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Sample records for players coaches parents

  1. Female soccer knee injury: observed knowledge gaps in injury prevention among players/parents/coaches and current evidence (the KNOW study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, B; Brown, C; Hemsing, J; McCormick, T; Pound, S; Otto, D; Emery, C A; Beaupre, L A

    2013-06-01

    This study sought to determine if knowledge regarding the risk for knee injuries and the potential for their prevention is being translated to female adolescent soccer players (13-18 years), their parents, and coaches. Eligible participants in the 2007 indoor soccer season were surveyed to determine their knowledge of the risk for and the potential to prevent knee injuries, and their knowledge of effective prevention strategies, if they felt that injury prevention was possible. Team selection was stratified to be representative of both competitive and recreational level play and age group distributions within the selected soccer association. Of the study subjects, 773/1396 (55.4%) responded to the survey: 408 (53%) players, 292 (38%) parents, and 73 (9%) coaches. Most respondents (538 [71%]) were aware of the risk for knee injury. Coaches and parents were more likely than players to view knee injuries as preventable; however, appropriate prevention strategies were often not identified. Four hundred eighty-four (63.8%) respondents reported that they had never received information on knee injuries. Substantial knowledge gaps regarding knee injury prevention and effective preventative strategies were identified. Given the predominance of knee injuries in female adolescent soccer players, there is an urgent need for knowledge translation of prevention strategies to decrease both incidence and long-term consequences of knee injuries. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Content Validity and Psychometric Properties of the Nomination Scale for Identifying Football Talent (NSIFT: Application to Coaches, Parents and Players

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    Alejandro Prieto-Ayuso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of football talent is a critical issue both for clubs and the families of players. However, despite its importance in a sporting, economic and social sense, there appears to be a lack of instruments that can reliably measure talent performance. The aim of this study was to design and validate the Nomination Scale for Identifying Football Talent (NSIFT, with the aim of optimising the processes for identifying said talent. The scale was first validated through expert judgment, and then statistically, by means of an exploratory factor analysis (EFA, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, internal reliability and convergent validity. The results reveal the presence of three factors in the scale’s factor matrix, with these results being confirmed by the CFA. The scale revealed suitable internal reliability and homogeneity indices. Convergent validity showed that it is teammates who are best able to identify football talent, followed by coaches and parents. It can be concluded that the NSIFT is suitable for use in the football world. Future studies should seek to confirm these results in different contexts by means of further CFAs.

  3. High School Rugby Players' Perception of Coaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broodryk, Retief; van den Berg, Pieter Hendrick

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were firstly to determine the players' perceptions of their respective coaches' coaching effectiveness and secondly, determine the difference between big and small schools of the players' perceptions of their respective coaches' coaching effectiveness. Four hundred and seventy six players from 22 schools were asked to fill…

  4. Understanding the Mismatch Between Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Exertion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Michel S.; Kersten, Anna W.; Frencken, Wouter G. P.

    2017-01-01

    A mismatch between the training exertion intended by a coach and the exertion perceived by players is well established in sports. However, it is unknown whether coaches can accurately observe exertion of individual players during training. Furthermore, the discrepancy in coaches' and players' percep

  5. Understanding the Mismatch Between Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Exertion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Michel S; Kersten, Anna W; Frencken, Wouter G

    2016-01-01

    A mismatch between the intended training exertion by the coach and the perceived exertion by players is well established in sports. However, it is unknown if coaches are able to accurately observe exertion of individual players during training. Furthermore, the discrepancy in coaches' and players' p

  6. Coach/player relationships in tennis.

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    Prapavessis, H; Gordon, S

    1991-09-01

    The present study examined the variables that predict coach/athlete compatibility. Compatibility among a sample of 52 elite tennis coach/player dyads was assessed using a sport adapted version of Schutz's (1966) Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behaviour (FIRO-B), a sport adapted version of Fiedler's (1967) Least Preferred Co-worker scale (LPC), and Chelladurai and Saleh's (1980) Leadership Scale for Sport (LSS). Self-ratings of the quality of the interaction were obtained from both coach and athlete. Multiple-regression analyses using self-rating scores as the dependent measure were carried out to determine which variables best predicted the degree of compatibility. The sole inventory that significantly predicted compatibility was the LSS. More specifically, the discrepancy between the athlete's preferences and perceptions on the autocratic dimension was the best predictor. Implications for tennis coaches and recommendations for future research in this area are discussed.

  7. Verbal aggressiveness and state anxiety of volleyball players and coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiari, Alexandra; Patsiaouras, Asterios; Kokaridas, Dimitrios; Sakellariou, Kimon

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation of verbal aggressiveness and state anxiety (somatic, cognitive, and self-confidence) in sports settings based on the ratings by volleyball coaches and their athletes. The sample consisted of volleyball athletes (n=208; 98 men and 110 women) and their coaches (n=20; 16 men and 4 women). Analysis showed that male volleyball players rated somatic anxiety higher and were more affected by the verbal aggressiveness of their coaches than female volleyball players. No mean differences were significant for male and female coaches on somatic or cognitive anxiety, self-confidence, or verbal aggressiveness. Also, correlation between subscale scores for male and female volleyball players and coaches was found. The correlations of verbal aggressiveness with self-confidence and anxiety were positive for these athletes, leading them to better behavior. This relationship needs further examination in sport settings.

  8. Understanding the Mismatch Between Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Michel S; Kersten, Anna W; Frencken, Wouter G P

    2017-04-01

    A mismatch between the training exertion intended by a coach and the exertion perceived by players is well established in sports. However, it is unknown whether coaches can accurately observe exertion of individual players during training. Furthermore, the discrepancy in coaches' and players' perceptions has not been explained. To determine the relation between intended and observed training exertion by the coach and perceived training exertion by the players and establish whether on-field training characteristics, intermittent endurance capacity, and maturity status explain the mismatch. During 2 mesocycles of 4 wk (in November and March), rating of intended exertion (RIE), rating of observed exertion (ROE), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored in 31 elite young soccer players. External and internal training loads were objectively quantified with accelerometers (PlayerLoad) and heart-rate monitors (TRIMPmod). Results of an interval shuttle-run test (ISRT) and age at peak height velocity (APHV) were determined for all players. RIE, ROE, and RPE were monitored in 977 training sessions. The correlations between RIE and RPE (r = .58; P players will do and what they actually did on the field. When doing this, they consider the intermittent endurance capacity of individual players.

  9. How the Iranian Football Coaches and Players Know About Doping?

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    Seif Barghi, Tohid; Halabchi, Farzin; Dvorak, Jiri; Hosseinnejad, Heydar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, doping is an intricate dilemma. Football is the nationally popular sport in Iran. On the other hand, doping is a serious health hazard sport faces today. Studies dealing with athletes’ knowledge, attitudes and behavior concerning doping in football are scarce. Objectives: Therefore, we aimed to investigate the knowledge and attitudes toward doping among the football coaches and players. Patients and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 375 participants (239 football players and 136 coaches) were studied. A specially made questionnaire was applied. In this study, football teams of different provinces of the country were selected by randomized clustered sampling and questionnaires were distributed among coaches and players. Results: Knowledge of football coaches and players in three categories of doping definitions, recognition of prohibited drugs and side effects of anabolic steroids was poor or moderate in 45.3%, 88.5% and 96.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Football players and coaches have poor knowledge about doping in Iran. Moreover, they believe in some inappropriate myths without any scientific or rational basis.It seems necessary to design a comprehensive educational program for all of the athletes and coaches in Iran. PMID:26448840

  10. "Badminton Player-Coach" Interactions between Failing Students

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    Mascret, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical education teachers often use the player-coach dyad in individual opposition sports so that students can obtain information on their actions and then better regulate them. This type of work also develops methodological and social skills. However, the task of observing a partner often poses problems for failing students, who…

  11. Coaching with Parents in Early Intervention: An Interdisciplinary Research Synthesis

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    Kemp, Peggy; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to synthesize intervention studies using coaching with parents in early intervention with a focus on (a) definitions and descriptions of coaching with parents; (b) characteristics of families and coaches; (c) parameters such as settings, contexts, dosage, and professional development related to coaching; and (d)…

  12. The parent-coach/child-athlete relationship in youth sport: cordial, contentious, or conundrum?

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    Weiss, Maureen R; Fretwell, Susan D

    2005-09-01

    The roles of coach and parent are often synonymous in youth sport, but little data-based research has been conducted on the parent-coach/child-athlete relationship. Six boys in U-12 competitive soccer were interviewed regarding positive and negative aspects about playing for their father-coach. Similar questions were posed to father-coaches and two teammates. Inductive content analysis indicated that, among the benefits, sons identified perks, praise, technical instruction, understanding of ability level, insider information, involvement in decision making, special attention, quality time, and motivation. Costs of being coached by one's father included negative emotional responses, pressure/expectations, conflict, lack of understanding/empathy, criticism for mistakes, and unfair behavior. For father-coaches, positive themes included taking pride in son's achievements, reason for coaching, positive social interactions, opportunity to teach skills and values, enjoying coaching son, and quality time. Negatives included inability to separate parent-child from coach-player role, placing greater expectations and pressure on son, and showing differential attention toward son. While teammates perceived some favoritism by the parent-coach, they cited mostly positive instructional experiences. Results are discussed within motivational theories that highlight the influence of significant adults on children's psychosocial development in the physical domain.

  13. A Study on In-Match Rugby Coaches' Communications with Players: A Holistic Approach

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    Mouchet, Alain; Harvey, Stephen; Light, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background: While there is significant interest in coach behaviour during training sessions and recognition of what it could add to existing knowledge on coaching, in-game coach behaviour has received little attention. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify coaches' in-competition communications with rugby players, through a series of…

  14. High School Football Players and Their Coaches: A Qualitative Study of Their Relationships

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    Skaza, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    This basic qualitative study of high school football coach-player relationships explores the players' perceptions of these relationships, specifically the perceptions the players have of how these relationships influenced their lives. This study allowed the researcher to examine the characteristics of high school football coaches as they relate to…

  15. High School Football Players and Their Coaches: A Qualitative Study of Their Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaza, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    This basic qualitative study of high school football coach-player relationships explores the players' perceptions of these relationships, specifically the perceptions the players have of how these relationships influenced their lives. This study allowed the researcher to examine the characteristics of high school football coaches as they relate to…

  16. [Motivational climate and coaches' communication style predict young soccer players' commitment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Miquel; Sousa, Catarina; Viladrich, Carme; Villamarín, Francisco; Cruz, Jaume

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the role of coaches' communication style and coach-created motivational climate in young soccer players' enjoyment and commitment. Four hundred and fifteen young soccer players of high competitive level in the age range from 14 to 16 completed the following questionnaires: a) coach-induced perceived motivational climate (PMCSQ-2), b) coaches' behaviour perception (CBAS-PBS), and c) sport commitment (SCQ). Results showed that coach-created motivational climate correlated highly with the perception of coaches' communication style. Moreover, coach-created motivational climate and communication style significantly determines players' sport commitment and enjoyment. Discussion focuses on the importance of seeking and training credible coaches that favours athletes' commitment.

  17. Correspondence between training load executed by volleyball players and the one observed by coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose A; Medina, Javier; García-López, Juan; García-Tormo, José V; Foster, Carl

    2014-06-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the training load (TL) executed by volleyball players with that observed by coaches. Second, we analyzed the influence of the coaches' experience in the estimated TL. Twelve female volleyball players and 4 male coaches participated in this study. During a period of 15 weeks, physical (PT) and technical-tactical training sessions and matches were monitored. In each session, the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) was recorded to analyze the players' exercise intensity and TL(RP)E. Coaches were present in all sessions and rated their estimate of sRPE at the same time as the players to calculate the coaches' TL(RPE). Both players' and coaches' mean sRPE (4.0 ± 1.1, 3.7 ± 1.1, and 3.8 ± 1.0 in players and expert and beginning coaches, respectively) and TLRPE (380.1 ± 106.8, 358.3 ± 110.5, and 359.7 ± 108.0 in players and expert and beginning coaches, respectively) were similar. However, a higher (p volleyball.

  18. Individual, team, and coach predictors of players' likelihood to aggress in youth soccer.

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    Chow, Graig M; Murray, Kristen E; Feltz, Deborah L

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine personal and socioenvironmental factors of players' likelihood to aggress. Participants were youth soccer players (N = 258) and their coaches (N = 23) from high school and club teams. Players completed the Judgments About Moral Behavior in Youth Sports Questionnaire (JAMBYSQ; Stephens, Bredemeier, & Shields, 1997), which assessed athletes' stage of moral development, team norm for aggression, and self-described likelihood to aggress against an opponent. Coaches were administered the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES; Feltz, Chase, Moritz, & Sullivan, 1999). Using multilevel modeling, results demonstrated that the team norm for aggression at the athlete and team level were significant predictors of athletes' self likelihood to aggress scores. Further, coaches' game strategy efficacy emerged as a positive predictor of their players' self-described likelihood to aggress. The findings contribute to previous research examining the socioenvironmental predictors of athletic aggression in youth sport by demonstrating the importance of coaching efficacy beliefs.

