundwater Program, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This characterization plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the characterization plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide subsequent GWOU remedial investigations. The plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It is important to note that the characterization plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. As such, remedial investigations will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This characterization plan outlines the overall strategy for the remedial investigations and defines tasks that are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  9. Quality assurance plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) is concerned with design and construction (Sect. 2) and characterization and monitoring (Sect. 3). The basis for Sect. 2 is the Quality Assurance Plan for the Design and Construction of Waste Area Grouping 6 Closure at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the basis for Sect. 3 is the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Combining the two areas into one plan gives a single, overall document that explains the requirements and from which the individual QAPs and quality assurance project plans can be written. The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 QAP establishes the procedures and requirements to be implemented for control of quality-related activities for the WAG 6 project. Quality Assurance (QA) activities are subject to requirements detailed in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), QA Program and the Environmental Restoration (ER) QA Program, as well as to other quality requirements. These activities may be performed by Energy Systems organizations, subcontractors to Energy Systems, and architect-engineer (A-E) under prime contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), or a construction manager under prime contract to DOE. This plan specifies the overall Energy Systems quality requirements for the project. The WAG 6 QAP will be supplemented by subproject QAPs that will identify additional requirements pertaining to each subproject

  10. Shallow mantle melt stagnation under Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Handt, A.; Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; Dick, H. J. B.; Michael, P.

    2003-04-01

    Few studies have been devoted to abyssal plagioclase peridotites, despite their relatively high abundance (30% of AP). Their origin is still unresolved, probably because intense alteration sets limits to spatially controlled geochemical analysis and obliterates textural relationships. Impregnation by a melt is the most widely accepted theory whereas other studies propose an origin by retrogression from spinel to plagioclase facies conditions. During the AMORE cruise along Gakkel Ridge in summer 2001, a dredge haul recovered spinel and plagioclase lherzolites in the axial valley of the amagmatic area. Their exceptional freshness has allowed to analyse all mineral phases. Plagioclase-bearing and -free samples are coarse-grained cpx-rich lherzolites. The plagioclase lherzolites show a wide range of modal plagioclase-contents and often showes textures related to impregnation. Noticeable are the common symplectite textures in the plagioclase peridotites, mostly opx-plag around cpx grains but also one ol-plag around cpx, suggesting a breakdown origin. The spinel lherzolites are characterised by low spinel-Cr# (˜16) and homogeneous flat cpx REE-patterns (~6 x CI). The plagioclase peridotites display strong compositional heterogeneities with pronounced core-rim variations in major and trace elements. Trace element variations in cpx show consistent correlations with textures as contact with plagioclase or symplectite formation. The An-contents of plagioclase range from 76 to 94, spinel Cr# from 10 to 48. Plagioclase trace element data reveal low concentrations for the LREE and no positive Sr-anomaly. Therefore it suggests an impregnation origin for most of the plagioclase by an already fractionated and depleted melt. Yet a minor breakdown component can be observed which was probably triggered by the impregnation. The inferred composition of this melt cannot be correlated with the nearest basalts in this region nor with a melt produced by melting of the spinel lherzolites.

  11. DRREP: deep ridge regressed epitope predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Gene; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Shaojie

    2017-10-03

    The ability to predict epitopes plays an enormous role in vaccine development in terms of our ability to zero in on where to do a more thorough in-vivo analysis of the protein in question. Though for the past decade there have been numerous advancements and improvements in epitope prediction, on average the best benchmark prediction accuracies are still only around 60%. New machine learning algorithms have arisen within the domain of deep learning, text mining, and convolutional networks. This paper presents a novel analytically trained and string kernel using deep neural network, which is tailored for continuous epitope prediction, called: Deep Ridge Regressed Epitope Predictor (DRREP). DRREP was tested on long protein sequences from the following datasets: SARS, Pellequer, HIV, AntiJen, and SEQ194. DRREP was compared to numerous state of the art epitope predictors, including the most recently published predictors called LBtope and DMNLBE. Using area under ROC curve (AUC), DRREP achieved a performance improvement over the best performing predictors on SARS (13.7%), HIV (8.9%), Pellequer (1.5%), and SEQ194 (3.1%), with its performance being matched only on the AntiJen dataset, by the LBtope predictor, where both DRREP and LBtope achieved an AUC of 0.702. DRREP is an analytically trained deep neural network, thus capable of learning in a single step through regression. By combining the features of deep learning, string kernels, and convolutional networks, the system is able to perform residue-by-residue prediction of continues epitopes with higher accuracy than the current state of the art predictors.

  12. The Composition of the Complete Crust at Ultraslow Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvassnes, A. J.; Devey, C.; Dick, H. J.

    2006-12-01

    Strongly focused magmatic activity at discrete points along the ridge axis is typical for the ultraslow ridges, resulting in the formation of axis-perpendicular basement ridges (Dick et al., Nature 426, 405-412, 2003; Jokat et al., Nature 423: 962-965, 2003). Middle and lower crustal rocks are exposed along steeply dipping normal faults at the basement ridges in places where seismic studies have demonstrated the crust to be ~2-km thick (Jokat et al., op. cit., Michael, et al., Nature Vol 423: 956-961, 2003). High Na8 values and low Fe8 values in many of the basaltic glasses probably result from very low rate of fractional melting of the mantle and caused the very thin crust to be formed. We present a model of the major and trace element composition of the complete crust at these ultraslow ridges based on an extensive study of whole rocks and minerals from upper, middle and lower crustal rocks from the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges. The Gakkel Ridge rocks fall clearly into two geochemical types based on geographic region the Western Volcanic Zone and the Sparsely Magmatic Zone. Magmas from the Western Volcanic Zone shows geochemical signatures indicating very large degrees of melting, or derivation from a very depleted source, or both, and as such are atypical of magmas from ultraslow ridges, and may or may not be a red herring. Therefore, in order to calculate a magmatic budget for the complete crust at the typical ultraslow ridges, we have used the data from the Sparsely Magmatic Zone together with the ultraslow part of the Southwest Indian Ridge. We have derived models for the major element compositions of coexisting mineral phases using the modeling program "Melts" (Ghiorso and Sack, Cont Min Pet, 119: 197- 212, 1995), and compared them to our data, in order to determine how much each of the rocks were crystallized relative to the major elements of a parental magma. The major and trace elements for the different rock types are then added together in

  13. Reading Ombrone river delta evolution through beach ridges morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammi, Irene; Piccardi, Marco; Pranzini, Enzo; Rossi, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    The present study focuses on the evolution of the Ombrone River delta (Southern Tuscany, Italy) in the last five centuries, when fluvial sediment input was huge also as a consequence of the deforestation performed on the watershed. The aim of this study is to find a correlation between river input and beach ridges morphology and to explain the different distribution of wetlands and sand deposits on the two sides of the delta. Visible, NIR and TIR satellite images were processed to retrieve soil wetness associated to sand ridges and interdune silty deposits. High resolution LiDAR data were analysed using vegetation filter and GIS enhancement algorithms in order to highlight small morphological variations, especially in areas closer to the river where agriculture has almost deleted these morphologies. A topographic survey and a very high resolution 3D model obtained from a set of images acquired by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) were carried out in selected sites, both to calibrate satellite LiDAR 3D data, and to map low relief areas. Historical maps, aerial photography and written documents were analysed for dating ancient shorelines associated to specific beach ridges. Thus allowing the reconstruction of erosive and accretive phases of the delta. Seventy beach ridges were identified on the two wings of the delta. On the longer down-drift side (Northern wing) beach ridges are more spaced at the apex and gradually converge to the extremity, where the Bruna River runs and delimits the sub aerial depositional area of the Ombrone River. On the shorter up-drift lobe (Southern wing), beach ridges are closer, but run almost parallel each other. In this case, a rocky headland called Collelungo promontory closes and cuts the beach ridges sequence but shallow water depth allows sediment by pass. One kilometre to the south a more pronounced promontory encloses a small pocket beach (Cala di Forno) and identifies the limit of the subaerial depositionary area. Beach ridges

  14. Seismicity and structure of a magmatic accretionary centre at an ultraslow spreading ridge: The volcanic centre at 85°E/85°N, Gakkel Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Korger, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are divergent plate boundaries. Yet, there are important differences between these individual ridges, which seem to be linked to the rate with which they spread apart. The appearance of 'ultraslow' spreading ridges is drastically different from faster spreading ridges. Yet, only few surveys have so far been conducted. In 1999, an exceptional earthquake sequence was teleseismically registered. It was unusual in the magnitudes involved, the number of events registered, and the ...

  15. Evidence for chemically heterogeneous Arctic mantle beneath the Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Megan E.; Warren, Jessica M.; Godard, Marguerite

    2016-02-01

    Ultraslow spreading at mid-ocean ridges limits melting due to on-axis conductive cooling, leading to the prediction that peridotites from these ridges are relatively fertile. To test this, we examined abyssal peridotites from the Gakkel Ridge, the slowest spreading ridge in the global ocean ridge system. Major and trace element concentrations in pyroxene and olivine minerals are reported for 14 dredged abyssal peridotite samples from the Sparsely Magmatic (SMZ) and Eastern Volcanic (EVZ) Zones. We observe large compositional variations among peridotites from the same dredge and among dredges in close proximity to each other. Modeling of lherzolite trace element compositions indicates varying degrees of non-modal fractional mantle melting, whereas most harzburgite samples require open-system melting involving interaction with a percolating melt. All peridotite chemistry suggests significant melting that would generate a thick crust, which is inconsistent with geophysical observations at Gakkel Ridge. The refractory harzburgites and thin overlying oceanic crust are best explained by low present-day melting of a previously melted heterogeneous mantle. Observed peridotite compositional variations and evidence for melt infiltration demonstrates that fertile mantle components are present and co-existing with infertile mantle components. Melt generated in the Gakkel mantle becomes trapped on short length-scales, which produces selective enrichments in very incompatible rare earth elements. Melt migration and extraction may be significantly controlled by the thick lithosphere induced by cooling at such slow spreading rates. We propose the heterogeneous mantle that exists beneath Gakkel Ridge is the consequence of ancient melting, combined with subsequent melt percolation and entrapment.

  16. Best management practices plan for the Chestnut Ridge-Filled Coal Ash Pond at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Chestnut Ridge Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP) Project has been established to satisfy Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2. FCAP is on Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant. A 62-foot high earthen dam across Upper McCoy Branch was constructed in 1955 to create a pond to serve as a settling basin for fly and bottom ashes generated by burning coal at the Y-12 Steam Plant. Ash from the steam was mixed with water to form a slurry and then pumped to the crest of Chestnut Ridge and released through a large pipe to flow across the Sluice Channel area and into the pond. The ash slurry eventually overtopped the dam and flowed along Upper McCoy Branch to Rogers Quarry. The purpose of this document is to provide a site-specific Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan for construction associated with environmental restoration activities at the FCAP Site.

  17. Best management practices plan for the Chestnut Ridge-Filled Coal Ash Pond at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The Chestnut Ridge Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP) Project has been established to satisfy Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2. FCAP is on Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant. A 62-foot high earthen dam across Upper McCoy Branch was constructed in 1955 to create a pond to serve as a settling basin for fly and bottom ashes generated by burning coal at the Y-12 Steam Plant. Ash from the steam was mixed with water to form a slurry and then pumped to the crest of Chestnut Ridge and released through a large pipe to flow across the Sluice Channel area and into the pond. The ash slurry eventually overtopped the dam and flowed along Upper McCoy Branch to Rogers Quarry. The purpose of this document is to provide a site-specific Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan for construction associated with environmental restoration activities at the FCAP Site

  18. Californium Electrodepositions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boll, Rose Ann [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Electrodepositions of californium isotopes were successfully performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the past year involving two different types of deposition solutions, ammonium acetate (NH4C2H3O2) and isobutanol ((CH3)2CHCH2OH). A californium product that was decay enriched in 251Cf was recovered for use in super-heavy element (SHE) research. This neutron-rich isotope, 251Cf, provides target material for SHE research for the potential discovery of heavier isotopes of Z=118. The californium material was recovered from aged 252Cf neutron sources in storage at ORNL. These sources have decayed for over 30 years, thus providing material with a very high 251Cf-to-252Cf ratio. After the source capsules were opened, the californium was purified and then electrodeposited using the isobutanol method onto thin titanium foils for use in an accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. Another deposition method, ammonium acetate, was used to produce a deposition containing 1.7 0.1 Ci of 252Cf onto a stainless steel substrate. This was the largest single electrodeposition of 252Cf ever prepared. The 252Cf material was initially purified using traditional ion exchange media, such as AG50-AHIB and AG50-HCl, and further purified using a TEVA-NH4SCN system to remove any lanthanides, resulting in the recovery of 3.6 0.1 mg of purified 252Cf. The ammonium acetate deposition was run with a current of 1.0 amp, resulting in a 91.5% deposition yield. Purification and handling of the highly radioactive californium material created additional challenges in the production of these sources.

