WorldWideScience

Sample records for point temperature sensing

  1. Building Temperature Set Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meincke, Carol L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, Christopher A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This white paper provides information and recommendations for an actionable and enforceable corporate policy statement on temperature set points for office and related spaces at Sandia and presents a strategy that balances the need to achieve the energy goals with optimizing employee comfort and productivity.

  2. Sensing with Superconducting Point Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argo Nurbawono

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors.

  3. Investigating Water Movement Within and Near Wells Using Active Point Heating and Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Selker

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are few methods to provide high-resolution in-situ characterization of flow in aquifers and reservoirs. We present a method that has the potential to quantify lateral and vertical (magnitude and direction components of flow with spatial resolution of about one meter and temporal resolution of about one day. A fiber optic distributed temperature sensor is used with a novel heating system. Temperatures before heating may be used to evaluate background geothermal gradient and vertical profile of thermal diffusivity. The innovation presented is the use of variable energy application along the well, in this case concentrated heating at equally-spaced (2 m localized areas (0.5 m. Relative to uniform warming this offers greater opportunity to estimate water movement, reduces required heating power, and increases practical length that can be heated. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate expected behaviors. We estimate relative advection rates near the well using the times at which various locations diverge from a heating trajectory expected for pure conduction in the absence of advection. The concept is demonstrated in a grouted 600 m borehole with 300 heated patches, though evidence of vertical water movement was not seen.

  4. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  5. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  6. Making Sense of Boiling Points and Melting Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 6. Making Sense of Boiling Points and Melting Points. S Prahlada Rao Shravan Sunkada. General Article Volume 12 Issue 6 June 2007 pp 43-57. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Thermoelectric Powered High Temperature Wireless Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukkomurler, Ahmet

    This study describes use of a thermoelectric power converter to transform waste heat into electrical energy to power an RF receiver and transmitter, for use in harsh environment wireless temperature sensing and telemetry. The sensing and transmitting module employs a DS-1820 low power digital temperature sensor to perform temperature to voltage conversion, an ATX-34 RF transmitter, an ARX-34 RF receiver module, and a PIC16f84A microcontroller to synchronize data communication between them. The unit has been tested in a laboratory environment, and promising results have been obtained for an actual automotive wireless under hood temperature sensing and telemetry implementation.

  8. Temperature Sensing in Modular Microfluidic Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna C. Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete microfluidic element with integrated thermal sensor was fabricated and demonstrated as an effective probe for process monitoring and prototyping. Elements were constructed using stereolithography and market-available glass-bodied thermistors within the modular, standardized framework of previous discrete microfluidic elements demonstrated in the literature. Flow rate-dependent response due to sensor self-heating and microchannel heating and cooling was characterized and shown to be linear in typical laboratory conditions. An acid-base neutralization reaction was performed in a continuous flow setting to demonstrate applicability in process management: the ratio of solution flow rates was varied to locate the equivalence point in a titration, closely matching expected results. This element potentially enables complex, three-dimensional microfluidic architectures with real-time temperature feedback and flow rate sensing, without application specificity or restriction to planar channel routing formats.

  9. Making Sense of Boiling Points and Melting Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The boiling and melting points of a pure substance are char- acteristic physical constants of that substance in its pure state. Although it is not possible to predict these physical constants for a given substance, it is, however, possible to rationalize these values on a relative basis for given substances, taking into account the ...

  10. Making Sense of Boiling Points and Melting Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to rationalize the trends in these physical constants based on non- covalent interactions and symmetry, .... the product of distance d between the two points and the magni- tude of charge e gives the magnitude of the ... Individual bond moments in a molecule add up in vector fashion to result in the net dipole moment for the ...

  11. Poisson point processes imaging, tracking, and sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Streit, Roy L

    2010-01-01

    This overview of non-homogeneous and multidimensional Poisson point processes and their applications features mathematical tools and applications from emission- and transmission-computed tomography to multiple target tracking and distributed sensor detection.

  12. GEOSTATISTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR DOWNSCALING REMOTELY SENSED LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST downscaling is an important issue in remote sensing. Geostatistical methods have shown their applicability in downscaling multi/hyperspectral images. In this paper, four geostatistical solutions, including regression kriging (RK, downscaling cokriging (DSCK, kriging with external drift (KED and area-to-point regression kriging (ATPRK, are applied for downscaling remotely sensed LST. Their differences are analyzed theoretically and the performances are compared experimentally using a Landsat 7 ETM+ dataset. They are also compared to the classical TsHARP method.

  13. Strain sensing technology for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Dan

    1993-01-01

    This review discusses the status of strain sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance strain gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance strain gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle strain measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.

  14. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W.F.; Winiecki, A.L.

    1984-10-17

    An instrument is described for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of means for varying the temperature with strain. The instrument includes opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  15. C59N Peapods Sensing the Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the novel photoresponse of nanodevices made from azafullerene (C59N-encapsulated single-walled carbon nanotubes (C59N@SWNTs, so called peapods. The photoconducting properties of a C59N@SWNT are measured over a temperature range of 10 to 300 K under a field-effect transistor configuration. It is found that the photosensitivity of C59N@SWNTs depends very sensitively on the temperature, making them an attractive candidate as a component of nanothermometers covering a wide temperature range. Our results indicate that it is possible to read the temperature by monitoring the optoelectronics signal of C59N@SWNTs. In particular, sensing low temperatures would become more convenient and easy by giving a simple light pulse.

  16. Exceptional points enhance sensing in an optical microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijian; Kaya Özdemir, Şahin; Zhao, Guangming; Wiersig, Jan; Yang, Lan

    2017-08-01

    Sensors play an important part in many aspects of daily life such as infrared sensors in home security systems, particle sensors for environmental monitoring and motion sensors in mobile phones. High-quality optical microcavities are prime candidates for sensing applications because of their ability to enhance light-matter interactions in a very confined volume. Examples of such devices include mechanical transducers, magnetometers, single-particle absorption spectrometers, and microcavity sensors for sizing single particles and detecting nanometre-scale objects such as single nanoparticles and atomic ions. Traditionally, a very small perturbation near an optical microcavity introduces either a change in the linewidth or a frequency shift or splitting of a resonance that is proportional to the strength of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate an alternative sensing scheme, by which the sensitivity of microcavities can be enhanced when operated at non-Hermitian spectral degeneracies known as exceptional points. In our experiments, we use two nanoscale scatterers to tune a whispering-gallery-mode micro-toroid cavity, in which light propagates along a concave surface by continuous total internal reflection, in a precise and controlled manner to exceptional points. A target nanoscale object that subsequently enters the evanescent field of the cavity perturbs the system from its exceptional point, leading to frequency splitting. Owing to the complex-square-root topology near an exceptional point, this frequency splitting scales as the square root of the perturbation strength and is therefore larger (for sufficiently small perturbations) than the splitting observed in traditional non-exceptional-point sensing schemes. Our demonstration of exceptional-point-enhanced sensitivity paves the way for sensors with unprecedented sensitivity.

  17. Nanomechanical displacement sensing using a quantum point contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, A.N.; Aldridge, J.S.; Driscoll, D.C.; Gossard, A. C.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a radio frequency mechanical resonator that includes a quantum point contact, defined using electrostatic top gates. We can mechanically actuate the resonator using either electrostatic or magnetomotive forces. We demonstrate the use of the quantum point contact as a displacement sensor, operating as a radio frequency mixer at the mechanical resonance frequency of 1.5 MHz. We calculate a displacement sensitivity of about 3x10 -12 m/Hz 1/2 . This device will potentially permit quantum-limited displacement sensing of nanometer-scale resonators, allowing the quantum entanglement of the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom of a nanoscale system

  18. Construction of an automated temperature sensing electric fan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An automated temperature-sensing fan regulator which controls the speed with respect to the sensed temperature, is designed and constructed. This design was implemented with simple and readily available electronics components at the local electric shops. The achieved results and its features when compared with ...

  19. Downscaling remotely sensed imagery using area-to-point cokriging and multiple-point geostatistical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunwei; Atkinson, Peter M.; Zhang, Jingxiong

    2015-03-01

    A cross-scale data integration method was developed and tested based on the theory of geostatistics and multiple-point geostatistics (MPG). The goal was to downscale remotely sensed images while retaining spatial structure by integrating images at different spatial resolutions. During the process of downscaling, a rich spatial correlation model in the form of a training image was incorporated to facilitate reproduction of similar local patterns in the simulated images. Area-to-point cokriging (ATPCK) was used as locally varying mean (LVM) (i.e., soft data) to deal with the change of support problem (COSP) for cross-scale integration, which MPG cannot achieve alone. Several pairs of spectral bands of remotely sensed images were tested for integration within different cross-scale case studies. The experiment shows that MPG can restore the spatial structure of the image at a fine spatial resolution given the training image and conditioning data. The super-resolution image can be predicted using the proposed method, which cannot be realised using most data integration methods. The results show that ATPCK-MPG approach can achieve greater accuracy than methods which do not account for the change of support issue.

  20. Proof of concept : Temperature sensing waders for environmental sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, R.W.; Tyler, S.; Van Emmerik, T.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    A prototype temperature sensing pair of waders is introduced and tested. The water temperature at the stream-bed is interesting both for scientist studying the hyporheic zone as well as for, e.g., fishers spotting good fishing locations. A temperature sensor incorporated in waders worn by members of

  1. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative

  2. Temperature dependency of silicon structures for magnetic field gradient sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabsch, Alexander; Rosenberg, Christoph; Stifter, Michael; Keplinger, Franz

    2018-02-01

    This work describes the temperature dependence of two sensors for magnetic field gradient sensors and demonstrates a structure to compensate for the drift of resonance frequency over a wide temperature range. The temperature effect of the sensing element is based on internal stresses induced by the thermal expansion of material, therefore FEM is used to determine the change of the eigenvalues of the sensing structure. The experimental setup utilizes a Helmholtz coil system to generate the magnetic field and to excite the MEMS structure with Lorentz forces. The MEMS structure is placed on a plate heated with resistors and cooled by a Peltier element to control the plate temperature. In the second part, we describe how one can exploit temperature sensitivity for temperature measurements and we show the opportunity to include the temperature effect to increase the sensitivity of single-crystal silicon made flux density gradient sensors.

  3. Sapphire-fiber-based distributed high-temperature sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Hill, Cary; Cheng, Yujie; Homa, Daniel; Pickrell, Gary; Wang, Anbo

    2016-09-15

    We present, for the first time to our knowledge, a sapphire-fiber-based distributed high-temperature sensing system based on a Raman distributed sensing technique. High peak power laser pulses at 532 nm were coupled into the sapphire fiber to generate the Raman signal. The returned Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes signals were measured in the time domain to determine the temperature distribution along the fiber. The sensor was demonstrated from room temperature up to 1200°C in which the average standard deviation is about 3.7°C and a spatial resolution of about 14 cm was achieved.

  4. The Influence of Air Temperature on the Dew Point Temperature in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    This research shows the influence of air temperature on the dew point temperature in Benin City, Edo. State, Nigeria. The dew point temperature was approximated from the measured air temperature and relative humidity with the aid of a self-designed weather monitoring system in 2016 and the regression equation was ...

  5. Thermodynamic Temperatures of High-Temperature Fixed Points: Uncertainties Due to Temperature Drop and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, P.; Machin, G.; Bloembergen, P.; Lowe, D.; Whittam, A.

    2014-07-01

    This study forms part of the European Metrology Research Programme project implementing the New Kelvin to assign thermodynamic temperatures to a selected set of high-temperature fixed points (HTFPs), Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. A realistic thermal model of these HTFPs, developed in finite volume software ANSYS FLUENT, was constructed to quantify the uncertainty associated with the temperature drop across the back wall of the cell. In addition, the widely applied software package, STEEP3 was used to investigate the influence of cell emissivity. The temperature drop, , relates to the temperature difference due to the net loss of heat from the aperture of the cavity between the back wall of the cavity, viewed by the thermometer, defining the radiance temperature, and the solid-liquid interface of the alloy, defining the transition temperature of the HTFP. The actual value of can be used either as a correction (with associated uncertainty) to thermodynamic temperature evaluations of HTFPs, or as an uncertainty contribution to the overall estimated uncertainty. In addition, the effect of a range of furnace temperature profiles on the temperature drop was calculated and found to be negligible for Cu, Co-C, and Pt-C and small only for Re-C. The effective isothermal emissivity is calculated over the wavelength range from 450 nm to 850 nm for different assumed values of surface emissivity. Even when furnace temperature profiles are taken into account, the estimated emissivities change only slightly from the effective isothermal emissivity of the bare cell. These emissivity calculations are used to estimate the uncertainty in the temperature assignment due to the uncertainty in the emissivity of the blackbody.

  6. Remote sensing of land surface temperature: The directional viewing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.A.; Schmugge, T.J.; Ballard, J.R. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is an important parameter in understanding global environmental change because it controls many of the underlying processes in the energy budget at the surface and heat and water transport between the surface and the atmosphere. The measurement of LST at a variety of spatial and temporal scales and extension to global coverage requires remote sensing means to achieve these goals. Land surface temperature and emissivity products are currently being derived from satellite and aircraft remote sensing data using a variety of techniques to correct for atmospheric effects. Implicit in the commonly employed approaches is the assumption of isotropy in directional thermal infrared exitance. The theoretical analyses indicate angular variations in apparent infrared temperature will typically yield land surface temperature errors ranging from 1 to 4 C unless corrective measures are applied

  7. Integrated Microfibre Device for Refractive Index and Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman W. Harun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A microfibre device integrating a microfibre knot resonator in a Sagnac loop reflector is proposed for refractive index and temperature sensing. The reflective configuration of this optical structure offers the advantages of simple fabrication and ease of sensing. To achieve a balance between responsiveness and robustness, the entire microfibre structure is embedded in low index Teflon, except for the 0.5–2 mm diameter microfibre knot resonator sensing region. The proposed sensor has exhibited a linear spectral response with temperature and refractive index. A small change in free spectral range is observed when the microfibre device experiences a large refractive index change in the surrounding medium. The change is found to be in agreement with calculated results based on dispersion relationships.

  8. Change point analysis of mean annual air temperature in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, A.

    2015-06-01

    The existence of change point in the mean of air temperature is an important indicator of climate change. In this study, Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric Change Point Models (CPMs) were applied to test whether a change point has occurred in the mean of annual Air Temperature Anomalies Time Series (ATATS) of 27 synoptic stations in different regions of Iran for the period 1956-2010. The Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) was also applied to evaluate the detected change points. The ATATS of all stations except Bandar Anzali and Gorgan stations, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series as an input file for the CPMs and LRT. Both the Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs detected the change point in the ATATS of (a) Tehran Mehrabad, Abadan, Kermanshah, Khoramabad and Yazd in 1992, (b) Mashhad and Tabriz in 1993, (c) Bandar Anzali, Babolsar and Ramsar in 1994, (d) Kerman and Zahedan in 1996 at 5% significance level. The likelihood ratio test shows that the ATATS before and after detected change points in these 12 stations are normally distributed with different means. The Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs suggested different change points for individual stations in Bushehr, Bam, Shahroud, and Gorgan. However, the LRT confirmed the change points in these four stations as 1997, 1996, 1993, and 1996, respectively. No change points were detected in the remaining 11 stations.

  9. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  10. Distributed Sensing for Quickest Change Detection of Point Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    paper, we consider an architecture in which each sensor node makes a local binary decision based on current observations only, binary decisions are...quickest change-point detection using a sensor network. They consider non- parametric CUSUM tests at each sensor node without an explicit statistical model of...post-change distribution is unknown and modeled as member of parametric family, one can follow a generalized likelihood ratio based approach [8] or a

  11. Unmanned Aerial System Aids Dry-season Stream Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M.; Detweiler, C.; Higgins, J.; Ore, J. P.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, temperature affects biogeochemistry and ecology, and is thus a primary physical determinant of habitat quality. Measuring temperatures in spatially heterogeneous water bodies poses a serious challenge to researchers due to constraints associated with currently available methods: in situ loggers record temporally continuous temperature measurements but are limited to discrete spatial locations, while distributed temperature and remote sensing provide fine-resolution spatial measurements that are restricted to only two-dimensions (i.e. streambed and surface, respectively). Using a commercially available quadcopter equipped with a 6m cable and temperature-pressure sensor system, we measured stream temperatures at two confluences at the South Fork Eel River, where cold water inputs from the tributary to the mainstem create thermal refugia for juvenile salmonids during the dry season. As a mobile sensing platform, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) can facilitate quick and repeated sampling with minimal disturbance to the ecosystem, and their datasets can be interpolated to create a three-dimensional thermal map of a water body. The UAS-derived data was compared to data from in situ data loggers to evaluate whether the UAS is better able to capture fine-scale temperature dynamics at each confluence. The UAS has inherent limitations defined by battery life and flight times, as well as operational constraints related to maneuverability under wind and streamflow conditions. However, the platform is able to serve as an additional field tool for researchers to capture complex thermal structures in water bodies.

  12. Two-point discrimination and kinesthetic sense disorders in productive age individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Tomasz; Saulicz, Edward; Linek, Paweł; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2016-06-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two-point discrimination (2PD) sense and kinesthetic sense dysfunctions in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients compared with a healthy group. The 2PD sense, muscle force, and kinesthetic differentiation (KD) of strength; the range of motion in radiocarpal articulation; and KD of motion were assessed. The 2PD sense assessment showed significantly higher values in all the examined fingers in the CTS group than in those in the healthy group (pmovement in the radiocarpal articulation (pmovement between CTS patients compared with healthy individuals.

  13. Complex saddle points in QCD at finite temperature and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Ogilvie, Michael C.; Pangeni, Kamal

    2014-08-01

    The sign problem in QCD at finite temperature and density leads naturally to the consideration of complex saddle points of the action or effective action. The global symmetry CK of the finite-density action, where C is charge conjugation and K is complex conjugation, constrains the eigenvalues of the Polyakov loop operator P at a saddle point in such a way that the action is real at a saddle point, and net color charge is zero. The values of TrFP and TrFP† at the saddle point are real but not identical, indicating the different free energy cost associated with inserting a heavy quark versus an antiquark into the system. At such complex saddle points, the mass matrix associated with Polyakov loops may have complex eigenvalues, reflecting oscillatory behavior in color-charge densities. We illustrate these properties with a simple model which includes the one-loop contribution of gluons and two flavors of massless quarks moving in a constant Polyakov loop background. Confinement-deconfinement effects are modeled phenomenologically via an added potential term depending on the Polyakov loop eigenvalues. For sufficiently large temperature T and quark chemical potential μ, the results obtained reduce to those of perturbation theory at the complex saddle point. These results may be experimentally relevant for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at FAIR.

  14. Soil temperature variability in complex terrain measured using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes but magnitude and nature of Ts variability in a landscape setting are rarely documented. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (FO-DTS) potentially measure Ts at high density over a large extent. ...

  15. Spotlighting quantum critical points via quantum correlations at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werlang, T.; Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    We extend the program initiated by T. Werlang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 095702 (2010)] in several directions. Firstly, we investigate how useful quantum correlations, such as entanglement and quantum discord, are in the detection of critical points of quantum phase transitions when the system is at finite temperatures. For that purpose we study several thermalized spin models in the thermodynamic limit, namely, the XXZ model, the XY model, and the Ising model, all of which with an external magnetic field. We compare the ability of quantum discord, entanglement, and some thermodynamic quantities to spotlight the quantum critical points for several different temperatures. Secondly, for some models we go beyond nearest neighbors and also study the behavior of entanglement and quantum discord for second nearest neighbors around the critical point at finite temperature. Finally, we furnish a more quantitative description of how good all these quantities are in spotlighting critical points of quantum phase transitions at finite T, bridging the gap between experimental data and those theoretical descriptions solely based on the unattainable absolute zero assumption.

  16. Nanoscale temperature sensing using single defects in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipp Neumann

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel nanoscale temperature sensing technique that is based on single atomic defects in diamonds, namely nitrogen vacancy color centers. Sample sizes range from millimeter down to a few tens of nanometers. In particular nanodiamonds were used as dispersed probes to acquire spatially resolved temperature profiles utilizing the sensitivity of the optically accessible electron spin level structure we achieve a temperature noise floor of 5mK/Mhz for bulk diamond and 130mK/Mhz for nanodiamonds and accuracies of 1mK. To this end we have developed a new decoupling technique in order to suppress to otherwise limiting effect of magnetic field fluctuations. In addition, high purity isotopically enriched 12C artificial diamonds is used. The high sensitivity to temperature changes adds to the well studied sensitivities to magnetic and electric fields and makes NV diamond a multipurpose nanoprobe. (author)

  17. Distributed temperature sensing using a SPIRAL configuration ultrasonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    Distributed temperature sensing has important applications in the long term monitoring of critical enclosures such as containment vessels, flue gas stacks, furnaces, underground storage tanks and buildings for fire risk. This paper presents novel techniques for such measurements, using wire in a spiral configuration and having special embodiments such a notch for obtaining wave reflections from desired locations. Transduction is performed using commercially available Piezo-electric crystal that is bonded to one end of the waveguide. Lower order axisymmetric guided ultrasonic modes were employed. Time of fight (TOF) differences between predefined reflectors located on the waveguides are used to infer temperature profile in a chamber with different temperatures. The L(0,1) wave mode (pulse echo approach) was generated/received in a spiral waveguide at different temperatures for this work. The ultrasonic measurements were compared with commercially available thermocouples.

  18. Extreme temperature sensing using brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Fellay, Alexandre

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in silica-based optical fibers may be considered from two different and complementary standpoints. For a physicist, this interaction of light and pressure wave in a material, or equivalently in quantum theory terms between photons and phonons, gives some glimpses of the atomic structure of the solid and of its vibration modes. For an applied engineer, the same phenomenon may be put to good use as a sensing mechanism for distributed measurements, thanks to the dependence of the scattered light on external parameters such as the temperature, the pressure or the strain applied to the fiber. As far as temperature measurements are concerned, Brillouin-based distributed sensors have progressively gained wide recognition as efficient systems, even if their rather high cost still restricts the number of their applications. Yet they are generally used in a relatively narrow temperature range around the usual ambient temperature; in this domain, the frequency of the scattered light incre...

  19. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret McCaul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8, small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation.

  20. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation. PMID:27589770

  1. Temperature-insensitive fiber Bragg grating dynamic pressure sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tuan; Zhao, Qida; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Chunshu; Huang, Guiling; Xue, Lifang; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2006-08-01

    Temperature-insensitive dynamic pressure measurement using a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based on reflection spectrum bandwidth modulation and optical power detection is proposed. A specifically designed double-hole cantilever beam is used to provide a pressure-induced axial strain gradient along the sensing FBG and is also used to modulate the reflection bandwidth of the grating. The bandwidth modulation is immune to spatially uniform temperature effects, and the pressure can be unambiguously determined by measuring the reflected optical power, avoiding the complex wavelength interrogation system. The system acquisition time is up to 85 Hz for dynamic pressure measurement, and the thermal fluctuation is kept less than 1.2% full-scale for a temperature range of -10 degrees C to 80 degrees C.

  2. Investigating the effect of surface water - groundwater interactions on stream temperature using Distributed temperature sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karthikeyan, Matheswaran; Blemmer, Morten; Mortensen, Julie Flor

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using...... the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and instream temperature modelling. Locations of surface water–groundwater interactions were identified from the temperature data collected over a 2-km stream reach using a DTS system with 1-m spatial and 5-min temporal resolution. The stream under consideration...... surface water–groundwater interactions on heterogeneous behaviour of stream temperature....

  3. Practical considerations for coil-wrapped Distributed Temperature Sensing setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcerova, Anna; van Emmerik, Tim; Hilgersom, Koen; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) has been applied widely in hydrological and meteorological systems. For example, DTS has been used to measure streamflow, groundwater, soil moisture and temperature, air temperature, and lake energy fluxes. Many of these applications require a spatial monitoring resolution smaller than the minimum resolution of the DTS device. Therefore, measuring with these resolutions requires a custom made setup. To obtain both high temporal and high spatial resolution temperature measurements, fiber-optic cable is often wrapped around, and glued to, a coil, for example a PVC conduit. For these setups, it is often assumed that the construction characteristics (e.g., the coil material, shape, diameter) do not influence the DTS temperature measurements significantly. This study compares DTS datasets obtained during four measurement campaigns. The datasets were acquired using different setups, allowing to investigate the influence of the construction characteristics on the monitoring results. This comparative study suggests that the construction material, shape, diameter, and way of attachment can have a significant influence on the results. We present a qualitative and quantitative approximation of errors introduced through the selection of the construction, e.g., choice of coil material, influence of solar radiation, coil diameter, and cable attachment method. Our aim is to provide insight in factors that influence DTS measurements, which designers of future DTS measurements setups can take into account. Moreover, we present a number of solutions to minimize these errors for improved temperature retrieval using DTS.

  4. Dissemination of thermodynamic temperature above the freezing point of silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadli, M; Machin, G; Anhalt, K; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; del Campo, D; Diril, A; Kozlova, O; Lowe, D H; Mantilla Amor, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Ojanen-Saloranta, M; Pehlivan, Ö; Rougié, B; Salim, S G R

    2016-03-28

    The mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin at high temperatures will formally allow dissemination of thermodynamic temperature either directly or mediated through high-temperature fixed points (HTFPs). In this paper, these two distinct dissemination methods are evaluated, namely source-based and detector-based. This was achieved by performing two distinct dissemination trials: one based on HTFPs, the other based on absolutely calibrated radiation thermometers or filter radiometers. These trials involved six national metrology institutes in Europe in the frame of the European Metrology Research Programme joint project 'Implementing the new kelvin' (InK). The results have shown that both dissemination routes are possible, with similar standard uncertainties of 1-2 K, over the range 1273-2773 K, showing that, depending on the facilities available in the laboratory, it will soon be possible to disseminate thermodynamic temperatures above 1273 K to users by either of the two methods with uncertainties comparable to the current temperature scale. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Temperature-emissivity separation for LWIR sensing using MCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Joshua N.; Meola, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Signal processing for long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing is made complicated by unknown surface temperatures in a scene which impact measured radiance through temperature-dependent black-body radiation of in-scene objects. The unknown radiation levels give rise to the temperature-emissivity separation (TES) problem describing the intrinsic ambiguity between an object's temperature and emissivity. In this paper we present a novel Bayesian TES algorithm that produces a probabilistic posterior estimate of a material's unknown temperature and emissivity. The statistical uncertainty characterization provided by the algorithm is important for subsequent signal processing tasks such as classification and sensor fusion. The algorithm is based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods and exploits conditional linearity to achieve efficient block-wise Gibbs sampling for rapid inference. In contrast to existing work, the algorithm optimally incorporates prior knowledge about inscene materials via Bayesian priors which may optionally be learned using training data and a material database. Examples demonstrate up to an order of magnitude reduction in error compared to classical filter-based TES methods.

  6. Novel High Temperature Materials for In-Situ Sensing Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florian Solzbacher; Anil Virkar; Loren Rieth; Srinivasan Kannan; Xiaoxin Chen; Hannwelm Steinebach

    2009-12-31

    The overriding goal of this project was to develop gas sensor materials and systems compatible with operation at temperatures from 500 to 700 C. Gas sensors operating at these temperatures would be compatible with placement in fossil-energy exhaust streams close to the combustion chamber, and therefore have advantages for process regulation, and feedback for emissions controls. The three thrusts of our work included investigating thin film gas sensor materials based on metal oxide materials and electroceramic materials, and also development of microhotplate devices to support the gas sensing films. The metal oxide materials NiO, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated for their sensitivity to H{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and CO{sub 2}, respectively, at high temperatures (T > 500 C), where the sensing properties of these materials have received little attention. New ground was broken in achieving excellent gas sensor responses (>10) for temperatures up to 600 C for NiO and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials. The gas sensitivity of these materials was decreasing as temperatures increased above 500 C, which indicates that achieving strong sensitivities with these materials at very high temperatures (T {ge} 650 C) will be a further challenge. The sensitivity, selectivity, stability, and reliability of these materials were investigated across a wide range of deposition conditions, temperatures, film thickness, as using surface active promoter materials. We also proposed to study the electroceramic materials BaZr{sub (1-x)}Y{sub x}O{sub (3-x/2)} and BaCe{sub (2-x)}Ca{sub x}S{sub (4-x/2)} for their ability to detect H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, respectively. This report focuses on the properties and gas sensing characteristics of BaZr{sub (1-x)}Y{sub x}O{sub (3-x/2)} (Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}), as significant difficulties were encounter in generating BaCe{sub (2-x)}Ca{sub x}S{sub (4-x/2)} sensors. Significant new results were achieved for Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}, including

  7. Distributed landsurface skin temperature sensing in Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Giesen, N.; Baerenbold, F.; Nadeau, D. F.; Pardyjak, E.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    The ZyTemp TN9 is a mass-produced thermal infrared (TIR) sensor that is normally used to build handheld non-contact thermometers. The measurement principle of the TN9 is similar to that of very costly meteorological pyrgeometers. The costs of the TN9 are less than 10. The output of the TN9 consists of observed thermal radiation, the temperature of the measurement instrument, and the emissivity used. The output is provided through a Serial Peripheral Interface protocol. The TN9 was combined with an Arduino board that registered data onto a USB memory stick. A solar cell, lead acid battery, housing and stand completed the meausrement set up. Total costs per set was in the order of 200 Land surface atmosphere interactions in mountainous areas, such as the Swiss Alps, are spatially heterogeneous. Shading, multi-layer cloud formation, and up- and downdrafts make for a very dynamic exchange of mass and energy along and across slopes. In order to better understand these exchanges, the Swiss Slope Experiment at La Fouly (SELF) has built a distributed sensing network consisting of eight micro-met stations and two flux towers in the "La Fouly" watershed in the upper Alps. To obtain a better handle on surface temperature, fifteen TIR sensing stations were installed that made observations during the 2010 Summer. Methods and results will be presented. Overview La Fouly watershed (source: http://eflum.epfl.ch/research/images/fouly_2.jpg)

  8. Distributed temperature and distributed acoustic sensing for remote and harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanos, Michael; Parker, Tom; Milne, Craig H.; Yeo, Jackson; Coleman, Thomas; Farhadiroushan, Mahmoud

    2015-05-01

    Advances in opto-electronics and associated signal processing have enabled the development of Distributed Acoustic and Temperature Sensors. Unlike systems relying on discrete optical sensors a distributed system does not rely upon manufactured sensors but utilises passive custom optical fibre cables resistant to harsh environments, including high temperature applications (600°C). The principle of distributed sensing is well known from the distributed temperature sensor (DTS) which uses the interaction of the source light with thermal vibrations (Raman scattering) to determine the temperature at all points along the fibre. Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) uses a novel digital optical detection technique to precisely capture the true full acoustic field (amplitude, frequency and phase) over a wide dynamic range at every point simultaneously. A number of signal processing techniques have been developed to process a large array of acoustic signals to quantify the coherent temporal and spatial characteristics of the acoustic waves. Predominantly these systems have been developed for the oil and gas industry to assist reservoir engineers in optimising the well lifetime. Nowadays these systems find a wide variety of applications as integrity monitoring tools in process vessels, storage tanks and piping systems offering the operator tools to schedule maintenance programs and maximize service life.

  9. Remote magneto-elastic analyte, viscosity and temperature sensing apparatus and associated methods of sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Stoyanov, Plamen G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An analyte, viscosity, or temperature sensing apparatus for operative arrangement within a time-varying magnetic field, including a sensor with an outer surface that is chemically, frictionally, or thermally responsive and adhered to a base magnetostrictive element, and a receiver to measure a first and second value for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor taken at, respectively, a first and second interrogation frequency. A change in mass or a change in material stiffness of the sensor due to the responsiveness, the viscosity and mass density of a fluid therearound, or the temperature, can be identified. The receiver, alternatively, measures a plurality of successive values for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor taken over an operating range of successive interrogation frequencies to identify a value for the sensor's magneto-elastic resonant frequency (a fundamental frequency or harmonic thereof). Several sensors in an ordered array will provide a package of information.

  10. Three-dimensional dense distributed temperature sensing for measuring layered thermohaline systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgersom, K.P.; van de Giesen, N.C.; de Louw, PGB; Zijlema, M.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed temperature sensing has proven a useful technique for geoscientists to obtain spatially distributed temperature data. When studies require high-resolution temperature data in three spatial dimensions, current practices to enhance the spatial resolution do not suffice. For example,

  11. Investigating the effect of surface water - groundwater interactions on stream temperature using Distributed temperature sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karthikeyan, Matheswaran; Blemmer, Morten; Mortensen, Julie Flor

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using...... the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and instream temperature modelling. Locations of surface water–groundwater interactions were identified from the temperature data collected over a 2-km stream reach using a DTS system with 1-m spatial and 5-min temporal resolution. The stream under consideration...... exhibits three distinct thermal regimes within a 2 km reach length due to two major interactions. An energy balance model is used to simulate the instream temperature and to quantify the effect of these interactions on the stream temperature. This research demonstrates the effect of reach level small scale...

  12. Measuring artificial recharge with fiber optic distributed temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthew W; Bauer, Brian; Hutchinson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Heat was used as a tracer to measure infiltration rates from a recharge basin. The propagation of diurnal oscillation of surface water temperature into the basin bed was monitored along a transect using Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FODTS). The propagation rate was related to downward specific discharge using standard theory of heat advection and dispersion in saturated porous media. An estimate of the temporal variation of heat propagation was achieved using a wavelet transform to find the phase lag between the surface temperature diurnal oscillation and the correlated oscillation at 0.33 and 0.98 m below the bed surface. The wavelet results compared well to a constant velocity model of thermal advection and dispersion during periods of relatively constant discharge rates. The apparent dispersion of heat was found to be due primarily to hydrodynamic mechanisms rather than thermal diffusion. Specific discharge estimates using the FODTS technique also compared well to water balance estimates over a four month period, although there were occasional deviations that have yet to be adequately explained. The FODTS technique is superior to water balance in that it produces estimates of infiltration rate every meter along the cable transect, every half hour. These high resolution measurements highlighted areas of low infiltration and demonstrated the degradation of basin efficiency due to source waters of high suspended solids. FODTS monitoring promises to be a useful tool for diagnosing basin performance in an era of increasing groundwater demand. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  13. Use of Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology to Characterize Fire Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Cram

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the potential of a fiber optic cable connected to distributed temperature sensing (DTS technology to withstand wildland fire conditions and quantify fire behavior parameters. We used a custom-made ‘fire cable’ consisting of three optical fibers coated with three different materials—acrylate, copper and polyimide. The 150-m cable was deployed in grasslands and burned in three prescribed fires. The DTS system recorded fire cable output every three seconds and integrated temperatures every 50.6 cm. Results indicated the fire cable was physically capable of withstanding repeated rugged use. Fiber coating materials withstood temperatures up to 422 °C. Changes in fiber attenuation following fire were near zero (−0.81 to 0.12 dB/km indicating essentially no change in light gain or loss as a function of distance or fire intensity over the length of the fire cable. Results indicated fire cable and DTS technology have potential to quantify fire environment parameters such as heat duration and rate of spread but additional experimentation and analysis are required to determine efficacy and response times. This study adds understanding of DTS and fire cable technology as a potential new method for characterizing fire behavior parameters at greater temporal and spatial scales.

  14. Generalized saddle point condition for ignition in a tokamak reactor with temperature and density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitari, O.; Hirose, A.; Skarsgard, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the concept of a generalized ignition contour map, is extended to the realistic case of a plasma with temperature and density profiles in order to study access to ignition in a tokamak reactor. The generalized saddle point is found to lie between the Lawson and ignition conditions. If the height of the operation path with Goldston L-mode scaling is higher than the generalized saddle point, a reactor can reach ignition with this scaling for the case with no confinement degradation effect due to alpha-particle heating. In this sense, the saddle point given in a general form is a new criterion for reaching ignition. Peaking the profiles for the plasma temperature and density can lower the height of the generalized saddle point and help a reactor to reach ignition. With this in mind, the authors can judge whether next-generation tokamaks, such as Compact Ignition Tokamak, Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor, Next European Torus, Fusion Experimental Reactor, International Tokamak Reactor, and AC Tokamak Reactor, can reach ignition with realistic profile parameters and an L-mode scaling law

  15. A Review of Hybrid Fiber-Optic Distributed Simultaneous Vibration and Temperature Sensing Technology and Its Geophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Miah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Distributed sensing systems can transform an optical fiber cable into an array of sensors, allowing users to detect and monitor multiple physical parameters such as temperature, vibration and strain with fine spatial and temporal resolution over a long distance. Fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS and distributed temperature sensing (DTS systems have been developed for various applications with varied spatial resolution, and spectral and sensing range. Rayleigh scattering-based phase optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR for vibration and Raman/Brillouin scattering-based OTDR for temperature and strain measurements have been developed over the past two decades. The key challenge has been to find a methodology that would enable the physical parameters to be determined at any point along the sensing fiber with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, yet within acceptable frequency range for dynamic vibration, and temperature detection. There are many applications, especially in geophysical and mining engineering where simultaneous measurements of vibration and temperature are essential. In this article, recent developments of different hybrid systems for simultaneous vibration, temperature and strain measurements are analyzed based on their operation principles and performance. Then, challenges and limitations of the systems are highlighted for geophysical applications.

  16. A Review of Hybrid Fiber-Optic Distributed Simultaneous Vibration and Temperature Sensing Technology and Its Geophysical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Khalid; Potter, David K

    2017-11-01

    Distributed sensing systems can transform an optical fiber cable into an array of sensors, allowing users to detect and monitor multiple physical parameters such as temperature, vibration and strain with fine spatial and temporal resolution over a long distance. Fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) systems have been developed for various applications with varied spatial resolution, and spectral and sensing range. Rayleigh scattering-based phase optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) for vibration and Raman/Brillouin scattering-based OTDR for temperature and strain measurements have been developed over the past two decades. The key challenge has been to find a methodology that would enable the physical parameters to be determined at any point along the sensing fiber with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, yet within acceptable frequency range for dynamic vibration, and temperature detection. There are many applications, especially in geophysical and mining engineering where simultaneous measurements of vibration and temperature are essential. In this article, recent developments of different hybrid systems for simultaneous vibration, temperature and strain measurements are analyzed based on their operation principles and performance. Then, challenges and limitations of the systems are highlighted for geophysical applications.

  17. [Online soft sensing method for freezing point of diesel fuel based on NIR spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Hui

    2008-07-01

    To solve the problems of real-time online measurement for the freezing point of diesel fuel products, a soft sensing method by near-infrared (NIR) spectrometry was proposed. Firstly, the information of diesel fuel samples in the spectral region of 750-1 550 nm was extracted by spectrum analyzer, and the polynomial convolution algorithm was also applied in spectrogram smoothness, baseline correction and standardization. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then used to extract the features of NIR spectrum data sets, which not only reduced the number of input dimension, but increased their sensitivity to output. Finally the soft sensing model for freezing point was built using SVR algorithm. One hundred fifty diesel fuel samples were used as experimental materials, 100 of which were used as training (calibrating) samples and the others as testing samples. Four hundred and one dimensional original NIR absorption spectrum data sets, through PCA, were reduced to 6 dimensions. To investigate the measuring effect, the freezing points of the testing samples were estimated by four different soft sensing models, BP, SVR, PCA-BP and PCA+SVR. Experimental results show that (1) the soft sensing models using PCA to extract features are generally better than those used directly in spectrum wavelength domain; (2) SVR based model outperforms its main competitors-BP model in the limited training data, the error of which is only half of the latter; (3) The MSE between the estimated values by the presented method and the standard chemical values of freezing point by condensing method are less than 4.2. The research suggests that the proposed method can be used in fast measurement of the freezing point of diesel fuel products by NIRS.

  18. Fabrication and Optimization of Bilayered Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Structures as Multi-Point Interferometric Sensing Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Nemati

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present an innovative strategy for optimizing hierarchical structures of nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA to advance their optical sensing performance toward multi-analyte biosensing. This approach is based on the fabrication of multilayered NAA and the formation of differential effective medium of their structure by controlling three fabrication parameters (i.e., anodization steps, anodization time, and pore widening time. The rationale of the proposed concept is that interferometric bilayered NAA (BL-NAA, which features two layers of different pore diameters, can provide distinct reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS signatures for each layer within the NAA structure and can therefore potentially be used for multi-point biosensing. This paper presents the structural fabrication of layered NAA structures, and the optimization and evaluation of their RIfS optical sensing performance through changes in the effective optical thickness (EOT using quercetin as a model molecule. The bilayered or funnel-like NAA structures were designed with the aim of characterizing the sensitivity of both layers of quercetin molecules using RIfS and exploring the potential of these photonic structures, featuring different pore diameters, for simultaneous size-exclusion and multi-analyte optical biosensing. The sensing performance of the prepared NAA platforms was examined by real-time screening of binding reactions between human serum albumin (HSA-modified NAA (i.e., sensing element and quercetin (i.e., analyte. BL-NAAs display a complex optical interference spectrum, which can be resolved by fast Fourier transform (FFT to monitor the EOT changes, where three distinctive peaks were revealed corresponding to the top, bottom, and total layer within the BL-NAA structures. The spectral shifts of these three characteristic peaks were used as sensing signals to monitor the binding events in each NAA pore in real-time upon exposure to different

  19. A Novel Technique for Maximum Power Point Tracking of a Photovoltaic Based on Sensing of Array Current Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zoghby, Helmy M.; Bendary, Ahmed F.

    2016-10-01

    Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) is now widely used method in increasing the photovoltaic (PV) efficiency. The conventional MPPT methods have many problems concerning the accuracy, flexibility and efficiency. The MPP depends on the PV temperature and solar irradiation that randomly varied. In this paper an artificial intelligence based controller is presented through implementing of an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) to obtain maximum power from PV. The ANFIS inputs are the temperature and cell current, and the output is optimal voltage at maximum power. During operation the trained ANFIS senses the PV current using suitable sensor and also senses the temperature to determine the optimal operating voltage that corresponds to the current at MPP. This voltage is used to control the boost converter duty cycle. The MATLAB simulation results shows the effectiveness of the ANFIS with sensing the PV current in obtaining the MPPT from the PV.

  20. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Manuela; Fischer, Gabi; Raabe, Armin; Weisse, Frank [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie; Ziemann, Astrid [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur fuer Meteorologie

    2013-04-15

    A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre. (orig.)

  1. Study on temperature field airborne remote sensing survey along shore nuclear power station in different tide status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Chunli; Li Mingsong

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Power Station needs to let large quantity of cooling water to the near sea area when it is running. Whether the cooling water has effect to surrounding environment and the running of Nuclear Power Station needs further research. Temperature Drainage Mathematic Model and Physical Analogue Model need to acquire the distribution characteristic of near Station sea surface temperature field in different seasons and different tide status. Airborne Remote Sending Technique has a advantage in gaining high resolution sea surface temperature in different tide status, and any other manual method with discrete point survey can not reach it. After a successful implementation of airborne remote sensing survey to gain the near-shore temperature drainage information in Qinshan Nuclear Power Station, it provides the reference methods and ideas for temperature drainage remote sensing survey of Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

  2. Enhanced Modeling of Remotely Sensed Annual Land Surface Temperature Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Z.; Zhan, W.; Jiang, L.

    2017-09-01

    Satellite thermal remote sensing provides access to acquire large-scale Land surface temperature (LST) data, but also generates missing and abnormal values resulting from non-clear-sky conditions. Given this limitation, Annual Temperature Cycle (ATC) model was employed to reconstruct the continuous daily LST data over a year. The original model ATCO used harmonic functions, but the dramatic changes of the real LST caused by the weather changes remained unclear due to the smooth sine curve. Using Aqua/MODIS LST products, NDVI and meteorological data, we proposed enhanced model ATCE based on ATCO to describe the fluctuation and compared their performances for the Yangtze River Delta region of China. The results demonstrated that, the overall root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the ATCE was lower than ATCO, and the improved accuracy of daytime was better than that of night, with the errors decreased by 0.64 K and 0.36 K, respectively. The improvements of accuracies varied with different land cover types: the forest, grassland and built-up areas improved larger than water. And the spatial heterogeneity was observed for performance of ATC model: the RMSEs of built-up area, forest and grassland were around 3.0 K in the daytime, while the water attained 2.27 K; at night, the accuracies of all types significantly increased to similar RMSEs level about 2 K. By comparing the differences between LSTs simulated by two models in different seasons, it was found that the differences were smaller in the spring and autumn, while larger in the summer and winter.

  3. Dew point temperature affects ascospore release of allergenic genus Leptosphaeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadyś, Magdalena; Kaczmarek, Joanna; Grinn-Gofron, Agnieszka; Rodinkova, Victoria; Prikhodko, Alex; Bilous, Elena; Strzelczak, Agnieszka; Herbert, Robert J.; Jedryczka, Malgorzata

    2018-01-01

    The genus Leptosphaeria contains numerous fungi that cause the symptoms of asthma and also parasitize wild and crop plants. In search of a robust and universal forecast model, the ascospore concentration in air was measured and weather data recorded from 1 March to 31 October between 2006 and 2012. The experiment was conducted in three European countries of the temperate climate, i.e., Ukraine, Poland, and the UK. Out of over 150 forecast models produced using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multivariate regression trees (MRTs), we selected the best model for each site, as well as for joint two-site combinations. The performance of all computed models was tested against records from 1 year which had not been used for model construction. The statistical analysis of the fungal spore data was supported by a comprehensive study of both climate and land cover within a 30-km radius from the air sampler location. High-performance forecasting models were obtained for individual sites, showing that the local micro-climate plays a decisive role in biology of the fungi. Based on the previous epidemiological studies, we hypothesized that dew point temperature (DPT) would be a critical factor in the models. The impact of DPT was confirmed only by one of the final best neural models, but the MRT analyses, similarly to the Spearman's rank test, indicated the importance of DPT in all but one of the studied cases and in half of them ranked it as a fundamental factor. This work applies artificial neural modeling to predict the Leptosphaeria airborne spore concentration in urban areas for the first time.

  4. Measurement Back-Action in Quantum Point-Contact Charge Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Küng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Charge sensing with quantum point-contacts (QPCs is a technique widely used in semiconductor quantum-dot research. Understanding the physics of this measurement process, as well as finding ways of suppressing unwanted measurement back-action, are therefore both desirable. In this article, we present experimental studies targeting these two goals. Firstly, we measure the effect of a QPC on electron tunneling between two InAs quantum dots, and show that a model based on the QPC’s shot-noise can account for it. Secondly, we discuss the possibility of lowering the measurement current (and thus the back-action used for charge sensing by correlating the signals of two independent measurement channels. The performance of this method is tested in a typical experimental setup.

  5. Determination of soil evaporation fluxes using distributed temperature sensing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, J. L.; Cristi Matte, F.; Munoz, J. F.; Suarez, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of evaporation fluxes in arid soils is an unresolved complex phenomenon that has a major impact on the basin's water availability. In arid zones, evaporation controls moisture contents near the soil surface and drives liquid water and water vapor fluxes through the vadose zone, playing a critical role in both the hydrological cycle and energy balance. However, determining soil evaporation in arid zones is a difficult undertaking. Thus, it is important to develop new measuring techniques that can determine evaporation fluxes. In the last decade, distributed temperature sensing (DTS) methods have been successfully used to investigate a wide range of hydrologic applications. In particular, DTS methods have been used indirectly to monitor soil moisture. Two methods have been developed: the passive and the active method. In the active mode, the DTS system uses cables with metal elements and a voltage difference is applied at the two ends to of the cable to heat it up for a defined time-period. Then, the cumulative temperature increase along the cable is computed and soil moisture is determined by using an empirical relation. DTS technology has also been used to determine water fluxes in porous media, but so far no efforts have been made to determine evaporation fluxes. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using the active DTS method to determine soil evaporation fluxes. To achieve this objective, column experiments were designed to study evaporation from sandy soils with shallow water tables. The soil columns were instrumented with traditional temperature and time-domain-reflectometry probes, and an armored fiber-optic cable that allows using the active method to estimate the soil moisture profile. In the experiments, the water table can be fixed at different depths and soil evaporation can be estimated by measuring the water added to the constant-head reservoir that feeds the column. Thus, allowing the investigation of soil evaporation fluxes from DTS

  6. Remote Sensing Analysis of Temperature and Suspended Sediment Concentration in Ayeyarwady River in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanda Ko, Nyein; Rutten, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Detailed spatial coverage of water quality parameters are crucial to better manage rivers. However, collection of water quality parameters is both time consuming and costly for large rivers. This study demonstrates that Operational Land Image (OLI) Sensor on board of Landsat 8 can be successfully applied for the detection of spatial patterns of water temperature as well as suspended sediment concentration (SSC) using the Ayeyarwady river, Myanmar as a case study. Water temperature estimation was obtained from the brightness thermal Band 10 by using the Split-Window algorithm. The study finds that there is a close agreement between the remote sensing temperature and in-situ temperature with relative error in the range from 4.5% to 8.2%. The sediment load of Ayeyarwady river is ranked as the third-largest sediment load among the world's rivers but there is very little known about this important parameter, due to a lack of adequate gauge data. The single band reflectance of Landsat image (Band 5) seems a good indicator for the estimation of SSC with relative error in the range of less than 10% but the developed empirical formula by the power relation with the only seven ground reference points is uncertain to apply for the entire river basin. It is to note that an important constraint for the sediment analysis is the availability of spatial and temporal ground reference data. Future studies should also focus on the improvement of ground reference data points to become more reliable, because most of the river in Asia, especially in Myanmar, don't have readily available continuous ground sediment data points due to lack of measurement gauge stations through the river.

  7. Remote sensing of row crop structure and component temperatures using directional radiometric temperatures and inversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    A physically based sensor response model of a row crop was used as the mathematical framework from which several inversion strategies were tested for extracting row structure information and component temperatures using a series of sensor view angles. The technique was evaluated on ground-based radiometric thermal infrared data of a cotton row crop that covered 48 percent of the ground in the vertical projection. The results showed that the accuracies of the predicted row heights and widths, vegetation temperatures, and soil temperatures of the cotton row crop were on the order of 5 cm, 1 deg, and 2 deg C, respectively. The inversion techniques can be applied to directional sensor data from aircraft platforms and even space platforms if the effects of atmospheric absorption and emission can be corrected. In theory, such inversion techniques can be applied to a wide variety of vegetation types and thus can have significant implications for remote sensing research and applications in disciplines that deal with incomplete vegetation canopies.

  8. Development of high temperature acoustic emission sensing system using fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Dandan; Sui, Qingmei; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei; Sai, Yaozhang

    2018-03-01

    In some applications in structural health monitoring (SHM), the acoustic emission (AE) detection technology is used in the high temperature environment. In this paper, a high-temperature-resistant AE sensing system is developed based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. A novel high temperature FBG AE sensor is designed with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared with the traditional FBG AE sensor. The output responses of the designed sensors with different sensing fiber lengths also are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Excellent AE detection results are obtained using the proposed FBG AE sensing system over a temperature range from 25 ° to 200 °. The experimental results indicate that this FBG AE sensing system can well meet the application requirement in AE detecting areas at high temperature.

  9. Development of high temperature acoustic emission sensing system using fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Dandan; Sui, Qingmei; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei; Sai, Yaozhang

    2017-09-01

    In some applications in structural health monitoring (SHM), the acoustic emission (AE) detection technology is used in the high temperature environment. In this paper, a high-temperature-resistant AE sensing system is developed based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. A novel high temperature FBG AE sensor is designed with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared with the traditional FBG AE sensor. The output responses of the designed sensors with different sensing fiber lengths also are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Excellent AE detection results are obtained using the proposed FBG AE sensing system over a temperature range from 25 °C to 200 °C. The experimental results indicate that this FBG AE sensing system can well meet the application requirement in AE detecting areas at high temperature.

  10. Method of nuclear reactor control using a variable temperature load dependent set point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.J.; Rambo, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor in response to a variable average reactor coolant temperature set point is disclosed. The set point is dependent upon percent of full power load demand. A manually-actuated ''droop mode'' of control is provided whereby the reactor coolant temperature is allowed to drop below the set point temperature a predetermined amount wherein the control is switched from reactor control rods exclusively to feedwater flow

  11. Test of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory using distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Sayde, C.; Li, Q.; Gentine, P.

    2017-12-01

    Monin-Obukhov similarity theory [Monin and Obukhov, 1954] (MOST) has been widely used to calculate atmospheric surface fluxes applying the structure correction functions [Stull, 1988]. The exact forms of the structure correction functions for momentum and heat, which depend on the vertical gradient velocity and temperature, have been determined empirically mostly from the Kansas experiment [Kaimal et al., 1972]. However, due to the limitation of point measurement, the vertical gradient of temperature and horizontal wind speed are not well captured. Here we propose a way to measure the vertical gradient of temperature and horizontal wind speed with high resolution in space (every 12.7 cm) and time (every second) using the Distributed Temperature Sensing [Selker et al., 2006] (DTS), thus determining the exact form of the structure correction functions of MOST under various stability conditions. Two parallel vertical fiber optics will be placed on a tower at the central facility of ARM SGP site. Vertical air temperature will be measured every 12.7 cm by the fiber optics and horizontal wind speed along fiber will be measured. Then vertical gradient of temperature and horizontal wind speed will be calculated and stability correction functions for momentum and heat will be determined. ReferencesKaimal, J. C., Wyngaard, J. C., Izumi, Y., and Cote, O. R. (1972), Spectral characteristics of surface-layer turbulence, Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 98(417), 563-589, doi: 10.1002/qj.49709841707. Monin, A., and Obukhov, A. (1954), Basic laws of turbulent mixing in the surface layer of the atmosphere, Contrib. Geophys. Inst. Acad. Sci. USSR, 24(151), 163-187. Selker, J., Thévenaz, L., Huwald, H., Mallet, A., Luxemburg, W., van de Giesen, N., Stejskal, M., Zeman, J., Westhoff, M., and Parlange, M. B. (2006), Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems, Water Resources Research, 42, W12202, doi: 10.1029/2006wr005326. Stull, R. (1988

  12. Wireless sensor networks for canopy temperature sensing and irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    For researchers, canopy temperature measurements have proven useful in characterizing crop water stress and developing protocols for irrigation management. Today, there is heightened interest in using remote canopy temperature measurements for real-time irrigation scheduling. However, without the us...

  13. Optical Microfiber Technology for Current, Temperature, Acceleration, Acoustic, Humidity and Ultraviolet Light Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, David G.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2017-01-01

    Optical microfibers possess excellent optical and mechanical properties that have been exploited for sensing. We highlight the authors’ recent work in the areas of current, temperature, acceleration, acoustic, humidity and ultraviolet-light sensing based on this exquisite technology, and the advantages and challenges of using optical microfibers are discussed. PMID:29283414

  14. High point for CERN and high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Amalia Ballarino is named the Superconductor Industry Person of the year 2006. Amalia Ballarino showing a tape of high-superconducting material used for the LHC current leads.The CERN project leader for the high-temperature superconducting current leads for the LHC, Amalia Ballarino, has received the award for "Superconductor Industry Person of the Year". This award, the most prestigious international award in the development and commercialization of superconductors, is presented by the leading industry newsletter "Superconductor Week". Amalia Ballarino was selected from dozens of nominations from around the world by a panel of recognized leading experts in superconductivity. "It is a great honour for me," says Amalia Ballarino. "It has been many years of hard work, and it’s a great satisfaction to see that the work has been completed successfully." Amalia Ballarino has been working on high-temperature superconducting materials sin...

  15. Development Of Test Rig System For Calibration Of Temperature Sensing Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Muhammad Dawood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A test rig is described, for the measurement of temperature and resistance parameters of a Temperature Sensing Fabric (TSF for calibration purpose. The equipment incorporated a temperature-controlled hotplate, two copper plates, eight thermocouples, a temperature data-logger and a four-wire high-resolution resistance measuring multimeter. The copper plates were positioned above and below the TSF and in physical contact with its surfaces, so that a uniform thermal environment might be provided. The temperature of TSF was estimated by the measurement of temperature profiles of the two copper plates. Temperature-resistance graphs were created for all the tests, which were carried out over the range of 20 to 50°C, and they showed that the temperature and resistance values were not only repeatable but also reproducible, with only minor variations. The comparative analysis between the temperature-resistance test data and the temperature-resistance reference profile showed that the error in estimation of temperature of the sensing element was less than ±0.2°C. It was also found that the rig not only provided a stable and homogenous thermal environment but also offered the capability of accurately measuring the temperature and resistance parameters. The Temperature Sensing Fabric is suitable for integration into garments for continuous measurement of human body temperature in clinical and non-clinical settings.

  16. Modal-interference-based temperature sensing using plastic optical fibers: markedly enhanced sensitivity near glass-transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Goki; Hayashi, Neisei; Tabaru, Marie; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    We developed strain and temperature sensors based on multimode interference in perfluorinated graded-index (GI) plastic optical fibers, and investigate their sensing performance at 1300 nm. At room temperature, we achieve ultra-high sensitivities of strain and temperature of -112 pm/μɛ and +49.8 nm/°C/m, the absolute value of which are approximately 7.2 and over 1800 times as large as those in silica GI multimode fibers, respectively. We also find that the temperature sensitivity is drastically enhanced with increasing temperature toward ~80 °C, where phase transition of core polymer partially occurs.