  19. Leadership Preferences of Adolescent Players in Sport: Influence of Coach Gender.

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    Cruz, Angelita B; Kim, Hyun-Duck

    2017-06-01

    The authors investigated the coaching behavior preferences and the relationships of these preferences with variables such as gender, type of sport, playing experience, competitive level, and coach gender among young athletes in the national badminton league. Participants were 167 elementary and high school badminton players (91 girls and 76 boys; age range = 9-18 years; M = 13.5 (SD = 2.22) years) competing in the badminton event of a national league. Players' preferences for coaching behavior were measured using athlete preference version of the LSS to evaluate the five dimensions of leadership behavior in a sporting context. Notably, young athletes strongly preferred training and instruction, followed by positive feedback, democratic behavior, social support, and autocratic behavior. An interaction effect of athlete and coach gender on the leadership dimensions of democratic behavior, autocratic behavior, and social support was found. Male athletes with female coaches preferred more democratic behavior, autocratic behavior, and social support behavior than did those with male coaches. Conversely, female players with male coaches favored more democratic behavior, autocratic behavior, and social support than did those with female coaches. This study provides valuable insight into understanding the dynamics of sport leadership environments among young athletes, and how crucial is the role of coach's gender in the athlete-coach dyad interaction.

  20. Leadership power perceptions of soccer coaches and soccer players according to their education.

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    Konter, Erkut

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the leadership power perceptions of soccer coaches and soccer players according to their educational levels. Data were collected from 165 male soccer coaches and 870 male soccer players. Adapted versions of the "Power in Soccer Questionnaire-Other", the "Power in Soccer Questionnaire-Self" and an "information form" were used for data collection, and collected data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney Tests. Analysis of the Power in Soccer Questionnaire-Other revealed significant differences between soccer players' level of education and their perception of Coercive Power (pPower, Legitimate Power and Expert Power. Analysis of the Power in Soccer Questionnaire-Self also revealed the only significant difference between coaches' level of education and their perception of Legitimate Power (ppowers between coaches and players might create communication and performance problems in soccer.

  1. Leadership Preferences of Adolescent Players in Sport: Influence of Coach Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Angelita B. Cruz, Hyun-Duck Kim

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigated the coaching behavior preferences and the relationships of these preferences with variables such as gender, type of sport, playing experience, competitive level, and coach gender among young athletes in the national badminton league. Participants were 167 elementary and high school badminton players (91 girls and 76 boys; age range = 9–18 years; M = 13.5 (SD = 2.22) years) competing in the badminton event of a national league. Players’ preferences for coaching behavio...

  2. Are They Listening? Parental Social Coaching and Parenting Emotional Climate Predict Adolescent Receptivity.

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    Gregson, Kim D; Erath, Stephen A; Pettit, Gregory S; Tu, Kelly M

    2016-12-01

    Associations linking parenting emotional climate and quality of parental social coaching with young adolescents' receptivity to parental social coaching were examined (N = 80). Parenting emotional climate was assessed with adolescent-reported parental warmth and hostility. Quality of parental social coaching (i.e., prosocial advice, benign framing) was assessed via parent-report and behavioral observations during a parent-adolescent discussion about negative peer evaluation. An adolescent receptivity latent variable score was derived from observations of adolescents' behavior during the discussion, change in adolescents' peer response plan following the discussion, and adolescent-reported tendency to seek social advice from the parent. Parenting climate moderated associations between coaching and receptivity: Higher quality coaching was associated with greater receptivity in the context of a more positive climate. Analyses suggested a stronger association between coaching and receptivity among younger compared to older adolescents. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2015 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  3. Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Training Dose : Not a Perfect Match

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Michel S.; Frencken, Wouter G. P.; Jordet, Geir; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate and compare coaches' and players' perceptions of training dose for a full competitive season. Methods: Session rating of perceived exertion (RPE), duration, and training load (session RPE x duration) of 33 professional soccer players (height 178.2 +/-

  4. Leadership Preferences of Adolescent Players in Sport: Influence of Coach Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelita B. Cruz, Hyun-Duck Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigated the coaching behavior preferences and the relationships of these preferences with variables such as gender, type of sport, playing experience, competitive level, and coach gender among young athletes in the national badminton league. Participants were 167 elementary and high school badminton players (91 girls and 76 boys; age range = 9–18 years; M = 13.5 (SD = 2.22 years competing in the badminton event of a national league. Players’ preferences for coaching behavior were measured using athlete preference version of the LSS to evaluate the five dimensions of leadership behavior in a sporting context. Notably, young athletes strongly preferred training and instruction, followed by positive feedback, democratic behavior, social support, and autocratic behavior. An interaction effect of athlete and coach gender on the leadership dimensions of democratic behavior, autocratic behavior, and social support was found. Male athletes with female coaches preferred more democratic behavior, autocratic behavior, and social support behavior than did those with male coaches. Conversely, female players with male coaches favored more democratic behavior, autocratic behavior, and social support than did those with female coaches. This study provides valuable insight into understanding the dynamics of sport leadership environments among young athletes, and how crucial is the role of coach’s gender in the athlete–coach dyad interaction.

  5. The Relationship Between Perceived Coaching Behaviors, Collective Efficacy and Goal Orientation among fencer players in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Turhan TOROS,; Ahmet DUVAN

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the perceived coaching behaviors, the goal orientation, the the relationship of the collective efficacy among fencer players in Turkey.In this research, the fencer players who played in the fencing teams in 2009-2010 league season and moreover, the ones who took parts in the teams participated into the Turkish National Championship were included. 141 fencer players who participated into the Turkish National Championship were included. In collecting the data, Leaders...

  6. Coaching Parents to Change: The Impact of In Vivo Feedback on Parents' Acquisition of Skills

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    Shanley, Jenelle R.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral parent training (BPT) includes a variety of evidence-based treatments with diverse techniques to alter parent behavior. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy is an innovative BPT with its use of in vivo feedback (i.e., "coaching") during parent-child interactions. An experimental design was used to assess whether coaching without…

  7. Leadership Preferences of Adolescent Players in Sport: Influence of Coach Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Angelita B.; Kim, Hyun-Duck

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigated the coaching behavior preferences and the relationships of these preferences with variables such as gender, type of sport, playing experience, competitive level, and coach gender among young athletes in the national badminton league. Participants were 167 elementary and high school badminton players (91 girls and 76 boys; age range = 9���18 years; M = 13.5 (SD = 2.22) years) competing in the badminton event of a national league. Players��� preferences for coaching beh...

  8. The Relationship between leadership styles of coaches with motivational climate of Iranian Elite Male Volleyball Players

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    Younis Mohammadzade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between leadership styles of coaches with motivational climate of Iranian elite male Volleyball players. It was survey research and field study. Statistical population was all players in men's volleyball league in Iran. According to the Morgan sampling table, 150 samples were investigated. To collect information, we applied motivational climate Questionnaire (PMCSQ and leadership styles in sports (LSS.The data analysis methods were descriptive statistics, and multivariate regression was used to investigate the relationship between variables. Results showed that there was a significant relationship between the leadership styles of coaches and motivational climate (p<0.05 There was a significant relationship between the authoritative style of leadership styles with positive feedback and motivational climate. Overall, a leadership style of coaches is most important predictive factor of the motivational climate.

  9. Srovnání hodnocení chování rodičů a trenérů u tenistů a tenistek různých věkových skupin Comparison of assessments of parents' and coaches' behaviour by male and female tennis players of different ages

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    Tjaša Filipčič

    2006-02-01

    , minimum, maximum, skewedness, kurtosis and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for normality. The analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to compare the assessments of behaviour of a player's father, mother and coach by gender and then between the three age categories (U12, U14, U16. A comparison between the assessments of the father's, mother's and coach's behaviour in terms of gender only revealed statistically significant differences in the assessments of the father. When assessments of both parents' and the coach's behaviour were compared in terms of age category, statistically significant differences were again established only in the assessments of the father.

  10. Family Makeover: Coaching, Confession and Parental Responsibilisation

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    Dahlstedt, Magnus; Fejes, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Today, there is a widespread idea that parents need to learn how to carry out their roles as parents. Practices of parental learning operate throughout society. This article deals with one particular practice of parental learning, namely nanny TV, and the way in which ideal parents are constructed through such programmes. The point of departure is…

  11. Sport Specialization: A Coach's Role in Being Honest with Parents

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    Stewart, Craig; Shroyer, Josh

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of sport specialization in youth sport is a source of parental confusion and potential conflicts of interest with coaches. Sport specialization is the exclusive participation in one sport in the belief that it will increase the chances of receiving an athletic college scholarship and/or being able to pursue a career as a professional…

  12. Sport Specialization: A Coach's Role in Being Honest with Parents

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    Stewart, Craig; Shroyer, Josh

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of sport specialization in youth sport is a source of parental confusion and potential conflicts of interest with coaches. Sport specialization is the exclusive participation in one sport in the belief that it will increase the chances of receiving an athletic college scholarship and/or being able to pursue a career as a professional…

  13. Autism and Externalizing Behaviors: Buffering Effects of Parental Emotion Coaching

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    Wilson, Beverly J.; Berg, Jessica L.; Zurawski, Megan E.; King, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between parental emotion coaching and externalizing behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Children with ASD often exhibit externalizing behaviors, particularly emotionally driven externalizing behaviors, at a higher rate than their typically developing peers. An…

  14. Autism and Externalizing Behaviors: Buffering Effects of Parental Emotion Coaching

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    Wilson, Beverly J.; Berg, Jessica L.; Zurawski, Megan E.; King, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between parental emotion coaching and externalizing behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Children with ASD often exhibit externalizing behaviors, particularly emotionally driven externalizing behaviors, at a higher rate than their typically developing peers. An…

  15. Group Parent Training Combined with Follow-Up Coaching for Parents of Children with Developmental Delays

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    Barton, Erin E.; Lissman, Dana Cohen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between group training using an abbreviated version of the Incredible Years parent training with family coaching and positive parenting practices. Two at-­risk mothers and their young children with disabilities participated in the study. Both mothers were enrolled in a group parent training…

  16. Coach-directed education is associated with injury-prevention behaviour in players: an ecological cross-sectional study.

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    Brown, James C; Gardner-Lubbe, Sugnet; Lambert, Michael Ian; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert

    2016-11-25

    Rugby union ('rugby') presents an above-average risk of injury to participants. BokSmart is a South African nationwide intervention that aims to reduce rugby-related injuries in players. This is achieved by educating coaches and referees to improve injury behaviour of players. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess if the receipt of injury-prevention education was associated with player behaviour. Junior (n=2279) and senior (n=1642) players, who attended merit-based South African Rugby tournaments (2008-2012), completed an anonymous questionnaire. Logistic regressions investigated if player injury-prevention behaviours were associated with the receipt of education on the same topic. Additionally, players' preferred sources of education were explored through frequency and χ(2) analyses. Of the 16 injury-prevention behaviours, 12 (75%) were associated with receiving education on that topic. The four behaviours not associated with education were: warming-up (before training and matches), and avoiding heat and massage post injury. Of the seven possible sources of this education, the majority of players chose either coaches or physiotherapists as their preferred media. In comparison with junior players, more senior players chose physiotherapists instead of coaches for warming-up and cooling-down education. The results of this study support, to a large degree, the strategy of BokSmart-influence of player behaviour through coach education. However, these findings also suggest that BokSmart could target team physiotherapists in addition to coaches and referees with their safety education. Also, players might have different preferences for this education depending on their age. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS ANALYSIS: TOP PLAYERS MOTIVATION APPLIED BY WELL-KNOWN COACHES

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    Naid Kadušić

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sports psychology, motivation and philosophy are integral part of every team. They make progress in training and contest possible. Psychology helps us to control the mind and body of a player in order to give optimum sporting performance. It is crucial to know how to motivate a player, as well as a team, since a team takes all credits for winning. A special care needs to be taken into account when it comes to preferences, ideas, emotions of players, a team and a coach, of course. There is sports philosphy also, which includes goal setting, behavioural characteristics at the moments of failure, as well as taking into account when, where and at what point to use the philosophy for winning.

  18. How should "hot" players in basketball be defended? The use of fast-and-frugal heuristics by basketball coaches and players in response to streakiness.

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    Csapo, Peter; Avugos, Simcha; Raab, Markus; Bar-Eli, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that changes in shot difficulty may have rendered the hot-hand effect in basketball unobservable and are potentially a result of defensive adjustments. However, it has not been directly analysed whether strategic changes indeed take place in response to streakiness and whether they are effective with respect to winning games. The current work consists of an experimental study with 18 professional coaches and 20 players based on video sequences from National Basketball Association games, where the shown player displayed a streaky performance in half of the sequences. While coaches were asked to devise a defensive strategy after each viewed sequence, players had to assume the role of the shown player and decide whether to shoot or pass the ball. We find that coaches tended to increase the defensive pressure significantly more often on presumably hot players and thus make use of the hot-hand heuristic. Meanwhile, players chose to shoot more frequently in low-pressure and streaky situations but selected "pass" regardless of the previous performance when they faced increased defensive pressure. Assuming that a streaky player's performance is indeed elevated during hot phases, hot-hand behaviour can be considered adaptive in certain situations as it led hot players to pass instead of shoot.

  19. Leadership power perception of amateur and professional soccer coaches and players according to their belief in good luck or not.

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    Konter, Erkut

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the leadership power perception of amateur and professional soccer coaches and players according to their belief in good luck or not. Data collected from 165 male soccer coaches and 870 male soccer players including professionals and amateurs. The coaches had a mean age of 40.24 years (SD = 8.40) and had been coaching for an average of 8.56 years (SD = 6.75). The players had a mean age of 18.40 years (SD = 4.00) and had been playing soccer for an average of 6.00 years (SD = 4.15) with license. Adapted Turkish version of Power in Soccer Questionnaire-Other (PSQ-O for soccer players), Power in Soccer Questionnaire-Self (PSQ-S for coaches) and an information form were used for the data collection. Cronbach Reliability Alphas of PSQ-O and PSQ-S range between 0.60 and 0.84. Players' and coaches' data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney Tests. Analysis of PSQ-O revealed significant differences related to Coersive Power-CP [chi2 (3) = 8.46, p differences related to Legitimate Power-LP (p > 0.05). Results of PSQ-O and PSQ-S indicated complex relationships related to belief in good luck or not. Overall, there are differences between coaches' and players'perception of CP, LP and EP related to belief in good luck or not. The only similarity appears to be in perception of RP. However, there is lack of research to make more certain conclusions. Future researchers should also take into consideration gender, sport experience, age, taking responsibility, self-confidence, attributions, expectations, superstitions, emotions, perception of achievement etc.