  19. Instrument development continues in Oak Ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekkebus, Allen E.

    2012-01-01

    Peer review panels composed of 80 external scientists recently visited Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review almost 700 proposals for experiments on 23 instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). These were proposed for the time period from January-June 2012. About 40% of the proposals were approved for beam time and 20% were placed on an alternate list if time becomes available. The Hybrid Spectrometer HYSPEC at SNS began its commissioning in September 2011. HYSPEC is otpimized for studying low energy dynamics in single-crystal samples using a broad variety of sample environments, and is equipped with a polarization analysis capability. It is expected to be available for users on a limited basis in the second half of 2012. The detector tank of CORELLI has been installed on beamline 9 at SNS. Now that the tank is in place, banks of neutron detectors and boron carbide shielding will be installed around the interior. CORELLI is optimized to probe complex disorder in crystalline materials through diffuse scattering from single-crystal samples. It will begin commissioning in 2014. CORELLI is one of four instruments being developed under the SING II (SNS Instruments Next Generation II) project. The others are the Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MANDI), the Vibrational Spectrometer (VISION, scheduled to begin commissioning in 2012), and the Time of Flight Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument (TOF-USANS). The single crystal neutron diffractometer IMAGINE, was deliverd to HFIR in October 2011. Preliminary testing has been carried out. IMAGINE will provide atomic resolution information on chemical, organic, metallo-organic and protein single crystals that will enable their chemical, physical and biological structure and function to be understood. This instrument will benefit scientists with interests in pharmaceuticals, minerals and other inorganic crystals, small molecules, molecular organo

  20. Instrument development continues in Oak Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Peer review panels composed of 80 external scientists recently visited Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review almost 700 proposals for experiments on 23 instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). These were proposed for the time period from January-June 2012. About 40% of the proposals were approved for beam time and 20% were placed on an alternate list if time becomes available. The Hybrid Spectrometer HYSPEC at SNS began its commissioning in September 2011. HYSPEC is otpimized for studying low energy dynamics in single-crystal samples using a broad variety of sample environments, and is equipped with a polarization analysis capability. It is expected to be available for users on a limited basis in the second half of 2012. The detector tank of CORELLI has been installed on beamline 9 at SNS. Now that the tank is in place, banks of neutron detectors and boron carbide shielding will be installed around the interior. CORELLI is optimized to probe complex disorder in crystalline materials through diffuse scattering from single-crystal samples. It will begin commissioning in 2014. CORELLI is one of four instruments being developed under the SING II (SNS Instruments Next Generation II) project. The others are the Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MANDI), the Vibrational Spectrometer (VISION, scheduled to begin commissioning in 2012), and the Time of Flight Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument (TOF-USANS). The single crystal neutron diffractometer IMAGINE, was deliverd to HFIR in October 2011. Preliminary testing has been carried out. IMAGINE will provide atomic resolution information on chemical, organic, metallo-organic and protein single crystals that will enable their chemical, physical and biological structure and function to be understood. This instrument will benefit scientists with interests in pharmaceuticals, minerals and other inorganic crystals, small molecules, molecular organo

  1. Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

  2. Ultra-slow-spreading - A New Class of Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H. J.; Lin, J.; Michael, P. J.; Schouten, H.; Snow, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    Surveys of the the SW Indian and Gakkel Ridges show that ultra-slow spreading ridges are as different from slow spreading ridges as fast spreading ridges are from slow ? perhaps more so. At an effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling rate spreading component measured orthogonal to the ridge trend) there are dramatic changes. Magmatism becomes discontinuous, with mantle peridotite emplaced directly to the sea floor over large regions. Local magmatic centers are either ephemeral point source or occur at long-lived cross-axis volcanic highs. The latter are principally localized at bends in the ridge trend or at ridge transform intersections. Mantle peridotites emplaced to the sea floor range from harzburgite to lherzolite, despite low levels of melt production, suggesting that much of this variability predates the ridge melting event. While high-pressure vein assemblages are not present, evidence for late stage low-pressure melt impregnation is common, suggesting that the peridotites underwent partial fusion. This likely eliminated pre-existing vein assemblages. Ridge basalts differ from those at faster spreading ridges as they are generally enriched - possible evidence of a pre-existing vein assemblage. In magmatically active areas, rift axes are sub-orthogonal to the spreading direction with high-angle normal faults dominating the formation of axial and rift valley relief. In the absence of active magmatism, rift valley walls are more subdued, and follow the ridge trend. The walls of amagmatic spreading segments are often lower than those at magmatic segments and are either highly irregular or dominated by low-angle normal faults. The latter dip ~14°-18° and slope down from the crest of the rift valley wall to the floor of the axial trough on essentially a single fault surface. Despite this an orthogonal fabric defined by 50 to 200-m high-angle normal fault scarps, reflecting brittle plate extension, is ubiquitous. This is most easily seen where the ridge

  3. Seamount volcanism along the Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, James R.

    2008-09-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean is the slowest spreading portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system. Total spreading rates vary from 12.8 mm yr-1 near Greenland to 6.5 mm yr-1 at the Siberian margin. Melting models predict a dramatic decrease in magma production and resulting crustal thickness at these low spreading rates. At slow spreading ridges, small volcanic seamounts are a dominant morphologic feature of the rift valley floor and an important mechanism in building the oceanic crust. This study quantitatively investigates the extent, nature and distribution of seamount volcanism at the ultraslow Gakkel Ridge, the manner in which it varies along the ridge axis and the relationship of the volcanoes to the larger scale rift morphology. A numerical algorithm is used to identify and characterize isolated volcanic edifices by searching gridded swath-bathymetry data for closed concentric contours protruding above the surrounding seafloor. A maximum likelihood model is used to estimate the total number of seamounts and the characteristic height within different seamount populations. Both the number and size of constructional volcanic features is greatly reduced at the Gakkel Ridge compared with the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The density of seamounts (number/area) on the rift valley floor of the Western Volcanic Zone (WVZ) is ~55% that of the MAR. The observed volcanoes are also much smaller, so, the amount of erupted material is greatly reduced compared with the MAR. However, the WVZ is still able to maintain a MAR-like morphology with axial volcanic ridges, volcanoes scattered on the valley floor and rift valley walls consisting of high-angle faults. Seamount density at the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) is ~45% that of the WVZ (~25% that of the MAR). Seamounts are clustered at the widely spaced magmatic centres characteristic of the EVZ, although some seamounts are found between magmatic centres. These seamounts tend to be located at the edge of the rift valley

  4. The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition - AMORE 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P.; Thiede, J.; Langmuir, C.; Jokat, W.; Dick, H.; Snow, J.; Goldstein, S.; Graham, D.; Edmonds, H.

    2003-04-01

    The first high resolution mapping and sampling study of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge was accomplished during an international icebreaker expedition to the high Arctic in summer 2001 involving research icebreakers PFS POLARSTERN and USCGC HEALY. Gakkel Ridge extends 1800 km from north of Greenland to Laptev Sea, all of it beneath Arctic sea ice. High-resolution maps of the seafloor were made with multibeam sonars, even while breaking ice. The western part of the ridge was mapped for the first time. We sampled and analyzed igneous rocks from over 200 sites along 1000 km of the ridge. Seismic refraction and reflection profiles were run across the basins flanking Gakkel Ridge and show that crustal thickness varies with time. Along-axis seismic refraction profiles show anomalously fast velocities present at shallow levels in the crust. Abundant hydrothermal activity was found using MAPRs deployed while rock sampling, and by dredging sulfides. For this slowest spreading mid-ocean ridge (MOR), predictions were that magmatism and crustal thickness should progressively diminish as the spreading rate decreases progressively eastward along the ridge and that hydrothermal activity should be rare. Instead, magmatic variations are irregular and hydrothermal activity is abundant. A 300-kilometer long central amagmatic zone where mantle peridotites are emplaced directly in the axis lies between abundant, continuous volcanism in the west and large, widely spaced volcanic centers in the east. Distinctive geochemical trends in basalts show that the extent of mantle melting is low and varies along axis but not systematically with spreading rate. They also show systematic variations in source composition. Most peridotites are less refractory and less altered than typical abyssal peridotites, but enigmatic harzburgites are also present. These observations show that the extent of mantle melting is not a simple function of spreading rate: mantle temperatures at depth and/or mantle

  5. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented

  6. Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts.

  7. Resource Management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 28, Wetlands on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pounds, Larry [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-01

    A survey of wetlands on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted in 1990. Wetlands occurring on ORR were identified using National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) maps and field surveys. More than 120 sites were visited and 90 wetlands were identified. Wetland types on ORR included emergent communities in shallow embayments on reservoirs, emergent and aquatic communities in ponds, forested wetland on low ground along major creeks, and wet meadows and marshes associated with streams and seeps. Vascular plant species occurring on sites visited were inventoried, and 57 species were added to the checklist of vascular plants on ORR. Three species listed as rare in Tennessee were discovered on ORR during the wetlands survey. The survey provided an intensive ground truth of the wetlands identified by NWI and offered an indication of wetlands that the NWI remote sensing techniques did not detect.

  8. Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts

  9. Anatomy of an Axial Volcanic Ridge: The Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, K. L.; Searle, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Study of a single axial volcanic ridge in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge median valley at 45°N has enabled us to construct a detailed volcano-stratigraphic model and thrown new light on the structure and development of AVRs. Data sets include 50 m resolution multibeam bathymetry, comprehensive 3 m resolution deep-towed sidescan sonar, a grid of twenty-two 1.4 km-spaced lines of deep-towed magnetic field measurements, continuous video observations and 270 rock samples from eleven ROV dives, and two approximately 8 km2 areas of very-high-resolution bathymetry and magnetics. A continuous topographic ridge extends ~35 km along the segment, and strikes 010°, ~5-10° CCW of the regional ridge trend. The northernmost 10 km appears older, as attested by lower topographic relief, acoustic backscatter and crustal magnetisation and greater degree of faulting. The rest, which we infer to be most recently constructed, is 25 km long, ~ 4 km wide and ~500 m high. It has a sharp crest, and lateral spurs trending NE that we attribute to tectonic control from the right-stepping MAR axis. The recent AVR is covered by approximately 3000 small (450 m diameter, though about ten, all flat-topped and up to 1.2 km diameter, occur elsewhere on the median valley floor. The high-resolution surveys show all cones >70 m high suffered significant flank collapse, often with near-vertical collapse scars. The active AVR is partly flanked by hummocky volcanic terrain similar to the AVR but of lower acoustic backscatter, which we infer to be older, and partly by flat-lying, mostly sediment-covered low-relief lavas. These typically have low relief lobate surfaces, often with collapse structures and occasional lava tubes. Most appear acoustically dark (implying significant sediment cover and age), though an extensive area off the NE flank is bright and apparently fairly young. The active AVR has open fissures, mostly along its crest, but few other faults are observed directly. Steep, outward-facing slopes

  10. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented.

  11. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollert, D.A.; Cretella, F.M.; Golden, K.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D&D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report.

  12. Site Characterization Plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The aboveground structures of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This Site Characterization Plan presents the strategy and techniques to be used to characterize the OHF D ampersand D structures in support of D ampersand D planning, design, and implementation. OHF is located approximately 1 mile southwest of the main ORNL complex. From 1964 to 1979, OHF was used in the development and full-scale application of hydrofracture operations in which 969,000 gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) was mixed with grout and then injected under high pressure into a low-permeability shale formation approximately 1/6 mile underground

  13. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollert, D.A.; Cretella, F.M.; Golden, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D ampersand D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report

  14. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. This volume contains the data from the Background Soil Characterization Project. When available, the following validation qualifiers are used in the appendixes. When validation qualifiers are not available, the corresponding contract laboratory data qualifiers appearing on the next page are used

  15. The Mozambique Ridge: a document of massive multistage magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Maximilian D.; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Jacques, Guillaume; Werner, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    The Mozambique Ridge, a prominent basement high in the southwestern Indian Ocean, consists of four major geomorphological segments associated with numerous phases of volcanic activity in the Lower Cretaceous. The nature and origin of the Mozambique Ridge have been intensely debated with one hypothesis suggesting a Large Igneous Province origin. High-resolution seismic reflection data reveal a large number of extrusion centres with a random distribution throughout the southern Mozambique Ridge and the nearby Transkei Rise. Intrabasement reflections emerge from the extrusion centres and are interpreted to represent massive lava flow sequences. Such lava flow sequences are characteristic of eruptions leading to the formation of continental and oceanic flood basalt provinces, hence supporting a Large Igneous Province origin of the Mozambique Ridge. We observe evidence for widespread post-sedimentary magmatic activity that we correlate with a southward propagation of the East African Rift System. Based on our volumetric analysis of the southern Mozambique Ridge we infer a rapid sequential emplacement between ˜131 and ˜125 Ma, which is similar to the short formation periods of other Large Igneous Provinces like the Agulhas Plateau.

  16. Ancient, highly heterogeneous mantle beneath Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Snow, Jonathan E; Hellebrand, Eric; Brügmann, Gerhard; von der Handt, Anette; Büchl, Anette; Hofmann, Albrecht W

    2008-03-20

    The Earth's mantle beneath ocean ridges is widely thought to be depleted by previous melt extraction, but well homogenized by convective stirring. This inference of homogeneity has been complicated by the occurrence of portions enriched in incompatible elements. Here we show that some refractory abyssal peridotites from the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge (Arctic Ocean) have very depleted 187Os/188Os ratios with model ages up to 2 billion years, implying the long-term preservation of refractory domains in the asthenospheric mantle rather than their erasure by mantle convection. The refractory domains would not be sampled by mid-ocean-ridge basalts because they contribute little to the genesis of magmas. We thus suggest that the upwelling mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is highly heterogeneous, which makes it difficult to constrain its composition by mid-ocean-ridge basalts alone. Furthermore, the existence of ancient domains in oceanic mantle suggests that using osmium model ages to constrain the evolution of continental lithosphere should be approached with caution.

  17. Gakkel Ridge: Geophysical Constraints on its Crustal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokat, W.

    2002-12-01

    Among the world's mid-ocean ridges the Gakkel Ridge has the slowest spreading rates at all. In contrast to other ultra slow spreading ridges its rift valley is not displaced by large-scale fracture zones. In 2001 an international expedition with the two research ice breakers Polarstern and Healy was scheduled to investigate the Arctic mid-ocean ridge. A wide variety of different geophysical investigations were carried out to investigate the crustal structure. Seismic investigations show the presence of thin oceanic crust (less than 3 km). Oceanic layer 3 is in most of the recordings not present. A joint interpretation of bathymetric and magnetic data allow the interpretation that discrete spreading cells are present along the ridge. Off-axis investigations show that thin crust is also present in the adjacent deep sea basins. However, the seismic reflection data in the Amundsen and Nansen basins show that in the past the spreading was not symmetric north and south of the rift valley. The new results will be presented and discussed.

  18. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant groundwater protection program management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Y- 1 2 Plant (Y-12 Plant) is owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. The Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), which was initiated in 1975, provides for the protection of groundwater resources consistent with Federal, State, and local regulations, and in accordance with DOE orders and Energy Systems policies and procedures. The Y-12 Plant is located in Anderson County, Tennessee, and is within the corporate limits of the City of Oak Ridge. The Y-12 Plant is one of three major DOE complexes that comprise the 37,000-acre Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) located in Anderson and Roane counties. The Y-12 Plant is located in Bear Creek Valley at an elevation of about 950 feet (ft) above sea level. Bear Creek Valley is bounded on the northwest and southeast, and is isolated from populated areas of Oak Ridge, by parallel ridges that rise about 300 ft above the valley floor. The Y-12 Plant and its fenced buffer area are about 0.6 mile wide by 3.2 miles long and cover approximately 4,900 acres. The main industrialized section encompasses approximately 800 acres

  19. Preservation of Fertile Mantle Components at Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L. G.; Behn, M. D.; Standish, J. J.; Dick, H. J.

    2007-12-01

    Recycled lithosphere is suspected to contribute to the geochemical enrichment not only of Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) but also exceptional Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts collected at ultraslow ridges. In particular, the chemistry of basalts at volcanic centers along the Southwest Indian Ridge oblique supersegment of 9-16°E is best explained by an exceptionally strong contribution from an enriched mafic component mixed in the upwelling mantle. Why this component is so strong at these volcanic centers can be understood in at least two ways. 1) The mantle underneath each volcanic center is anomalous. Such an explanation is equivalent to appealing to small plume-like features underneath each volcanic center. 2) The fertile component is present everywhere but melt migration gathers the resulting magma toward the volcanic centers. In this contribution, we test the second hypothesis using a numerical melt migration model in which magma rises vertically until it encounter the base of the thermal lithosphere. In the SWIR 9-16°E area, variations in ridge axis azimuth produce a strong relief to the base of the lithosphere, which focuses magma towards the location of the observed volcanic centers. Magma produced off-axis, which is dominated by the fertile component, is focused even more strongly than near-axis magma, explaining the relative enrichment of the surface lava. We compare the expected enrichment pattern with the geochemistry of collected lava and show that, were the ridge straighter or spreading faster, this signal would be more difficult to observe.