  17. Distributed Temperature Sensing as a tool for measuring soil heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Van De Giesen, N.; Selker, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Soil heat flux is an important component of the surface energy balance. It is typically measured at a point using heat flux plates. Spatial patterns as well as temporal variability can be measured using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS), in which fiber-optic cable is used as an environmental temperature sensor. Previous research has demonstrated that DTS can be used to monitor soil moisture patterns and soil thermal profiles. By using a custom-built mole-plow, fiber optic cables were installed at three depths within the top 15 centimeters of a grass plot in Delft, The Netherlands. DTS was used to measure temperatures along the cable with a spatial resolution of 1 meter and a temporal resolution 5 minutes along a cable of 84 meters length. In this cable the response of soil temperature to the diurnal cycle of net radiation was measured over three months (Passive DTS). By inverse modeling of the diffusion equation, thermal properties of the soil are determined from which soil heat flux is calculated. During several more intensive campaigns, active heating experiments (Active DTS) were also carried out. In this case, a controlled electrical pulse was applied to the stainless steel armoring on the cable. The thermal response of the cable is measured for pulses of different input power, and this is related to the thermal properties of the surrounding soil. Net radiation, thermal conductivity and sensible heat flux were also measured to quantify the surface energy balance during the intensive campaigns. Results will be presented to illustrate that DTS (Active and/or Passive) is a promising and relatively inexpensive tool to measure large scale spatial patterns in temperature, soil moisture and soil heat flux at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. Distributed fiber?optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selker, J.S.; Thévenaz, L.; Huwald, H.; Mallet, A.; Luxemburg, W.M.J.; Van de Giesen, N.; Stejskal, M.; Zeman, J.; Westhoff, M.; Parlange, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Instruments for distributed fiber-optic measurement of temperature are now available with temperature resolution of 0.01°C and spatial resolution of 1 m with temporal resolution of fractions of a minute along standard fiber-optic cables used for communication with lengths of up to 30,000 m. We

  19. Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selker, John S.; Thévenaz, Luc; Huwald, Hendrik; Mallet, Alfred; Luxemburg, Wim; van de Giesen, Nick C.; Stejskal, Martin; Zeman, Josef; Westhoff, Martijn; Parlange, Marc B.

    2006-01-01

    Instruments for distributed fiber-optic measurement of temperature are now available with temperature resolution of 0.01°C and spatial resolution of 1 m with temporal resolution of fractions of a minute along standard fiber-optic cables used for communication with lengths of up to 30,000 m. We

  20. Multiple-Point Temperature Gradient Algorithm for Ring Laser Gyroscope Bias Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To further improve ring laser gyroscope (RLG bias stability, a multiple-point temperature gradient algorithm is proposed for RLG bias compensation in this paper. Based on the multiple-point temperature measurement system, a complete thermo-image of the RLG block is developed. Combined with the multiple-point temperature gradients between different points of the RLG block, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to tune the support vector machine (SVM parameters, and an optimized design for selecting the thermometer locations is also discussed. The experimental results validate the superiority of the introduced method and enhance the precision and generalizability in the RLG bias compensation model.

  1. Super-Resolution Mapping of Impervious Surfaces from Remotely Sensed Imagery with Points-of-Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehong Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The accurate mapping of impervious surfaces is of key significance for various urban applications. Usually, traditional methods extract the proportion image of impervious surfaces from remote sensing images; however, the proportion image cannot specify where the impervious surfaces spatially distribute within a pixel. Meanwhile, impervious surfaces often locate urban areas and have a strong correlation with the relatively new big (geodata points of interest (POIs. This study, therefore, proposed a novel impervious surfaces mapping method (super-resolution mapping of impervious surfaces, SRMIS by combining a super-resolution mapping technique and POIs to increase the spatial resolution of impervious surfaces in proportion images and determine the accurate spatial location of impervious surfaces within each pixel. SRMIS was evaluated using a 10-m Sentinel-2 image and a 30-m Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI image of Nanjing city, China. The experimental results show that SRMIS generated satisfactory impervious surface maps with better-classified image quality and greater accuracy than a traditional hard classifier, the two existing super-resolution mapping (SRM methods of the subpixel-swapping algorithm, or the method using both pixel-level and subpixel-level spatial dependence. The experimental results show that the overall accuracy increase of SRMIS was from 2.34% to 5.59% compared with the hard classification method and the two SRM methods in the first experiment, while the overall accuracy of SRMIS was 1.34–3.09% greater than that of the compared methods in the second experiment. Hence, this study provides a useful solution to combining SRM techniques and the relatively new big (geodata (i.e., POIs to extract impervious surface maps with a higher spatial resolution than that of the input remote sensing images, and thereby supports urban research.

  2. Optical sensing of anticoagulation status: Towards point-of-care coagulation testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M Tshikudi

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant overdose is associated with major bleeding complications. Rapid coagulation sensing may ensure safe and accurate anticoagulant dosing and reduce bleeding risk. Here, we report the novel use of Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR for measuring anticoagulation and haemodilution status in whole blood. In the LSR approach, blood from 12 patients and 4 swine was placed in disposable cartridges and time-varying intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns were measured to quantify the viscoelastic modulus during clotting. Coagulation parameters, mainly clotting time, clot progression rate (α-angle and maximum clot stiffness (MA were derived from the clot viscoelasticity trace and compared with standard Thromboelastography (TEG. To demonstrate the capability for anticoagulation sensing in patients, blood samples from 12 patients treated with warfarin anticoagulant were analyzed. LSR clotting time correlated with prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time (r = 0.57-0.77, p<0.04 and all LSR parameters demonstrated good correlation with TEG (r = 0.61-0.87, p<0.04. To further evaluate the dose-dependent sensitivity of LSR parameters, swine blood was spiked with varying concentrations of heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban or serially diluted with saline. We observed that anticoagulant treatments prolonged LSR clotting time in a dose-dependent manner that correlated closely with TEG (r = 0.99, p<0.01. LSR angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented dose-dependent diminution likely linked to the mechanical manipulation of the clot. In both LSR and TEG, MA was largely unaffected by anticoagulation, and LSR presented a higher sensitivity to increased haemodilution in comparison to TEG (p<0.01. Our results establish that LSR rapidly and accurately measures the response of various anticoagulants, opening the opportunity for routine anticoagulation monitoring at the point-of-care or for patient self-testing.

  3. Non-contact local temperature measurement inside an object using an infrared point detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaka, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Local temperature measurement in deep areas of objects is an important technique in biomedical measurement. We have investigated a non-contact method for measuring temperature inside an object using a point detector for infrared (IR) light. An IR point detector with a pinhole was constructed and the radiant IR light emitted from the local interior of the object is photodetected only at the position of pinhole located in imaging relation. We measured the thermal structure of the filament inside the miniature bulb using the IR point detector, and investigated the temperature dependence at approximately human body temperature using a glass plate positioned in front of the heat source.

  4. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-07-09

    In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM) and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R² ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics) in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system.

  5. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM) and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R2 ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics) in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system. PMID:27409620

  6. Temperature Sensing Solution for Cryogenic Space Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic systems, heavily used in rocket ground testing, space station operations, shuttle launch systems, etc, require a large number of temperature sensors for...

  7. Remotely sensed variability of temperature and chlorophyll in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    series of daily sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll a ... Most notable is the rapidly pulsating nature of the upwelling, with intense warm/cold events clearly distinguished. The phytoplankton response to this physical forcing is described.

  8. Sensing disks for slug-type calorimeters have higher temperature stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    Graphite sensing disk for slug-type radiation calorimeters exhibits better performance at high temperatures than copper and nickel disks. The graphite is heat-soaked to stabilize its emittance and the thermocouple is protected from the graphite so repeated temperature cycling does not change its sensitivity.

  9. Body temperatures of fish feeding in the Point Beach thermal discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spigarelli, S.A.; Thommes, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Between April and November, 1973, measurements of internal body temperature were made on 1310 fish caught by fishermen at the Point Beach Nuclear Plant. Records were also made of fish weight, length, and sex and intake and discharge temperatures. A table is presented to show mean monthly body temperatures and numbers of each species. Approximately 76 percent of the measurements were made on rainbow and brown trout, since these species accounted for 74 percent of the catch. Body temperatures of most fish were intermediate between intake and discharge temperatures. Results suggested that each species has rather specific seasonal temperature requirements and that the maximum discharge temperature was normally avoided by feeding fish

  10. Feasibility of soil moisture estimation using passive distributed temperature sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steele-Dunne, S.C.; Rutten, M.M.; Krzeminska, D.M.; Hausner, M.; Tyler, S.W.; Selker, J.; Bogaard, T.A.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Through its role in the energy and water balances at the land surface, soil moisture is a key state variable in surface hydrology and land?atmosphere interactions. Point observations of soil moisture are easy to make using established methods such as time domain reflectometry and gravimetric

  11. FAST OCCLUSION AND SHADOW DETECTION FOR HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGE COMBINED WITH LIDAR POINT CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Hu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The orthophoto is an important component of GIS database and has been applied in many fields. But occlusion and shadow causes the loss of feature information which has a great effect on the quality of images. One of the critical steps in true orthophoto generation is the detection of occlusion and shadow. Nowadays LiDAR can obtain the digital surface model (DSM directly. Combined with this technology, image occlusion and shadow can be detected automatically. In this paper, the Z-Buffer is applied for occlusion detection. The shadow detection can be regarded as a same problem with occlusion detection considering the angle between the sun and the camera. However, the Z-Buffer algorithm is computationally expensive. And the volume of scanned data and remote sensing images is very large. Efficient algorithm is another challenge. Modern graphics processing unit (GPU is much more powerful than central processing unit (CPU. We introduce this technology to speed up the Z-Buffer algorithm and get 7 times increase in speed compared with CPU. The results of experiments demonstrate that Z-Buffer algorithm plays well in occlusion and shadow detection combined with high density of point cloud and GPU can speed up the computation significantly.

  12. Evaluation of a Novel Temperature Sensing Probe for Monitoring and Controlling Glass Temperature in a Joule-Heated Glass Melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, A. D.; Musick, C. A.; Cannon, C.; Carlson, N. M.; Mullenix, P.D.; Tillotson, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    A self-verifying temperature sensor that employs advanced contact thermocouple probe technology was tested in a laboratory-scale, joule-heated, refractory-lined glass melter used for radioactive waste vitrification. The novel temperature probe monitors melt temperature at any given level of the melt chamber. The data acquisition system provides the real-time temperature for molten glass. Test results indicate that the self-verifying sensor is more accurate and reliable than classic platinum/rhodium thermocouple and sheath assemblies. The results of this test are reported as well as enhancements being made to the temperature probe. To obtain more reliable temperature measurements of the molten glass for improving production efficiency and ensuring consistent glass properties, optical sensing was reviewed for application in a high temperature environment

  13. Temperature dependence of gas sensing behaviour of TiO2 doped PANI composite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Subodh; Sharma, Preetam; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, S. S.; Sharma, Vinay; Rajura, Rajveer Singh

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we have reported the effect of temperature on the gas sensing properties of TiO 2 doped PANI composite thin film based chemiresistor type gas sensors for hydrogen gas sensing application. PANI and TiO 2 doped PANI composite were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline at low temperature. The electrical properties of these composite thin films were characterized by I-V measurements as function of temperature. The I-V measurement revealed that conductivity of composite thin films increased as the temperature increased. The changes in resistance of the composite thin film sensor were utilized for detection of hydrogen gas. It was observed that at room temperature TiO 2 doped PANI composite sensor shows higher response value and showed unstable behavior as the temperature increased. The surface morphology of these composite thin films has also been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement

  14. Thermocouple-based Temperature Sensing System for Chemical Cell Inside Micro UAV Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanhui; Feng, Yue; Lou, Haozhe; Zhang, Xinzhao

    2018-03-01

    Environmental temperature of UAV system is crucial for chemical cell component inside. Once the temperature of this chemical cell is over 259 °C and keeps more than 20 min, the high thermal accumulation would result in an explosion, which seriously damage the whole UAV system. Therefore, we develop a micro temperature sensing system for monitoring the temperature of chemical cell thermally influenced by UAV device deployed in a 300 °C temperature environment, which is quite useful for insensitive munitions and UAV safety enhancement technologies.

  15. Comparison of Single-Point and Continuous Sampling Methods for Estimating Residential Indoor Temperature and Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James D; Magnusson, Brianna M; Eggett, Dennis; Collingwood, Scott C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Residential temperature and humidity are associated with multiple health effects. Studies commonly use single-point measures to estimate indoor temperature and humidity exposures, but there is little evidence to support this sampling strategy. This study evaluated the relationship between single-point and continuous monitoring of air temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity over four exposure intervals (5-min, 30-min, 24-hr, and 12-days) in 9 northern Utah homes, from March-June 2012. Three homes were sampled twice, for a total of 12 observation periods. Continuous data-logged sampling was conducted in homes for 2-3 wks, and simultaneous single-point measures (n = 114) were collected using handheld thermo-hygrometers. Time-centered single-point measures were moderately correlated with short-term (30-min) data logger mean air temperature (r = 0.76, β = 0.74), apparent temperature (r = 0.79, β = 0.79), relative humidity (r = 0.70, β = 0.63), and absolute humidity (r = 0.80, β = 0.80). Data logger 12-day means were also moderately correlated with single-point air temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.43) and apparent temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.44), but were weakly correlated with single-point relative humidity (r = 0.53, β = 0.35) and absolute humidity (r = 0.52, β = 0.39). Of the single-point RH measures, 59 (51.8%) deviated more than ±5%, 21 (18.4%) deviated more than ±10%, and 6 (5.3%) deviated more than ±15% from data logger 12-day means. Where continuous indoor monitoring is not feasible, single-point sampling strategies should include multiple measures collected at prescribed time points based on local conditions.

  16. A Plasmonic Temperature-Sensing Structure Based on Dual Laterally Side-Coupled Hexagonal Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyuan Xie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A plasmonic temperature-sensing structure, based on a metal-insulator-metal (MIM waveguide with dual side-coupled hexagonal cavities, is proposed and numerically investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method in this paper. The numerical simulation results show that a resonance dip appears in the transmission spectrum. Moreover, the full width of half maximum (FWHM of the resonance dip can be narrowed down, and the extinction ratio can reach a maximum value by tuning the coupling distance between the waveguide and two cavities. Based on a linear relationship between the resonance dip and environment temperature, the temperature-sensing characteristics are discussed. The temperature sensitivity is influenced by the side length and the coupling distance. Furthermore, for the first time, two concepts—optical spectrum interference (OSI and misjudge rate (MR—are introduced to study the temperature-sensing resolution based on spectral interrogation. This work has some significance in the design of nanoscale optical sensors with high temperature sensitivity and a high sensing resolution.

  17. Temperature-independent strain sensing characteristics of coupled photonic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Leng, Lemeng; Ma, Hanlin; Li, Lei; Zhang, Sheng; Cheng, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    A highly sensitive strain sensor based on coupled two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal waveguides consisting of dielectric rods array immersed in air is designed. The effective side-coupling between directional coupled waveguides and surrounding defect cavities gives flexibility in the choice of the sensing monitoring band. The coupling process and transmission spectral properties are analyzed by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The influence of strain and temperature on the transmission spectrum is investigated by monitoring the wavelength shift in the loss peaks. The dual-channel sensing method is proposed to eliminate the cross sensitivity effect between the strain and ambient temperature, and render a new category of temperature-independent strain sensing devices.

  18. Plasmonic nanocomposite thin film enabled fiber optic sensors for simultaneous gas and temperature sensing at extreme temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohodnicki, Paul R; Buric, Michael P; Brown, Thomas D; Matranga, Christopher; Wang, Congjun; Baltrus, John; Andio, Mark

    2013-10-07

    Embedded sensors capable of operation in extreme environments including high temperatures, high pressures, and highly reducing, oxidizing and/or corrosive environments can make a significant impact on enhanced efficiencies and reduced greenhouse gas emissions of current and future fossil-based power generation systems. Relevant technologies can also be leveraged in a wide range of other applications with similar needs including nuclear power generation, industrial process monitoring and control, and aviation/aerospace. Here we describe a novel approach to embedded sensing under extreme temperature conditions by integration of Au-nanoparticle based plasmonic nanocomposite thin films with optical fibers in an evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy configuration. Such sensors can potentially enable simultaneous temperature and gas sensing at temperatures approaching 900-1000 °C in a manner compatible with embedded and distributed sensing approaches. The approach is demonstrated using the Au/SiO2 system deposited on silica-based optical fibers. Stability of optical fibers under relevant high temperature conditions and interactions with changing ambient gas atmospheres is an area requiring additional investigation and development but the simplicity of the sensor design makes it potentially cost-effective and may offer a potential for widespread deployment.

  19. Study on temperature and damage sensing capability of Portland cement paste through the thermoelectric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Tai, Ko-Hung; Su, Yu-Min

    2017-04-01

    This study attempted to investigate the self-sensing capability of Portland cement composites in sensing temperature and detecting damages through the measurements of materials' thermoelectric properties. Specimens were made of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) with the water to cement ratio of 0.4. Temperature sensing property was characterized at various ages of the specimens from 28 to 49 days and at dried/moisturized conditions. It was found there exists an approximately linear relationship between temperature differences (ΔT) and the measured thermoelectric potentials, which is known as the Seebeck effect. This linearity was observed to be varied but able to be characterized for cement pastes at different ages and water saturation conditions. Mechanical loading that introduced different types and degrees of damages also translated into the variations of thermoelectric properties. Specifically, different types of compressive loads were tested for comparison. The study results have shown that Seebeck coefficient dropped with introduced damages, and restored with the subsequent re-curing as well as the continued cement hydration. Mild and moderate damages can be partially or fully restored, while severe damages that have resulted in significant drop of the Seebeck coefficients would restrain the self-restoration. Determination of the damage threshold was not yet revealed in this study, while it was shown obviously there existed one. Our investigation results indicated that characterizing the self-sensing capability of Portland cement composites is achievable through the measurements of thermoelectric properties. This study, in particular, has showcased the temperature sensing and damage detection capability.

  20. Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertész, K., E-mail: kertesz.krisztian@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Piszter, G. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Jakab, E. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P O Box 17 (Hungary); Bálint, Zs. [Hungarian Natural History Museum, H-1088, Budapest, Baross utca 13 (Hungary); Vértesy, Z.; Biró, L.P. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary)

    2014-06-01

    The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies. - Highlights: • We report optical gas sensing on blue butterfly wing scale nanostructures. • The sample temperature decrease effects a reversible break-down in the measured spectra. • The break-down is connected with the vapor condensation in the scales and wing surface. • Capillary condensation occurs in the wing scales.

  1. Combination of Well-Logging Temperature and Thermal Remote Sensing for Characterization of Geothermal Resources in Hokkaido, Northern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingwei Tian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal resources have become an increasingly important source of renewable energy for electrical power generation worldwide. Combined Three Dimension (3D Subsurface Temperature (SST and Land Surface Temperature (LST measurements are essential for accurate assessment of geothermal resources. In this study, subsurface and surface temperature distributions were combined using a dataset comprised of well logs and Thermal Infrared Remote sensing (TIR images from Hokkaido island, northern Japan. Using 28,476 temperature data points from 433 boreholes sites and a method of Kriging with External Drift or trend (KED, SST distribution model from depths of 100 to 1500 m was produced. Regional LST was estimated from 13 scenes of Landsat 8 images. Resultant SST ranged from around 50 °C to 300 °C at a depth of 1500 m. Most of western and part of the eastern Hokkaido are characterized by high temperature gradients, while low temperatures were found in the central region. Higher temperatures in shallower crust imply the western region and part of the eastern region have high geothermal potential. Moreover, several LST zones considered to have high geothermal potential were identified upon clarification of the underground heat distribution according to 3D SST. LST in these zones showed the anomalies, 3 to 9 °C higher than the surrounding areas. These results demonstrate that our combination of TIR and 3D temperature modeling using well logging and geostatistics is an efficient and promising approach to geothermal resource exploration.

  2. Fat cells directly sense temperature to activate thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li; Wu, Jun; Cohen, Paul; Kazak, Lawrence; Khandekar, Melin J; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Zeng, Xing; Gygi, Steven P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2013-07-23

    Classic brown fat and inducible beige fat both dissipate chemical energy in the form of heat through the actions of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1. This nonshivering thermogenesis is crucial for mammals as a defense against cold and obesity/diabetes. Cold is known to act indirectly through the sympathetic nervous systems and β-adrenergic signaling, but here we report that cool temperature (27-33 °C) can directly activate a thermogenic gene program in adipocytes in a cell-autonomous manner. White and beige fat cells respond to cool temperatures, but classic brown fat cells do not. Importantly, this activation in isolated cells is independent of the canonical cAMP/Protein Kinase A/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway downstream of the β-adrenergic receptors. These findings provide an unusual insight into the role of adipose tissues in thermoregulation, as well as an alternative way to target nonshivering thermogenesis for treatment of obesity and metabolic diseases.

  3. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature daily range points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature daily ranges in New England based on a spatial statistical...

  4. New England observed and predicted median August stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted median August stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial statistical network...

  5. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum negative rate of change in New England based on a...

  6. New England observed and predicted Julian day of maximum growing season stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted Julian day of maximum growing season stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial...

  7. New England observed and predicted median July stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted median July stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial statistical network...

  8. New England observed and predicted July stream/river temperature daily range points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature daily ranges in New England based on a spatial statistical network...

  9. New England observed and predicted growing season maximum stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted growing season maximum stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial statistical...

  10. Fire Source Localization Based on Distributed Temperature Sensing by a Dual-Line Optical Fiber System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Sigrist, Markus W; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-06-06

    We propose a method for localizing a fire source using an optical fiber distributed temperature sensor system. A section of two parallel optical fibers employed as the sensing element is installed near the ceiling of a closed room in which the fire source is located. By measuring the temperature of hot air flows, the problem of three-dimensional fire source localization is transformed to two dimensions. The method of the source location is verified with experiments using burning alcohol as fire source, and it is demonstrated that the method represents a robust and reliable technique for localizing a fire source also for long sensing ranges.

  11. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20 °C...

  12. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  13. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  14. Using thermal analysis techniques for identifying the flash point temperatures of some lubricant and base oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksam Abdelkhalik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The flash point (FP temperatures of some lubricant and base oils were measured according to ASTM D92 and ASTM D93. In addition, the thermal stability of the oils was studied using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA under nitrogen atmosphere. The DSC results showed that the FP temperatures, for each oil, were found during the first decomposition step and the temperature at the peak of the first decomposition step was usually higher than FP temperatures. The TGA results indicated that the temperature at which 17.5% weigh loss take placed (T17.5% was nearly identical with the FP temperature (±10 °C that was measured according to ASTM D92. The deviation percentage between FP and T17.5% was in the range from −0.8% to 3.6%. Keywords: Flash point, TGA, DSC

  15. Reaction temperature sensing (RTS)-based control for Li-ion battery safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangsheng; Cao, Lei; Ge, Shanhai; Wang, Chao-Yang; Shaffer, Christian E; Rahn, Christopher D

    2015-12-11

    We report reaction temperature sensing (RTS)-based control to fundamentally enhance Li-ion battery safety. RTS placed at the electrochemical interface inside a Li-ion cell is shown to detect temperature rise much faster and more accurately than external measurement of cell surface temperature. We demonstrate, for the first time, that RTS-based control shuts down a dangerous short-circuit event 3 times earlier than surface temperature- based control and prevents cell overheating by 50 °C and the resultant cell damage.

  16. Simulation study based on the single-point temperature monitoring system of LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongling; Yang, Na; Liu, Shuping; Pan, Xiaohui; Wang, Wenjiang

    2014-12-01

    This paper takes LabVIEW2012 as a development platform, creating a J-type thermocouple sensor and the NI USB-6229 data acquisition card and other hardware emulation circuitry which combined with the PC designed a single-point temperature monitoring system. Through simulation experiments, the system has a collection interval, the sampling rate per channel sampling on the temperature limit set by the user function and it also has the function of real-time display the current temperature, the temperature limit alarm, maximum temperature, minimum temperature display and a temperature history data query. This system can be used for temperature monitoring of life, research, industrial control, environmental monitoring, biomedical, tobacco processing, greenhouse cultivation, livestock breeding and other fields, which has important significance and practical value.

  17. Numerical solution of the point reactor kinetics equations with fuel burn-up and temperature feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashakor, S.; Jahanfarnia, G.; Hashemi-Tilehnoee, M.

    2010-01-01

    Point reactor kinetics equations are solved numerically using one group of delayed neutrons and with fuel burn-up and temperature feedback included. To calculate the fraction of one-group delayed neutrons, a group of differential equations are solved by an implicit time method. Using point reactor kinetics equations, changes in mean neutrons density, temperature, and reactivity are calculated in different times during the reactor operation. The variation of reactivity, temperature, and maximum power with time are compared with the predictions by other methods.

  18. Preparation of 147Pm metal and the determination of the melting point and phase transformation temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, P.; Adair, H.L.

    1976-07-01

    The promethium metal used in the determination of the melting point and phase transformation temperatures was prepared by reduction of promethium oxide with thorium metal at 1600 0 C and distilling the promethium metal into a quartz dome. The melting point and phase transformation temperatures of promethium metal were found to be 1042 +- 5 0 C and 890 +- 5 0 C, respectively. The ratio for the heat of the high-temperature transformation to the heat of fusion was determined to be 0.415

  19. Elucidating the impact of temperature variability and extremes on cereal croplands through remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, John M A; Dash, Jadunandan; Atkinson, Peter M

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing-derived wheat crop yield-climate models were developed to highlight the impact of temperature variation during thermo-sensitive periods (anthesis and grain-filling; TSP) of wheat crop development. Specific questions addressed are: can the impact of temperature variation occurring during the TSP on wheat crop yield be detected using remote sensing data and what is the impact? Do crop critical temperature thresholds during TSP exist in real world cropping landscapes? These questions are tested in one of the world's major wheat breadbaskets of Punjab and Haryana, north-west India. Warming average minimum temperatures during the TSP had a greater negative impact on wheat crop yield than warming maximum temperatures. Warming minimum and maximum temperatures during the TSP explain a greater amount of variation in wheat crop yield than average growing season temperature. In complex real world cereal croplands there was a variable yield response to critical temperature threshold exceedance, specifically a more pronounced negative impact on wheat yield with increased warming events above 35 °C. The negative impact of warming increases with a later start-of-season suggesting earlier sowing can reduce wheat crop exposure harmful temperatures. However, even earlier sown wheat experienced temperature-induced yield losses, which, when viewed in the context of projected warming up to 2100 indicates adaptive responses should focus on increasing wheat tolerance to heat. This study shows it is possible to capture the impacts of temperature variation during the TSP on wheat crop yield in real world cropping landscapes using remote sensing data; this has important implications for monitoring the impact of climate change, variation and heat extremes on wheat croplands. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ratiometric Afterglow Nanothermometer for Simultaneous in Situ Bioimaging and Local Tissue Temperature Sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, Z.; Zhang, M.; Yan, D.; Zhu, H.; Liu, C.; Xu, C.; Zhang, H.

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ bioimage tracing and temperature sensing have been two of the foci of modern biomedicine that have given birth to designing novel luminescent nanothermometers with dual functions. To minimize the disadvantages of existing approaches, like the surface effect of nanoparticles,

  1. Stomatal conductance, canopy temperature, and leaf area index estimation using remote sensing and OBIA techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Panda; D.M. Amatya; G. Hoogenboom

    2014-01-01

    Remotely sensed images including LANDSAT, SPOT, NAIP orthoimagery, and LiDAR and relevant processing tools can be used to predict plant stomatal conductance (gs), leaf area index (LAI), and canopy temperature, vegetation density, albedo, and soil moisture using vegetation indices like normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) or soil adjusted...

  2. Technical note: using Distributed Temperature Sensing for Bowen ratio evaporation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilperoort, B.; Coenders, Miriam; Luxemburg, W.M.J.; Jimenez Rodriguez, C.D.; Cisneros Vaca2, C.; Savenije, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    Rapid improvements in the precision and spatial resolution of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology now allows its use in hydrological and atmospheric sciences. Introduced by Euser [Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 2021–2032 (2014)] is the use of DTS for measuring the Bowen ratio (BR-DTS),

  3. A Nonlinear Multiparameters Temperature Error Modeling and Compensation of POS Applied in Airborne Remote Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The position and orientation system (POS is a key equipment for airborne remote sensing systems, which provides high-precision position, velocity, and attitude information for various imaging payloads. Temperature error is the main source that affects the precision of POS. Traditional temperature error model is single temperature parameter linear function, which is not sufficient for the higher accuracy requirement of POS. The traditional compensation method based on neural network faces great problem in the repeatability error under different temperature conditions. In order to improve the precision and generalization ability of the temperature error compensation for POS, a nonlinear multiparameters temperature error modeling and compensation method based on Bayesian regularization neural network was proposed. The temperature error of POS was analyzed and a nonlinear multiparameters model was established. Bayesian regularization method was used as the evaluation criterion, which further optimized the coefficients of the temperature error. The experimental results show that the proposed method can improve temperature environmental adaptability and precision. The developed POS had been successfully applied in airborne TSMFTIS remote sensing system for the first time, which improved the accuracy of the reconstructed spectrum by 47.99%.

  4. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly accomplished by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. Using this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within +/- 0.5K. However, because of the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP has been carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor is placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir is cold-biased and is heated by a control heater. Tests results show that it is feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. Using this method, the heat source temperature can be maintained within a tight range for moderate and high powers. At low powers, however, temperature oscillations may occur due to interactions among the reservoir control heater power, the heat source mass, and the heat output from the heat source. In addition, the heat source temperature could temporarily deviate from its set point during fast thermal transients. The implication is that more sophisticated feedback control algorithms need to be implemented for LHP transient operation when the heat source temperature is used for feedback control.

  5. Carrier Mobility-Dominated Gas Sensing: A Room-Temperature Gas-Sensing Mode for SnO2 Nanorod Array Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shipu; Zhao, Huaping; Xu, Yang; Xu, Rui; Lei, Yong

    2018-04-16

    Adsorption-induced change of carrier density is presently dominating inorganic semiconductor gas sensing, which is usually operated at a high temperature. Besides carrier density, other carrier characteristics might also play a critical role in gas sensing. Here, we show that carrier mobility can be an efficient parameter to dominate gas sensing, by which room-temperature gas sensing of inorganic semiconductors is realized via a carrier mobility-dominated gas-sensing (CMDGS) mode. To demonstrate CMDGS, we design and prepare a gas sensor based on a regular array of SnO 2 nanorods on a bottom film. It is found that the key for determining the gas-sensing mode is adjusting the length of the arrayed nanorods. With the change in the nanorod length from 340 to 40 nm, the gas-sensing behavior changes from the conventional carrier-density mode to a complete carrier-mobility mode. Moreover, compared to the carrier density-dominating gas sensing, the proposed CMDGS mode enhances the sensor sensitivity. CMDGS proves to be an emerging gas-sensing mode for designing inorganic semiconductor gas sensors with high performances at room temperature.

  6. Nucleation and droplet growth from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below the triple point temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2016-01-01

    nucleation without the use of a thermostat. The simulations of homogeneous nucleation in a Lennard-Jones system from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below Ttr.p. reveals that the nucleation to a liquid-like critical nucleus is initiated by a small cold cluster [S. Toxvaerd, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{143...

  7. Modeling of Aerobrake Ballute Stagnation Point Temperature and Heat Transfer to Inflation Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    2012-01-01

    A trailing Ballute drag device concept for spacecraft aerocapture is considered. A thermal model for calculation of the Ballute membrane temperature and the inflation gas temperature is developed. An algorithm capturing the most salient features of the concept is implemented. In conjunction with the thermal model, trajectory calculations for two candidate missions, Titan Explorer and Neptune Orbiter missions, are used to estimate the stagnation point temperature and the inflation gas temperature. Radiation from both sides of the membrane at the stagnation point and conduction to the inflating gas is included. The results showed that the radiation from the membrane and to a much lesser extent conduction to the inflating gas, are likely to be the controlling heat transfer mechanisms and that the increase in gas temperature due to aerodynamic heating is of secondary importance.

  8. Investigat ing the effect of surface water – groundwater interactions on stream temperature using D istributed Temperature Sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matheswaran, K.; Blemmer, M.; Mortensen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using...... the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and instream temperature modelling. Locations of surface water–groundwater interactions were identified from the temperature data collected over a 2-km stream reach using a DTS system with 1-m spatial and 5-min temporal resolution. The stream under consideration...... exhibits three distinct thermal regimes within a 2 km reach length due to two major interactions. An energy balance model is used to simulate the instream temperature and to quantify the effect of these interactions on the stream temperature. This research demonstrates the effect of reach level small scale...

  9. Fluorescent carbon nanodots facilely extracted from Coca Cola for temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feiming; Chen, Qiaoling; Cai, Zhixiong; Lin, Fangyuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2017-12-01

    A novel method for the fabrication of carbon nanodots (CDs) is introduced: extracting CDs from the well-known soft drink Coca Cola via dialysis. The obtained CDs are of good monodispersity with a narrow size distribution (average diameter of 3.0 nm), good biocompatibility, high solubility (about 180 mg ml-1) and stable fluorescence even at a high salt concentration. Furthermore, they are sensitive to the temperature change with a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and temperature from 5 °C-95 °C. The CDs have been applied in high stable temperature sensing. This protocol is quite simple, green, cost-effective and technologically simple, which might be used for a range of applications including sensing, catalysts, drug and gene delivery, and so on.

  10. Temperature Modulation with Specified Detection Point on Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors for E-Nose Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief SUDARMAJI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature modulation technique, some called dynamic measurement mode, on Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS/MOX gas sensor has been widely observed and employed in many fields. We present its development, a Specified Detection Point (SDP on modulated sensing element of MOS sensor is applied which associated to its temperature modulation, temperature modulation-SDP so-named. We configured the rectangular modulation signal for MOS gas sensors (TGSs and FISs using PSOC CY8C28445-24PVXI (Programmable System on Chip which also functioned as acquisition unit and interface to a computer. Initial responses and selectivity evaluations were performed using statistical tool and Principal Component Analysis (PCA to differ sample gases (Toluene, Ethanol and Ammonia on dynamic chamber measurement under various frequencies (0.25 Hz, 1 Hz, 4 Hz and duty-cycles (25 %, 50 %, 75 %. We found that at lower frequency the response waveform of the sensors becomes more sloping and distinct, and selected modulations successfully increased the selectivity either on singular or array sensors rather than static temperature measurement.

  11. Research and development program in fiber optic sensors and distributed sensing for high temperature harsh environment energy applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanosky, Robert R.

    2017-05-01

    he National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Fossil Energy (FE) Program is leading the effort to not only develop near zero emission power generation systems, but to increaser the efficiency and availability of current power systems. The overarching goal of the program is to provide clean affordable power using domestic resources. Highly efficient, low emission power systems can have extreme conditions of high temperatures up to 1600 oC, high pressures up to 600 psi, high particulate loadings, and corrosive atmospheres that require monitoring. Sensing in these harsh environments can provide key information that directly impacts process control and system reliability. The lack of suitable measurement technology serves as a driver for the innovations in harsh environment sensor development. Advancements in sensing using optical fibers are key efforts within NETL's sensor development program as these approaches offer the potential to survive and provide critical information about these processes. An overview of the sensor development supported by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will be given, including research in the areas of sensor materials, designs, and measurement types. New approaches to intelligent sensing, sensor placement and process control using networked sensors will be discussed as will novel approaches to fiber device design concurrent with materials development research and development in modified and coated silica and sapphire fiber based sensors. The use of these sensors for both single point and distributed measurements of temperature, pressure, strain, and a select suite of gases will be addressed. Additional areas of research includes novel control architecture and communication frameworks, device integration for distributed sensing, and imaging and other novel approaches to monitoring and controlling advanced processes. The close coupling of the sensor program with process modeling and

  12. Comparison of the Argon Triple-Point Temperature in Small Cells of Different Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziej, B.; Kowal, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.

    2017-06-01

    The argon triple point (T_{90} = 83.8058 \\hbox {K}) is a fixed point of the International Temperature Scale of Preston-Thomas (Metrologia 27:3, 1990). Cells for realization of the fixed point have been manufactured by several European metrology institutes (Pavese in Metrologia 14:93, 1978; Pavese et al. in Temperature, part 1, American Institute of Physics, College Park, 2003; Hermier et al. in Temperature, part 1, American Institute of Physics, College Park, 2003; Pavese and Beciet in Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurement, Springer, New York, 2013). The Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research has in its disposal a few argon cells of various constructions used for calibration of capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometers (CSPRT) that were produced within 40 years. These cells differ in terms of mechanical design and thermal properties, as well as source of gas filling the cell. This paper presents data on differences between temperature values obtained during the realization of the triple point of argon in these cells. For determination of the temperature, a heat-pulse method was applied (Pavese and Beciet in Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurement, Springer, New York, 2013). The comparisons were performed using three CSPRTs. The temperatures difference was determined in relation to a reference function W(T)=R(T_{90})/R(271.16\\hbox {K}) in order to avoid an impact of CSPRT resistance drift between measurements in the argon cells. Melting curves and uncertainty budgets of the measurements are given in the paper. A construction of measuring apparatus is also presented in this paper.

  13. Temperature comparison of initial, middle and final point of polypropylene friction stir welded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusharjanta, Bambang; Raharjo, Wahyu P.; Triyono

    2016-03-01

    Friction Stir Welding is known as a new solid state joining process. This process is applied in thermoplastic polymers material recently. One of member thermoplastic polymer is polypropylene. Polypropylene sheet 6 mm thick was friction stir welded with a cone cut steel pin. Tool rotation, travelling speed, and plunge depth, as welding parameters were 620 rpm, 7.3 mm/minutes and 0.02 mm respectively. Temperature at the initial, middle, and final point of advance side working piece were measured and compared. Measurement were done by thermocouple and recorded by data acquisition. Based on this research, it is concluded that temperature at the initial, middle and final point of friction stir welding process are different. The highest temperature peak reach at the middle point on the advance side which affects face bending strength.

  14. Operation of a low temperature absorption chiller at rating point and at reduced evaporator temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, R.; Biermann, W.; Reimann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The returned fifteen ton Solar Absorption Machine (SAM) 015 chiller was given a cursory visual inspection, some obvious problems were remedied, and then it was placed on a test stand to get a measure of dirty performance. It was then given a standard acid clean, the water side of the tubes was brushed clean, and then the machine was retested. The before and after cleaning data were compared to equivalent data taken before the machine was shipped. The second part of the work statement was to experimentally demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating the chiller at evaporator temperatures below 0(0)C (32(0)F) and identify any operational problems.

  15. On a closed form solution of the point kinetics equations with reactivity feedback of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jeronimo J.A.; Vilhena, Marco T.M.B.; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical solution of the point kinetics equations to calculate reactivity as a function of time by the Decomposition method has recently appeared in the literature. In this paper, we go one step forward, by considering the neutron point kinetics equations together with temperature feedback effects. To accomplish that, we extended the point kinetics by a temperature perturbation, obtaining a second order nonlinear ordinary differential equation. This equation is then solved by the Decomposition Method, that is, by expanding the neutron density in a series and the nonlinear terms into Adomian Polynomials. Substituting these expansions into the nonlinear ordinary equation, we construct a recursive set of linear problems that can be solved by the methodology previously mentioned for the point kinetics equation. We also report on numerical simulations and comparisons against literature results. (author)

  16. Reversible Switched Detection of Dihydroxybenzenes Using a Temperature-sensitive Electrochemical Sensing Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yuanqing; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Jia; Fei, Junjie; Ding, Yonglan; Cai, Yuanli

    2016-01-01

    A composite sensing film (PGS), consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) 101 -b-poly(2-acrylamidoethyl benzoate) 37 (PNIPAM 101 -b-PAAEB 37 ), graphene oxides (GO) and short multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SMWCNs), was fabricated and modified onto a working electrode. The sensing film served as a reversible switch for electrochemical detection, with the switching behaviour responding to thermal stimuli. Cyclic voltammetry of hydroquinone (HQ) and catechol (CC) at the PGS film-modified electrode displayed large peak currents when the temperature was above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM 101 -b-PAAEB 37 . These large currents disappeared at low temperature. Interestingly, the composite film showed reversed electrochemical “on/off” behaviour as compared to previously reported switchable electrodes, which were modified only with temperature-responsive polymers. This behaviour can be attributed to the temperature-dependent phase transition of PNIPAM 101 -b-PAAEB 37 and cooperative effects of the other two functional components (SMWCNs and GO). The repeatable “on/off” switching of the voltammetric responses of HQ/CC on the PGS-modified electrode were achieved via regulating the solution temperature. This research provides a new type of temperature-controlled switchable electrode with potential applications in the design of novel sensors, fuel cells and electronics.

  17. Retrieval of surface temperature by remote sensing. [of earth surface using brightness temperature of air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    A simple procedure and computer program were developed for retrieving the surface temperature from the measurement of upwelling infrared radiance in a single spectral region in the atmosphere. The program evaluates the total upwelling radiance at any altitude in the region of the CO fundamental band (2070-2220 1/cm) for several values of surface temperature. Actual surface temperature is inferred by interpolation of the measured upwelling radiance between the computed values of radiance for the same altitude. Sensitivity calculations were made to determine the effect of uncertainty in various surface, atmospheric and experimental parameters on the inferred value of surface temperature. It is found that the uncertainties in water vapor concentration and surface emittance are the most important factors affecting the accuracy of the inferred value of surface temperature.

  18. Illumination invariant feature point matching for high-resolution planetary remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Zeng, Hai; Hu, Han

    2018-03-01

    Despite its success with regular close-range and remote-sensing images, the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm is essentially not invariant to illumination differences due to the use of gradients for feature description. In planetary remote sensing imagery, which normally lacks sufficient textural information, salient regions are generally triggered by the shadow effects of keypoints, reducing the matching performance of classical SIFT. Based on the observation of dual peaks in a histogram of the dominant orientations of SIFT keypoints, this paper proposes an illumination-invariant SIFT matching method for high-resolution planetary remote sensing images. First, as the peaks in the orientation histogram are generally aligned closely with the sub-solar azimuth angle at the time of image collection, an adaptive suppression Gaussian function is tuned to level the histogram and thereby alleviate the differences in illumination caused by a changing solar angle. Next, the suppression function is incorporated into the original SIFT procedure for obtaining feature descriptors, which are used for initial image matching. Finally, as the distribution of feature descriptors changes after anisotropic suppression, and the ratio check used for matching and outlier removal in classical SIFT may produce inferior results, this paper proposes an improved matching procedure based on cross-checking and template image matching. The experimental results for several high-resolution remote sensing images from both the Moon and Mars, with illumination differences of 20°-180°, reveal that the proposed method retrieves about 40%-60% more matches than the classical SIFT method. The proposed method is of significance for matching or co-registration of planetary remote sensing images for their synergistic use in various applications. It also has the potential to be useful for flyby and rover images by integrating with the affine invariant feature detectors.

  19. Identification of Yield Point of Polymer-Based Composite Material in the Conditions of Increased Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arustamian A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and practical research on the influence of temperature on mechanical characteristics of the composite material MM “Steel 1018” has been conducted. Both laboratory equipment used to measure of mechanical properties, the technique of material preparation and the experimental procedure were described. The analysis of the the obtained results revealed that with temperature increase the material yield point goes down.

  20. Interest Point Detection for Multispectral Remote Sensing Image Using Phase Congruency in Illumination Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Min

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A robust interest point detection algorithm based on illumination space and phase congruency is proposed in this paper. Firstly, image illumination space is constructed by using a parameters adaptive method. Secondly, a phase congruency based interest point detection algorithm is adopted to compute candidate points in illumination space. Then, all interest point candidates are mapped back to the original image and a non-maximum suppression step is added to find final interest points. Finally, the feature scale values of all interest points are calculated based on the Laplacian function. The proposed algorithm combines the advantages of illumination space and phase congruency, which makes the proposed method robust to the radiation variation of multispectral images. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs better than other traditional methods in feature repeatability rate and repeated features number.

  1. Temperature sensing of micron scale polymer fibers using fiber Bragg gratings

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Jian

    2015-07-02

    Highly conductive polymer fibers are key components in the design of multifunctional textiles. Measuring the voltage/temperature relationships of these fibers is very challenging due to their very small diameters, making it impossible to rely on classical temperature sensing techniques. These fibers are also so fragile that they cannot withstand any perturbation from external measurement systems. We propose here, a non-contact temperature measurement technique based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The heat exchange is carefully controlled between the probed fibers and the sensing FBG by promoting radiation and convective heat transfer rather than conduction, which is known to be poorly controlled. We demonstrate our technique on a highly conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS)-based fiber. A non-phenomenological model of the sensing system based on meaningful physical parameters is validated towards experimental observations. The technique reliably measures the temperature of the polymer fibers when subjected to electrical loading. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Research of temperature field measurement using a flexible temperature sensor array for robot sensing skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Siyu; Li, Ruiqi; Yang, Qinghua; Zhang, Yugang; Liu, Caixia

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a novel temperature sensor array by dispensing conductive composites on a flexible printed circuit board which is able to acquire the ambient temperature. The flexible temperature sensor array was fabricated by using carbon fiber-filled silicon rubber based composites on a flexible polyimide circuit board, which can both ensure their high flexibility. It found that CF with 12 wt% could be served as the best conductive filler for higher temperature sensitivity and better stability comparing with some other proportion for dynamic range from 30&° to 90°. The preparation of the temperature sensitive material has also been described in detail. Connecting the flexible sensor array with a data acquisition card and a personal computer (PC), some heat sources with different shapes were loaded on the sensor array; the detected results were shown in the interface by LabVIEW software. The measured temperature contours are in good agreement with the shapes and amplitudes of different heat sources. Furthermore, in consideration of the heat dissipation in the air, the relationship between the resistance and the distance of heat sources with sensor array was also detected to verify the accuracy of the sensor array, which is also a preparation for our future work. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the developed flexible sensor array, and it can be used as humanoid artificial skin for sensation system of robots.

  3. Point stresses during reproductive stage rather than warming seasonal temperature determine yield in temperate rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espe, Matthew B; Hill, Jim E; Hijmans, Robert J; McKenzie, Kent; Mutters, Randall; Espino, Luis A; Leinfelder-Miles, Michelle; van Kessel, Chris; Linquist, Bruce A

    2017-10-01

    Climate change is predicted to shift temperature regimes in most agricultural areas with temperature changes expected to impact yields of most crops, including rice. These temperature-driven effects can be classified into point stresses, where a temperature event during a sensitive stage drives a reduction in yield, or seasonal warming losses, where raised temperature is thought to increase maintenance energy demands and thereby decrease available resources for yield formation. Simultaneous estimation of the magnitude of each temperature effect on yield has not been well documented due to the inherent difficulty in separating their effects. We simultaneously quantified the magnitude of each effect for a temperate rice production system using a large data set covering multiple locations with data collected from 1995 to 2015, combined with a unique probability-based modeling approach. Point stresses, primarily cold stress during the reproductive stages (booting and flowering), were found to have the largest impact on yield (over 3 Mg/ha estimated yield losses). Contrary to previous reports, yield losses caused by increased temperatures, both seasonal and during grain-filling, were found to be small (approximately 1-2% loss per °C). Occurrences of cool temperature events during reproductive stages were found to be persistent over the study period, and within season, the likelihood of a cool temperature event increased when flowering occurred later in the season. Short and medium grain types, typically recommended for cool regions, were found to be more tolerant of cool temperatures but more sensitive to heat compared to long grain cultivars. These results suggest that for temperate rice systems, the occurrence of periodic stress events may currently overshadow the impacts of general warming temperature on crop production. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Optimization of Temperature Sensing with Polymer-Embedded Luminescent Ru(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelia Bustamante

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is a key parameter in many fields and luminescence-based temperature sensing is a solution for those applications in which traditional (mechanical, electrical, or IR-based thermometers struggle. Amongst the indicator dyes for luminescence thermometry, Ru(II polyazaheteroaromatic complexes are an appealing option to profit from the widespread commercial technologies for oxygen optosensing based on them. Six ruthenium dyes have been studied, engineering their structure for both photostability and highest temperature sensitivity of their luminescence. The most apt Ru(II complex turned out to be bis(1,10-phenanthroline(4-chloro-1,10-phenanthrolineruthenium(II, due to the combination of two strong-field chelating ligands (phen and a substituent with electron withdrawing effect on a conjugated position of the third ligand (4-Clphen. In order to produce functional sensors, the dye has been best embedded into poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate, due to its low permeability to O2, high temperature sensitivity of the indicator dye incorporated into this polymer, ease of fabrication, and excellent optical quality. Thermosensitive elements have been fabricated thereof as optical fiber tips for macroscopic applications (water courses monitoring and thin spots for microscopic uses (temperature measurements in cell culture-on-a-chip. With such dye/polymer combination, temperature sensing based on luminescence lifetime measurements allows 0.05 °C resolution with linear response in the range of interest (0–40 °C.

  5. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines.

  6. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  7. Applying Fibre-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing to Near-surface Temperature Dynamics of Broadacre Cereals During Radiant Frost Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutsel, B.; Callow, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    Radiant frost events, particularly those during the reproductive stage of winter cereal growth, cost growers millions of dollars in lost yield. Whilst synoptic drivers of frost and factors influencing temperature variation at the landscape scale are relatively well understood, there is a lack of knowledge surrounding small-scale temperature dynamics within paddocks and plot trials. Other work has also suggested a potential significant temperature gradient (several degrees) vertically from ground to canopy, but this is poorly constrained experimentally. Subtle changes in temperature are important as frost damage generally occurs in a very narrow temperature range (-2 to -5°C). Once a variety's damage threshold is reached, a 1°C difference in minimum temperature can increase damage from 10 to 90%. This study applies Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) using fibre optics to understand how minimum temperature evolves during a radiant frost. DTS assesses the difference in attenuation of Raman scattering of a light pulse travelling along a fibre optic cable to measure temperature. A bend insensitive multimode fibre was deployed in a double ended duplex configuration as a "fence" run through four times of sowing at a trial site in the Western Australian Wheatbelt. The fibre optic fence was 160m long and 800mm tall with the fibre optic cable spaced 100mm apart vertically, and calibrated in ambient water ( 10 to 15oC) and a chilled glycol ( -8 to-10 oC) baths. The temperature measurements had a spatial resolution of 0.65m and temporal resolution of 60s, providing 2,215 measurements every minute. The results of this study inform our understanding of the subtle temperature changes from the soil to canopy, providing new insight into how to place traditional temperature loggers to monitor frost damage. It also addresses questions of within-trial temperature variability, and provides an example of how novel techniques such as DTS can be used to improve the way temperature

  8. Fiber optic sensing system for temperature and gas monitoring in coal waste pile combustion environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, D.; Ribeiro, J.; Ferreira, J.; Lopez-Albada, A.; Pinto, A. M. R.; Perez-Herrera, R. A.; Diaz, S.; Lopez-Gil, A.; Dominguez-Lopez, A.; Esteban, O.; Martin-Lopez, S.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Rougier, S.; Silva, S. O.; Frazão, O.; Santos, J. L.; Flores, D.; Roy, P.; Gonzalez-Herraez, M.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Baptista, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    It is presented an optical fiber sensing system projected to operate in the demanding conditions associated with coal waste piles in combustion. Distributed temperature measurement and spot gas sensing are requirements for such a system. A field prototype has been installed and is continuously gathering data, which will input a geological model of the coal waste piles in combustion aiming to understand their dynamics and evolution. Results are presented on distributed temperature and ammonia measurement, being noticed any significant methane emission in the short time period considered. Carbon dioxide is also a targeted gas for measurement, with validated results available soon. The assessment of this technology as an effective and reliable tool to address the problem of monitoring coal waste piles in combustion opens the possibility of its widespread application in view of the worldwide presence of coal related fires.

  9. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Field Dependence of Quantum Point Contacts in Si-Inversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.L.; Son, P.C. van; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The conductance of ballistic point contacts in high-mobility Si-inversion layers has been studied at several temperatures between 75 and 600 mK both without and in a magnetic field (up to 12T). When the width of constriction is varied in zero magnetic field, step-like features at multiples of 4e2/h

  10. The finite temperature density matrix and two-point correlations in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhmann, Frank; Hasenclever, Nils P.; Seel, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    We derive finite temperature versions of integral formulae for the two-point correlation functions in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain. The derivation is based on the summation of density matrix elements characterizing a finite chain segment of length m. On this occasion we also supply a proof of the basic integral formula for the density matrix presented in an earlier publication.

  11. Measurement of Sticky Point Temperature of Coffee Powder with a Rheometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticky point temperature (Ts) measurement for hygroscopic food and biomaterial powders is traditionally performed with complex glass instruments. This property is used to characterize material stickiness, which substantially affects the flow and physical behavior of powders. In this research study w...

  12. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective...

  13. Indium oxide octahedrons based on sol–gel process enhance room temperature gas sensing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Xiaohui; Chen, Changlong; Han, Liuyuan; Shao, Baiqi; Wei, Yuling; Liu, Qinglong; Zhu, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In 2 O 3 octahedron films are prepared based on sol–gel technique for the first time. • The preparation possesses merits of low temperature, catalyst-free and large production. • It was found that the spin-coating process in film fabrication was key to achieve the octahedrons. • The In 2 O 3 octahedrons could significantly enhance room temperature NO 2 gas sensing performance. - Abstract: Indium oxide octahedrons were prepared on glass substrates through a mild route based on sol–gel technique. The preparation possesses characteristics including low temperature, catalyst-free and large production, which is much distinguished from the chemical-vapor-deposition based methods that usually applied to prepare indium oxide octahedrons. Detailed characterization revealed that the indium oxide octahedrons were single crystalline, with {1 1 1} crystal facets exposed. It was found that the spin-coating technique was key for achieving the indium oxide crystals with octahedron morphology. The probable formation mechanism of the indium oxide octahedrons was proposed based on the experiment results. Room temperature NO 2 gas sensing measurements exhibited that the indium oxide octahedrons could significantly enhance the sensing performance in comparison with the plate-like indium oxide particles that prepared from the dip-coated gel films, which was attributed to the abundant sharp edges and tips as well as the special {1 1 1} crystal facets exposed that the former possessed. Such a simple wet-chemical based method to prepare indium oxide octahedrons with large-scale production is promising to provide the advanced materials that can be applied in wide fields like gas sensing, solar energy conversion, field emission, and so on

  14. Refractive index and temperature sensing in anisotropic silver nanostructures with stable photo-physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subrata; Kumbhakar, Pathik

    2018-01-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated the refractive index and temperature-sensing abilities of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-protected silver nanostructures of triangular, connected and plate-like shapes. Interestingly, these nanostructures even after 2 and ½ years of syntheses showed plasmonic-sensing ability of temperature in the temperature range of 283-333 K. Also, refractive index (R.I.) sensing has been demonstrated in the aged samples and obtained the highest R.I. sensitivity of 306 nm/RIU in one of the sample. The synthesized samples have been kept in dark (inside desiccators) intentionally for the extended period of 2 and ½ years after synthesis and monitored intermittently their UV-Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) emission characteristics to check the functionally of the aged silver nanostructures. It has been found the samples remain well dispersed in different solvents and can forbid agglomeration even in 0.25 M NaCl solution. We have also demonstrated here fabrication of a flexible and transparent thin film of the synthesized samples in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and investigated its low power continuous-wave (CW) nonlinear optical properties using spatial self-phase modulation (SSPM) technique. The nonlinear refractive index ( n 2) value of the film has been determined to be 5.6 × 10- 6 cm2/W at the He-Ne laser wavelength of 632.8 nm. In this report we have demonstrated temperature and R.I. sensing and also it has been demonstrated that the synthesized samples remain functional even after 2 and ½ years of synthesis. Also, samples may find potential applications in nonlinear optical phase modulation devices.

  15. Room Temperature Gas Sensing of Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide (MXene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunji; VahidMohammadi, Armin; Prorok, Barton C; Yoon, Young Soo; Beidaghi, Majid; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2017-10-25

    Wearable gas sensors have received lots of attention for diagnostic and monitoring applications, and two-dimensional (2D) materials can provide a promising platform for fabricating gas sensors that can operate at room temperature. In the present study, the room temperature gas-sensing performance of Ti 3 C 2 T x nanosheets was investigated. 2D Ti 3 C 2 T x (MXene) sheets were synthesized by removal of Al atoms from Ti 3 AlC 2 (MAX phases) and were integrated on flexible polyimide platforms with a simple solution casting method. The Ti 3 C 2 T x sensors successfully measured ethanol, methanol, acetone, and ammonia gas at room temperature and showed a p-type sensing behavior. The fabricated sensors showed their highest and lowest response toward ammonia and acetone gas, respectively. The limit of detection of acetone gas was theoretically calculated to be about 9.27 ppm, presenting better performance compared to other 2D material-based sensors. The sensing mechanism was proposed in terms of the interactions between the majority charge carriers of Ti 3 C 2 T x and gas species.

  16. Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal temperature series in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaila, Jamaludin; Yusop, Zulkifli

    2017-06-01

    Most of the trend analysis that has been conducted has not considered the existence of a change point in the time series analysis. If these occurred, then the trend analysis will not be able to detect an obvious increasing or decreasing trend over certain parts of the time series. Furthermore, the lack of discussion on the possible factors that influenced either the decreasing or the increasing trend in the series needs to be addressed in any trend analysis. Hence, this study proposes to investigate the trends, and change point detection of mean, maximum and minimum temperature series, both annually and seasonally in Peninsular Malaysia and determine the possible factors that could contribute to the significance trends. In this study, Pettitt and sequential Mann-Kendall (SQ-MK) tests were used to examine the occurrence of any abrupt climate changes in the independent series. The analyses of the abrupt changes in temperature series suggested that most of the change points in Peninsular Malaysia were detected during the years 1996, 1997 and 1998. These detection points captured by Pettitt and SQ-MK tests are possibly related to climatic factors, such as El Niño and La Niña events. The findings also showed that the majority of the significant change points that exist in the series are related to the significant trend of the stations. Significant increasing trends of annual and seasonal mean, maximum and minimum temperatures in Peninsular Malaysia were found with a range of 2-5 °C/100 years during the last 32 years. It was observed that the magnitudes of the increasing trend in minimum temperatures were larger than the maximum temperatures for most of the studied stations, particularly at the urban stations. These increases are suspected to be linked with the effect of urban heat island other than El Niño event.