  20. AN EXAMINATION OF CHARISMATIC LEADERSHIP CHARACTERISTICS OF HANDBALL COACHES AS PERCEIVED BY THEIR PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Onur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that the leaders that are perceived as charismatic by their followers are quite successful in establishing cohesion in organizations and increasing the performance and satisfaction levels of the employees. Thus, it is believed that when coaches are perceived as charismatic by their players, it might play a significant role in achieving the goals set by the teams. The current study examines the charismatic leadership perception of male and female handball players playing in the leagues of Turkish Handball Federation according to different variables. The sampling of the study consists of 242 handball players in the leagues of Turkish Handball Federation during 2012-2013 season. In order to obtain data regarding the charismatic leadership perception of the players for their coaches, “Charismatic Leadership Scale” developed by Çelik (2011 was administered. This scale consists of eight subscales and 35 items. For the purposes of data analysis, reliability tests (Cronbach Alpha, t-test, one-way variance analysis and factor analysis were applied. KMO value for the scale was found to be 0.895 and Barlett’s Sphericity test χ2= 4898,521 at p < 0.001. According to the results of Cronbach Alpha test, the values for subscales were between 0.762 and 0.910. The comparison made according to the variables “sex” and “education level” showed statistically meaningful differences in some subscales (p <0.05. One-way ANOVA test results revealed meaningful differences among the groups in some subscales for the variables “age”, “league level”, “the duration of working with the same coach” and “the duration of doing the same sports branch (p<0.05. According to research findings, the players with lower levels of educational background think that their coach trusts them very much, cares them a lot, takes risks for success and has good communication with them. These findings are consistent with autocratic leadership findings

  1. Assessing the Key to Effective Coaching in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: The Therapist-Parent Interaction Coding System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Miya L; Niec, Larissa N; Acevedo-Polakovich, I David

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the initial evaluation of the Therapist-Parent Interaction Coding System (TPICS), a measure of in vivo therapist coaching for the evidence-based behavioral parent training intervention, parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT). Sixty-one video-recorded treatment sessions were coded with the TPICS to investigate (1) the variety of coaching techniques PCIT therapists use in the early stage of treatment, (2) whether parent skill-level guides a therapist's coaching style and frequency, and (3) whether coaching mediates changes in parents' skill levels from one session to the next. Results found that the TPICS captured a range of coaching techniques, and that parent skill-level prior to coaching did relate to therapists' use of in vivo feedback. Therapists' responsive coaching (e.g., praise to parents) was a partial mediator of change in parenting behavior from one session to the next for specific child-centered parenting skills; whereas directive coaching (e.g., modeling) did not relate to change. The TPICS demonstrates promise as a measure of coaching during PCIT with good reliability scores and initial evidence of construct validity.

  2. "Tuning into Kids": Reducing Young Children's Behavior Problems Using an Emotion Coaching Parenting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Sophie S.; Wilson, Katherine R.; Harley, Ann E.; Kehoe, Christiane; Efron, Daryl; Prior, Margot R.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a 6-session group parenting program, "Tuning into Kids" (TIK), as treatment for young children (aged 4.0-5.11 years) with behavior problems. TIK targets parent emotion socialization (parent emotion awareness, regulation and emotion coaching skills). Fifty-four parents, recruited via a child behavior clinic, were randomized…

  3. The Alliance in a Friendship Coaching Intervention for Parents of Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Mikami, Amori Yee; McLeod, Bryce D.

    2011-01-01

    The alliance between parent and therapist was observed in a group-based parent-training intervention to improve social competency among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The intervention, called Parental Friendship Coaching (PFC), was delivered to 32 parents in small groups as part of a randomized clinical trial. PFC…

  4. Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Elsebet Frydendal

    kravet om ansvar for egen læring nye krav til lærerne på uddannelsesstederne, til pædagogikken og til læringsprocessen. Rapporten er en sammenskrivning af baggrundsviden om coaching og teorier, der relaterer sig til dette, især læringsprocesser. Derudover indgår nogle konkrete anvisninger til...... gennemførselen af selve coaching forløbet....

  5. Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Elsebet Frydendal

    kravet om ansvar for egen læring nye krav til lærerne på uddannelsesstederne, til pædagogikken og til læringsprocessen. Rapporten er en sammenskrivning af baggrundsviden om coaching og teorier, der relaterer sig til dette, især læringsprocesser. Derudover indgår nogle konkrete anvisninger til...... gennemførselen af selve coaching forløbet....

  6. Superiority of group counseling to individual coaching for parents of children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danino, Maly; Shechtman, Zippi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Two interventions for parents of children with learning disabilities (LD)-individual coaching and group counseling-were compared. Participants were 169 parents, non-randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: coaching (n=45), group counseling (n=93) and control (n=31). Variables included outcomes (parental stress and parental coping), personal (perceived social support) and process (bonding with therapist/group). Findings indicated more favorable outcomes for parents in both treatment conditions compared to control, more favorable outcomes on the stress index for parents treated in groups compared to individual coaching, and bonding was the most consistent predictor of outcomes. The discussion focuses on the power of group counseling for parents of children with LD.

  7. For Parents, Teachers and Coaches: About Sports Eye Injury and Protective Eyewear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protection Resources for Adults Resources for Children About Sports Eye Injury and Protective Eyewear Parents and coaches play an ... activities and protective eyewear, visit: Coalition to Prevent Sports Eye Injuries Vision Council of America Prevent Blindness America Photo ...

  8. Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amhøj, Christa Breum

    2008-01-01

    Coaching vinder mere og mere indpas i den danske folkeskole og udpeges som løsning på forskellige problemer. Eksempelvis som løsning på hvordan skolelederen kan sætte sig fri fra irrationelle og automatpilotiske reaktionsmønstre og lede sine medarbejdere til at lede sig selv; som løsning på hvordan...... for statiske og kontrollerende læringsstrukturer. Artiklen påstår, at det fælles for disse ledelsesmæssige problemer er, at coaching udpeges som en styringsteknologi, der kan bruges til at styre det mulighedsrum, der skabes, når den traditionelle skole bliver erstattet af mere komplekse tilblivelses- og...... disciplineringsformer og nye krav fra omverden. Der er en mængde forskellige styringsteknologier, der konkurrerer om at skabe og styre de indbyggere, der søger at befolke den tomme plads, der opstår, når den traditionelle skole trækkes tilbage. Artiklen påstår, at coaching er en styringsteknologi, der muliggør ledelse...

  9. Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amhøj, Christa Breum

    2008-01-01

    Coaching vinder mere og mere indpas i den danske folkeskole og udpeges som løsning på forskellige problemer. Eksempelvis som løsning på hvordan skolelederen kan sætte sig fri fra irrationelle og automatpilotiske reaktionsmønstre og lede sine medarbejdere til at lede sig selv; som løsning på hvordan...... for statiske og kontrollerende læringsstrukturer. Artiklen påstår, at det fælles for disse ledelsesmæssige problemer er, at coaching udpeges som en styringsteknologi, der kan bruges til at styre det mulighedsrum, der skabes, når den traditionelle skole bliver erstattet af mere komplekse tilblivelses- og...... disciplineringsformer og nye krav fra omverden. Der er en mængde forskellige styringsteknologier, der konkurrerer om at skabe og styre de indbyggere, der søger at befolke den tomme plads, der opstår, når den traditionelle skole trækkes tilbage. Artiklen påstår, at coaching er en styringsteknologi, der muliggør ledelse...

  10. "Tuning into Kids": reducing young children's behavior problems using an emotion coaching parenting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Sophie S; Wilson, Katherine R; Harley, Ann E; Kehoe, Christiane; Efron, Daryl; Prior, Margot R

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated a 6-session group parenting program, Tuning into Kids (TIK), as treatment for young children (aged 4.0-5.11 years) with behavior problems. TIK targets parent emotion socialization (parent emotion awareness, regulation and emotion coaching skills). Fifty-four parents, recruited via a child behavior clinic, were randomized into intervention (TIK) or waitlist (clinical treatment as usual). Parents reported emotion awareness/regulation, emotion coaching, empathy and child behavior (pre-intervention, post-intervention, 6-month follow-up); teachers reported child behavior and observers rated parent-child emotion coaching and child emotion knowledge (pre-intervention, follow-up). Data were analyzed using growth curve modeling and ANCOVA. Parents in both conditions reported less emotional dismissiveness and reduced child behavior problems; in the intervention group, parents also reported greater empathy and had improved observed emotion coaching skills; their children had greater emotion knowledge and reduced teacher-reported behavior problems. TIK appears to be a promising addition to treatment for child behavior problems.

  11. Coaching Coaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, G.; Bendix, Lars Gotfred; Magnusson, B.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a tandem of undergraduate courses for teaching XP and coaching of XP teams. This paper focuses on the coaching course and the coaching practices we have developed. The tandem of courses enables us to give a challenging and interesting course for the coaches, and, at the same tim...

  12. The Commercialising of British Men’s Basketball: Psychological Contracts Between Coaches and Players in the Post-Bosman Game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Owen-Pugh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the psychological contracts of male players and coaches in British commercial basketball, and the ways in which these might be shaped by the constraining and enabling pressures of athletic talent migration. It draws on qualitative interview data to argue that commercialising changes in the game’s recent history have led to the emergence of divergent forms of psychological contract between coaches and players. These have promoted the interests of the game’s migrant Americans at the expense of its indigenous athletes. In particular, while the Americans reap the benefits of a high social reputation, material rewards and career development, many indigenous athletes working in the top-flight clubs struggle to gain remuneration and court-time and must fall back on their own resources to build self-confidence and self-respect. It is argued that this marginalising process was intensified following the Bosman ruling of 1995, which led to the exodus of many skilled indigenous players from the UK and prompted the commercial league to make more extensive use of Americans. Interpretation of the study’s findings is informed by Elias’ theory of established-outsider relations.

  13. Effects of Coach and Parent Training on Performance Anxiety in Young Athletes: A Systemic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank L. Smoll

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Coaches and parents play a major role in determining the consequences of sport participation in young athletes. This study focuses on the assessment of a systemic, empirically inspired intervention directed at coaches and parents. Parallel workshops derived in part from achievement goal theory were presented to the coaches and parents of 9 to 15 year old boys and girls participating in community-based basketball programs, and their effects were compared with a matched control condition. Multilevel analyses revealed significant Time x Condition interactions on all three subscales of the Sport Anxiety Scale-2 (SAS-2 and on a total anxiety score. Athletes in the intervention condition decreased in cognitive and somatic anxiety scores on the SAS-2, whereas athletes in the control condition exhibited increases in cognitive and somatic anxiety. Results suggest the potential efficacy of brief, economical interventions in enhancing the psychosocial impact of the youth sport environment.

  14. Parental Social Coaching Promotes Adolescent Peer Acceptance Across the Middle School Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Kim D; Tu, Kelly M; Erath, Stephen A; Pettit, Gregory S

    2017-03-20

    The present study investigated longitudinal associations between behavioral and cognitive dimensions of parental social coaching (i.e., advice about how to behave or think about peer challenges) and young adolescents' peer acceptance, and whether such associations are moderated by youths' social skills. Time 1 (T1) participants included 123 young adolescents (M age = 12.03 years; 50% boys; 58.5% European American). Parents gave open-ended reports about their social coaching to hypothetical peer stress scenarios, which were coded from low to high quality on behavioral and cognitive dimensions. Parents and teachers reported on adolescent prosocial behavior (i.e., social-behavioral skills), and adolescents reported on their social appraisals and social self-efficacy (i.e., social-cognitive skills). At T1 (before the first year of middle school) and Time 2 (approximately 10 months later, after the first year of middle school), parents and teachers rated adolescent peer acceptance. Analyses revealed that parents' prosocial behavioral advice and benign cognitive framing independently predicted adolescents' higher peer acceptance prospectively (controlling for earlier levels of peer acceptance). Furthermore, adolescent social skills moderated links between coaching and peer acceptance. Specifically, adolescents with higher, but not lower, social-cognitive skills became more accepted in the context of higher-quality coaching, supporting a "capitalization" pattern, such that these youth may be better able to utilize coaching suggestions. Results underscore the utility of parents' behavioral advice and cognitive framing for adolescent peer adjustment across the middle school transition and suggest that optimal social-coaching strategies may depend in part on adolescent social skill level. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Improving Service Utilization for Parents with Substance Abuse Problems: Experimenting with Recovery Coaches in Child Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Substance abusers often face substantial systematic and personal barriers to receiving required substance abuse treatment services as well as other services; hence, various linkage mechanisms have been proposed for drug abuse treatment programs to overcome such barriers. Although there is a growing interest in the use of case management with a substance abuse background, its effectiveness in child welfare has yet to be explored. In this study the author attempts to investigate the effectiveness of case management in service utilization by systematically evaluating the five-year Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) waiver demonstration project with Recovery Coaches in Illinois. A classic experimental design with a control group was used. Random assignment occurs at the agency level. Parents in the experimental group (N = 1562) received recovery coaches in addition to traditional child welfare services while parents in the control group (N = 598) only received traditional child welfare services. Bivariate and multivariate analyses (Ordinary Last Square regressions) were used. Compared to parents in the control group, parents in the experimental group were more likely to utilize substance abuse treatment. The results suggest that gender, education level, employment status, and the number of service needs were significantly associated with service utilization. Controlling other factors, recovery coaches improved overall service utilization. Because the outcome of child welfare often depends on the improvement of risks or resolution, it is important for parents to utilize the needed services. Future studies need to address what aspects of recovery coaches facilitate the services utilization.