  20. Ridge Distance Estimation in Fingerprint Images: Algorithm and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Jie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to estimate the ridge distance accurately, an intrinsic texture property of a fingerprint image. Up to now, only several articles have touched directly upon ridge distance estimation. Little has been published providing detailed evaluation of methods for ridge distance estimation, in particular, the traditional spectral analysis method applied in the frequency field. In this paper, a novel method on nonoverlap blocks, called the statistical method, is presented to estimate the ridge distance. Direct estimation ratio (DER and estimation accuracy (EA are defined and used as parameters along with time consumption (TC to evaluate performance of these two methods for ridge distance estimation. Based on comparison of performances of these two methods, a third hybrid method is developed to combine the merits of both methods. Experimental results indicate that DER is 44.7%, 63.8%, and 80.6%; EA is 84%, 93%, and 91%; and TC is , , and seconds, with the spectral analysis method, statistical method, and hybrid method, respectively.

  1. Stress distribution prevents ischaemia and bone resorption in residual ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Oka, Morihiko; Hara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Minagi, Shogo

    2010-11-01

    Intensive mechanical stress and/or inflammation are known to induce alveolar bone resorption. This study investigated whether a distribution of mechanical stress would reduce residual ridge resorption or improve ischaemia. Thirty rats were divided into six experimental groups (n=5). The control group received no intentional stimulation, but rats in the experimental groups wore denture stimulators made of acrylic resin or a soft lining material. The stimulator transmitted masticatory pressure to the rats' palates for four weeks. The four types of soft lining materials investigated in this study dispersed the applied pressure, with compressive stress ranging from 20.8 to 90.8kPa. Volumes of blood flow and bone resorption of denture foundations were measured every week for 4 weeks. Statistical evaluation of these results was performed using two-way ANOVA and Holm-Sidak test within 5% error limits. Non-viscoelastic material clearly induced bone resorption and ischaemia of denture foundations, while viscoelastic materials reduced these phenomena to different extents according to their viscoelastic properties. Ischaemia in the alveolar ridge preceded residual ridge resorption, because the amount of residual ridge resorption and blood flow rate showed a simple linear regression. Animal model of this study suggested that a distribution or reduction of mechanical stress could improve blood flow and decrease alveolar ridge resorption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T&E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T&E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T&E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T&E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T&E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, {open_quotes}T&E species{close_quotes} include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T&E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival.

  3. RidgeRace: ridge regression for continuous ancestral character estimation on phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratsch, Christina; McHardy, Alice C

    2014-09-01

    Ancestral character state reconstruction describes a set of techniques for estimating phenotypic or genetic features of species or related individuals that are the predecessors of those present today. Such reconstructions can reach into the distant past and can provide insights into the history of a population or a set of species when fossil data are not available, or they can be used to test evolutionary hypotheses, e.g. on the co-evolution of traits. Typical methods for ancestral character state reconstruction of continuous characters consider the phylogeny of the underlying data and estimate the ancestral process along the branches of the tree. They usually assume a Brownian motion model of character evolution or extensions thereof, requiring specific assumptions on the rate of phenotypic evolution. We suggest using ridge regression to infer rates for each branch of the tree and the ancestral values at each inner node. We performed extensive simulations to evaluate the performance of this method and have shown that the accuracy of its reconstructed ancestral values is competitive to reconstructions using other state-of-the-art software. Using a hierarchical clustering of gene mutation profiles from an ovarian cancer dataset, we demonstrate the use of the method as a feature selection tool. The algorithm described here is implemented in C++ as a stand-alone program, and the source code is freely available at http://algbio.cs.uni-duesseldorf.de/software/RidgeRace.tar.gz. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T ampersand E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T ampersand E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T ampersand E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T ampersand E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T ampersand E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, open-quotes T ampersand E speciesclose quotes include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T ampersand E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their

  5. Kinematics of Mid-Ocean Ridge Relative Motions in the Indo-Atlantic Frame of Reference: Passive and Active Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Forte, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    A kinematic analysis of the motions of mid-ocean ridges is presented in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference. Relative motions of all major divergent plate boundaries are computed, including an assessment of uncertainties in their motions, back to 83 Ma (C34ny). As is expected from the general assumption that ridges are passive components of the plate boundary and mantle convective system, most ridges migrate across the underlying mantle along simple paths, largely perpendicular to the trend of the ridge. In the Indo-Atlantic reference frame, the Nansen-Gakkel ridge has migrated away from Europe by ~800 km along a NE trajectory. The Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) just north of the Azores triple junction (TJ) has moved away from Europe by ~1800km towards the WNW. South of the Azores TJ the MAR has moved away from Africa by ~1600 km towards the W. The slow to ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge has migrated slightly away from Antarctica, with a considerable fraction of the motion approximately parallel to the ridge trend. The Carlsberg Ridge has moved ~3400 km away from Africa towards the NNE in the past 65 Ma, while the Mid-Indian Ridge has migrated to the NNE away from Africa by ~3950 km over 83 Ma. The Southeast Indian Ridge, west of the 90°E ridge (Capricorn-Australia-East Antarctica TJ), has migrated ~3950 km to the NE away from Antarctica. Farther east, divergence between Australia and Antarctica has resulted in ~1800 km of northward motion of the ridge away from Antarctica. The Southwest Pacific Ridge, between the Pacific and West Antarctic plates has migrated ~1500 km to the NW away from west Antarctica. These motions are entirely consistent with intuition, given that Africa and Antarctica are largely surrounded by spreading systems. In contrast to the rest of the global ridge system, despite its high spreading rate the East Pacific Ridge has undergone essentially no (ridge perpendicular (E-W) migration in the past 80 Ma, and neglible ridge parallel

  6. Arctic Lena Trough -- NOT a Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; Handt, A. V.; Nauret, F.; Gao, Y.; Feig, S.; Jovanovic, Z.

    2005-12-01

    The North American-Eurasian plate boundary traverses the Atlantic and Arctic oceans. Over most of that length, it is a Mid-Ocean Ridge that spreads between about 23 mm/yr (MAR) and 10 mm/yr (Gakkel Ridge) full rate. The northern MAR and the Gakkel ridge are connected by a deep linear feature called Lena Trough. Until about 10 million years ago, Lena Trough was not an oceanic domain at all, but a continental shear zone through a narrow isthmus of continental crust that connected the American and Eurasian plates. Its opening was, significantly, the most recent and final event in the separation of the North American from the Eurasian continent, and opened the gateway for deep water circulation between the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. Models for the tectonic configuration of Lena Trough have until now differed only in the number and length of fracture zones and spreading segments thought to be present. Lena Trough is a deep fault-bounded basin with depths of 3800-4200m, and irregular, steep valley sides that are oblique to the spreading direction. Basement horst structures outcrop as sigmoidal ridges with steeply dipping sides project out of the valley floor, but these are not traceable to any parallel structures on either side. Ridge-orthogonal topography is simply absent (ie no segments trending parallel nor fracture zones perpendicular to Gakkel Ridge). Most faults trend approximately SSE-NNW, an obliquity with respect to Gakkel Ridge (SW-NE) of about 55 degrees. The basement ridges are composed nearly entirely of mantle peridotite, as are the valley walls. Only at the northern and southern extremities of Lena Trough do basalts appear at all. The Northern basalts show strong chemical affinities to those of Gakkel Ridge, and can be considered a part of the Gakkel volcanic system. The rare southernmost basalts, however, are quite unique. They are alkali basalts with K2O up to 2 weight percent, highly incompaitble element enriched and occupy a corner of isotope

  7. Mishmash Impression Technique for Managing Maxillary Anterior Fibrous Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Kulkarni

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Flabby or fibrous ridge is one of the consequences of long term wearing of complete dentures. It can develop where hyperplasic soft tissue replaces the alveolar bone and is a common finding, particularly in the upper anterior region of long term denture wearers. Forces exerted during impression making can result in distortion of the mobile tissue unless managed appropriately; such flabby ridges adversely affect support, retention and stability of complete dentures. Many impression techniques have been developed to help overcome this problem. While these vary in the method applied, they are similar in their complexity, are often quite time-consuming to perform and rely on materials not commonly used in contemporary general dental practice. The purpose of this article is to describe an impression technique for flabby ridges usingrubber base impression materials, routinely available in general dental practice.

  8. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Joan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thompson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Page, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-09-30

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of three major government-owned, contractor-operated facilities: the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park. The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation’s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved, and continue to involve, the use of radiological and hazardous materials. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and supporting data are available at Http://www.ornl.gov/sci/env_rpt or from the project director.

  9. Feature Selection for Ridge Regression with Provable Guarantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Saurabh; Drineas, Petros

    2016-04-01

    We introduce single-set spectral sparsification as a deterministic sampling-based feature selection technique for regularized least-squares classification, which is the classification analog to ridge regression. The method is unsupervised and gives worst-case guarantees of the generalization power of the classification function after feature selection with respect to the classification function obtained using all features. We also introduce leverage-score sampling as an unsupervised randomized feature selection method for ridge regression. We provide risk bounds for both single-set spectral sparsification and leverage-score sampling on ridge regression in the fixed design setting and show that the risk in the sampled space is comparable to the risk in the full-feature space. We perform experiments on synthetic and real-world data sets; a subset of TechTC-300 data sets, to support our theory. Experimental results indicate that the proposed methods perform better than the existing feature selection methods.

  10. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This annual groundwater report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual groundwater report for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts; Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline

  11. Significance testing in ridge regression for genetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Iorio Maria

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological developments have increased the feasibility of large scale genetic association studies. Densely typed genetic markers are obtained using SNP arrays, next-generation sequencing technologies and imputation. However, SNPs typed using these methods can be highly correlated due to linkage disequilibrium among them, and standard multiple regression techniques fail with these data sets due to their high dimensionality and correlation structure. There has been increasing interest in using penalised regression in the analysis of high dimensional data. Ridge regression is one such penalised regression technique which does not perform variable selection, instead estimating a regression coefficient for each predictor variable. It is therefore desirable to obtain an estimate of the significance of each ridge regression coefficient. Results We develop and evaluate a test of significance for ridge regression coefficients. Using simulation studies, we demonstrate that the performance of the test is comparable to that of a permutation test, with the advantage of a much-reduced computational cost. We introduce the p-value trace, a plot of the negative logarithm of the p-values of ridge regression coefficients with increasing shrinkage parameter, which enables the visualisation of the change in p-value of the regression coefficients with increasing penalisation. We apply the proposed method to a lung cancer case-control data set from EPIC, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Conclusions The proposed test is a useful alternative to a permutation test for the estimation of the significance of ridge regression coefficients, at a much-reduced computational cost. The p-value trace is an informative graphical tool for evaluating the results of a test of significance of ridge regression coefficients as the shrinkage parameter increases, and the proposed test makes its production computationally feasible.

  12. Significance testing in ridge regression for genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cule, Erika; Vineis, Paolo; De Iorio, Maria

    2011-09-19

    Technological developments have increased the feasibility of large scale genetic association studies. Densely typed genetic markers are obtained using SNP arrays, next-generation sequencing technologies and imputation. However, SNPs typed using these methods can be highly correlated due to linkage disequilibrium among them, and standard multiple regression techniques fail with these data sets due to their high dimensionality and correlation structure. There has been increasing interest in using penalised regression in the analysis of high dimensional data. Ridge regression is one such penalised regression technique which does not perform variable selection, instead estimating a regression coefficient for each predictor variable. It is therefore desirable to obtain an estimate of the significance of each ridge regression coefficient. We develop and evaluate a test of significance for ridge regression coefficients. Using simulation studies, we demonstrate that the performance of the test is comparable to that of a permutation test, with the advantage of a much-reduced computational cost. We introduce the p-value trace, a plot of the negative logarithm of the p-values of ridge regression coefficients with increasing shrinkage parameter, which enables the visualisation of the change in p-value of the regression coefficients with increasing penalisation. We apply the proposed method to a lung cancer case-control data set from EPIC, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. The proposed test is a useful alternative to a permutation test for the estimation of the significance of ridge regression coefficients, at a much-reduced computational cost. The p-value trace is an informative graphical tool for evaluating the results of a test of significance of ridge regression coefficients as the shrinkage parameter increases, and the proposed test makes its production computationally feasible.

  13. Geophysical characteristics of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokat, Wilfried; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita C.

    2007-03-01

    The northernmost spreading centre of the world, the Gakkel Ridge, is also an end-member in terms of global spreading velocities. Models show that full spreading rates vary between 1.3 and 0.63 mm yr-1 along the almost 1800 km long ridge system in the Central Arctic Ocean. The western part of the ridge was investigated in great detail by a two-ship expedition in summer 2001. The complete data sets and the modelling of the seismic refraction and aeromagnetic experiments gathered during this expedition are shown in this study. The magnetic signals along the dense (2 km spacing) aeromagnetic flight lines acquired at the same time show a good correlation between high amplitudes and a shallowing of the rift valley and the presence of large volcanic constructions at the rift shoulders. The magnetic anomalies rapidly fade out east and west of these centres of focused magmatism. This might indicate that the basaltic layer producing the magnetic anomaly thins away from the volcanic centres. A continuous magnetic anomaly is observed along the rift valley west of 3°30'E, consistent with increasing and more robust magmatism. The crustal thickness along the Gakkel Ridge varies greatly. Beneath some of the centres of focused magmatism, the oceanic crust thickens up to 3.5 km. In the amagmatic segments in between the crust thins to 1.4-2.9 km. This observation is also valid for the Western Volcanic Zone west of 3°30'E, where despite the stronger magnetic anomaly the crust does not significantly thicken. The strength of the magnetic anomaly along the rift valley is thus not a reliable indicator of crustal thickness beneath the Gakkel Ridge. The data show that the crustal thickness does not change dramatically across 3°30'E. Only the occurrence of a large elongate volcanic ridge significantly influences this parameter. More frequent volcanic eruptions along such ridges are most likely responsible for the basalts found in the westernmost part of the Gakkel Ridge. In the non

  14. Petrology and geochemistry of basalts from the Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C.; Gier, E.; Soffer, G.; Goldstein, S.; Michael, P.; Lehnert, K.; Simons, K.

    2003-04-01

    The AMORE expedition recovered igneous rocks from over two hundred stations from the Gakkel Ridge, permitting the first regional scale investigation of its composition. These samples permit for the first time the evaluation of petrological systematics from an ultra-slow spreading ridge (0.7029 west of the SMZ and < 0.7028 to the east, even for the same La/Sm). Thus the amagmatic zone appears to reflect a boundary between distinct mantle domains. As at the Australian Antarctic Discordance, such a domain boundary is associated with greater depths, diminished melting and large geochemical variations independent of spreading rate.

  15. Using ridge regression in systematic pointing error corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiar, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    A pointing error model is used in the antenna calibration process. Data from spacecraft or radio star observations are used to determine the parameters in the model. However, the regression variables are not truly independent, displaying a condition known as multicollinearity. Ridge regression, a biased estimation technique, is used to combat the multicollinearity problem. Two data sets pertaining to Voyager 1 spacecraft tracking (days 105 and 106 of 1987) were analyzed using both linear least squares and ridge regression methods. The advantages and limitations of employing the technique are presented. The problem is not yet fully resolved.