  17. Characterization of piezoelectric materials for simultaneous strain and temperature sensing for ultra-low frequency applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Mohammad Nouroz; Seethaler, Rudolf; Alam, M Shahria

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are used extensively in a number of sensing applications ranging from aerospace industries to medical diagnostics. Piezoelectric materials generate charge when they are subjected to strain. However, since measuring charge is difficult at low frequencies, traditional piezoelectric sensors are limited to dynamic applications. In this research an alternative technique is proposed to determine static strain that relies upon the measurement of piezoelectric capacitance and resistance using piezoelectric sensors. To demonstrate the validity of this approach, the capacitance and resistance of a piezoelectric patch sensor was characterized for a wide range of strain and temperature. The study shows that the piezoelectric capacitance is sensitive to both strain and temperature while the resistance is mostly dependent on the temperature variation. The findings can be implemented to obtain thermally compensated static strain from piezoelectric sensors, which does not require an additional temperature sensor. (paper)

  18. Temperature-driven growth of reduced graphene oxide/copper nanocomposites for glucose sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Wu, Zhong; Xu, Chen; Liu, Lei; Hu, Wenbin

    2016-12-01

    A one-spot method was developed for the synthesis of graphene sheet decorated with copper nanoparticles using different reduction temperatures via a molecular level mixing process. Here, we demonstrate that the reduction temperature is a crucial determinant of the properties of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/metal composite and its electrocatalytic application in glucose sensing. To show this, we prepared a series of RGO/Cu composites at different reduction temperatures and examined the change rules of size, loading and dispersion of Cu particles, and the reduction extent of the RGO. Results showed that the Cu particle size increased with increasing reduction temperatures due to the Ostwald ripening process. Meanwhile, the Cu loading decreased with increasing reduction temperatures and the aggregation had not appeared in the high Cu loading situation. Additionally, the increasing reduction temperatures led to the decreasing concentrations of various oxygen-containing functional group of RGO with various degrees. The cyclic voltammogram showed that the RGO/metal composites fabricated under lower reduction temperatures exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity for glucose sensing, which was attributed to the higher surface area from larger loading of RGO/metal composites with smaller particle size. It can be concluded that the above factors play more significant roles in electrocatalytic efficiency than the decreased electron transfer rate between RGO and Cu within a certain range. These results highlight the importance of the reduction temperature influencing the properties of the RGO/metal composite and its application. We believe that these findings can be of great value in the further developing RGO/metal-based sensors for electrochemical detection of different analytes in emerging fields.

  19. Airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements of atmospheric CO2 to quantify point source emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Thomas; Neininger, Bruno; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Lindemann, Carsten; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2018-02-01

    Reliable techniques to infer greenhouse gas emission rates from localised sources require accurate measurement and inversion approaches. In this study airborne remote sensing observations of CO2 by the MAMAP instrument and airborne in situ measurements are used to infer emission estimates of carbon dioxide released from a cluster of coal-fired power plants. The study area is complex due to sources being located in close proximity and overlapping associated carbon dioxide plumes. For the analysis of in situ data, a mass balance approach is described and applied, whereas for the remote sensing observations an inverse Gaussian plume model is used in addition to a mass balance technique. A comparison between methods shows that results for all methods agree within 10 % or better with uncertainties of 10 to 30 % for cases in which in situ measurements were made for the complete vertical plume extent. The computed emissions for individual power plants are in agreement with results derived from emission factors and energy production data for the time of the overflight.

  20. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik P. Schartner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C.

  1. A Hybrid Maximum Power Point Search Method Using Temperature Measurements in Partial Shading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroczka Janusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic panels have a non-linear current-voltage characteristics to produce the maximum power at only one point called the maximum power point. In the case of the uniform illumination a single solar panel shows only one maximum power, which is also the global maximum power point. In the case an irregularly illuminated photovoltaic panel many local maxima on the power-voltage curve can be observed and only one of them is the global maximum. The proposed algorithm detects whether a solar panel is in the uniform insolation conditions. Then an appropriate strategy of tracking the maximum power point is taken using a decision algorithm. The proposed method is simulated in the environment created by the authors, which allows to stimulate photovoltaic panels in real conditions of lighting, temperature and shading.

  2. A dual-mode proximity sensor with integrated capacitive and temperature sensing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Shihua; Huang, Ying; He, Xiaoyue; Sun, Zhiguang; Liu, Ping; Liu, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    The proximity sensor is one of the most important devices in the field of robot application. It can accurately provide the proximity information to assistant robots to interact with human beings and the external environment safely. In this paper, we have proposed and demonstrated a dual-mode proximity sensor composed of capacitive and resistive sensing units. We defined the capacitive type proximity sensor perceiving the proximity information as C-mode and the resistive type proximity sensor detecting as R-mode. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were chosen as the R-mode sensing material because of its high performance. The dual-mode proximity sensor presents the following features: (1) the sensing distance of the dual-mode proximity sensor has been enlarged compared with the single capacitive proximity sensor in the same geometrical pattern; (2) experiments have verified that the proposed sensor can sense the proximity information of different materials; (3) the proximity sensing capability of the sensor has been improved by two modes perceive collaboratively, for a plastic block at a temperature of 60 °C: the R-mode will perceive the proximity information when the distance d between the sensor and object is 6.0–17.0 mm and the C-mode will do that when their interval is 0–2.0 mm; additionally two modes will work together when the distance is 2.0–6.0 mm. These features indicate our transducer is very valuable in skin-like sensing applications. (paper)

  3. Crack Risk Evaluation of Early Age Concrete Based on the Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks often appear in concrete arch dams, due to the thermal stress and low tensile strength of early age concrete. There are three commonly used temperature controlling measures: controlling the casting temperature, burying cooling pipe, and protecting the surface. However, because of the difficulty to obtain accurate temperature and thermal stress field of the concrete, the rationality and economy of these measures are not assessed validly before and after construction. In this paper, a crack risk evaluation system for early age concrete is established, including distributed optical fiber temperature sensing (DTS, prediction of temperature and stress fields, and crack risk evaluation. Based on the DTS temperature data, the back-analysis method is applied to retrieve the thermal parameters of concrete. Then, the temperature and thermal stress of early age concrete are predicted using the reversed thermal parameters, as well as the laboratory test parameters. Finally, under the proposed cracking risk evaluation principle, the cracking risk level of each concrete block is given; the preliminary and later temperature controlling measures were recommended, respectively. The application of the proposed system in Xiluodu super high arch dam shows that this system works effectively for preventing cracks of early age concrete.

  4. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.; Schaltz, E.; Rosendahl, L.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is widely discussed and equipment has been built that can perform such analysis. One method is often used to perform such characterization: constant temperature with variable thermal power input. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) methods for TEG systems are mostly tested under steady-state conditions for different constant input temperatures. However, for most TEG applications, the input temperature gradient changes, exposing the MPPT to variable tracking conditions. An example is the exhaust pipe on hybrid vehicles, for which, because of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated in several applications were evaluated; the results showed temperature variation up to 5°C/s for TEG systems. Electrical characterization of a calcium-manganese oxide TEG was performed at steady-state for different input temperatures and a maximum temperature of 401°C. By using electrical data from characterization of the oxide module, a solar array simulator was emulated to perform as a TEG. A trapezoidal temperature profile with different gradients was used on the TEG simulator to evaluate the dynamic MPPT efficiency. It is known that the perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm may have difficulty accurately tracking under rapidly changing conditions. To solve this problem, a compromise must be found between the magnitude of the increment and the sampling frequency of the control algorithm. The standard P&O performance was evaluated experimentally by using different temperature gradients for different MPPT sampling frequencies, and efficiency values are provided for all cases. The results showed that a tracking speed of 2.5 Hz can be successfully implemented on a TEG

  5. Reliability of High-Temperature Fixed-Point Installations over 8 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, C. J.; Ford, T.; Ongrai, O.; Pearce, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    At NPL, high-temperature metal-carbon eutectic fixed points have been set up for thermocouple calibration purposes since 2006, for realising reference temperatures above the highest point specified in the International Temperature Scale of 1990 for contact thermometer calibrations. Additionally, cells of the same design have been provided by NPL to other national measurement institutes (NMIs) and calibration laboratories over this period, creating traceable and ISO 17025 accredited facilities around the world for calibrating noble metal thermocouples at 1324 {°}C (Co-C) and 1492 {°}C (Pd-C). This paper shows collections of thermocouple calibration results obtained during use of the high-temperature fixed-point cells at NPL and, as further examples, the use of cells installed at CCPI Europe (UK) and NIMT (Thailand). The lifetime of the cells can now be shown to be in excess of 7 years, whether used on a weekly or monthly basis, and whether used in an NMI or industrial calibration laboratory.

  6. Nutrition content of brisket point end of part Simental Ongole Crossbred meat in boiled various temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto, J.; Sudibya; Cahyadi, M.; Aji, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the quality of nutritional contents of beef brisket point end of Simental Ongole Crossbred meat in various boiling temperatures. Simental Ongole Crossbred had been fattened for 9 months. Furthermore, they were slaughtered at slaughterhouse and brisket point end part of meat had been prepared to analyse its nutritional contents using Food Scan. These samples were then boiled at 100°C for 0 (TR), 15 (R15), and 30 (R30) minutes, respectively. The data was analysed using Randomized Complete Design (CRD) and Duncan’s multiple range test (DMRT) had been conducted to differentiate among three treatments. The results showed that boiling temperatures significantly affected moisture, and cholesterol contents of beef (P<0.05) while fat content was not significantly affected by boiling temperatures. The boiling temperature decreased beef water contents from 72.77 to 70.84%, on the other hand, the treatment increased beef protein and cholesterol contents from 20.77 to 25.14% and 47.55 to 50.45 mg/100g samples, respectively. The conclusion of this study was boiling of beef at 100°C for 15 minutes and 30 minutes decreasing water content and increasing protein and cholesterol contents of brisket point end of Simental Ongole Crossbred beef.

  7. High temperature sensing using higher-order-mode rejected sapphire-crystal fiber gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chun; Kim, Jae Hun; Lee, Jon; Yin, Stuart; Ruffin, Paul; Luo, Claire

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of higher-order-mode rejected fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in sapphire crystal fiber using infrared (IR) femtosecond laser illumination. The grating is tested in high temperature furnace up to 1600 degree Celsius. As sapphire fiber is only available as highly multimode fiber, a scheme to filter out higher order modes in favor for the fundamental mode is theoretically evaluated and experimentally demonstrated. The approach is to use an ultra thin sapphire crystal fiber (60 micron in diameter) to decrease the number of modes. The small diameter fiber also enables bending the fiber to certain radius which is carefully chosen to provide low loss for the fundamental mode LP01 and high loss for the other high-order modes. After bending, less-than-2-nm resonant peak bandwidth is achieved. The grating spectrum is improved, and higher resolution sensing measurement can be achieved. This mode filtering method is very easy to implement. Furthermore, the sapphire fiber is sealed with hi-purity alumina ceramic cement inside a flexible high temperature titanium tube, and the highly flexible titanium tube offers a robust packaging to sapphire fiber. Our high temperature sapphire grating sensor is very promising in extremely high temperature sensing application.

  8. Semi-Automatic Selection of Ground Control Points for High Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulbe Linda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometrical accuracy of remote sensing data often is ensured by geometrical transforms based on Ground Control Points (GCPs. Manual selection of GCP is a time-consuming process, which requires some sort of automation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to present and evaluate methodology for easier, semi-automatic selection of ground control points for urban areas. Custom line scanning algorithm was implemented and applied to data in order to extract potential GCPs for an image analyst. The proposed method was tested for classical orthorectification and special object polygon transform. Results are convincing and show that in the test case semi-automatic methodology is able to correct locations of 70 % (thermal data – 80 % (orthophoto images of buildings. Geometrical transform for subimages of approximately 3 hectares with approximately 12 automatically found GCPs resulted in RSME approximately 1 meter with standard deviation of 1.2 meters.

  9. Correlation Wave-Front Sensing Algorithms for Shack-Hartmann-Based Adaptive Optics using a Point Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poynee, L A

    2003-01-01

    Shack-Hartmann based Adaptive Optics system with a point-source reference normally use a wave-front sensing algorithm that estimates the centroid (center of mass) of the point-source image 'spot' to determine the wave-front slope. The centroiding algorithm suffers for several weaknesses. For a small number of pixels, the algorithm gain is dependent on spot size. The use of many pixels on the detector leads to significant propagation of read noise. Finally, background light or spot halo aberrations can skew results. In this paper an alternative algorithm that suffers from none of these problems is proposed: correlation of the spot with a ideal reference spot. The correlation method is derived and a theoretical analysis evaluates its performance in comparison with centroiding. Both simulation and data from real AO systems are used to illustrate the results. The correlation algorithm is more robust than centroiding, but requires more computation

  10. Temperature calibration procedure for thin film substrates for thermo-ellipsometric analysis using melting point standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappert, Emiel J.; Raaijmakers, Michiel J.T.; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Nijmeijer, Arian; Huiskes, Cindy; Benes, Nieck E., E-mail: n.e.benes@utwente.nl

    2015-02-10

    Highlights: • Facile temperature calibration method for thermo-ellipsometric analysis. • The melting point of thin films of indium, lead, zinc, and water can be detected by ellipsometry. • In-situ calibration of ellipsometry hot stage, without using any external equipment. • High-accuracy temperature calibration (±1.3 °C). - Abstract: Precise and accurate temperature control is pertinent to studying thermally activated processes in thin films. Here, we present a calibration method for the substrate–film interface temperature using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The method is adapted from temperature calibration methods that are well developed for thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry instruments, and is based on probing a transition temperature. Indium, lead, and zinc could be spread on a substrate, and the phase transition of these metals could be detected by a change in the Ψ signal of the ellipsometer. For water, the phase transition could be detected by a loss of signal intensity as a result of light scattering by the ice crystals. The combined approach allowed for construction of a linear calibration curve with an accuracy of 1.3 °C or lower over the full temperature range.

  11. Development of large-area high-temperature fixed-point blackbodies for photometry and radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlevnoy, Boris; Grigoryeva, Irina; Anhalt, Klaus; Waehmer, Martin; Ivashin, Evgeniy; Otryaskin, Denis; Solodilov, Maxim; Sapritsky, Victor

    2018-04-01

    Large-area high-temperature fixed-point (HTFP) blackbodies with working temperatures of approximately 2748 K and 3021 K, based on an Re-C eutectic and a WC-C peritectic respectively, have been developed and investigated. The blackbodies have an emissivity of 0.9997, show high-quality phase-transition plateaus and have high repeatability of the melting temperatures, but demonstrate temperature differences (from 0.2 K to 0.6 K) compared with small-cell blackbodies of the same HTFP. We associate these temperature differences with the temperature drop effect, which may differ from cell to cell. The large radiating cavity diameter of 14 mm allows developed HTFP blackbodies to be used for photometric and radiometric applications in irradiance mode with uncertainties as small as 0.12% (k  =  1) in the visible. A photometer and an irradiance-mode filter radiometer (visible range), previously calibrated at VNIIOFI, were used to measure illuminance and irradiance of the HTFP blackbodies equipped with a precise outer aperture. The values measured by the detectors agreed with those based on the blackbody calculation to within 0.2%. The large-area HTFP blackbodies will be used in a joint PTB-VNIIOFI experiment on measuring thermodynamic temperature.

  12. Estimation of the global average temperature with optimally weighted point gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, James W.; Upson, Robert B.

    1993-12-01

    This paper considers the minimum mean squared error (MSE) incurred in estimating an idealized Earth's global average temperature with a finite network of point gauges located over the globe. We follow the spectral MSE formalism given by North et al. [1992] and derive the optimal weights for N gauges in the problem of estimating the Earth's global average temperature. Our results suggest that for commonly used configurations the variance of the estimate due to sampling error can be reduced by as much as 50%.

  13. Scallop-Inspired DNA Nanomachine: A Ratiometric Nanothermometer for Intracellular Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Nuli; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; He, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jiaqi; Fang, Hongmei; Wang, Kemin

    2017-11-21

    Accurate measurement of intracellular temperature is of great significance in biology and medicine. With use of DNA nanotechnology and inspiration by nature's examples of "protective and reversible responses" exoskeletons, a scallop-inspired DNA nanomachine (SDN) is desgined as a ratiometric nanothermometer for intracellular temperature sensing. The SDN is composed of a rigid DNA tetrahedron, where a thermal-sensitive molecular beacon (MB) is embedded in one edge of the DNA tetrahedron. Relying on the thermal-sensitive MB and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signaling mechanism, the "On" to "Off" signal is reversibly responding to "below" and "over" the melting temperature. Mimicking the functional anatomy of a scallop, the SDN exhibits high cellular permeability and resistance to enzymatic degradation, good reversibility, and tunable response range. Furthermore, FRET ratiometric signal that allows the simultaneous recording of two emission intensities at different wavelengths can provide a feasible approach for precise detection, minimizing the effect of system fluctuations.

  14. POINT 2011: ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta2 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and presented in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results. The latest ENDF/B-VII.1 beta2 data library was recently and is now freely available through the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Brookhaven National Laboratory. This release completely supersedes all preceding releases of ENDF/B. As distributed the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. All results are in the computer independent ENDF-6 character format (R2), which allows the data to be easily transported between computers. In its processed form the POINT 2011 library is approximately 16 gigabyte in size and is distributed on one compressed DVDs (see, below for the details of the contents of each DVD).

  15. POINT 2011: ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta2 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    2011-04-07

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and presented in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results. The latest ENDF/B-VII.1 beta2 data library was recently and is now freely available through the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Brookhaven National Laboratory. This release completely supersedes all preceding releases of ENDF/B. As distributed the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. All results are in the computer independent ENDF-6 character format [R2], which allows the data to be easily transported between computers. In its processed form the POINT 2011 library is approximately 16 gigabyte in size and is distributed on one compressed DVDs (see, below for the details of the contents of each DVD).

  16. On two special values of temperature factor in hypersonic flow stagnation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchenko, G. G.; Bilchenko, N. G.

    2018-03-01

    The hypersonic aircraft permeable cylindrical and spherical surfaces laminar boundary layer heat and mass transfer control mathematical model properties are investigated. The nonlinear algebraic equations systems are obtained for two special values of temperature factor in the hypersonic flow stagnation point. The mappings bijectivity between heat and mass transfer local parameters and controls is established. The computation experiments results are presented: the domains of allowed values “heat-friction” are obtained.

  17. Investigation of potential factors affecting the measurement of dew point temperature in oil-soaked transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Adam H.

    Moisture within a transformer's insulation system has been proven to degrade its dielectric strength. When installing a transformer in situ, one method used to calculate the moisture content of the transformer insulation is to measure the dew point temperature of the internal gas volume of the transformer tank. There are two instruments commercially available that are designed for dew point temperature measurement: the Alnor Model 7000 Dewpointer and the Vaisala DRYCAPRTM Hand-Held Dewpoint Meter DM70. Although these instruments perform an identical task, the design technology behind each instrument is vastly different. When the Alnor Dewpointer and Vaisala DM70 instruments are used to measure the dew point of the internal gas volume simultaneously from a pressurized transformer, their differences in dew point measurement have been observed to vary as much as 30 °F. There is minimal scientific research available that focuses on the process of measuring dew point of a gas inside a pressurized transformer, let alone this observed phenomenon. The primary objective of this work was to determine what effect certain factors potentially have on dew point measurements of a transformer's internal gas volume, in hopes of understanding the root cause of this phenomenon. Three factors that were studied include (1) human error, (2) the use of calibrated and out-of-calibration instruments, and (3) the presence of oil vapor gases in the dry air sample, and their subsequent effects on the Q-value of the sampled gas. After completing this portion of testing, none of the selected variables proved to be a direct cause of the observed discrepancies between the two instruments. The secondary objective was to validate the accuracy of each instrument as compared to its respective published range by testing against a known dew point temperature produced by a humidity generator. In a select operating range of -22 °F to -4 °F, both instruments were found to be accurate and within their

  18. Uncertainty Analysis of the Temperature–Resistance Relationship of Temperature Sensing Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dawood Husain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the uncertainty analysis of the temperature–resistance (TR data of the newly developed temperature sensing fabric (TSF, which is a double-layer knitted structure fabricated on an electronic flat-bed knitting machine, made of polyester as a basal yarn, and embedded with fine metallic wire as sensing element. The measurement principle of the TSF is identical to temperature resistance detector (RTD; that is, change in resistance due to change in temperature. The regression uncertainty (uncertainty within repeats and repeatability uncertainty (uncertainty among repeats were estimated by analysing more than 300 TR experimental repeats of 50 TSF samples. The experiments were performed under dynamic heating and cooling environments on a purpose-built test rig within the temperature range of 20–50 °C. The continuous experimental data was recorded through LabVIEW-based graphical user interface. The result showed that temperature and resistance values were not only repeatable but reproducible, with only minor variations. The regression uncertainty was found to be less than ±0.3 °C; the TSF sample made of Ni and W wires showed regression uncertainty of <±0.13 °C in comparison to Cu-based TSF samples (>±0.18 °C. The cooling TR data showed considerably reduced values (±0.07 °C of uncertainty in comparison with the heating TR data (±0.24 °C. The repeatability uncertainty was found to be less than ±0.5 °C. By increasing the number of samples and repeats, the uncertainties may be reduced further. The TSF could be used for continuous measurement of the temperature profile on the surface of the human body.

  19. An efficient technique for the point reactor kinetics equations with Newtonian temperature feedback effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahla, Abdallah A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An efficient technique for the nonlinear reactor kinetics equations is presented. → This method is based on Backward Euler or Crank Nicholson and fundamental matrix. → Stability of efficient technique is defined and discussed. → This method is applied to point kinetics equations of six-groups of delayed neutrons. → Step, ramp, sinusoidal and temperature feedback reactivities are discussed. - Abstract: The point reactor kinetics equations of multi-group of delayed neutrons in the presence Newtonian temperature feedback effects are a system of stiff nonlinear ordinary differential equations which have not any exact analytical solution. The efficient technique for this nonlinear system is based on changing this nonlinear system to a linear system by the predicted value of reactivity and solving this linear system using the fundamental matrix of the homogenous linear differential equations. The nonlinear point reactor kinetics equations are rewritten in the matrix form. The solution of this matrix form is introduced. This solution contains the exponential function of a variable coefficient matrix. This coefficient matrix contains the unknown variable, reactivity. The predicted values of reactivity in the explicit form are determined replacing the exponential function of the coefficient matrix by two kinds, Backward Euler and Crank Nicholson, of the rational approximations. The nonlinear point kinetics equations changed to a linear system of the homogenous differential equations. The fundamental matrix of this linear system is calculated using the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors of the coefficient matrix. Stability of the efficient technique is defined and discussed. The efficient technique is applied to the point kinetics equations of six-groups of delayed neutrons with step, ramp, sinusoidal and the temperature feedback reactivities. The results of these efficient techniques are compared with the traditional methods.

  20. Remote Sensing Analysis of a Rapidly Eroding Sea Cliff at Point Grey, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, A. M.; Francioni, M.; Kremsater, R.; Stead, D.; Clague, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    A range of remote sensing tools can be used to document hazardous and sensitive environments. Presented at this time are the first results of an ongoing study of a rapidly eroding, steep sea cliff in Vancouver, British Columbia. The sea cliff is formed in a 70-m-thick sequence of outwash sands and silts (Quadra Sand) deposited during the early part of the last glaciation, known locally as the Fraser Glaciation. The sea cliff is unstable and retreating due to wave attack, groundwater seepage, and shallow-seated landslides. If no measures are taken to stem wave erosion, the sea cliff will likely retreat faster with rising seas over the remainder of this century. The beach below the cliff is a popular recreational location, thus a hard engineering solution to the erosion problem might be unacceptable to Vancouver residents. We have used conventional photogrammetry, structures from motion, thermal imaging, and terrestrial full waveform laser scanning to provide base-line spatial data for the most rapidly eroding section of the cliff. Here, we present some of our results and discuss the challenges that we faced in characterizing this large soil slope.

  1. The dew point temperature as a criterion for optimizing the operating conditions of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    In this article an analytical method to calculate the dew point temperatures of the anode and cathode exit gas streams of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is developed. The results of these calculations are used to create diagrams that show the dew point temperatures as function of the operat......In this article an analytical method to calculate the dew point temperatures of the anode and cathode exit gas streams of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is developed. The results of these calculations are used to create diagrams that show the dew point temperatures as function...

  2. NIR spectroscopic sensing for point-of-need freshness assessment of meat, fish, vegetables and fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoho; Noh, Tae Gyoon; Choi, Jun Hoe; Han, Jeongsu; Ha, Joo Young; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Yongjong

    2017-05-01

    Foodborne illness represents a significant health burden worldwide. While monitoring the freshness of food before consumption could significantly improve the current predicament, there is a lack of a simple system that one can use to accurately assess the freshness of their food. Currently, the most common practice for food quality determination is by visual or odor inspection which lacks objectivity, accuracy and precision. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic techniques can help address this problem by providing rapid and non-destructive means to estimate the freshness state of various foods based on the changes to their characteristic spectra in the NIR region. Recent advancements in the development of portable NIR spectrometers are also enabling the realization of this technique at the point-of-need. In this study, we have evaluated the feasibility of using NIR spectroscopy at the point-of-need to estimate the freshness of various foods including: beef sirloin, beef eyeround, pork sirloin, bass, salmon, corvina, tomato and watermelon. Using a commercial portable NIR spectrometer, we periodically scanned and collected NIR spectra from the food items that were stored at 4°C inside a refrigerator for up to 30 days. For these food items, we show that the NIR spectra can be classified by the foods' aging day as well as by the levels of chemical/microbial indicators (i.e., thiobarbituric acid, volatile basic nitrogen and bacteria levels) with high accuracy, which represents high prospects of NIR spectroscopy for point-of-need freshness assessment of meat, fish, vegetables and fruits.

  3. Acoustic resonator providing fixed points of temperature between 0.1 and 2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmela, Anssi; Tuoriniemi, Juha; Pentti, Elias; Sebedash, Alexander; Rysti, Juho

    2009-01-01

    Below 2 K the speed of second sound in mixtures of liquid 3 He and 4 He first increases to a maximum of 30-40 m/s at about 1 K and then decreases again at lower temperatures to values below 15 m/s. The exact values depend on the concentration and pressure of the mixture. This can be exploited to provide fixed points in temperature by utilizing a resonator with appropriate dimensions and frequency to excite standing waves in the resonator cavity filled with helium mixture. We demonstrate that commercially mass produced quartz tuning forks can be used for this purpose. They are meant for frequency standards operating at 32 kHz. Their dimensions are typically of order 1 mm matching the wavelength of the second sound in helium mixtures at certain values of temperature. Due to the complicated geometry, we observe some 20 sharp acoustic resonances in the range 0.1l 2 K having temperature resolution of order 1 μK. The quartz resonators are cheap, compact, simple to implement, easy to measure with great accuracy, and, above all, they are not sensitive to magnetic field, which is a great advantage compared to fixed point devices based on superconductivity transitions. The reproducibility of the resonance pattern upon thermal cycling remains to be verified.

  4. Solution of the neutron point kinetics equations with temperature feedback effects applying the polynomial approach method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumelero, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.tumelero@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Goncalves, Glenio A.; Lazzari, Luana, E-mail: claudiopeteren@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gleniogoncalves@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: luana-lazzari@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (DME/UFPEL), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica e Matematica

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we present a solution of the Neutron Point Kinetics Equations with temperature feedback effects applying the Polynomial Approach Method. For the solution, we consider one and six groups of delayed neutrons precursors with temperature feedback effects and constant reactivity. The main idea is to expand the neutron density, delayed neutron precursors and temperature as a power series considering the reactivity as an arbitrary function of the time in a relatively short time interval around an ordinary point. In the first interval one applies the initial conditions of the problem and the analytical continuation is used to determine the solutions of the next intervals. With the application of the Polynomial Approximation Method it is possible to overcome the stiffness problem of the equations. In such a way, one varies the time step size of the Polynomial Approach Method and performs an analysis about the precision and computational time. Moreover, we compare the method with different types of approaches (linear, quadratic and cubic) of the power series. The answer of neutron density and temperature obtained by numerical simulations with linear approximation are compared with results in the literature. (author)

  5. Correlation of Coral Bleaching Events and Remotely-Sensed Sea Surface Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-19

    corals , Pacific Science, 30(2), 159-166, 1976. Coles, S.L., and P.L. Jokiel, Effects of temperature on photosynthesis and respiration in hermatypic ...compounds (S-320) in a hermatypic scleractinian, Coral Reefs, 5, 155-159, 1986. Elms, J.D. and R.G. Quayle, Multi-decade sea surface temperature...effluent on hermatypic corals at Kahe Point, Oahu, Pacific Science, 28, 1-18, 1974 57 Jokiel, P.L. and S.L, Coles, Effects of temperature on the

  6. Switched voltammetric determination of ractopamine by using a temperature-responsive sensing film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Mingxuan; Li, Chunyan; Xie, Yixi; Fei, Junjie

    2018-02-03

    This study describes an electrochemical sensor for the animal growth promoter ractopamine. The method is based on the use of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a temperature-responsive sensing film composed of reduced graphene oxide, C 60 fullerene, and the temperature-sensitive polymer poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (PMEO 2 MA). The modified GCE was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A large oxidation peak current can be observed (maximum typically at 0.57 V vs. Ag/AgCl) when the temperature is raised to above the lower critical solution temperature of PMEO 2 MA. This peak disappears at lower temperature. Under optimum conditions, the sensor has a detection range for ractopamine from 0.1 to 3.1 μM, with an 82 nM detection limit. The method was successfully applied to the determination of ractopamine in spiked pork samples. Graphical abstract Schematic presentation of the reversible, temperature-controlled "on/off" electrochemical behavior of ractopamine at a glassy carbon electrode modified with a film composed of reduced graphene oxide (rGO), C 60 fullerene and the poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (PMEO2MA).

  7. Spatio-Temporal Relationship Between Surface Temperature and NDVI Using Remotely Sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Yasser; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Kabiri, Keivan

    2016-07-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a significant factor to analyze the global climate changes, and LULC (Land use/Land cover) changes, as well as urban thermal behavior. Land surface temperature exhibit the surface atmosphere in relation with energy flux between earth and atmosphere. This paper intended to examine the evaluation of LST and assessment of relationship between LST and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with associated different LULC. Al- Hawizeh wetland located in the Iraq-Iran border was selected as a study area. Two Landsat satellite thermal infrared (TIR) images of October 26, 1998, thematic mapper (TM), and October 26, 2002 enhanced thematic mapper (ETM+) were used. Both images were corrected geometrically and atmospherically before carried out any analysis. NDVI was estimated from reflectance values of the visible band (band 3, Red) and the near infrared band (band 4, VNIR). Maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) was applied to determine the different LULC. Plank equation was utilized to extract land surface temperature over the study region. The results provide information about the spatial distribution of LST over different LULC during mentioned date. The highest mean temperature was observed over the rangeland and the lowest mean temperature was found in water bodies. The results of regression analysis exhibited that the LST and NDVI has an inverse correlation except for water bodies. The negative correlation coefficient was observed over vegetation (-0.733, R2=0.66). Keywords-component; Land Surface Temperature, Remote Sensing, Al-Havizeh wetland, Regression Analysis, NDVI, GIS

  8. Developing upconversion nanoparticle-based smart substrates for remote temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Zachary; Marble, Kassie; Alkahtani, Masfer; Hemmer, Philip; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2018-02-01

    Recent developments in understanding of nanomaterial behaviors and synthesis have led to their application across a wide range of commercial and scientific applications. Recent investigations span from applications in nanomedicine and the development of novel drug delivery systems to nanoelectronics and biosensors. In this study, we propose the application of a newly engineered temperature sensitive water-based bio-compatible core/shell up-conversion nanoparticle (UCNP) in the development of a smart substrate for remote temperature sensing. We developed this smart substrate by dispersing functionalized nanoparticles into a polymer solution and then spin-coating the solution onto one side of a microscope slide to form a thin film substrate layer of evenly dispersed nanoparticles. By using spin-coating to deposit the particle solution we both create a uniform surface for the substrate while simultaneously avoid undesired particle agglomeration. Through this investigation, we have determined the sensitivity and capabilities of this smart substrate and conclude that further development can lead to a greater range of applications for this type smart substrate and use in remote temperature sensing in conjunction with other microscopy and spectroscopy investigations.

  9. Effects of cold temperatures on the excitability of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that are not for cold-sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hirosato; Gu, Jianguo G.

    2016-01-01

    Except a small population of primary afferent neurons for sensing cold to generate the sensations of innocuous and noxious cold, it is generally believed that cold temperatures suppress the excitability of other primary afferent neurons that are not for cold-sensing. These not-for-cold-sensing neurons include the majority of non-nociceptive and nociceptive afferent neurons. In the present study we have found that not-for-cold-sensing neurons of rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) change their excitability in several ways at cooling temperatures. In nearly 70% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, the cooling temperature of 15°C increases their membrane excitability. We regard these neurons as cold-active neurons. For the remaining 30% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, the cooling temperature of 15°C either has no effect (regarded as cold-ineffective neurons) or suppress (regarded as cold-suppressive neurons) their membrane excitability. For cold-active neurons, the cold temperature of 15°C increases their excitability as is evidenced by the increases in action potential (AP) firing numbers and/or reduction of AP rheobase when these neurons are depolarized electrically. The cold temperature of 15°C significantly inhibits M-currents and increases membrane input resistance of cold-active neurons. Retigabine, an M-current activator, abolishes the effect of cold temperatures on AP firing but not the effect of cold temperature on AP rheobase levels. The inhibition of M-currents and the increases of membrane input resistance are likely two mechanisms by which cooling temperatures increase the excitability of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons. PMID:26709732

  10. From single point of measurement to distributed sensing in long-term glacier monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarini, Daniel; Avvenuti, Marco; Jelicic, Vana; Bilas, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    Glacial environment monitoring is a key task in understanding natural phenomena related to global warming. For the last 30 years, Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) have been spreading among the meteorological and geophysical community, and are on the way to become a de facto standard to perform long-lasting unattended data acquisitions in single localized points of interest. Sensor Networks (SNs), on the other hand, promise the possibility to perform measurements with a higher spatial density and lower cost. Designing and developing a SN for glacial environment face particular challenges for embedded electronics and sensor systems, which is why SNs are still under research and development in this field. This paper surveys the AWSs and SNs for glacial monitoring applications and compares their characteristics.

  11. Precipitated nickel doped ZnO nanoparticles with enhanced low temperature ethanol sensing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umadevi Godavarti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Zn1-xNixO nanoparticles have been synthesized by novel co-precipitation method and systematically characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM and photo luminescence. The XRD patterns confirm the hexagonal wurzite structure without secondary phases in Ni substituted ZnO samples. SEM and TEM are used for the estimation of particle shape and size. In PL study there is a peak in the range of 380–390 nm in all samples that is attributed to the oxygen vacancies. Gas sensing tests reveal that Ni doped ZnO sensor has remarkably enhanced performance compared to pure ZnO detected at an optimum temperature 100 °C. It could detect ethanol gas in a wide concentration range with very high response, fast response–recovery time, good selectivity and stable repeatability. The possible sensing mechanism is discussed. The high response of ZnO Nanoparticles was attributed to large contacting surface area for electrons, oxygen, target gas molecule, and abundant channels for gas diffusion. The superior sensing features indicate the present Ni doped ZnO as a promising nanomaterial for gas sensors. The response time and recovery time of undoped is 75 s and 60 s and 0.25 at% Ni are found to be 60 s and 45 s at 100 °C respectively.

  12. Down-conversion luminescence and its temperature-sensing properties from Er3+-doped sodium bismuth titanate ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Zheng, Shanshan; Zhou, Hong; Pan, Anlian; Wu, Guangheng; Liu, Jun-ming

    2015-11-01

    Here, we demonstrate outstanding temperature-sensing properties from Na0.5Bi0.49Er0.01TiO3 (NBT:Er) thin films. The perovskite phase for them is stable in the temperature range from 80 to 440 K. Interestingly, the Er doping enhances the ferroelectric polarization and introduces local dipolar, which are positive for temperature sensing. Pumped by a 488-nm laser, the NBT:Er thin films show strong green luminescence with two bands around 525 and 548 nm. The intensity ratio I 525/ I 548 can be used for temperature sensing, and the maximum sensitivity is about 2.3 × 10-3 K-1, higher than that from Er-doped silicon oxide. These suggest NBT:Er thin film is a promising candidate for temperature sensor.

  13. Fiber‐optic distributed temperature sensing: A new tool for assessment and monitoring of hydrologic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John W.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Johnson, Carole D.; Dawson, Cian B.; Nelms, David L.; Miller, Cheryl; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Harvey, Charles F.; Karam, Hanan N.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber‐optic distributed temperature sensing (FO DTS) is an emerging technology for characterizing and monitoring a wide range of important earth processes. FO DTS utilizes laser light to measure temperature along the entire length of standard telecommunications optical fibers. The technology can measure temperature every meter over FO cables up to 30 kilometers (km) long. Commercially available systems can measure fiber temperature as often as 4 times per minute, with thermal precision ranging from 0.1 to 0.01 °C depending on measurement integration time. In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a project to demonstrate and evaluate DTS as a technology to support hydrologic studies. This paper demonstrates the potential of the technology to assess and monitor hydrologic processes through case‐study examples of FO DTS monitoring of stream‐aquifer interaction on the Shenandoah River near Locke's Mill, Virginia, and on Fish Creek, near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and estuary‐aquifer interaction on Waquoit Bay, Falmouth, Massachusetts. The ability to continuously observe temperature over large spatial scales with high spatial and temporal resolution provides a new opportunity to observe and monitor a wide range of hydrologic processes with application to other disciplines including hazards, climate‐change, and ecosystem monitoring.

  14. EGFET pH Sensor Performance Dependence on Sputtered TiO2 Sensing Membrane Deposition Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Aimi Yusof

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 thin films were sputtered by radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering method and have been employed as the sensing membrane of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET for pH sensing detection application. The TiO2 thin films were deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO coated glass substrates at room temperature and 200°C, respectively. The effect of deposition temperature on thin film properties and pH detection application was analyzed. The TiO2 samples used as the sensing membrane for EGFET pH-sensor and the current-voltage (I-V, hysteresis, and drift characteristics were examined. The sensitivity of TiO2 EGFET sensing membrane was obtained from the transfer characteristic (I-V curves for different substrate heating temperatures. TiO2 thin film sputtered at room temperature achieved higher sensitivity of 59.89 mV/pH compared to the one deposited at 200°C indicating lower sensitivity of 37.60 mV/pH. Moreover the hysteresis and the drift of TiO2 thin film deposited at room temperature showed lower values compared to the one at 200°C. We have also tested the effect of operating temperature on the performance of the EGFET pH-sensing and found that the temperature effect was very minimal.

  15. How Close Are We to the Temperature Tipping Point of the Biosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    All biological processes accelerate rapidly with increasing temperature (Tinf); reaching a maximum rate (Tmax), after which they decline. However different biological processes may not be synchronised in their response to increasing temperatures resulting in major dis-equilibria of ecosystem processes. Particularly, the linked processes of photosynthesis and respiration have different curvature that is determined by their inherent sensitivity to temperature. Constraining the difference in temperature curves between photosynthesis and respiration allows us to quantify changes to global carbon metabolism and the land sink of carbon as a whole. During the last century the biosphere has acted as a sink of carbon from the atmosphere partly mitigating accumulation of CO2 derived from burning of fossil fuels Here we ask the following questions: As global temperature increases will photosynthesis and respiration become de-coupled and when? What is Tmax for the land sink, and where is current mean temperature range in regard to this important threshold? At what global and regional temperatures do we expect the biosphere to become a source of carbon to the atmosphere? To address these questions we used the recently released FLUXNET2015 dataset comprised of 212 eddy covariance flux tower sites which concurrently measure land-atmosphere carbon exchange along with micro-meteorological variables. Here, we illustrate our results for Tinf and Tmax of the land sink by biome and for the biosphere as a whole. Our results suggest that recent warming has already pushed us past the inflection point of photosynthesis, and that any additional warming will increase the cumulative annual dose of time spent past Tmax for the land sink. Even under moderate climate projections, we expect to see a slowing of the terrestrial carbon sink by as early as 2040.

  16. Estimation of the temperature dependent interaction between uncharged point defects in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); GlobalWafers Japan Co., Ltd., 30 Soya, Hadano, Kanagawa, 257-8566 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    A method is described to estimate the temperature dependent interaction between two uncharged point defects in Si based on DFT calculations. As an illustration, the formation of the uncharged di-vacancy V{sub 2} is discussed, based on the temperature dependent attractive field between both vacancies. For that purpose, all irreducible configurations of two uncharged vacancies are determined, each with their weight given by the number of equivalent configurations. Using a standard 216-atoms supercell, nineteen irreducible configurations of two vacancies are obtained. The binding energies of all these configurations are calculated. Each vacancy is surrounded by several attractive sites for another vacancy. The obtained temperature dependent of total volume of these attractive sites has a radius that is closely related with the capture radius for the formation of a di-vacancy that is used in continuum theory. The presented methodology can in principle also be applied to estimate the capture radius for pair formation of any type of point defects.

  17. Polyaniline-Cadmium Ferrite Nanostructured Composite for Room-Temperature Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotresh, S.; Ravikiran, Y. T.; Tiwari, S. K.; Vijaya Kumari, S. C.

    2017-08-01

    We introduce polyaniline-cadmium ferrite (PANI-CdFe2O4) nanostructured composite as a room-temperature-operable liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensor. The structure of PANI and the composite prepared by chemical polymerization was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Comparative XRD and FT-IR analysis confirmed CdFe2O4 embedded in PANI matrix with mutual interfacial interaction. The nanostructure of the composite was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. A simple LPG sensor operable at room temperature, exclusively based on spin-coated PANI-CdFe2O4 nanocomposite, was fabricated with maximum sensing response of 50.83% at 1000 ppm LPG. The response and recovery time of the sensor were 50 s and 110 s, respectively, and it was stable over a period of 1 month with slight degradation of 4%. The sensing mechanism is discussed on the basis of the p- n heterojunction barrier formed at the interface of PANI and CdFe2O4.

  18. A luminescent Lanthanide-free MOF nanohybrid for highly sensitive ratiometric temperature sensing in physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Zhang, Denan; Zeng, Jin; Gan, Ning; Cuan, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Luminescent MOF materials with tunable emissions and energy/charge transfer processes have been extensively explored as ratiometric temperature sensors. However, most of the ratiometric MOF thermometers reported thus far are based on the MOFs containing photoactive lanthanides, which are potentially facing cost issue and serious supply shortage. Here, we present a ratiometric luminescent thermometer based on a dual-emitting lanthanide-free MOF hybrid, which is developed by encapsulation of a fluorescent dye into a robust nanocrystalline zirconium-based MOF through a one-pot synthesis approach. The structure and morphology of the hybrid product was characterized by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurement and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pore confinement effect well isolates the guest dye molecules and therefore suppresses the nonradiative energy transfer process between dye molecules. The incorporated dye emission is mainly sensitized by the organic linkers within MOF through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The ratiometric luminescence of the MOF hybrid shows a significant response to temperature due to the thermal-related back energy transfer process from dye molecules and organic linkers, thus can be exploited for self-calibrated temperature sensing. The maximum thermometric sensitivity is 1.19% °C -1 in the physiological temperature range, which is among the highest for the ratiomtric MOF thermometers that operating in 25-45°C. The temperature resolution is better than 0.1°C over the entire operative range (20-60°C). By integrating the advantages of excellent stability, nanoscale nature, and high sensitivity and precision in the physiological temperature range, this dye@MOF hybrid might have potential application in biomedical diagnosis. What' more, this work has expanded the possibility of non-lanthanide luminescent MOF materials for the development of ratiometric temperature sensors. Copyright © 2018

  19. The use of distributed temperature sensing technology for monitoring wildland fire intensity and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, C. G.; Cram, D.; Hatch, C. E.; Tyler, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) technology offers a viable alternative for accurately measuring wildland fire intensity and distribution in real time applications. We conducted an experiment to test the use of DTS as an alternative technology to monitor prescribed fire temperatures in real time and across a broad spatial scale. The custom fiber-optic cable consisted of three fiber optic lines buffered by polyamide, copper, and polyvinyl chloride, respectively, each armored in a stainless steel tube backfilled with Nitrogen gas. The 150 m long cable was deployed in three different 20 by 26 m experimental plots of short-grass rangeland in central New Mexico. Cable was arranged to maximize coverage of the experimental plots and allow cross-comparison between two main parallel straight-line sections approximately 8 m apart. A DTS system recorded fire temperatures every three seconds and integrated every one meter. A series of five thermocouples attached to a datalogger were placed at selected locations along the cable and also recorded temperature data every three seconds on each fiber. Results indicate that in general there is good agreement between thermocouple-measured and DTS-measured temperatures. A close match in temperature between DTS and thermocouples was particularly observed during the rising limb but not so much during the decline. The metal armoring of the fiber-optic cable remained hot longer than the thermocouples after the flames had passed. The relatively short-duration, high-intensity, prescribed burn fire in each plot resulted in temperatures reaching up to 450 degrees Celsius. In addition, DTS data allow for illustration of the irregular nature of flame speed and travel path across the rangeland grasses, a phenomenon that was impossible to quantify without the use of this tool. This study adds to the understanding of using DTS as a new alternative tool for better characterizing wildland fire intensity, distribution and travel patterns, and

  20. Underwater Depth and Temperature Sensing Based on Fiber Optic Technology for Marine and Fresh Water Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Leen, Gabriel; Toal, Daniel; Newe, Thomas; Lewis, Elfed; Dooly, Gerard

    2017-05-27

    Oceanic conditions play an important role in determining the effects of climate change and these effects can be monitored through the changes in the physical properties of sea water. In fact, Oceanographers use various probes for measuring the properties within the water column. CTDs (Conductivity, Temperature and Depth) provide profiles of physical and chemical parameters of the water column. A CTD device consists of Conductivity (C), Temperature (T) and Depth (D) probes to monitor the water column changes with respect to relative depth. An optical fibre-based point sensor used as a combined pressure (depth) and temperature sensor and the sensor system are described. Measurements accruing from underwater trials of a miniature sensor for pressure (depth) and temperature in the ocean and in fresh water are reported. The sensor exhibits excellent stability and its performance is shown to be comparable with the Sea-Bird Scientific commercial sensor: SBE9Plus.

  1. Underwater Depth and Temperature Sensing Based on Fiber Optic Technology for Marine and Fresh Water Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Babu Duraibabu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic conditions play an important role in determining the effects of climate change and these effects can be monitored through the changes in the physical properties of sea water. In fact, Oceanographers use various probes for measuring the properties within the water column. CTDs (Conductivity, Temperature and Depth provide profiles of physical and chemical parameters of the water column. A CTD device consists of Conductivity (C, Temperature (T and Depth (D probes to monitor the water column changes with respect to relative depth. An optical fibre-based point sensor used as a combined pressure (depth and temperature sensor and the sensor system are described. Measurements accruing from underwater trials of a miniature sensor for pressure (depth and temperature in the ocean and in fresh water are reported. The sensor exhibits excellent stability and its performance is shown to be comparable with the Sea-Bird Scientific commercial sensor: SBE9Plus.

  2. Two-color laser absorption near 5 μm for temperature and nitric oxide sensing in high-temperature gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almodovar, Christopher A.; Spearrin, R. Mitchell; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2017-12-01

    An infrared laser-absorption technique for in situ temperature and nitric oxide species sensing in high-temperature gases is presented. A pair of quantum cascade lasers in the mid-infrared near 5 μm were utilized to probe rovibrational transitions in nitric oxide's fundamental band. The line parameters of the selected transitions, including line strengths and collision broadening coefficients of nitric oxide with argon and nitrogen, were evaluated during controlled room-temperature static cell experiments and high-temperature shock tube experiments at temperatures between 1000 and 3000 K, and pressures between 1 and 5 atm. These studies provided new insights into the temperature dependence of nitric oxide collision broadening, highlighting the inadequacies of the power law over a broad temperature range. With an accurate spectroscopic model over a broad temperature range, the quantitative two-color temperature sensing strategy was demonstrated in non-reactive shock tube experiments from 1000 to 3000 K to validate thermometry and during a nitric oxide formation experiment near 1700 K and 4 atm to highlight capability for temporally-resolved species measurements at MHz rates. The technique has applicability for sensing in a broad range of flow fields that involve high-temperature air.

  3. ZZ POINT-2007, linearly interpolable ENDF/B-VII.0 data for 14 temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, Dermott E.

    2007-01-01

    A - Description or function: The ENDF/B data library, ENDF/B-VII.0 was processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections. The original evaluated data include cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications, these ENDF/B-VII.0 data were processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight temperatures: 0, 300, 600, 900, 1200, 1500, 1800 and 2100 Kelvin. It has also been processed to six astrophysics like temperatures: 0.1, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy with a tolerance of 0.1 %. POINT 2007 contains all of the evaluations in the ENDF/B-VII general purpose library, which contains 78 new evaluations + 315 old ones: total 393 nuclides. It also includes 16 new elemental evaluations replaced by isotopic evaluations + 19 old ones. No special purpose ENDF/B-VII libraries, such as fission products, thermal scattering, photon interaction data are included. These evaluations include all cross sections over the energy range 10 e-5 eV to at least 20 MeV. The list of nuclides is indicated. B - Methods: The PREPRO 2007 code system was used to process the ENDF/B data. Listed below are the steps, including the PREPRO2007 codes, which were used to process the data in the order in which the codes were run. 1) Linearly interpolable, tabulated cross sections (LINEAR) 2) Including the resonance contribution (RECENT) 3) Doppler broaden all cross sections to temperature (SIGMA1) 4) Check data, define redundant cross sections by summation (FIXUP) 5) Update evaluation dictionary in MF/MT=1/451 (DICTIN) C - Restrictions: Due to recent changes in ENDF-6 Formats and Procedures only the latest version of the ENDF/B Pre-processing codes, namely PREPRO 2007, can be used to accurately process all current ENDF/B-VII evaluations. The use of

  4. Using Distributed Temperature Sensing for measuring vertical temperature profiles and air temperature variance in the roughness sublayer above a forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilperoort, B.; Coenders, M.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the accuracy and resolution of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) machines has increased enough to expand its use in atmospheric sciences. With DTS the temperature of a fiber optic (FO) cable can be measured with a high frequency (1 Hz) and high resolution (0.30 m), for cable lengths up to kilometers. At our measurement site, a patch of 26 to 30 m tall Douglas Fir in mixed forest, we placed FO cables vertically along a 48 m tall flux tower. This gives a high resolution vertical temperature profile above, through, and below the canopy. By using a `bare' FO cable, with a diameter of 0.25 mm, we are able to measure variations in air temperature at a very small timescale, and are able to measure a vertical profile of the air temperature variance. The vertical temperature profiles can be used to study the formation of the stable boundary layer above and in the canopy at a high resolution. It also shows that a stable layer can develop below the canopy, which is not limited to night time conditions but also occurs during daytime. The high frequency measurements can be used to study the gradient of the variance of air temperature over the height. To study how the flux tower itself affects temperature variance measurements, the `bare' FO cable can be placed horizontally under a support structure away from the flux tower. Lastly, by using the hot-wire anemometer principle with DTS, the measurements can be expanded to also include vertical wind profile.

  5. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Sensing mode coupling analysis for dual-mass MEMS gyroscope and bandwidth expansion within wide-temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiliang; Li, Hongsheng; Shao, Xingling; Liu, Zhiyu; Kou, Zhiwei; Shan, Yanhu; Shi, Yunbo; Shen, Chong; Liu, Jun

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the bandwidth expanding method with wide-temperature range for sense mode coupling dual-mass MEMS gyro. The real sensing mode of the gyroscope is analyzed to be the superposition of in-phase and anti-phase sensing modes. The mechanical sensitivity and bandwidth of the gyroscope structure are conflicted with each other and both governed by the frequency difference between sensing and drive modes (min {Δω1, Δω2}). The sensing mode force rebalancing combs stimulation method (FRCSM) is presented to simulate the Coriolis force, and based on this method, the gyro's dynamic characteristics are tested. The sensing closed- loop controller is achieved by operational amplifier based on phase lead method, which enable the magnitude margin and phase margin of the system to reach 7.21 dB and 34.6° respectively, and the closed-loop system also expands gyro bandwidth from 13 Hz (sensing open-loop) to 102 Hz (sensing closed-loop). What's more, the turntable test results show that the sensing closed-loop works stably in wide-temperature range (from -40 °C to 60 °C) and the bandwidth values are 107 Hz @-40 °C and 97 Hz @60 °C. The results indicate that the higher temperature causes lower bandwidth, and verify the simulation results are 103 Hz @-40 °C and 98.2 Hz @60 °C. The new bottleneck of the closed loop bandwidth is the valley generated by conjugate zeros, which is formed by superposition of sensing modes.

  7. Fiber ring laser sensor based on Fabry-Perot cavity interferometer for temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hui; Ma, Lei; Xiong, Hui; Zhang, Yunshan; Li, Yong Tao

    2018-01-01

    A ring laser temperature sensor based on a novel reflective fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer air cavity is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The reflective F-P air cavity, which consists of a segment of glass capillary inserted between two single-mode fibers, is utilized as a sensing element as well as as a filter in the fiber ring cavity. As temperature increases, the reflection spectra of the F-P sensor move towards the longer wavelength, and then cause lasing wavelength shifts. By monitoring the variation of lasing wavelength, we obtain a temperature sensor system with a high temperature sensitivity of 0.249 nm °C-1, a narrow 3 dB bandwidth of 0.1514 nm, and a high signal-to-noise ratio of 52 dB. Moreover, it is convenient to fabricate the sensor head, and the stability is very good, giving it a wide range of applications.

  8. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective sheathing of the pipe; this paper aims at testing the feasibility of detecting leakages with temporary introduced fiber optic cable inside the pipe. The detection and localization were tested in a laboratory experiment. The intrusion of water from leakages into the pipe, producing a local temperature drop, served as indicator for leakages. Measurements were taken under varying measurement conditions, including the number of leakages as well as the positioning of the fiber optic cable. Experiments showed that leakages could be detected accurately with the proposed methodology, when measuring resolution, temperature gradient and measurement time were properly selected. Despite the successful application of DTS for leakage detection in this lab environment, challenges in real system applications may arise from temperature gradients within the pipe system over longer distances and the placement of the cable into the real pipe system.

  9. Self-sensing of temperature rises on light emitting diode based optrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkhoda, Fahimeh; Soltan, Ahmed; Ponon, Nikhil; Jackson, Andrew; O’Neill, Anthony; Degenaar, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Objective. This work presents a method to determine the surface temperature of microphotonic medical implants like LEDs. Our inventive step is to use the photonic emitter (LED) employed in an implantable device as its own sensor and develop readout circuitry to accurately determine the surface temperature of the device. Approach. There are two primary classes of applications where microphotonics could be used in implantable devices; opto-electrophysiology and fluorescence sensing. In such scenarios, intense light needs to be delivered to the target. As blue wavelengths are scattered strongly in tissue, such delivery needs to be either via optic fibres, two-photon approaches or through local emitters. In the latter case, as light emitters generate heat, there is a potential for probe surfaces to exceed the 2 °C regulatory. However, currently, there are no convenient mechanisms to monitor this in situ. Main results. We present the electronic control circuit and calibration method to monitor the surface temperature change of implantable optrode. The efficacy is demonstrated in air, saline, and brain. Significance. This paper, therefore, presents a method to utilize the light emitting diode as its own temperature sensor.

  10. Mapping high-resolution soil moisture and properties using distributed temperature sensing data and an adaptive particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrated a new method for mapping high-resolution (spatial: 1 m, and temporal: 1 h) soil moisture by assimilating distributed temperature sensing (DTS) observed soil temperatures at intermediate scales. In order to provide robust soil moisture and property estimates, we first proposed...

  11. An Examination of Body Temperature for the Rocky Intertidal Mussel species, Mytilus californianus, Using Remotely Sensed Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J.; Liff, H.; Lakshmi, V.

    2012-12-01

    Temperature is considered to be one of the most important physical factors in determining organismal distribution and physiological performance of species in rocky intertidal ecosystems, especially the growth and survival of mussels. However, little is known about the spatial and temporal patterns of temperature in intertidal ecosystems or how those patterns affect intertidal mussel species because of limitations in data collection. We collected in situ temperature at Strawberry Hill, Oregon USA using mussel loggers embedded among the intertidal mussel species, Mytilus californianus. Remotely sensed surface temperatures were used in conjunction with in situ weather and ocean data to determine if remotely sensed surface temperatures can be used as a predictor for changes in the body temperature of a rocky intertidal mussel species. The data used in this study was collected between January 2003 and December 2010. The mussel logger temperatures were compared to in situ weather data collected from a local weather station, ocean data collected from a NOAA buoy, and remotely sensed surface temperatures collected from NASA's sun-synchronous Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Earth Observing System Aqua and EOS Terra satellites. Daily surface temperatures were collected from four pixel locations which included two sea surface temperature (SST) locations and two land surface temperature (LST) locations. One of the land pixels was chosen to represent the intertidal surface temperature (IST) because it was located within the intertidal zone. As expected, all surface temperatures collected via satellite were significantly correlated to each other and the associated in situ temperatures. Examination of temperatures from the off-shore NOAA buoy and the weather station provide evidence that remotely sensed temperatures were similar to in situ temperature data and explain more variability in mussel logger temperatures than the in situ temperatures. Our

  12. Synthesis, characterization and performance of zinc ferrite nanorods for room temperature sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Archana; Singh, Ajendra [Macromolecular Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Singh, Satyendra, E-mail: satyendra_nano84@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, U.P. (India); Tandon, Poonam [Macromolecular Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Yadav, B.C. [Department of Applied Physics, School for Physical Sciences, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Lucknow 226025, U.P. (India); Yadav, R.R. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, U.P. (India)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Fabrication of zinc ferrite thin film LPG and CO{sub 2} gas sensors. • Morphological growth of nanorods. • Significant advancement towards the fabrication of a reliable LPG sensor. • A new pathway to produce nanorods as sensorial material. - Abstract: In the present communication, nanorods of zinc ferrite was synthesized and fabricated by employing sol–gel spin coating process. The synthesized material was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, acoustic particle sizer, atomic force microscopy, UV–visible absorption and infrared spectroscopic techniques. Thermal properties were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The XRD reveals cubic spinel structure with minimum crystallite size 10 nm. SEM image of the film shows porous surface morphology with uniform distribution of nanorods. The band gap of the zinc ferrite nanorods was found 3.80 eV using the Tauc plot. ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} shows weak super paramagnetic behavior at room temperature investigated using the vibrating sample magnetometer. Further, the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) sensing properties of the fabricated film were investigated at room temperature (25 °C). More variations in electrical resistance were observed for LPG in comparison to CO{sub 2} gas. The parameters such as lattice constant, X-ray density, porosity and specific surface area were also calculated for the better understanding of the observed gas sensing properties. High sensitivity and percentage sensor response, small response and recovery times, good reproducibility and stability characterized the fabricated sensor for the detection of LPG at room temperature.