  16. The Relationship between leadership styles of coaches with self-determination and burn-out of the Iranian elite female Volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Zardoshtian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between leadership styles of coaches with self-determination and burnout of the Iranian elite female Volleyball players .It was survey research and field study. The statistical population used in this study was all female volleyball players in Volleyball Iran League in 2010 including 144 players in 12 teams. The study sample was statistically equal to statistical population. The questionnaire included three scales measuring leadership in sports (LSS, self-determination questionnaire (SMS and burnout analysis of questionnaire (ABQ. In order to organize and summarize, and classify the raw scores, we used descriptive statistics and multivariate regression was used to investigate the relationship between variables. The research findings showed that leadership styles of coaches was significantly related to self-determination and burnout of the players (p<0.05. So the coaches of sports teams are recommended to prevent burnout and the negative impact of these factors on players' athletic performance and motivation through a proper communication and creating opportunities for players participating in the initiative development and the decision making processes.

  17. Team Sports, Gymnastics, and Dance in Community Settings. A Guide for Teachers, Coaches, and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patricia A., Ed.

    This book is designed to enhance understanding of what is important for parents, coaches, and teachers to know when making choices about non-school-based programs for children. The book begins with "Preface" (Patricia A. Sullivan" and "Introduction" (Liane M. Summerfield.) The first section, "Team Sports" (Danny R. Mielke), which applies to a…

  18. Team Sports, Gymnastics, and Dance in Community Settings. A Guide for Teachers, Coaches, and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patricia A., Ed.

    This book is designed to enhance understanding of what is important for parents, coaches, and teachers to know when making choices about non-school-based programs for children. The book begins with "Preface" (Patricia A. Sullivan" and "Introduction" (Liane M. Summerfield.) The first section, "Team Sports" (Danny R. Mielke), which applies to a…

  19. Assessment and Accountability in Youth Soccer: How Parents Grade Coaching, Refereeing, and the Soccer Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffus, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The term accountability is used extensively in performance management. In youth soccer, accountability is often discussed in the context of issues such as quality of coaching, officiating, responsiveness to stakeholders, scheduling of games, building parental involvement and support, and philosophical orientation to the sport. As part of the…

  20. Decision coaching using the Ottawa family decision guide with parents and their children: a field testing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenstra, Bryan; Lawson, Margaret L; Harrison, Denise; Boland, Laura; Stacey, Dawn

    2015-02-07

    Although children can benefit from being included in health decisions, little is known about effective interventions to support their involvement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of decision coaching guided by the Ottawa Family Decision Guide with children and parents considering insulin delivery options for type 1 diabetes (insulin pump, multiple daily injections, or standard insulin injections). Pre-/post-test field testing design. Eligible participants were children (≤18 years) with type 1 diabetes and their parents attending an ambulatory diabetes clinic in a tertiary children's hospital. Parent-child dyads received decision coaching using the Ottawa Family Decision Guide that was pre-populated with evidence on insulin delivery options, benefits, and harms. Primary outcomes were feasibility of recruitment and data collection, and parent and child acceptability of the intervention. Of 16 families invited to participate, 12 agreed and 7 attended the decision coaching session. For the five missed families, two families were unable to attend the session or the decision coach was not available (N=3). Baseline and immediately post-coaching questionnaires were all completed and follow-up questionnaires two weeks post-coaching were missing from one parent-child dyad. Missing questionnaire items were 5 of 340 items for children (1.5%) and 1 of 429 for parents (0.2%). Decision coaching was rated as acceptable with higher scores from parents and their children who were in earlier stages of decision making. Decision coaching with children and their parents considering insulin options was feasible implement and evaluate in our diabetes clinic and was acceptable to participants. Recruitment was difficult due to scheduling restrictions related to the timing of the study. Coaching should target participants earlier in the decision making process and be scheduled at times that are convenient for families and coaches. Findings were

  1. Behavioral Characteristics of "Favorite" Coaches: Implications for Coach Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Craig; Owens, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to use athletes' and former athletes' memories of their favorite coach to improve coach education curriculum. Player preferences of coaching behavior can affect both their attitudes toward their sport experiences and team performance. By identifying positive coaching behaviors as recalled by athletes, coach educators…

  2. The Effect of Autonomy-Supportive Behaviors of Coaches on Need Satisfaction and Sport Commitment of Elite Female Players in Handball Premier League

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Hosseinpoor Delavar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effects of autonomy-supportive behaviors on satisfying the psychological needs and commitment of female handball players in premier league in Iran. Here, we used descriptive research (survey method. The statistical population of 237 players was selected as our samples. We administered three questionnaires for autonomy-Supportive behaviors, psychological needs and commitment including perceived autonomy-supportive behaviors of coaches in sport (PASSES, satisfaction of the psychological needs in sports and sports Commitment Scale (SCMS questionnaires. We applied multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM to analyze the data. Results showed there was a positive correlation between autonomy-supportive behaviors with the psychological needs of competence and commitment of athletes. On the other hand, the players `commitment correlated positively with psychological needs. Results of multivariate regression showed that the autonomy-supportive behaviors were predictor of psychological needs and commitment of players. The path analysis, also, established mediator role of psychological needs between autonomy-supportive behavior of the coach and players` commitment. Thus, the self-determination Theory among the elite players and sports teams was confirmed.

  3. Teaching Parents Enhanced Milieu Teaching with Words and Signs Using the Teach-Model-Coach-Review Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Courtney A.; Kaiser, Ann P.

    2017-01-01

    Measuring treatment fidelity is an essential step in research designed to increase the use of evidence-based practices. For parent-implemented communication interventions, measuring the implementation of the teaching and coaching provided to the parents is as critical as measuring the parents' delivery of the intervention to the child. Both levels…

  4. Comparison of Indiana High School Football Injury Rates by Inclusion of the USA Football “Heads Up Football” Player Safety Coach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Dalton, Sara L.; Roos, Karen G.; Djoko, Aristarque; Phelps, Jennifer; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Indiana, high school football coaches are required to complete a coaching education course with material related to concussion awareness, equipment fitting, heat emergency preparedness, and proper technique. Some high schools have also opted to implement a player safety coach (PSC). The PSC, an integral component of USA Football’s Heads Up Football (HUF) program, is a coach whose primary responsibility is to ensure that other coaches are implementing proper tackling and blocking techniques alongside other components of the HUF program. Purpose: To compare injury rates in Indiana high school football teams by their usage of a PSC or online coaching education only. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Athletic trainers (ATs) evaluated and tracked injuries at each practice and game during the 2015 high school football season. Players were drawn from 6 teams in Indiana. The PSC group, which used the PSC component, was comprised of 204 players from 3 teams. The “education only” group (EDU), which utilized coaching education only, was composed of 186 players from 3 teams. Injury rates and injury rate ratios (IRRs) were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: During 25,938 athlete-exposures (AEs), a total of 149 injuries were reported, of which 54 (36.2%) and 95 (63.8%) originated from the PSC and EDU groups, respectively. The practice injury rate was lower in the PSC group than the EDU group (2.99 vs 4.83/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.95). The game injury rate was also lower in the PSC group than the EDU group (11.37 vs 26.37/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25-0.74). When restricted to concussions only, the rate was lower in the PSC group (0.09 vs 0.73/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.01-0.94), although only 1 concussion was reported in the PSC group. No differences were found in game concussion rates (0.60 vs 4.39/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.02-1.11). Conclusion: Findings support the PSC as an effective

  5. Coaching Parents to Use Naturalistic Language and Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamoglu, Yusuf; Dinnebeil, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    Naturalistic language and communication strategies (i.e., naturalistic teaching strategies) refer to practices that are used to promote the child's language and communication skills either through verbal (e.g., spoken words) or nonverbal (e.g., gestures, signs) interactions between an adult (e.g., parent, teacher) and a child. Use of naturalistic…

  6. The relationship between perceived coaching behaviors, goal orientation, team cohesion, perceived motivational climate ve collective efficacy among basketball players before and after the tournament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turhan Toros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false TR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Normal Tablo"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This paper aims to examine the perceived coaching behaviors, the goal orientation, the team cohesion, the perceived motivational climate and the relationship of the collective efficacy among basketball players before and after the tournament. In this research, the young male basketball players who played in the young male basketball teams in 2005-2006 league season and moreover, the ones who took parts in the teams participated into the Turkish National Championship were included. The only 12 teams(144 players of the total 16 teams who participated into the Turkish National Championship were included. In collecting the data, Leadership for Sport Scale-LSS, Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire-TEOSQ, Group Environment Questionnaire-GEQ, Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire- PMCSQ and Collective Efficacy Scale-CES were used. The data were calculated with The Analysis of the Descriptive Statistical Techiques, Partial, Part and Pearson Correlation Analysis. Results revealed significant relationship with task orientation and autocratic (r=.195;p<.05 social support (r=.664;p<.05 before the Turkish National Championship. revealed significant relationship with mastery climate and training

  7. Coach Expectations About Off-Field Conduct and Bystander Intervention by U.S. College Football Players to Prevent Inappropriate Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Paskus, Tom; Bell, Lydia

    2015-09-21

    The objective of the present study was to assess whether there is a positive association between expectations about off-field conduct set by the team coach and the likelihood that college football players intend to engage as prosocial bystanders in the prevention of what they consider to be inappropriate sexual behavior. In a sample of U.S. collegiate football players (N = 3,281), a path analysis model tested the association between coach expectations, perceived likelihood of discipline for off-field transgressions, and likelihood of intending to intervene to prevent inappropriate sexual behavior. Mediation of these relationships by the athlete's sense of exploitative entitlement and their attitudes about intervening were also assessed. Findings supported the hypothesized relationships, with expectations and discipline associated with bystander intentions both directly and indirectly through the mediating pathways of entitlement and attitudes about intervening. These findings provide evidence about the important role that sports team coaches can play in encouraging bystander intervention by clarifying expectations and consequences for conduct off the field of play. Athletic departments can provide a framework within which coaches are informed about the importance of setting and enforcing standards for off-field behavior, and are appropriately incentivized to do so. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Parental Emotion Coaching: Associations With Self-Regulation in Aggressive/Rejected and Low Aggressive/Popular Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Beverly J.; Petaja, Holly; Yun, Jenna; King, Kathleen; Berg, Jessica; Kremmel, Lindsey; Cook, Diana

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated associations between maternal and paternal emotion coaching and the self-regulation skills of kindergarten and first-grade children. Participants were 54 children categorized as either aggressive/rejected or low aggressive/popular by peer reports. Findings indicated a statistical trend for fathers of low aggressive/popular children to engage in more emotion coaching than fathers of aggressive/rejected children. Paternal emotion coaching accounted for significant variance in children’s regulation of attention. Maternal emotion coaching moderated the relation between children’s status and regulation of emotion. Findings suggest that interventions focused on parental emotion coaching may prove beneficial for increasing the self-regulation and attention skills of children with social and conduct problems. PMID:25071301

  9. Effects of Coaching on the Implementation of Functional Assessment-Based Parent Intervention in Reducing Challenging Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettig, Angel; Schultz, Tia R.; Sreckovic, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of coaching on the implementation of functional assessment--based parent intervention in reducing children's challenging behaviors. A multiple baseline across participants design was used with three parent-child dyads with children between the ages of 2 and 5 years. The intervention consisted of training and delayed…

  10. Creating a Supportive Environment among Youth Football Players: A Qualitative Study of French and Norwegian Youth Grassroots Football Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Torill; Van Hoye, Aurelie; Tjomsland, Hege Eikeland; Holsen, Ingrid; Wold, Bente; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Samdal, Oddrun; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The health promoting benefits of sport participation are under-utilized and should be further developed, particularly at the grassroots level. The purpose of this paper is to examine how grassroots coaches in youth football perceive their coaching practices after participating in a community-based coach education program aimed at…

  11. Creating a Supportive Environment among Youth Football Players: A Qualitative Study of French and Norwegian Youth Grassroots Football Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Torill; Van Hoye, Aurelie; Tjomsland, Hege Eikeland; Holsen, Ingrid; Wold, Bente; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Samdal, Oddrun; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The health promoting benefits of sport participation are under-utilized and should be further developed, particularly at the grassroots level. The purpose of this paper is to examine how grassroots coaches in youth football perceive their coaching practices after participating in a community-based coach education program aimed at…

  12. Measurement of Perceived Parental Success Standards in Sport and Relations with Athletes’ Self-Esteem, Performance Anxiety, and Achievement Goal Orientation: Comparing Parental and Coach Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Schwebel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Perceived Parent Success Standards Scale (PPSSS, adapted from the Perception of Success Questionnaire constructed by Roberts et al. (1998 to measure athletes’ achievement goal orientation, provides a measure of athletes’ perceptions of mastery- and ego-oriented parental success criteria, a central component of parental motivational climate. This study focused on 543 young athletes (ages 9–16 on 82 teams in recreational basketball leagues. The PPSSS exhibited strong factorial validity, construct validity, and orthogonality between ego and mastery factors that allow for different combinations of these factors to be tested. We also compared the impact of the motivational climates created by coaches and success standards conveyed by parents on postseason athlete outcome measures of anxiety, self-esteem, and achievement goal orientation. Correlational and multilevel regression analyses revealed that both coach and parent variables were significantly related to the athlete variables. However, mediational analyses indicated that parental success standards mediated relations between coach-initiated climate and all of the outcome variables, reflecting the power of parental socialization processes. We discuss potential reasons for the greater parental influence shown in this and a previous study, and we suggest directions for further research as well as possible interventions that can help both coaches and parents create a more positive athletic environment for young athletes.