  16. Transductive Ridge Regression in Structure-activity Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcou, Gilles; Delouis, Grace; Mokshyna, Olena; Horvath, Dragos; Lachiche, Nicolas; Varnek, Alexandre

    2018-01-01

    In this article we consider the application of the Transductive Ridge Regression (TRR) approach to structure-activity modeling. An original procedure of the TRR parameters optimization is suggested. Calculations performed on 3 different datasets involving two types of descriptors demonstrated that TRR outperforms its non-transductive analogue (Ridge Regression) in more than 90 % of cases. The most significant transductive effect was observed for small datasets. This suggests that transduction may be particularly useful when the data are expensive or difficult to collect. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Reduced Rank Ridge Regression and Its Kernel Extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ashin; Zhu, Ji

    2011-12-01

    In multivariate linear regression, it is often assumed that the response matrix is intrinsically of lower rank. This could be because of the correlation structure among the prediction variables or the coefficient matrix being lower rank. To accommodate both, we propose a reduced rank ridge regression for multivariate linear regression. Specifically, we combine the ridge penalty with the reduced rank constraint on the coefficient matrix to come up with a computationally straightforward algorithm. Numerical studies indicate that the proposed method consistently outperforms relevant competitors. A novel extension of the proposed method to the reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) set-up is also developed.

  18. Multiple Congenital Epulis of the Mandibular Ridge: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital epulis is a very rare benign soft-tissue tumor of uncertain histogenesis, which is also known as “gingival granular cell tumor of the newborn”. It occurs almost exclusively as a single tumor along the alveolar ridge of the maxilla in newborn females. Although congenital epulis is strikingly similar to the more common adult granular cell tumor histologically, in contrast to the latter congenital epulis cells are negative for S-100 protein. This case report describes a 15-day-old female infant with multiple congenital epulis of the mandibular alveolar ridge.

  19. Similarities in Chemistry of North Gorda Ridge basalts with Ultra-slow Spreading Ridge Lavas Due to Decreasing Magma Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. S.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Chemical variability of MORB has been reported from ultra-fast to ultra-slow spreading ridges. Despite the large number of studies, high density of precisely located samples is still rare for most ridge segments. Using MBARI's ROV Tiburon and a rock corer, we collected 71 basalt glasses along the axial valley of the 65 km- long, northern Gorda Ridge segment. To explore the temporal variability at the central part of the segment, we collected an additional twenty samples over a distance of 4 km up the eastern valley wall, corresponding to a maximum age of about 150, 000 years. Lava compositions along the ridge axis show considerable major-and minor element diversity (MgO 8.4-4.4%, K2O 0.07-0.36%) for lavas erupted in close proximity. Although they form a near-continuum, the compositions can be separated into two groups, one is typical N-MORB (K2O/TiO2 0.09). The chondrite-normalized REE patterns also reflect this grouping with Ce/YbN 20 for N- MORB and Ce/YbN >1 and Zr/Nb ridge segment, nearly as much diversity exists at the deepest part (>3,800 m) near the non-transform offset at the southern end. Except for two more enriched compositions, off-axis samples are LREE-depleted N-MORB with a narrow compositional range (MgO 7.7±0.3%, Zr/Nb=38-50). In comparison, basalts from the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, which has a comparable spreading rate but different ridge morphology, all plot on the N-MORB trend with high Zr/Nb (30-40) and slight LREE depletion (Smith et al. 1994). In contrast, ultra-slow spreading ridges like Knipovich, Gakkel, and Mohns, with ridge morphologies similar to North Gorda although reaching even greater depth (>4000m), have erupted predominantly E-MORB. Their least enriched compositions overlap with the most LREE-enriched North Gorda lava although most have Zr/Nb1.0 and up to 3.2 (e.g. Haase et al., 1996; Muhe et al., 1997, Hellevang and Pedersen, 2005). On a Zr/Nb versus K2O /TiO2 plot, the basalts from the ultra-slow ridges

  20. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5

  1. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5.

  2. Lateral ridge split and immediate implant placement in moderately resorbed alveolar ridges: How much is the added width?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Rahpeyma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lateral ridge split technique is a way to solve the problem of the width in narrow ridges with adequate height. Simultaneous insertion of dental implants will considerably reduce the edentulism time. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients who were managed with ridge splitting technique were enrolled. Thirty-eight locations in both jaws with near equal distribution in quadrants received 82 dental fixtures. Beta Tricalcium phosphate (Cerasorb® was used as biomaterial to fill the intercortical space. Submerged implants were used and 3 months later healing caps were placed. Direct bone measurements before and after split were done with a Collis. Patients were clinically re-evaluated at least 6 months after implant loading. All the data were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 11.5 (SPSS Inc, Chicago Illinois, USA. Frequency of edentulous spaces and pre/post operative bone width was analyzed. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Difference was considered significant if P value was less than 0.05. Results: Mean value for presplit width was 3.2 ± 0.34 mm while post-split mean width was 5.57 ± 0.49 mm. Mean gain in crest ridge after ridge splitting was 2 ± 0.3 mm. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in width before and after operation ((P < 0.05. All implants (n = 82 survived and were in full function at follow up (at least 6 months after implant loading. Conclusion: Ridge splitting technique in both jaws showed the predictable outcomes, if appropriate cases selected and special attention paid to details; then the waiting time between surgery and beginning of prosthodontic treatment can be reduced to 3 month.

  3. The Effects of Aseismic Ridge Collision on Upper Plate Deformation: Cocos Ridge Collision and Deformation of the Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Govers, R. M. A.; Ruiz, G.; Geirsson, H.; Camacho, E.; Mora-Paez, H.

    2015-12-01

    The collision of the Panamanian isthmus with northwestern South America is thought to have initiated as early as Oligocene - Miocene time (23-25 Ma) based on geologic and geophysical data and paleogeographic reconstructions. This collision was driven by eastward-directed subduction beneath northwestern South America. Cocos - Caribbean convergence along the Middle America Trench, and Nazca - Caribbean oblique convergence along the South Panama Deformed Belt have resulted in complex deformation of the southwestern Caribbean since Miocene - Pliocene time. Subduction and collision of the aseismic Cocos Ridge is thought to have initiated migration of the volcanic arc toward the back-arc in Costa Rica; 3) Quaternary to present deformation within the Central Costa Rica Deformed Belt; 4) Quaternary to present shortening across the fore-arc Fila Costeña fold and thrust belt and back-arc North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB); 5) Quaternary to present outer fore-arc uplift of Nicoya Peninsula above the seamount domain, and the Osa and Burica peninsulas above the ridge; and 6) Pleistocene to present northwestward motion of the Central American Fore Arc (CAFA) and northeastward motion of the Panama Region. We investigate the geodynamic effects of Cocos Ridge collision on motion of the Panama Region with a new geodynamic model. The model is compared to a new 1993-2015 GPS-derived three-dimensional velocity field for the western Caribbean and northwestern South America. Specifically, we test the hypotheses that the Cocos Ridge is the main driver for upper plate deformation in the western Caribbean. Our models indicate that Cocos Ridge collision drives northwest-directed motion of the CAFA and the northeast-directed motion of the Panama Region. The Panama Region is driven into the Caribbean across the NPDB and into northwestern South America, which is also converging with the Panama Region, pushing it toward the west-northwest. Therefore, recent (South America is driven by Cocos

  4. Structure and development of an axial volcanic ridge: Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 45°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, R. C.; Murton, B. J.; Achenbach, K.; LeBas, T.; Tivey, M.; Yeo, I.; Cormier, M. H.; Carlut, J.; Ferreira, P.; Mallows, C.; Morris, K.; Schroth, N.; van Calsteren, P.; Waters, C.

    2010-10-01

    We describe the most comprehensive and detailed high resolution survey of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) ever conducted, at 45°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We use 3 m resolution sidescan sonar, deep-towed magnetic field measurements, video observations from eleven ROV dives, and two very-high-resolution bathymetry and magnetic surveys. The most recently active AVR has high topographic relief, high acoustic backscatter, high crustal magnetization and little faulting. It is sharp-crested, 25 × 4 km in extent and 500 m high, and is covered by approximately 8000 volcanic "hummocks" whose detailed nature is revealed for the first time. Each is an individual volcano ≤ 450 m in diameter and ≤ 200 m high, ranging from steep-sided (45°) cones to low domes. Many have suffered significant flank collapse. Hummocks tend to align in rows parallel to the AVR axis, parallel to its NE-trending spurs or, on its lower flanks, sub-normal to the AVR trend. These latter are spaced 1-2 km apart and comprise 1-2 km-long rows of single volcanoes. We infer that their emplacement is controlled by down-flank magma transport, possibly via lava tubes. The AVR contains only one large flat-topped seamount. The flanking median valley floor consists of either older hummocky volcanic terrain or flat-lying, mostly sediment-covered lavas. These typically have low-relief lobate surfaces, inflation and collapse structures, and occasional lava tubes and tumuli. The AVR displays open fissures, mostly along its crest. There is direct evidence for only a few small faults on the AVR, though steep, outward-facing slopes draped by elongate pillows may be small normal faults covered by lava. The surrounding median valley floor is heavily fissured. Normal faults cut it and an older AVR, the latter displaying significant outward facing faults. High crustal magnetization, an approximate proxy for crustal age within the Brunhes, is confined to the active AVR. Magnetic palaeointensity measurements are

  5. Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-03-02

    This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for

  6. Surface radiological investigations along State Highway 95, Lagoon Road, and Melton Valley Drive, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiner, P.F.; Uziel, M.S.; Rice, D.E.; Williams, J.K.

    1995-08-01

    The surface radiological investigation along State Highway 95, Lagoon Road, and Melton Valley Drive at the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducted as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program Surveillance and Maintenance activities. This report was prepared to document results of the investigation and subsequent remedial actions. The report details surface gamma radiation levels including gamma anomalies; surface beta radiation levels including beta anomalies; results of analysis of soil, water, and vegetation samples and smear samples collected from paved surfaces; remediation activities conducted as a result of the survey; and recommendations for further corrective measures

  7. Greenland Fracture Zone-East Greenland Ridge(s) revisited: Indications of a C22-change in plate motion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Arne; Funck, T.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the lithospheric stress field, causing axial rift migration and reorientation of the transform, are generally proposed as an explanation for anomalously old crust and/or major aseismic valleys in oceanic ridge-transform-ridge settings. Similarly, transform migration of the Greenland...... degrees difference in strike. This is suggested to relate to an early episode of transform migration and reorientation of the lithospheric stress field around Chron 22 time, i.e., shortly after the Eocene breakup in the northern NE Atlantic. These findings contradict with previous interpretations...

  8. Paleotsunami Inundation of a Beach Ridge Plain: Cobble Ridge Overtopping and Interridge Valley Flooding in Seaside, Oregon, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Curt D.; Jol, Harry M.; Horning, Tom; Cruikshank, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    The Seaside beach ridge plain was inundated by six paleotsunamis during the last ~2500 years. Large runups (adjusted >10 m in height) overtopped seawardmost cobble beach ridges (7 m elevation) at ~1.3 and ~2.6 ka before present. Smaller paleotsunami (6–8 m in height) likely entered the beach plain interior (4-5 m elevation) through the paleo-Necanicum bay mouth. The AD 1700 Cascadia paleotsunami had a modest runup (6-7 m height), yet it locally inundated to 1.5 km landward distance. Bed shear...

  9. Proposed plan for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with Section 117(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, is releasing the proposed plan for remedial action at the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site located at the DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of this document is to present and solicit for comment to the public and all interested parties the ''preferred plan'' to remediate the UNC Disposal Site. However, comments on all alternatives are invited

  10. Spatial variations in isostatic compensation mechanisms of the Ninetyeast Ridge and their tectonic significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.; Krishna, K.S.

    The Ninetyeast Ridge (NER), one of the longest linear volcanic features on the Earth, offers an excellent opportunity of understanding the isostatic response to the interactions of mantle plume with the migrating mid-ocean ridge. Bathymetry, geoid...

  11. Borehole geophysical and flowmeter data for eight boreholes in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, Lake Seminole, Jackson County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John S.; Hamrick, Michael D.; Holloway, O. Gary

    2011-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs and flowmeter data were collected in April 2011 from eight boreholes to identify the depth and orientation of cavernous zones within the Miocene Tampa Limestone in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam in Jackson County, Florida. These data are used to assess leakage near the dam. Each of the eight boreholes was terminated in limestone at depths ranging from 84 to 104 feet. Large cavernous zones were encountered in most of the borings, with several exceeding 20-inches in diameter. The cavernous zones generally were between 1 and 5 feet in height, but a cavern in one of the borings reached a height of about 6 feet. The resistivity of limestone layers penetrated by the boreholes generally was less than 1,000 ohm-meters. Formation resistivity near the cavernous zones did not show an appreciable contrast from surrounding bedrock, probably because the bedrock is saturated, owing to its primary permeability. Measured flow rates in the eight boreholes determined using an electromagnetic flowmeter were all less than ±0.1 liter per second. These low flow rates suggest that vertical hydraulic gradients in the boreholes are negligible and that hydraulic head in the various cavernous zones shows only minor, if any, variation.

  12. Rhythm and Meter in the Early Juan Ramón Jiménez: The Case of "¡Silencio!" of Estío

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vialla Hartfield-Méndez

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The literary trajectory of Juan Ramón Jiménez is commonly divided into two periods, though this division is also generally recognized as an oversimplification of a very complex process in which the poet moves from the use of more traditional poetic forms, and a more concrete reference to reality, to the practice of free verse and more metaphysical expressions of man's relationship to his surroundings. "¡Silencio!," the last poem of Estío (1915, was written just prior to Diario de un poeta reciéncasado , the book with which it is considered that Juan Ramón began the second stage of his literary trajectory. "¡Silencio!" is a pivotal poem which presents various elements of nature that had appeared in Juan Ramón's earlier poetry, but in a new context, clearly anticipating in form and content what was to be Juan Ramón's next poetic enterprise. The "eternal silence" of the poem's last line is a transcendental silence that is the ultimate goal of his poetry. A close structural analysis of the poem reveals the manner in which Juan Ramón identifies transcendental qualities that he finds within himself with the various elements of Nature, and thus anticipates the totality of being that he seemed to achieve in his later works.

  13. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process...

  14. Water quality assessment of streams draining the Akwapim Ridge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surface water samples from seven streams on the Akwapim Ridge were analysed over a period of 1 year for various water quality parameters following standard methods prescribed in APHA, AWWA, WEF and AOAC. The study was carried out in order to assess the suitability of the streams for drinking and other domestic ...

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation. Physical Characteristics and National Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parr, Patricia Dreyer [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joan, F. Hughes [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2006-10-09

    The topology, geology, hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide a complex and intricate array of resources that directly impact land stewardship and use decisions. The purpose of this document is to consolidate general information regarding the natural resources and physical characteristics of the ORR.

  16. a comparative study of some robust ridge and liu estimators

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    ABSTRACT. In multiple linear regression analysis, multicollinearity and outliers are two main problems. When multicollinearity exists, biased estimation techniques such as Ridge and Liu Estimators are preferable to Ordinary Least Square. On the other hand, when outliers exist in the data, robust estimators like M, MM, LTS ...