  13. Joint positioning sense, perceived force level and two-point discrimination tests of young and active elderly adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila G. Franco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Changes in the proprioceptive system are associated with aging. Proprioception is important to maintaining and/or recovering balance and to reducing the risk of falls.Objective:To compare the performance of young and active elderly adults in three proprioceptive tests.Method:Twenty-one active elderly participants (66.9±5.5 years and 21 healthy young participants (24.6±3.9 years were evaluated in the following tests: perception of position of the ankle and hip joints, perceived force level of the ankle joint, and two-point discrimination of the sole of the foot.Results:No differences (p>0.05 were found between groups for the joint position and perceived force level. On the other hand, the elderly participants showed lower sensitivity in the two-point discrimination (higher threshold when compared to the young participants (p < 0.01.Conclusion:Except for the cutaneous plantar sensitivity, the active elderly participants had maintained proprioception. Their physical activity status may explain similarities between groups for the joint position sense and perceived force level, however it may not be sufficient to prevent sensory degeneration with aging.

  14. Joint positioning sense, perceived force level and two-point discrimination tests of young and active elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Priscila G; Santos, Karini B; Rodacki, André L F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the proprioceptive system are associated with aging. Proprioception is important to maintaining and/or recovering balance and to reducing the risk of falls. To compare the performance of young and active elderly adults in three proprioceptive tests. Twenty-one active elderly participants (66.9 ± 5.5 years) and 21 healthy young participants (24.6 ± 3.9 years) were evaluated in the following tests: perception of position of the ankle and hip joints, perceived force level of the ankle joint, and two-point discrimination of the sole of the foot. No differences (p>0.05) were found between groups for the joint position and perceived force level. On the other hand, the elderly participants showed lower sensitivity in the two-point discrimination (higher threshold) when compared to the young participants (p elderly participants had maintained proprioception. Their physical activity status may explain similarities between groups for the joint position sense and perceived force level, however it may not be sufficient to prevent sensory degeneration with aging.

  15. Optical and structural characterization of pulsed laser deposited ruby thin films for temperature sensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Satchi [Laser and Photonics Lab, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Khare, Alika, E-mail: alika@iitg.ernet.in [Laser and Photonics Lab, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epitaxial ruby thin film is deposited on sapphire substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PL spectra for R lines show highly crystalline stress free film with FWHM of 11.4 cm{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PLD ruby thin film can be used as photonics based temperature sensor. - Abstract: The ruby thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique in an atmosphere of oxygen using ruby pellet, indigenously prepared by mixing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in appropriate proportion. The characteristics R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines at 694.2 nm and 692.7 nm in the photoluminescence spectra of target pellet as well as that of PLD thin films, confirmed the ruby phase in both. The XRD and Raman spectra confirmed deposition of c-axis oriented crystalline ruby thin film on sapphire substrate. Effect of deposition time, substrate and deposition temperature on PLD grown thin films of ruby are reported. The intensity of R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines of PLD ruby thin films increased enormously after annealing the film at 1000 Degree-Sign C for 2 h. The film deposited on sapphire substrate for 2 h was 260 nm thick and the corresponding deposition rate was 2.16 nm/min. This film was subjected to temperature dependent photoluminescence studies. The peak positions of R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines and corresponding line width of PLD ruby thin film were observed to be blue shifted with decrease in temperature. R{sub 1} line position sensitivity, d{nu}{sup Macron }/dT, cm{sup -1}/K in the range 138-368 K was very well fitted to linear fit and hence can be used as temperature sensor in this range.

  16. Water loss at normal enamel histological points during air drying at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Medeiros, R C G; De Lima, T A S; Gouveia, C R; De Sousa, F B

    2013-06-01

    This in vitro study aimed to quantify water loss at histological points in ground sections of normal enamel during air drying at room temperature (25°C) and relative humidity of 50%. From each of 10 ground sections of erupted permanent human normal enamel, three histological points (n = 30) located at 100, 300 and 500 μm from enamel surface and along a transversal following prisms paths were characterized regarding the mineral, organic and water volumes. Water loss during air drying was from 0 to 48 h. Drying occurred with both falling and constant-drying rates, and drying stabilization times (Teq ) ranged from 0.5 to 11 h with a mean 0.26 (±0.12)% weight loss. In some samples (n = 5; 15 points), Teq increased as a function of the distance from the enamel surface, and drying occurred at an apparent diffusion rate of 3.47 × 10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹. Our data provide evidence of air drying resulting in air replacing enamel's loosely bound water in prisms sheaths following a unidirectional water diffusion rate of 3.47 × 10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹ (from the original enamel surface inward), not necessarily resulting in water evaporating directly into air, with important implications for transport processes and optical and mechanical properties. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Analysis of temperature data over semi-arid Botswana: trends and break points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Adedoyin, Akintayo; Nkoni, Godiraone; Ramaphane, Galebonwe; Wiston, Modise; Chimidza, Oyapo

    2017-06-01

    Climate change is a global challenge which impacts negatively on sustainable rural livelihoods, public health and economic development, more especially for communities in Southern Africa. Assessment of indices that signify climate change can inform formulation of relevant adaptation strategies and policies for the communities. Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is acknowledged as an expedient measure of the scourge as it is sensitive to variations in radiative energy balance. In this study, a long-term (1961-2010) daily temperature data obtained from nine (9) synoptic stations in Botswana were analyzed for monotonic trends and epochal changes in annual maximum (T max), minimum (T min) temperatures and DTR time series. Most of the considered stations were along the Kalahari Transect, a region which is at high risk of extensive environmental change due to climate change. Mann-Kendall trend and Lepage tests were applied for trend and change point analysis, respectively. The statistical analysis shows that stations in the southern part of the country experienced significant negative trends in annual DTR at the rate of -0.09 to -0.30 °C per decade due to steeper warming rates in annual T min than annual T max trends. On the contrary, stations in the northern part of the country experienced positive trends in annual DTR brought about by either a decreasing annual T min trend which outstripped annual T max or annual T max which outpaced annual T min. The increasing trends in DTR varied from 0.25 to 0.67 °C per decade. For most of the stations, the most significant annual DTR trends change point was in 1982 which coincided with the reversal of atmospheric circulation patterns.

  18. Using Distributed Temperature Sensing for evaporation measurements: background, verification, and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; van Iersel, Tara; Jiménez Rodríguez, Cesar; Luxemburg, Willem; Cisneros Vaca, Cesar; Ucer, Murat

    2017-04-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) is a relatively new method for measuring latent and sensible heat fluxes. The method has been successfully tested before on multiple sites (Euser, 2014). It uses a glass fibre optic cable of which the temperature can be measured every 12.5cm. By placing the cable vertically along a structure, the air temperature profile can be measured. If the cable is wrapped with cloth and kept wet (akin to a psychrometer), a vertical wet-bulb temperature gradient over height can be calculated. From these dry and wet-bulb temperatures over the height the Bowen ratio is determined and together with the energy balance the latent and sensible heat can be determined. To verify the measurements of the DTS based Bowen ratio method (BR-DTS) we assessed in detail; the accuracy of the air temperature and wet-bulb temperature measurements, the influence of solar radiation and wind on these temperatures, and a comparison to standard methods of evaporation measurement. We tested the performance of the BR-DTS on a 45m high tower in a tall mixed forest in the centre of the Netherlands in August. The average tree height is 30m, hence we measure temperature gradients above, in, and underneath the canopy. We found that solar radiation has a significant effect on the temperature measurements due to heating of the cable coating and leads to deviations up to 2° C. By using cables with different coating thickness we could theoretically correct for this effect, but this introduces too much uncertainty for calculating the temperature gradient. By installing screens the effect of direct sunlight on the cable is sufficiently reduced, and the correlation of the cable temperature with reference air temperature sensors is very high (R2=0.988 to 0.998). Wind speed seems to have a minimal effect on the measured wet-bulb temperature, both below and above the canopy. The latent heat fluxes of the BR-DTS were compared to an eddy covariance system using data from 10 days

  19. Climate-monitoring CubeSat mission (CM2): a project for global mesopause temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Richard A.; Watchorn, Steven

    2011-10-01

    The goals of the Climate Monitoring CubeSat Mission (CM2) are to accelerate climate projection by obtaining global temperature, tidal and wave measurements with a simple CubeSat-based imaging spectrograph; and to demonstrate how a high-resolution imaging spectrograph can be deployed on a CubeSat satellite. In the middle atmosphere (50 - 100 km), beyond the reach of balloons or satellites, thermal signatures of CO2 radiation and wave activity have been largely missing from climate model inputs. This paper outlines an instrument to advance the state of the art in atmospheric climate projection by providing critical global measurements of middle-atmosphere temperatures and waves with a CubeSatscale imaging spectrograph. The CM2 will remotely sense middle-atmosphere temperatures and waves at ~90 km by analyzing spectra of intrinsically bright molecular oxygen emissions at near-infrared wavelengths in the O2 atmospheric band. The core instrument will be a miniaturized imaging spectrograph based on a monolithic spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS). This spectrograph will have sensitivity and spectral resolution to extract temperatures with 10° K precision and waves with 4 km scale resolution along a ~200 km cross-track swath. The SHS is significantly more robust than conventional interferometers, and thus better suited to space-based observation. Acquiring high-resolution middle-atmosphere temperature, tidal, and wave data on a daily, global basis will significantly improve climate models, and will help assess long-term greenhouse gas mitigation policy impact on upper-atmosphere thermal signatures. The CM2 program will also establish the efficacy of highresolution CubeSat-based broadband (near-IR to UV) spectroscopy for application to other atmospheric research missions.

  20. Low temperature sensing in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) is mediated through an increased response to auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, P L; Wilkinson, C; Franssen, H M; Balk, P A; van der Plas, L H; Weisbeek, P J; Douwe de Boer, A

    2000-03-01

    Tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) is a bulbous plant species that requires a period of low temperature for proper growth and flowering. The mechanism of sensing the low temperature period is unknown. The study presented in this paper shows that the essential developmental change in tulip bulbs during cold treatment is an increase in sensitivity to the phytohormone auxin. This is demonstrated using a model system consisting of isolated internodes grown on tissue culture medium containing different combinations of the phytohormones auxin and gibberellin. Using mathematical modelling, equations taken from the field of enzyme kinetics were fitted through the data. By doing so it became apparent that longer periods of low temperature resulted in an increased maximum response at a lower auxin concentration. Besides the cold treatment, gibberellin also enhances the response to auxin in the internodes in this in vitro system. A working model describing the relationship between the cold requirement, gibberellin action and auxin sensitivity is put forward. Possible analogies with other cold-requiring processes such as vernalization and stratification, and the interaction of auxin and gibberellin in the stalk elongation process in other plant species are discussed.

  1. Superior Self-Powered Room-Temperature Chemical Sensing with Light-Activated Inorganic Halides Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongjun; Zhang, Meng; Bo, Renheng; Barugkin, Chog; Zheng, Jianghui; Ma, Qingshan; Huang, Shujuan; Ho-Baillie, Anita W Y; Catchpole, Kylie R; Tricoli, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid halide perovskite is one of the promising light absorber and is intensively investigated for many optoelectronic applications. Here, the first prototype of a self-powered inorganic halides perovskite for chemical gas sensing at room temperature under visible-light irradiation is presented. These devices consist of porous network of CsPbBr 3 (CPB) and can generate an open-circuit voltage of 0.87 V under visible-light irradiation, which can be used to detect various concentrations of O 2 and parts per million concentrations of medically relevant volatile organic compounds such as acetone and ethanol with very quick response and recovery time. It is observed that O 2 gas can passivate the surface trap sites in CPB and the ambipolar charge transport in the perovskite layer results in a distinct sensing mechanism compared with established semiconductors with symmetric electrical response to both oxidizing and reducing gases. The platform of CPB-based gas sensor provides new insights for the emerging area of wearable sensors for personalized and preventive medicine. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. New Scheme for Validating Remote-Sensing Land Surface Temperature Products with Station Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Continuous land-surface temperature (LST observations from ground-based stations are an important reference dataset for validating remote-sensing LST products. However, a lack of evaluations of the representativeness of station observations limits the reliability of validation results. In this study, a new practical validation scheme is presented for validating remote-sensing LST products that includes a key step: assessing the spatial representativeness of ground-based LST measurements. Three indicators, namely, the dominant land-cover type (DLCT, relative bias (RB, and average structure scale (ASS, are established to quantify the representative levels of station observations based on the land-cover type (LCT and LST reference maps with high spatial resolution. We validated MODIS LSTs using station observations from the Heihe River Basin (HRB in China. The spatial representative evaluation steps show that the representativeness of observations greatly differs among stations and varies with different vegetation growth and other factors. Large differences in the validation results occur when using different representative level observations, which indicates a large potential for large error during the traditional T-based validation scheme. Comparisons show that the new validation scheme greatly improves the reliability of LST product validation through high-level representative observations.

  3. A review on remotely sensed land surface temperature anomaly as an earthquake precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshuman; Singh, Shaktiman; Sam, Lydia; Joshi, P. K.; Bhardwaj, Akanksha; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-12-01

    The low predictability of earthquakes and the high uncertainty associated with their forecasts make earthquakes one of the worst natural calamities, capable of causing instant loss of life and property. Here, we discuss the studies reporting the observed anomalies in the satellite-derived Land Surface Temperature (LST) before an earthquake. We compile the conclusions of these studies and evaluate the use of remotely sensed LST anomalies as precursors of earthquakes. The arrival times and the amplitudes of the anomalies vary widely, thus making it difficult to consider them as universal markers to issue earthquake warnings. Based on the randomness in the observations of these precursors, we support employing a global-scale monitoring system to detect statistically robust anomalous geophysical signals prior to earthquakes before considering them as definite precursors.

  4. Zeonex-PMMA microstructured polymer optical FBGs for simultaneous humidity and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Pedersen, Jens Kristian Mølgaard; Fasano, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    ) is based on two separate in-line fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) inscribed in the fabricated mPOF. A root mean square deviation of 0.8% RH and 0.6°C in the range of 10%-90% RH and 20°C-80°C was found. The developed mPOFBG sensor constitutes an efficient route toward low-cost, easy-to-fabricate and compact......In this Letter, we report for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the fabrication and characterization of a Zeonex/PMMA microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) Bragg grating sensor for simultaneous monitoring of relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The sensing element (probe...

  5. Application of remote sensing to thermal pollution analysis. [satellite sea surface temperature measurement assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, H. W.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Sengupta, S.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical model development program for near-field thermal plume discharge and far field general circulation in coastal regions is being carried on at the University of Miami Clean Energy Research Institute. The objective of the program is to develop a generalized, three-dimensional, predictive model for thermal pollution studies. Two regions of specific application of the model are the power plants sites at the Biscayne Bay and Hutchinson Island area along the Florida coastline. Remote sensing from aircraft as well as satellites are used in parallel with in situ measurements to provide information needed for the development and verification of the mathematical model. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to identify problems and limitations of the presently available satellite data and to develop methods for enhancing and enlarging thermal infrared displays for mesoscale sea surface temperature measurements.

  6. Structure and temperature distribution of a stagnation-point Diesel spray premixed flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.-C.; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2005-01-01

    We experimentally examine the flow and flame characteristics of a stagnation point premixed flame influenced by Diesel sprays. In the experiment, distributions of drop size, drop axial velocity and its fluctuation as well as the gas phase temperature are measured by using the phase-doppler particle analyzer and a thin thermocouple. As might be expected, similar to the gasoline spray flame, the partially prevaporized Diesel spray flame is composed of a weak blue flame zone, indicating the burning of methane fuel, and a strongly luminous zone containing many bright yellow lines showing the passages of burning Diesel drops. It is found that the axial temperature profiles at various radial positions consist of an upstream preheat region, a maximum temperature downstream of the blue flame and a downstream region with a declined temperature curve because of the heat loss to the quartz plate. The SMD of the drops increases from the upstream preheat region to a maximum near the blue flame and then decreases in the downstream burning zone. Along the axial position, the drops are decelerated in front of the flame but accelerated when passing through the blue flame. It is also interesting to note that the radial distributions of SMD and number density of drops in the upstream region are mainly influenced by small drops flowing outward, since the upstream vaporization of Diesel drops is very limited; while those in the downstream region should be influenced by both small drops flowing outward and Diesel drops burning. From the experimental observations, there are impinging and bouncing of Diesel drops downstream of the spray flame near the quartz plate, resulting in a small amount of soot and carbon deposits on the wall. These interesting phenomena will be reported in the near future

  7. Temperature Optimized Ammonia and Ethanol Sensing Using Ce Doped Tin Oxide Thin Films in a Novel Flow Metric Gas Sensing Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Govardhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple process of gas sensing is represented here using Ce doped tin oxide nanomaterial based thin film sensor. A novel flow metric gas chamber has been designed and utilized for gas sensing. Doping plays a vital role in enhancing the sensing properties of nanomaterials. Ce doped tin oxide was prepared by hydrothermal method and the same has been used to fabricate a thin film for sensing. The microstructure and morphology of the prepared materials were analysed by SEM, XRD, and FTIR analysis. The SEM images clearly show that doping can clamp down the growth of the large crystallites and can lead to large agglomeration spheres. Thin film gas sensors were formed from undoped pure SnO2 and Ce doped SnO2. The sensors were exposed to ammonia and ethanol gases. The responses of the sensors to different concentrations (50–500 ppm of ammonia and ethanol at different operating temperatures (225°C–500°C were studied. Results show that a good sensitivity towards ammonia was obtained with Ce doped SnO2 thin film sensor at an optimal operating temperature of 325°C. The Ce doped sensor also showed good selectivity towards ammonia when compared with ethanol. Pure SnO2 showed good sensitivity with ethanol when compared with Ce doped SnO2 thin film sensor. Response time of the sensor and its stability were also studied.

  8. Remote Sensing the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius, Thermodynamic Phase, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. V.; Marshak, A.; Remer, L. A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Koren, I.; Correia, A. L.; Zubko, V.; Artaxo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument) that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

  9. Consistency of the National Realization of Dew-Point Temperature Using Standard Humidity Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyon, R.; Vicente, T.

    2012-09-01

    The comparison of two high-range standard humidity generators used by Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial to realize dew-point temperature in the range from -10 °C to +95 °C has been performed using state-of-the art transfer standards and measurement procedures, over their overlapping range from -10 °C to +75 °C. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of agreement between the two generators, to determine any bias, and to quantify the level of consistency of the two realizations. The measurement procedures adopted to minimize the effect of the influence factors due to the transfer standards are described, and the results are discussed in the context of the declared calibration and measurement capabilities (CMCs).

  10. Remote sensing optical instrumentation for enhanced space weather monitoring from the L1 and L5 Lagrange points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, S.; Puschmann, K. G.; Luntama, J. P.

    2017-09-01

    As part of the Space Situational Awareness Programme (SSA), ESA has initiated the assessment of two missions currently foreseen to be implemented to enable enhanced space weather monitoring. These missions utilize the positioning of satellites at the Lagrangian L1 and L5 points. These Phase 0 or Pre-Phase A mission studies are about to be completed and will thereby have soon passed the Mission Definition Review. Phase A studies are planned to start in 2017. The space weather monitoring system currently considers four remote sensing optical instruments and several in-situ instruments to analyse the Sun and the solar wind conditions, in order to provide early warnings of increased solar activity and to identify and mitigate potential threats to society and ground, airborne and space based infrastructure. The suggested optical instruments take heritage from ESA and NASA science missions like SOHO, STEREO and Solar Orbiter, but the instruments are foreseen to be optimized for operational space weather monitoring purposes with high reliability and robustness demands. The instruments are required to provide high quality measurements particularly during severe space weather events. The program intends to utilize the results of the on-going ESA instrument prototyping and technology development activities, and to initiate pre-developments of the operational space weather instruments to ensure the required maturity before the mission implementation.

  11. Amplitude Sensing below the Zero-Point Fluctuations with a Two-Dimensional Trapped-Ion Mechanical Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, K A; Bohnet, J G; Sawyer, B C; Britton, J W; Bollinger, J J

    2017-06-30

    We present a technique to measure the amplitude of a center-of-mass (c.m.) motion of a two-dimensional ion crystal of ∼100 ions. By sensing motion at frequencies far from the c.m. resonance frequency, we experimentally determine the technique's measurement imprecision. We resolve amplitudes as small as 50 pm, 40 times smaller than the c.m. mode zero-point fluctuations. The technique employs a spin-dependent, optical-dipole force to couple the mechanical oscillation to the electron spins of the trapped ions, enabling a measurement of one quadrature of the c.m. motion through a readout of the spin state. We demonstrate sensitivity limits set by spin projection noise and spin decoherence due to off-resonant light scattering. When performed on resonance with the c.m. mode frequency, the technique demonstrated here can enable the detection of extremely weak forces (limits and search for physics beyond the standard model.

  12. New England observed and predicted July maximum negative stream/river temperature daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum negative daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  13. New England observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  14. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  15. Wet-bulb, dew point, and air temperature trends in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moratiel, R.; Soriano, B.; Centeno, A.; Spano, D.; Snyder, R. L.

    2017-10-01

    This study analyses trends of mean ( T m), maximum ( T x), minimum ( T n), dew point ( T d), and wet-bulb temperatures ( T w) on an annual, seasonal, and monthly time scale over Spain during the period 1981-2010. The main purpose was to determine how temperature and humidity changes are impacting on T w, which is probably a better measure of climate change than temperature alone. In this study, 43 weather stations were used to detect data trends using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test and the Sen method to estimate the slope of trends. Significant linear trends observed for T m, T x, and T n versus year were 56, 58, and 47 % of the weather stations, respectively, with temperature ranges between 0.2 and 0.4 °C per decade. The months with bigger trends were April, May, June, and July with the highest trend for T x. The spatial behaviour of T d and T w was variable, with various locations showing trends from -0.6 to +0.3 °C per decade for T d and from -0.4 to +0.5 °C per decade for T w. Both T d and T w showed negative trends for July, August, September, November, and December. Comparing the trends versus time of each variable versus each of the other variables exhibited poor relationships, which means you cannot predict the trend of one variable from the trend of another variable. The trend of T x was not related to the trend of T n. The trends of T x, T m, and T n versus time were unrelated to the trends versus time of either T d or T w. The trend of T w showed a high coefficient of determination with the trend of T d with an annual value of R 2 = 0.86. Therefore, the T w trend is more related to changes in humidity than temperature.

  16. POINT 2012: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    2012-02-26

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B [R1]. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes: (1) publicly available nuclear data (the current ENDF/B data, available on-line at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/) and, (2) publicly available computer codes (the current PREPRO codes, available on-line at the Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, http://www-nds.iaea.or.at/ndspub/endf/prepro/) and, (3) My own personal computer located in my home. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and described in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results: by its very nature I consider this data to be born in the public domain.

  17. POINT 2012: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B [R1]. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes: (1) publicly available nuclear data (the current ENDF/B data, available on-line at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/) and, (2) publicly available computer codes (the current PREPRO codes, available on-line at the Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, http://www-nds.iaea.or.at/ndspub/endf/prepro/) and, (3) My own personal computer located in my home. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and described in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results: by its very nature I consider this data to be born in the public domain.

  18. Temperature evolution of subharmonic gap structures in MgB{sub 2}/Nb point-contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubileo, F. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT e Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: giubileo@sa.infn.it; Bobba, F.; Scarfato, A.; Piano, S. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT e Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Aprili, M. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie en Lumiere Polarisee, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); CSNSM-CNRS, Bat. 108 Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Cucolo, A.M. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT e Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)

    2007-09-01

    We have performed point-contact spectroscopy experiments on superconducting micro-constrictions between Nb tips and high quality MgB{sub 2} pellets. We measured the temperature evolution (between 4.2 K and 300 K) of the current-voltage (I-V) and of the dynamical conductance (dI/dV-V) characteristics. Above the Nb critical temperature T{sub C}{sup Nb}, the conductance of the constrictions behaves as predicted by the BTK model for S/N contacts being Nb in its normal state below T{sub C}{sup Nb}, the contacts show Josephson current and subharmonic gap structures, due to multiple Andreev reflections. These observations clearly indicate the coupling of the MgB{sub 2} 3D {pi}-band with the Nb superconducting order parameter. We found {delta}{sub {pi}} = 2.4 {+-} 0.2 meV for the three-dimensional gap of MgB{sub 2}.

  19. Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity at Hinkley Point 'B': 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, T.A.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity made at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR in 1981 are described. These measurements follow earlier tests reported in e.g. RD/B/N4846 and are part of a series of measurements designed to support theoretical estimates of the change of fuel temperature coefficient as a function of core irradiation. Low and high power measurements were made at a mean core irradiation of 1170GWD. As previously, the measurements at both power levels show agreement with theoretical predictions to within the estimated experimental errors. Recent measurements (mean core irradiation >500GWD) show evidence of a small systematic difference between measured and theoretical values with the experimental values being approximately equal to 0.1mN/ 0 C more positive than the theoretical ones. The measured value of αsub(U) at high power was -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C and the low power value, corrected theoretically to normal operating conditions, was also -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C. (author)

  20. Verifying the distributed temperature sensing Bowen ratio method for measuring evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Willem; Cisneros Vaca, César; Ucer, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation is an important process in the hydrological cycle, therefore measuring evaporation accurately is essential for water resource management, hydrological management and climate change models. Current techniques to measure evaporation, like eddy covariance systems, scintillometers, or lysimeters, have their limitations and therefore cannot always be used to estimate evaporation correctly. Also the conventional Bowen ratio surface energy balance method has as drawback that two sensors are used, which results in large measuring errors. In Euser et al. (2014) a new method was introduced, the DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS), that overcomes this drawback. It uses a distributed temperature sensing technique (DTS) whereby a fibre optic cable is placed vertically, going up and down along a measurement tower. One stretch of the cable is dry, the other wrapped with cloth and kept wet, akin to a psychrometer. Using this, the wet and dry bulb temperatures are determined every 12.5 cm over the height, from which the Bowen ratio can be determined. As radiation and wind have an effect on the cooling and heating of the cable's sheath as well, the DTS cables do not necessarily always measure dry and wet bulb temperature of the air accurately. In this study the accuracy in representing the dry and wet bulb temperatures of the cable are verified, and evaporation observations of the BR-DTS method are compared to Eddy Covariance (EC) measurements. Two ways to correct for errors due to wind and solar radiation warming up the DTS cables are presented: one for the dry cable and one for the wet cable. The measurements were carried out in a pine forest near Garderen (The Netherlands), along a 46-meter tall scaffold tower (15 meters above the canopy). Both the wet (Twet) and dry (Tdry) temperature of the DTS cable were compared to temperature and humidity (from which Twet is derived) observations from sensors placed along the height of the tower. Underneath the canopy, where there was

  1. Preparation and Extraordinary Room-Temperature CO Sensing Capabilities of Pd-SnO₂ Composite Nanoceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengye; Sun, Beilei; Jiang, Zhengyong; Liu, Yong; Wang, Xuening; Tang, Zilong; Wang, Yu; Chen, Wanping

    2018-06-01

    Pd-SnO2 composite nanoceramics have been prepared from SnO2 and Pd nanoparticles through traditional pressing and sintering. Their responses to CO at room temperature are found to depend greatly on the content of Pd. For those samples with 1.0 and 5.0 mol% Pd, their resistance increases dramatically upon being exposed to CO in air; while for samples of 0.2 mol% Pd, their resistance decreases greatly upon being exposed to CO in air, and extraordinary room-temperature CO sensing capabilities, including high sensitivities around 15, short response time of 20 s and recovery time of 60 s for 100 ppm CO in air, a high selectivity against H2, have been observed for them. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed that Pd2+ was formed in samples of 1 mol% Pd, while both Pd2+ and Pd4+ were formed in samples of 0.2 mol% Pd. It is proposed that for Pd-SnO2 composite nanoceramics, Pd2+ is responsible for CO-induced increase while Pd4+ is responsible for CO-induced decrease in resistance.

  2. γ-irradiation induced zinc ferrites and their enhanced room-temperature ammonia gas sensing properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, S. D.; Awasarmol, V. V.; Ghule, B. G.; Shaikh, S. F.; Gore, S. K.; Sharma, R. P.; Pawar, P. P.; Mane, R. S.

    2018-03-01

    Zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs), synthesized using a facile and cost-effective sol-gel auto-combustion method, were irradiated with 2 and 5 kGy γ-doses using 60Co as a radioactive source. Effect of γ-irradiation on the structure, morphology, pore-size and pore-volume and room-temperature (300 K) gas sensor performance has been measured and reported. Both as-synthesized and γ-irradiated ZnFe2O4 NPs reveal remarkable gas sensor activity to ammonia in contrast to methanol, ethanol, acetone and toluene volatile organic gases. The responses of pristine, 2 and 5 kGy γ-irradiated ZnFe2O4 NPs are respectively 55%, 66% and 81% @100 ppm concentration of ammonia, signifying an importance of γ-irradiation for enhancing the sensitivity, selectivity and stability of ZnFe2O4 NPs as ammonia gas sensors. Thereby, due to increase in surface area and crystallinity on γ-doses, the γ-irradiation improves the room-temperature ammonia gas sensing performance of ZnFe2O4.

  3. Fiber optic sensing subsystem for temperature monitoring in space in-flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, S.; Araujo, F.; Pinto, F.; González Torres, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Moreno, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    Fiber Optic Sensor (FOS) technology presents long recognized advantages which enable to mitigate deficient performance of conventional technology in hazard-environments common in spacecraft monitoring applications, such as: multiplexing capability, immunity to EMI/RFI, remote monitoring, small size and weight, electrical insulation, intrinsically safe operation, high sensibility and long term reliability. A key advantage is also the potential reduction of Assembly Integration and Testing (AIT) time achieved by the multiplexing capability and associated reduced harness. In the frame of the ESA's ARTES5.2 and FLPP-Phase 3 programs, Airbus DS-Crisa and FiberSensing are developing a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) - based temperature monitoring system for application in space telecommunication platforms and launchers. The development encompasses both the interrogation unit and the FBG temperature sensors and associated fiber harness. In parallel Airbus DS - Crisa is developing a modular RTU (RTU2015) to provide maximum flexibility and mission-customization capability for RTUs maintaining the ESA's standards at I/O interface level [1]. In this context, the FBG interrogation unit is designed as a module to be compatible, in both physical dimensions and electrical interfaces aspects, with the Electrical Internal Interface Bus of the RTU2015, thus providing the capability for a hybrid electrical and optical monitoring system.

  4. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  5. High Resolution Mapping of Wind Speed Using Active Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayde, C.; Thomas, C. K.; Wagner, J.; Selker, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel approach to continuously measure wind speed simultaneously at thousands of locations using actively heated fiber optics with a distributed temperature sensing system (DTS). Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, this approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface: The temperature difference between the heated surface and ambient air is a function of the convective cooling of the air flowing past the surface. By knowing the thermal properties of the heated surface, the heating input, and ambient temperature, wind speed can be calculated. In our case, the heated surface consists of a thin stainless steel tube that can exceed several km in length. A fiber optic is enclosed within the stainless steel tube to report the heated tube temperature, which in this case was sampled every 0.125 m. Ambient temperature were measured by an independent fiber optic cable located proximally to the stainless steel tube. We will present the theoretical bases of measuring wind speed using heated fiber optic as well as validation of this method in the field. In the field testing, more than 5000 simultaneous wind speed measurements were obtained every 5.5 second at 3 elevations (2m, 1m, and 0.5 m) every 0.125 m along a 230 m transects located across a shallow gulley in Nunn, CO. This method, which provides both air temperature and wind speed spanning four orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1 - 1,000m) opens up many important opportunities for testing basic theories in micro-meteorology regarding spatial scales of turbulent length scales as a function of distance from the earth, development of internal boundary layers, applicability of Taylors hypothesis, etc. The equipment employed, including the heating system, which is available to all US scientists, was provided by CTEMPs.org thanks to the generous grant support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or

  6. The initial freezing point temperature of beef rises with the rise in pH: a short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, M M; Kemp, R M; Cartwright, S; North, M

    2013-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the initial freezing point temperature of meat is affected by pH. Sixty four bovine M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum were classified into two ultimate pH groups: low (6.2) and their cooling and freezing point temperatures were determined. The initial freezing temperatures for beef ranged from -0.9 to -1.5°C (∆=0.6°C) with the higher and lower temperatures associated with high and low ultimate pH respectively. There was a significant correlation (r=+0.73, Pfreezing point temperature in the present study. The outcome of this study has implications for the meat industry where evidence of freezing (ice formation) in a shipment as a result of high pH meat could result in a container load of valuable chilled product being downgraded to a lower value frozen product. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fabrication of ultra-high sensitive and selective CH4 room temperature gas sensing of TiO2nanorods: Detailed study on the annealing temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available . In addition, the 1.0 M TiO2 sensing material annealed at 700 °C also revealed an excellent sensitivity and selectivity to CH(sub4) gas at room temperature compared to other gases (H(sub2), NH(sub3), and NO(sub2)), indicating that the TiO2 nanoparticles...

  8. Technical note: Using distributed temperature sensing for Bowen ratio evaporation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Willem; Jiménez Rodríguez, César; Cisneros Vaca, César; Savenije, Hubert

    2018-01-01

    Rapid improvements in the precision and spatial resolution of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) technology now allow its use in hydrological and atmospheric sciences. Introduced by ) is the use of DTS for measuring the Bowen ratio (BR-DTS), to estimate the sensible and latent heat flux. The Bowen ratio is derived from DTS-measured vertical profiles of the air temperature and wet-bulb temperature. However, in previous research the measured temperatures were not validated, and the cables were not shielded from solar radiation. Additionally, the BR-DTS method has not been tested above a forest before, where temperature gradients are small and energy storage in the air column becomes important. In this paper the accuracy of the wet-bulb and air temperature measurements of the DTS are verified, and the resulting Bowen ratio and heat fluxes are compared to eddy covariance data. The performance of BR-DTS was tested on a 46 m high tower in a mixed forest in the centre of the Netherlands in August 2016. The average tree height is 26 to 30 m, and the temperatures are measured below, in, and above the canopy. Using the vertical temperature profiles the storage of latent and sensible heat in the air column was calculated. We found a significant effect of solar radiation on the temperature measurements, leading to a deviation of up to 3 K. By installing screens, the error caused by sunlight is reduced to under 1 K. Wind speed seems to have a minimal effect on the measured wet-bulb temperature, both below and above the canopy. After a simple quality control, the Bowen ratio measured by DTS correlates well with eddy covariance (EC) estimates (r2 = 0.59). The average energy balance closure between BR-DTS and EC is good, with a mean underestimation of 3.4 W m-2 by the BR-DTS method. However, during daytime the BR-DTS method overestimates the available energy, and during night-time the BR-DTS method estimates the available energy to be more negative. This difference could be

  9. Technical note: Using distributed temperature sensing for Bowen ratio evaporation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schilperoort

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid improvements in the precision and spatial resolution of distributed temperature sensing (DTS technology now allow its use in hydrological and atmospheric sciences. Introduced by is the use of DTS for measuring the Bowen ratio (BR-DTS, to estimate the sensible and latent heat flux. The Bowen ratio is derived from DTS-measured vertical profiles of the air temperature and wet-bulb temperature. However, in previous research the measured temperatures were not validated, and the cables were not shielded from solar radiation. Additionally, the BR-DTS method has not been tested above a forest before, where temperature gradients are small and energy storage in the air column becomes important. In this paper the accuracy of the wet-bulb and air temperature measurements of the DTS are verified, and the resulting Bowen ratio and heat fluxes are compared to eddy covariance data. The performance of BR-DTS was tested on a 46 m high tower in a mixed forest in the centre of the Netherlands in August 2016. The average tree height is 26 to 30 m, and the temperatures are measured below, in, and above the canopy. Using the vertical temperature profiles the storage of latent and sensible heat in the air column was calculated. We found a significant effect of solar radiation on the temperature measurements, leading to a deviation of up to 3 K. By installing screens, the error caused by sunlight is reduced to under 1 K. Wind speed seems to have a minimal effect on the measured wet-bulb temperature, both below and above the canopy. After a simple quality control, the Bowen ratio measured by DTS correlates well with eddy covariance (EC estimates (r2 = 0.59. The average energy balance closure between BR-DTS and EC is good, with a mean underestimation of 3.4 W m−2 by the BR-DTS method. However, during daytime the BR-DTS method overestimates the available energy, and during night-time the BR-DTS method estimates the available energy to be more

  10. Autonomous distributed temperature sensing for long-term heated applications in remote areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-M. Kurth

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Distributed temperature sensing (DTS is a fiber-optical method enabling simultaneous temperature measurements over long distances. Electrical resistance heating of the metallic components of the fiber-optic cable provides information on the thermal characteristics of the cable's environment, providing valuable insight into processes occurring in the surrounding medium, such as groundwater–surface water interactions, dam stability or soil moisture. Until now, heated applications required direct handling of the DTS instrument by a researcher, rendering long-term investigations in remote areas impractical due to the often difficult and time-consuming access to the field site. Remote control and automation of the DTS instrument and heating processes, however, resolve the issue with difficult access. The data can also be remotely accessed and stored on a central database. The power supply can be grid independent, although significant infrastructure investment is required here due to high power consumption during heated applications. Solar energy must be sufficient even in worst case scenarios, e.g. during long periods of intense cloud cover, to prevent system failure due to energy shortage. In combination with storage batteries and a low heating frequency, e.g. once per day or once per week (depending on the season and the solar radiation on site, issues of high power consumption may be resolved. Safety regulations dictate adequate shielding and ground-fault protection, to safeguard animals and humans from electricity and laser sources. In this paper the autonomous DTS system is presented to allow research with heated applications of DTS in remote areas for long-term investigations of temperature distributions in the environment.

  11. Advances in Using Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing to Identify the Mixing of Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Lane, J. W., Jr.; Hare, D. K.; Boutt, D. F.; Voytek, E. B.; Buckley, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) provides thermal data through space and time along linear cables. When installed along a streambed, FO-DTS can capture the influence of upwelling groundwater (GW) as thermal anomalies. The planning of labor-intensive physical measurements can make use of FO-DTS data to target areas of focused GW discharge that can disproportionately affect surface-water (SW) quality and temperature. Typical longitudinal FO-DTS spatial resolution ranges 0.25 to1.0 m, and cannot resolve small-scale water-column mixing or sub-surface diurnal fluctuations. However, configurations where the cable is wrapped around rods can improve the effective vertical resolution to sub-centimeter scales, and the pipes can be actively heated to induce a thermal tracer. Longitudinal streambed and high-resolution vertical arrays were deployed at the upper Delaware River (PA, USA) and the Quashnet River (MA, USA) for aquatic habitat studies. The resultant datasets exemplify the varied uses of FO-DTS. Cold anomalies found along the Delaware River steambed coincide with zones of known mussel populations, and high-resolution vertical array data showed relatively stable in-channel thermal refugia. Cold anomalies at the Quashnet River identified in 2013 were found to persist in 2014, and seepage measurements and water samples at these locations showed high GW flux with distinctive chemistry. Cable location is paramount to seepage identification, particularly in faster flowing deep streams such as the Quashnet and Delaware Rivers where steambed FO-DTS identified many seepage zones with no surface expression. The temporal characterization of seepage dynamics are unique to FO-DTS. However, data from Tidmarsh Farms, a cranberry bog restoration site in MA, USA indicate that in slower flowing shallow steams GW inflow affects surface temperature; therefore infrared imaging can provide seepage location information similar to FO-DTS with substantially less effort.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Distributed Soil Moisture Profiles by Active Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, F.; Van De Giesen, N.; Assouline, S.; Huwald, H.; Lunati, I.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring and measuring the fluctuations of soil moisture at large scales in the filed remains a challenge. Although sensors based on measurement of dielectric properties such as Time Domain Reflectometers (TDR) and capacity-based probes can guarantee reasonable responses, they always operate on limited spatial ranges. On the other hand optical fibers, attached to a Distribute Temperature Sensing (DTS) system, can allow for high precision soil temperature measurements over distances of kilometers. A recently developed technique called Active DTS (ADTS) and consisting of a heat pulse of a certain duration and power along the metal sheath covering the optical fiber buried in the soil, has proven a promising alternative to spatially-limited probes. Two approaches have been investigated to infer distributed soil moisture profiles in the region surrounding the optic fiber cable by analyzing the temperature variations during the heating and the cooling phases. One directly relates the change of temperature to the soil moisture (independently measured) to develop specific calibration curve for the soil used; the other requires inferring the thermal properties and then obtaining the soil moisture by inversion of known relationships. To test and compare the two approaches over a broad range of saturation conditions a large lysimeter has been homogeneously filled with loamy soil and 52 meters of fiber optic cable have been buried in the shallower 0.8 meters in a double coil rigid structure of 15 loops along with a series of capacity-based sensors (calibrated for the soil used) to provide independent soil moisture measurements at the same depths of the optical fiber. Thermocouples have also been wrapped around the fiber to investigate the effects of the insulating cover surrounding the cable, and in between each layer in order to monitor heat diffusion at several centimeters. A high performance DTS has been used to measure the temperature along the fiber optic cable. Several

  13. Self-Evaluation of PANDA-FBG Based Sensing System for Dynamic Distributed Strain and Temperature Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengshi; Murayama, Hideaki; Wada, Daichi

    2017-10-12

    A novel method is introduced in this work for effectively evaluating the performance of the PANDA type polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PANDA-FBG) distributed dynamic strain and temperature sensing system. Conventionally, the errors during the measurement are unknown or evaluated by using other sensors such as strain gauge and thermocouples. This will make the sensing system complicated and decrease the efficiency since more than one kind of sensor is applied for the same measurand. In this study, we used the approximately constant ratio of primary errors in strain and temperature measurement and realized the self-evaluation of the sensing system, which can significantly enhance the applicability, as well as the reliability in strategy making.

  14. Facile synthesis of improved room temperature gas sensing properties of TiO2 nanostructures: Effect of acid treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available and Actuators B: Chemical Facile synthesis of improved room temperature gas sensing properties of TiO2 nanostructures: Effect of acid treatment Z.P. Tshabalalaa,b, D.E. Motaunga,∗, G.H. Mhlongoa,∗, O.M. Ntwaeaborwab,∗ a DST/CSIR, National Centre for Nano...

  15. Facile synthesis of improved room temperature gas sensing properties of TiO2 nanostructures: Effect of acid treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available and Actuators B: Chemical Facile synthesis of improved room temperature gas sensing properties of TiO2 nanostructures: Effect of acid treatment Z.P. Tshabalalaa,b, D.E. Motaunga,∗, G.H. Mhlongoa,∗, O.M. Ntwaeaborwab,∗ a DST/CSIR, National Centre...

  16. Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fiber: fabrication friendly fibers for high temperature and humidity insensitive Bragg grating sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    In the quest of finding the ideal polymer optical fiber (POF) for Bragg grating sensing, we have fabricated and characterized an endlessly single mode microstructured POF (mPOF). This fiber is made from cyclo-olefin homopolymer Zeonex grade 480R which has a very high glass transition temperature...

  17. Determination of land surface temperature and soil moisture from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager remote sensing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wen, J.; Su, Z.; Ma, Y.

    2003-01-01

    An analytical algorithm for the determination of land surface temperature and soil moisture from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI) remote sensing data has been developed in this study. The error analyses indicate that the uncertainties of the enrolled parameters

  18. New luminescent oxygen-sensing and temperature-sensing materials based on gadolinium(III) and europium(III) complexes embedded in an acridone-polystyrene conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, I

    2012-12-01

    New sensing materials have been developed which rely on the use of luminescent europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes with thenoylacetylacetonate embedded in an acridone-polystyrene conjugate. Acridone acts as an antenna which efficiently absorbs violet light. Covalent coupling to the polystyrene backbone prevents aggregation and enables very high antenna loading (16% w/w). Energy transfer from the antenna to the lanthanide complexes results in efficient red luminescence from the Eu(III) complex or green phosphorescence originating from the Gd(III) chelate. The luminescence of the material based on the Eu(III) complex is only slightly affected by oxygen but is highly sensitive to temperature under physiological conditions (20-40 °C). The Gd(III) complex has long phosphorescence decay times of approximately 1 ms and high sensitivity to oxygen. Ultra-thin (250 nm) sensing layers with sufficient absorption at the excitation wavelength enable monitoring of rapid oxygen changes virtually in real time. Immobilization of both complexes in a single matrix results in a dual-luminescence material with emissions almost ideally matching the red and green channels of a digital camera. Thus, oxygen imaging using a very simple and inexpensive set-up can be realized. Additionally, the material can be used for simultaneous sensing of oxygen and temperature.

  19. Construction and in-situ characterisation of high-temperature fixed point cells devoted to industrial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadli Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the activities of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP project HiTeMS one work package is devoted to the development and testing of industrial solutions for long-standing temperature measurement problems at the highest temperatures. LNE-Cnam, NPL, TUBITAK-UME have worked on the design of high temperature fixed points (HTFP suitable for in-situ temperature monitoring to be implemented in the facilities of CEA (Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives. Several high temperature fixed point cells were constructed in these three national metrology institutes (NMIs using a rugged version of cells based on the hybrid design of the laboratory HTFP developed and continuously improved at LNE-Cnam during the last years. The fixed points of interest were Co-C, Ru-C and Re-C corresponding to melting temperatures of 1324 °C, 1953 °C and 2474 °C respectively. The cells were characterised at the NMIs after their construction. Having proved robust enough, they were transported to CEA and tested in an induction furnace and cycled from room temperature to temperatures much above the melting temperatures (> +400 °C with extremely high heating and cooling rates (up to 10 000 K/h. All the cells withstood the tests and the melting plateaus could be observed in all cases.

  20. Calibration of soil moisture flow simulation models aided by the active heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing AHFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Zubelzu, Sergio; Sobrino, Fernando Fernando; Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    Most of the studies dealing with the development of water flow simulation models in soils, are calibrated using experimental data measured by soil probe sensors or tensiometers which locate at specific points in the study area. However since the beginning of the XXI century, the use of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature Measurement for estimating temperature variation along a cable of fiber optic has been assessed in multiple environmental applications. Recently, its application combined with an active heating pulses technique (AHFO) has been reported as a sensor to estimate soil moisture. This method applies a known amount of heat to the soil and monitors the temperature evolution, which mainly depends on the soil moisture content. Thus, it allows estimations of soil water content every 12.5 cm along the fiber optic cable, as long as 1500 m , with 2 % accuracy , every second. This study presents the calibration of a soil water flow model (developed in Hydrus 2D) with the AHFO technique. The model predicts the distribution of soil water content of a green area irrigated by sprinkler irrigation. Several irrigation events have been evaluated in a green area located at the ETSI Agronómica, Agroalimentaria y Biosistemas in Madrid where an installation of 147 m of fiber optic cable at 15 cm depth is deployed. The Distribute Temperature Sensing unit was a SILIXA ULTIMA SR (Silixa Ltd, UK) and has spatial and temporal resolution of 0.29 m. Data logged in the DTS unit before, during and after the irrigation event were used to calibrate the estimations in the Hydrus 2D model during the infiltration and redistribution of soil water content within the irrigation interval. References: Karandish, F., & Šimůnek, J. (2016). A field-modeling study for assessing temporal variations of soil-water-crop interactions under water-saving irrigation strategies. Agricultural Water Management, 178, 291-303. Li, Y., Šimůnek, J., Jing, L., Zhang, Z., & Ni, L. (2014). Evaluation of

  1. Monitoring of Regional Land Surface Temperature in city by Wireless Sensing Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Jin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important environmental factor. The precise monitoring data of LST can provide crucial support for further ecological researches such as the environment change and urban heat island. The Wireless Sensing Network (WSN) is a kind of modern information technology which integrates sensor technology, automatic control technology with data network transmission, storage, processing and analysis technology. As a new kind of data collection method, WSN is innovatively applied to monitor regional LST in different land cover types of city in this study. The LST data with high temporal resolution is obtained from temperature sensors of WSN. The land cover types of city are extracted from WorldView-II image with high resolution. The Southeast University Wuxi Branch campus and its surroundings which covers 2 km2 is chosen as the study area in Wuxi city, Jiangsu province, China. WSN is established to continuously monitor LST in real-time for one week. Then, the heterogeneous pattern of LST is investigated at a fine spatial and temporal scale based on different land cover types. The result shows LST of streets is higher than LST of campus in the daytime, but lower than LST of campus at night. The spatial heterogeneity of LST in the campus is not significant. This is because the number of vehicle was larger in the daytime than that at night, while the population of campus in day and night almost having little change. Notably, the influence of plant activities (e.g. photosynthesis and respiration) on LST can be detected by WSN. This study is a new attempt to monitor regional environment of city by WSN technology. Moreover, compared to traditional methods, WSN technology can improve the detection of LST with finer temporal and spatial resolution.

  2. Phosphorus doped TiO2 as oxygen sensor with low operating temperature and sensing mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Zhizhong; Wang, Jiejie; Liao, Lan; Pan, Haibo; Shen, Shuifa; Chen, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Nano-scale TiO 2 powders doped with phosphorus were prepared by sol–gel method. The characterization of the materials was performed by XRD, BET, FT-IR spectroscopy, Zeta potential measurement and XPS analysis. The results indicate that the phosphorus suppresses the crystal growth and phase transformation and, at the same time, increases the surface area and enhances the sensitivity and selectivity for the P-doped TiO 2 oxygen sensors. In this system, the operating temperature is low, only 116 °C, and the response time is short. The spectra of FT-IR and XPS show that the phosphorus dopant presents as the pentavalent-oxidation state in TiO 2 , further phosphorus can connect with Ti 4+ through the bond of Ti-O-P. The positive shifts of XPS peaks indicate that electron depleted layer of P-doped TiO 2 is narrowed compared with that of pure TiO 2 , and the results of Zeta potential illuminate that the density of surface charge carrier is intensified. The adsorptive active site and Lewis acid characteristics of the surface are reinforced by phosphorus doping, where phosphorus ions act as a new active site. Thus, the sensitivity of P-doped TiO 2 is improved, and the 5 mol% P-doped sample has the optimal oxygen sensing properties.

  3. Comparison of Land Skin Temperature from a Land Model, Remote Sensing, and In-situ Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aihui; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Draper, Clara Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Land skin temperature (Ts) is an important parameter in the energy exchange between the land surface and atmosphere. Here hourly Ts from the Community Land Model Version 4.0, MODIS satellite observations, and in-situ observations in 2003 were compared. Compared with the in-situ observations over four semi-arid stations, both MODIS and modeled Ts show negative biases, but MODIS shows an overall better performance. Global distribution of differences between MODIS and modeled Ts shows diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. Over sparsely vegetated areas, the model Ts is generally lower than the MODIS observed Ts during the daytime, while the situation is opposite at nighttime. The revision of roughness length for heat and the constraint of minimum friction velocity from Zeng et al. [2012] bring the modeled Ts closer to MODIS during the day, and have little effect on Ts at night. Five factors contributing to the Ts differences between the model and MODIS are identified, including the difficulty in properly accounting for cloud cover information at the appropriate temporal and spatial resolutions, and uncertainties in surface energy balance computation, atmospheric forcing data, surface emissivity, and MODIS Ts data. These findings have implications for the cross-evaluation of modeled and remotely sensed Ts, as well as the data assimilation of Ts observations into Earth system models.

  4. Quantification of the Scale Effect in Downscaling Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Most current statistical models for downscaling the remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST are based on the assumption of the scale-invariant LST-descriptors relationship, which is being debated and requires an in-depth examination. Additionally, research on downscaling LST to high or very high resolutions (~10 m is still rare. Here, a simple analytical model was developed to quantify the scale effect in downscaling the LST from a medium resolution (~100 m to high resolutions. The model was verified in the Zhangye oasis and Beijing city. Examinations of the simulation datasets that were generated based on airborne and space station LSTs demonstrate that the developed model can predict the scale effect in LST downscaling; the scale effect exists in both of these two study areas. The model was further applied to 12 ASTER images in the Zhangye oasis during a complete crop growing season and one Landsat-8 TIRS image in Beijing city in the summer. The results demonstrate that the scale effect is intrinsically caused by the varying probability distribution of the LST and its descriptors at the native and target resolutions. The scale effect depends on the values of the descriptors, the phenology, and the ratio of the native resolution to the target resolution. Removing the scale effect would not necessarily improve the accuracy of the downscaled LST.

  5. Free standing CuO-MnO2 nanocomposite for room temperature ammonia sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneshwari, S.; Papachan, Seethal; Gopalakrishnan, N.

    2017-05-01

    CuO nanostructures and CuO-MnO2 nanocomposite were successfully synthesized using hydrothermal method without any aid of growth controlling agents. The synthesized CuO nanostructures have monoclinic structure. The XRD pattern of CuO-MnO2 observed with mixed phases of monoclinic CuO and birnessite-type MnO2 which confirms the formation of nanocomposite. SEM images revealed the turmeric-like morphology for CuO and intercalated sheets with flowers on the surface for CuO-MnO2. The length and breadth of turmeric-like structure is about 642.2 nm and 141.8 nm, respectively. The band gap of 1.72 eV for CuO nanostructure and 1.9 eV for CuO-MnO2 nanocomposite were observed from the absorption spectra. The free standing devices of CuO-MnO2 showed nearly a 3 fold increase sensing response to ammonia at room temperature when compared to the constituent CuO. The composite sensor showed response time of 120 s and recovered within 600 s. This enhanced response can be asserted to the peculiar morphology of the composite that provides more adsorption site for gas diffusion to take place.

  6. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Peng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ-based thermal barrier coating (TBC has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm; a photo-multiplier tube (PMT and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor’s performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature.

  7. Temperature sensing in underground facilities by Raman optical frequency domain reflectometry using fiber-optic communication cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brüne

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaining information on climatic conditions in subway tunnels is the key to predicting the propagation of smoke or toxic gases in these infrastructures in the case of a fire or a terrorist attack. As anemometer measurements are not economically suitable, the employment of alternative monitoring methods is necessary. High-resolution temperature sensing with Raman optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR using optical communication fiber cables shows great potential as it allows the surveillance of several kilometers of underground transport facilities without the need for installing sensing equipment in the tunnels. This paper presents first results of a study using this approach for monitoring subway tunnels. In the Berlin subway, temperature data gathered from newly installed as well as pre-installed communication cables were evaluated and compared to reference data from temperature loggers. Results are very promising as high correlations between all data can be achieved showing the potential of this approach.

  8. Temperature sensing based on multimodal interference in polymer optical fibers: Room-temperature sensitivity enhancement by annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Tomohito; Numata, Goki; Lee, Heeyoung; Hayashi, Neisei; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-07-01

    To date, we have developed a temperature sensor based on multimodal interference in a polymer optical fiber (POF) with an extremely high sensitivity. Here, we experimentally evaluate the influence of annealing (heat treatment) of the POF on the temperature sensitivity at room temperature. We show that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced with increasing annealing temperature, and that, by annealing the POF at 90 °C, we can achieve a temperature sensitivity of +2.17 nm/°C, which is 2.9 times larger than that without annealing (+0.75 nm/°C).

  9. Temperature calibration procedure for thin film substrates for thermo-ellipsometric analysis using melting point standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappert, Emiel; Raaijmakers, Michiel; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Nijmeijer, Arian; Huiskes, Cindy; Huiskes, C.; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate temperature control is pertinent to studying thermally activated processes in thin films. Here, we present a calibration method for the substrate–film interface temperature using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The method is adapted from temperature calibration methods that are well

  10. Room-Temperature H2 Gas Sensing Characterization of Graphene-Doped Porous Silicon via a Facile Solution Dropping Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nu Si A. Eom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a graphene-doped porous silicon (G-doped/p-Si substrate for low ppm H2 gas detection by an inexpensive synthesis route was proposed as a potential noble graphene-based gas sensor material, and to understand the sensing mechanism. The G-doped/p-Si gas sensor was synthesized by a simple capillary force-assisted solution dropping method on p-Si substrates, whose porosity was generated through an electrochemical etching process. G-doped/p-Si was fabricated with various graphene concentrations and exploited as a H2 sensor that was operated at room temperature. The sensing mechanism of the sensor with/without graphene decoration on p-Si was proposed to elucidate the synergetic gas sensing effect that is generated from the interface between the graphene and p-type silicon.

  11. On the yield of cold and ultracold neutrons for liquid hydrogen at low temperatures near the melting point

    CERN Document Server

    Morishima, N

    1999-01-01

    The neutron scattering cross sections for liquid hydrogen in the temperature range from the melting point to the boiling point are calculated. It is shown that lowering the temperature results in a significant increase in the yield of cold neutrons: for instance, a 44% increase for an incident neutron energy of 19.4 meV. The major cause of this increment is the para-to-ortho transition of a hydrogen molecule though accompanied by an appreciable increase in the density. The results of the cold- and ultracold-neutron yields are discussed in connection with the experimental results of Altarev et al. at the WWR-M reactor.

  12. Holographic Real-Time Finite-Temperature 3-Point Correlators and Their Applications on Second Order Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaolun; Vaman, Diana; Arnold, Peter; Barnes, Edwin; Xiao, Wei

    2011-10-01

    We built up a complete real-time prescription for calculating n- point correlators of finite-temperature conformal field theory operators using holography. We found it amounts to integrating only the right quadrant of the black hole, and then adapting the finite temperature analog of Veltman's circling rules to gravity tree-level diagrams to calculate correlators. We constructed a complete mapping between the real-time finite- temperature field theory and its real-time dual supergravity description. We subjected our prescription to several checks. We gave, for the first time, concrete formulas for all real- time 3-point correlators. We applied the above to study second order hydrodynamics in 4-d conformal field theories. We derived Kubo relations for second order transport coefficients in terms of 3-point stress tensor retarded correlators. For N=4 super Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling and finite temperature we computed these stress tensor 3-point correlators using AdS/CFT. The small momentum expansion of the 3-point correlators in terms of transport coefficients is matched with AdS result and the coefficients are retrieved consitently. Our method allows for a unified treatment of hydrodynamic coefficients and can be systematically generalized to higher order hydrodynamics.