  13. 'Just wait then and see what he does': a speech act analysis of healthcare professionals' interaction coaching with parents of children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Lindsay M; O'Malley-Keighran, Mary-Pat; Carroll, Clare

    2016-11-01

    There is evidence indicating that parent training programmes including interaction coaching of parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can increase parental responsiveness, promote language development and social interaction skills in children with ASD. However, there is a lack of research exploring precisely how healthcare professionals use language in interaction coaching. To identify the speech acts of healthcare professionals during individual video-recorded interaction coaching sessions of a Hanen-influenced parent training programme with parents of children with ASD. This retrospective study used speech act analysis. Healthcare professional participants included two speech-language therapists and one occupational therapist. Sixteen videos were transcribed and a speech act analysis was conducted to identify the form and functions of the language used by the healthcare professionals. Descriptive statistics provided frequencies and percentages for the different speech acts used across the 16 videos. Six types of speech acts used by the healthcare professionals during coaching sessions were identified. These speech acts were, in order of frequency: Instructing, Modelling, Suggesting, Commanding, Commending and Affirming. The healthcare professionals were found to tailor their interaction coaching to the learning needs of the parents. A pattern was observed in which more direct speech acts were used in instances where indirect speech acts did not achieve the intended response. The study provides an insight into the nature of interaction coaching provided by healthcare professionals during a parent training programme. It identifies the types of language used during interaction coaching. It also highlights additional important aspects of interaction coaching such as the ability of healthcare professionals to adjust the directness of the coaching in order to achieve the intended parental response to the child's interaction. The findings may be used

  14. Creating Concussion Management Policy: How School Leaders, Coaches and Parents Can Work Together to Ensure Kids Stay Safer in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    School leaders, parents and coaches are challenged to ensure the safety of athletes participating in interscholastic programs, including concussion management. With an estimated 300,000 sport-related concussions occurring annually in the United States and a public perception that bell ringers are not concussions, many head-injured children are…

  15. The Relationship between Coach Leadership, the Coach-Athlete Relationship, Team Success, and the Positive Developmental Experiences of Adolescent Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Stewart A.; Oades, Lindsay G.; Crowe, Trevor P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The goals of participation youth sports are primarily concerned with the facilitation of positive youth development as opposed to outright success. Consequently, there are strong theoretical and empirical links between sports coaching and athlete development. Transformational leadership behaviours, in particular, have been…

  16. Concussion under-reporting and pressure from coaches, teammates, fans, and parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Garnett, Bernice; Hawrilenko, Matt; Baugh, Christine M.; Calzo, Jerel P.

    2015-01-01

    Concussions from sport present a substantial public health burden given the number of youth, adolescent and emerging adult athletes that participate in contact or collision sports. Athletes who fail to report symptoms of a suspected concussion and continue play are at risk of worsened symptomatology and potentially catastrophic neurologic consequences if another impact is sustained during this vulnerable period. Understanding why athletes do or do not report their symptoms is critical for developing efficacious strategies for risk reduction. Psychosocial theories and frameworks that explicitly incorporate context, as a source of expectations about the outcomes of reporting and as a source of behavioral reinforcement, are useful in framing this problem. The present study quantifies the pressure that athletes experience to continue playing after a head impact—from coaches, teammates, parents, and fans—and assesses how this pressure, both independently and as a system, is related to future concussion reporting intention. Participants in the study were 328 male and female athletes from 19 teams competing in one of seven sports (soccer, lacrosse, basketball, softball, baseball, volleyball, field hockey) at four colleges in the northeast region of the United States. Results found that more than one-quarter of the sample had experienced pressure from at least one source to continue playing after a head impact during the previous year. Results of a latent profile mixture model indicated that athletes who experienced pressure from all four of the measured sources were significantly more likely to intend to continue playing in the future than were athletes who had not experienced pressure from all sources, or only pressure from coaches and teammates. These findings underscore the importance of designing interventions that address the system in which athletes make decisions about concussion reporting, including athletes’ parents, rather than focusing solely on modifying

  17. Concussion under-reporting and pressure from coaches, teammates, fans, and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Garnett, Bernice; Hawrilenko, Matt; Baugh, Christine M; Calzo, Jerel P

    2015-06-01

    Concussions from sport present a substantial public health burden given the number of youth, adolescent and emerging adult athletes that participate in contact or collision sports. Athletes who fail to report symptoms of a suspected concussion and continue play are at risk of worsened symptomatology and potentially catastrophic neurologic consequences if another impact is sustained during this vulnerable period. Understanding why athletes do or do not report their symptoms is critical for developing efficacious strategies for risk reduction. Psychosocial theories and frameworks that explicitly incorporate context, as a source of expectations about the outcomes of reporting and as a source of behavioral reinforcement, are useful in framing this problem. The present study quantifies the pressure that athletes experience to continue playing after a head impact--from coaches, teammates, parents, and fans--and assesses how this pressure, both independently and as a system, is related to future concussion reporting intention. Participants in the study were 328 male and female athletes from 19 teams competing in one of seven sports (soccer, lacrosse, basketball, softball, baseball, volleyball, field hockey) at four colleges in the northeast region of the United States. Results found that more than one-quarter of the sample had experienced pressure from at least one source to continue playing after a head impact during the previous year. Results of a latent profile mixture model indicated that athletes who experienced pressure from all four of the measured sources were significantly more likely to intend to continue playing in the future than were athletes who had not experienced pressure from all sources, or only pressure from coaches and teammates. These findings underscore the importance of designing interventions that address the system in which athletes make decisions about concussion reporting, including athletes' parents, rather than focusing solely on modifying the

  18. Does playing experience improve coaching? An exploratory study of perceptual-cognitive skill in soccer coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eGrundel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In many sports, it is common for top coaching positions to be held by former players; however, despite the natural progression in many sports for skilled players to become high-level coaches, we have little understanding of how playing may develop useful skills for coaching. In this study we considered perceptual-cognitive skill across groups of high and low skilled soccer players and soccer coaches. A range of perceptual-cognitive variables was measured in an attempt to capture the diverse skills related to expertise in sport and coaching. Generally, results highlighted similarities between coaches and players on some tasks and differences on others.

  19. The relationship between perceived coaching behaviors, goal orientation, team cohesion, perceived motivational climate ve collective efficacy among basketball players before and after the tournament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turhan Toros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the perceived coaching behaviors, the goal orientation, the team cohesion, the perceived motivational climate and the relationship of the collective efficacy among basketball players before and after the tournament. In this research, the young male basketball players who played in the young male basketball teams in 2005-2006 league season and moreover, the ones who took parts in the teams participated into the Turkish National Championship were included. The only 12 teams(144 players of the total 16 teams who participated into the Turkish National Championship were included. In collecting the data, Leadership for Sport Scale-LSS, Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire-TEOSQ, Group Environment Questionnaire-GEQ, Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire- PMCSQ and Collective Efficacy Scale-CES were used. The data were calculated with The Analysis of the Descriptive Statistical Techiques, Partial, Part and Pearson Correlation Analysis. Results revealed significant relationship with task orientation and autocratic (r=.195;p<.05 social support (r=.664;p<.05 before the Turkish National Championship. revealed significant relationship with mastery climate and training and instruction (r=.174; p<.05 after the Turkish National Championship. In conclusion; There is a relation between over the course of a season, the pre-tournament and after the tournament.

  20. Parental Emotion Coaching and Child Emotion Regulation as Protective Factors for Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmore, Julie C.; Booker, Jordan A.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed linkages of mothers' emotion coaching and children's emotion regulation and emotion lability/negativity with children's adjustment in 72 mother-child dyads seeking treatment for oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Dyads completed the questionnaires and discussed emotion-related family events. Maternal emotion coaching was associated…

  1. Instant Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Paul

    This book is intended to help managers coach individuals and groups; assess current performance; develop a coaching plan; keep track of whether their coaching is having the right effect; and learn how to motivate and communicate effectively. Chapters 1-3 establish what coaching is; who can coach; and who can be coached. Chapter 4 lays coaching out…

  2. Talking with parents of high school football players about chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a concise summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Shawn; Solomon, Gary S

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, athletic-related chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has garnered a great deal of attention in the popular press and, more recently, in the scientific press. With increasing frequency, sports medicine practitioners and providers are faced with questions from the parents of high school football players about CTE and the risk posed to children who participate in this or other contact or collision sports. The purpose of this review was to summarize the research on CTE in an attempt to provide some evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions in clinics from parents. Addressed are (1) the definitions of CTE and its symptoms, (2) the evidence for CTE in football, (3) abnormal tau protein, (4) the use of neuroimaging in CTE diagnosis, (5) risk for CTE, (6) CTE diagnosis in youth, (7) CTE and its relationship to suicide, and (8) contact and collision sports as a risk factor for permanent brain injury or death.

  3. Online Coaching of Emotion-Regulation Strategies for Parents: Efficacy of the Online Rational Positive Parenting Program and Attention Bias Modification Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Oana A; Capris, David; Jarda, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Parenting programs are currently treatment of choice for behavioral disorders in children and one of their main components is reducing the negativity bias in the child-parent dyad. The Rational Positive Parenting Program (rPPP) is a program with a special focus on parent emotion-regulation functional reappraisal strategies, which has recently received consistent support for reducing child externalizing and internalizing disorders. In the last years, online interventions were proliferated and the Attention Bias Modification (ABM) becoming a promising implicit therapeutic intervention based on attention deployment emotion-regulation strategy, or adjunctive module to usual treatments, with results in multiple domains, varying from pain to self-esteem and emotional disorders (e.g., anxiety). We conducted two studies to investigate (1) the efficacy of the ABM procedures applied to parents and (2) the efficacy of the online version of the rPPP augmented with an ABM module. A total of 42 parents of children aged 2-12 years old participated in the first study, being allocated either to the ABM training or wait-list. Positive results were reported by the parents participating in the ABM group for own distress, satisfaction, positive interactions with the child, and child's strengths. In the second study, 53 parents and their children were allocated either in the rPPP group or in the rPPP + ABM group. Results show that ABM training can boost the effects of the rPPP on the strengths of children reported by the parents after the intervention. Findings are discussed in the light of limited research on using online tools for coaching effective emotion-regulation strategies for parents.

  4. Papel dos pais no desenvolvimento de jovens futebolistas Parents role in the development of soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Moraes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investigou o papel dos pais no desenvolvimento de atletas jovens de futebol. Foram voluntários nesse projeto 20 pais e 12 filhos jogadores, entre as idades de 15 e 18 anos, participantes da temporada 2000 do Campeonato Mineiro. Utilizou-se uma abordagem quantitativa e qualitativa, através de formulários, questionários e entrevistas semi-estruturadas de aprofundamento. Constatou-se que os pais tinham pouco envolvimento nos treinamentos e competições dos atletas, não alteraram a rotina familiar em função dos treinamentos dos mesmos. O relativo apoio dos pais não prejudicou o progresso dos filhos devido os pais permitirem os mesmos praticarem o futebol livremente. Outro aspecto importante foi o progresso dos filhos devido à paixão, à intensidade e freqüência de prática, além do apelo financeiro que o futebol profissional evoca no Brasil. Esses resultados indicam a necessidade de precauções quando se considerar paradigmas de primeiro mundo em outras culturas na qual exista restrição contextual.This study investigated the role of parents in the development of soccer players. Twenty parents and 12 soccer players, between 15 and 18 years old participated in the study. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used by administrating questionnaires forms and interviews. It was observed that few changes occurred in the family routines and that parents were minimally involved in their sons' sport activities. This did not appear to be a constraint for their sons' development because of their passion for soccer, the total amount of practice, and a potential lucrative professional career. Researchers should carefully adopt important paradigms from first world countries to another country with contextual differences.

  5. ANALYSIS OF SELECTION INDICATORS OF BADMINTON PLAYERS BY THE DELPHI METHOD AND ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Han-Chen Huang; Chun-Ta Lin; Chia-Sen Hu

    2015-01-01

    .... The researcher then interviewed badminton coaches and applied Analytic Hierarchy process (AHP) to determine the importance of the indicators of potential badminton players for badminton coaches...

  6. Positive Pedagogy for Sport Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard L.; Harvey, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The literature suggests that, despite some challenges in their implementation, player/athlete-centred, inquiry-based approaches to teaching games and coaching team sport can improve game playing ability, increase player/athlete motivation and provide positive affective experiences of learning. A range of these approaches, including Teaching Games…

  7. Kollegial Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Bidraget sammenfatter pointerne fra min ph.d.-afhandling: Kollegial Coaching - Filosoferende fællesskaber i professionspraksis. Bidraget fokuserer på: 1. Kontekstualisering af coaching i feltet for praksislæring 2. Konfigurering af coaching som ramme for filosoferende fællesskaber 3....... Konceptualisering af coaching som modus for evidensreflekteret praksis...