  17. A comparative study of some robust ridge and liu estimators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In multiple linear regression analysis, multicollinearity and outliers are two main problems. When multicollinearity exists, biased estimation techniques such as Ridge and Liu Estimators are preferable to Ordinary Least Square. On the other hand, when outliers exist in the data, robust estimators like M, MM, LTS and S ...

  18. Oak Ridge Reservation, annual site environmental report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The US DOE currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation; Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and K-25. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its surroundings. The results summarized in this report are based on the data collected during calendar year (CY) 1993 and compiled in; Environmental Monitoring in the Oak Ridge Reservation: CY 1993 Results. Annual environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid, gaseous, or airborne effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants and process stream characteristics, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards. Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuffs, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs and the measurement of external radiation for purposes of demonstrating compliance with applicable standards, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and assessing effects, if any, on the local environment

  19. Cement Stabilization of Bama Ridge Soil | Kundiri | Nigerian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cm high and it is approximately 50-100 m wide and 350 km long. The non-plastic Bama ridge soil stabilized at 7% could be deemed viable as a good base course material for lightly trafficked highway pavement. Keywords: keyword; keyword; keyword. Nigerian Journal of Soil and Environmental Research Vol. 7 2007: pp.

  20. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  1. Equatorial segment of the mid-atlantic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Equatorial Segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a part of this mid-oceanic ridge limited by a cluster of fracture zones - Cape Verde, Marathon, Mercury, Vema, Doldrums, Vernadsky and Sierra Leone - in the North, and a similar cluster of fracture zones - St Paul, Romanche and Chain - in the South. During recent decades, following the publication of the 5. edition of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO), there has been a great deal of geological-geophysical research and mapping of the World Ocean. The results have led to the development of a number of theories concerning the essential heterogeneity of the structure of the ocean floor and, in particular, the heterogeneity of the structure and segmentation of mid-oceanic ridges. Research on the nature of such segmentation is of great importance for an understanding of the processes of development of such ridges and oceanic basins as a whole. Chapter 20 is dedicated to the study of the atlantic ocean mantle by using (Th.U)Th, (Th/U)pb and K/Ti systematics 380 refs.

  2. Department of Energy Environmental Management Plan for Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Environmental Program Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Complex was prepared in response to recommendations made at the Congressional hearing held in Oak Ridge on July 11, 1983, to discuss the extent and impact of mercury and other pollutants from DOE's Oak Ridge facilities. While this is a planning document and not a commitment of funds, this effort will help to focus DOE resources toward resolving environmental problems at Oak Ridge in a timely and cost-effective manner. The plan includes: (1) an environmental planning basis; (2) a brief description of the problems and proposed resolutions for each plant; (3) research and development requirements and funding schedules; (4) funding schedule summaries; and (5) continuing analyses and unresolved issues. The planning basis provides the foundation for identifying the environmental problems and their potential resolutions. While applicable environmental standards must be met, there is considerable latitude for interpretation of existing regulations and projection of future requirements. This latitude can have a significant impact on funding and scheduling. 11 figures, 8 tables

  3. Alveolar ridge preservation and biologic width management for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alveolar bone atrophy is a chronically progressive, irreversible process which results in bone loss in both the buccal, lingual and apico-coronal region. Without bone preservation measures, bone resorption is experienced and continues for life. Preservation of alveolar ridge is indicated when a tooth-supported fixed partial ...

  4. Alveolar ridge augmentation in rats by Bio-Oss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine if Bio-Oss initiated osteoinduction or osteoconduction when implanted into rats. Sintered and unsintered granules of the anorganic bovine bone Bio-Oss was implanted subperiosteally for alveolar ridge augmentation purposes and heterotopically in the abdominal...

  5. Procedures manual for the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Procedures Manual for the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator contains specific information pertaining to operation and safety of the facility. Items such as the interlock system, radiation monitoring, emergency procedures, night shift and weekend operation, and maintenance are discussed in detail

  6. Equatorial segment of the mid-atlantic ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Equatorial Segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a part of this mid-oceanic ridge limited by a cluster of fracture zones - Cape Verde, Marathon, Mercury, Vema, Doldrums, Vernadsky and Sierra Leone - in the North, and a similar cluster of fracture zones - St Paul, Romanche and Chain - in the South. During recent decades, following the publication of the 5. edition of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO), there has been a great deal of geological-geophysical research and mapping of the World Ocean. The results have led to the development of a number of theories concerning the essential heterogeneity of the structure of the ocean floor and, in particular, the heterogeneity of the structure and segmentation of mid-oceanic ridges. Research on the nature of such segmentation is of great importance for an understanding of the processes of development of such ridges and oceanic basins as a whole. Chapter 20 is dedicated to the study of the atlantic ocean mantle by using (Th.U)Th, (Th/U)pb and K/Ti systematics

  7. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncinski, W.S.

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics include: site and operations overview; environmental compliance strategies; environmental management program; effluent monitoring; environmental surveillance; radiation doses; chemical doses; ground water; and quality assurance

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation, annual site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The US DOE currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation; Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and K-25. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its surroundings. The results summarized in this report are based on the data collected during calendar year (CY) 1993 and compiled in; Environmental Monitoring in the Oak Ridge Reservation: CY 1993 Results. Annual environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid, gaseous, or airborne effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants and process stream characteristics, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards. Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuffs, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs and the measurement of external radiation for purposes of demonstrating compliance with applicable standards, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and assessing effects, if any, on the local environment.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koncinski, W.S. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics include: site and operations overview; environmental compliance strategies; environmental management program; effluent monitoring; environmental surveillance; radiation doses; chemical doses; ground water; and quality assurance.

  10. Oak Ridge Research reactor shutdown maintenance and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, G.H.; Laughlin, D.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Department of Energy ordered the Oak Ridge Research Reactor to be placed in permanent shutdown on July 14, 1987. The paper outlines routine maintenance activities and surveillance tests performed April through September, 1990, on the reactor instrumentation and controls, process system, and the gaseous waste filter system. Preparations are being made to transfer the facility to the Remedial Action Program. 6 tabs

  11. The Variance Normalization Method of Ridge Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcock, J. W.; And Others

    The testing of contemporary sociological theory often calls for the application of structural-equation models to data which are inherently collinear. It is shown that simple ridge regression, which is commonly used for controlling the instability of ordinary least squares regression estimates in ill-conditioned data sets, is not a legitimate…

  12. Gourds: Bitter, Bottle, Wax, Snake, Sponge and Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor cucurbits include bitter gourd, bottle gourd, wax gourd, snake gourd, and sponge and ridge gourd, which are significant dietary sources of nutrients such as vitamin A and C, iron and calcium. These cucurbits are cultivated and marketed by smallholder farmers and remain important components of ...

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1995--FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years (1995-2000). Included in this report are the: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; and resource projections.

  14. Diapycnal Diffusivities over the Southwestern Indian Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.

    2016-02-01

    The southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) Ridge stems from the South Atlantic and extends northeastward to Rodrigues Island. The deep trenches and fracture zones between the Crozet Basin and the Madagascar Basin provide the major passages for the deep and the bottom water to enter the Indian Ocean, which is also part of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the Indian Ocean. More than 70 CTD profiles have been conducted over the SWIO Ridge from 2010 up to now. Besides, a mooring was deployed about 2900 m below the sea surface for almost one year. Three Seaguard current meters, nine Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-pressure sensor, and one Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-Conductivity-Pressure Sensor were mounted on the mooring. The diapycnal diffusivity over the SWIO Ridge is estimated with two methods, i.e., the Internal Wave Spectrum Method (GHP) which relies on the energy cascade due to wave interactions, and the Thorpe scale method. Large diffusivities on the order of 10-2 m2 s-1 are found over the rough ridges. Moreover, the temporal and spatial distributions of diapycnal diffusivities are presented and their physical relations with the fine structure of the bottom topography are analyzed in this study.

  15. Ridging, a Mechanized Alternative to Mounding for Yam and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam Eshun

    cassava is planted usually on flat ground or on mounds 1–1.5 m apart, in rows or at random. In other parts ... Africa (Coursey, 1967), yam may be planted 'on the flat', on mounds or ridges, or on raised beds; or they may ..... necessitate the moving of substantially greater quantities of earth for yam production (Orkwor & Asadu.

  16. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides formed by metal coating of dielectric ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenin, Volodymyr; Choudhury, Sajid; Saha, Soham

    2017-01-01

    Bound hybrid plasmon-polariton modes supported by waveguides, which are formed by gold coating of ridges etched into a silica substrate, are analyzed using numerical simulations and investigated experimentally using near-field microscopy at telecom wavelengths (1425-1625 nm). Drastic modifications...

  17. Structure and origin of the 85 degrees E ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Chaubey, A.K.; Ramprasad, T.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Krishna, K.S.; Desa, M.; Murty, G.P.S.; Subrahmanyam, C.

    The submerged 85 degrees E Ridge in the Bay of Bengal trends approximately N-S between 19 degrees N and 6 degrees N latitudes. Off the southeast coast of Sri Lanka it takes an arcuate shape and seems to terminate with the northweard extension...

  18. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... accommodations, food and beverage, retail sales, boat rentals, and other services at Crabtree Falls, Price Lake... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-CONC-0511-7182; 2410-OYC] Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  19. Sharing the Arts of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Apple Dolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Martha; Gailey, Lamar

    This module on apple dolls is one of eight modules designed to provide instruction on authentic Blue Ridge Mountain crafts to adult basic education students at a low cost. Contents include notes on the apple doll making; process used, including equipment and materials, as well as method described narratively and graphically; and the followup,…

  20. Automated Medical Record Tracking System for the Ridge Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper employs the systems analysis and design approach (also known as systems development lifecycle) to design and develop an automated medical records tracking system. This proposed system is a case study at the Ridge Hospital, Ghana. The system is limited to the tracking and management of in patients\\' ...

  1. Fingermarks in blood: Mechanical models and the color of ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Boris; Leifer, Amihud; Attias, David; Mark, Yanku

    2018-03-14

    This article treats fingermarks in blood on non-porous surfaces and addresses the question of "which came first": the fingermark or the blood. Three mechanical models were systematically examined: (1) A blood-contaminated finger pressed against a clean surface; (2) blood contaminates a latent print that had been placed on a clean surface; (3) A clean finger pressed against a blood-contaminated surface. The questions of reliability and limits of all three models were discussed. The relevancy of the approach to "which came first", based solely on the color of ridges was questioned. The first mechanical model most simulated a real situation, when previously cleaned, a blood contaminated finger touched a clean Formica or glass surface with pressure of 100-500g. Concerning the second model, it was observed that in the case of a greasy latent print, placed on an inclined surface and contaminated with appropriate amount of blood, the color of ridges were normally darker than the color of its valleys. As for the third model, it was concluded that it works only in about 25% of cases. While investigating this model, two phenomena were observed: ridge color inversion and valley color inversion. In conclusion the color of ridges can not be the only and ultimate indicator to the question of "which came first", the fingermark or the blood stain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance

  3. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for ∼ 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring

  4. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs

  5. Removal site evaluation report for the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This removal site evaluation (RmSE) report of the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Isotopes Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and if remedial site evaluations (RSEs) or removal actions are required. The scope of the project included: (1) a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; (3) a site inspection; and (4) identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. The results of RmSE indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present in the Isotope Facilities because adequate controls and practices exist to protect human health and the environment. The recommended correction from the RmSE are being conducted as maintenance actions; accordingly, this RmSE is considered complete and terminated.

  6. Removal site evaluation report on Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report on Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility nd identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that areas inside Building 3019B pose no imminent hazard because adequate engineering and administrative controls are in place and enforced within the facility to ensure worker and environmental protection. A maintenance action, however, is being undertaken or proposed. Deteriorated and peeling exterior paint in areas on the west and south walls on the exterior of the building has an uninhibited pathway to the storm water drainage system and can potentially impact the local surface water during periods of storm water runoff. The paint is assumed to be lead based, thus posing a potential problem. In addition, the subsurface of all of the exterior walls may be radiologically contaminated. A maintenance action will be necessary to prevent further deterioration and dislodging of the paint

  7. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for {approximately} 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring.

  8. Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance.

  9. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base

  10. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatmaker, T.L.; Hook, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. ORR background soil characterization data will be used for two purposes. The first application will be in differentiating between naturally occurring constituents and site-related contamination. This is a very important step in a risk assessment because if sufficient background data are not available, no constituent known to be a contaminant can be eliminated from the assessment even if the sampled concentration is measured at a minimum level. The second use of the background data will be in calculating baseline risks against which site-specific contamination risks can be compared

  11. Removal site evaluation report on Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report for Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility and identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions, removal actions, or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that areas associated with Building 7602 pose no imminent hazards requiring maintenance actions. Adequate engineering and administrative controls are in place and enforced within the facility to ensure worker and environmental protection. Current actions that are being taken to prevent further release of contamination and ensure worker safety within Building 7602 are considered adequate until decontamination and decommissioning activities begin. Given the current status and condition of Building 7602, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated

  12. Site characterization report for the Old Hydrofracture Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Several Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) structures (i.e., Building 7852, the bulk storage bins, the pump house, water tank T-5, and pump P-3) are surplus facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). OHF was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solids storage, handling, mixing, and grout injection facility. It was shut down in 1980 and transferred to ORNL's Surveillance and Maintenance Program. The hydrofracture process was a unique disposal method that involved injecting waste materials mixed with grout and additives under pumping pressures of 2,000 psi or greater into a deep, low-permeability shale formation. The injected slurry spread along fractures and bedding planes for hundreds of feet from the injection points, forming thin grout sheets (often less than 1/8 in. thick). The grout ostensibly immobilized and solidified the liquid wastes. Site characterization activities were conducted in the winter and spring of 1994 to collect information necessary to plan the D and D of OHF structures. This site characterization report documents the results of the investigation of OHF D and D structures, presenting data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate. 25 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs

  13. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), X-10 site, conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ORNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for ORNL. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the ORNL Survey. 120 refs., 68 figs., 71 tabs.

  15. Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ''closure'' in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document

  16. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base.