  13. Seasonal variations in groundwater upwelling zones in a Danish lowland stream analyzed using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matheswaran, Karthikeyan; Blemmer, Morten; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of groundwater inflows in a stream reach plays a major role in controlling the stream temperature, a vital component shaping the riverine ecosystem. In this study, the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system was installed in a small Danish lowland stream, Elverdamsåen......–night temperature difference were applied to three DTS datasets representing stream temperature responses to the variable meteorological and hydrological conditions prevailing in summer, winter and spring. The standard deviation criterion was useful to identify groundwater discharge zones in summer and spring......, antecedent precipitation and presence of fractured clayey till in the stream reach were deemed as the vital factors causing apparent seasonal variation in the locations of upwelling zones, prompting use of DTS not only in preconceived scenarios of large diurnal temperature change but rather a long...

  14. Irrigation scheduling of green areas based on soil moisture estimation by the active heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing AHFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubelzu, Sergio; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sobrino, Fernando; Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation programing determines when and how much water apply to fulfill the plant water requirements depending of its phenology stage and location, and soil water content. Thus, the amount of water, the irrigation time and the irrigation frequency are variables that must be estimated. Likewise, irrigation programing has been based in approaches such as: the determination of plant evapotranspiration and the maintenance of soil water status between a given interval or soil matrix potential. Most of these approaches are based on the measurements of soil water sensors (or tensiometers) located at specific points within the study area which lack of the spatial information of the monitor variable. The information provided in such as few points might not be adequate to characterize the soil water distribution in irrigation systems with poor water application uniformity and thus, it would lead to wrong decisions in irrigation scheduling. Nevertheless, it can be overcome if the active heating pulses distributed fiber optic temperature measurement (AHFO) is used. This estimates the temperature variation along a cable of fiber optic and then, it is correlated with the soil water content. This method applies a known amount of heat to the soil and monitors the temperature evolution, which mainly depends on the soil moisture content. Thus, it allows estimations of soil water content every 12.5 cm along the fiber optic cable, as long as 1500 m (with 2 % accuracy) , every second. This study presents the results obtained in a green area located at the ETSI Agronómica, Agroalimentaria y Biosistesmas in Madrid. The area is irrigated by an sprinkler irrigation system which applies water with low uniformity. Also, it has deployed and installation of 147 m of fiber optic cable at 15 cm depth. The Distribute Temperature Sensing unit was a SILIXA ULTIMA SR (Silixa Ltd, UK) with spatial and temporal resolution of 0.29 m and 1 s, respectively. In this study, heat pulses of 7 W/m for 2

  15. A power law fit to oxygen absorption at 60 GHz and its application to remote sensing of atmospheric temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, R. K. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an empirical study of the oxygen spectrum near 60 GHz with reference to its applicability to the remote sensing of the tropospheric and lower stratospheric temperature. It is demonstrated that the absorption coefficient of oxygen at 60 GHz can be fitted to the power law form with a relative rms error of about 8%. The power law form, when used in conjunction with the weighting function, permits the definition of some basic quantities in the passive remote sensing of the atmospheric temperature. It is shown how the power law form has been utilized in processing data from the Nimbus 5 microwave spectrometer experiment. The algorithm presented can be applied to spectrometer experiments at infrared frequencies.

  16. Room temperature ferromagnetism and CH{sub 4} gas sensing of titanium oxynitride induced by milling and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolokang, Amogelang S., E-mail: Sylvester.Bolokang@transnet.net [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Transnet Engineering, Product Development, Private Bag X 528, Kilnerpark, 0127 (South Africa); Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P. [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Malgas, Gerald F. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville, 7535 (South Africa); Kortidis, Ioannis [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); West Virginia University, Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Evansdale Campus, Morgantown, WV, 26506 (United States); Swart, Hendrik C. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Motaung, David E., E-mail: dmotaung@csir.co.za [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)

    2017-06-01

    We report on the room temperature ferromagnetism and CH{sub 4} gas sensing of titanium oxynitride prepared by milling and annealing at 1100 °C in a nitrogen gas environment. Structural analyses revealed a metastable orthorhombic TiO{sub 2} phase after milling for 120 h. The 120 h milled TiO{sub 2} particles and subsequently annealed in nitrogen gas at 1100 °C showed the formation of titanium oxynitride (TiO{sub x}N{sub y}) with a tetragonal crystal structure. An FCC metastable TiO{sub x}N{sub y} phase was also observed with a lattice parameter a = 4.235 Å. The vibrating sample magnetometer and electron paramagnetic analyses showed that the milled and TiO{sub x}N{sub y} samples possess room temperature ferromagnetism. Gas sensing measurements were carried out toward CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} gases. The TiO{sub x}N{sub y} nanostructures demonstrated higher sensing response and selectivity to CH{sub 4} gas at room temperature. The enhanced response of 1010 and sensitivity of 50.12 ppm{sup -1} at a concentration of 20 ppm CH{sub 4} are associated with higher surface area, pore diameter and surface defects such as oxygen vacancies and Ti{sup 3+}, as evidenced from the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller, photoluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray photoelectron analyses. - Highlights: • Ball milled of TiO{sub 2} structure revealed metastable orthorhombic phase. • Upon nitridation tetragonal and FCC TiO{sub x}N{sub y} crystal structures were induced. • The magnetic properties of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was transformed by milling. • TiO{sub x}N{sub y} sensing response for CH{sub 4} gas at room temperature was high.

  17. The Single Transmembrane Segment of Minimal Sensor DesK Senses Temperature via a Membrane-Thickness Caliper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria E; Oliveira, Rafael G; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E

    2016-11-01

    Thermosensors detect temperature changes and trigger cellular responses crucial for survival at different temperatures. The thermosensor DesK is a transmembrane (TM) histidine kinase which detects a decrease in temperature through its TM segments (TMS). Here, we address a key issue: how a physical stimulus such as temperature can be converted into a cellular response. We show that the thickness of Bacillus lipid membranes varies with temperature and that such variations can be detected by DesK with great precision. On the basis of genetic studies and measurements of in vitro activity of a DesK construct with a single TMS (minimal sensor DesK [MS-DesK]), reconstituted in liposomes, we propose an interplay mechanism directed by a conserved dyad, phenylalanine 8-lysine 10. This dyad is critical to anchor the only transmembrane segment of the MS-DesK construct to the extracellular water-lipid interphase and is required for the transmembrane segment of MS-DesK to function as a caliper for precise measurement of membrane thickness. The data suggest that positively charged lysine 10, which is located in the hydrophobic core of the membrane but is close to the water-lipid interface, pulls the transmembrane region toward the water phase to localize its charge at the interface. Nevertheless, the hydrophobic residue phenylalanine 8, located at the N-terminal extreme of the TMS, has a strong tendency to remain in the lipid phase, impairing access of lysine 10 to the water phase. The outcome of this interplay is a fine-tuned sensitivity to membrane thickness that elicits conformational changes that favor different signaling states of the protein. The ability to sense and respond to extracellular signals is essential for cell survival. One example is the cellular response to temperature variation. How do cells "sense" temperature changes? It has been proposed that the bacterial thermosensor DesK acts as a molecular caliper measuring membrane thickness variations that would occur

  18. Rayleigh scatter based order of magnitude increase in distributed temperature and strain sensing by simple UV exposure of optical fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranger, Sébastien; Gagné, Mathieu; Lambin-Iezzi, Victor; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-06-16

    We present a technique to improve signal strength, and therefore sensitivity in distributed temperature and strain sensing (DTSS) using Frequency domain Rayleigh scatter. A simple UV exposure of a hydrogen loaded standard SMF-28 fibre core is shown to enhance the Rayleigh back-scattered light dramatically by ten-fold, independent of the presence of a Bragg grating, and is therefore created by the UV exposure alone. This increase in Rayleigh back-scatter allows an order-of-magnitude increase in temperature and strain resolution for DTSS compared to un-exposed SMF-28 fibre used as a sensing element. This enhancement in sensitivity is effective for cm range or more sensor gauge length, below which is the theoretical cross-correlation limit. The detection of a 20 mK temperature rise with a spatial resolution of 2 cm is demonstrated. This gain in sensitivity for SMF-28 is compared with a high Ge doped photosensitive fibre with a characteristically high NA. For the latter, the UV enhancement is also present although of lower amplitude, and enables an even lower noise level for sensing, due to the fibre's intrinsically higher Rayleigh scatter signal.

  19. Fluorescent Nanodiamond: A Versatile Tool for Long-Term Cell Tracking, Super-Resolution Imaging, and Nanoscale Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wesley Wei-Wen; Hui, Yuen Yung; Tsai, Pei-Chang; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    ±1 sublevels. Interestingly, the transitions between the spin sublevels can be optically detected and manipulated by microwave radiation, a technique known as optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). In addition, the electron spins have an exceptionally long coherence time, making FND useful for ultrasensitive detection of temperature at the nanoscale. Pump-probe-type nanothermometry with a temporal resolution of better than 10 μs has been achieved with a three-point sampling method. Gold/diamond nanohybrids have also been developed for highly localized hyperthermia applications. This Account provides a summary of the recent advances in FND-enabled technologies with a special focus on long-term cell tracking, super-resolution imaging, and nanoscale temperature sensing. These emerging and multifaceted technologies are in synchronicity with modern imaging modalities.

  20. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  1. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  2. UWBRAD: Ultra Wideband Software Defined Microwave Radiometer for Ice Sheet Subsurface Temperature Sensing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Existing space and airborne remote sensing instruments have pushed the state-of-the-art in the characterization of ice sheet behaviors with the exception of one key...

  3. Novel low-temperature growth of SnO2 nanowires and their gas-sensing properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R. Rakesh; Parmar, Mitesh; Narasimha Rao, K.; Rajanna, K.; Phani, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- A simple thermal evaporation method is presented for the growth of crystalline SnO 2 nanowires at a low substrate temperature of 450 °C via an gold-assisted vapor–liquid–solid mechanism. The as-grown nanowires were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and were also tested for methanol vapor sensing. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed the single-crystalline nature of the each nanowire. The fabricated sensor shows good response to methanol vapor at an operating temperature of 450 °C.

  4. Low-temperature H2 sensing in self-assembled organotin thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Laetitia; Elhamzaoui, Hicham; Jousseaume, Bernard; Toupance, Thierry; Laurent, Guillaume; Ribot, François; Saadaoui, Hassan; Brötz, Joachim; Fuess, Hartmut; Riedel, Ralf; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2011-02-07

    Self-assembled nanoporous tin-based hybrid thin films prepared by the sol-gel method from organically-bridged ditin hexaalkynides detect hydrogen gas from 50 to 200 °C at the 200-10,000 ppm level. This finding opens a fully new class of gas-sensing materials as well as a new opportunity to integrate organic functionality in gas sensing metal oxides.

  5. Loop Heat Pipe Transient Behavior Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control with Thermoelectric Converter on Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly done by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. With this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within 0.5K or better. However, because the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if the LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP was carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor was placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir was cold-biased and was heated by a control heater. Test results show that it was feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. In particular, when a thermoelectric converter was used as the reservoir control heater, the heat source temperature could be maintained within a tight range using a proportional-integral-derivative or on/off control algorithm. Moreover, because the TEC could provide both heating and cooling to the reservoir, temperature oscillations during fast transients such as loop startup could be eliminated or substantially reduced when compared to using an electrical heater as the control heater.

  6. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.

    2016-01-01

    of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated...

  7. Thermal Error Modeling Method with the Jamming of Temperature-Sensitive Points' Volatility on CNC Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIAO, Enming; LIU, Yi; XU, Jianguo; LIU, Hui

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at the deficiency of the robustness of thermal error compensation models of CNC machine tools, the mechanism of improving the models' robustness is studied by regarding the Leaderway-V450 machining center as the object. Through the analysis of actual spindle air cutting experimental data on Leaderway-V450 machine, it is found that the temperature-sensitive points used for modeling is volatility, and this volatility directly leads to large changes on the collinear degree among modeling independent variables. Thus, the forecasting accuracy of multivariate regression model is severely affected, and the forecasting robustness becomes poor too. To overcome this effect, a modeling method of establishing thermal error models by using single temperature variable under the jamming of temperature-sensitive points' volatility is put forward. According to the actual data of thermal error measured in different seasons, it is proved that the single temperature variable model can reduce the loss of forecasting accuracy resulted from the volatility of temperature-sensitive points, especially for the prediction of cross quarter data, the improvement of forecasting accuracy is about 5 μm or more. The purpose that improving the robustness of the thermal error models is realized, which can provide a reference for selecting the modeling independent variable in the application of thermal error compensation of CNC machine tools.

  8. Dynamics regulating major trends in Barents Sea temperatures and subsequent effect on remotely sensed particulate inorganic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovland, Erlend Kjeldsberg; Dierssen, Heidi M.; Ferreira, Ana Sofia

    2013-01-01

    A more comprehensive understanding of how ocean temperatures influence coccolithophorid production of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) will make it easier to constrain the effect of ocean acidification in the future. We studied the effect of temperature on Emiliania huxleyi PIC production...... in the Barents Sea using ocean colour remote sensing data. Gross annual PIC production was calculated for 1998-2011 from SeaWiFS and MODIS data and coupled with results from previous studies to create a time-series from 1979-2011. Using that data, we investigated (1) correlations between various climate indices....... The effect of ocean temperature on PIC production was complex but generally positive, explaining roughly 50% of the annual variability and indicating that rising temperatures in the North Atlantic may favour coccolithophorid PIC production in the Barents Sea. Positive phases of the Atlantic multidecadal...

  9. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challener, William [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2015-02-10

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  10. Distributed-Temperature-Sensing Using Optical Methods: A First Application in the Offshore Area of Campi Flegrei Caldera (Southern Italy for Volcano Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Carlino

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A temperature profile 2400 m along the off-shore active caldera of Campi Flegrei (Gulf of Pozzuoli was obtained by the installation of a permanent fiber-optic monitoring system within the framework of the Innovative Monitoring for Coastal and Marine Environment (MON.I.C.A project. The system consists of a submerged, reinforced, multi-fiber cable containing six single-mode telecom grade optical fibers that, exploiting the stimulated Brillouin scattering, provide distributed temperature sensing (DTS with 1 m of spatial resolution. The obtained data show that the offshore caldera, at least along the monitored profile, has many points of heat discharge associated with fluid emission. A loose association between the temperature profile and the main structural features of the offshore caldera was also evidenced by comparing DTS data with a high-resolution reflection seismic survey. This represents an important advancement in the monitoring of this high-risk volcanic area, since temperature variations are among the precursors of magma migration towards the surface and are also crucial data in the study of caldera dynamics. The adopted system can also be applied to many other calderas which are often partially or largely submerged and hence difficult to monitor.

  11. Comparing and Combining Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature Products for Improved Hydrological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Parinussa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important variable that provides a valuable connection between the energy and water budget and is strongly linked to land surface hydrology. Space-borne remote sensing provides a consistent means for regularly observing LST using thermal infrared (TIR and passive microwave observations each with unique strengths and weaknesses. The spatial resolution of TIR based LST observations is around 1 km, a major advantage when compared to passive microwave observations (around 10 km. However, a major advantage of passive microwaves is their cloud penetrating capability making them all-weather sensors whereas TIR observations are routinely masked under the presence of clouds and aerosols. In this study, a relatively simple combination approach that benefits from the cloud penetrating capacity of passive microwave sensors was proposed. In the first step, TIR and passive microwave LST products were compared over Australia for both anomalies and raw timeseries. A very high agreement was shown over the vast majority of the country with R2 typically ranging from 0.50 to 0.75 for the anomalies and from 0.80 to 1.00 for the raw timeseries. Then, the scalability of the passive microwave based LST product was examined and a pixel based merging approach through linear scaling was proposed. The individual and merged LST products were further compared against independent LST from the re-analysis model outputs. This comparison revealed that the TIR based LST product agrees best with the re-analysis data (R2 0.26 for anomalies and R2 0.76 for raw data, followed by the passive microwave LST product (R2 0.16 for anomalies and R2 0.66 for raw data and the combined LST product (R2 0.18 for anomalies and R2 0.62 for raw data. It should be noted that the drop in performance comes with an increased revisit frequency of approximately 20% compared to the revised frequency of the TIR alone. Additionally, this comparison against re

  12. Polypyrrole/silver coaxial nanowire aero-sponges for temperature-independent stress sensing and stress-triggered Joule heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weina; Li, Guangyong; Zhang, Shangquan; Wei, Yong; Wang, Jin; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xuetong

    2015-04-28

    To obtain ideal sensing materials with nearly zero temperature coefficient resistance (TCR) for self-temperature-compensated pressure sensors, we proposed an Incipient Network Conformal Growth (INCG) technology to prepare hybrid and elastic porous materials: the nanoparticles (NPs) are first dispersed in solvent to form an incipient network, another component is then introduced to coat the incipient network conformally via wet chemical route. The conformal coatings not only endow NPs with high stability but also offer them additional structural elasticity, meeting requirements for future generations of portable, compressive and flexible devices. The resultant polypyrrole/silver coaxial nanowire hybrid aero-sponges prepared via INCG technology have been processed into a piezoresistive sensor with highly sensing stability (low TCR 0.86 × 10(-3)/°C), sensitivity (0.33 kPa(-1)), short response time (1 ms), minimum detectable pressure (4.93 Pa) after suffering repeated stimuli, temperature change and electric heating. Moreover, a stress-triggered Joule heater can be also fabricated mainly by the PPy-Ag NW hybrid aero-sponges with nearly zero temperature coefficient.

  13. New fixed-point mini-cell to investigate thermocouple drift in a high-temperature environment under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, M.; Vlahovic, L.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Sadli, M.; Failleau, G. [Laboratoire Commun de Metrologie, LNE-Cnam, Saint-Denis, (France); Fuetterer, M.; Lapetite, J.M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten, (Netherlands); Fourrez, S. [Thermocoax, 8 rue du pre neuf, F-61100 St Georges des Groseillers, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Temperature measurements in the nuclear field require a high degree of reliability and accuracy. Despite their sheathed form, thermocouples subjected to nuclear radiations undergo changes due to radiation damage and transmutation that lead to significant EMF drift during long-term fuel irradiation experiment. For the purpose of a High Temperature Reactor fuel irradiation to take place in the High Flux Reactor Petten, a dedicated fixed-point cell was jointly developed by LNE-Cnam and JRC-IET. The developed cell to be housed in the irradiation rig was tailor made to quantify the thermocouple drift during the irradiation (about two year duration) and withstand high temperature (in the range 950 deg. C - 1100 deg. C) in the presence of contaminated helium in a graphite environment. Considering the different levels of temperature achieved in the irradiation facility and the large palette of thermocouple types aimed at surveying the HTR fuel pebble during the qualification test both copper (1084.62 deg. C) and gold (1064.18 deg. C) fixed-point materials were considered. The aim of this paper is to first describe the fixed-point mini-cell designed to be embedded in the reactor rig and to discuss the preliminary results achieved during some out of pile tests as much as some robustness tests representative of the reactor scram scenarios. (authors)

  14. Can the Point Defect Model Explain the Influence of Temperature and Anion Size on Pitting of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The pitting behaviours of 304L and 316L stainless steels were investigated at 3 °C to 90 °C in 1 M solutions of NaCl, NaBr and NaI by potentiodynamic polarization. The temperature dependences of the pitting potential varied according to the anion, being near linear in bromide but exponential in chloride. As a result, at low temperatures grades 304L and 316L steel are most susceptible to pitting by bromide ions, while at high temperatures both stainless steels were more susceptible to pitting by small chloride anions than the larger bromide and iodide. Thus, increasing temperature appears to favour attack by smaller anions. This paper will attempt to rationalise both of the above findings in terms of the point defect model. Initial findings are that qualitatively this approach can be reasonably successful, but not at the quantitative level, possibly due to insufficient data on the mechanical properties of thin passive films

  15. INVESTIGASI TRANSIEN TEKANAN DAN TEMPERATUR SUNGKUP REAKTOR AP1000 DALAM KECELAKAAN SBO DENGAN SET-POINT TEKANAN PENGGUYURAN BERBEDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Tjahjono

    2015-03-01

    AP1000 reactor applying external cooling concept to anticipate the increase in pressure due to Station Black Out (SBO. Disposal mechanism of decay heat conducted through the Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS to In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST and subsequently forwarded to the reactor containment. Containment is externally cooled through natural convection in the air gap and through evaporation cooling water poured on the outer surface of the containment wall when the pressure attaints 1.7 bars according to the applied pressure set-point. With this mechanism, the pressure will increase until it reaches certain maximum value and then decrease when containment cooling already begun effectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the set-point to the maximum pressure and temperature reached. The utilized method is to perform simulations using Matlab-07 model of analytical calculations based on a transient state that is capable of estimating the power of heat evacuated and the pressure in the containment. The simulation results show the pattern of pressure and temperature transient rises to a maximum and drops back to a value that is relatively constant. With the set-point variation ranging from 1.7 bars to 5 bars, the maximum pressure varies from 3.5 bars to 5 bars and the maximum temperature varies from 117 °C to 125 °C. It can be concluded that with increasing the set-point pressure of starting the external cooling with water, the maximum pressure and temperature increase. Keywords: Transient pressure, containment external cooling set-point, AP1000, SBO.

  16. Laser beam propagation in nematic liquid crystals at the temperature close to the nematicisotropic critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Lin, Yu-Sung; Jiang, I-Min; Tsai, Ming-Shan

    2008-03-17

    This study investigates the optical nonlinearity of beam propagation in homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells at a temperature close to the nematic-isotropic temperature (TNI). The undulate propagation mode with convergent and divergent loops appearing alternately is reported and the thermally enhanced optical reorientation nonlinearity at the focus is described. The optically induced phase transition exists along the pump beam direction. With the application of the conscopic technique, the arrangements of LC at the focus are proposed in this study. Results of this study demonstrate that the evolution of the LC configuration was affected by the pump beam based on the analysis of conoscopic patterns.

  17. Detection of trends and break points in temperature: the case of Umbria (Italy) and Guadalquivir Valley (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Grimaldi, Pascual; García-Marín, Amanda; Ayuso-Muñoz, José Luís; Flamini, Alessia; Morbidelli, Renato; Ayuso-Ruíz, José Luís

    2018-02-01

    The increase of air surface temperature at global scale is a fact with values around 0.85 °C since the late nineteen century. Nevertheless, the increase is not equally distributed all over the world, varying from one region to others. Thus, it becomes interesting to study the evolution of temperature indices for a certain area in order to analyse the existence of climatic trend in it. In this work, monthly temperature time series from two Mediterranean areas are used: the Umbria region in Italy, and the Guadalquivir Valley in southern Spain. For the available stations, six temperature indices (three annual and three monthly) of mean, average maximum and average minimum temperature have been obtained, and the existence of trends has been studied by applying the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test. Both regions show a general increase in all temperature indices, being the pattern of the trends clearer in Spain than in Italy. The Italian area is the only one at which some negative trends are detected. The presence of break points in the temperature series has been also studied by using the non-parametric Pettit test and the parametric standard normal homogeneity test (SNHT), most of which may be due to natural phenomena.

  18. Low-Temperature, Solution-Processed, Transparent Zinc Oxide-Based Thin-Film Transistors for Sensing Various Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chiang You

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A low temperature solution-processed thin-film transistor (TFT using zinc oxide (ZnO film as an exposed sensing semiconductor channel was fabricated to detect and identify various solution solvents. The TFT devices would offer applications for low-cost, rapid and highly compatible water-soluble detection and could replace conventional silicon field effect transistors (FETs as bio-sensors. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of the TFT ZnO channel to sense various liquids, such as polar solvents (ethanol, non-polar solvents (toluene and deionized (DI water, which were dropped and adsorbed onto the channel. It is discussed how different dielectric constants of polar/non-polar solvents and DI water were associated with various charge transport properties, demonstrating the main detection mechanisms of the thin-film transistor.

  19. The research on temperature sensing properties of photonic crystal fiber based on Liquid crystal filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zan Xiangzhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the photonic bandgap-photonic crystal fibers( PBG-PCF fiber core fills the namitic liquid crystal. By readjusting the temperature to change the refractive index, constitute new liquid fiber-optic temperature sensor. In this paper, we use finite element COMSOL software to simulate and analyze photonic crystal optical fiber sensitive properties. The research show that after the PBG – PCF filling the liquid crystal, its mode field distribution, effective refractive index, waveguide dispersion etc changing with temperature is so big. Therefore, the properties that the refractive index of PCF mode CF changing with temperature sensitive medium, provides the theoretical basis for designing optic fiber temperature sensors.

  20. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  1. Drastic sensitivity enhancement of temperature sensing based on multimodal interference in polymer optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Goki; Hayashi, Neisei; Tabaru, Marie; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    It has been reported that temperature sensors based on modal interference in perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers show extremely high temperature sensitivity at room temperature. In this work, we confirm that the temperature sensitivity (absolute value) is significantly enhanced when the temperature increases toward ∼70 °C, which is close to the glass-transition temperature of the core polymer. When the core diameter is 62.5 µm, the sensitivity at 72 °C at 1300 nm is 202 nm/°C/m, which is approximately 26 times the value obtained at room temperature and >7000 times the highest value previously reported using a silica multimode fiber.

  2. Brillouin distributed temperature sensing system for monitoring of submarine export cables of off-shore wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Benjamin; Rath, Alexander; Kolm, Frederick; Schröder, Andreas; Buntebarth, Christian; Dreß, Albrecht; Hill, Wieland

    2016-05-01

    For high-voltage cables, the maximum temperature of the insulation must never be exceeded at any location and at any load condition. The local temperatures depend not only on the cable design and load history, but also on the local thermal environment of the cable. Therefore, distributed temperature monitoring of high-voltage cables is essential to ensure the integrity of the cable at high load. Especially, the load of the export cables of wind farms varies strongly in dependence on weather conditions. In this field study, we demonstrate the measurement performance of a new, robust Brillouin distributed temperature sensing system (Brillouin-DTS). The system is based on spontaneous Brillouin scattering and does not require a fibre loop. This is essential for long submarine high-voltage cables, where normally no loop can be formed in the seabed. It is completely passively cooled and does not contain any moving or wearing parts. The instrument is dedicated for use in industrial and other rough environments. With a measuring time below 10 min, the temperature resolution is better than 1 °C for distances up to 50 km. In the field study, the submarine export cable of an off-shore wind farm has been monitored. The temperature profile of the export cable shows several hot spots, mostly located at cable joints, and also several cold spots.

  3. Drastic sensitivity enhancement of temperature sensing based on modal interference in plastic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, G.; Hayashi, N.; Tabaru, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Nakamura, K.

    2015-09-01

    It has been reported that temperature sensors based on modal interference in perfluorinated graded-index (GI) plastic optical fibers (POFs) show the world's highest temperature sensitivity of +49.8 nm/°C/m at 1300 nm at room temperature, which is over 1800 times the value in silica multimode fibers (MMFs). In this work, we newly find that the temperature sensitivity (absolute value) is significantly enhanced with increasing temperature toward ~70°C, which is close to the glass-transition temperature of the core polymer. When the core diameter is 62.5 μm, the sensitivity at 72 °C at 1300 nm is +202 nm/°C/m, which is approximately 26 times the value obtained at room temperature and even over 7000 times the highest value previously reported using a silica MMF. As the glass-transition temperature of polymers can be generally set to an arbitrary value, this characteristic could be used to develop POF-based temperature sensors with ultra-high sensitivity not only at ~70°C but at arbitrary temperature in future.

  4. Dependence of the Q10 values on the depth of the soil temperature measuring point

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Acosta, Manuel; Marek, Michal V.; Kutsch, W.; Janouš, Dalibor

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 292, - (2007), s. 171-179 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD526/03/H036; GA MŽP SM/640/18/03 Grant - others:EU(XE) GOCE-CT-2003-505572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : respiration * soil * temperature * Q10 * Norway spruce * grassland Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.821, year: 2007

  5. INTRAMUSCULAR TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE MID-POINT AND PERIPHERAL EFFECTIVE RADIATING AREA WITH ULTRASOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michale G. Miller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine whether uniform intramuscular heating is achieved throughout a treatment area 2 times the transducer head at both 1 and 3 MHz. Seven male and three female subjects (Age: 23.6 ± 1.0 yrs, Weight: 83.8 ± 23.2 kg, Site Skinfold: 13.9 ± 7.3 mm underwent two ultrasound treatments (1 and 3 MHz in the triceps surae muscle group. Thermocouples were inserted at the midpoint and periphery of the treatment area. Ten minute baseline temperatures were recorded followed by a ten minute ultrasound treatment. Two (site X 10 (time repeated measures ANOVAs were separately used to determine significance for 1 and 3 MHz treatments. Post-hoc testing was performed using the Bonferroni adjustment. A significant site-by-time interaction was observed for both the 1 and 3 MHz treatments. From baseline to the end of the treatment, temperature increased approximately 2.62°C and 1.58°C for the midpoint and periphery of the 1 MHz treatment and 5.88°C and 3.64°C for the 3 MHz treatment. The differences in temperature suggest that uniform heating does not occur throughout the treatment area

  6. Magnetron sputtered Au-decorated vanadium oxides composite thin films for methane-sensing properties at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jiran, E-mail: liang_jiran@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Junfeng; Li, Na; Li, Wenjiao

    2016-06-25

    Room temperature methane (CH{sub 4}) gas sensing properties of Au-decorated vanadium oxide (VO{sub x}) nanostructured films have been prepared by dc-magnetron sputtering of V metal, followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in O{sub 2} atmosphere from 470 °C to 500 °C on the sapphire substrate. The structural properties of the Au/VO{sub x} films were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vanadium oxide phases were found and identified as VOx. The films showed a cracking and porous morphology structure, measured by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The CH{sub 4}-sensing properties of the sensor based on Au/VO{sub x} composite films were carried out in the temperatures span ranging from room temperature (∼25 °C) to 100 °C. The films sensors achieved their maximum response values toward CH{sub 4} at room temperature (RT) and the optimal concentration at the concentration of 1500 ppm. At RT, the sensor exhibited higher gas response, good repeatability and excellent selectivity characteristics toward CH{sub 4} gas due to its high specific surface area, special structure, and large amounts of oxygen vacancies. Obtained results revealed that the Au/VO{sub x} films sensors showed a broad commercial applications prospect to detect CH{sub 4} in the field of RT. - Highlights: • Au/VO{sub x} films were prepared involving sputtering and rapid thermal annealing. • A mixture of vanadium dioxide and vanadium pentoxide were synthesized. • The Au/VO{sub x} films methane sensor could operate at room temperature (∼25 °C). • The optimal operating concentration was obtained at 1500 ppm toward methane.

  7. Polymer-based composite material yield point identification in the conditions of high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Артем Сергійович Арустамян

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and practical research of temperature influence on mechanical characteristics of the composite material «Multimetal Stahl 1018» («MM Stahl 1018» have been conducted. Both the laboratory equipment used to measure the mechanical properties, the technique of material preparation and the experimental procedure were described. The compressive tests were carried out on Zwick Roell Amsler HB 100, that can approximate the experiment to real conditions, as it has a special heat chamber in which the samples were heated up to 20°C, 40°C, 60°C and 80°C. The samples were subjected to the load of 15kN, 30KN to complete failure. The experimental values of conventional yield limit of «MM Stahl 1018» samples of various thicknesses for high temperatures have been got. On the strength of this experiment when repairing machinery and parts operating at high temperatures, it is recommended to use the material layer of no more than two millimeters and apply a little loaded nodes. The analysis of the results of the experiments showed that temperature increasing, the yield strength of the material decreases. The «MM Stahl 1018» basing on the best polymers that almost do not shrink at hardening, has good chemical resistance. The powders - fillers include high quality stainless steel, ceramics and additives for improving the surface tension and chemical resistance. Due to its perfect viscous consistency «MM Stahl 1018» can be easily applied with a spatula on wedges breechblocks or bridge supports and is evenly distributed in all directions at assembling. Thanks to «MM Stahl 1018» good forming properties the units may be fitted on the spot with the accuracy of 1/100 mm that is of 100% accuracy, no additional fitting is required, i.e., traditional fitting of wedges breechblocks and piers to the lower zone of the bridge. At assembling a bridge support must be adjusted in the final position with 100% accuracy. This material can work in real

  8. Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fiber: fabrication friendly fibers for high temperature and humidity insensitive Bragg grating sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos; Stefani, Alessio; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    In the quest of finding the ideal polymer optical fiber (POF) for Bragg grating sensing, we have fabricated and characterized an endlessly single mode microstructured POF (mPOF). This fiber is made from cyclo-olefin homopolymer Zeonex grade 480R which has a very high glass transition temperature of 138 °C and is humidity insensitive. It represents a significant improvement with respect to the also humidity insensitive Topas core fibers, in that Zeonex fibers are easier to manufacture, has bet...

  9. Sensing Properties of a Novel Temperature Sensor Based on Field Assisted Thermal Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Pan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The existing temperature sensors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs are limited by low sensitivity, complicated processes, or dependence on microscopy to observe the experimental results. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of an ionization temperature sensor featuring non-self-sustaining discharge. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering the work function of electrons emitted by CNTs, and thereby enabling the safe operation of such sensors. Due to the temperature effect on the electron emission of CNTs, the collecting current exhibited an exponential increase with temperature rising from 20 °C to 100 °C. Additionally, a higher temperature coefficient of 0.04 K−1 was obtained at 24 V voltage applied on the extracting electrode, higher than the values of other reported CNT-based temperature sensors. The triple-electrode ionization temperature sensor is easy to fabricate and converts the temperature change directly into an electrical signal. It shows a high temperature coefficient and good application potential.

  10. Sensing Properties of a Novel Temperature Sensor Based on Field Assisted Thermal Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhigang; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Zhenzhen; Tong, Jiaming; Chen, Qiyu; Zhang, Jianpeng; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Li, Xin; Li, Yunjia

    2017-02-27

    The existing temperature sensors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are limited by low sensitivity, complicated processes, or dependence on microscopy to observe the experimental results. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of an ionization temperature sensor featuring non-self-sustaining discharge. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering the work function of electrons emitted by CNTs, and thereby enabling the safe operation of such sensors. Due to the temperature effect on the electron emission of CNTs, the collecting current exhibited an exponential increase with temperature rising from 20 °C to 100 °C. Additionally, a higher temperature coefficient of 0.04 K -1 was obtained at 24 V voltage applied on the extracting electrode, higher than the values of other reported CNT-based temperature sensors. The triple-electrode ionization temperature sensor is easy to fabricate and converts the temperature change directly into an electrical signal. It shows a high temperature coefficient and good application potential.

  11. A Eu/Tb-mixed MOF for luminescent high-temperature sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huizhen; Zhao, Dian; Cui, Yuangjing, E-mail: cuiyj@zju.edu.cn; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong, E-mail: gdqian@zju.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    Temperature measurements and thermal mapping using luminescent MOF operating in the high-temperature range are of great interest in the micro-electronic diagnosis. In this paper, we report a thermostable Eu/Tb-mixed MOF Eu{sub 0.37}Tb{sub 0.63}-BTC-a exhibiting strong luminescence at elevated temperature, which can serve as a ratiometric luminescent thermometer for high-temperature range. The high-temperature operating range (313–473 K), high relative sensitivity and accurate temperature resolution, make such a Eu/Tb-mixed MOF useful for micro-electronic diagnosis. - Graphical abstract: A thermostable Eu/Tb-mixed MOF Eu{sub 0.37}Tb{sub 0.63}-BTC-a was developed as a ratiometric luminescent thermometers in the high-temperature range of 313–473 K. - Highlights: • A thermostable Eu/Tb-codoped MOF exhibiting strong luminescent at elevated temperature is reported. • The high-temperature operating range of Eu{sub 0.37}Tb{sub 0.63}-BTC-a is 313–473 K. • The mechanism of Eu{sub 0.37}Tb{sub 0.63}-BTC-a used as thermometers are also discussed.

  12. Effects of cold temperatures on the excitability of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that are not for cold sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hirosato; Gu, Jianguo G

    2017-05-01

    Aside from a small population of primary afferent neurons for sensing cold, which generate sensations of innocuous and noxious cold, it is generally believed that cold temperatures suppress the excitability of primary afferent neurons not responsible for cold sensing. These not-for-cold-sensing neurons include the majority of non-nociceptive and nociceptive afferent neurons. In this study we have found that the not-for-cold-sensing neurons of rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) change their excitability in several ways at cooling temperatures. In nearly 70% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, a cooling temperature of 15°C increases their membrane excitability. We regard these neurons as cold-active neurons. For the remaining 30% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, the cooling temperature of 15°C either has no effect (cold-ineffective neurons) or suppress their membrane excitability (cold-suppressive neurons). For cold-active neurons, the cold temperature of 15°C increases their excitability as is evidenced by increases in action potential (AP) firing numbers and/or the reduction in AP rheobase when these neurons are depolarized electrically. The cold temperature of 15°C significantly inhibits M-currents and increases membrane input resistance of cold-active neurons. Retigabine, an M-current activator, abolishes the effect of cold temperatures on AP firing, but not the effect of cold temperature on AP rheobase levels. The inhibition of M-currents and the increases of membrane input resistance are likely two mechanisms by which cooling temperatures increase the excitability of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons. This article is part of the special article series "Pain". © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Sensing of low concentration of ammonia at room temperature by decorated multi-walled carbon nanotube: fabrication and characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnahena, S. T.; Roy, M.

    2018-01-01

    A chemical sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) decorated with densely populated thiol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with sizes smaller than 3 nm for sensing low concentrations of ammonia gas is reported. The functionalized MWCNTs, subsequently decorated with AuNPs following an easy fabrication route were exposed to NH3 gas at the room temperature and the electrical resistance of the sensor changed upon exposure. The sensor also partially recovered the initial state after sensing in the normal air environment (without any dry air or N2 gas purge). The gold nanoparticles decoration is found to enhance the sensitivity and selectivity of MWCNT towards NH3 gas under ambient conditions with a reduced response and recovery time. The material was structurally characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Thermal stability of the sensor till 574 °C was demonstrated by TGA analysis. This papers describes how thiol-capped AuNPs are uniformly decorated on the outer walls of the MWCNTs with a separation of 2-3 nm making use of the ionic nature of Au and how this uniform distribution of AuNPs increases the active sites for absorption of NH3 gas molecules leading to sensing its low concentrations.

  14. Negative temperature coefficient of the action of DDT in a sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercken, J. van den; Akkermans, L.M.A.

    1972-01-01

    DDT induced repetitive spontaneuos activity inthe afferent nerve fibers of the lateral-line organ of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis. The action of DDT increased markedly with lowered temperature. This temperature-effect was easily reversible. The results demonstrate that DDT has a definite negative

  15. Stress Concentration in the Bulk Cr2O3: Effects of Temperature and Point Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazharul M. Islam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the growth and failure of passive oxide films formed on stainless steels is of general interest for the use of stainless steel as structural material and of special interest in the context of life time extension of light water reactors in nuclear power plants. Using the DFT+U approach, a theoretical investigation on the resistance to failure of the chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed at the surface of chromium-containing austenitic alloys (stainless steel and nickel based alloys has been performed. The investigations were done for periodic bulk models. The data at the atomic scale were extrapolated by using the Universal Binding Energy Relationships (UBERs model in order to estimate the mechanical behavior of a 10 μm thick oxide scale. The calculated stress values are in good agreement with experiments. Tensile stress for the bulk chromia was observed. The effects of temperature and structural defects on cracking were investigated. The possibility of cracking intensifies at high temperature compared to 0 K investigations. Higher susceptibility to cracking was observed in presence of defects compared to nondefective oxide, in agreement with experimental observation.

  16. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  17. Steam generators secondary side chemical cleaning at Point Lepreau using the Siemens high temperature process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, K.; MacNeil, C.; Odar, S.; Kuhnke, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the chemical cleaning of the four steam generators at the Point Lepreau facility, which was accomplished as a part of a normal service outage. The steam generators had been in service for twelve years. Sludge samples showed the main elements were Fe, P and Na, with minor amounts of Ca, Mg, Mn, Cr, Zn, Cl, Cu, Ni, Ti, Si, and Pb, 90% in the form of Magnetite, substantial phosphate, and trace amounts of silicates. The steam generators were experiencing partial blockage of broached holes in the TSPs, and corrosion on tube ODs in the form of pitting and wastage. In addition heat transfer was clearly deteriorating. More than 1000 kg of magnetite and 124 kg of salts were removed from the four steam generators

  18. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-09-08

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range.

  19. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range.

  20. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C.

    2015-10-01

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33.

  1. Remotely sensed sea surface temperature variability off California during a 'Santa Ana' clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, R. J.; Svejkovsky, J.

    1984-01-01

    Multichannel atmospheric correction equations for the NOAA 6 proposed by Bernstein (1982) and by McClain (1981) are evaluated by using satellite and in situ data collected over and in the Southern California Bight. The temporal and spatial variation of sea surface temperature over small scales is estimated from the data, and the effect of this variation in matching satellite and in situ data sets is discussed. Changes in the temperature fields between images are examined for diurnal variation and for surface advection of horizontal temperature gradients.

  2. Relationships between membrane water molecules and Patman equilibration kinetics at temperatures far above the phosphatidylcholine melting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Bell, Thomas A; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Askew, Caitlin; Franchino, Hannabeth; Hirsche, Kelsey; Kemsley, Linea; Melchor, Stephanie; Moulton, Emma; Schwab, Morgan; Nelson, Jennifer; Bell, John D

    2015-04-01

    The naphthalene-based fluorescent probes Patman and Laurdan detect bilayer polarity at the level of the phospholipid glycerol backbone. This polarity increases with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase of phosphatidylcholines and was observed even 90°C above the melting temperature. This study explores mechanisms associated with this phenomenon. Measurements of probe anisotropy and experiments conducted at 1M NaCl or KCl (to reduce water permittivity) revealed that this effect represents interactions of water molecules with the probes without proportional increases in probe mobility. Furthermore, comparison of emission spectra to Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the increased polarity represents elevation in probe access to water molecules rather than increased mobility of relevant bilayer waters. Equilibration of these probes with the membrane involves at least two steps which were distinguished by the membrane microenvironment reported by the probe. The difference in those microenvironments also changed with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase in that the equilibrium state was less polar than the initial environment detected by Patman at temperatures near the melting point, more polar at higher temperatures, and again less polar as temperature was raised further. Laurdan also displayed this level of complexity during equilibration, although the relationship to temperature differed quantitatively from that experienced by Patman. This kinetic approach provides a novel way to study in molecular detail basic principles of what happens to the membrane environment around an individual amphipathic molecule as it penetrates the bilayer. Moreover, it provides evidence of unexpected and interesting membrane behaviors far from the phase transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of lidar remote sensing capability of Raman water temperature from laboratory and field experiments (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Damien B.; Hou, Weilin W.; Goode, Wesley; Matt, Silvia C.; Hu, Yongxiang

    2017-05-01

    Lidar remote sensing based on visible wavelength is one of the only way to penetrate the water surface and to obtain range resolved information of the ocean surface mixed layer at the synoptic scale. Accurate measurement of the mixed layer properties is important for ocean weather forecast and to assist the optimal deployment of military assets. Turbulence within the mixed layer also plays an important role in climate variability as it also influences ocean heat storage and algae photosynthesis (Sverdrup 1953, Behrenfeld 2010). As of today, mixed layer depth changes are represented in the models through various parameterizations constrained mostly by surface properties like wind speed, surface salinity and sea surface temperature. However, cooling by wind and rain can create strong gradients (0.5C) of temperature between the submillimeter surface layer and the subsurface layer (Soloviev and Lukas, 1997) which will manifest itself as a low temperature bias in the observations. Temperature and salinity profiles are typically used to characterize the mixed layer variability (de Boyer Montégut et al. 2004) and are both key components of turbulence characterization (Hou 2009). Recently, several research groups have been investigating ocean temperature profiling with laser remote sensing based either on Brillouin (Fry 2012, Rudolf and Walther 2014) or Raman scattering (Artlett and Pask 2015, Lednev et al. 2016). It is the continuity of promising research that started decades ago (Leonard et al. 1979, Guagliardo and Dufilho 1980, Hirschberg et al. 1984) and can benefit from the current state of laser and detector technology. One aspect of this research that has not been overlooked (Artlett and Pask 2012) but has yet to be revisited is the impact of temperature on vibrational Raman polarization (Chang and Young, 1972). The TURBulence Ocean Lidar is an experimental system, aimed at characterizing underwater turbulence by examining various Stokes parameters. Its

  4. Remote Sensing of Gravity Wave Intensity and Temperature Signatures at Mesopause Heights Using the Nightglow Emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, M. J; Pendleton, W. R., Jr; Seo, S. H; Picard, R. H

    2003-01-01

    ...) are facilitated by several naturally occurring, vertically distinct nightglow layers. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art ground-based CCD imaging techniques to detect these waves in intensity and temperature. All-sky (180...

  5. Ellipsometric study of the temperature dependences of the dielectric function and the critical points of AlSb at temperatures from 300 to 803 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Han Gyeol; Kim, Tae Jung; Hwang, Soon Yong; Kim, Jun Young; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Young Dong [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hoon; Song, Jin Dong [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We report the complex pseudodielectric function <ε> = <ε{sub 1} > + i<ε{sub 2} > of an oxide-free AlSb film for energies from 0.7 to 5.0 eV and temperatures from 300 to 803 K. The 1.5-μm-thick film was grown on a (001) GaAs substrate by using molecular beam epitaxy. We maintained the film in an ultrahigh vacuum to prevent oxidation artifacts and used a rotating-compensator ellipsometer to obtain the optical properties. Critical-point (CP) energies were obtained by numerically calculating second energy derivatives of the data. Blue shifts of the CP energies and sharper structures were observed with decreasing temperature. The calculated CP energies were fit to a linear equation.

  6. Atmospheric remote sensing to detect effects of temperature inversions on sputum cell counts in airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julie; Nair, Parameswaran; Kanaroglou, Pavlos

    2010-08-01

    Temperature inversions result in the accumulation of air pollution, often to levels exceeding air quality criteria. The respiratory response may be detectable in sputum cell counts. This study investigates the effect of boundary layer temperature inversions on sputum cell counts. Total and differential cell counts of neutrophils, eosinophils, macrophages and lymphocytes were quantified in sputum samples of patients attending an outpatient clinic. Temperature inversions were identified using data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, an atmospheric sensor on the Aqua spacecraft which was launched in 2002 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. On inversion days, a statistically significant increase in the percent of cells that were neutrophils was observed in stable patients. There was also a statistically significant increase in the percent of cells that were macrophages, in exacerbated patients. Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the relationship between temperature inversions and cell counts, controlling patients' age, smoking status, medications and meteorological variables of temperature and humidity. The analyses indicate that, in the stable and exacerbated groups, percent neutrophils and macrophages increased by 12.6% and 2.5%, respectively, on inversion days. These results suggest that temperature inversions need consideration as an exacerbating factor in bronchitis and obstructive airway disease. The effects of air pollutants, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, fine particulate matter and ozone, were investigated. We identified no significant associations with any pollutant. However, we found that monthly averages of total cell counts were strongly correlated with monthly nitrogen dioxide concentrations, an association not previously identified in the literature.

  7. Distributed Optical Fiber Radiation and Temperature Sensing at High Energy Accelerators and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090137; Brugger, Markus

    The aim of this Thesis is to investigate the feasibility of a distributed optical fiber radiation sensing system to be used at high energy physics accelerators and experiments where complex mixed-field environments are present. In particular, after having characterized the response of a selection of radiation sensitive optical fibers to ionizing radiation coming from a 60Co source, the results of distributed optical fiber radiation measurements in a mixed-field environment are presented along with the method to actually estimate the dose variation. This study demonstrates that distributed optical fiber dosimetry in the above mentioned mixed-field radiation environment is feasible, allowing to detect dose variations of about 10-15 Gy with a 1 m spatial resolution. The proof of principle has fully succeeded and we can now tackle the challenge of an industrial installation taking into account that some optimizations need to be done both on the control unit of the system as well as on the choice of the sensing f...

  8. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  9. Optical temperature sensing by upconversion luminescence of Er doped Bi5TiNbWO15ferroelectric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Er3+ doped Bi5TiNbWO15 ceramics have been synthesized using conventional solid-state reaction techniques. The crystal structure, ferroelectric properties, UC emission properties and especially the temperature sensing behaviors were systematically studied. With increasing Er3+ content, the investigation of XRD pattern, the ferroelectric loop and the UC emission indicated that the Er3+ ions dopants preferentially substituted the A sites of Bi3TiNbO9 and then Bi2WO6. Based on fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR technique, the observed results implied the ceramics were promising candidates for temperature sensors in the temperature range of 175 K −550 K. More importantly, this study provided a contrast of temperature sensitivity between emission from the same part (Bi3TiNbO9 in bismuth layered-structure and emission from the different part (Bi3TiNbO9 and Bi2WO6 in bismuth layered-structure for the first time.

  10. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Gas Sensing Performance of SnO2 Thin Films Prepared by Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. PATIL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of variation of annealing temperature on the gas sensing characteristics of SnO2 thin films, which have been prepared by spray pyrolysis on alumina substrate at 350 oC, is investigated systematically for various gases at different operating temperature. The XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy and SEM techniques were employed to establish the structural, optical and morphological characteristics of the materials, resp. The X-ray diffraction results showed an increase in the crystallinity at higher annealing temperature. A high value of sensitivity is obtained for H2S gas at an optimum temperature of 100 oC is improved considerably. A SnO2 gas sensor annealed at 950 oC with sensitivity as high as 24 %, 4 times higher than that of sensor annealed at 550oC, are obtained for 80 ppm of H2S. The degree of crystallinity and grain size calculated from the XRD patterns has been found increasing with annealing temp

  11. The intrinsic crossing point of the magnetization vs. temperature curves in superconducting cuprates in the high-magnetic-field limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosqueira, J.; Torron, C.; Veira, J.A.; Vidal, F.

    1998-01-01

    The crossing point of the magnetization vs. temperature curves that appears below T c in highly anisotropic superconducting cuprates was measured in different compounds, with a different number, N, of superconducting CuO 2 layers per periodicity length, s, and also with different values of s. By correcting the measurements from different extrinsic inhomogeneity effects through the Meissner fraction, it is demonstrated experimentally for the first time that in the high-magnetic-field limit the intrinsic crossing point may be explained at a quantitative level in terms of the Tesanovic and coworkers approach based on thermal fluctuations of quasi-2D vortices (pancakes), with an effective periodicity length equal to s, independently of N. (orig.)

  12. Water heater temperature set point and water use patterns influence Legionella pneumophila and associated microorganisms at the tap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, William J; Ji, Pan; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-12-01

    Lowering water heater temperature set points and using less drinking water are common approaches to conserving water and energy; yet, there are discrepancies in past literature regarding the effects of water heater temperature and water use patterns on the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens, in particular Legionella pneumophila. Our objective was to conduct a controlled, replicated pilot-scale investigation to address this knowledge gap using continuously recirculating water heaters to examine five water heater set points (39-58 °C) under three water use conditions. We hypothesized that L. pneumophila levels at the tap depend on the collective influence of water heater temperature, flow frequency, and the resident plumbing ecology. We confirmed temperature setting to be a critical factor in suppressing L. pneumophila growth both in continuously recirculating hot water lines and at distal taps. For example, at 51 °C, planktonic L. pneumophila in recirculating lines was reduced by a factor of 28.7 compared to 39 °C and was prevented from re-colonizing biofilm. However, L. pneumophila still persisted up to 58 °C, with evidence that it was growing under the conditions of this study. Further, exposure to 51 °C water in a low-use tap appeared to optimally select for L. pneumophila (e.g., 125 times greater numbers than in high-use taps). We subsequently explored relationships among L. pneumophila and other ecologically relevant microbes, noting that elevated temperature did not have a general disinfecting effect in terms of total bacterial numbers. We documented the relationship between L. pneumophila and Legionella spp., and noted several instances of correlations with Vermamoeba vermiformis, and generally found that there is a dynamic relationship with this amoeba host over the range of temperatures and water use frequencies examined. Our study provides a new window of understanding into the microbial ecology of potable hot water systems and helps to resolve

  13. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) demonstration reactor (DR) is a concept for a salt-cooled reactor with 100 megawatts of thermal output (MWt). It would use tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel within prismatic graphite blocks. FLiBe (2 LiF-BeF2) is the reference primary coolant. The FHR DR is designed to be small, simple, and affordable. Development of the FHR DR is a necessary intermediate step to enable near-term commercial FHRs. Lower risk technologies are purposely included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include TRISO particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers. Several preconceptual and conceptual design efforts that have been conducted on FHR concepts bear a significant influence on the FHR DR design. Specific designs include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) with 3400/1500 MWt/megawatts of electric output (MWe), as well as a 125 MWt small modular AHTR (SmAHTR) from ORNL. Other important examples are the Mk1 pebble bed FHR (PB-FHR) concept from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and an FHR test reactor design developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The MIT FHR test reactor is based on a prismatic fuel platform and is directly relevant to the present FHR DR design effort. These FHR concepts are based on reasonable assumptions for credible commercial prototypes. The FHR DR concept also directly benefits from the operating experience of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), as well as the detailed design efforts for a large molten salt reactor concept and its breeder variant, the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor. The FHR DR technology is most representative of the 3400 MWt AHTR

  14. Dirac-Point Shift by Carrier Injection Barrier in Graphene Field-Effect Transistor Operation at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia; Alexander-Webber, Jack; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Sagade, Abhay A; Lu, Haichang; Hasko, David; Robertson, John; Hofmann, Stephan

    2018-03-21

    A positive shift in the Dirac point in graphene field-effect transistors was observed with Hall-effect measurements coupled with Kelvin-probe measurements at room temperature. This shift can be explained by the asymmetrical behavior of the contact resistance by virtue of the electron injection barrier at the source contact. As an outcome, an intrinsic resistance is given to allow a retrieval of an intrinsic carrier mobility found to be decreased with increasing gate bias, suggesting the dominance of short-range scattering in a single-layer graphene field-effect transistor. These results analytically correlate the field-effect parameters with intrinsic graphene properties.

  15. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  16. Electron beam physical vapor deposition of thin ruby films for remote temperature sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Greg Walker, D.; Valentine, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors (TGPs) possessing temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties have a wide range of uses in thermometry due to their remote access and large temperature sensitivity range. However, in most cases, phosphors are synthesized in powder form, which prevents their use in high resolution micro and nanoscale thermal microscopy. In the present study, we investigate the use of electron beam physical vapor deposition to fabricate thin films of chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Cr-Al 2 O 3 , ruby) thermographic phosphors. Although as-deposited films were amorphous and exhibited weak photoluminescence, the films regained the stoichiometry and α-Al 2 O 3 crystal structure of the combustion synthesized source powder after thermal annealing. As a consequence, the annealed films exhibit both strong photoluminescence and a temperature-dependent lifetime that decreases from 2.9 ms at 298 K to 2.1 ms at 370 K. Ruby films were also deposited on multiple substrates. To ensure a continuous film with smooth surface morphology and strong photoluminescence, we use a sapphire substrate, which is thermal expansion coefficient and lattice matched to the film. These thin ruby films can potentially be used as remote temperature sensors for probing the local temperatures of micro and nanoscale structures.

  17. C-QDs@UiO-66-(COOH)2Composite Film via Electrophoretic Deposition for Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ji-Fei; Gao, Shui-Ying; Shi, Jianlin; Liu, Tian-Fu; Cao, Rong

    2018-03-05

    Temperature plays a crucial role in both scientific research and industry. However, traditional temperature sensors, such as liquid-filled thermometers, thermocouples, and transistors, require contact to obtain heat equilibrium between the probe and the samples during the measurement. In addition, traditional temperature sensors have limitations when being used to detect the temperature change of fast-moving samples at smaller scales. Herein, the carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) composite film, a novel contactless solid optical thermometer, has been prepared via electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Instead of terephthalic acid (H 2 BDC), 1',2',4',5'-benzenetetracarboxylic (H 4 BTEC) acid was employed to construct a UiO-66 framework to present two uncoordinated carboxylic groups decorated on the pore surface. The uncoordinated carboxylic groups can generate negative charges, which facilitates the deposition of film on the positive electrode during the EPD process. Moreover, UiO-66-(COOH) 2 MOFs can absorb C-QDs from the solution and prevent C-QDs from aggregating, and the well-dispersed C-QDs impart fluorescence characteristics to composites. As-synthesized composite film was successfully used to detect temperature change in the range of 97-297 K with a relative sensitivity up to 1.3% K -1 at 297 K.

  18. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wenchuan; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Xinhua; Zhuang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    In order to predict the water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with the water content of 18–37% between 5 and 40 °C. The regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The results showed that increases in either water content or temperature resulted in an increase in the electrical conductivity of honey with greater changes at higher water content and/or higher temperature. The linear terms of water content and temperature, a quadratic term of water content, and the interaction effect of water content and temperature had significant influence on the electrical conductivity of honey (p < 0.0001). Regardless of blossom honey type, the linear coefficient of the determination of measured and calculated electrical conductivities was 0.998 and the range error ratio was larger than 100. These results suggest that the electrical conductivity of honey might be used to develop a detector for rapidly predicting the water content in blossom honey

  19. Latent Heat Flux Estimate Through an Energy Water Balance Model and Land Surface Temperature from Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, Chiara; Sobrino, Jose A.; Mancini, Marco; Hidalgo, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in the terrestrial water cycle and is responsible for the partitioning of precipitation between runoff and infiltration. Moreover, surface soil moisture controls the redistribution of the incoming solar radiation on land surface into sensible and latent heat fluxes. Recent developments have been made to improve soil moisture dynamics predictions with hydrologic land surface models (LSMs) that compute water and energy balances between the land surface and the low atmosphere. However, most of the time soil moisture is confined to an internal numerical model variable mainly due to its intrinsic space and time variability and to the well known difficulties in assessing its value from remote sensing as from in situ measurements. In order to exploit the synergy between hydrological distributed models and thermal remote sensed data, FEST-EWB, a land surface model that solves the energy balance equation, was developed. In this hydrological model, the energy budget is solved looking for the representative thermodynamic equilibrium temperature (RET) defined as the land surface temperature that closes the energy balance equation. So using this approach, soil moisture is linked to the latent heat flux and then to LST. In this work the relationship between land surface temperature and soil moisture is analysed using LST from AHS (airborne hyperspectral scanner), with a spatial resolution of 2-4 m, LST from MODIS, with a spatial resolution of 1000 m, and thermal infrared radiometric ground measurements that are compared with the thermodynamic equilibrium temperature from the energy water balance model. Moreover soil moisture measurements were carried out during the airborne overpasses and then compared with SM from the hydrological model. An improvement of this well known inverse relationship between soil moisture and land surface temperature is obtained when the thermodynamic approach is used. The analysis of the scale effects of the different

  20. Polymer functionalized nanostructured porous silicon for selective water vapor sensing at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Priyanka; Das, Samaresh; Dhanekar, Saakshi

    2017-04-01

    This paper highlights the surface treatment of porous silicon (PSi) for enhancing the sensitivity of water vapors at room temperature. A simple and low cost technique was used for fabrication and functionalization of PSi. Spin coated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used for functionalizing PSi surface. Morphological and structural studies were conducted to analyze samples using SEM and XRD/Raman spectroscopy respectively. Contact angle measurements were performed for assessing the wettability of the surfaces. PSi and functionalized PSi samples were tested as sensors in presence of different analytes like ethanol, acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and water vapors in the range of 50-500 ppm. Electrical measurements were taken from parallel aluminium electrodes fabricated on the functionalized surface, using metal mask and thermal evaporation. Functionalized PSi sensors in comparison to non-functionalized sensors depicted selective and enhanced response to water vapor at room temperature. The results portray an efficient and selective water vapor detection at room temperature.