  8. Understanding Expertise from Elite Badminton Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Badminton is a growing sport with a limited amount of expertise both in players and coaches so attempts are being made to extend the expertise internationally. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of coaching expertise in badminton because such an understanding might have implications for a more general understanding of expertise,…

  9. Understanding Expertise from Elite Badminton Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Badminton is a growing sport with a limited amount of expertise both in players and coaches so attempts are being made to extend the expertise internationally. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of coaching expertise in badminton because such an understanding might have implications for a more general understanding of expertise,…

  10. The Coach's Playbook Against Drugs. Portable Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    This booklet helps coaches educate student athletes in middle, junior high, and high school about the dangers of drugs. Athletic coaches have a special relationship with athletes and other students but often underestimate their influence on them. When they talk to their players and students about the dangers of drugs, the message is more effective…

  11. Sportsmanship, Gamesmanship, and the Implications for Coach Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C. Craig

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the responses of hundreds of future coaches from an introductory coaching course regarding the appropriateness of player and coach behaviors in various athletic scenarios. The scenarios epitomize ethical and sportsmanship behaviors across various sports and situations. The students read the situations and expressed their…

  12. Managerial Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommelje, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores how coaching equips managers and supervisors to be successful in the 21st-century workplace. Coaching has benefited these professionals by providing them with viable tools to enhance the leadership and managerial tools they already possess.

  13. Coaching: evoking excellence in others

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flaherty, James

    2005-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv 1 The Foundation for Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Why Coaching Now?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  14. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Cusimano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs. A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM. The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action that may affect an athlete’s decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36, as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37. Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players’ willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

  15. Seven Legal Duties of a Coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figone, Albert J.

    1989-01-01

    This article identifies seven legal duties of coaches and discusses the practical application of each. These duties relate to supervision, planning, warning of risks, providing a safe environment, evaluating players for injuries and incapacities, fairly matching players, and first aid and emergency procedures. (IAH)

  16. Coaching psykologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Imer, Anna; Palmer, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Praksis-modellen er inspireret og udviklet på baggrund af den engelsksprogede Practice model. Modellen anvendes især som et centralt redskab for problemløsning i coaching og terapi. Men praksis modellen kan anvendes bredere og som redskab til at hjælpe coachée mod at opnå mål i coaching og især...

  17. Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  18. An Eye for Talent: Talent Identification and Practical Sense of Top-level Soccer Coaches

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how top-level soccer coaches identify talent. I draw on Bourdieu's work to challenge a commonly held assumption that talent identification is a rational or objective process. Analysis of in-depth interviews with eight coaches of national youth soccer teams indicated these coaches identified talent in three ways. Firstly, coaches use their practical sense and their visual experience to recognize patterns of movement among the players. Secondly, the coach...

  19. Narrative coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drake, David; Stelter, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    From the introduction: While a narrative frame is relatively new in the fi elds of psychotherapy and coaching, stories have been an essential constituent of cultures and communities since the dawn of time and are fundamental to the way we make sense and meaning. We use stories to structure our...... keep individually and collectively telling ourselves that reinforce them. As such, they are at the core of what it means to be human – as refl ected in our biology, ontology, epistemology and cosmology – and a natural medium for use in coaching. Narrative coaches are, therefore, keenly interested...

  20. Behavioral coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniuk, Holly A; Witts, Benjamin N; Williams, W Larry; Ghezzi, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis.

  1. Narrative coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drake, David; Stelter, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    keep individually and collectively telling ourselves that reinforce them. As such, they are at the core of what it means to be human – as refl ected in our biology, ontology, epistemology and cosmology – and a natural medium for use in coaching. Narrative coaches are, therefore, keenly interested...... in what Foucault (1965 ) called people’s ‘theory of events’, particularly as they wrestle with existential issues and choices in their life and work....

  2. Concepções de treinadores "experts" Brasileiros sobre o processo de formação desportiva do jogador de voleibol Expert coaches conceptions concerning the sport development of the volleyball player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Milistetd

    2010-03-01

    ção desportiva a longo prazo do jogador de Voleibol.The aim of the present study was to examine the conceptions of expert coaches concerning the volleyball player's long term sport development. The participants were 10 expert coaches. The sample presented 45 ± 13.8 years old and 24.8 ± 12.1 years of coaching experience in the Brazilian volleyball. Data collection was accomplished through structured open answer interviews based on Fernandes' protocol (2004. Its content adaptation to sociocultural and sportive Brazilian reality was accomplished through expert validation. The treatment of the information was accomplished through content analysis, with logic-semantic procedures of the prevalent ideas in the corpus of interviews. The reliability of codification was assured by percentage accord of the same encoder and the different encoders, registering values between 95% and 100%. The present study evidences that no participant knows about the existence of a national long term sport development model for a volleyball player. Moreover, coaches confirmed that the Volleyball is a sport of late specialization, being a widespread consensus that the age of initiation of systematic practice is in the beginning of adolescence, around the age of 13 years old. The components of sport development throughout the stages highlight the practice of the deliberate play in the first stage, where diversified motor experiences prevail. From the second stage, the deliberate practice increases with the acquisition of specific competences and commitment with the modality. The absence of specification of the training contents along the stages, as well as the scanty reference to the psychosocial competences along the stages, can be due, in great measure, to the inexistence of a national model of long term sport development.

  3. Preferred Leadership Behaviours of Male and Female Badminton Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar S HARMA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pr eferences for specific coaching behaviours of male and female Badminton players were measured by the modified and revised Leadership Scale for Sport. Eighty two (Males=61, Females=21 badminton players were selected from amongst the players representing th eir respective university teams in East - zone Inter - university Badminton (Men/Women tournaments held at Bilaspur (CG. The present investigation noted the statistically significant differences among East - zone Inter - university level male as well as female B adminton player’s preferences for specific coaching behaviour. Differences were not observed between male and female badminton players in all the dimensions together of specific coaching behaviours of preferred leadership. It is recommended that coaches a lign their coaching style to meet the needs of their teams.

  4. Ledelsesbaseret coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molly-Søholm, Thorkil; Storch, Jacob; Juhl, Andreas;

    Hvordan coacher man som leder? Når jeg sidder i kursuslokalet og træner spørgeteknikker, går det fint, men når jeg skal bruge det hjemme i min organisation, fungerer det slet ikke. Skal coaching kunne fungere som et ledelsesværktøj, må det tilpasses de spilleregler, der gælder for arbejdskonteksten...... - det er udgangspunktet for denne bog. Forfatternes argument er, at der er sket en kortslutning i den måde, coaching er overført fra idrættens og terapiens verden til den organisatoriske hverdag. I denne bog giver forfatterne indgående beskrivelser af coachingværktøjer omsat til en ledelsesmæssig...... kontekst, og de byder på en række praktiske anvisninger til, hvordan man tilegner sig en coachende ledelsesstil. Ledelsesbaseret coaching henvender sig til ledere på alle niveauer, der ønsker at bringe coaching et skridt videre ind i organisationerne som en ledelsesform, der rummer stort potentiale...

  5. First Days of Preseason Practice Pose Big Heat Risks for College Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preseason Practice Pose Big Heat Risks for College Football Players Coaches, trainers need to be aware of ... FRIDAY, Aug. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As college football players trade in their beach towels for helmets ...

  6. Preferred Leadership Behaviours of Male and Female Badminton Players

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar S HARMA

    2015-01-01

    Pr eferences for specific coaching behaviours of male and female Badminton players were measured by the modified and revised Leadership Scale for Sport. Eighty two (Males=61, Females=21) badminton players were selected from amongst the players representing th eir respective university teams in East - zone Inter - university Badminton (Men/Women) tournaments held at Bilaspur (CG). The present investigation noted ...

  7. Coaching relationship - and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; O'Broin, Alanna; Løkken, Lillith Olesen

    2016-01-01

    on the outcomes of coaching. It is a presentation, on factors specifically related to engagement of the coachee and building effective coaching relationships: (a) a study examining the power relations between employee coachee and coach from the middle manager coach perspective, highlighting coaching relationship...... quality as a necessity for moments of symmetry and equality in fruitful coaching; (b) a study on the diversity factor of coach age, finding that age was not significant in executive coachées coach selection, however age signified credibility and experience, with possible implications for young executive...

  8. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  9. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  10. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  11. Sex Discrimination in Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessem, Lawrence

    1980-01-01

    Even in situations in which the underpayment of girls' coaches is due to the sex of the students coached rather than to the sex of the coaches, the coaches and the girls coached are victims of unlawful discrimination. Available from Harvard Women's Law Journal, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA 02138. (Author/IRT)

  12. What Good Coaches Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching guru Jim Knight suggests that how we think about coaching can enhance or interfere with our success as a coach. He suggests that coaches take a partnership approach to collaboration and adopt seven principles that define how coaches interact with collaborating teachers: equality, choice, voice, reflection, dialogue, praxis,…

  13. Provocative coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kukkonen, Tanja; Lilleberg, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This thesis takes part in a project called HURMOS which is conducted by Oulu University and Oulu University of Applied Sciences in cooperation with nine local companies. The project aims to examine the use of humour in business environments and discover ways of utilizing it more efficiently. The topic of provocative coaching originated from commissioner’s suggestion and was chosen due to authors’ interest in human resource management and topic’s relation to humour. The objective of this p...

  14. Third generation coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Third generation coaching unfolds a new universe for coaching and coaching psychology in the framework of current social research, new learning theories and discourses about personal leadership. Third generation coaching views coaching in a societal perspective. Coaching has become important...... as a form of dialogue because the (hyper)complexity of our society. Today, knowledge has to be shaped and applied in specific contexts and situations, and both in our personal lives and in the public space we have to learn to negotiate. Coaching can help us generate new knowledge and manage social...... transformation. Coaching thus facilitates new reflections and perspectives, as well as empowerment and support for self-Bildung processes. Third generation coaching focuses on the coach and the coachee in their narrative collaborative partnership. Unlike first generation coaching, where the goal is to help...

  15. Talent development of high performance coaches in team sports in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Ian; Campbell, Mark J; Macintyre, Tadhg Eoghan

    2017-04-01

    Coaches are central to the development of the expert performer and similarly to continued lifelong participation in sport. Coaches are uniquely positioned to deliver specific technical and tactical instruction and mentoring programmes that support the psychological and social development of athletes in a challenging, goal-oriented and motivational environment. The current study aimed to qualitatively investigate current coach learning sources and coaches' educational backgrounds in team sports in Ireland. Coaches from five team sports in Ireland were asked to complete an online questionnaire. Subsequently male coaches (n = 19) from five team sports who completed the questionnaire and met the inclusion criteria were invited to attend a follow-up semi-structured interview. Inclusion criteria for coaches were that they possess at least 10 years' experience coaching their sport and were coaching more than 4 hours per week. Formal coach education does not meet the needs of high performance coaches who rely more on self-directed learning and coaching experience as their main sources of CPD. Although prior playing experience at a high level is both valuable and desirable, there are concerns about fast-tracking of ex-players into high performance coaching roles. Preferred sources of education and the best learning environment for coaches of team sports in Ireland are more informal than formal. Further research is needed to examine how this learning is applied in a practical manner by examining coaching behaviours and the impact it has on the athlete development process.

  16. Leadership Coaching: Coaching Competencies and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Donald; Hammack, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Leadership coaching is now seen as a valuable tool to assist school leaders. Through a survey of school principals, this study identified specific coaching competencies used by leadership coaches that were perceived by principals to influence key best practices for schools. These best practices have in turn been correlated to increased student…

  17. Transpersonal Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Bonney Gulino; White, Mary Beth

    2015-08-01

    These are just a few of many stories shared by patients who have benefited from transpersonal coaching. This practice blends well with holistic nursing and can be easily applied to a variety of situations and healthcare settings. When a holistic nurse works from the assumption that the transpersonal aspect of human nature is an objective fact, it is possible to help patients gain access to their transpersonal nature and thereby experience new feelings and insights. The insights usually come in the form of images and energies and provide the personality with a greater sense of wholeness and courage.

  18. Third Generation Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Third Generation Coaching entfaltet ein neues Universum für Coaching und Coaching-Psychologie auf der Grundlage veränderter Gesellschaftsbedingungen. Wir leben in hyperkomplexen sozialen und ökonomischen Kontexten. Coaching muss sich deshalb zu einer Dialogform weiterentwickeln, die dem Einzelnen...

  19. Considering Student Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, James P.

    2014-01-01

    What does student coaching involve and what considerations make sense in deciding to engage an outside contractor to provide personal coaching? The author explores coaching in light of his own professional experience and uses this reflection as a platform from which to consider the pros and cons of student coaching when deciding whether to choose…

  20. Kollegial coaching mellem sygeplejersker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molly, Asbjørn; Høeg, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen henvender sig til afdelingssygeplejersker med interesse for coaching. Hovedbudskabet er, at kollegial coaching tilbyder en ramme, hvor det er muligt at få udviklet et sprog for ledelse. I artiklen defineres coaching ind i en sygeplejekontekst, og to afdelingssygeplejersker fra Vejle...... Sygehus fortæller om deres erfaringer med kollegial coaching....

  1. Kollegial coaching mellem sygeplejersker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molly, Asbjørn; Høeg, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen henvender sig til afdelingssygeplejersker med interesse for coaching. Hovedbudskabet er, at kollegial coaching tilbyder en ramme, hvor det er muligt at få udviklet et sprog for ledelse. I artiklen defineres coaching ind i en sygeplejekontekst, og to afdelingssygeplejersker fra Vejle...... Sygehus fortæller om deres erfaringer med kollegial coaching....