  17. The Distribution of Hydrothermal Venting on Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, E. T.; Edmonds, H. N.; German, C. R.; Bach, W.; Banerjee, N. R.; Walker, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Modeling efforts and field observations over the last decade have concluded that the thermal structure of midocean ridges (MORs) represents a balance between the supply of magmatic heat and the efficiency of cooling by hydrothermal circulation. A simple hypothesis states that the spatial density of hydrothermal circulation increases with the magma budget, but complicating factors include the role of permeability, heat sources other than magma, time-scale differences between venting and magma delivery/cooling, the uncertainty of vent-field exploration, and others. One of the most intriguing areas of hydrothermal research is ultraslow (spreading centers. These ridges compose ~25% of the global MOR system and are believed to have a much lower magma supply rate than would be predicted by a simple spreading-rate extrapolation. Is convective hydrothermal cooling proportionally lower as well? Recent plume-mapping surveys along more than 950 km of the Gakkel Ridge (GR) and 1300 km in two areas of the South West Indian Ridge (SWIR: 10° - 24° E and 58° - 66° E) have provided a first look at hydrothermal activity along ultraslow-spreading MORs. Hydrothermal plumes in all three of these regions have been detected almost exclusively using optical/temperature sensors, though corroborating chemical data exist for several sites on the GR. Plumes were rare on the SWIR, suggesting 8-15 active sites. In sharp contrast, >80% of 138 vertical profiles on the GR detected a plume, though these likely emanate from a minimum of 8-12 individual sites. Apparently the unusual hydrography of the deep Arctic Ocean combined with the simple geometry and deep rift valley of the GR promotes along-axis plume dispersal on a scale unseen elsewhere. Viewed on the global scale, and based on this limited data set, active venting per kilometer of axis length is substantially sparser on the SWIR and GR than on faster spreading ridges. Proportional to the magma delivery rate, however, venting appears to

  18. Taking the Pulse of Mid-Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, M.

    2016-12-01

    Seafloor spreading and thus mid-ocean ridge eruptions are generally viewed as relatively steady state processes, with images of a conveyor belt smoothly churning out fresh seafloor, as documented by the revolutionary 1960s observations of stripes in marine magnetic anomalies. However, recent evidence from present day eruptions, as well as seafloor bathymetric and hydrothermal output, suggest that these processes might in fact wax and wane, showing a sensitivity to orbital and sea-level forcings over a wide range of time scales. In the last two and a half decades our understanding of mid-ocean ridge eruptions has been revolutionized by hydroacoustic monitoring, the ability to keep ocean bottom seismographs deployed and recording for longer periods of time, and most recently by a fiber optic cable delivering data from Axial Seamount back to shore in real-time. Comparisons of recent eruptions at the East Pacific Rise and Axial Seamount highlight some differences between mid-ocean ridge eruptions and caldera centered eruptions, the latter showing obvious sensitivity to magma pressure, while mid-ocean ridges are ultimately driven by extensional forces, all of which has implications for understanding the impact of external forcings. The evidence for short and long-term pulsing of mid-ocean ridge volcanism throws light on how the seafloor is formed, but also highlights potential feedbacks to global geochemical and physical cycles. If seafloor spreading is not steady-state, neither is its geochemical flux, including input into the carbon cycle. In particular, evidence for a recent 100 kyr cycle in mid-ocean ridge volcanism raises the possibility that ridges respond to, and perhaps feed back into, Milankovitch cycles, possibly playing a role in the abrupt end of glaciations in the last 800 kyr. While the magnitude of any input is poorly understood, these findings highlight that the solid earth system should not be viewed in isolation from the ocean and atmospheric systems

  19. Microbial diversity in subseafloor fluids from Explorer Ridge, Northeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S.; Huber, J. A.; Embley, R.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Gorda, Juan de Fuca and Explorer Ridges are first order spreading centers located in the northeast Pacific. While the Gorda and Juan de Fuca Ridges have been extensively sampled for chemical and microbiological analyses, what little is known about the Explorer Ridge is from preliminary observations made in the mid-1980's. A cruise in 2002 revisited the area and discovered vigorous hydrothermal activity at Magic Mountain, a site located outside the primary rift valley. Explorer Ridge is an important site to compare with other well-described vent sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Our research has focused on describing the phylogenetic and physiological diversity of bacteria and archaea in low temperature hydrothermal fluids in an effort to identify subseafloor indicator organisms and to use the physiological characteristics of these organisms to help constrain subseafloor habitat characteristics. We have previously established that there are microbial taxa that are unique to subseafloor habitats associated with diffuse flow fluids at Axial Seamount and at Endeavour both located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These included cultured anaerobic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic heterotrophs, methanogens and sulfur metabolizers. Moreover, results from molecular phylogeny analyses using the 16S rRNA sequences identified a phylogenetically diverse group of bacteria belonging to the epsilon-proteobacteria. While anaerobic hyperthermophiles were cultured from some diffuse-flow vent sites at Explorer, they were less abundant than at Axial Volcano and Endeavour, and curiously, no methanogens were cultured or detected in 16S rRNA clonal libraries. Like Axial, a diverse group of epsilon-proteobacterial clones were found with many similar to those identified from Axial Seamount and other hydrothermal vent sites, although there appears to be some unique species. The overall bacterial diversity at Explorer appears different than at Axial, possibly linked to temperature or chemical

  20. Large Eddy Simulations of Flow over Double-Ridge Orography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goger, Brigitta; Serafin, Stefano; Stiperski, Ivana; Grubišić, Vanda

    2014-05-01

    Lee waves excited by a single mountain range have been studied extensively in the past. Flow over a single mountain range is often associated with downslope windstorms and turbulence, both of which may pose a hazard for aviation. A particularly turbulent phenomenon associated with large-amplitude lee waves or hydraulic jumps is an atmospheric rotor, characterized by a reversal of surface flow on the lee of the mountain range and turbulent internal structure. In reality, mountain ridges are rarely isolated. Flow over double or multiple ridges can lead to lee wave interference, either enhancing or diminishing the amplitude of lee waves downstream of the ridges. A similar effect can be expected on the flow field in between the individual ridges. To test the influence of secondary topography on lee wave amplitudes, wavelengths, steadiness, and the boundary layer separation point, water-flume experiments are planned with a double ridge setup. In preparation for these experiments, several possible laboratory setups have been simulated numerically with the CM1 model (Bryan Cloud Model 1, version 16) with two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) large-eddy simulations (LES). Non-dimensional parameters such as the Froude number (Fr) and the mountain/inversion height ratio (H/zi) are used for classifications of the simulation results. For the 2D simulations, both with a single and double-ridge topography, a series of sensitivity tests were conducted to examine the dependence of the flow field on a number of physical parameters, including the inversion height and strength, horizontal wind speed, and mountain shape. In the double-ridge simulations, a lee wave interference pattern is observed for setups including inversions, and the results mostly agree with previous findings by Stiperski and Grubišić (2011) for nonlinear flow regimes. From the 2D sensitivity tests, special cases were selected for the 3D LES simulations. In the analysis, a special focus was laid on the

  1. A review on alveolar ridge preservation following tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Holtzclaw, Danny; Rosen, Paul S

    2012-09-01

    The question that clinicians face is whether the use of bone replacement grafts and/or barrier membranes enhance their ability to provide for the future placement of a dental implant or to maximize ridge dimensions following the extraction of a tooth versus no additional treatments. The evidence was obtained by search of Entrez PubMed and manual search of The International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, The International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry, Clinical Oral Implant Research, The Journal of Periodontology, The Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and The Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry. Key search words included Guided Bone Regeneration, Dental Extraction, Tooth Extraction, Bone Replacement Graft, Alveolar Ridge. The years of search included from January 2011 through February 2012. The recurring theme was that there was considerable heterogeneity to study designs, time periods, and methods of evaluation. This created great difficulty in trying to answer with good high-quality evidence questions about the techniques and materials to be used for maximizing regeneration at the time of tooth extraction or in which situations this ought to be used. There appears to be consensus from the reviewed literature supporting ridge preservation techniques as a whole. Multiple studies demonstrated less ridge resorption occurring when alveolar ridge preservation procedures were used versus the placement of no graft material in fresh alveolar sockets. The analysis did not show any grafting materials demonstrating a clear benefit over any others or that a barrier membrane is necessary. The evidence is also too premature about whether socket preservation efforts require primary closure. In the emerging area of growth factors, there is no high-quality evidence to either support or refute their use. Tooth extraction is one of the most widely performed procedures in dentistry today and it has been historically well documented that

  2. European temperature responses to blocking and ridge regional patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Pedro M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Barriopedro, David; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Santos, João A.

    2018-01-01

    Blocking occurrence and its impacts on European temperature have been studied in the last decade. However, most previous studies on blocking impacts have focused on winter only, disregarding its fingerprint in summer and differences with other synoptic patterns that also trigger temperature extremes. In this work, we provide a clear distinction between high-latitude blocking and sub-tropical ridges occurring in three sectors of the Euro-Atlantic region, describing their climatology and consequent impacts on European temperature during both winter and summer. Winter blocks (ridges) are generally associated to colder (warmer) than average conditions over large regions of Europe, in some areas with anomalies larger than 5 °C, particularly for the patterns occurring in the Atlantic and Central European sectors. During summer, there is a more regional response characterized by above average temperature for both blocking and ridge patterns, especially those occurring in continental areas, although negative temperature anomalies persist in southernmost areas during blocking. An objective analysis of the different forcing mechanisms associated to each considered weather regime has been performed, quantifying the importance of the following processes in causing the temperature anomalies: horizontal advection, vertical advection and diabatic heating. While during winter advection processes tend to be more relevant to explain temperature responses, in summer radiative heating under enhanced insolation plays a crucial role for both blocking and ridges. Finally, the changes in the distributions of seasonal temperature and in the frequencies of extreme temperature indices were also examined for specific areas of Europe. Winter blocking and ridge patterns are key drivers in the occurrence of regional cold and warm extreme temperatures, respectively. In summer, they are associated with substantial changes in the frequency of extremely warm days, but with different signatures in

  3. Comparative effect of ridge furrow and zero tillage on cowpea at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trials were carried out to compare effect of different seedbeds on cowpea at Abeokuta and Akure in different microclimates of Nigeria. The values of selected soil physical properties, plant nutrient status and growth and yield of cowpea given by zero tillage, manual clearing, ridge top, ridge side, ridge base, and furrow were ...

  4. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3 S and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. In the present study, the shipboard gravity and multibeam bathymetry data acquired over a 750 km long section of the Central Indian Ridge between 3°S and 11°S ...

  5. Diversity and biogeochemical structuring of bacterial communities across the Porangahau ridge accretionary prism, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdan, L.J.; Gillevet, P.M.; Pohlman, J.W.; Sikaroodi, M.; Greinart, J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from the Porangahau ridge, located off the northeastern coast of New Zealand, were studied to describe bacterial community structure in conjunction with differing biogeochemical regimes across the ridge. Low diversity was observed in sediments from an eroded basin seaward of the ridge and

  6. Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.R.; Curtis, A.H.; Houlberg, L.M.; Purucker, S.T.; Singer, M.L.; Tardiff, M.F.; Wolf, D.A.

    1994-07-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to WAG 1 groundwater and presents the rationale, justification, and objectives for conducting this continuing site characterization. This report summarizes the operations that have taken place at each of the areas of concern in WAG 1, summarizes previous characterization studies that have been performed, presents interpretations of previously collected data and information, identifies contaminants of concern, and presents an action plan for further site investigations and early actions that will lead to identification of contaminant sources, their major groundwater pathways, and reduced off-site migration of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Site characterization Activities performed to date at WAG I have indicated that groundwater contamination, principally radiological contamination, is widespread. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to an unknown extent. The general absence of radiological contamination in surface water at the perimeter of WAG 1 is attributed to the presence of pipelines and underground waste storage tank sumps and dry wells distributed throughout WAG 1 which remove more than about 40 million gal of contaminated groundwater per year

  7. Paleotsunami Inundation of a Beach Ridge Plain: Cobble Ridge Overtopping and Interridge Valley Flooding in Seaside, Oregon, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt D. Peterson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Seaside beach ridge plain was inundated by six paleotsunamis during the last ~2500 years. Large runups (adjusted >10 m in height overtopped seawardmost cobble beach ridges (7 m elevation at ~1.3 and ~2.6 ka before present. Smaller paleotsunami (6–8 m in height likely entered the beach plain interior (4-5 m elevation through the paleo-Necanicum bay mouth. The AD 1700 Cascadia paleotsunami had a modest runup (6-7 m height, yet it locally inundated to 1.5 km landward distance. Bed shear stresses (100–3,300 dyne cm−2 are estimated for paleotsunami surges (0.5–2 m depths that flowed down slopes (0.002–0.017 gradient on the landward side of the cobble beach ridges. Critical entrainment shear stresses of 1,130–1,260 dyne cm−2 were needed to dislodge the largest clasts (26–32 cm diameter in paleotsunami coulees that were cut (100–200 m width into the landward side of the cobble ridges.

  8. Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.R.; Curtis, A.H.; Houlberg, L.M.; Purucker, S.T.; Singer, M.L.; Tardiff, M.F.; Wolf, D.A.

    1994-07-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to WAG 1 groundwater and presents the rationale, justification, and objectives for conducting this continuing site characterization. This report summarizes the operations that have taken place at each of the areas of concern in WAG 1, summarizes previous characterization studies that have been performed, presents interpretations of previously collected data and information, identifies contaminants of concern, and presents an action plan for further site investigations and early actions that will lead to identification of contaminant sources, their major groundwater pathways, and reduced off-site migration of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Site characterization Activities performed to date at WAG I have indicated that groundwater contamination, principally radiological contamination, is widespread. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to an unknown extent. The general absence of radiological contamination in surface water at the perimeter of WAG 1 is attributed to the presence of pipelines and underground waste storage tank sumps and dry wells distributed throughout WAG 1 which remove more than about 40 million gal of contaminated groundwater per year.

  9. Tectonics of the Ninetyeast Ridge derived from spreading records in adjacent oceanic basins and age constraints of the ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Abraham, H.; Sager, W.W.; Pringle, M.S.; Frey, F.; Rao, D.G.; Levchenko, O.V.

    and the Wharton spreading ridge. Satellite gravity data and magnetic anomalies 34 through 19 define crustal isochrons and show fracture zones striking approx. N5 degrees E. One of these, at 89 degrees E, crosses the approx. N10 degrees E trending NER, impacting...

  10. La légalisation de l’eugénisme en Espagne. Les théories de Jiménez de Asúa dans Libertad de amar y derecho a morir (1928

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Flores Rodríguez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cet article étudie les théories eugénistes du juriste et socialiste espagnol Luis Jiménez de Asúa, exposées dans son livre Libertad de amar y derecho a morir (1928, dont l’examen met en évidence l’importance des débats autour de la légalisation de l’eugénisme en Espagne. En démontrant sa viabilité juridique, fondée sur le respect du droit et des principes socialistes, Jiménez de Asúa ouvre de nouvelles perspectives au mouvement eugéniste espagnol, laissant entrevoir les contours d’un nouvel ordre, au détriment de la Dictature de Primo de Rivera, déjà sclérosée.

  11. Traducción literaria según un escritor español del siglo XVI, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada descubridor del Nuevo Reino de Granada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Caro Molina

    1966-10-01

    Full Text Available El Prólogo de El antijovio de Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada ofrece a los lectores un interés especial, cual es el de expresar, en estilo propio y enérgico los pensamientos de uno de los hombres más cultos de la nación más importante de la época de la conquista y colonización del Nuevo Reino de Granada.