  1. Cooling Effect of Rivers on Metropolitan Taipei Using Remote Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yen-Chang; Tan, Chih-Hung; Wei, Chiang; Su, Zi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study applied remote sensing technology to analyze how rivers in the urban environment affect the surface temperature of their ambient areas. While surface meteorological stations can supply accurate data points in the city, remote sensing can provide such data in a two-dimensional (2-D) manner. The goal of this paper is to apply the remote sensing technique to further our understanding of the relationship between the surface temperature and rivers in urban areas. The 2-D surface tempera...

  2. Characterization of thick and thin film SiCN for pressure sensing at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40-60 μm) and thick (about 2-3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated.

  3. Characterization of Thick and Thin Film SiCN for Pressure Sensing at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama B. Bhat

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA, thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40–60 µm and thick (about 2–3 mm films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated.

  4. Effect of Firing Temperature on Humidity Sensing Properties of SnO2 Thick Film Resistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Y. Borse

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Thick films of SnO2 were prepared using standard screen printing technique. The films were dried and fired at different temperatures. Tin-oxide is an n-type wide band gap semiconductor, whose resistance is described as a function of relative humidity. An increasing firing temperature on SnO2 film increases the sensitivity to humidity. The parameters such as sensitivity, response times and hysteresis of the SnO2 film sensors have been evaluated. The thick films were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDAX and grain size, composition of elements, relative phases are obtained.

  5. A time domain design technique for high precision full digital pointing system in balloon-borne remote infrared sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscaleri, A.; Venturi, V.; Tronconi, A.; Colzi, R.

    1990-09-01

    The design of two motor servoloops for an azimuth stabilization of a gondola of a large telescope is described. The system uses two dc torque motors, one for any motion of the platform around the vertical axis and one placed at the interconnecting point balloon-payload for attenuating the friction bearing. Mechanical nonlinearities impose a time domain design for any settling time control whenever the gondola experiences a new step in azimuth coordinate. A simplified equations of motion in the time domain are shown which enable this settling time to be controlled. A mechanical approach using an active pivot to avoid disturbances of the balloon rotation on current tracking of the sky azimuthal target is described.

  6. Canine sense and sensibility: tipping points and response latency variability as an optimism index in a canine judgement bias assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Melissa J; Branson, Nicholas; Cody, Denis; Starling, Timothy R; McGreevy, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in animal welfare science used judgement bias, a type of cognitive bias, as a means to objectively measure an animal's affective state. It is postulated that animals showing heightened expectation of positive outcomes may be categorised optimistic, while those showing heightened expectations of negative outcomes may be considered pessimistic. This study pioneers the use of a portable, automated apparatus to train and test the judgement bias of dogs. Dogs were trained in a discrimination task in which they learned to touch a target after a tone associated with a lactose-free milk reward and abstain from touching the target after a tone associated with water. Their judgement bias was then probed by presenting tones between those learned in the discrimination task and measuring their latency to respond by touching the target. A Cox's Proportional Hazards model was used to analyse censored response latency data. Dog and Cue both had a highly significant effect on latency and risk of touching a target. This indicates that judgement bias both exists in dogs and differs between dogs. Test number also had a significant effect, indicating that dogs were less likely to touch the target over successive tests. Detailed examination of the response latencies revealed tipping points where average latency increased by 100% or more, giving an indication of where dogs began to treat ambiguous cues as predicting more negative outcomes than positive ones. Variability scores were calculated to provide an index of optimism using average latency and standard deviation at cues after the tipping point. The use of a mathematical approach to assessing judgement bias data in animal studies offers a more detailed interpretation than traditional statistical analyses. This study provides proof of concept for the use of an automated apparatus for measuring cognitive bias in dogs.

  7. Cloud tolerance of remote sensing technologies to measure land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional means to estimate land surface temperature (LST) from space relies on the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral window and is limited to cloud-free scenes. To also provide LST estimates during periods with clouds, a new method was developed to estimate LST based on passive microwave (MW) obse...

  8. Development of LTCC smart channels for integrated chemical, temperature, and flow sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Kenneth Allen; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Turner, Timothy Shawn

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the development of 'smart' channels that can be used simultaneously as a fluid channel and as an integrated chemical, temperature, and flow sensor. The uniqueness of this device lies in the fabrication and processing of low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) materials that act as the common substrate for both the sensors and the channel itself. Devices developed in this study have employed rolled LTCC tubes, but grooves or other channel shapes can be fabricated depending on the application requirements. The chemical transducer is fabricated by depositing a conductive polymer 'ink' across a pair of electrodes that acts as a chemical resistor (chemiresistor) within the rolled LTCC tube. Volatile organic compounds passing through the tube are absorbed into the polymers, causing the polymers to reversibly swell and change in electrical resistance. The change in resistance is calibrated to the chemical concentration. Multiple chemiresistors have been integrated into a single smart channel to provide chemical discrimination through the use of different polymers. A heating element is embedded in the rolled tube to maintain a constant temperature in the vicinity of the chemical sensors. Thick-film thermistor lines are printed to monitor the temperature near the chemical sensor and at upstream locations to monitor the incoming ambient flow. The thermistors and heating element are used together as a thermal anemometer to measure the flow rate through the tube. Configurations using both surface-printed and suspended thermistors have been evaluated.

  9. Industrial Qualification Process for Optical Fibers Distributed Strain and Temperature Sensing in Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Delepine-Lesoille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and strain monitoring will be implemented in the envisioned French geological repository for high- and intermediate-level long-lived nuclear wastes. Raman and Brillouin scatterings in optical fibers are efficient industrial methods to provide distributed temperature and strain measurements. Gamma radiation and hydrogen release from nuclear wastes can however affect the measurements. An industrial qualification process is successfully proposed and implemented. Induced measurement uncertainties and their physical origins are quantified. The optical fiber composition influence is assessed. Based on radiation-hard fibers and carbon-primary coatings, we showed that the proposed system can provide accurate temperature and strain measurements up to 0.5 MGy and 100% hydrogen concentration in the atmosphere, over 200 m distance range. The selected system was successfully implemented in the Andra underground laboratory, in one-to-one scale mockup of future cells, into concrete liners. We demonstrated the efficiency of simultaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering measurements to provide both strain and temperature distributed measurements. We showed that 1.3 μm working wavelength is in favor of hazardous environment monitoring.

  10. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Gyroscope Noise Analysis and Scale Factor Characterization over Temperature Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    trials) ........................................................................10 Fig. 7 Allan deviation graph from the PinPoint CRM100 datasheet ...15 Fig. 12 Bias over temperature from the PinPoint CRM100 datasheet (image courtesy of Silicon Sensing Systems Limited...17 Fig. 14 Scale factor error over temperature from the PinPoint CRM100 datasheet (image courtesy of Silicon Sensing

  11. Evolution of Skin Temperature after the Application of Compressive Forces on Tendon, Muscle and Myofascial Trigger Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Marina Figueiredo; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Girasol, Carlos Eduardo; de Oliveira, Alessandra Kelly; Dias, Fabiana Rodrigues Cancio; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Some assessment and diagnosis methods require palpation or the application of certain forces on the skin, which affects the structures beneath, we highlight the importance of defining possible influences on skin temperature as a result of this physical contact. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the ideal time for performing thermographic examination after palpation based on the assessment of skin temperature evolution. Randomized and crossover study carried out with 15 computer-user volunteers of both genders, between 18 and 45 years of age, who were submitted to compressive forces of 0, 1, 2 and 3 kg/cm2 for 30 seconds with a washout period of 48 hours using a portable digital dynamometer. Compressive forces were applied on the following spots on the dominant upper limb: myofascial trigger point in the levator scapulae, biceps brachii muscle and palmaris longus tendon. Volunteers were examined by means of infrared thermography before and after the application of compressive forces (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes). In most comparisons made over time, a significant decrease was observed 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the application of compressive forces (p 0.05). In conclusion, infrared thermography can be used after assessment or diagnosis methods focused on the application of forces on tendons and muscles, provided the procedure is performed 15 minutes after contact with the skin. Regarding to the myofascial trigger point, the thermographic examination can be performed within 60 minutes after the contact with the skin.

  12. Quantum tricritical point in the temperature-pressure-magnetic field phase diagram of CeTiGe3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2018-01-01

    We report the temperature-pressure-magnetic-field phase diagram of the ferromagnetic Kondo-lattice CeTiGe3 determined by means of electrical resistivity measurements. Measurements up to ˜5.8 GPa reveal a rich phase diagram with multiple phase transitions. At ambient pressure, CeTiGe3 orders ferromagnetically at TC=14 K. Application of pressure suppresses TC, but a pressure-induced ferromagnetic quantum criticality is avoided by the appearance of two new successive transitions for p >4.1 GPa that are probably antiferromagnetic in nature. These two transitions are suppressed under pressure, with the lower-temperature phase being fully suppressed above 5.3 GPa. The critical pressures for the presumed quantum phase transitions are p1≅4.1 GPa and p2≅5.3 GPa. Above 4.1 GPa, application of magnetic field shows a tricritical point evolving into a wing-structure phase with a quantum tricritical point at 2.8 T at 5.4 GPa, where the first-order antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition changes into the second-order antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition.

  13. Two cloud-point phenomena in tetrabutylammonium perfluorooctanoate aqueous solutions: anomalous temperature-induced phase and structure transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng; Huang, Jin; Lu, Run-Chao; Jin, Chen; Xiao, Jin-Xin; Chen, Yong-Ming

    2005-03-24

    This paper reported the phase behavior and aggregate structure of tetrabutylammonium perfluorooctanoate (TBPFO), determined by differential scanning calorimeter, electrical conductivity, static/dynamic light scattering, and rheology methods. We found that above a certain concentration the TBPFO solution showed anomalous temperature-dependent phase behavior and structure transitions. Such an ionic surfactant solution exhibits two cloud points. When the temperature was increased, the solution turned from a homogeneous-phase to a liquid-liquid two-phase system, then to another homogeneous-phase, and finally to another liquid-liquid two-phase system. In the first homogeneous-phase region, the aggregates of TBPFO were rodlike micelles and the solution was Newtonian fluid. While in the second homogeneous-phase region, the aggregates of TBPFO were large wormlike micelles, and the solution behaved as pseudoplastic fluid that also exhibited viscoelastic behavior. We thought that the first cloud point might be caused by the "bridge" effect of the tetrabutylammonium counterion between the micelles and the second one by the formation of the micellar network.

  14. Temperature, light and nitrate sensing coordinate Arabidopsis seed dormancy cycling, resulting in winter and summer annual phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footitt, Steven; Huang, Ziyue; Clay, Heather A; Mead, Andrew; Finch-Savage, William E

    2013-01-01

    Seeds use environmental cues to sense the seasons and their surroundings to initiate the life cycle of the plant. The dormancy cycling underlying this process is extensively described, but the molecular mechanism is largely unknown. To address this we selected a range of representative genes from published array experiments in the laboratory, and investigated their expression patterns in seeds of Arabidopsis ecotypes with contrasting life cycles over an annual dormancy cycle in the field. We show how mechanisms identified in the laboratory are coordinated in response to the soil environment to determine the dormancy cycles that result in winter and summer annual phenotypes. Our results are consistent with a seed-specific response to seasonal temperature patterns (temporal sensing) involving the gene DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) that indicates the correct season, and concurrent temporally driven co-opted mechanisms that sense spatial signals, i.e. nitrate, via CBL-INTERACTING PROTEIN KINASE 23 (CIPK23) phosphorylation of the NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1 (NRT1.1), and light, via PHYTOCHROME A (PHYA). In both ecotypes studied, when all three genes have low expression there is enhanced GIBBERELLIN 3 BETA-HYDROXYLASE 1 (GA3ox1) expression, exhumed seeds have the potential to germinate in the laboratory, and the initiation of seedling emergence occurs following soil disturbance (exposure to light) in the field. Unlike DOG1, the expression of MOTHER of FLOWERING TIME (MFT) has an opposite thermal response in seeds of the two ecotypes, indicating a role in determining their different dormancy cycling phenotypes. PMID:23590427

  15. Paper-Based Sensing Device for Electrochemical Detection of Oxidative Stress Biomarker 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in Point-of-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Gabriela V; Tavares, Ana P M; Fortunato, Elvira; Sales, M Goreti F

    2017-11-06

    This work presents a cost-effective, label-free in point-of-care (POC) biosensor for the sensitive detection of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), the most abundant oxidative product of DNA, that may allow a premature assessment of cancer disease, thereby improving diagnosis, prognostics and survival rates. The device targets the direct detection of 8-OHdG by using for the first time a carbon-ink 3-electrode on a paper substrate coupled to Differential Pulse Voltammetry readings. This design was optimized by adding nanostructured carbon materials to the ink and the conducting polymer PEDOT, enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of the sensor towards 8-OHdG detection. Meanwhile, the ability of this oxidative stress biomarker to undertake an oxidation reaction enabled the development of the sensing electrochemical device without the need of chemical probes and long incubation periods. This paper-modified sensor presented high electrochemical performance on the oxidation of 8-OHdG with a wide linear range (50-1000 ng/ml) and a low detection limit (14.4 ng/ml). Thus, our results showed the development of a direct and facile sensor with good reproducibility, stability, sensitivity and more importantly, selectivity. The proposed carbon-based electrochemical sensor is a potential candidate to be miniaturized to small portable size, which make it applicable for in-situ 8-OHdG sensing in real biological samples.

  16. An elevated-temperature depth-sensing instrumented indentation apparatus for investigating thermo-mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhaoliang; Yu, Miao; Liu, Yanchao; Xu, Baosheng; He, Rujie; Pei, Yongmao; Zhao, Hongwei; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    In our study, an elevated-temperature depth-sensing instrumented indentation apparatus was designed and developed to investigate thermo-mechanical response of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A furnace was used to heat the test region up to 1600 °C and a heat protection design was proposed to protect electronic devices from high temperature environment. Load was applied by a precise loading motor and a piezoelectric actuator in high (0-440 N) and low (0-40 N) load ranges, respectively. A loading shielding scheme was designed to protect the low load sensor during the high loading process. In order to obtain reliable test data, the as-developed apparatus was calibrated at room and elevated temperatures. It is found that the developed apparatus was suitable to obtain the intended data. After that, two typical TBCs were tested from 600 to 1500 °C, and the load-depth curves were presented to show the main functions and usability of the measuring system.

  17. An improvement of the retrieval of temperature and relative humidity profiles from a combination of active and passive remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yunfei; Ma, Shuqing; Xing, Fenghua; Li, Siteng; Dai, Yaru

    2018-03-01

    This paper focuses on an improvement of the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity profiles through combining active and passive remote sensing. Ground-based microwave radiometer and millimeter-wavelength cloud radar were used to acquire the observations. Cloud base height and cloud thickness determinations from cloud radar were added into the atmospheric profile retrieval process, and a back-propagation neural network method was used as the retrieval tool. Because a substantial amount of data are required to train a neural network, and as microwave radiometer data are insufficient for this purpose, 8 years of radiosonde data from Beijing were used as the database. The monochromatic radiative transfer model was used to calculate the brightness temperatures in the same channels as the microwave radiometer. Parts of the cloud base heights and cloud thicknesses in the training data set were also estimated using the radiosonde data. The accuracy of the results was analyzed through a comparison with L-band sounding radar data and quantified using the mean bias, root-mean-square error (RMSE), and correlation coefficient. The statistical results showed that an inversion with cloud information was the optimal method. Compared with the inversion profiles without cloud information, the RMSE values after adding cloud information reduced to varying degrees for the vast majority of height layers. These reductions were particularly clear in layers with clouds. The maximum reduction in the RMSE for the temperature profile was 2.2 K, while that for the humidity profile was 16%.

  18. Temporal Variability in Vertical Groundwater Fluxes and the Effect of Solar Radiation on Streambed Temperatures Based on Vertical High Resolution Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, E.; Karan, S.; Engesgaard, P. K.; Duque, C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its large spatial and temporal variability, groundwater discharge to streams is difficult to quantify. Methods using vertical streambed temperature profiles to estimate vertical fluxes are often of coarse vertical spatial resolution and neglect to account for the natural heterogeneity in thermal conductivity of streambed sediments. Here we report on a field investigation in a stream, where air, stream water and streambed sediment temperatures were measured by Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) with high spatial resolution to; (i) detect spatial and temporal variability in groundwater discharge based on vertical streambed temperature profiles, (ii) study the thermal regime of streambed sediments exposed to different solar radiation influence, (iii) describe the effect of solar radiation on the measured streambed temperatures. The study was carried out at a field site located along Holtum stream, in Western Denmark. The 3 m wide stream has a sandy streambed with a cobbled armour layer, a mean discharge of 200 l/s and a mean depth of 0.3 m. Streambed temperatures were measured with a high-resolution DTS system (HR-DTS). By helically wrapping the fiber optic cable around two PVC pipes of 0.05 m and 0.075 m outer diameter over 1.5 m length, temperature measurements were recorded with 5.7 mm and 3.8 mm vertical spacing, respectively. The HR-DTS systems were installed 0.7 m deep in the streambed sediments, crossing both the sediment-water and the water-air interface, thus yielding high resolution water and air temperature data as well. One of the HR-DTS systems was installed in the open stream channel with only topographical shading, while the other HR-DTS system was placed 7 m upstream, under the canopy of a tree, thus representing the shaded conditions with reduced influence of solar radiation. Temperature measurements were taken with 30 min intervals between 16 April and 25 June 2013. The thermal conductivity of streambed sediments was calibrated in a 1D flow

  19. Heterogeneous all-solid multicore fiber based multipath Michelson interferometer for high temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Li; Zhang, Peng; Tang, Ming; Wang, Ruoxu; Zhao, Zhiyong; Fu, Songnian; Gan, Lin; Zhu, Benpeng; Tong, Weijun; Liu, Deming; Shum, Perry Ping

    2016-09-05

    A compact high temperature sensor utilizing a multipath Michelson interferometer (MI) structure based on weak coupling multicore fiber (MCF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The device is fabricated by program-controlled tapering the spliced region between single mode fiber (SMF) and a segment of MCF. After that, a spherical reflective structure is formed by arc-fusion splicing the end face of MCF. Theoretical analysis has been implemented for this specific multipath MI structure; beam propagation method based simulation and corresponding experiments were performed to investigate the effect of taper and spherical end face on system's performance. Benefiting from the multipath interferences and heterogeneous structure between the center core and surrounding cores of the all-solid MCF, an enhanced temperature sensitivity of 165 pm/°C up to 900°C and a high-quality interference spectrum with 25 dB fringe visibility were achieved.

  20. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  1. Remote Sensing of Coral Bleaching Using Temperature and Light: Progress towards an Operational Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    William Skirving; Susana Enríquez; John D. Hedley; Sophie Dove; C. Mark Eakin; Robert A. B. Mason; Jacqueline L. De La Cour; Gang Liu; Ove Hoegh-Guldberg; Alan E. Strong; Peter J. Mumby; Roberto Iglesias-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Watch program developed and operates several global satellite products to monitor bleaching-level heat stress. While these products have a proven ability to predict the onset of most mass coral bleaching events, they occasionally miss events; inaccurately predict the severity of some mass coral bleaching events; or report false alarms. These products are based solely on temperature and yet coral bleaching is known to result from...

  2. Recent Improvements in Retrieving Near-Surface Air Temperature and Humidity Using Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent

    2010-01-01

    Detailed studies of the energy and water cycles require accurate estimation of the turbulent fluxes of moisture and heat across the atmosphere-ocean interface at regional to basin scale. Providing estimates of these latent and sensible heat fluxes over the global ocean necessitates the use of satellite or reanalysis-based estimates of near surface variables. Recent studies have shown that errors in the surface (10 meter)estimates of humidity and temperature are currently the largest sources of uncertainty in the production of turbulent fluxes from satellite observations. Therefore, emphasis has been placed on reducing the systematic errors in the retrieval of these parameters from microwave radiometers. This study discusses recent improvements in the retrieval of air temperature and humidity through improvements in the choice of algorithms (linear vs. nonlinear) and the choice of microwave sensors. Particular focus is placed on improvements using a neural network approach with a single sensor (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) and the use of combined sensors from the NASA AQUA satellite platform. The latter algorithm utilizes the unique sampling available on AQUA from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A). Current estimates of uncertainty in the near-surface humidity and temperature from single and multi-sensor approaches are discussed and used to estimate errors in the turbulent fluxes.

  3. Remote Sensing of Coral Bleaching Using Temperature and Light: Progress towards an Operational Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Skirving

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Watch program developed and operates several global satellite products to monitor bleaching-level heat stress. While these products have a proven ability to predict the onset of most mass coral bleaching events, they occasionally miss events; inaccurately predict the severity of some mass coral bleaching events; or report false alarms. These products are based solely on temperature and yet coral bleaching is known to result from both temperature and light stress. This study presents a novel methodology (still under development, which combines temperature and light into a single measure of stress to predict the onset and severity of mass coral bleaching. We describe here the biological basis of the Light Stress Damage (LSD algorithm under development. Then by using empirical relationships derived in separate experiments conducted in mesocosm facilities in the Mexican Caribbean we parameterize the LSD algorithm and demonstrate that it is able to describe three past bleaching events from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR. For this limited example, the LSD algorithm was able to better predict differences in the severity of the three past GBR bleaching events, quantifying the contribution of light to reduce or exacerbate the impact of heat stress. The new Light Stress Damage algorithm we present here is potentially a significant step forward in the evolution of satellite-based bleaching products.

  4. Ultra-fast and calibration-free temperature sensing in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin S. M.

    2014-11-20

    A simultaneously time-resolved and calibration-free sensor has been demonstrated to measure temperature at the nanosecond timescale at repetition rates of 1.0 MHz. The sensor benefits from relying on a single laser, is intuitive and straightforward to implement, and can sweep across spectral ranges in excess of 1 cm-1. The sensor can fully resolve rovibrational features of the CO molecule, native to combustion environments, in the mid-infrared range near X = 4.85 μm at typical combustion temperatures (800-2500 K) and pressures (1-3 atm). All of this is possible through the exploitation of chirp in a quantum cascade laser, operating at a duty cycle of 50%, and by using high bandwidth (500 MHz) photodetection. Here, we showcase uncluttered, spectrally-pure Voigt profile fitting with accompanying peak SNRs of 150, resulting in a typical temperature precision of 0.9% (1u) at an effective time-resolution of 1.0 MHz. Our sensor is applicable to other species, and canbe integrated into commercial technologies.

  5. Room Temperature Ammonia Gas Sensing Using Mixed Conductor based TEMPOS Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Chandra

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The current/voltage characteristics of mixed (ion+electron conductor-based ‘TEMPOS’ (Tunable Electronic Material with Pores in Oxide on Silicon structures are reported. TEMPOS are novel electronic MOS-like structures having etched swift heavy ion tracks (i.e., nanopores in the dielectric layer filled with some conducting material. The three contacts (two on top and one on the bottom, which resemble the classical bipolar or field effect transistor arrangements are, in principle, interchangeable when the overall electrical resistance along the tracks and on the surface are similar. Consequently, three configurations are obtained by interchanging the top contacts with the base contact in electronic circuits. The current/voltage characteristics show a diode like behaviour. Impedance measurements have been made for TEMPOS structures with tracks filled with ion conductors and also mixed conductors to study the ammonia sensing behaviour. The impedance has been found to be a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied signal and concentration of the ammonia solution. This is attributed to the large number of charge carriers (here protons available for conduction on exposure to ammonia and also to the large surface to volume ratio of the polymer composites embedded in the ion tracks. The measurement of both, the real and imaginary parts of impedance allows one to enhance the detection sensitivity greatly.

  6. Room Temperature Ammonia Gas Sensing Using Mixed Conductor based TEMPOS Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroch, Mamta; Srivastava, Sunita; Fink, Dietmar; Chandra, Amita

    2008-10-14

    The current/voltage characteristics of mixed (ion+electron) conductor-based 'TEMPOS' (Tunable Electronic Material with Pores in Oxide on Silicon) structures are reported. TEMPOS are novel electronic MOS-like structures having etched swift heavy ion tracks (i.e., nanopores) in the dielectric layer filled with some conducting material. The three contacts (two on top and one on the bottom), which resemble the classical bipolar or field effect transistor arrangements are, in principle, interchangeable when the overall electrical resistance along the tracks and on the surface are similar. Consequently, three configurations are obtained by interchanging the top contacts with the base contact in electronic circuits. The current/voltage characteristics show a diode like behaviour. Impedance measurements have been made for TEMPOS structures with tracks filled with ion conductors and also mixed conductors to study the ammonia sensing behaviour. The impedance has been found to be a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied signal and concentration of the ammonia solution. This is attributed to the large number of charge carriers (here protons) available for conduction on exposure to ammonia and also to the large surface to volume ratio of the polymer composites embedded in the ion tracks. The measurement of both, the real and imaginary parts of impedance allows one to enhance the detection sensitivity greatly.

  7. Role of hydrothermal temperature on crystallinity, photoluminescence, photocatalytic and gas sensing properties of TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malligavathy, M.; Iyyapushpam, S.; Nishanthi, S. T.; Padiyan, D. Pathinettam

    2018-04-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesised by hydrothermal method. The degree of crystallinity and phase purity were confirmed from the Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction. By increasing the hydrothermal temperature, crystallinity and AC conductivity of the TiO2 nanoparticles increase. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements confirmed that the samples were mesoporous with an average pore diameter of 4.4-7.45 nm. Photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles was evaluated and the sample hydrothermally treated at 160°C has the highest photocatalytic activity. In gas sensing measurements, sensitivity increases as a function of concentration and the response to ethanol vapour was better compared to other gases for the sample synthesised at 160°C.

  8. Influence of temperature on measurements of the CO2 compensation point: differences between the Laisk and O2-exchange methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Berkley J.; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2013-01-01

    The CO2 compensation point in the absence of day respiration (Γ*) is a key parameter for modelling leaf CO2 exchange. Γ* links the kinetics of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) with the stoichiometry of CO2 released per Rubisco oxygenation from photorespiration (α), two essential components of biochemical models of photosynthesis. There are two main gas-exchange methods for measuring Γ*: (i) the Laisk method, which requires estimates of mesophyll conductance to CO2 (g m) and (ii) measurements of O2 isotope exchange, which assume constant values of α and a fixed stoichiometry between O2 uptake and Rubisco oxygenation. In this study, the temperature response of Γ* measured using the Laisk and O2-exchange methods was compared under ambient (25 °C) and elevated (35 °C) temperatures to determine whether both methods yielded similar results. Previously published temperature responses of Γ* estimated with the Laisk and O2-exchange methods in Nicotiana tabacum demonstrated that the Laisk-derived model of Γ* was more sensitive to temperature compared with the O2-exchange model. Measurements in Arabidopsis thaliana indicated that the Laisk and O2-exchange methods produced similar Γ* at 25 °C; however, Γ* values from O2 exchange were lower at 35 °C compared with the Laisk method. Compared with a photorespiratory mutant (pmdh1pmdh2hpr) with increased α, wild-type (WT) plants had lower Laisk values of Γ* at 25 °C but were not significantly different at 35 °C. These differences between Laisk and O2 exchange values of Γ* at 35 °C could be explained by temperature sensitivity of α in WT and/or errors in the assumptions of O2 exchange. The differences between Γ* measured using the Laisk and O2-exchange method with temperature demonstrate that assumptions used to measure Γ*, and possibly the species-specific validity of these assumptions, need to be considered when modelling the temperature response of photosynthesis. PMID:23630324

  9. Can we use remotely sensed land surface temperatures to evaluate and improve model simulations of the urban heat island?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Monaghan, A. J.; Brunsell, N. A.; Barlage, M. J.; Feddema, J. J.; Wilhelmi, O.

    2013-12-01

    Extreme heat events are the leading cause of weather-related human mortality in the United States and in many countries world-wide, and the development of highly accurate urban climate models to predict heat waves and extreme heat events is critical. However, the heterogeneous urban surface with myriad energy and moisture fluxes increases model complexity and uncertainty. Remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) offers advantages such as comparable spatial scale, global coverage, steady periodicity, and long-term observations, which can be applied to assess model simulations. This research proposes a sampling technique to select and compare MODIS LST and model-simulated radiative temperature for eight configurations of the High Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS) during 2003-2012 summers (JJA) for Houston, TX. The objective is to decrease comparison biases between MODIS and HRLDAS caused by clouds, view angles, and the LST retrieval algorithm, and to understand which urban surface properties are critical for accurate UHI simulations. The results show that the accurate description of urban fraction can effectively decrease more than 25% of RMSE for HRLDAS LST for both daytime and nighttime comparisons. Assuming irrigated vegetation in the urban area largely improved the RMSE by about 2K during the daytime, while there was no significant difference for the nighttime periods. In the most realistic scenario HRLDAS performed quite well at night, both temporally and spatially. HRLDAS daytime LST simulations are warmer than MODIS observations by approximately 5K but with relatively strong correlations. In summary, remotely sensed LST can be a good observational source for the assessment of UHI simulations, but requires careful pre-processing beforehand to avoid unrepresentative comparisons. The proposed sampling method is practical and effective for validation of long-term urban-scale model simulations.

  10. A One-Source Approach for Estimating Land Surface Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of available energy between sensible heat and latent heat is important for precise water resources planning and management in the context of global climate change. Land surface temperature (LST is a key variable in energy balance process and remotely sensed LST is widely used for estimating surface heat fluxes at regional scale. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero poses a great challenge for regional heat fluxes estimation in one-source energy balance models. To address this issue, we proposed a One-Source Model for Land (OSML to estimate regional surface heat fluxes without requirements for empirical extra resistance, roughness parameterization and wind velocity. The proposed OSML employs both conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analog formula of sensible heat flux (H to analytically estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae via a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX in United States and the Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration (MUSOEXE in China, using remotely sensed retrievals as auxiliary data sets at regional scale. Validated against tower-based surface fluxes observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD of H and latent heat flux (LE from OSML are 34.5 W/m2 and 46.5 W/m2 at SMACEX site and 50.1 W/m2 and 67.0 W/m2 at MUSOEXE site. The performance of OSML is very comparable to other published studies. In addition, the proposed OSML model demonstrates similar skills of predicting surface heat fluxes in comparison to SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System. Since OSML does not require specification of aerodynamic surface characteristics, roughness parameterization and meteorological conditions with high spatial variation such as wind speed, this proposed method shows high potential for routinely acquisition of latent heat flux estimation

  11. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    Abstract In this thesis, different experiments on spin squeezing and entanglement involving room temperature ensembles of Cesium atoms are described. The key method is the off-resonant Faraday interaction of spin-polarized atomic ensemble with a light field. And the key component is the micro......-fabricated vapor cell coupled into an optical cavity. Quantum backaction evading measurement of one quadrature of collective spin components by stroboscopically modulating the intensity of probe beam at twice Larmor frequency is used to generate the spin-squeezed state. A projection noise limited optical...... of spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  12. Periodical rocking long period gratings in PANDA fibers for high temperature and refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wa; Bi, Wei-hong; Fu, Xing-hu; Fu, Guang-wei

    2017-09-01

    We report periodical rocking long period gratings (PR-LPGs) in PANDA fibers fabricated with CO2 laser. The PR-LPGs achieve very high coupling efficiency of 19 dB with 12 periods and a 3.5° twist angle in just one scanning cycle, which is much more effective than the conventional CO2 laser fabrication technique. This type of LPGs exhibits polarization-selective resonance dips which demonstrate different sensitivities to environmental parameters. The high temperature and external refractive index sensitivities are measured simultaneously, so it can be used as a wavelength-selective polarization filter and sensor.

  13. A novel method of sensing temperatures of magnet coils of SINP-MaPLE plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A. M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biswas, S.; Basu, S.; Pal, R.

    2014-03-01

    A set of 36 magnet coils is used to produce a continuous, uniform magnetic field of about 0.35 Tesla inside the vacuum chamber of the MaPLE Device, a linear laboratory plasma device (3 m long and 0.30 m in diameter) built for studying basic magnetized plasma physics phenomena. To protect the water cooled-coils from serious damage due to overheating temperatures of all the coils are monitored electronically using low cost temperature sensor IC chips, a technique first being used in similar magnet system. Utilizing the Parallel Port of a Personal Computer a novel scheme is used to avoid deploying microprocessor that is associated with involved circuitry and low level programming to address and control the large number of sensors. The simple circuits and a program code to implement the idea are developed, tested and presently in operation. The whole arrangement comes out to be not only attractive, but also simple, economical and easy to install elsewhere.

  14. Characterizing submarine ground‐water discharge using fiber‐optic distributed temperature sensing and marine electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rory; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Lane, John W.; Harvey, Charles F.; Liu, Lanbo

    2008-01-01

    Submarine ground‐water discharge (SGD) contributes important solute fluxes to coastal waters. Pollutants are transported to coastal ecosystems by SGD at spatially and temporally variable rates. New approaches are needed to characterize the effects of storm‐event, tidal, and seasonal forcing on SGD. Here, we evaluate the utility of two geophysical methods‐fiber‐optic distributed temperature sensing (FO‐DTS) and marine electrical resistivity (MER)—for observing the spatial and temporal variations in SGD and the configuration of the freshwater/saltwater interface within submarine sediments. FO‐DTS and MER cables were permanently installed into the estuary floor on a transect extending 50 meters offshore under Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts, at the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, and nearly continuous data were collected for 4 weeks in summer 2007. Initial results indicate that the methods are extremely useful for monitoring changes in the complex estuarine environment. The FO‐DTS produced time‐series data at approximately 1‐meter increments along the length of the fiber at approximately 29‐second intervals. The temperature time‐series data show that the temperature at near‐shore locations appears to be dominated by a semi‐diurnal (tidal) signal, whereas the temperature at off‐shore locations is dominated by a diurnal signal (day/night heating and cooling). Dipole‐dipole MER surveys were completed about every 50 minutes, allowing for production of high‐resolution time‐lapse tomograms, which provide insight into the variations of the subsurface freshwater/saltwater interface. Preliminary results from the MER data show a high‐resistivity zone near the shore at low tide, indicative of SGD, and consistent with the FO‐DTS results.

  15. Assessment of land surface temperature and heat fluxes over Delhi using remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Surya Deb; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, Debashis

    2015-01-15

    Surface energy processes has an essential role in urban weather, climate and hydrosphere cycles, as well in urban heat redistribution. The research was undertaken to analyze the potential of Landsat and MODIS data in retrieving biophysical parameters in estimating land surface temperature & heat fluxes diurnally in summer and winter seasons of years 2000 and 2010 and understanding its effect on anthropogenic heat disturbance over Delhi and surrounding region. Results show that during years 2000-2010, settlement and industrial area increased from 5.66 to 11.74% and 4.92 to 11.87% respectively which in turn has direct effect on land surface temperature (LST) and heat fluxes including anthropogenic heat flux. Based on the energy balance model for land surface, a method to estimate the increase in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) has been proposed. The settlement and industrial areas has higher amounts of energy consumed and has high values of Has in all seasons. The comparison of satellite derived LST with that of field measured values show that Landsat estimated values are in close agreement within error of ±2 °C than MODIS with an error of ±3 °C. It was observed that, during 2000 and 2010, the average change in surface temperature using Landsat over settlement & industrial areas of both seasons is 1.4 °C & for MODIS data is 3.7 °C. The seasonal average change in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) estimated using Landsat & MODIS is up by around 38 W/m(2) and 62 W/m(2) respectively while higher change is observed over settlement and concrete structures. The study reveals that the dynamic range of Has values has increased in the 10 year period due to the strong anthropogenic influence over the area. The study showed that anthropogenic heat flux is an indicator of the strength of urban heat island effect, and can be used to quantify the magnitude of the urban heat island effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced and selective ammonia sensing of reduced graphene oxide based chemo resistive sensor at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshphysicsdu@gmail.com; Kaur, Amarjeet, E-mail: amarkaur@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The reduced graphene oxide thin films were fabricated by using the spin coating method. The reduced graphene oxide samples were characterised by Raman studies to obtain corresponding D and G bands at 1360 and 1590 cm{sup −1} respectively. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra consists of peak corresponds to sp{sup 2} hybridisation of carbon atoms at 1560 cm{sup −1}. The reduced graphene oxide based chemoresistive sensor exhibited a p-type semiconductor behaviour in ambient conditions and showed good sensitivity to different concentration of ammonia from 25 ppm to 500 ppm and excellent selectivity at room temperature. The sensor displays selectivity to several hazardous vapours such as methanol, ethanol, acetone and hydrazine hydrate. The sensor demonstrated a sensitivity of 9.8 at 25 ppm concentration of ammonia with response time of 163 seconds.

  17. Remote sensing of sea surface temperatures during 2002 Barrier Reef coral bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Strong, Alan E.; Skirving, William

    Early in 2002, satellites of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) detected anomalously high sea surface temperatures (SST) developing in the western Coral Sea, midway along Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR). This was the beginning of what was to become the most significant GBR coral bleaching event on record [Wilkinson, 2002]. During this time, NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) provided satellite data as part of ongoing collaborative work on coral reef health with the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA). These data proved invaluable to AIMS and GBRMPA as they monitored and assessed the development and evolution of SSTs throughout the austral summer, enabling them to keep stakeholders, government, and the general public informed and up to date.

  18. Cloud Tolerance of Remote-Sensing Technologies to Measure Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Thomas R. H.; Hain, Christopher R.; Anderson, Martha C.; Crow, Wade T.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional methods to estimate land surface temperature (LST) from space rely on the thermal infrared(TIR) spectral window and is limited to cloud-free scenes. To also provide LST estimates during periods with clouds, a new method was developed to estimate LST based on passive microwave(MW) observations. The MW-LST product is informed by six polar-orbiting satellites to create a global record with up to eight observations per day for each 0.25resolution grid box. For days with sufficient observations, a continuous diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) was fitted. The main characteristics of the DTC were scaled to match those of a geostationary TIR-LST product. This paper tests the cloud tolerance of the MW-LST product. In particular, we demonstrate its stable performance with respect to flux tower observation sites (four in Europe and nine in the United States), over a range of cloudiness conditions up to heavily overcast skies. The results show that TIR based LST has slightly better performance than MW-LST for clear-sky observations but suffers an increasing negative bias as cloud cover increases. This negative bias is caused by incomplete masking of cloud-covered areas within the TIR scene that affects many applications of TIR-LST. In contrast, for MW-LST we find no direct impact of clouds on its accuracy and bias. MW-LST can therefore be used to improve TIR cloud screening. Moreover, the ability to provide LST estimates for cloud-covered surfaces can help expand current clear-sky-only satellite retrieval products to all-weather applications.

  19. Remote Sensing of Almond and Walnut Tree Canopy Temperatures Using an Inexpensive Infrared Sensor on a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kellen Ethan

    the needs of a given field for more precise monitoring. The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of using an inexpensive temperature sensor (Melexis MLX90614; NV Melexis SA, Rozendaalstraat 12, 8900 Ieper, Belgium) on a small UAV (Mikrokopter OktoXL; Hisystems GmbH Flachsmeerstrasse 2, 26802 Moormerland, Germany) to sense the canopy temperatures of almond and walnut trees. To accomplish this goal, we installed an infrared temperature sensor and a digital camera on a small UAV. The camera provided a spatial awareness of the IR temperature measurements which would otherwise require a very expensive thermal imager to obtain. The UAV was flown above almond and walnut trees recording images and temperatures, which were aligned temporally in post-processing. The pixels of each image were classified in to four classes: sunlit leaves, shaded leaves, sunlit soil, and shaded soil. Assuming that the measured temperature could be described as a weighted sum of each class in the field of view of the IR sensor, a linear system of equations was established to estimate the temperature of each class using at least several measurements of the same tree. Results indicated a good correlation between the temperatures estimated from the linear system of equations and the temperatures of those classes sampled on the ground immediately following each flight. With leaf temperatures ranging from about 12 to 40 degrees Celsius between 23 flights over two years, the linear solver was able to estimate the temperature of the sunlit and shaded leaves to within several degrees Celsius of the sampled temperature in most cases, with a coefficient of determination (r2 value) of 0.96 during the first year, and 0.73 during the second year. An additional study was undertaken to detect spatial temperature distribution within the orchard. Ground measurements were taken of every other tree in two walnut rows and one almond row using the handheld sensor, and the UAV was flown over those rows

  20. Dosimeter-type NOx sensing properties of KMnO4 and its electrical conductivity during temperature programmed desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Andrea; Kremling, Michael; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J; Visser, Jacobus H; Tuller, Harry L; Moos, Ralf

    2013-04-02

    An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT) for NOx storage catalysts (NSC) enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1) time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2) during the short-term thermal NOx release.

  1. Active-sensing based damage monitoring of airplane wings under low-temperature and continuous loading condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jun Young; Jung, Hwee Kwon; Park, Gyu Hae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jae Seok; Park, Chan Yik [7th R and D Institute, Agency for Denfense Development, Yuseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    As aircrafts are being operated at high altitude, wing structures experience various fatigue loadings under cryogenic environments. As a result, fatigue damage such as a crack could be develop that could eventually lead to a catastrophic failure. For this reason, fatigue damage monitoring is an important process to ensure efficient maintenance and safety of structures. To implement damage detection in real-world flight environments, a special cooling chamber was built. Inside the chamber, the temperature was maintained at the cryogenic temperature, and harmonic fatigue loading was given to a wing structure. In this study, piezoelectric active-sensing based guided waves were used to detect the fatigue damage. In particular, a beam forming technique was applied to efficiently measure the scattering wave caused by the fatigue damage. The system was used for detection, growth monitoring, and localization of a fatigue crack. In addition, a sensor diagnostic process was also applied to ensure the proper operation of piezoelectric sensors. Several experiments were implemented and the results of the experiments demonstrated that this process could efficiently detect damage in such an extreme environment.

  2. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Moos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT for NOx storage catalysts (NSC enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1 time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2 during the short-term thermal NOx release.

  3. Remote sensing measurements of sea surface temperature as an indicator of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oyster meat and human illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Stephanie; Paduraru, Peggy; Romero-Barrios, Pablo; Henderson, Sarah B; Galanis, Eleni

    2017-08-31

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) is a naturally occurring bacterium found in marine environments worldwide. It can cause gastrointestinal illness in humans, primarily through raw oyster consumption. Water temperatures, and potentially other environmental factors, play an important role in the growth and proliferation of Vp in the environment. Quantifying the relationships between environmental variables and indicators or incidence of Vp illness is valuable for public health surveillance to inform and enable suitable preventative measures. This study aimed to assess the relationship between environmental parameters and Vp in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The study used Vp counts in oyster meat from 2002-2015 and laboratory confirmed Vp illnesses from 2011-2015 for the province of BC. The data were matched to environmental parameters from publicly available sources, including remote sensing measurements of nighttime sea surface temperature (SST) obtained from satellite readings at a spatial resolution of 1 km. Using three separate models, this paper assessed the relationship between (1) daily SST and Vp counts in oyster meat, (2) weekly mean Vp counts in oysters and weekly Vp illnesses, and (3) weekly mean SST and weekly Vp illnesses. The effects of salinity and chlorophyll a were also evaluated. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship between SST and Vp, and piecewise regression was used to identify SST thresholds of concern. A total of 2327 oyster samples and 293 laboratory confirmed illnesses were included. In model 1, both SST and salinity were significant predictors of log(Vp) counts in oyster meat. In model 2, the mean log(Vp) count in oyster meat was a significant predictor of Vp illnesses. In model 3, weekly mean SST was a significant predictor of weekly Vp illnesses. The piecewise regression models identified a SST threshold of approximately 14 o C for both model 1 and 3, indicating increased risk of Vp in oyster meat and Vp illnesses at higher

  4. Effect of temperature of CO2 injection on the pH and freezing point of milks and creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M

    2003-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure the impact of CO2 injection temperature (0 degree C and 40 degrees C) on the pH and freezing point (FP) of (a) milks with different fat contents (i.e., 0, 15, 30%) and (b) creams with 15% fat but different fat characteristics. Skim milk and unhomogenized creams containing 15 and 30% fat were prepared from the same batch of whole milk and were carbonated at 0 and 40 degrees C in a continuous flow CO2 injection unit (230 ml/min). At 0 degree C, milk fat was mostly solid; at 40 degrees C, milk fat was liquid. At the same total CO2 concentration with CO2 injection at 0 degree C, milk with a higher fat content had a lower pH and FP, while with CO2 injection at 40 degrees C, milks with 0%, 15%, and 30% fat had the same pH. This indicated that less CO2 was dissolved in the fat portion of the milk when the CO2 was injected at 0 degree C than when it was injected at 40 degrees C. Three creams, 15% unhomogenized cream, 15% butter oil emulsion in skim milk, and 15% vegetable oil emulsion in skim milk were also carbonated and analyzed as described above. Vegetable oil was liquid at both 0 and 40 degrees C. At a CO2 injection temperature of 0 degree C, the 15% vegetable oil emulsion had a slightly higher pH than the 15% butter oil emulsion and the 15% unhomogenized cream, indicating that the liquid vegetable oil dissolved more CO2 than the mostly solid milk fat and butter oil. No difference in the pH or FP of the 15% unhomogenized cream and 15% butter oil emulsion was observed when CO2 was injected at 0 degree C, suggesting that homogenization or physical dispersion of milk fat globules did not influence the amount of CO2 dissolved in milk fat at a CO2 injection temperature of 0 degree C. At a CO2 injection temperature of 40 degrees C and at the same total CO2 concentration, the 15% unhomogenized cream, 15% vegetable oil emulsion, and 15% butter oil emulsion had similar pH. At the same total concentration of CO2 in cream, injection

  5. Role of single-point mutations and deletions on transition temperatures in ideal proteinogenic heteropolymer chains in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Quiroz, L

    2016-07-01

    A coarse-grained statistical mechanics-based model for ideal heteropolymer proteinogenic chains of non-interacting residues is presented in terms of the size K of the chain and the set of helical propensities [Formula: see text] associated with each residue j along the chain. For this model, we provide an algorithm to compute the degeneracy tensor [Formula: see text] associated with energy level [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is the number of residues with a native contact in a given conformation. From these results, we calculate the equilibrium partition function [Formula: see text] and characteristic temperature [Formula: see text] at which a transition from a low to a high entropy states is observed. The formalism is applied to analyze the effect on characteristic temperatures [Formula: see text] of single-point mutations and deletions of specific amino acids [Formula: see text] along the chain. Two probe systems are considered. First, we address the case of a random heteropolymer of size K and given helical propensities [Formula: see text] on a conformational phase space. Second, we focus our attention to a particular set of neuropentapeptides, [Met-5] and [Leu-5] enkephalins whose thermodynamic stability is a key feature on their coupling to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] receptors and the triggering of biochemical responses.

  6. Low Loss Polycarbonate Polymer Optical Fiber for High Temperature FBG Humidity Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a polycarbonate (PC) microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) Bragg grating (FBG) humidity sensor that can operate beyond 100°C. The PC preform, from which the fiber was drawn, was produced using an improved casting approach to reduce the atte......We report the fabrication and characterization of a polycarbonate (PC) microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) Bragg grating (FBG) humidity sensor that can operate beyond 100°C. The PC preform, from which the fiber was drawn, was produced using an improved casting approach to reduce...... the attenuation of the fiber. The fiber loss was found reduced by a factor of two compared to the latest reported PC mPOF [20], holding the low loss record in PC based fibers. PC mPOFBG was characterized to humidity and temperature, and a relative humidity (RH) sensitivity of 7.31± 0.13 pm/% RH in the range 10...

  7. Comparisons of temperature, pressure and humidity measurements by balloon-borne radiosondes and frost point hygrometers during MOHAVE-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Hurst

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We compare coincident, in situ, balloon-borne measurements of temperature (T and pressure (P by two radiosondes (Vaisala RS92, Intermet iMet-1-RSB and similar measurements of relative humidity (RH by RS92 sondes and frost point hygrometers. Data from a total of 28 balloon flights with at least one pair of radiosondes are analyzed in 1-km altitude bins to quantify measurement differences between the sonde sensors and how they vary with altitude. Each comparison (T, P, RH exposes several profiles of anomalously large measurement differences. Measurement difference statistics, calculated with and without the anomalous profiles, are compared to uncertainties quoted by the radiosonde manufacturers. Excluding seven anomalous profiles, T differences between 19 pairs of RS92 and iMet sondes exceed their measurement uncertainty limits (2 σ 31% of the time and reveal a statistically significant, altitude-independent bias of 0.5 ± 0.2 °C. Similarly, RS92-iMet P differences in 22 non-anomalous profiles exceed their uncertainty limits 23% of the time, with a disproportionate 83% of the excessive P differences at altitudes >16 km. The RS92-iMet pressure differences increase smoothly from −0.6 hPa near the surface to 0.8 hPa above 25 km. Temperature and P differences between all 14 pairs of RS92 sondes exceed manufacturer-quoted, reproducibility limits (σ 28% and 11% of the time, respectively. About 95% of the excessive T differences are eliminated when 5 anomalous RS92-RS92 profiles are excluded. Only 5% of RH measurement differences between 14 pairs of RS92 sondes exceed the manufacturer's measurement reproducibility limit (σ. RH measurements by RS92 sondes are also compared to RH values calculated from frost point hygrometer measurements and coincident T measurements by the radiosondes. The influences of RS92-iMet Tand P differences on RH values and water vapor mixing

  8. Benefits of Silica Core-Shell Structures on the Temperature Sensing Properties of Er,Yb:GdVO4 Up-Conversion Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchuk, Oleksandr A; Carvajal, Joan J; Cascales, C; Aguiló, M; Díaz, F

    2016-03-23

    We studied the temperature-dependent luminescence of GdVO4 nanoparticles co-doped with Er(3+) (1 mol %) and Yb(3+) (20 mol %) and determined their thermal sensing properties through the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique. We also analyzed how a silica coating, in a core-shell structure, affects the temperature sensing properties of this material. Spectra were recorded in the range of biological temperatures (298-343 K). The absolute sensitivity for temperature determination calculated for the core-shell nanoparticles is double the one calculated for bare nanoparticles, achieving a thermal resolution of 0.4 K. Moreover, silica-coated nanoparticles show good dispersibility in different solvents, such as water, DMSO, and methanol. Also, they show good luminescence stability without interactions with solvent molecules. Furthermore, we also observed that the silica coating shell prevents progressive heating of the nanoparticles during prolonged excitation periods with the 980 nm laser, preventing effects on their thermometric applications.

  9. Monitoring thermal processes in low-permeability fractured media using fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixel, Bernard; Klepikova, Maria; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Loew, Simon; Amann, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) systems constitute arguably one of the main significant advances in the development of modern monitoring techniques in field hydrogeology, both for shallow (e.g. quantification of surface water-groundwater interactions) and deeper applications (borehole temperature monitoring). Deployment of FO-DTS monitoring systems in boreholes has notably allowed further promoting the use of temperature as a tracer to improve the characterization of heterogeneous media, with a strong focus on permeable environments such as shallow unconsolidated aquifers and/or highly-fractured rocks, generally found close to ground surface. However, applying this technology to low-permeability media, as in the case of intact rock mass intersected by isolated, discrete fractures still remains a challenge, perhaps explaining the limited number of field results reported in the scientific literature to date. Yet, understanding the transport, storage and exchange of heat in deep, low-permeability crystalline rocks is critical to many scientific and engineering research topics and applications, including for example deep geothermal energy (DGE). In the present contribution, we describe the use and application of FO-DTS monitoring to a broad range of processes, varying from the propagation and persistence of thermal anomalies (both natural and induced) to the monitoring of the curing of epoxy resin and cement grouts along the annular space of boreholes designed for monitoring discrete, packed-off zones. All data provided herein has been collected as part of a multi-disciplinary research program on hydraulic stimulation and deep geothermal energy carried out at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), an underground rock laboratory located in the Aar massif, in the Swiss Alps. Through these examples, we illustrate the importance of understanding the spatial and temporal variations of local thermal regimes when planning to monitoring boreholes temperatures

  10. Mustiscaling Analysis applied to field Water Content through Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez Buelga, Javier; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sanchez, Raul; Gil, Maria; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    Soils can be seen as the result of spatial variation operating over several scales. This observation points to 'variability' as a key soil attribute that should be studied. Soil variability has often been considered to be composed of 'functional' (explained) variations plus random fluctuations or noise. However, the distinction between these two components is scale dependent because increasing the scale of observation almost always reveals structure in the noise. Geostatistical methods and, more recently, multifractal/wavelet techniques have been used to characterize scaling and heterogeneity of soil properties among others coming from complexity science. Multifractal formalism, first proposed by Mandelbrot (1982), is suitable for variables with self-similar distribution on a spatial domain (Kravchenko et al., 2002). Multifractal analysis can provide insight into spatial variability of crop or soil parameters (Vereecken et al., 2007). This technique has been used to characterize the scaling property of a variable measured along a transect as a mass distribution of a statistical measure on a spatial domain of the studied field (Zeleke and Si, 2004). To do this, it divides the transect into a number of self-similar segments. It identifies the differences among the subsets by using a wide range of statistical moments. Wavelets were developed in the 1980s for signal processing, and later introduced to soil science by Lark and Webster (1999). The wavelet transform decomposes a series; whether this be a time series (Whitcher, 1998; Percival and Walden, 2000), or as in our case a series of measurements made along a transect; into components (wavelet coefficients) which describe local variation in the series at different scale (or frequency) intervals, giving up only some resolution in space (Lark et al., 2003, 2004). Wavelet coefficients can be used to estimate scale specific components of variation and correlation. This allows us to see which scales contribute most to

  11. Effect of River Restoration on Ground Water Recharge: Investigation of Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, A.-M.; Schirmer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Following the EU Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC (1) Switzerland passed the Water Protection Act 814.20 (2), obligating the cantons to restoring their surface water bodies to a near-natural state within the next 100 years. In case of rivers and streams this comprises the provision of extensive areas to allow for meandering, sufficient discharge to prevent drying-out of the river, as might be caused by hydropower production, and adequate water quality, e.g. by limiting waste water discharge. Hereby, the main aim lies in improving the ecological status of the surface water bodies, as well as flood protection and mitigation (2). However, apart from the enhancement of the water quality, river restoration has the potential to increase groundwater recharge due to improved connectivity between the surface water bodies and the underlying aquifers. A new method for the estimation of groundwater recharge in rivers is currently developed at Eawag in Switzerland, and will be employed to investigate if river restoration enhances groundwater recharge. This method comprises the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS), as well as heatable glass-fibre optics cables. DTS is a fibre-optical method for temperature determination over long distances with high accuracy and precision (3), largely depending on the instrument settings and calibration, as well as the fibre-optics cables employed in the measurements (4). Temperature data will be used to distinguish between ground- and surface water, due to their different temperature signatures (5). By heating the glass-fibre optics cable the additional information on the cooling behaviour of the cable may be used to (i) distinguish between up- and downwelling water and to (ii) estimate the volume of water exchanged locally in the river bed. In order to separate the signal of horizontal flow from vertical flow over the cable, it will be buried 30-40 cm deep in the river bed; a control cable will be installed in 10-20 cm depth right

  12. Integrating distributed temperature sensing and geological characterization to quantify spatiotemporal variability in subsurface heat transport within the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. F. F.; Stumpf, A.; Luo, Y.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    This study is designed to investigate how the ambient ground temperature fluctuates with diurnal and seasonal changes under various hydrogeological system variations as part of the Intensively Managed Landscapes-Critical Zone Observatory. A fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) system is used to measure thermal profiles in two adjacent boreholes situated in a complex glaciated landscape. The test site is located in east-central Illinois on a terminal moraine of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The moraine crosses a buried preglacial bedrock valley that is 50 m deep. The valley fill contains alternating deposits of clayey glacial till and gravelly sand that have varying physical and hydrological properties. In the 100-m-deep borehole, a fiber-optic cable was installed without casing, sealed against the sidewall with grout. This borehole was drilled to the top of bedrock and penetrated a sequence of glacial sediments containing at least two aquifer units. Thick, Early Pleistocene glacial sand and gravel that penetrated near the bedrock forms an aquifer that is part of a regional groundwater system, the Mahomet Aquifer System. The aquifer system is primarily recharged by slow infiltration of surface waters and has been designated by the USEPA as a "Sole Source" of drinking water. At the same location, a second 40-m-deep borehole was drilled through Middle-Late Pleistocene till and fluvioglacial sediment, and a groundwater monitoring well was installed. Fiber-optic cable was attached along the outside of the casing, and the well was screened in a shallower, localized aquifer. At a broad scale, thermal variations in the subsurface appear to be correlated with sediment type. The basal sand and gravel aquifer exhibits a unique thermal profile deviating from patterns at shallower depths. Temperature measurements with 1-m and 0.1°C resolutions have being collected at various temporal scales, ranging from 30-minute to 2-week intervals, since June 2015. The initial

  13. Technology to accelerate pangenomic scanning for unknown point mutations in exonic sequences: cycling temperature capillary electrophoresis (CTCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørheim Jens

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid means to discover and enumerate unknown mutations in the exons of human genes on a pangenomic scale are needed to discover the genes carrying inherited risk for common diseases or the genes in which somatic mutations are required for clonal diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancers. The method of constant denaturing capillary electrophoresis (CDCE permitted sensitive detection and enumeration of unknown point mutations but labor-intensive optimization procedures for each exonic sequence made it impractical for application at a pangenomic scale. Results A variant denaturing capillary electrophoresis protocol, cycling temperature capillary electrophoresis (CTCE, has eliminated the need for the laboratory optimization of separation conditions for each target sequence. Here are reported the separation of wild type mutant homoduplexes from wild type/mutant heteroduplexes for 27 randomly chosen target sequences without any laboratory optimization steps. Calculation of the equilibrium melting map of each target sequence attached to a high melting domain (clamp was sufficient to design the analyte sequence and predict the expected degree of resolution. Conclusion CTCE provides practical means for economical pangenomic detection and enumeration of point mutations in large-scale human case/control cohort studies. We estimate that the combined reagent, instrumentation and labor costs for scanning the ~250,000 exons and splice sites of the ~25,000 human protein-coding genes using automated CTCE instruments in 100 case cohorts of 10,000 individuals each are now less than U.S. $500 million, less than U.S. $500 per person.