  2. Third generation coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Third generation coaching unfolds a new universe for coaching and coaching psychology in the framework of current social research, new learning theories and discourses about personal leadership. Third generation coaching views coaching in a societal perspective. Coaching has become important...... as a form of dialogue because the (hyper)complexity of our society. Today, knowledge has to be shaped and applied in specific contexts and situations, and both in our personal lives and in the public space we have to learn to negotiate. Coaching can help us generate new knowledge and manage social....... It is the author’s ambition to elevate coaching and coaching psychology to a new professional level with a new agenda. The term “third generation coaching” may be understood as a sort of manifesto – not in a normative sense but as an invitation to reconsider the main objective of coaching in late- or post...

  3. Player-Centered Coaching: Enhancing Player Game Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Learning has been defined in many ways as having a certain degree of overlap with both intelligence and development. From a movement point of view, "learning is defined as a relatively permanent change in a person's capability to execute a motor skill as a result of practice or experience." So learning is a result of an individual interacting with…

  4. Implementation of concussion guidelines in community Australian Football and Rugby League-The experiences and challenges faced by coaches and sports trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Joanne L; Newton, Joshua D; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-04-01

    While guidelines outlining the appropriate management of sport-related concussion have been developed and adapted for use within community sport, it remains unknown how they are experienced by those responsible for implementing them. Longitudinal study. 111 coaches and sports trainers from community-level Australian Football and Rugby League teams completed pre- and post-season surveys assessing their attitudes towards using concussion guidelines. Participants also provided post-season feedback regarding their experiences in using the guidelines. 71% of participants reported using the guidelines in the preceding season. Post-season attitude was related to pre-season attitude (p=0.002), football code (p=0.015), and team role (p=0.045). An interaction between team role and guideline use (p=0.012) was also found, with coaches who had used the guidelines, and sports trainers who had not, reporting more positive post-season attitudes towards using the concussion guidelines. Implementation challenges included disputing of decisions about return-to-play by players, parents, and coaches, and a perceived lack of time. Recommendations for improved guideline materials included using larger fonts and providing for witnessing of advice given to players. This is the first study to examine the implementation of concussion guidelines in community sport. Training of coaches/sports trainers needs enhancement. In addition, new education should be developed for parents/players about the importance of the return-to-play advice given to them by those who follow these guidelines. Information provided by those who attempted to use the guidelines will assist the refinement of implementation and dissemination processes around concussion guidelines across sports. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Why "The Best Way of Learning to Coach the Game Is Playing the Game": Conceptualising "Fast-Tracked" High-Performance Coaching Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, Alexander David; Evans, Adam; Piggott, David

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning of the 2013/2014 season in England and Wales, 90 head coaches of the 92 men's national professional football league clubs and 20 of the 22 men's professional rugby union clubs had tenure as a professional elite player in their respective sports. Moreover, Rynne [(2014). "'Fast track' and 'traditional path' coaches:…

  6. Perspectives on Agile Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Steven; Lundh, Erik; Davies, Rachel; Eckstein, Jutta; Larsen, Diana; Vilkki, Kati

    There are many perspectives to agile coaching including: growing coaching expertise, selecting the appropriate coach for your context; and eva luating value. A coach is often an itinerant who may observe, mentor, negotiate, influence, lead, and/or architect everything from team organization to system architecture. With roots in diverse fields ranging from technology to sociology coaches have differing motivations and experience bases. This panel will bring together coaches to debate and discuss various perspectives on agile coaching. Some of the questions to be addressed will include: What are the skills required for effective coaching? What should be the expectations for teams or individu als being coached? Should coaches be: a corporate resource (internal team of consultants working with multiple internal teams); an integral part of a specific team; or external contractors? How should coaches exercise influence and au thority? How should management assess the value of a coaching engagement? Do you have what it takes to be a coach? - This panel will bring together sea soned agile coaches to offer their experience and advice on how to be the best you can be!

  7. Team Dynamics. Implications for Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freishlag, Jerry

    1985-01-01

    A recent survey of coaches ranks team cohesion as the most critical problem coaches face. Optimal interpersonal relationships among athletes and their coaches can maximize collective performance. Team dynamics are discussed and coaching tips are provided. (MT)

  8. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation......-reported gains from coaching show that doctoral students experience coaching as an effective method to support the doctoral study process. This study also provides preliminary empirical evidence that coaching of doctoral students can facilitate the doctoral study process so that the doctoral students experience...... an enhanced feeling of progress and that they can change their study behaviour in a positive direction. The study discusses the difference between coaching and supervision, for instance power imbalances and contrary to earlier research into coaching of doctoral students this study indicates that coaching can...

  9. Playing time between senior rugby players of different ethnic groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discovery High Performance Centre, Sports Science Institute of South Africa, and MRC/UCT Research Unit for Exercise ... nutritional advice, life skills and technical rugby coaching. The ... Players were given feedback on their performance in each of the 3 ..... the skill acquisition that is required by a high-level adult player.

  10. Norwegian Football Academy Players-Players Self-Assessed Competence, Perfectionism, Goal Orientations and Motivational Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Nerland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Grounded in the theoretical framework of achievement goal theory and perfectionism theory, the purpose of this study was to examine how self-assessed perceived abilities covariance these variables among Norwegian football academy players. 140 adolescent football players participated, representing three football academies. Perceived competence was reported as equivalent to or better than others. Perfectionism scores showed personal standards as the highest of the dimensions of perfectionism, while perceived parental pressure was lowest. In contrast, mean task orientation and perceived mastery climate were higher than ego orientation and perceived performance climate. The correlation analysis showed that perceived competence correlated positively with personal standards. Personal standards correlated positively with the rest of the perfectionism dimensions as well as ego orientation, perceived mastery- and performance climate. Concern over mistakes was positively correlated with ego-orientation. Overall, findings suggested that personal standards correlate with perceived competence, while these variables also relate to other perfectionism dimensions, goal orientations and perceived motivational climate. Therefore, coaches should highlight the importance of high personal standards, as a potentially maladaptive function on talent development.

  11. Soccer Players Cultural Capital and Its Impact on Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskošek, Bojan; Vodičar, Janez; Topič, Mojca Doupona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to identify factors that constituted the cultural capital among soccer players. We assumed that in the increasingly globalized world of professional soccer, a player’s success would often depend on migrating and adjusting to life in other countries. Willingness to migrate and successful adjustment are tied to player’s previous attitudes and/or behaviours (habitus), significant support from others, including family members, and previous experiences and success in sports and education. Our hypothesised model of the cultural capital was based on the Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical framework. It consisted of 26 variables related to three sets of factors: soccer experiences, a family context and support, and educational achievements of the players and their parents. The model was tested using a sample of 79 current soccer coaches who also had been players at the elite level. A factor analysis was used to empirically verify the content of the hypothetical model of the soccer players’ cultural capital. Nine latent factors were extracted and together, they accounted for 55.01% of the total model variance. Individual factors obtained showed a sufficient level of substantial connection. The Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.77 confirmed the internal consistency of the operationalised variables in the hypothetical model. In addition, the impact of these aforementioned life dimensions on the migration of soccer players was studied. The results of the binary logistic regression analysis showed that the first factor of the hypothetical model (F1) had 2.2 times and the second factor (F8) had 3.9 times higher odds for migration abroad. Sociocultural findings using this new assessment approach could help create better “success conditions” in the talent development of young players. PMID:28031770

  12. Third Generation Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    German abstract: Auf der Grundlage aktueller Sozialforschung, neuer Lerntheorien und Diskurse der Personalführung entfaltet sich ein neues Verständnis von Coaching und Coaching-Psychologie. In der dritten Generation wird Coaching aus gesellschaftlicher Perspektive betrachtet. Wenn sich die...

  13. Becoming a 'good coach'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Frank; Claringbould, Inge; Knoppers, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to gain insight into how coaches problematized their coaching practices and the process in which they engaged to become what they perceived to be better coaches using a course based on critical reflective practice. We assumed that constant critical self-reflection would

  14. The 3 vs 1 game build-up effectiveness examination in physical and technical tests of 11-year-old football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth jr. Janos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study is to prove that young players who have been coached with the main focus on technical ability and player interaction, perform better when tested on physical and technical attributes.

  15. Existential Coaching Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Langdridge

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article I seek to elaborate a model of existential coaching psychology that is both grounded in existentialphenomenological philosophy but also informed by work in coaching. To date, many attempts to develop anexistential approach to coaching have – in my view – described an approach to coaching that is either indistinguishablefrom existential counselling and psychotherapy or a rather crude form of technical eclecticism.In this article, I discuss the key elements of existential coaching, as I understand it, and the need to modify theexistential therapeutic approach for coaching practise. To this end, I draw on extant work on coaching and,in particular, the need for both a goal and solution directed approach if an existential model of psychologicalcoaching is going to provide the basis for effective practise.

  16. SUPERSTITIOUS BEHAVIOR AMONG JUDO, TAEKWONDO AND BOXING PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Dureja

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study was designed to measure superstitious behavior among Judo, Taekwondo and Boxing players. Material: Thirty (N=30 male inter-college level players with the age group of 19-25 years were selected through purposive sampling technique to act as subjects from affiliated colleges of Panjab University, Chandigarh. They were further divided into three groups: Group-A [Judo (n=10], Group-B [Taekwondo (n=10] and Group-C [Boxing (n=10]. One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was applied to find out the differences among judo, taekwondo and boxing players. Where ‘F’ values found significant, Least Significant Differences (LSD Post-hoc test was applied to find out the direction and degree of difference. Results: The level of significance was set at 0.05. The result revealed significant differences among judo, taekwondo and boxing players on the sub parameters: clothing and appearance, preparation, team ritual and coach. However, no significant differences have been observed on the sub-parameters fetish, game/competition, prayer and parameter superstitious (Total. Conclusions: The obtained results showed significant differences on the sub-parameter Coach among Judo, Taekwondo and Boxing players. While calculating the mean values of entire groups, it has been observed that Boxing players demonstrate significantly better on the sub-parameter Coach. Therefore, it can be ascertained that Boxing players are more confident that coach bring a lucky charm to our game.

  17. Metaphorical Conceptualizations of Football Coach through Social Cognitive Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervent, Fatih; Inan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the metaphors which were used to describe the concept "football coach" by some stakeholders in football, such as players, club officials and referees. Each individual (N = 389) within the study group was asked to reveal the single metaphor s/he has in mind in respect of the concept of football…

  18. Effective Organizational and Coaching Strategies for Youth Traveling Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Jennifer; Deutsch, Joe

    2017-01-01

    In today's competitive world, many young people are getting involved in organized sports at an early age. Every single child deserves a coach who will consider the influence he or she has on the lives of their players and their love of the game. These young athletes need a mentor who leads with character and is committed to teaching them about the…

  19. THE COACH-ATHLETE RELATIONSHIP IN BASKETBALL. ANALYSIS OF THE ANTECEDENTS, COMPONENTS AND OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos\\u00E9 M. S\\u00E1nchez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the coach-athlete relationship by analyzing the determinants of the quality of that relationship, the components emerged from previous constraints and the outcomes of the relationship. We accomplished a qualitative study using semistructured in-depth interviews with a total of 4 dyads (2 coaches and 4 players selected deliberately. The data obtained suggested that the coach-athlete relationship in basketball is organized into three layers: a relationship antecedent variables (coach's and athlete's behaviour and values wanted, b components (behaviours, feelings, cognitions, improvement and maintenance strategies, and management of differences and c the consequences or outcomes (the coach and the player. In conclusion, we found that the different antecedents determine the components of the relationship, generating, in the case of positive relationships, satisfaction, wellbeing and performance, representing a personal and professional growth in both members of the dyad.

  20. Gambling and football: Epidemiological research on gambling participation and problem gambling among adult football players in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    There is not much known about the gambling behaviour of Icelandic football players. Aims of the current study were to examine the prevalence of total gambling participation and problem gambling among Icelandic football players, to examine if Icelandic football players have been involved in behaviour that could possibly be related to game fixing and to examine players attitudes towards banning coaches and players to gamble on games the Icelandic championship. Participants were 725, of which 75...

  1. Division I athletes' attitudes toward and preferences for male and female strength and conditioning coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusen, Marshall J; Rhea, Deborah J

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether male and female Division I team sport athletes prefer same-sex or opposite-sex strength and conditioning coaches. Participants included 476 (male = 275, female = 201) National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football, soccer, and volleyball athletes; the men were from football programs and the women were from soccer and volleyball programs. The Attitudes of Athletes toward Male versus Female Coaches Questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes and feelings of male and female athletes toward the gender of their strength coach (29). The results of a 2 x 2 multivariate analysis of variance (athlete gender x coach gender) revealed that the male athletes (all football players) were less comfortable with a female strength coach in all regards and preferred to have a male strength coach (p preference, nor did they have any negative attitudes toward a strength coach. The women would be productive training with any qualified strength coach, whereas the men would prefer working with a male strength coach no matter how qualified the female coach might be. As a result of this study, one suggestion is for male athletes to be exposed to female strength coaches much earlier in their sport experience. This might help reduce gender bias later in their athletic careers.

  2. Sports Training Support Method by Self-Coaching with Humanoid Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, S.; Ikeda, F.; Yasaka, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a new training support method called self-coaching with humanoid robots. In the proposed method, two small size inexpensive humanoid robots are used because of their availability. One robot called target robot reproduces motion of a target player and another robot called reference robot reproduces motion of an expert player. The target player can recognize a target technique from the reference robot and his/her inadequate skill from the target robot. Modifying the motion of the target robot as self-coaching, the target player could get advanced cognition. Some experimental results show some possibility as the new training method and some issues of the self-coaching interface program as a future work.

  3. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    .... We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork...