  12. Wind tunnel experiments on the effects of tillage ridge features on wind erosion horizontal fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the well-known soil factors which control wind erosion on flat, unridged surfaces, two specific processes affect the susceptibility of tillage ridged surfaces to wind erosion: ridge-induced roughness and ridge- trapping efficiency. In order to parameterize horizontal soil fluxes produced by wind over tillage ridges, eight-ridge configurations composed of sandy soil and exhibiting ridge heights to ridge spacing (RH/RS ratios ranging from 0.18 to 0.38 were experimented in a wind tunnel. These experiments are used to develop a parameterization of the horizontal fluxes over tillage ridged surfaces based only on the geometric characteristics of the ridges. Indeed, the key parameters controlling the horizontal flux, namely the friction velocity, threshold friction velocity and the adjustment coefficient, are derived through specific expressions, from ridge heights (RH and ridge spacing (RS. This parameterization was evaluated by comparing the results of the simulations to an additional experimental data set and to the data set obtained by Hagen and Armbrust (1992. In both cases, predicted and measured values are found to be in a satisfying agreement. This parameterization was used to evaluate the efficiency of ridges in reducing wind erosion. The results show that ridged surfaces, when compared to a loose, unridged soil surface, lead to an important reduction in the horizontal fluxes (exceeding 60%. Moreover, the effect of ridges in trapping particles contributes for more than 90% in the flux reduction while the ridge roughness effect is weak and decreases when the wind velocity increases.

  13. Wind tunnel experiments on the effects of tillage ridge features on wind erosion horizontal fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the well-known soil factors which control wind erosion on flat, unridged surfaces, two specific processes affect the susceptibility of tillage ridged surfaces to wind erosion: ridge-induced roughness and ridge- trapping efficiency.

    In order to parameterize horizontal soil fluxes produced by wind over tillage ridges, eight-ridge configurations composed of sandy soil and exhibiting ridge heights to ridge spacing (RH/RS ratios ranging from 0.18 to 0.38 were experimented in a wind tunnel. These experiments are used to develop a parameterization of the horizontal fluxes over tillage ridged surfaces based only on the geometric characteristics of the ridges. Indeed, the key parameters controlling the horizontal flux, namely the friction velocity, threshold friction velocity and the adjustment coefficient, are derived through specific expressions, from ridge heights (RH and ridge spacing (RS. This parameterization was evaluated by comparing the results of the simulations to an additional experimental data set and to the data set obtained by Hagen and Armbrust (1992. In both cases, predicted and measured values are found to be in a satisfying agreement.

    This parameterization was used to evaluate the efficiency of ridges in reducing wind erosion. The results show that ridged surfaces, when compared to a loose, unridged soil surface, lead to an important reduction in the horizontal fluxes (exceeding 60%. Moreover, the effect of ridges in trapping particles contributes for more than 90% in the flux reduction while the ridge roughness effect is weak and decreases when the wind velocity increases.

  14. Design demonstrations for Category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL has conducted research in energy related fields since 1943. The facilities used to conduct the research include nuclear reactors, chemical pilot plants, research laboratories, radioisotope production laboratories, and support facilities. These facilities have produced a variety of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes. These wastes have been stored and transported through an extensive network of piping and tankage. Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) - Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or Replacement Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category B -- Existing Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category C -- Existing Tank Systems without Secondary Containment; and Category D -- Existing Tank Systems without Secondary Containment that are; Removed from Service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category ''B.'' The design demonstration for each tank is presented in Section 2. The design demonstrations were developed using information obtained from the design drawings (as-built when available), construction specifications, and interviews with facility operators. The assessments assume that each tank system was constructed in accordance with the design drawings and construction specifications for that system unless specified otherwise. Each design demonstration addresses system conformance to the requirements of the FFA (Appendix F, Subsection C)

  15. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure.

  16. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ''past practice'' technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable

  17. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S and M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S and M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the EFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of EFDP Facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 2000. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $51M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S and M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

  18. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ``past practice`` technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable.

  19. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure

  20. Robotic system for decommissioning the Gunite tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesser, J.B.; Evans, J.H.; Norman, R.E.; Peishel, F.L.; Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-01-01

    Robotic systems and equipment to facilitate removal of the contents of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Waste Tanks as well as the tanks themselves are one of several options being considered for this site. The technology described consists of proven remote systems and equipment or remote adaptations of proven industrial concepts. The proposed robotic system would be housed in a portable containment structure, fabricated from steel plate, and reinforced with structural shapes. The structure would be cylindrical and have a domed head. The containment structure would be sized to cover one tank. The tanks are in two sizes: 60 ft and 35 ft diameters. The structures would be supported on driven steel piles and would have an earthen berm around the base to enhance the effectiveness of the containment. Internal to the containment structure, a polar crane bridge equipped with a pair of trolley-mounted telescoping masts would be utilized to support and manipulate the systems, tools, etc., which would perform the individual tasks. The bridge and mast control system and the manipulator control system would provide both teleoperated and robotic modes to support either manual or preprogrammed operations. Equipment mounted at the end of the mast would include servomanipulators, water jet cutter, or a clam shell bucket. The mast would feature an interface plate allowing remote changeout of most mounted equipment. The operating system would be required to have the capability to decontaminate the dome and its equipment to the degree necessary to allow it to be relocated. Viewing would be provided by commercial closed-circuit TV (CCTV). It is believed that the systems described herein represent a feasible approach to removing the contents from the ORNL gunite tanks and implementing remediation of the site

  1. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S and M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S and M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the EFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of EFDP Facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 2000. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $51M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S and M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year

  2. Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge west of Scarboro Road and east of an unnamed drainage feature southwest of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (unless otherwise noted, directions are in reference to the Y-12 Plant administrative grid). The Chestnut Ridge Regime contains several sites used for management of hazardous and nonhazardous wastes associated with plant operations. Groundwater and surface water quality monitoring associated with these waste management sites is performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included in this annual monitoring report are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit for the Chestnut Ridge Regime (post-closure permit) issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in June 1996. Besides the signed certification statement and the RCRA facility information summarized below, condition II.C.6 of the post-closure permit requires annual reporting of groundwater monitoring activities, inclusive of the analytical data and results of applicable data evaluations, performed at three RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) units: the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin), the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and Kerr Hollow Quarry

  3. The Pontic-Shield: Partial Extraction Therapy for Ridge Preservation and Pontic Site Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Howard; Du Toit, Jonathan; Salama, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Augmentive ridge preservation techniques aim to manage the postextraction ridge. The partial extraction of teeth may better preserve the ridge form by maintaining the bundle bone-periodontal ligament apparatus. Root submergence has been demonstrated to retain the periodontal tissues and preserve the ridge beneath dentures or fixed prostheses. The socket-shield technique entails preparing a tooth root section simultaneous to immediate implant placement and has demonstrated histologic and clinical results contributory to esthetic implant treatment. A retrospective 10-patient case series treating 14 partial extraction sites demonstrates how a modification of the socket-shield technique can successfully develop pontic sites and preserve the ridge.

  4. Segmentation and seismicity of the ultraslow Knipovich and Gakkel mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarayskaya, Yu. A.

    2017-03-01

    Comprehensive analysis of detailed bathymetric data obtained during legs 24-27 of the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov has been carried out on the Knipovich Ridge. The revealed variations of magmatic activity along the axis supplement the available information on segmentation of this ridge [7, 19, 33]. The new statistical data characterize seismic activity under settings of ultraslow oblique extension. As follows from the seismic data, the Knipovich Ridge belongs to structural units with intermediate geodynamics between the spreading ridge and transform fault. Magmatic and amagmatic segments of the Arctic ultraslow Knipovich and Gakkel mid-ocean ridges are compared.

  5. Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, B.K.

    1993-04-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

  6. Oak Ridge Reservation Physical Characteristics and Natural Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parr, P.D.; Hughes, J.F.

    2006-09-19

    The topography, geology, hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide a complex and intricate array of resources that directly impact land stewardship and use decisions (Fig. 1). The purpose of this document is to consolidate general information regarding the natural resources and physical characteristics of the ORR. The ORR, encompassing 33,114 acres (13,401 ha) of federally owned land and three Department of Energy (DOE) installations, is located in Roane and Anderson Counties in east Tennessee, mostly within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge and southwest of the population center of Oak Ridge. The ORR is bordered on the north and east by the population center of the city of Oak Ridge and on the south and west by the Clinch River/Melton Hill Lake impoundment. All areas of the ORR are relatively pristine when compared with the surrounding region, especially in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province (Fig. 2). From the air, the ORR is clearly a large and nearly continuous island of forest within a landscape that is fragmented by urban development and agriculture. Satellite imagery from 2006 was used to develop a land-use/land-cover cover map of the ORR and surrounding lands (Fig. 3). Following the acquisition of the land comprising the ORR in the early 1940s, much of the Reservation served as a buffer for the three primary facilities: the X-10 nuclear research facility (now known as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL]), the first uranium enrichment facility or Y-12 (now known as the Y-12 National Security Complex [Y-12 Complex]), and a gaseous diffusion enrichment facility (now known as the East Tennessee Technology Park [ETTP]). Over the past 60 years, this relatively undisturbed area has evolved into a rich and diverse eastern deciduous forest ecosystem of streams and reservoirs, hardwood forests, and extensive upland mixed forests. The combination of a large land area with complex physical characteristics

  7. The Geological Setting of Hydrothermal Vent Sites on Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M. H.; Edmonds, H. N.; Johnson, P. D.

    2006-12-01

    In 1998 and 1999, the Science Ice Exercises (SCICEX) mapped the fine-scale textures of the flanks and axial valley of Gakkel Ridge, the slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge on Earth (full-spreading rates 250 teleseismic events that occurred in 1999 [Müller and Jokat, 1999; Edwards et al., 2001]. During the 2001 Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition (AMORE), hydrothermal plume reconnaissance conducted during rock sampling operations revealed evidence of abundant hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel Ridge [Edmonds et al., 2003]. Comparison of the plume distributions with multibeam bathymetry data collected during AMORE showed that vent plumes were closely associated with topographic highs located inside the axial valley, with the largest and highest-temperature plume coinciding with the 85°E volcano. We describe the geological setting of vent plumes discussed in Edmonds et al. [2003] by integrating water column information from the AMORE program with detailed textural data from the SCICEX surveys and develop predictions for locations where hydrothermal venting is likely to occur on ultra-slow spreading mid-ocean ridges. Our efforts focus on five hydrothermal sites identified by Edmonds et al. [2003] and Baker et al. [2004] (7.5°E, 37°°E, 43°E, 55°E and 85°E). We co-register the observed plume distributions with interpretative maps showing the locations of tectonic and volcanic features such as faults and reflective lava flows in order to characterize the hydrothermal sites. These results are compared with similar interpretative products for the 69°E region and other sites where plume signals were observed but the hydrothermal activity could not be localized based on the strength of the hydrothermal signals or the occurrence of "near-field" signatures such as distinct layering or temperature anomalies. Finally, we examine reflective regions not associated with plumes, either because no hydrothermal anomalies were detected or the regions were not hydrographically

  8. Hydrothermal plume anomalies over the southwest Indian ridge: magmatic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Li, H.; Tao, C.; Ren, J.; Zhou, J.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Here we firstly reported the extensive survey results of the hydrothermal activity along the ultra-slow spreading southwest Indian ridge (SWIR). The study area is located at segment 27, between the Indomed and Gallieni transform faults, SWIR. The seismic crustal thickness reaches 9.5km in this segment (Li et al., 2015), which is much thicker than normal crustal. The anomaly thickened crust could be affected by the Crozet hotspot or highly focused melt delivery from the mantle. The Duanqiao hydrothermal field was reported at the ridge valley of the segment by Tao et al (2009). The Deep-towed Hydrothermal Detection System (DHDS) was used to collect information related with hydrothermal activity, like temperature, turbidity, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and seabed types. There are 15 survey lines at the interval of 2 to 3 km which are occupied about 1300 km2 in segment 27. After processing the raw data, including wiping out random noise points, 5-points moving average processing and subtracting the ambient, we got anomalous Nephelometric Turbidity Units values (ΔNTU). And dE/dt was used to identify the ORP anomalous as the raw data is easily influenced by electrode potentials drifting (Baker et al., 2016). According to the results of water column turbidity and ORP distributions, we confirmed three hydrothermal anomaly fields named A1, A2 and A3. The three fields are all located in the western part of the segment. The A1 field lies on the ridge valley, west side of Duanqiao field. The A2 and A3 field lie on the northern and southern of the ridge valley, respectively. We propose that recent magmatic activity probably focus on the western part of segment 27.And the extensive distribution of hydrothermal plume in the segment is the result of the discrete magma intrusion. References Baker E T, et al. How many vent fields? New estimates of vent field populations on ocean ridges from precise mapping of hydrothermal discharge locations. EPSL, 2016, 449:186-196. Li J

  9. Tiger Team Assessment of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The Office of Special Projects in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25 Site), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the: current ES ampersand H compliance status of the Site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES ampersand H management programs; adequacy of response actions developed to address identified problem areas; and adequacy of ES ampersand H self-assessments and the institutionalization of the self-assessment process at the K-25 Site

  10. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. (ed.)

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

  11. Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sharon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) environmental surveillance is to characterize radiological and nonradiological conditions of the off-site environs and estimate public doses related to these conditions, confirm estimations of public dose based on effluent monitoring data, and, where appropriate, provide supplemental data to support compliance monitoring for applicable environmental regulations. This environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is intended to document the rationale, frequency, parameters, and analytical methods for the ORR environmental surveillance program and provides information on ORR site characteristics, environmental pathways, dose assessment methods, and quality management. ORR-wide environmental monitoring activities include a variety of media including air, surface water, vegetation, biota, and wildlife. In addition to these activities, site-specific effluent, groundwater, and best management monitoring programs are conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). This is revision 5.

  12. Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

  13. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction annual report for calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Calendar year 1997 was the third full year of work on the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction. Activities are summarized on the following individual project tasks: Task 1 -- Investigation of radioiodine releases from X-10 radioactive lanthanum processing; Task 2 -- Investigation of mercury releases from Y-12 lithium enrichment; Task 3 -- Investigation of PCBs in the environment near Oak Ridge; Task 4 -- Investigation of radionuclides released from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River; Task 5 -- Systematic searching of records repositories; Task 6 -- Evaluation of the quality of uranium monitoring data and a screening evaluation of potential off-site health risks; and Task 7 -- Performance of screening for additional materials not evaluated in the feasibility study

  14. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. (ed.)

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates envirorunental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. This volume, Volume 2, contains logic diagrams with an index. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use.

  15. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction annual report for calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Calendar year 1997 was the third full year of work on the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction. Activities are summarized on the following individual project tasks: Task 1 -- Investigation of radioiodine releases from X-10 radioactive lanthanum processing; Task 2 -- Investigation of mercury releases from Y-12 lithium enrichment; Task 3 -- Investigation of PCBs in the environment near Oak Ridge; Task 4 -- Investigation of radionuclides released from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River; Task 5 -- Systematic searching of records repositories; Task 6 -- Evaluation of the quality of uranium monitoring data and a screening evaluation of potential off-site health risks; and Task 7 -- Performance of screening for additional materials not evaluated in the feasibility study.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report summary for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires an annual site environmental report from each of the sites operating under its authority. The reports present the results from the various environmental monitoring and surveillance programs carried out during the year. In addition to meeting the DOE requirement, the reports also document compliance with various state and federal laws and regulations. This report was published to fulfill those requirements for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for calendar year 1995. The report is based on thousands of environmental samples collected on and around the ORR and analyzed during the year. The data on which the report is based are published in Environmental Monitoring and Surveillance on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1995 Data (ES/ESH-71). Both documents are highly detailed. This summary report is meant for readers who are interested in the monitoring results but who do not need to review the details.