  14. Investigation of ternary and quaternary high-temperature fixed-point cells, based on platinum-carbon-X, as blind comparison artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, W.; Machin, G.; Bloembergen, P.; Lowe, D.; Wang, T.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive studies of platinum-carbon eutectic alloy based high temperature fixed point cells have shown that this alloy has extremely good metrological potential as a temperature reference. However, it’s possible adoption as an accepted reference standard means that its eutectic temperature value will soon be agreed with an uncertainty less than most radiation thermometry scales at that temperature. Thus it will lack credibility if used as a future scale comparison artefact. To avoid this, the fixed-point cell can be deliberately doped with an impurity to change its transition temperature by an amount sufficient to test the accuracy of the scales of the institutes, involved in the comparison. In this study dopants of palladium and iridium were added to platinum-carbon to produce ternary alloy and quaternary alloy fixed-point cells. The stability of these artefacts was demonstrated and the fixed-point cells were used to compare the ITS-90 scales of NIM and NPL. It was found that the fixed point temperatures could be changed by an appreciable amount while retaining the stability and repeatability required for comparison artefacts.

  15. Projections onto Convex Sets Super-Resolution Reconstruction Based on Point Spread Function Estimation of Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chong; Wu, Chaoyun; Li, Grand; Ma, Jun

    2017-02-13

    To solve the problem on inaccuracy when estimating the point spread function (PSF) of the ideal original image in traditional projection onto convex set (POCS) super-resolution (SR) reconstruction, this paper presents an improved POCS SR algorithm based on PSF estimation of low-resolution (LR) remote sensing images. The proposed algorithm can improve the spatial resolution of the image and benefit agricultural crop visual interpolation. The PSF of the highresolution (HR) image is unknown in reality. Therefore, analysis of the relationship between the PSF of the HR image and the PSF of the LR image is important to estimate the PSF of the HR image by using multiple LR images. In this study, the linear relationship between the PSFs of the HR and LR images can be proven. In addition, the novel slant knife-edge method is employed, which can improve the accuracy of the PSF estimation of LR images. Finally, the proposed method is applied to reconstruct airborne digital sensor 40 (ADS40) three-line array images and the overlapped areas of two adjacent GF-2 images by embedding the estimated PSF of the HR image to the original POCS SR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields higher quality of reconstructed images than that produced by the blind SR method and the bicubic interpolation method.

  16. Projections onto Convex Sets Super-Resolution Reconstruction Based on Point Spread Function Estimation of Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Fan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem on inaccuracy when estimating the point spread function (PSF of the ideal original image in traditional projection onto convex set (POCS super-resolution (SR reconstruction, this paper presents an improved POCS SR algorithm based on PSF estimation of low-resolution (LR remote sensing images. The proposed algorithm can improve the spatial resolution of the image and benefit agricultural crop visual interpolation. The PSF of the highresolution (HR image is unknown in reality. Therefore, analysis of the relationship between the PSF of the HR image and the PSF of the LR image is important to estimate the PSF of the HR image by using multiple LR images. In this study, the linear relationship between the PSFs of the HR and LR images can be proven. In addition, the novel slant knife-edge method is employed, which can improve the accuracy of the PSF estimation of LR images. Finally, the proposed method is applied to reconstruct airborne digital sensor 40 (ADS40 three-line array images and the overlapped areas of two adjacent GF-2 images by embedding the estimated PSF of the HR image to the original POCS SR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields higher quality of reconstructed images than that produced by the blind SR method and the bicubic interpolation method.

  17. Study of Room Temperature H2S Gas Sensing Behavior of CuO-modified BSST Thick Film Resistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Baviskar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Thick films of (Ba0.1Sr0.9(Sn0.5Ti0.5O3 referred as BSST, were prepared by screen-printing technique. The preparation, characterization and gas sensing properties of pure and CuO-BSST mixed oxide semiconductors have been investigated. The mixed oxides were obtained by dipping the pure BSST thick films into 0.01 M aqueous solution of CuCl2, for different intervals of time. Pure BSST was observed to be less sensitive to H2S gas. However, mixed oxides of CuO and BSST were observed to be highly sensitive to H2S gas. Upon exposure to H2S gas, the barrier height of CuO-BSST intergranular regions decreases markedly due to the chemical transformation of CuO into well conducting CuS leading to a drastic decrease in resistance. The crucial gas response was found to H2S gas at room temperature and no cross sensitivity was observed to other hazardous and polluting gases. The effects of microstructure and doping concentration on the gas response, selectivity, response and recovery of the sensor in the presence of H2S gas were studied and discussed.

  18. ZnO–PDMS Nanohybrids: A Novel Optical Sensing Platform for Ethanol Vapor Detection at Room Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Klini, Argyro

    2015-01-08

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. A new optical gas sensor platform based on highly luminescent ZnO-polymer nanohybrids is demonstrated. The nanohybrids consist of ZnO nanoparticles, typically 125 (±25) nm in size, dispersed in an inert cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. Upon exposure to ethanol-enriched air at room temperature, the nanocomposites exhibit a clear increase in their photoluminescence (PL) emission, which shows a nearly Langmuir dependence on the alcohol vapor pressure. The response time is on the order of 50 s, particularly at low ethanol concentrations. The limit of ethanol vapor detection (LOD) is as low as 0.4 Torr, while the sensor remains unaffected by the presence of water vapor, demonstrating the potential of the ZnO-PDMS system as an optical gas sensing device. The interaction of the ZnO nanoparticles with molecular oxygen plays an essential role on the overall performance of the sensor, as shown in comparative experiments performed in the presence and absence of atmospheric air. Notably, O2 was found to be quite effective in accelerating the sensor recovery process compared to N2 or vacuum.

  19. Development and Improvement of an Intelligent Cable Monitoring System for Underground Distribution Networks Using Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintae Cho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With power systems switching to smart grids, real-time and on-line monitoring technologies for underground distribution power cables have become a priority. Most distribution components have been developed with self-diagnostic sensors to realize self-healing, one of the smart grid functions in a distribution network. Nonetheless, implementing a real-time and on-line monitoring system for underground distribution cables has been difficult because of high cost and low sensitivity. Nowadays, optical fiber composite power cables (OFCPCs are being considered for communication and power delivery to cope with the increasing communication load in a distribution network. Therefore, the application of distributed temperature sensing (DTS technology on OFCPCs used as underground distribution lines is studied for the real-time and on-line monitoring of the underground distribution power cables. Faults can be reduced and operating ampacity of the underground distribution system can be increased. This paper presents the development and improvement of an intelligent cable monitoring system for the underground distribution power system, using DTS technology and OFCPCs as the underground distribution lines in the field.

  20. Spatial and temporal patterns of land surface fluxes from remotely sensed surface temperatures within an uncertainty modelling framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. McCabe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterising the development of evapotranspiration through time is a difficult task, particularly when utilising remote sensing data, because retrieved information is often spatially dense, but temporally sparse. Techniques to expand these essentially instantaneous measures are not only limited, they are restricted by the general paucity of information describing the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of evaporative patterns. In a novel approach, temporal changes in land surface temperatures, derived from NOAA-AVHRR imagery and a generalised split-window algorithm, are used as a calibration variable in a simple land surface scheme (TOPUP and combined within the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE methodology to provide estimates of areal evapotranspiration at the pixel scale. Such an approach offers an innovative means of transcending the patch or landscape scale of SVAT type models, to spatially distributed estimates of model output. The resulting spatial and temporal patterns of land surface fluxes and surface resistance are used to more fully understand the hydro-ecological trends observed across a study catchment in eastern Australia. The modelling approach is assessed by comparing predicted cumulative evapotranspiration values with surface fluxes determined from Bowen ratio systems and using auxiliary information such as in-situ soil moisture measurements and depth to groundwater to corroborate observed responses.

  1. Study on room temperature gas-sensing performance of CuO film-decorated ordered porous ZnO composite by In2O3 sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-tian; Bao, Na; Geng, Ai-fang; Yu, Hui; Yang, Ying; Dong, Xiang-ting

    2018-02-01

    For the first time, ordered mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by a template method. The electroplating after chemical plating method was creatively used to form copper film on the surface of the prepared ZnO, and then a CuO film-decorated ordered porous ZnO composite (CuO/ZnO) was obtained by a high-temperature oxidation method. In2O3 was loaded into the prepared CuO film-ZnO by an ultrasonic-assisted method to sensitize the room temperature gas-sensing performance of the prepared CuO/ZnO materials. The doped In2O3 could effectively improve the gas-sensing properties of the prepared materials to nitrogen oxides (NOx) at room temperature. The 1% In2O3 doped CuO/ZnO sample (1 wt% In2O3-CuO/ZnO) showed the best gas-sensing properties whose response to 100 ppm NOx reached 82%, and the detectable minimum concentration reached 1 ppm at room temperature. The prepared materials had a good selectivity, better response, very low detection limit, and high sensitivity to NOx gas at room temperature, which would have a great development space in the gas sensor field and a great research value.

  2. Study on room temperature gas-sensing performance of CuO film-decorated ordered porous ZnO composite by In2O3sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-Tian; Bao, Na; Geng, Ai-Fang; Yu, Hui; Yang, Ying; Dong, Xiang-Ting

    2018-02-01

    For the first time, ordered mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by a template method. The electroplating after chemical plating method was creatively used to form copper film on the surface of the prepared ZnO, and then a CuO film-decorated ordered porous ZnO composite (CuO/ZnO) was obtained by a high-temperature oxidation method. In 2 O 3 was loaded into the prepared CuO film-ZnO by an ultrasonic-assisted method to sensitize the room temperature gas-sensing performance of the prepared CuO/ZnO materials. The doped In 2 O 3 could effectively improve the gas-sensing properties of the prepared materials to nitrogen oxides (NO x ) at room temperature. The 1% In 2 O 3 doped CuO/ZnO sample (1 wt% In 2 O 3 -CuO/ZnO) showed the best gas-sensing properties whose response to 100 ppm NO x reached 82%, and the detectable minimum concentration reached 1 ppm at room temperature. The prepared materials had a good selectivity, better response, very low detection limit, and high sensitivity to NO x gas at room temperature, which would have a great development space in the gas sensor field and a great research value.

  3. Properties of NiO nanostructured growth using thermal dry oxidation of nickel metal thin film for hydrogen gas sensing at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Dauda; Ahmed, Naser M.; Mahmud, Shahrom; Algadri, Natheer A.

    2017-07-01

    A highly qualitative NiO nanostructure was synthesized using thermal dry oxidation of metallic Ni thin films on ITO/glass using the RF sputtering technique. The deposited nickel thin films were oxidized in air ambient at 550 °C inside a furnace. The structural and surface morphologies, and the electrical and gas sensing properties of the NiO nanostructure were examined. An x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the NiO nanostructure has a cubic structure with orientation of the most intense peak at (2 0 0), and shows good crystalline quality. Finite-element scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results revealed O and Ni present in the treated samples, indicating a pure NiO nanostructure composition obtained with high porosity. The electrical properties of the oxidize Ni thin films showed a p-type NiO thin film semiconductor. A hydrogen gas sensing measurement was made at different operating temperatures and different gas concentrations with a detection limit of 30 ppm concentration. The sensor device shows great sensing properties with an excellent sensitivity (310%) at room temperature, which decreases with an increase in the operating temperature. Superfast response and recovery times of 6 and 0.5 s, respectively, were observed with the device at 150 °C operating temperature.

  4. Characterizing fractured rock aquifers using heated Distributed Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensing to determine borehole vertical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, T. O.; Bour, O.; Selker, J. S.; Le Borgne, T.; Bense, V.; Hochreutener, R.; Lavenant, N.

    2013-12-01

    In highly heterogeneous media, fracture network connectivity and hydraulic properties can be estimated using methods such as packer- or cross-borehole pumping-tests. Typically, measurements of hydraulic head or vertical flow in such tests are made either at a single location over time, or at a series of depths by installing a number of packers or raising or lowering a probe. We show how this often encountered monitoring problem, with current solutions sacrificing either one of temporal or spatial information, can be addressed using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS). Here, we electrically heat the conductive cladding materials of cables deployed in boreholes to determine the vertical flow profile. We present results from heated fiber optic cables deployed in three boreholes in a fractured rock aquifer at the much studied experimental site near Ploemeur, France, allowing detailed comparisons with alternative methods (e.g. Le Borgne et al., 2007). When submerged in water and electrically heated, the cable very rapidly reaches a steady state temperature (less than 60 seconds). The steady state temperature of the heated cable, measured using the DTS method, is then a function of the velocity of the fluid in the borehole. We find that such cables are sensitive to a wide range of fluid velocities, and thus suitable for measuring both ambient and pumped flow profiles at the Ploemeur site. The cables are then used to monitor the flow profiles during all possible configurations of: ambient flow, cross-borehole- (pumping one borehole, and observing in another), and dipole-tests (pumping one borehole, re-injection in another). Such flow data acquired using DTS may then be used for tomographic flow inversions, for instance using the approach developed by Klepikova et al., (submitted). Using the heated fiber optic method, we are able to observe the flow response during such tests in high spatial detail, and are also able to capture temporal flow dynamics occurring at the

  5. Gas sensing performance at room temperature of nanogap interdigitated electrodes for detection of acetone at low concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minh, Q. Nguyen; Tong, H.D.; Kuijk, A.; van de Bent, F.; Beekman, Pepijn; Van Rijn, C. J.M.

    2017-01-01

    A facile approach for the fabrication of large-scale interdigitated nanogap electrodes (nanogap IDEs) with a controllable gap was demonstrated with conventional micro-fabrication technology to develop chemocapacitors for gas sensing applications. In this work, interdigitated nanogap electrodes

  6. Maximum power point search method for photovoltaic panels which uses a light sensor in the conditions of real shading and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczka, Janusz; Ostrowski, Mariusz

    2015-06-01

    Disadvantages of photovoltaic panels are their low efficiency and non-linear current-voltage characteristic. Therefore it is necessary to apply the maximum power tracking systems which are dependent on the sun exposure and temperature. Trackers, that are used in photovoltaic systems, differ from each other in the speed and accuracy of tracking. Typically, in order to determine the maximum power point, trackers use measure of current and voltage. The perturb and observe algorithm or the incremental conductance method are frequent in the literature. The drawback of these solutions is the need to search the entire current-voltage curve, resulting in a significant loss of power in the fast-changing lighting conditions. Modern solutions use an additional measurement of temperature, short-circuit current or open circuit voltage in order to determine the starting point of one of the above methods, what decreases the tracking time. For this paper, a sequence of simulations and tests in real shading and temperature conditions for the investigated method, which uses additional light sensor to increase the speed of the perturb and observe algorithm in fast-changing illumination conditions was performed. Due to the non-linearity of the light sensor and the photovoltaic panel and the influence of temperature on the used sensor and panel characteristics, we cannot directly determine the relationship between them. For this reason, the tested method is divided into two steps. In the first step algorithm uses the correlation curve of the light sensor and current at the maximum power point and determines the current starting point with respect of which the perturb and observe algorithm is run. When the maximum power point is reached, in a second step, the difference between the starting point and the actual maximum power point is calculated and on this basis the coefficients of correlation curve are modified.

  7. Engineering of Highly Susceptible Paramagnetic Nanostructures of Gd2S3:Eu3+: Potentially an Efficient Material for Room Temperature Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed M. Radhi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This research papers throws light into the compositional, morphological and structural properties of novel nanoparticles of Gd2S3:Eu3+ synthesized by a simple co-precipitation technique. Furthermore, we also prognosticate that this material could be useful for gas sensing applications at room temperature. Nanostructures formulation by this method resulted in the formation of orthorhombic crystal structure with primitive lattice having space group Pnma. The material characterizations are performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX, thermo-gravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The calculated crystallite sizes are ~ 2-5 nm and are in well accordance with the HRTEM results. EDX result confirms the presence and homogeneous distribution of Gd and Eu throughout the nanoparticle. The prepared nanoparticles exhibit strong paramagnetic nature with paramagnetic term, susceptibility c = 8.2 ´ 10-5 emg/g Gauss. TGA/DTA analysis shows 27 % weight loss with rise in temperature. The gas sensing capability of the prepared Gd2S3:Eu3+ magnetic nanoparticles are investigated using the amperometric method. These nanoparticles show good I-V characteristics with ideal semiconducting nature at room temperature with and without ammonia dose. The observed room temperature sensitivity with increasing dose of ammonia indicates applicability of Gd2S3 nanoparticles as room temperature ammonia sensors.

  8. Process analytical technology (PAT) approach to the formulation of thermosensitive protein-loaded pellets: Multi-point monitoring of temperature in a high-shear pelletization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristó, Katalin; Kovács, Orsolya; Kelemen, András; Lajkó, Ferenc; Klivényi, Gábor; Jancsik, Béla; Pintye-Hódi, Klára; Regdon, Géza

    2016-12-01

    In the literature there are some publications about the effect of impeller and chopper speeds on product parameters. However, there is no information about the effect of temperature. Therefore our main aim was the investigation of elevated temperature and temperature distribution during pelletization in a high shear granulator according to process analytical technology. During our experimental work, pellets containing pepsin were formulated with a high-shear granulator. A specially designed chamber (Opulus Ltd.) was used for pelletization. This chamber contained four PyroButton-TH® sensors built in the wall and three PyroDiff® sensors 1, 2 and 3cm from the wall. The sensors were located in three different heights. The impeller and chopper speeds were set on the basis of 3 2 factorial design. The temperature was measured continuously in 7 different points during pelletization and the results were compared with the temperature values measured by the thermal sensor of the high-shear granulator. The optimization parameters were enzyme activity, average size, breaking hardness, surface free energy and aspect ratio. One of the novelties was the application of the specially designed chamber (Opulus Ltd.) for monitoring the temperature continuously in 7 different points during high-shear granulation. The other novelty of this study was the evaluation of the effect of temperature on the properties of pellets containing protein during high-shear pelletization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Future PMPs Estimation in Korea under AR5 RCP 8.5 Climate Change Scenario: Focus on Dew Point Temperature Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okjeong, Lee; Sangdan, Kim

    2016-04-01

    According to future climate change scenarios, future temperature is expected to increase gradually. Therefore, it is necessary to reflect the effects of these climate changes to predict Probable Maximum Precipitations (PMPs). In this presentation, PMPs will be estimated with future dew point temperature change. After selecting 174 major storm events from 1981 to 2005, new PMPs will be proposed with respect to storm areas (25, 100, 225, 400, 900, 2,025, 4,900, 10,000 and 19,600 km2) and storm durations (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 hours) using the Korea hydro-meteorological method. Also, orographic transposition factor will be applied in place of the conventional terrain impact factor which has been used in previous Korean PMPs estimation reports. After estimating dew point temperature using future temperature and representative humidity information under the Korea Meteorological Administration AR5 RCP 8.5, changes in the PMPs under dew point temperature change will be investigated by comparison with present and future PMPs. This research was supported by a grant(14AWMP-B082564-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  10. Pulse-width-modulated device for precision temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyser, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Temperature controller is described which reduces difference between temperature oscillations about control point. Standard temperature-sensitive resistor element is utilized which is highly stable and reproducible. Temperature sensing circuitry is conventional dc bridge with power supplied by battery or highly regulated supply source.

  11. Directional wave and temperature data from seven buoys at Point Reyes, CA, 1996-2002 (NODC Accession 0000760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave data were collected from 7 buoys in Point Reyes, California, from 06 December 1996 to 25 July 2002. Data were collected as part of the Coastal Data Information...

  12. A multicenter study for a single, three-step laser treatment for cellulite using a 1440-nm Nd:YAG laser, a novel side-firing fiber, and a temperature-sensing cannula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBernardo, Barry; Sasaki, Gordon; Katz, Bruce E; Hunstad, Joseph P; Petti, Christine; Burns, A Jay

    2013-05-01

    Historically, treatments for cellulite have not been able to address all of its physiological components and require multiple sessions. The authors evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single, subdermal procedure to treat the underlying structure of cellulite. Fifty-seven patients underwent a 3-step cellulite treatment with a 1440-nm Nd:YAG laser with a side-firing fiber and temperature-sensing cannula. Efficacy was measured by the ability of blinded evaluators to distinguish baseline photos from those taken at 3 and 6 months posttreatment, as well as their rating of the results on a 5-point, 2-category ordinal photonumeric scale when comparing baseline photos to those taken at 2, 3, and 6 months posttreatment. Patient and physician satisfaction was assessed based on completion of a satisfaction survey at 2, 3, and 6 months posttreatment. Adverse events (AE) were recorded throughout the study. At 6 months posttreatment, blinded evaluators rated at least a 1-point improvement in the appearance of cellulite in 96% of treated sites. Blinded evaluators were also able to correctly identify baseline versus posttreatment photos in 95% of cases. At least 90% of patients and physicians reported satisfaction with the results of treatment throughout 6 months. AE were mild in intensity and transient to treatment. A single, 3-step, minimally invasive laser treatment using a 1440-nm Nd:YAG laser, side-firing fiber, and temperature-sensing cannula to treat the underlying structure of cellulite proved to be safe and maintained effectiveness at least 6 months posttreatment. 2.

  13. Room temperature, ppb-level NO2 gas sensing of multiple-networked ZnSe nanowire sensors under UV illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghoon Park

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Reports of the gas sensing properties of ZnSe are few, presumably because of the decomposition and oxidation of ZnSe at high temperatures. In this study, ZnSe nanowires were synthesized by the thermal evaporation of ZnSe powders and the sensing performance of multiple-networked ZnSe nanowire sensors toward NO2 gas was examined. The results showed that ZnSe might be a promising gas sensor material if it is used at room temperature. The response of the ZnSe nanowires to 50 ppb–5 ppm NO2 at room temperature under dark and UV illumination conditions were 101–102% and 113–234%, respectively. The responses of the ZnSe nanowires to 5 ppm NO2 increased from 102 to 234% with increasing UV illumination intensity from 0 to 1.2 mW/cm2. The response of the ZnSe nanowires was stronger than or comparable to that of typical metal oxide semiconductors reported in the literature, which require higher NO2 concentrations and operate at higher temperatures. The origin of the enhanced response of the ZnSe nanowires towards NO2 under UV illumination is also discussed.

  14. Mesospheric Temperatures over Apache Point Observatory (32°N, 105°W Derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We retrieved rotational temperatures from emission lines of the OH airglow (8-3 band in the sky spectra of the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS for the period 2000-2014, as part of the astronomical observation project conducted at the Apache Point observatory (32°N, 105°W. The SDSS temperatures show a typical seasonal variation of mesospheric temperature: low in summer and high in winter. We find that the temperatures respond to solar activity by as much as 1.2 K ±0.8 K per 100 solar flux units, which is consistent with other studies in mid-latitude regions. After the seasonal variation and solar response were subtracted, the SDSS temperature is fairly constant over the 15 year period, unlike cooling trends suggested by some studies. This temperature analysis using SDSS spectra is a unique contribution to the global monitoring of climate change because the SDSS project was established for astronomical purposes and is independent from climate studies. The SDSS temperatures are also compared with mesospheric temperatures measured by the microwave limb sounder (MLS instrument on board the Aura satellite and the differences are discussed.

  15. Operating temperature measuring method for SnO2 gas-sensing materials using infra-red sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Sun, Yongquan; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Operating temperature was crucial for SnO2 gas sensor considering the serious impacts on sensors' selectivity and reliability. While, it was difficult to measure this operating temperature because the size of the sensitive body was small, as well as its heat capacity. In this paper, the temperature signal was acquired by the non-contact infrared temperature sensor and processed by the signal conditioning circuit and single-chip, and then the measured temperature were displayed by the single-chip. The method of subsection calibration was adopted to improve the accuracy of temperature measurement. Finally, the uncertainty of system measurement was estimated.

  16. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part II. State estimation via impedance-based temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Impedance-based temperature detection (ITD) is a promising approach for rapid estimation of internal cell temperature based on the correlation between temperature and electrochemical impedance. Previously, ITD was used as part of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state-estimator in conjunction with a thermal model to enable estimation of the 1-D temperature distribution of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery. Here, we extend this method to enable estimation of the 2-D temperature field of a battery with temperature gradients in both the radial and axial directions. An EKF using a parameterised 2-D spectral-Galerkin model with ITD measurement input (the imaginary part of the impedance at 215 Hz) is shown to accurately predict the core temperature and multiple surface temperatures of a 32,113 LiFePO4 cell, using current excitation profiles based on an Artemis HEV drive cycle. The method is validated experimentally on a cell fitted with a heat sink and asymmetrically cooled via forced air convection. A novel approach to impedance-temperature calibration is also presented, which uses data from a single drive cycle, rather than measurements at multiple uniform cell temperatures as in previous studies. This greatly reduces the time required for calibration, since it overcomes the need for repeated cell thermal equalization.

  17. Enhancement of yield point at high pressure high temperature wells by using polymer nanocomposites based on ZnO & CaCO3 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Z. Noah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs and modified calcium carbonate (nano-CaCO3 nanoparticles were successfully prepared and added to polystyrene-butadiene rubber copolymer (PSBR matrix to prepare PSBR nanocomposites. The prepared nanomaterials (ZnO-NPs & nano-CaCO3 were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Furthermore, the prepared polymer nanocomposites and oil base mud were used for drilling in high pressure high temperature (HPHT wells. The consequence of using polymer nanocomposites based on different loading of ZnO-NPs and nano-CaCO3 on the rheological properties of oil base mud was evaluated and enhanced the yield point at high pressure high temperature wells (HPHT. The using of the polymer with different percentage from (0.5 in all percent the obtained results is very promising; this means that the increase of polymer is reasonable for the increase of apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity and yield point at high temperature. Correspondingly, polymer nanocomposites displayed rise of apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and yield point, decreased in fluid loss and increased in electrical stability at high pressure high temperature wells.

  18. A Large-Area Nanoplasmonic Sensor Fabricated by Rapid Thermal Annealing Treatment for Label-Free and Multi-Point Immunoglobulin Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Tzu-Han Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are important biomarkers to evaluate the immune status or development of infectious diseases. To provide timely clinical treatments, it is important to continuously monitor the level of multiple immunoglobulins. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR-based nanoplasmonic sensors have been demonstrated for multiplex immunoglobulins detection. However, the sensor fabrication process is usually slow and complicated, so it is not accessible for large-area and batch fabrication. Herein, we report a large-area (2 cm × 2 cm nanofabrication method using physical vapor deposition followed by a rapid thermal annealing treatment. To optimize the sensor performance, we systematically characterized three fabrication conditions, including (1 the deposition thickness; (2 the maximum annealing temperature, and (3 the annealing time. The corresponding absorbance spectrum profile and surface morphology of the nanostructures were observed by a UV-VIS spectrometer and atomic force microscopy. We then tested the sensitivity of the sensor using a glucose solution at different concentrations. The results showed that the sensor with 10 nm gold deposition thickness under 5-min 900 °C rapid thermal annealing can achieve the highest sensitivity (189 nm RIU−1. Finally, we integrated this nanoplasmonic sensor with a microchannel and a motorized stage to perform a 10-spot immunoglobulin detection in 50 min. Based on its real-time, dynamic and multi-point analyte detection capability, the nanoplasmonic sensor has the potential to be applied in high-throughput or multiplex immunoassay analysis, which would be beneficial for disease diagnosis or biomedical research in a simple and cost-effective platform.

  19. A Large-Area Nanoplasmonic Sensor Fabricated by Rapid Thermal Annealing Treatment for Label-Free and Multi-Point Immunoglobulin Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hana Tzu-Han; Yang, Chuan-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wu, Albert Meng-Hsin; Wang, Lon A; Huang, Nien-Tsu

    2017-05-02

    Immunoglobulins are important biomarkers to evaluate the immune status or development of infectious diseases. To provide timely clinical treatments, it is important to continuously monitor the level of multiple immunoglobulins. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based nanoplasmonic sensors have been demonstrated for multiplex immunoglobulins detection. However, the sensor fabrication process is usually slow and complicated, so it is not accessible for large-area and batch fabrication. Herein, we report a large-area (2 cm × 2 cm) nanofabrication method using physical vapor deposition followed by a rapid thermal annealing treatment. To optimize the sensor performance, we systematically characterized three fabrication conditions, including (1) the deposition thickness; (2) the maximum annealing temperature, and (3) the annealing time. The corresponding absorbance spectrum profile and surface morphology of the nanostructures were observed by a UV-VIS spectrometer and atomic force microscopy. We then tested the sensitivity of the sensor using a glucose solution at different concentrations. The results showed that the sensor with 10 nm gold deposition thickness under 5-min 900 °C rapid thermal annealing can achieve the highest sensitivity (189 nm RIU -1 ). Finally, we integrated this nanoplasmonic sensor with a microchannel and a motorized stage to perform a 10-spot immunoglobulin detection in 50 min. Based on its real-time, dynamic and multi-point analyte detection capability, the nanoplasmonic sensor has the potential to be applied in high-throughput or multiplex immunoassay analysis, which would be beneficial for disease diagnosis or biomedical research in a simple and cost-effective platform.

  20. Modelling the association of dengue fever cases with temperature and relative humidity in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia-A generalised linear model with break-point analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaldy, Ibrahim

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of environmental factors in the temporal distribution of dengue fever in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The relationship between dengue fever cases and climatic factors such as relative humidity and temperature was investigated during 2006-2009 to determine whether there is any relationship between dengue fever cases and climatic parameters in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia. A generalised linear model (GLM) with a break-point was used to determine how different levels of temperature and relative humidity affected the distribution of the number of cases of dengue fever. Break-point analysis was performed to modelled the effect before and after a break-point (change point) in the explanatory parameters under various scenarios. Akaike information criterion (AIC) and cross validation (CV) were used to assess the performance of the models. The results showed that maximum temperature and mean relative humidity are most probably the better predictors of the number of dengue fever cases in Jeddah. In this study three scenarios were modelled: no time lag, 1-week lag and 2-weeks lag. Among these scenarios, the 1-week lag model using mean relative humidity as an explanatory variable showed better performance. This study showed a clear relationship between the meteorological variables and the number of dengue fever cases in Jeddah. The results also demonstrated that meteorological variables can be successfully used to estimate the number of dengue fever cases for a given period of time. Break-point analysis provides further insight into the association between meteorological parameters and dengue fever cases by dividing the meteorological parameters into certain break-points. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dual functional NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+@NaYF4:Yb3+, Nd3+ core-shell nanoparticles for cell temperature sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zengliang; Duan, Yue; Zhu, Xingjun; Wang, Qiwei; Li, DongDong; Hu, Ke; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou; Xu, Chunxiang

    2018-03-01

    Lanthanide-doped up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) provide a remote temperature sensing approach to monitoring biological microenvironments. In this research, the UCNPs of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+@NaYF4:Yb3+, Nd3+ with hexagonal (β)-phase were synthesized and applied in cell temperature sensing as well as imaging after surface modification with meso-2, 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid. In the core-shell UCNPs, Yb3+ ions were introduced as energy transfer media between sensitizers of Nd3+ and activators of Er3+ to improve Er3+emission and prevent their quenching behavior due to multiple energy levels of Nd3+. Under the excitations of 808 nm and 980 nm lasers, the NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+@NaYF4:Yb3+, Nd3+ nanoparticles exhibited an efficient green band with two emission peaks at 525 nm and 545 nm, respectively, which originated from the transitions of 2H11/2 → 4I15/2 and 4S3/2 → 4I15/2 for Er3+ ions. We demonstrate that an occurrence of good logarithmic linearity exists between the intensity ratio of these two emission peaks and the reciprocal of the inside or outside temperature of NIH-3T3 cells. A better thermal stability is proved through temperature-dependent spectra with a heating-cooling cycle. The obtained viability of NIH-3T3 cells is greater than 90% after incubations of about 12 and 24 (h), and they possess a lower cytotoxicity of UCNPs. This work provides a method for monitoring the cell temperature and its living state from multiple dimensions including temperature response, cell images and visual up-conversion fluorescent color.

  2. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of

  3. A flexible sensor based on polyaniline hybrid using ZnO as template and sensing properties to triethylamine at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Le; Sun, Jianhua; Bai, Shouli; Luo, Ruixian; Li, Dianqing; Chen, Aifan; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Rapid synthesis of PANI has novelty, which is different with that reported before. • Enhancement of gas sensing is attributed to synergistic effect and heterojunction. • PET film is used as substrate to obtain a flexible, wearable and smart sensor. • Room temperature operating of sensor leads to save energy, safety and long life. - Abstract: A network structure of PANI/SnO 2 hybrid was synthesized by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization using cheaper ZnO nanorods as sacrificial template and the hybrid was loaded on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) thin film to construct a flexible smart sensor. The sensor not only exhibits high sensitivity which is 20 times higher than that of pure PANI to 10 ppm triethylamine, good selectivity and linear response at room temperature but also has flexible, structure simple, economical and portable characters compared with recently existing sensors. Room temperature operating of the sensor is also particularly interesting, which leads to low power consumption, environmental safety and long life times. The improvement of sensing properties is attributed to the network structure of hybrid and formation of p-n heterojunction at the interface between the PANI and SnO 2 . The research is expected to open a new window for development of a kind of wearable electronic devices based on the hybrid of conducting polymer and metal oxides.

  4. Intensive up-conversion photoluminescence of Er3+-doped Bi7Ti4NbO21 ferroelectric ceramics and its temperature sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The intensive up-conversion (UC photoluminescence and temperature sensing behavior of Er3+-doped Bi7Ti4NbO21(BTN ferroelectric ceramics prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction technique have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscope analyses demonstrated that the Er3+-doped BTN ceramics are single phase and uniform flake-like structure. With the Er3+ ions doping, the intensive UC emission was observed without obviously changing the properties of ferroelectric. The optimal emission intensity was obtained when Er doping level was 15 mol.%. The temperature sensing behavior was studied by fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR technique of two green UC emission bands, and the experimental data fitted very well with the function of temperature in a range of 133–573 K. It suggested that the Er3+-doped BTN ferroelectric ceramics are very good candidates for applications such as optical thermometry, electro-optical devices and bio-imaging ceramics.

  5. A flexible sensor based on polyaniline hybrid using ZnO as template and sensing properties to triethylamine at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Le [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Analysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Sun, Jianhua [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Analysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Guangxi Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Resource Processing and Process Intensification Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Bai, Shouli, E-mail: baisl@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Analysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Luo, Ruixian [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Analysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Li, Dianqing, E-mail: lidq@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Analysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Aifan [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Analysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Liu, Chung Chiun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecule Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Rapid synthesis of PANI has novelty, which is different with that reported before. • Enhancement of gas sensing is attributed to synergistic effect and heterojunction. • PET film is used as substrate to obtain a flexible, wearable and smart sensor. • Room temperature operating of sensor leads to save energy, safety and long life. - Abstract: A network structure of PANI/SnO{sub 2} hybrid was synthesized by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization using cheaper ZnO nanorods as sacrificial template and the hybrid was loaded on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) thin film to construct a flexible smart sensor. The sensor not only exhibits high sensitivity which is 20 times higher than that of pure PANI to 10 ppm triethylamine, good selectivity and linear response at room temperature but also has flexible, structure simple, economical and portable characters compared with recently existing sensors. Room temperature operating of the sensor is also particularly interesting, which leads to low power consumption, environmental safety and long life times. The improvement of sensing properties is attributed to the network structure of hybrid and formation of p-n heterojunction at the interface between the PANI and SnO{sub 2}. The research is expected to open a new window for development of a kind of wearable electronic devices based on the hybrid of conducting polymer and metal oxides.

  6. Tunnel diode amplifiers and their background noise as a function of the polarization point, the temperature, and the bandwidth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozveaminian, K.

    1969-01-01

    The author presents mathematical and graphical methods for the study of the stability of tunnel diode circuits. He gives an application to the realization of three amplifiers. Then he describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise of these amplifiers and of its variations with the bias, the temperature and the bandwidth. (author) [fr

  7. Calibration of micro-thermal analysis for the detection of glass transition temperatures and melting points: repeatability and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    Micro-thermal analysis (μTATM) is a technique in which thermal analysis is performed on surfaces of test specimens on a small (ca. 2×2 μm) scale. Like any thermal analysis technique, interpretation of results benefits from accurate temperature information and knowledge of the precision of the

  8. Supercooling points and heat coma temperatures in four species of oceanic sea skaters of the genus Halobates (Heteroptera: Gerridae: Halobatinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harada, T.; Takenaka, S.; Iyota, K.; Shiraki, T.; Moku, M.; Katagiri, C.; Košťál, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2013), s. 219-222 ISSN 1226-8615 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : temperature dynamics * distribution * heat tolerance Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.875, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ artic le/pii/S1226861513000150#

  9. Vertical profiles of ozone, carbon monoxide, and dew-point temperature obtained during GTE/CITE 1, October-November 1983. [Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jack; Gregory, Gerald L.; Sachse, Glen W.; Beck, Sherwin M.; Hill, Gerald F.

    1987-01-01

    A set of 14 pairs of vertical profiles of ozone and carbon monoxide, obtained with fast-response instrumentation, is presented. Most of these profiles, which were measured in the remote troposphere, also have supporting fast-response dew-point temperature profiles. The data suggest that the continental boundary layer is a source of tropospheric ozone, even in October and November, when photochemical activity should be rather small. In general, the small-scale vertical variability between CO and O3 is in phase. At low latitudes this relationship defines levels in the atmosphere where midlatitude air is being transported to lower latitudes, since lower dew-point temperatures accompany these higher CO and O3 concentrations. A set of profiles which is suggestive of interhemispheric transport is also presented. Independent meteorological analyses support these interpretations.

  10. Visible photoassisted room-temperature oxidizing gas-sensing behavior of Sn2S3 semiconductor sheets through facile thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Lung, Tsai-Wen; Wang, Chein-Chung

    2016-11-01

    Well-crystallized Sn2S3 semiconductor thin films with a highly (111)-crystallographic orientation were grown using RF sputtering. The surface morphology of the Sn2S3 thin films exhibited a sheet-like feature. The Sn2S3 crystallites with a sheet-like surface had a sharp periphery with a thickness in a nanoscale size, and the crystallite size ranged from approximately 150 to 300 nm. Postannealing the as-synthesized Sn2S3 thin films further in ambient air at 400 °C engendered roughened and oxidized surfaces on the Sn2S3 thin films. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the surfaces of the Sn2S3 thin films transformed into a SnO2 phase, and well-layered Sn2S3-SnO2 heterostructure thin films were thus formed. The Sn2S3-SnO2 heterostructure thin film exhibited a visible photoassisted room-temperature gas-sensing behavior toward low concentrations of NO2 gases (0.2-2.5 ppm). By contrast, the pure Sn2S3 thin film exhibited an unapparent room-temperature NO2 gas-sensing behavior under illumination. The suitable band alignment at the interface of the Sn2S3-SnO2 heterostructure thin film and rough surface features might explain the visible photoassisted room-temperature NO2 gas-sensing responses of the heterostructure thin film on exposure to NO2 gas at low concentrations in this work.

  11. Assessment of injected warm plumes along a free surface flow channel using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Lay, Hugo; Thomas, Zahra; Rouault, François; Pichelin, Pascal; Bour, Olivier; Moatar, Florentina

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and predicting stream thermal regimes is a key goal for aquatic ecosystems resiliency to climate change. Mapping thermal anomalies finely becomes feasible thanks to methods such as fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS). Despite being the main thermal anomalies in stream, groundwater inflows are difficult to detect because of high water stages and turbulent stream flow. We hypothesized that thresholds in flow regime and hydraulic parameters may affect thermal regime characterization. Our main objective was to test and validate the use of FO-DTS for the quantification of inflows in order to determine the physical processes behind these thresholds. Experiments were carried out outdoor, using an open flow hydraulic channel. A warm water tank was used to simulate groundwater inflows with known discharge rates and temperatures. These discharge rates varied between 4 and 72% of the channel flow. Numerical experiments were also conducted to test the consistency of our experimental results and discriminate the effect of inflow rate and hydraulic parameters. The water temperature in the channel was monitored by Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing with cables set on two lines, over three depths. The injected warm plume was tracked along the channel and across the water stage to estimate temperature increases it induced. A relationship was found between these thermal anomalies and flow dynamic, defining different types of flow configurations. For given channel flow rate and water stage, a threshold for the inflow rate was identified at which the injected plume is not detectable by our means. The effect of the channel flow velocity over the plume spreading appears clearly with a dominance of advection for high flow rate. In addition, outdoor experiments were affected by atmospheric conditions (air temperature, solar radiation, etc.) while simulations allowed refining results without external artefacts and showed a good fit with measurements

  12. AN INVESTIGATION ON THE SCHOOL INTEGRATION IN ITALY: MAINSTREAM AND SPECIAL TEACHERS’ POINT OF VIEW, AND SENSE OF LONELINESS IN DISABLED AND NOT DISABLED STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa FERRI

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Italian scholastic system provides for disabled students a complete social and teaching integration in the classes of the public schools.The present study is focused on the evaluation of the quality of school integration in 36 classes of different schools in the district of Rome, Italy. The school integration of the disabled students was analyzed through the teachers’ evaluation; in each class it was also analyzed the sense of loneliness in the disabled and not disabled students.Results showed a good teachers’ evaluation of the integration process, and the students, disabled and not disabled, reported low scores in the sense of loneliness in their class, although a difference between the two groups was noticed.The present work re-affirm the need to monitor the quality of the school integration process, in order to find efficient quality indicators, and each possible improvement in usual procedures carried on in school systems concerning the disabled students integration.

  13. The effect of impact velocity on droplet-wall collision heat transfer above the leidenfrost point temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Hyung Dae [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sung Won; Kim, Kyung Doo [Thermal Hydraulics Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Single droplet-wall collision heat transfer characteristics on a heated plate above Leidenfrost temperature were experimentally investigated considering the effects of impact velocity. The collision characteristics of the droplet impinged on the heated wall and the changes in temperature distribution were simultaneously measured using synchronized high-speed video and infrared cameras. The surface heat flux distribution was obtained by solving the three-dimensional transient heat conduction equation for the heated substrate using the measured surface temperature data as the boundary condition for the collision surface. As the normal impact velocity increased, heat transfer effectiveness increased because of an increase in the maximum spreading diameter and a decrease in the vapor film thickness between the droplet and heated wall. For We < 30, droplets stably rebounded from a heated wall without breakup. However, the droplets broke up into small droplets for We > 30. The tendency of the heat transfer to increase with increasing impact velocity was degraded by the transition from the rebounding region to the breakup region; this was resulted from the reduction in the effective heat transfer area enlargement due to the breakup phenomenon.

  14. An experimental investigation on dynamics and heat transfer associated with a single droplet impacting on a hot surface above the Leidenfrost point temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.; Kim, H. [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2016-07-15

    During large loss-of-coolant accidents in nuclear reactors, water splatters as the quench front propagates at the quenching surface, and many droplets of different sizes and velocities are generated and carried with the steam in the cooling channel. Heat transfer due to droplets striking an overheated fuel rod above the Leidenfrost point temperature is important for predicting the peak cladding temperature. This study investigated the dynamics and heat transfer characteristics when a single droplet at room temperature collided with a surface at 425 C experimentally, using synchronized high-speed video and infrared cameras. Various physical parameters related to heat transfer model development were measured, including the residence time, spreading diameter, local heat flux distribution, effective heat transfer area, average vapor film thickness, and total heat transfer per collision. The measured data were compared with the values of the physical parameters predicted by existing mechanistic models.

  15. Determination of transient temperature and heat flux on the surface of a reactor control rod based on temperature measurements at the interior points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebula, Artur; Taler, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents heat transfer calculation results concerning a control rod of nuclear power plant. Apart from numerical calculation results, experimental heat transfer measurements of the control rod model are also presented. The control rod that is the object of interest is surrounded by a mixing region of hot and cold streams and, as a consequence, is subjected to thermal fluctuations. The paper describes a method based on the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) for determining heat flux on the outer surface of the rod. Numerical tests were conducted to validate the method by comparison of the results with the time changes of surface temperature and heat flux which were obtained from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the mixing process. A measuring instrument was designed to measure the heat flux at the outer surface of the control rod model. In addition, the principle of operation and construction of heat flux meter is presented in detail. -- Highlights: • Temperature and heat flux estimation during cooling of control rod are presented. • The inverse technique is based on the space marching method. • The instrument for surface heat flux measurement was manufactured and tested. • CFD simulations were used to validate the developed inverse technique. • Actual data were used to demonstrate practical applicability of the method

  16. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  17. Mass Screening of Suspected Febrile Patients with Remote-sensing Infrared Thermography: Alarm Temperature and Optimal Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fu Chiang

    2008-12-01

    Conclusion: The temperature readings obtained by IRT may be used as a proxy for core temperature. An effective IRT system with a strict operating protocol can be rapidly implemented at the entrance of a hospital during SARS or avian influenza epidemics.

  18. Greener process to synthesize water-soluble Mn.sup.2+-doped CdSSe(ZnS) core(shell) nanocrystals for ratiometric temperature sensing, nanocrystals, and methods implementing nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haw; Hsia, Chih-Hao

    2017-07-04

    Novel Mn.sup.2+-doped quantum dots are provided. These Mn.sup.2+-doped quantum dots exhibit excellent temperature sensitivity in both organic solvents and water-based solutions. Methods of preparing the Mn.sup.2+-doped quantum dots are provided. The Mn.sup.2+-doped quantum dots may be prepared via a stepwise procedure using air-stable and inexpensive chemicals. The use of air-stable chemicals can significantly reduce the cost of synthesis, chemical storage, and the risk associated with handling flammable chemicals. Methods of temperature sensing using Mn.sup.2+-doped quantum dots are provided. The stepwise procedure provides the ability to tune the temperature-sensing properties to satisfy specific needs for temperature sensing applications. Water solubility may be achieved by passivating the Mn.sup.2+-doped quantum dots, allowing the Mn.sup.2+-doped quantum dots to probe the fluctuations of local temperature in biological environments.

  19. Self-Tuning Fully-Connected PID Neural Network System for Distributed Temperature Sensing and Control of Instrument with Multi-Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Cheng; Zhu, Rong

    2016-10-14

    High integration of multi-functional instruments raises a critical issue in temperature control that is challenging due to its spatial-temporal complexity. This paper presents a multi-input multi-output (MIMO) self-tuning temperature sensing and control system for efficiently modulating the temperature environment within a multi-module instrument. The smart system ensures that the internal temperature of the instrument converges to a target without the need of a system model, thus making the control robust. The system consists of a fully-connected proportional-integral-derivative (PID) neural network (FCPIDNN) and an on-line self-tuning module. The experimental results show that the presented system can effectively control the internal temperature under various mission scenarios, in particular, it is able to self-reconfigure upon actuator failure. The system provides a new scheme for a complex and time-variant MIMO control system which can be widely applied for the distributed measurement and control of the environment in instruments, integration electronics, and house constructions.

  20. Remote sensing of height of a fog layer and temperature of fog droplets using infrared thermometer and meteorological satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Abe, H.

    1998-01-01

    To study meteorological characteristics of cool foggy easterly (Yamase), by which rice production in the Tohoku region was frequently damaged, we measured temperature of the fog layer resulted from Yamase, using infrared thermal indicator and meteorological satellite (HIMAWARI). These temperature data were compared with wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures obtained by a ventilated psychrometer. Generally, the temperature of fog droplets estimated from infrared thermal indicator was higher than the wet-bulb temperature by about 0∼1°C. This result indicates clearly that fog droplets were cooled by evaporation on the droplet surface. Under the conditions that the fog layer is homogeneous in liquid water content and fog droplet size distribution, the height of the fog layer can be estimated by the observation of visibility and relative solar radiation flux. (author)

  1. Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability and nano-porosity on the Leidenfrost point temperature of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Dae [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Quenching phenomena play a key role in LWR safety, particularly in the reflood phase of a large-break LOCA. It is well known that quenching phenomena are affected by the physico-chemical characteristics of the hot surface, such as surface roughness, wettability and porosity. However, while some general qualitative trends are known, there is a lack of quantitative data on the relative importance and magnitude of these effects. Therefore, we conduct water-droplet Leidenfrost Point (LFP) tests using custom-fabricated surfaces for which roughness, wettability and porosity were controlled accurately and separately at the nanoscale

  2. Photo-Induced Room-Temperature Gas Sensing with a-IGZO Based Thin-Film Transistors Fabricated on Flexible Plastic Foil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobelspies, Stefan; Bierer, Benedikt; Daus, Alwin; Takabayashi, Alain; Salvatore, Giovanni Antonio; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Ortiz Perez, Alvaro; Wöllenstein, Jürgen; Palzer, Stefan; Tröster, Gerhard

    2018-01-26

    We present a gas sensitive thin-film transistor (TFT) based on an amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide (a-IGZO) semiconductor as the sensing layer, which is fabricated on a free-standing flexible polyimide foil. The photo-induced sensor response to NO₂ gas at room temperature and the cross-sensitivity to humidity are investigated. We combine the advantages of a transistor based sensor with flexible electronics technology to demonstrate the first flexible a-IGZO based gas sensitive TFT. Since flexible plastic substrates prohibit the use of high operating temperatures, the charge generation is promoted with the help of UV-light absorption, which ultimately triggers the reversible chemical reaction with the trace gas. Furthermore, the device fabrication process flow can be directly implemented in standard TFT technology, allowing for the parallel integration of the sensor and analog or logical circuits.

  3. Photo-Induced Room-Temperature Gas Sensing with a-IGZO Based Thin-Film Transistors Fabricated on Flexible Plastic Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, Benedikt; Takabayashi, Alain; Ortiz Perez, Alvaro; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    We present a gas sensitive thin-film transistor (TFT) based on an amorphous Indium–Gallium–Zinc–Oxide (a-IGZO) semiconductor as the sensing layer, which is fabricated on a free-standing flexible polyimide foil. The photo-induced sensor response to NO2 gas at room temperature and the cross-sensitivity to humidity are investigated. We combine the advantages of a transistor based sensor with flexible electronics technology to demonstrate the first flexible a-IGZO based gas sensitive TFT. Since flexible plastic substrates prohibit the use of high operating temperatures, the charge generation is promoted with the help of UV-light absorption, which ultimately triggers the reversible chemical reaction with the trace gas. Furthermore, the device fabrication process flow can be directly implemented in standard TFT technology, allowing for the parallel integration of the sensor and analog or logical circuits. PMID:29373524

  4. Optical and Structural Properties of Multi-wall-carbon-nanotube-modified ZnO Synthesized at Varying Substrate Temperatures for Highly Efficient Light Sensing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Saasa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural, optical and light detection properties on carbon-nanotube-modified ZnO thin films grown at various temperatures from room to 1173 K are investigated. The optical band gap values calculated from reflectivity data show a hump at a critical temperature range of 873-1073 K. Similar trends in surface roughness as well as crystallite size of the films are observed. These changes have been attributed to structural change from wurzite hexagonal to cubic carbon modified ZnO as also validated by x-ray diffraction, RBS and PIXE of these layers. UV and visible light detection properties show similar trends. It is demonstrated that the present films can sense both UV and visible light to a maximum response efficiency of 66 % which is much higher than the last reported efficiency 10 %. This high response is given predominantly by cubic crystallite rather than the wurzite hexagonal composites.

  5. Photo-Induced Room-Temperature Gas Sensing with a-IGZO Based Thin-Film Transistors Fabricated on Flexible Plastic Foil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Knobelspies

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a gas sensitive thin-film transistor (TFT based on an amorphous Indium–Gallium–Zinc–Oxide (a-IGZO semiconductor as the sensing layer, which is fabricated on a free-standing flexible polyimide foil. The photo-induced sensor response to NO2 gas at room temperature and the cross-sensitivity to humidity are investigated. We combine the advantages of a transistor based sensor with flexible electronics technology to demonstrate the first flexible a-IGZO based gas sensitive TFT. Since flexible plastic substrates prohibit the use of high operating temperatures, the charge generation is promoted with the help of UV-light absorption, which ultimately triggers the reversible chemical reaction with the trace gas. Furthermore, the device fabrication process flow can be directly implemented in standard TFT technology, allowing for the parallel integration of the sensor and analog or logical circuits.

  6. Use of remotely sensed land surface temperature as a proxy for air temperatures at high elevations: Findings from a 5000 m elevational transect across Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, N. C.; Maeda, E. E.; Williams, R.

    2016-09-01

    High elevations are thought to be warming more rapidly than lower elevations, but there is a lack of air temperature observations in high mountains. This study compares instantaneous values of land surface temperature (10:30/22:30 and 01:30/13:30 local solar time) as measured by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer MOD11A2/MYD11A2 at 1 km resolution from the Terra and Aqua platforms, respectively, with equivalent screen-level air temperatures (in the same pixel). We use a transect of 22 in situ weather stations across Kilimanjaro ranging in elevation from 990 to 5803 m, one of the biggest elevational ranges in the world. There are substantial differences between LST and Tair, sometimes up to 20°C. During the day/night land surface temperature tends to be higher/lower than Tair. LST-Tair differences (ΔT) show large variance, particularly during the daytime, and tend to increase with elevation, particularly on the NE slope which faces the morning Sun. Differences are larger in the dry seasons (JF and JJAS) and reduce in cloudy seasons. Healthier vegetation (as measured by normalized difference vegetation index) and increased humidity lead to reduced daytime surface heating above air temperature and lower ΔT, but these relationships weaken with elevation. At high elevations transient snow cover cools LST more than Tair. The predictability of ΔT therefore reduces. It will therefore be challenging to use satellite data at high elevations as a proxy for in situ air temperatures in climate change assessments, especially for daytime Tmax. ΔT is smaller and more consistent at night, so it will be easier to use LST to monitor changes in Tmin.

  7. Influence of heat treatment and indenter tip material on depth sensing hardness tests at high temperatures of fusion relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredl, Julian; Dany, Manuel; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Kraft, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Operation of a custom-made indentation device designed for test temperatures up to 650 °C and a remote handled operation in a Hot Cell. • Instrumented indentation and conventional hardness testing of unirradiated MANET II and EUROFER. • Comparison of diamond and sapphire as indenter tip materials. - Abstract: The instrumented indentation is a suitable method for testing of even small neutron-irradiated specimens. From the continuously recorded indentation depth and the indentation force, it is possible to deduce mechanical parameters of the tested material. In this paper, a brief description of the high temperature device is given and representative results are presented. In the study, unirradiated steels are investigated by instrumented indentation at temperatures up to 500 °C. It is shown that the hardness is highly depending on the testing-temperature and can be correlated to the results of conventional tensile testing experiments. A not negligible influence of the indenter tip material is observed. The results show the functionality of the high-temperature indentation device.

  8. Quantitative analysis of the radiation error for aerial coiled-fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing deployments using reinforcing fabric as support structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Armin; Pfister, Lena; Sayde, Chadi; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the spatial resolution of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) has been enhanced in various studies by helically coiling the fiber around a support structure. While solid polyvinyl chloride tubes are an appropriate support structure under water, they can produce considerable errors in aerial deployments due to the radiative heating or cooling. We used meshed reinforcing fabric as a novel support structure to measure high-resolution vertical temperature profiles with a height of several meters above a meadow and within and above a small lake. This study aimed at quantifying the radiation error for the coiled DTS system and the contribution caused by the novel support structure via heat conduction. A quantitative and comprehensive energy balance model is proposed and tested, which includes the shortwave radiative, longwave radiative, convective, and conductive heat transfers and allows for modeling fiber temperatures as well as quantifying the radiation error. The sensitivity of the energy balance model to the conduction error caused by the reinforcing fabric is discussed in terms of its albedo, emissivity, and thermal conductivity. Modeled radiation errors amounted to -1.0 and 1.3 K at 2 m height but ranged up to 2.8 K for very high incoming shortwave radiation (1000 J s-1 m-2) and very weak winds (0.1 m s-1). After correcting for the radiation error by means of the presented energy balance, the root mean square error between DTS and reference air temperatures from an aspirated resistance thermometer or an ultrasonic anemometer was 0.42 and 0.26 K above the meadow and the lake, respectively. Conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber cable had a small effect on fiber temperatures (cable were significant temperature artifacts of up to 2.5 K observed. Overall, the reinforcing fabric offers several advantages over conventional support structures published to date in the literature as it minimizes both radiation and conduction errors.

  9. Towards simultaneous calibration-free and ultra-fast sensing of temperature and species in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin S.M.

    2014-07-02

    We report on exploiting the down-chirp phenomenon seen in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), when modulated with long pulses, for the purpose of performing calibration-free and temporally resolved measurements. Intrapulse spectra of a native species (e.g., H2O), common to combustion environments, were generated near λ = 7.62 μm at repetition rates as high as 3.125 MHz. Two-line absorption spectroscopy was employed to infer calibration-free temperature from the chirp-induced intrapulse spectra. In this study, such temperature measurements were limited to rates of 250 kHz due to spectral distortion at higher repetition rates. We demonstrate the ease at which accurate temperatures and H2O compositions can be achieved using simple and compact QCLs operated in the intrapulse mode. The sensor is also applicable to other species, and has the potential to be integrated into commercial technologies. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Low-temperature thermal reduction of suspended graphene oxide film for electrical sensing of DNA-hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tun; Guo, Hong-Chen; Chen, Xin-Yi; Lu, Miao

    2017-03-01

    A reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based capacitive real time bio-sensor was presented. Suspended graphene oxide (GO) film was assembled electrophoretically between the source and drain electrodes of a transistor and then reduced by annealing in hydrogen/nitrogen forming gas to optimize the surface functional groups and conductivity. The resonance frequency of the transmission coefficient (S 21 ) of the transistor was observed to shift with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-hybridization, with a detecting limit of ~5nM. The advantages of the bio-sensing approach include low-noise frequency output, solution based real time detection and capable of on-chip integration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Half-metallic compensated ferrimagnetism with a tunable compensation point over a wide temperature range in the Mn-Fe-V-Al Heusler system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Stinshoff

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The cubic Heusler compound Mn1.5FeV0.5Al with the L21 Heusler structure is the first fully compensated half-metallic ferrimagnet with 24 valence electrons. The ferrimagnetic state can be tuned by changing the composition such that the compensation point appears at finite temperatures ranging from 0 K up to 226 K, while retaining half-metallicity in the system. In this paper, the structural, magnetic and transport properties of the Mn-Fe-V-Al system are discussed. Magnetic reversal and a change of sign of the anomalous Hall effect were observed at the compensation point, which gives rise to a sublattice spin-crossing. These materials present new possibilities for potential spintronic devices because of their advantageous properties such as imperceptibility to external fields, lower power consumption and ultrafast switching in the THz region.

  12. Solution of the point kinetics equations in the presence of Newtonian temperature feedback by Pade approximations via the analytical inversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboanber, A E; Nahla, A A

    2002-01-01

    A method based on the Pade approximations is applied to the solution of the point kinetics equations with a time varying reactivity. The technique consists of treating explicitly the roots of the inhour formula. A significant improvement has been observed by treating explicitly the most dominant roots of the inhour equation, which usually would make the Pade approximation inaccurate. Also the analytical inversion method which permits a fast inversion of polynomials of the point kinetics matrix is applied to the Pade approximations. Results are presented for several cases of Pade approximations using various options of the method with different types of reactivity. The formalism is applicable equally well to non-linear problems, where the reactivity depends on the neutron density through temperature feedback. It was evident that the presented method is particularly good for cases in which the reactivity can be represented by a series of steps and performed quite well for more general cases

  13. A Miniature Fiber-Optic Sensor for High-Resolution and High-Speed Temperature Sensing in Ocean Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    Nebra>.a-Lhcoln, •t s p<Jp(H wrll be pre~rontod at tile _?SA Im aging and Applfed Optics Me~~g (ll.ame o! C<lr ’erunco) 07-JUN · 𔃻-JUN-15 Arlinqon. V...patterns, and heat exchange. The influence from rapid temperature changes within microstructures are can have strong impacts to optical and acoustical ...also affect acoustical signal propagation [4]. While salinity variations could sometimes lead to severe turbulence [5], temperature gradient is the

  14. Increase in the boiler's performance in terms of the acid dew point temperature: Environmental advantages of replacing fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, J.M.; Pena, F. [Dpto. Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria, Universidad del Pais Vasco/E.H.U., Alameda de Urquijo s/n (48013) Bilbao (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    The aim of air pre-heaters is to raise the temperature of the combustion air in boilers, using heat recovered from the power plant combustion gases. On the one hand, this paper compares the effects of the acid dew point temperature (ADT) on pre-heaters in a reference thermal power plant for two types of fuel, ''fuel No. 2'' and ''low sulphur fuel'' respectively and on the other hand, it shows how a changeover to this latter fuel would increase the useful lifetime of this equipment, reducing this way cost of maintenance due to the considerable decrease in the area exposed to ADT with the subsequent increase in the boiler's performance. (author)

  15. Technical evaluation of the electrical, instrumentation, and control design aspects of the low temperature overpressure protection system for the Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laudenbach, D.H.

    1979-03-01

    The technical evaluation is presented for the electrical, instrumentation, and control design aspects of the low temperature overpressure protection system for the Point Beach nuclear power plant, Units 1 and 2. Design basis criteria used to evaluate the acceptability of the system included operator action, system testability, single failure criterion, and seismic Category I and IEEE Std-279-1971 criteria. This report is supplied as part of the Selected Electrical, Instrumentation, and Control Systems Issues Support Program being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

  16. Technical evaluation of the electrical, instrumentation, and control design aspects of the low temperature overpressure protection system for the Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laudenbach, D.H.

    1979-03-01

    The technical evaluation is presented for the electrical, instrumentation, and control design aspects of the low temperature overpressure protection system for the Point Beach nuclear power plant, Units 1 and 2. Design basis criteria used to evaluate the acceptability of the system included operator action, system testability, single failure criterion, and seismic Category I and IEEE Std-279-1971 criteria. This report is supplied as part of the Selected Electrical, Instrumentation, and Control Systems Issues Support Program being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory.

  17. Effects of Different End-Point Cooking Temperatures on the Efficiency of Encapsulated Phosphates on Lipid Oxidation Inhibition in Ground Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, B; Şimşek, A; Claus, J R; Atılgan, E; Aktaş, N

    2015-10-01

    Effects of 0.5% encapsulated (e) phosphates (sodium tripolyphosphate, STP; sodium hexametaphosphate, HMP; sodium pyrophosphate, SPP) on lipid oxidation during storage (0, 1, and 7 d) of ground meat (chicken, beef) after being cooked to 3 end-point cooking temperatures (EPCT; 71, 74, and 77 °C) were evaluated. The use of STP or eSTP resulted in lower (P phosphates can be a strategy to inhibit lipid oxidation for meat industry and the efficiency of encapsulated phosphates on lipid oxidation inhibition can be enhanced by lowering EPCT. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Effects of temperatures near the freezing point on N2O emissions, denitrification and on the abundance and structure of nitrifying and denitrifying soil communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Sophie; Goyer, Claudia; Zebarth, Bernie J; Burton, David L; Tatti, Enrico; Chantigny, Martin H; Filion, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming in temperate regions may lead to decreased soil temperatures over winter as a result of reduced snow cover. We examined the effects of temperatures near the freezing point on N(2)O emissions, denitrification, and on the abundance and structure of soil nitrifiers and denitrifiers. Soil microcosms supplemented with NO3 - and/or NO3 - plus red clover residues were incubated for 120 days at -4 °C, -1 °C, +2 °C or +5 °C. Among microcosms amended with residues, N(2)O emission and/or denitrification increased with increasing temperature on Days 2 and 14. Interestingly, N(2)O emission and/or denitrification after Day 14 were the greatest at -1 °C. Substantial N(2) O emissions were only observed on Day 2 at +2 °C and +5 °C, while at -1 °C, N(2)O emissions were consistently detected over the duration of the experiment. Abundances of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), Nitrospira-like bacteria and nirK denitrifiers were the lowest in soils at -4 °C, while abundances of Nitrobacter-like bacteria and nirS denitrifiers did not vary among temperatures. Community structures of nirK and nirS denitrifiers and Nitrobacter-like bacteria shifted between below-zero and above-zero temperatures. Structure of AOA and AOB communities also changed but not systematically among frozen and unfrozen temperatures. Results indicated shifts in some nitrifier and denitrifier communities with freezing and a surprising stimulation of N(2)O emissions at -1 °C when NO3 - and C are present. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effects of Temperature and Relative Humidity on Point-of-Care Glucose Measurements in Hospital Practice in a Tropical Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratumvinit, Busadee; Charoenkoop, Nattakom; Niwattisaiwong, Soamsiri; Kost, Gerald J; Tientadakul, Panutsaya

    2016-09-01

    Hospitals in tropical countries experience conditions that exceed manufacturer temperature and humidity limits for point-of-care (POC) glucose reagents. Our goal was to assess the effects of out-of-limits storage temperature, operating temperature, and operating humidity on POC glucose measurement reliability. Quality control measurements were performed monthly using glucose test strips stored under controlled conditions and in inpatient wards under ambient conditions. Glucose test strips were evaluated in groups organized by operating temperatures of 24-25 (group 1), 28-29 (group 2), and 33-34°C (group 3), and relative humidity (RH) of ≤70 (group A), ~80 (group B), and ~90% (group C). Glucose results for different storage conditions were inconsistent. Measurements at higher operating temperatures had lower values with mean differences of -2.4 (P < .001) and -36.5 (P < .001) mg/dL (28-29 vs 24-25°C), and -3.6 (P < .001) and -37.4 (P < .001) mg/dL (33-34 vs 24-25°C) for low and high control levels, respectively. Measurements at higher RH had lower values with mean differences of -4.0 (P < .001) and -13.2 (P < .001) mg/dL (~80 vs ≤70% RH), and -5.8 (P < .001) and -16.6 (P < .001) mg/dL (~90 vs ≤70% RH) for low and high levels, respectively. High temperature and high RH decreased glucose concentrations for the POC oxidase-based system we evaluated. We recommend that individual hospitals perform stress testing, then determine if maximum absolute differences, which represent highest risk for patients, are clinically significant for decision making by using error grid analysis. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  20. Study of temperature distribution of fuel, clad and coolant in the VVER-1000 reactor core during group-10 control rod scram by using diffusion and point kinetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahgoshay, M.; Rahmani, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, through the application of two different methods (point kinetic and diffusion), the temperature distribution of fuel, clad and coolant has been studied and calculated during group-10 control rod scram, in the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (Iran) with a VVER-1000 reactor core. In the reactor core of Bushehr NPP, 10 groups of control rods are used of which, group-10 control rods contain the highest amount of injected negative reactivity in terms of quantity as compared to other groups of control rods. In this paper we explain impacts of negative reactivity, caused by a complete or minor scram of group-10 control rods, on thermoneutronic parameters of the VVER-1000 nuclear reactor core. It should be noted that through these calculations and by using the results, we can develop a sound understanding of impacts of this controlling element in optimum control of the reactor core and, on this basis, with careful attention and by gaining access to a reliable simulation (on the basis of results of calculations made in this survey) we can monitor the VVER-1000 reactor core through a smart control system. In continuation, for a more accurate survey and for comparing results of different calculation systems (point kinetic and diffusion), by using COSTANZA-R,Z calculation code (in which neutronic calculations are based on diffusion model) and using WIMS code at different areas and temperatures (for calculation of constant physical coefficients and temperature coefficients needed in COSTANZAR, Z code) for the VVER-1000 reactor core of Bushehr NPP, calculation of temperature distribution of fuel elements and coolant by using diffusion model is made in the course of group-10 control rods scram and afterwards. (author)

  1. Unravelling the dependence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on the size of Pt nanoparticles by in operando nanoplasmonic temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, Kristina; Hellman, Anders; Cavalca, Filippo Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We use a noninvasive nanoscale optical-temperature measurement method based on localized surface plasmon resonance to investigate the particle size-dependence of the hydrogen oxidation reaction kinetics on model supported Pt nanocatalysts at atmospheric pressure in operando. With decreasing average...

  2. Global climatology and variability of potential new production estimated from remote sensing of sea-surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Richard C.; Wilkerson, Frances P.

    1995-01-01

    During this project we have collected numerous shipboard data-bases of oceanic nitrate and silicate versus temperature for both equatorial and coastal upwelling regions. These cruises all have accompanying N-15 measurements of new production. The inverse relationships between nutrients and temperatures have been determined and are being used to obtain surface nutrient fields from sea surface temperatures measured remotely by satellite borne sensors- i.e. AVHRR data from NOAA satellites contained in the MCSST data set for the world ocean provided by the University of Miami. The images and data derived from space in this way show the strong seasonal fluctuations and interannual el Nino fluctuations of the nitrate field. the nitrate data has been used to make estimates of new production for the equatorial pacific which are compared with shipboard measurements when available. The importance of silicate as a nutrient driving new production and the ratio of nitrate to silicate has been discovered to be crucial to better understand the causes of new production variability, so we have added these parameters to our study and have begun to make estimates of these for the equatorial Pacific, derived from the weekly averaged sea surface temperatures (SSTs).

  3. Inversion of land-air temperature difference by using remote sensing data over the North Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiqiang; Huang, Fangfang; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong; Zhong, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Time series of MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) products, combined with digital elevation model (DEM) and meteorological data from 2001 to 2012, were used to map the spatial distribution of monthly mean air temperature over the Northern Tibetan Plateau (NTP). A time series analysis and a regression analysis of monthly mean land surface temperature (Ts) and air temperature (Ta) were conducted using ordinary linear regression (OLR) and geographical weighted regression (GWR) methods. The analyses showed that the GWR method, which considers MODIS LST, NDVI and elevation as independent variables, yielded much better results (Adjusted R2 > 0.79, and root mean square error (RMSE) between 0.51 °C and 1.12 °C) associated with estimating Ta compared to those of the OLR method (Adjusted R2 = 0.40 0.78, and RMSE=1.60 4.38 °C). In addition, some characteristics of the spatial distribution of monthly Ta and the difference (dT) between the surface and air temperature are as follows. According to the analysis of the 0 °C and 10 °C isothermals, Ta values over the NTP at elevations of 4000 5000 meters were over 10 °C in the summer (from May to October), and Ta values at an elevation of 3200 meters dropped below 0 °C in the winter (from November to April). Ta exhibited an increasing trend from northwest to southeast. Except in the southeastern area of the NTP, dT values in other areas were all larger than 0 °C in the winter.

  4. Flexible camphor sulfonic acid-doped PAni/α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite films and their room temperature ammonia sensing activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandgar, D.K. [Functional Materials Research Laboratory (FMRL), School of Physical Sciences, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Navale, S.T. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Polymer Science and Technology, Guangdong Research Center for Interfacial Engineering of Functional Materials, Nanshan District Key Lab for Biopolymers and Safety Evaluation, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Navale, Y.H.; Ingole, S.M. [Functional Materials Research Laboratory (FMRL), School of Physical Sciences, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Stadler, F.J. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Polymer Science and Technology, Guangdong Research Center for Interfacial Engineering of Functional Materials, Nanshan District Key Lab for Biopolymers and Safety Evaluation, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Ramgir, N.; Aswal, D.K.; Gupta, S.K. [Technical Physics Division, Babha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, M.S. (India); Mane, R.S. [School of Physical Sciences, SRTM University, Nanded 431606 (India); Patil, V.B., E-mail: drvbpatil@gmail.com [Functional Materials Research Laboratory (FMRL), School of Physical Sciences, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India)

    2017-03-01

    Composite nanostructures play a crucial role in gas sensing applications owing to their tunable properties and sizes. The main goal of this article is to prepare camphor sulfonic acid (10–50 wt%)-doped PAni/α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (PFC) composite nanostructured films on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate through in-situ polymerization process and study their gas sensing activity towards various gases. Structural and morphological measurements along with gas sensing properties in terms of selectivity, response, stability, and response-recovery times are investigated and reported. The gas selectivity tests of flexible PFC nanostructured composite films are performed towards different gases such as NO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, LPG, CH{sub 3}OH, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH etc., wherein all the flexible PFC (10–50%) films demonstrate a superior selectivity towards NH{sub 3} gas even in the presence of other test gases. Among the different compositions, 30% PFC flexible film exhibits highest response of 72% to 100 ppm NH{sub 3} with good response time of 65 s. The systematic study between PFC flexible nanocomposite films and NH{sub 3} gas is conducted and reported. In addition, the interfacial charge transfer kinetics across NH{sub 3} and PFC film interface was investigated by means of impendence spectroscopy study. - Highlights: • Novel route of preparation of camphor sulfonic acid doped PAni-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (PFC) flexible films. • XRD, FTIR, and RAMAN analysis confirms the formation of PFC composites. • PFC films are highly selective towards NH{sub 3} gas at room temperature. • PFC films able to detect as low as 2.5 ppm concentration of NH{sub 3} gas. • 30% PFC flexible film exhibits highest response of 72%–100 ppm NH{sub 3} gas with good response time of 65 s.

  5. Gas-Sensing Performance of M-Doped CuO-Based Thin Films Working at Different Temperatures upon Exposure to Propane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Rydosz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cupric oxide (CuO thin films are promising materials in gas sensor applications. The CuO-based gas sensors behaved as p-type semiconductors and can be used as part of an e-nose or smart sensor array for breath analysis. The authors present the investigation results on M-doped CuO-based (M = Ag, Au, Cr, Pd, Pt, Sb, Si sensors working at various temperatures upon exposure to a low concentration of C3H8, which can be found in exhaled human breath, and it can be considered as a one of the biomarkers of several diseases. The films have been deposited in magnetron sputtering technology on low temperature cofired ceramics substrates. The results of the gas sensors’ response are also presented and discussed. The Cr:CuO-based structure, annealed at 400 °C for 4 h in air, showed the highest sensor response, of the order of 2.7 at an operation temperature of 250 °C. The response and recovery time(s were 10 s and 24 s, respectively. The results show that the addition of M-dopants in the cupric oxide films effectively act as catalysts in propane sensors and improve the gas sensing properties. The films’ phase composition, microstructure and surface topography have been assessed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX methods.

  6. An Assessment of Methods and Remote-Sensing Derived Covariates for Regional Predictions of 1 km Daily Maximum Air Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Parmentier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring and prediction of biodiversity and environmental changes is constrained by the availability of accurate and spatially contiguous climatic variables at fine temporal and spatial grains. In this study, we evaluate best practices for generating gridded, one-kilometer resolution, daily maximum air temperature surfaces in a regional context, the state of Oregon, USA. Covariates used in the interpolation include remote sensing derived elevation, aspect, canopy height, percent forest cover and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST. Because of missing values, we aggregated daily LST values as long term (2000–2010 monthly climatologies to leverage its spatial detail in the interpolation. We predicted temperature with three methods—Universal Kriging, Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR and Generalized Additive Models (GAM—and assessed predictions using meteorological stations over 365 days in 2010. We find that GAM is least sensitive to overtraining (overfitting and results in lowest errors in term of distance to closest training stations. Mean elevation, LST, and distance to ocean are flagged most frequently as significant covariates among all daily predictions. Results indicate that GAM with latitude, longitude and elevation is the top model but that LST has potential in providing additional fine-grained spatial structure related to land cover effects. The study also highlights the need for more rigorous methods and data to evaluate the spatial structure and fine grained accuracy of predicted surfaces.

  7. Gas-Sensing Performance of M-Doped CuO-Based Thin Films Working at Different Temperatures upon Exposure to Propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydosz, Artur; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Cupric oxide (CuO) thin films are promising materials in gas sensor applications. The CuO-based gas sensors behaved as p-type semiconductors and can be used as part of an e-nose or smart sensor array for breath analysis. The authors present the investigation results on M-doped CuO-based (M = Ag, Au, Cr, Pd, Pt, Sb, Si) sensors working at various temperatures upon exposure to a low concentration of C3H8, which can be found in exhaled human breath, and it can be considered as a one of the biomarkers of several diseases. The films have been deposited in magnetron sputtering technology on low temperature cofired ceramics substrates. The results of the gas sensors’ response are also presented and discussed. The Cr:CuO-based structure, annealed at 400 °C for 4 h in air, showed the highest sensor response, of the order of 2.7 at an operation temperature of 250 °C. The response and recovery time(s) were 10 s and 24 s, respectively. The results show that the addition of M-dopants in the cupric oxide films effectively act as catalysts in propane sensors and improve the gas sensing properties. The films’ phase composition, microstructure and surface topography have been assessed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) methods. PMID:26287204

  8. UV-enhanced room-temperature gas sensing of ZnGa2O4 nanowires functionalized with Au catalyst nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghoon; An, Soyeon; Mun, Youngho; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-03-01

    ZnGa2O4 nanowires were synthesized using a thermal evaporation technique. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction revealed that the nanowires were single crystals 30-200 nm in diameter and ranged up to ˜100 μm in length. The sensing properties of multiple networked ZnGa2O4 nanowire sensors functionalized with Au catalyst nanoparticles with diameters of a few nanometers toward NO2 gas at room temperature under UV irradiation were examined. The sensors showed a remarkably enhanced response and far reduced response and recovery times toward NO2 gas at room temperature under 254 nm-ultraviolet (UV) illumination. The response of ZnGa2O4 nanowires to NO2 gas at room temperature increased from ˜100 to ˜861 % with increasing the UV intensity from 0 to 1.2 mW/cm2. The significant improvement in the response of ZnGa2O4 nanowires to NO2 gas by UV irradiation is attributed to the increased change in resistance due to the increase in the number of electrons participating in the reactions with NO2 molecules by photo-generation of electron-hole pairs.

  9. Gas-Sensing Performance of M-Doped CuO-Based Thin Films Working at Different Temperatures upon Exposure to Propane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydosz, Artur; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra

    2015-08-14

    Cupric oxide (CuO) thin films are promising materials in gas sensor applications. The CuO-based gas sensors behaved as p-type semiconductors and can be used as part of an e-nose or smart sensor array for breath analysis. The authors present the investigation results on M-doped CuO-based (M = Ag, Au, Cr, Pd, Pt, Sb, Si) sensors working at various temperatures upon exposure to a low concentration of C3H8, which can be found in exhaled human breath, and it can be considered as a one of the biomarkers of several diseases. The films have been deposited in magnetron sputtering technology on low temperature cofired ceramics substrates. The results of the gas sensors' response are also presented and discussed. The Cr:CuO-based structure, annealed at 400 °C for 4 h in air, showed the highest sensor response, of the order of 2.7 at an operation temperature of 250 °C. The response and recovery time(s) were 10 s and 24 s, respectively. The results show that the addition of M-dopants in the cupric oxide films effectively act as catalysts in propane sensors and improve the gas sensing properties. The films' phase composition, microstructure and surface topography have been assessed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) methods.

  10. Analyzing the Potential Risk of Climate Change on Lyme Disease in Eastern Ontario, Canada Using Time Series Remotely Sensed Temperature Data and Tick Population Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of Lyme disease cases (Lyme borreliosis in Ontario, Canada has increased over the last decade, and that figure is projected to continue to increase. The northern limit of Lyme disease cases has also been progressing northward from the northeastern United States into southeastern Ontario. Several factors such as climate change, changes in host abundance, host and vector migration, or possibly a combination of these factors likely contribute to the emergence of Lyme disease cases in eastern Ontario. This study first determined areas of warming using time series remotely sensed temperature data within Ontario, then analyzed possible spatial-temporal changes in Lyme disease risk in eastern Ontario from 2000 to 2013 due to climate change using tick population modeling. The outputs of the model were validated by using tick surveillance data from 2002 to 2012. Our results indicated areas in Ontario where Lyme disease risk changed from unsustainable to sustainable for sustaining Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick populations. This study provides evidence that climate change has facilitated the northward expansion of black-legged tick populations’ geographic range over the past decade. The results demonstrate that remote sensing data can be used to increase the spatial detail for Lyme disease risk mapping and provide risk maps for better awareness of possible Lyme disease cases. Further studies are required to determine the contribution of host migration and abundance on changes in eastern Ontario’s Lyme disease risk.

  11. Large-strain optical fiber sensing and real-time FEM updating of steel structures under the high temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ying; Fang, Xia; Xiao, Hai; Bevans, Wesley James; Chen, Genda; Zhou, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Steel buildings are subjected to fire hazards during or immediately after a major earthquake. Under combined gravity and thermal loads, they have non-uniformly distributed stiffness and strength, and thus collapse progressively with large deformation. In this study, large-strain optical fiber sensors for high temperature applications and a temperature-dependent finite element model updating method are proposed for accurate prediction of structural behavior in real time. The optical fiber sensors can measure strains up to 10% at approximately 700 °C. Their measurements are in good agreement with those from strain gauges up to 0.5%. In comparison with the experimental results, the proposed model updating method can reduce the predicted strain errors from over 75% to below 20% at 800 °C. The minimum number of sensors in a fire zone that can properly characterize the vertical temperature distribution of heated air due to the gravity effect should be included in the proposed model updating scheme to achieve a predetermined simulation accuracy. (paper)

  12. Label-free electrical sensing of bacteria in eye wash samples: A step towards point-of-care detection of pathogens in patients with infectious keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hardik J; Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Verma, Saloni; Chug, Manjyot Kaur; Memic, Adnan; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Shafiee, Hadi

    2017-05-15

    The diagnosis of keratitis is based on visual exam, tissue cytology, and standard microbial culturing to determine the type of the infectious pathogen. To prescribe appropriate therapy, it is important to distinguish between bacterial, fungal, and viral keratitis, as the treatments are quite different. Diagnosis of the causative organism has a substantial prognostic importance. Further, timely knowledge of the nature of the pathogen is also critical to adapt therapy in patients unresponsive to empiric treatment options, which occurs in 10% of all cases. Currently, the identification of the nature of the pathogen that causes keratitis is achieved via microbial culture screening, which is laboratory-based, expensive, and time-consuming. The most frequent pathogens that cause the corneal ulcers are P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Here, we report a microchip for rapid (<1h) detection of P. aeruginosa (6294), S. aureus(LAC), through on-chip electrical sensing of bacterial lysate. We evaluated the microchip with spiked samples of PBS with bacteria concentration between 10 1 to 10 8 CFU/mL. The least diluted bacteria concentration in bacteria-spiked samples with statistically significant impedance change was 10 CFU/mL. We further validated our assay by comparing our microchip results with the standard culture-based methods using eye washes obtained from 13 infected mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. STUDY ON THE DEW POINT TEMPERATURE IN AREAS COVERED BY COLLUVIAL MESOVOID SHALLOW SUBSTRATUM (CRYSTALLINE SCHISTS SCREE IN THE LEAOTA MOUNTAINS, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalin Leonard Dorobăţ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper present and discussed the results of the monitoring of the dew point values, recorded in October and November 2014, in an ecological station in the Leaota Mountains. In this station, two polls were located in areas covered by colluvial mesovoid shallow substratum (MSS formed by epi- and mesometamorphic crystalline schists. In the ecological stations we located in the Leaota Mountains, almost always we found condensation on the walls of the polls tubes placed at different depths. Most often in spring or autumn or in other cold days, the dew point is more revealing regarding the recording actual amount of moisture in the air, than the relative humidity indicator. This work is part of a larger project that seeks correlations between ecological factors (humidity, temperature and dew point registered in various types of screes (limestone and crystalline schists and some zoocenotic components (invertebrates. This research aim to know the importance of mesovoid shallow substratum for invertebrates or small vertebrates fauna and represents a premiere for Leaota Mountains, not only regarding the continuous monitoring of some ecologic factors of these types of ecosystems (MSS, rarely researched even at global level, and also regarding the inventory of the invertebrate fauna in scree for these mountains.

  14. A ground temperature map of the North Atlantic permafrost region based on remote sensing and reanalysis data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westermann, S.; Østby, T. I.; Gisnås, K.

    2015-01-01

    input parameters which for each grid cell allows scanning the range of possible results by running many realizations with different parameters. The approach is applied to the unglacierized land areas in the North Atlantic region, an area of more than 5 million km2 ranging from the Ural Mountains...... in the east to the Canadian Archipelago in the west. A comparison to in situ temperature measurements in 143 boreholes suggests a model accuracy better than 2.5 °C, with 139 considered boreholes within this margin. The statistical approach with a large number of realizations facilitates estimating...

  15. High temperature spin-glass-like transition in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 nanofibers near the Curie point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruie; Yang, Sen; Li, Yitong; Chen, Kaiyun; Jiang, Yun; Fu, Bi; Zhang, Yin; Zhou, Chao; Xu, Minwei; Zhou, Xuan

    2017-06-28

    The glassy transition of superparamagnetic (SPM) (r glass-like (SGL) behavior near the Curie point (T C ), i.e., T 0 = 330 K, in La 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 (LSMO) nanofibers (NFs) composed of nanoparticles beyond the SPM size (r ≫ r 0 ), resulting in a significant increase of the glass transition temperature. This SGL transition near the T C of bulk LSMO can be explained to be the scenario of locally ordered clusters embedded in a disordered host, in which the assembly of nanoparticles has a magnetic core-shell model driven by surface spin glass. The presence of a surface spin glass of nanoparticles was proved by the Almeida-Thouless line δT f ∝ H 2/3 , exchange bias, and reduced saturation magnetization of the NF system. Composite dynamics were found - that is, both the SPM and the super-spin-glass (SSG) behavior are found in such an NF system. The bifurcation of the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetization vs. temperature curves at the ZFC peak, and the flatness of FC magnetization involve SSG, while the frequency-dependent ac susceptibility anomaly follows the Vogel-Fulcher law that implies weak dipole interactions of the SPM model. This finding can help us to find a way to search for high temperature spin glass materials.

  16. Calculation of point defect concentration in Cu2ZnSnS4: Insights into the high-temperature equilibrium and quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyak, V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Scragg, J.; Scarpulla, M. A.; Platzer-Björkman, C.

    2017-07-01

    Herein, we study the native point defect equilibrium in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) by applying a statistical thermodynamic model. The stable chemical-potential space (SCPS) of CZTS at an elevated temperature was estimated directly, on the basis of deviations from stoichiometry calculated for the different combinations of chemical potential of the components. We show that the SCPS is narrow due to high concentration of (" separators="|VCu --ZnC u + ) complex which is dominant over other complexes and isolated defects. The CZTS was found to have p-type conductivity for both stoichiometric and Cu-poor/Zn-rich composition. It is established that the reason for this is that the majority of donor-like ZnC u + antisites are involved in the formation of (" separators="|VCu --ZnC u + ) complex making CuZ n - dominant and providing p-type conductivity even for Cu-poor/Zn-rich composition. However, our calculation reveals that the hole concentration is almost insensitive to the variation of the chemical composition within the composition region of the single-phase CZTS due to nearly constant concentration of dominant charged defects. The calculations for the full equilibrium and quenching indicate that hole concentration is strongly dependent on the annealing temperature and decreases substantially after the drastic cooling. This means that the precise control of annealing temperature and post-annealing cooling rate are critical for tuning the electrical properties of CZTS.

  17. Experimental study on structural, optoelectronic and room temperature sensing performance of Nickel doped ZnO based ethanol sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, M.; Radha, S.; Kirubaveni, S.; Kiruthika, R.; Govindaraj, R.; Santhosh, N.

    2018-04-01

    Nano crystalline undoped (1Z) Zinc Oxide (ZnO) and 5, 10 and 15 Wt. % (1ZN, 2ZN and 3ZN) of Nickel doped ZnO based sensors were fabricated using the hydrothermal approach on Fluorine doped Tin Oxide (FTO) glass substrates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved the hexagonal Wurtzite structure of ZnO. Parametric variations in terms of dislocation density, bond length, lattice parameters and micro strain with respect to dopant concentration were analysed. The prominent variations in the crystallite size, optical band gap and Photoluminescence peak ratio of devices fabricated was observed. The Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) images showed a change in diameter and density of the nanorods. The effect of the operating temperature, concentration of ethanol and the different doping levels of sensitivity, response and recovery time were investigated. It was inferred that 376% of sensitivity with a very quick response and recovery time of <5 s and 10 s respectively at 150 °C of 3ZN sensor has better performance compared to other three sensors. Also 3ZN sensor showed improved sensitivity of 114%, even at room temperature with response and recovery time of 35 s and 45 s respectively.

  18. Modeling of mean radiant temperature based on comparison of airborne remote sensing data with surface measured data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Matzarakis, Andreas; Liu, Jin-King; Lin, Tzu-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of outdoor thermal comfort is becoming increasingly important due to the urban heat island effect, which strongly affects the urban thermal environment. The mean radiant temperature (Tmrt) quantifies the effect of the radiation environment on humans, but it can only be estimated based on influencing parameters and factors. Knowledge of Tmrt is important for quantifying the heat load on human beings, especially during heat waves. This study estimates Tmrt using several methods, which are based on climatic data from a traditional weather station, microscale ground surface measurements, land surface temperature (LST) and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data measured using airborne devices. Analytical results reveal that the best means of estimating Tmrt combines information about LST and surface elevation information with meteorological data from the closest weather station. The application in this method can eliminate the inconvenience of executing a wide range ground surface measurement, the insufficient resolution of satellite data and the incomplete data of current urban built environments. This method can be used to map a whole city to identify hot spots, and can be contributed to understanding human biometeorological conditions quickly and accurately.

  19. Optical temperature sensing of Er3+/Yb3+ doped LaGdO3 based on fluorescence intensity ratio and lifetime thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaï, A.; Haro-González, P.; Horchani Naifer, K.; Férid, M.

    2018-02-01

    The investigation of the fluorescence intensity ratio and the lifetime thermometry techniques for two rare earth perovskites-type oxide (LaGdO3:Er3+ and LaGdO3:Er3+/Yb3+) has been carried out. We have demonstrated that the intensity ratio of thermally coupled levels of erbium (2H11/2 and 4S3/2) is temperature dependant in the range from 283 to 393 K. The sensitivity parameter was found to reach a maximum value of 31 × 10-4 K-1 and 34 × 10-4 K-1 at 393 K and the temperature resolution to be equivalent to 1.61 and 3.1 K, for Er3+ and Er3+/Yb3+ doped oxide, respectively. By studying the temperature dependence of the normalized lifetimes in the range from 293 to 348 K, we proved that the sensitivity of the green emission (4S3/2) is higher than the red one (4F9/2) for both samples, and that it increases from 144 × 10-4 K-1 for LaGdO3:Er3+ to 179 × 10-4 K-1 for LaGdO3:Er3+/Yb3+. The thermal coefficients were quite large in comparison to those calculated for different luminescent materials and reported in literature. The repeatability of measurements was tested by performing heating and cooling cycles for both methods and the results show that these optical techniques have a good repeatability performance. Hence, the LaGdO3: Er3+, Yb3+ oxide has a precise and a satisfying sensitivity associated to a good thermal and chemical stability, suggesting that it can be a potential candidate in temperature sensing.

  20. Novel High Temperature and Radiation Resistant Infrared Glasses and Optical Fibers for Sensing in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballato, John [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2018-01-22

    One binary and three series of ternary non-oxide pure sulfide glasses compositions were investigated with the goal of synthesizing new glasses that exhibit high glass transition (Tg) and crystallization (Tc) temperatures, infrared transparency, and reliable glass formability. The binary glass series consisted of Ges2 and La2S3 and the three glass series in the x(nBaS + mLa2S3) + (1-2x)GeS2 ternary system have BaS:La2S3 modifier ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 with . With these glasses, new insights were realized as to how ionic glasses form and how glass modifiers affect both structure and glass formability. All synthesized compositions were characterized by Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to better understand the fundamental structure, optical, and thermal characteristics of the glasses. After a range of these glasses were synthesized, optimal compositions were formed into glass disks and subjected to gamma irradiation. Glass disks were characterized both before and after irradiation by microscope imaging, measuring the refractive index, density, and UV-VIS-IR transmission spectra. The final total dose the samples were subjected to was ~2.5 MGy. Ternary samples showed a less than 0.4% change in density and refractive index and minimal change in transmission window. The glasses also resisted cracking as seen in microscope images. Overall, many glass compositions were developed that possess operating temperatures above 500 °C, where conventional chalcogenide glasses such as As2S3 and have Tgs from ~200-300 °C, and these glasses have a greater than Tc – Tg values larger than 100 °C and this shows that these glasses have good thermal stability of Tg such that they can be fabricated into optical fibers and as such can be considered candidates for high temperature infrared fiber optics. Initial fiber fabrication efforts showed that selected glasses could be drawn but larger

  1. Nanotechnology - Enabled Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-07

    for public release ; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Ultimately, such sensing systems will become ubiquitous and an integral part of buildings, cars, textiles , and point-of-care medical devices...analytes, or for concentration of vapor or liquid analytes prior to sensing. Porous nanoscale materials could also be used as nanoscale bioreactors

  2. Effect of Synthesis Temperature, Nucleation Time, and Postsynthesis Heat Treatment of ZnO Nanoparticles and Its Sensing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Control in size, crystallinity, and optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs synthesized via coprecipitate method were investigated. A systematic change in particle size, crystallinity, and optical properties was observed by increasing synthesis temperature from 65°C to 75°C. A detailed study also suggested that smaller nucleation time is better to control the size distribution but the crystallinity will be compromised accordingly. Postannealing of ZnO NPs at 400°C also improves the crystal quality. Ultraviolet (UV sensors were successfully synthesized and the results suggested that as-synthesized ZnO NPs can be used as active material for sensor applications.

  3. Closing the Seasonal Ocean Surface Temperature Balance in the Eastern Tropical Oceans from Remote Sensing and Model Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Clayson, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Residual forcing necessary to close the MLTB on seasonal time scales are largest in regions of strongest surface heat flux forcing. Identifying the dominant source of error - surface heat flux error, mixed layer depth estimation, ocean dynamical forcing - remains a challenge in the eastern tropical oceans where ocean processes are very active. Improved sub-surface observations are necessary to better constrain errors. 1. Mixed layer depth evolution is critical to the seasonal evolution of mixed layer temperatures. It determines the inertia of the mixed layer, and scales the sensitivity of the MLTB to errors in surface heat flux and ocean dynamical forcing. This role produces timing impacts for errors in SST prediction. 2. Errors in the MLTB are larger than the historical 10Wm-2 target accuracy. In some regions, a larger accuracy can be tolerated if the goal is to resolve the seasonal SST cycle.

  4. Development of a Remote Sensing Small Satellite for Temperature Sounding in the Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere by Measurement of the Oxygen Atmospheric Band Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiml, Michael; Kaufmann, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Coupling processes initiated by gravity waves in the middle atmosphere have increasing importance for the modeling of the climate system and represent one of the larger uncertainties in this field. To support new modeling efforts spatially resolved measurements of wave fields are very beneficial. This contribution proposes a new small satellite mission based on a three unit CubeSat form factor to observe the Oxygen Atmospheric Band emission around 762 nm for temperature derivation in a limb sounding configuration to characterize gravity waves. The satellite instrument resolves individual rotational lines whose intensities follow a Boltzmann law allowing for the derivation of temperature from the relative structure of these lines. The employed Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer is characterized by its high throughput at a small form factor, allowing to perform scientific remote sensing measurements within a small satellite during day and night. The spectrometer consists of a thermally stabilized solid block and has no moving parts, which increases its reliability in orbit while allowing high precision measurements within a small volume. The instrument is verified in its precursor mission, the Atmospheric Heterodyne Interferometer Test (AtmoHIT), within the REXUS/BEXUS ballistic rocket flight campaign. The description of the flight campaign and the results thereof conclude this contribution.

  5. Dryness Indices Based on Remotely Sensed Vegetation and Land Surface Temperature for Evaluating the Soil Moisture Status in Cropland-Forest-Dominant Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Moon and Minha Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI was derived from the relationship between remotely sensed vegetation indices and land surface temperature (TS in this study for assessing the soil moisture status at regional scale in South Korea. The Leaf Area Index (LAI is newly applied in this method to overcome the increasing uncertainty of using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI at high vegetation conditions. Both dryness indices were found to be well correlated with in situ soil moisture and 8-day average precipitation at most of the in situ measurement sites. The dryness indices accuracy was found to be influenced by rainfall events. An average correlation coefficient was improved from -0.253 to -0.329 when LAI was used instead of NDVI in calculating the TVDI. In the spatial analysis between the dryness indices and Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT surface soil moisture (SSM using geographically weighted regression (GWR, the results showed the average negative correlation (R between the variables, while LAI-induced TVDI was more strongly correlated with SSM on average with the R value improved from -0.59 to -0.62. Both dryness indices and ASCAT SSM mappings generally showed coherent patterns under low vegetation and dry conditions. Based on these results, the LAI-induced TVDI accuracy as an index for soil moisture status was validated and found appropriate for use as an alternative and complementary method for NDVI-induced TVDI.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the radiation error for aerial coiled-fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing deployments using reinforcing fabric as support structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sigmund

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the spatial resolution of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS has been enhanced in various studies by helically coiling the fiber around a support structure. While solid polyvinyl chloride tubes are an appropriate support structure under water, they can produce considerable errors in aerial deployments due to the radiative heating or cooling. We used meshed reinforcing fabric as a novel support structure to measure high-resolution vertical temperature profiles with a height of several meters above a meadow and within and above a small lake. This study aimed at quantifying the radiation error for the coiled DTS system and the contribution caused by the novel support structure via heat conduction. A quantitative and comprehensive energy balance model is proposed and tested, which includes the shortwave radiative, longwave radiative, convective, and conductive heat transfers and allows for modeling fiber temperatures as well as quantifying the radiation error. The sensitivity of the energy balance model to the conduction error caused by the reinforcing fabric is discussed in terms of its albedo, emissivity, and thermal conductivity. Modeled radiation errors amounted to −1.0 and 1.3 K at 2 m height but ranged up to 2.8 K for very high incoming shortwave radiation (1000 J s−1 m−2 and very weak winds (0.1 m s−1. After correcting for the radiation error by means of the presented energy balance, the root mean square error between DTS and reference air temperatures from an aspirated resistance thermometer or an ultrasonic anemometer was 0.42 and 0.26 K above the meadow and the lake, respectively. Conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber cable had a small effect on fiber temperatures (< 0.18 K. Only for locations where the plastic rings that supported the reinforcing fabric touched the fiber-optic cable were significant temperature artifacts of up to 2.5 K observed. Overall, the

  7. Non-Point Source Pollutant Load Variation in Rapid Urbanization Areas by Remote Sensing, Gis and the L-THIA Model: A Case in Bao'an District, Shenzhen, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianhong; Bai, Fengjiao; Han, Peng; Zhang, Yuanyan

    2016-11-01

    Urban sprawl is a major driving force that alters local and regional hydrology and increases non-point source pollution. Using the Bao'an District in Shenzhen, China, a typical rapid urbanization area, as the study area and land-use change maps from 1988 to 2014 that were obtained by remote sensing, the contributions of different land-use types to NPS pollutant production were assessed with a localized long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) model. The results show that the non-point source pollution load changed significantly both in terms of magnitude and spatial distribution. The loads of chemical oxygen demand, total suspended substances, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were affected by the interactions between event mean concentration and the magnitude of changes in land-use acreages and the spatial distribution. From 1988 to 2014, the loads of chemical oxygen demand, suspended substances and total phosphorus showed clearly increasing trends with rates of 132.48 %, 32.52 % and 38.76 %, respectively, while the load of total nitrogen decreased by 71.52 %. The immigrant population ratio was selected as an indicator to represent the level of rapid urbanization and industrialization in the study area, and a comparison analysis of the indicator with the four non-point source loads demonstrated that the chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads are linearly related to the immigrant population ratio. The results provide useful information for environmental improvement and city management in the study area.

  8. Determining the impact of urban components on land surface temperature of Istanbul by using remote sensing indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektaş Balçik, Filiz

    2014-02-01

    For the past 60 years, Istanbul has been experiencing an accelerated urban expansion. This urban expansion is leading to the replacement of natural surfaces by various artificial materials. This situation has a critical impact on the environment due to the alteration of heat energy balance. In this study, the effect upon the urban heat island (UHI) of Istanbul was analyzed using 2009 dated Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data. An Index Based Built-up Index (IBI) was used to derive artificial surfaces in the study area. To produce the IBI index, Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index, Normalized Difference Built-up Index, and Modified Normalized Difference Water Index were calculated. Land surface temperature (LST) distribution was derived from Landsat 5 TM images using a mono-window algorithm. In addition, 24 transects were selected, and different regression models were applied to explore the correlation between LST and IBI index. The results show that artificial surfaces have a positive exponential relationship with LST rather than a simple linear one. An ecological evaluation index of the region was calculated to explore the impact of both the vegetated land and the artificial surfaces on the UHI. Therefore, the quantitative relationship of urban components (artificial surfaces, vegetation, and water) and LST was examined using multivariate statistical analysis, and the correlation coefficient was obtained as 0.829. This suggested that the areas with a high rate of urbanization will accelerate the rise of LST and UHI in Istanbul.

  9. Resolving key drivers of variability through an important circulation choke point in the western Mediterranean Sea; using gliders, models & satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Emma; Aguiar, Eva; Mourre, Baptiste; Juza, Mélanie; Escudier, Romain; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2017-04-01

    The Ibiza Channel plays an important role in the circulation of the Western Mediterranean Sea, it governs the north/south exchange of different water masses that are known to affect regional ecosystems and is influenced by variability in the different drivers that affect sub-basins to the north (N) and south (S). A complex system. In this study we use a multi-platform approach to resolve the key drivers of this variability, and gain insight into the inter-connection between the N and S of the Western Mediterranean Sea through this choke point. The 6-year glider time series from the quasi-continuous glider endurance line monitoring of the Ibiza Channel, undertaken by SOCIB (Balearic Coastal Ocean observing and Forecasting System), is used as the base from which to identify key sub-seasonal to inter-annual patterns and shifts in water mass properties and transport volumes. The glider data indicates the following key components in the variability of the N/S flow of different water mass through the channel; regional winter mode water production, change in intermediate water mass properties, northward flows of a fresher water mass and the basin-scale circulation. To resolve the drivers of these components of variability, the strength of combining datasets from different sources, glider, modeling, altimetry and moorings, is harnessed. To the north atmospheric forcing in the Gulf of Lions is a dominant driver, while to the south the mesoscale circulation patterns of the Atlantic Jet and Alboran gyres dominate the variability but do not appear to influence the fresher inflows. Evidence of a connection between the northern and southern sub-basins is however indicated. The study highlights importance of sub-seasonal variability and the scale of rapid change possible in the Mediterranean, as well as the benefits of leveraging high resolution glider datasets within a multi-platform and modelling study.

  10. On laboratory simulation and the effect of small temperature oscillations about the freezing point and ice formation on the evaporation rate of water on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Shauntae R; Sears, Derek W G

    2006-08-01

    We report measurements of the evaporation rate of water under Mars-like conditions (CO2 atmosphere at 7 mbar and approximately 0 degrees C) in which small temperature oscillations about the freezing point repeatedly formed and removed a thin layer of ice. We found that the average evaporation at 2.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C without an ice layer (corrected for the difference in gravity on Earth and on Mars) was 1.24 +/- 0.12 mm/h, while at -2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C with an ice layer the average evaporation rate was 0.84 +/- 0.08 mm/h. These values are in good agreement with those calculated for the evaporation of liquid water and ice when it is assumed that evaporation only depends on diffusion and buoyancy. Our findings suggest that such differences in evaporation rates are entirely due to the temperature difference and that the ice layer has little effect on evaporation rate. We infer that the formation of thin layers of ice on pools of water on Mars does not significantly increase the stability of water on the surface of Mars.

  11. Lake Chad Total Surface Water Area as Derived from Land Surface Temperature and Radar Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Policelli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lake Chad, located in the middle of the African Sahel belt, underwent dramatic decreases in the 1970s and 1980s leaving less than ten percent of its 1960s surface water extent as open water. In this paper, we present an extended record (dry seasons 1988–2016 of the total surface water area of the lake (including both open water and flooded vegetation derived using Land Surface Temperature (LST data (dry seasons 2000–2016 from the NASA Terra MODIS sensor and EUMETSAT Meteosat-based LST measurements (dry seasons 1988–2001 from an earlier study. We also examine the total surface water area for Lake Chad using radar data (dry seasons 2015–2016 from the ESA Sentinel-1a mission. For the limited number of radar data sets available to us (18 data sets, we find on average a close match between the estimates from these data and the corresponding estimates from LST, though we find spatial differences in the estimates using the two types of data. We use these spatial differences to adjust the record (dry seasons 2000–2016 from MODIS LST. Then we use the adjusted record to remove the bias of the existing LST record (dry seasons 1988–2001 derived from Meteosat measurements and combine the two records. From this composite, extended record, we plot the total surface water area of the lake for the dry seasons of 1988–1989 through 2016–2017. We find for the dry seasons of 1988–1989 to 2016–2017 that the maximum total surface water area of the lake was approximately 16,800 sq. km (February and May, 2000, the minimum total surface water area of the lake was approximately 6400 sq. km (November, 1990, and the average was approximately 12,700 sq. km. Further, we find the total surface water area of the lake to be highly variable during this period, with an average rate of increase of approximately 143 km2 per year.

  12. The potential for adaptation in a natural Daphnia magna population: broad and narrow-sense heritability of net reproductive rate under Cd stress at two temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiaen, M; Janssen, C R; Thas, O; De Schamphelaere, K A C

    2012-10-01

    The existence of genetic variability is a key element of the adaptive potential of a natural population to stress. In this study we estimated the additive and non-additive components of the genetic variability of net reproductive rate (R(0)) in a natural Daphnia magna population exposed to Cd stress at two different temperatures. To this end, life-table experiments were conducted with 20 parental and 39 offspring clonal lineages following a 2 × 2 design with Cd concentration (control vs. 3.7 μg Cd/L) and temperature (20 vs. 24 °C) as factors. Offspring lineages were obtained through inter-clonal crossing of the different parental lineages. The population mean, additive and non-additive genetic components of variation in each treatment were estimated by fitting an Animal Model to the observed R(0) values using restricted maximum likelihood estimation. From those estimates broad-sense heritabilities (H(2)), narrow-sense heritabilities (h(2)), total (CV(G)) and additive genetic coefficients of variation (CV(A)) of R(0) were calculated. The exposure to Cd imposed a considerable level of stress to the population, as shown by the fact that the population mean of R(0) exposed to Cd was significantly lower than in the control at the corresponding temperature, i.e. by 23 % at 20 °C and by 88 % at 24 °C. The latter difference indicates that increasing temperature increased the stress level imposed by Cd. The H² and CV(G) were significantly greater than 0 in all treatments, suggesting that there is a considerable degree of genetic determination of R(0) in this population and that clonal selection could rapidly lead to increasing population mean fitness under all investigated conditions. More specifically, the H² was 0.392 at 20 °C+Cd and 0.563 at 24 °C+Cd; the CV(G) was 30.0 % at 20 °C+Cd and was significantly higher (147.6 %) in the 24 °C+Cd treatment. Significant values of h(2) (= 0.23) and CV(A) (= 89.7 %) were only found in the 24 °C+Cd treatment, suggesting

  13. Luminescent sensing and imaging of oxygen: fierce competition to the Clark electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2015-08-01

    Luminescence-based sensing schemes for oxygen have experienced a fast growth and are in the process of replacing the Clark electrode in many fields. Unlike electrodes, sensing is not limited to point measurements via fiber optic microsensors, but includes additional features such as planar sensing, imaging, and intracellular assays using nanosized sensor particles. In this essay, I review and discuss the essentials of (i) common solid-state sensor approaches based on the use of luminescent indicator dyes and host polymers; (ii) fiber optic and planar sensing schemes; (iii) nanoparticle-based intracellular sensing; and (iv) common spectroscopies. Optical sensors are also capable of multiple simultaneous sensing (such as O2 and temperature). Sensors for O2 are produced nowadays in large quantities in industry. Fields of application include sensing of O2 in plant and animal physiology, in clinical chemistry, in marine sciences, in the chemical industry and in process biotechnology. © 2015 The Author. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Fluorescence of tautomeric forms of curcumin in different pH and biosurfactant rhamnolipids systems: Application towards on-off ratiometric fluorescence temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Zeinab; Chebl, Mazhar; Patra, Digambara

    2017-08-01

    Medicinal properties of curcumin are widely getting realized. For its applicability as a hydrophobic drug molecule and food spice interaction of curcumin with rhamnolipids, a biosurfactant, bears importance. Here we have explored interaction of curcumin with rhamnolipids biosurfactant and its aggregation behavior. The impact of pH on critical micelle concentration (cmc) of rhamnolipids has been studied using fluorescence of curcumin and found that cmc of rhamnolipids increases with increase in pH of the medium. In acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline medium (pH8), at λ ex =355nm (for β-diketone form) curcumin undergoes excited state hydrogen transfer (ESHT) and emits solely from enol form both in the presence and absence of rhamnolipids, but first time we report that in extreme alkaline condition, at pH13, at λ ex =355nm curcumin emits from both β-diketone as well as enolic ESHT forms in absence of rhamnolipids but in the presence of rhamnolipids β-diketone is stabilized and the emission solely comes from β-diketone by completely revoking ESHT process. Fluorescence quenching by hydrophobic cetylpyridinium bromide confirms curcumin penetrates deep inside the hydrophobic pocket of rhamnolipid aggregates/micelle by reducing the distance between N + -atom of pyridinium ion and curcumin. On the other hand hydrophobic molecule like pyrene stays near to the Stern layer of rhamnolipids facilitating electron transfer from pyrene to N + -atom of pyridinium ion. Even in neutral condition, in the presence of rhamnolipids the β-diketone form, though in small proportions, can be stabilized in higher temperature in expense of enolic ESHT form, thus, offering an on off ratiometric fluorescence temperature sensing in solution, which bears significance as ratiometric probe molecules. Interaction of curcumin with rhamnolipids stabilizes curcumin in acidic, neutral and moderate alkaline condition but fails at extreme pH13. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Solid state synthesis of tin-doped ZnO at room temperature: Characterization and its enhanced gas sensing and photocatalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Xiaohua; Fan, Huiqing; Afzaal, Mohammad; Wu, Xiangyang; O'Brien, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A room temperature solid-state reaction was used to prepare crystalline tin-doped ZnO. → The obtained products were well-dispersed, which is attributed to the difference in sizes between Zn and Sn atoms and the change of pH value. → Gas response of sample S4 to ethanol vapor can reach 124. The same sample exhibit photocatalysis characteristics to methyl orange (MO) solution. - Abstract: A room temperature solid-state reaction has been used to prepare crystalline tin-doped ZnO. Zinc nitrate hexahydrate, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, stannic chloride pentahydrate and sodium hydroxide with proper ratios were ground together. As-synthesized samples were characterized by inductively coupled plasma analysis (ICP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD); The products were of different morphologies, well dispersed and exhibited good crystallinity, it is also found that the growth direction and morphology of ZnO depend on the amount of Sn doped, which is mainly caused by the difference in sizes between Zn and Sn atoms as well as the change of pH value. Moreover, gas sensing and photocatalytic properties of the obtained products were studied. The materials showed a high gas response to ethanol vapor, and the gas response can reach a maximum of R a /R g = 124. In addition, tin-doped ZnO materials exhibited improved photocatalytic performance toward methyl orange (MO) solution under a current density of 0.03 mg L -1 comparison with undoped ZnO.

  16. Enhancing Extreme Heat Health-Related Intervention and Preparedness Activities Using Remote Sensing Analysis of Daily Surface Temperature, Surface Observation Networks and Ecmwf Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R. L.; Booth, J.; Hondula, D.; Ross, K. W.; Stuyvesant, A.; Alm, G.; Baghel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme heat causes more human fatalities in the United States than any other natural disaster, elevating the concern of heat-related mortality. Maricopa County Arizona is known for its high heat index and its sprawling metropolitan complex which makes this region a perfect candidate for human health research. Individuals at higher risk are unequally spatially distributed, leaving the poor, homeless, non-native English speakers, elderly, and the socially isolated vulnerable to heat events. The Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona State University and NASA DEVELOP LaRC are working to establish a more effective method of placing hydration and cooling centers in addition to enhancing the heat warning system to aid those with the highest exposure. Using NASA's Earth Observation Systems from Aqua and Terra satellites, the daily spatial variability within the UHI was quantified over the summer heat seasons from 2005 - 2014, effectively establishing a remotely sensed surface temperature climatology for the county. A series of One-way Analysis of Variance revealed significant differences between daily surface temperature averages of the top 30% of census tracts within the study period. Furthermore, synoptic upper tropospheric circulation patterns were classified to relate surface weather types and heat index. The surface weather observation networks were also reviewed for analyzing the veracity of the other methods. The results provide detailed information regarding nuances within the UHI effect and will allow pertinent recommendations regarding the health department's adaptive capacity. They also hold essential components for future policy decision-making regarding appropriate locations for cooling centers and efficient warning systems.

  17. Modelling an induced thermal plume with data from electrical resistivity tomography and distributed temperature sensing: a case study in northeast Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Matteo; Boaga, Jacopo; Di Sipio, Eloisa; Dalla Santa, Giorgia; De Seta, Massimiliano; Galgaro, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater tracer tests are often used to improve aquifer characterization, but they present several disadvantages, such as the need to pour solutions or dyes into the aquifer system and alteration of the water's chemical properties. Thus, tracers can affect the groundwater flow mechanics and data interpretation becomes more complex, hindering effective study of ground heat pumps for low enthalpy geothermal systems. This paper presents a preliminary methodology based on a multidisciplinary application of heat as a tracer for defining the main parameters of shallow aquifers. The field monitoring techniques electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) are noninvasive and were applied to a shallow-aquifer test site in northeast Italy. The combination of these measurement techniques supports the definition of the main aquifer parameters and therefore the construction of a reliable conceptual model, which is then described through the numerical code FEFLOW. This model is calibrated with DTS and validated by ERT outcomes. The reliability of the numerical model in terms of fate and transport is thereby enhanced, leading to the potential for better environmental management and protection of groundwater resources through more cost-effective solutions.

  18. Modelling an induced thermal plume with data from electrical resistivity tomography and distributed temperature sensing: a case study in northeast Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Matteo; Boaga, Jacopo; Di Sipio, Eloisa; Dalla Santa, Giorgia; De Seta, Massimiliano; Galgaro, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Groundwater tracer tests are often used to improve aquifer characterization, but they present several disadvantages, such as the need to pour solutions or dyes into the aquifer system and alteration of the water's chemical properties. Thus, tracers can affect the groundwater flow mechanics and data interpretation becomes more complex, hindering effective study of ground heat pumps for low enthalpy geothermal systems. This paper presents a preliminary methodology based on a multidisciplinary application of heat as a tracer for defining the main parameters of shallow aquifers. The field monitoring techniques electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) are noninvasive and were applied to a shallow-aquifer test site in northeast Italy. The combination of these measurement techniques supports the definition of the main aquifer parameters and therefore the construction of a reliable conceptual model, which is then described through the numerical code FEFLOW. This model is calibrated with DTS and validated by ERT outcomes. The reliability of the numerical model in terms of fate and transport is thereby enhanced, leading to the potential for better environmental management and protection of groundwater resources through more cost-effective solutions.

  19. First-principles study on oxidation effects in uranium oxides and high-pressure high-temperature behavior of point defects in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gen