  17. Estimating peak flow characteristics at ungaged sites by ridge regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Gary D.

    1982-01-01

    A regression simulation model, is combined with a multisite streamflow generator to simulate a regional regression of 50-year peak discharge against a set of basin characteristics. Monte Carlo experiments are used to compare the unbiased ordinary lease squares parameter estimator with Hoerl and Kennard's (1970a) ridge estimator in which the biasing parameter is that proposed by Hoerl, Kennard, and Baldwin (1975). The simulation results indicate a substantial improvement in parameter estimation using ridge regression when the correlation between basin characteristics is more than about 0.90. In addition, results indicate a strong potential for improving the mean square error of prediction of a peak-flow characteristic versus basin characteristics regression model when the basin characteristics are approximately colinear. The simulation covers a range of regression parameters, streamflow statistics, and basin characteristics commonly found in regional regression studies.

  18. Eskers in Ireland, analogs for sinuous ridges on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, Xavier; Bourke, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Sinuous ridges on the surface of Mars are often inferred as putative esker ridges. Eskers cover several hundred kilometers of the Irish landscape and are one of the dominant landforms in the Irish Midlands. Well exposed stratigraphic sections and the body of existing knowledge due to extensive research carried out on these landforms make the Irish eskers an excellent analog for sinuous ridges on Mars. The Irish Eskers are sinuous ridges 0.1 - 80 km long, 20 - 500 m wide and 4 - 50 m high laid down by glacial meltwater in tunnels and crevasses in stationary or retreating ice sheets. They are commonly composed of sands and gravels with rounded boulders and cobbles. The gravels are usually bedded and the beds often slump towards the flank of the esker, indicating collapse as the confining ice walls melt. Four types of eskers have been identified in Ireland: (i) Continuous subglacial tunnel fill represents deposition within tunnels underneath or within an ice body originally used as water escape conduits; (ii) Continuous fluvial ice-channel fill deposit in channels cut into the ice on top of the glacier or down to the substrate subsequently infilled by sediments; (iii) Long beads - subglacial tunnel fill are segmented ridges, with a length-width ratio of 5:1 to 10:1, representing sequential deposition near or at the ice margin as the ice sheet retreats; (iv) Short beads are glaciolacustrine deposits interpreted as sequential deposition of ice-contact subaqueous outwash fans. Irish eskers have significant morphological similarities with those identified on Mars providing an opportunity for an insightful morphological and morphometric analysis to determine potential formative environments on Mars. Putative Martian eskers are 2-300 km long, 50-3000 m wide and 10-150 m high. The Irish eskers are similar in scale and present dimensions within these ranges. Eskers in Ireland are composed of sand and gravel with cobbles and boulders. Mars esker-like ridges observed in high

  19. Status report: A hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.K.; Toran, L.E.; Dreier, R.B.; Moore, G.K.; McMaster, W.M.

    1992-05-01

    This first status report on the Hydrologic Studies Task of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) revises earlier concepts of subsurface hydrology and hydrogeochemistry of the ORR. A new classification of hydrogeologic units is given, as well as new interpretations of the gydrogeologic properties and processes that influence contaminant migration. The conceptual hydrologic framework introduced in this report is based primarily on reinterpretations of data acquired during earlier hydrologic investigations of waste areas at and near the three US Department of Energy Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) plant facilities. In addition to describing and interpreting the properties and processes of the groundwater systems as they are presently understood, this report describes surface water-subsurface water relations, influences on contaminant migration,and implications to environmental restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management

  20. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report summary for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires an annual site environmental report from each of the sites operating under its authority. The reports present the results from the various environmental monitoring and surveillance programs carried out during the year. In addition to meeting the DOE requirement, the reports also document compliance with various state and federal laws and regulations. This report was published to fulfill those requirements for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for calendar year 1995. The report is based on thousands of environmental samples collected on and around the ORR and analyzed during the year. The data on which the report is based are published in Environmental Monitoring and Surveillance on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1995 Data (ES/ESH-71). Both documents are highly detailed. This summary report is meant for readers who are interested in the monitoring results but who do not need to review the details

  1. Markov Boundary Discovery with Ridge Regularized Linear Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, Eric V; Visweswaran, Shyam

    2016-03-01

    Ridge regularized linear models (RRLMs), such as ridge regression and the SVM, are a popular group of methods that are used in conjunction with coefficient hypothesis testing to discover explanatory variables with a significant multivariate association to a response. However, many investigators are reluctant to draw causal interpretations of the selected variables due to the incomplete knowledge of the capabilities of RRLMs in causal inference. Under reasonable assumptions, we show that a modified form of RRLMs can get "very close" to identifying a subset of the Markov boundary by providing a worst-case bound on the space of possible solutions. The results hold for any convex loss, even when the underlying functional relationship is nonlinear, and the solution is not unique. Our approach combines ideas in Markov boundary and sufficient dimension reduction theory. Experimental results show that the modified RRLMs are competitive against state-of-the-art algorithms in discovering part of the Markov boundary from gene expression data.

  2. Surfactant Distribution Measurements Downstream of a Reynolds Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. S.; Korenowski, G. M.; Vogel, M. J.; Hirsa, A. H.

    1999-11-01

    Minuscule amounts of surface-active agents, of the order of 1 mg/m^2, are sufficient to change the characteristics of flow at an air/water interface. Specifically, the intrinsic viscoelastic interfacial properties, which are a strong function of the concentration of the surfactant, appear in essential terms of the boundary conditions of the flow equations. The noninvasive laser-based technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to determine the surfactant concentration profile downstream of a contamination front in real time. In this experiment, a Reynolds ridge marks the leading edge of a contaminated region upstream of a surface barrier. The SHG technique allows for the nonintrusive characterization of the top molecular layer over the subsurface flow. Results include the concentration gradient and surface tension profiles downstream of the Reynolds ridge. The SHG results, along with simultaneous DPIV measurements, will be related to the interfacial viscosities.

  3. Strongly coupled interaction between a ridge of fluid and an inviscid airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The behaviour of a steady thin sessile or pendent ridge of fluid on an inclined planar substrate which is strongly coupled to the external pressure gradient arising from an inviscid airflow parallel to the substrate far from the ridge is described. When the substrate is nearly horizontal, a very wide ridge can be supported against gravity by capillary and/or external pressure forces; otherwise, only a narrower (but still wide) ridge can be supported. Classical thin-aerofoil theory is adapted to obtain the governing singular integro-differential equation for the profile of the ridge in each case. Attention is focused mainly on the case of a very wide sessile ridge. The effect of strengthening the airflow is to push a pinned ridge down near to its edges and to pull it up near to its middle. At a critical airflow strength, the upslope contact angle reaches the receding contact angle at which the upslope contact line de-pins, and continuing to increase the airflow strength beyond this critical value results in the de-pinned ridge becoming narrower, thicker, and closer to being symmetric in the limit of a strong airflow. The effect of tilting the substrate is to skew a pinned ridge in the downslope direction. Depending on the values of the advancing and receding contact angles, the ridge may first de-pin at either the upslope or the downslope contact line but, in general, eventually both contact lines de-pin. The special cases in which only one of the contact lines de-pins are also considered. It is also shown that the behaviour of a very wide pendent ridge is qualitatively similar to that of a very wide sessile ridge, while the important qualitative difference between the behaviour of a very wide ridge and a narrower ridge is that, in general, for the latter one or both of the contact lines may never de-pin.

  4. Oak Ridge TNS Program: summary of FY 1978 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Brown, T.G.

    1979-07-01

    The Next Step (TNS) represents the stage of fusion energy development in which the major emphasis is on engineering testing and demonstration. In this document, the activities of the Oak Ridge TNS Program for FY 1978 are described and summarized. The Reference Design that has evolved from these activities is described, its operating characteristics are examined, and project planning issues are considered. Major conclusions from the FY 1978 effort are stated.

  5. Caldera collapse at near-ridge seamounts: an experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumans, Jason P.; Stix, John

    2016-10-01

    Collapse calderas are sub-circular volcanic depressions caused by subsidence of the magma reservoir roof during an eruption. Scaled physical models of caldera collapse using flat topography have been instrumental in investigating the spatial and temporal development of calderas, in particular, two distinctive sets of concentric ring faults, one reverse and one normal. More recent analog studies have investigated the effect of non-flat topography which alters the principle stress trajectories and resulting collapse structure. This work provides the basis for investigating how naturally scaled topographic loads may affect caldera collapse in relation to shallow magma reservoirs. The objective of this study is to understand how a near-ridge seamount affects caldera collapse from both a central and offset position as the seamount migrates above the magma reservoir as a result of plate motion. We utilize scaled analog models of caldera collapse in conjunction with three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to investigate caldera collapse dynamics at near-ridge seamounts. Experiments using a seamount cone positioned centrally above the magma reservoir result in (1) increased subsidence along the interior outward-dipping faults and (2) a preference to more symmetric collapse patterns as indicated by the subsidence profile and structure of the caldera relative to experiments with an offset cone. When the cone is offset, the collapse is asymmetric and trapdoor in nature, with the center of greatest subsidence displaced away from the region of largest topographic load. For these latter experiments, subsidence is focused where the roof is thinnest along an initial reverse fault, followed by a transition to an antithetic graben structure. The asymmetric collapse in the experiments results in a caldera with a tilted profile. Offset calderas at near-ridge seamounts are tilted towards the ridge axis, suggesting that they may have collapsed

  6. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process of...... of the mandible. Light microscopic evaluation revealed fibrous encapsulation, a few multinuclear giant cells, little inflammatory reaction, and no osteoinduction. It was concluded that no osteoinduction took place in goats....

  7. Alveolar ridge augmentation in rats by Bio-Oss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine if Bio-Oss initiated osteoinduction or osteoconduction when implanted into rats. Sintered and unsintered granules of the anorganic bovine bone Bio-Oss was implanted subperiosteally for alveolar ridge augmentation purposes and heterotopically in the abdominal...... muscles of rats. Light microscopic evaluation revealed no osteoinduction or osteoconduction in connection with sintered or unsintered Bio-Oss. A foreign body reaction was observed around both forms....

  8. Evaluation of the Oak Ridge MS/MS explosives detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, F.J.; Hannum, D.W.; Grant, B.C.; McLuckey, S.A.; McKown, H.S.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented for the evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) MS/MS as an explosives detector. This instrument is a beam instrument containing a quadrupole and a time-of-flight detector section (QTOF). The tests include a Limit of Detection for the instrument, an interferent study, a test of personnel sampling for explosives, a test involving mail sampling, and detection tests with bomb quantity explosives. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Postextraction Alveolar Ridge Preservation: Biological Basis and Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Pagni, Giorgio; Pellegrini, Gaia; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Following tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge undergoes an inevitable remodeling process that influences implant therapy of the edentulous area. Socket grafting is a commonly adopted therapy for the preservation of alveolar bone structures in combination or not with immediate implant placement although the biological bases lying behind this treatment modality are not fully understood and often misinterpreted. This review is intended to clarify the literature support to socket grafting in ord...

  10. Hydrothermal plumes over the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Baker, E.T.; Rao, A.S.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Lupton, J.E.; SuryaPrakash, L.; Gawas, R.B.; VijayaKumar, T.

    year later [Ray et al., 2008] found evidence of a chronic hydrothermal plume. Neither study was able to provide any information about the location of seafloor vent sources. Other than these slim results, no other hydrothermal evidence has been.... The newly discovered submarine plumes have a maximum thickness of ~200 m and maximum rise height of about 400 m from seafloor, resembling a typical chronic hydrothermal plume rather than the apparent event plume discovered on the Carlsberg Ridge by Murton...

  11. Monolithic circuit development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alley, G.T.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Newport, D.F.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The work performed for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 91 is presented in this paper. The work includes preamplifier, analog memory, and analog-digital converter development for Dimuon Pad Readout, and evaluation and development of preamplifier-shapers for silicon strip readout. The approaches for implementation are considered as well as measured data for the various circuits that have been developed.

  12. Recent package testing successes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, S.B.; Singley, P.T.; Michelhaugh, R.D.; Hawk, M.B.; Shappert, L.B.

    2004-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)'s history of testing of radioactive material packages dates back to the early 1960s, and includes the testing of hundreds of different packages of all shapes and sizes. This paper provides an overview of ORNL's new Packaging Research Facility (PRF) at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC), and describes recent package testing successes conducted at the NTRC from September 2002 to September 2003

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review. Volume 25, No. 1, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. [eds.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  14. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of three major government-owned, contractor-operated facilities: the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park. The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation’s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved, and continue to involve, the use of radiological and hazardous materials. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and supporting data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/env_rpt or from the project director. This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental monitoring activities, on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2008. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years. Included in the report are: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory strategic plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; resource projections; appendix which contains data for site and facilities, user facility, science and mathematic education and human resources; and laboratory organization chart.

  16. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  17. Upper mantle structure at Walvis Ridge from Pn tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Trond; Braeuer, Benjamin; Weber, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Passive continental margins offer the unique opportunity to study the processes involved in continental extension and break-up. Within the LISPWAL (LIthospheric Structure of the Namibian continental Passive margin at the intersection with the Walvis Ridge from amphibious seismic investigations) project, combined on- and offshore seismic experiments were designed to characterize the Southern African passive margin at the Walvis Ridge in northern Namibia. In addition to extensive analysis of the crustal structures, we carried out seismic investigations targeting the velocity structure of the upper mantle in the landfall region of the Walvis Ridge with the Namibian coast. Upper mantle Pn travel time tomography from controlled source, amphibious seismic data was used to investigate the sub-Moho upper mantle seismic velocity. We succeeded in imaging upper mantle structures potentially associated with continental break-up and/or the Tristan da Cunha hotspot track. We found mostly coast-parallel sub-Moho velocity anomalies, interpreted as structures which were created during Gondwana break-up.

  18. Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

  19. Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site

  20. Public involvement plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    For the past few years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has increased its efforts to involve the public in environmental management decisions. On the national level, Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary has declared public involvement one of DOE's most important objectives. On the local level, citizens are taking the microphone at DOE public hearings to voice their opinions and ask tough, detailed questions about proposed cleanup plans. To ensure that it hears, understands and responds to public input from all of its neighbors, DOE-Oak Ridge Operations has developed an Environmental Management Public Involvement Program to keep stakeholders--those affected or potentially affected by cleanup programs--informed about environmental management work on the Oak Ridge Reservation and opportunities for public comment. This Public Involvement Plan contains information about the Oak Ridge Public Involvement Program its history, goals and proposed interactions with stakeholders. It also contains information to help area citizens become involved or increase their involvement in helping DOE make responsible environmental management decisions