  4. The effects of artificial surface temperature on mechanical properties and player kinematics during landing and acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Charalambous

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: These findings highlight different demands placed on players due to the surface temperature and suggest a need for coaches, practitioners, and sports governing bodies to be aware of these differences.

  5. Drop and Give Us 20, Seifried: A Practical Response to "Defending the Use of Punishment by Coaches"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Rick

    2009-01-01

    In a recent issue of "Quest," Seifried (2008) explicitly depicted his work as an "attempt to present some rationale for supporting the use by coaches of corporal punishment in the sport setting . . . [and] to develop a defense, not previously offered, for those coaches who thoughtfully employ punishment strategies to manage their players and…

  6. Arrangement of Players Position in Soccer using the Technique of Naive Bayes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Made Trisetya Putra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the modern soccer era, soccer is already considered as an entertainment, even modern soccer already become as an industry or a business that considered can bring a great profit to the club owner. One of the most important factor in building a team is young age soccer player development. Right young age soccer player development method, can be very helpful in establish a good team. A professional team must have a coach, for the first team or junior team. The duties of a coach is determine a right position for soccer player in the game, this duties sometimes make a coach is hard to making a right decision. This research will discuss about how to design a decision support system for determine soccer player using naive bayes technique. Data mining used naive bayes technique for find a prediction for soccer player based on the player skill test result. From this research result, it can be seen that by using decision support system using data mining with naive bayes technique can be help coach performance in determine position for soccer player especially for young age soccer player development so that can help coach in the making right decision effectively and efficiently.

  7. Physiological characteristics of international female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Sarah A; Brughelli, Matt; Harris, Nigel K

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological characteristics of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) eligible international female soccer players aged 14-36 years and to determine if measures were significantly different for players selected (i.e., starters) to the starting line up for an FIFA tournament as compared with those not selected (i.e., nonstarters). Fifty-one (N = 18 Under 17; N = 18 Under 20; N = 15 Senior) international female soccer players participated in this study. The subjects underwent measurements of anthropometry (height and body mass), lower body strength (isokinetic testing), sprint kinetics and kinematics (nonmotorized treadmill), leg power (unilateral jumping), and maximal aerobic velocity (30:15 intermittent fitness test) during the final preparatory stage for an FIFA event. Outcomes of the age group data indicate that differences in physiological capacities are evident for the Under 17 players as compared with those for the Under 20 and Senior capped international players, suggesting a plateau in the acquisition of physical qualities as players mature. Starters tended to be faster (effect size [ES] = 0.55-1.0, p velocity (ES = 0.78-2.45, p velocity (ES = 0.87, p players, where maximal aerobic velocity was the primary difference between starters and nonstarters (ES = 0.83-2.45, p players. Coaches should emphasize the development of speed, maximal aerobic velocity, and leg strength in developing female soccer players.

  8. Veto players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warntjen, Andreas; Dowding, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Veto players are political actors whose consent is necessary to adopt a new policy. Put otherwise, they have veto power which allows them to prevent a change to the status quo. The concept is crucial to the influential veto player theory developed by George Tsebelis. Building on earlier work in form

  9. Veto players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warntjen, Andreas; Dowding, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Veto players are political actors whose consent is necessary to adopt a new policy. Put otherwise, they have veto power which allows them to prevent a change to the status quo. The concept is crucial to the influential veto player theory developed by George Tsebelis. Building on earlier work in form

  10. Coach behaviours and practice structures in youth soccer: implications for talent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushion, Chris; Ford, Paul R; Williams, A Mark

    2012-01-01

    Coaches are central to talent development in youth soccer and what they say and do impacts on players' achievements and well-being. Researchers have systematically observed coach behaviour and practice activities within this setting (i.e. 'what coaches do'). We review this research in light of contemporary discussion that highlights a potential 'theory-practice' divide. Our main example focuses on the discrepancy between coaching behaviour and research from the sports science sub-discipline areas of motor learning and skill acquisition that relate to how best to design practice sessions and provide instruction (i.e., 'what coaches should probably do'). The underlying reasons for this discrepancy are discussed and recommendations made to address this disparity in research, education and coach behaviours.

  11. STUDY ON THE ETHICS OF THE COACHES OF PUBLIC SPORTS CLUBS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Constantin Razvan BARBU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I identified and presented the role of ethics in the activity of the coaches. I highlighted the main issues the coaches confront in relationship with themselves or with the other participants. The morality of the coaches is important since they have an important influence on the players they train, acting, the same as the managers, as an ethic catalyst within the sport club. In this paper I presented the ethical level of the coaches from the municipal clubs of Romania, based on a sample of 40 coaches acting in 20 public sport clubs from Romania. The main finding of the paper is that the coaches demonstrated a good level of ethics in their activity.

  12. Discussion for pain of shoulder muscles in badminton player

    OpenAIRE

    兒嶋, 昇; Kojima, Noboru; 升, 佑二郎; Masu, Yujiro; 野瀬, 朋洋; Nose, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to provide a basis for the development of appropriate preventive measures during training and coaching by examining shoulder impingement in Japanese top-level university badminton players. As the contracture of muscles, such as the anterior and middle scalene muscles, as well as the infraspinatus, was likely to cause pain, it may be effective to perform conditioning to reduce such muscle contracture during coaching in order to reduce the occurrence of impairment, and impro...

  13. Integral transformational coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, W.A.J.; Nandram, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    In Chap. 12, Keizer and Nandram present the concept of Integral Transformational Coaching based on the concept of Flow and its effects on work performance. Integral Transformational Coaching is a method that prevents and cures unhealthy stress and burnout. They draw on some tried and tested spiritua

  14. Coaching touch points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, Ingrid Johnson; Kowalski, Karren

    2014-04-01

    The ability to coach staff and learners is a critical skill for current staff development educators. Coaching includes setting your intention, creating a safe space, staying present, staying curious, withholding judgment, mirroring and modeling, avoiding a set agenda, and requiring accountability.

  15. Integral transformational coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, W.A.J.; Nandram, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    In Chap. 12, Keizer and Nandram present the concept of Integral Transformational Coaching based on the concept of Flow and its effects on work performance. Integral Transformational Coaching is a method that prevents and cures unhealthy stress and burnout. They draw on some tried and tested

  16. Quality Coaching Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Scholastic sport is a double-edged sword that can have positive or negative effects. Whether those effects are positive or negative depends on those who wield that sword--chiefly, the school's sports coach. While it is clear that coaches make a difference in ensuring that educational athletics lead to beneficial outcomes for student-athletes, a…

  17. Coaching i perspektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen er en grundbog, der sætter coaching ind i et større perspektiv og en bredere sammenhæng.......Bogen er en grundbog, der sætter coaching ind i et større perspektiv og en bredere sammenhæng....

  18. Coaching som styringsteknologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anita Monnerup

    2010-01-01

    Coaching er ikke et neutralt værktøj, men producerer begrænsninger og muligheder for, hvad der kan tales om......Coaching er ikke et neutralt værktøj, men producerer begrænsninger og muligheder for, hvad der kan tales om...

  19. Coaching af dit studieliv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus Thorning

    2008-01-01

    En generel beskrivelse af de problemer specialestuderende sidder med og hvorledes coaching kan hjælpe med at (gen)skabe motivation og fokus......En generel beskrivelse af de problemer specialestuderende sidder med og hvorledes coaching kan hjælpe med at (gen)skabe motivation og fokus...

  20. Coaching Barometret 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrock, Christian; Didriksen, Vibeke; Stelter, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Coaching synes udbredt i danske organisationer og anvendes tilsyneladende i et utal af sammenhænge og på alle niveauer i organisationen. Blandt de adspurgte HR-ansvarlige er der generelt stor tilfredshed med coaching. Nærværende undersøgelse udgør et første overbliksbillede, som kan lede videre til...

  1. Coaching for viderekomne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte Gørtz, Kim Erik

    Bogen går i dybden med begrebet om coaching i en undersøgelse af, hvilken funktion og betydning filosofi kan have på og i coachprocessen......Bogen går i dybden med begrebet om coaching i en undersøgelse af, hvilken funktion og betydning filosofi kan have på og i coachprocessen...

  2. Learning Developmental Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James M.; Weintraub, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an educational intervention designed to promote the ability and willingness of MBA students to lead through coaching. MBA leadership students are trained to serve as coaches for undergraduate business students in a developmental assessment center. In this compelling context, their main source of influence is the ability to…

  3. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…

  4. Coaching Barometret 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrock, Christian; Didriksen, Vibeke; Stelter, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Coaching synes udbredt i danske organisationer og anvendes tilsyneladende i et utal af sammenhænge og på alle niveauer i organisationen. Blandt de adspurgte HR-ansvarlige er der generelt stor tilfredshed med coaching. Nærværende undersøgelse udgør et første overbliksbillede, som kan lede videre til...

  5. Are coaches' health promotion activities beneficial for sport participants? A multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoye, Aurélie; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    As major actors in sports activities, sports coaches can play a significant role in health education and contribute to the psychological well-being of young people. However, not all participants in sports activities experience sports positively, which reduces the potential benefits for health. The present study investigates if coaches' efforts to promote health increase young athletes' enjoyment, self-esteem and perceived health in daily life and decrease sport dropout. To control for the variability between teams and between clubs, multilevel modeling was applied. A sample of 342 young football players completed questionnaires assessing their perceptions of coaches' Health Promotion (HP) activities, enjoyment of sports, dropout intentions, self-esteem and perceived health in daily life. HP general score was positively related to enjoyment and perceived health as well as negatively dropout intentions. Players perceiving their coaches as promoting fair and play (Respect for oneself and others) scored higher on their perceptions of enjoyment in sport, self-esteem and self-reported health, and lower on dropout intentions. Moreover, players recognizing their coaches as encouraging their healthy lifestyle also reported higher perceptions of sport enjoyment, whereas player's perceived coaches' activities on substance use were associated with lower participants' enjoyment. These results support the importance of developing HP in sports clubs. Especially, promoting respect of oneself and others seems to be the more beneficial to sport participants. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Coaching af nystartede universitetsstuderende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Løkken, Lillith Olesen; Kyndesen, Anna Imer

    2011-01-01

    Mål: At undersøge hvorvidt fire coachingpsykologiske sessioner kunne reducere stress, angst og depressions niveau, samt forøge velvære hos 1.semesters studerende. At belyse hvilken betydning coaching får for de studerende. Design: Mixed method design med før- og eftertest, samt kontrolgruppe, (N=52......). Kvalitative interviews med fire deltagere før og efter coaching interventionen. Metode: Ni erfarne coaches gennemførte fire sessioner med 52 første semesters studerende fra Aalborg universitet. Deltagerne udfyldte DASS-21, Subjective Wellbeing Scale og Adult Hope Scale før og efter coaching interventionerne....... De kvalitative interviews blev analyseret med Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Resultater: En markant lavere stigning i depressionsniveau (DASS-21) hos coaching gruppen. Angstniveauet faldt i begge grupper, men et større fald i coachinggruppen end i ventelistegruppen. Håb-niveauet steg...

  7. Coaching af nystartede universitetsstuderende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Løkken, Lillith Olesen; Kyndesen, Anna Imer

    2011-01-01

    Mål: At undersøge hvorvidt fire coachingpsykologiske sessioner kunne reducere stress, angst og depressions niveau, samt forøge velvære hos 1.semesters studerende. At belyse hvilken betydning coaching får for de studerende. Design: Mixed method design med før- og eftertest, samt kontrolgruppe, (N=52......). Kvalitative interviews med fire deltagere før og efter coaching interventionen. Metode: Ni erfarne coaches gennemførte fire sessioner med 52 første semesters studerende fra Aalborg universitet. Deltagerne udfyldte DASS-21, Subjective Wellbeing Scale og Adult Hope Scale før og efter coaching interventionerne....... De kvalitative interviews blev analyseret med Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Resultater: En markant lavere stigning i depressionsniveau (DASS-21) hos coaching gruppen. Angstniveauet faldt i begge grupper, men et større fald i coachinggruppen end i ventelistegruppen. Håb-niveauet steg...

  8. The Coaching Process in Football – A qualitative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Sarmento

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand what the coaches observe in the game, and how they evaluate and make their intervention based on this observation. The participants were 8 experienced First Portuguese League coaches. Semi-structured interviews were carried out and the data were analysed through the technique of content analysis. The software QSR NVivo 9 was used in coding the transcripts of the interviews. According to these coaches to effectively observe and analyze the game it is crucial to have a detailed knowledge of the game and of the individual characteristics of players. They consider that the most important aspects to observe in the game are: i the 4 moments of the game; ii set pieces; iv individual characteristics of players; v random aspects of the game. Coaches have the perception that over the years their observation has become more effective and they value different aspects in the game. They consider that the factors responsible for the evolution of their observations are: i the accumulated experience; ii a better knowledge of the game; iii the academic formation. These coaches evaluate the teams in a general way focusing mainly on strengths and weaknesses and they follow a specific logic of prioritization for the evaluation of these aspects that is based mainly, in their model of the game. The intervention is done mainly through the adaptation of the training exercises, but also through visual strategies (movies, photos, etc. and meetings (individual, by sector or in group.

  9. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach.

  10. Coaches' implicit associations between size and giftedness: implications for the relative age effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furley, Philip; Memmert, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is a well-established phenomenon in education and sports. Coaches have been assumed to be important social agents of RAE via biased selection decisions in favour of children with maturation advantages. In the present research, we used the Implicit Association Test to investigate automatic associations between body size and a player's domain-specific giftedness amongst youth baseball (N = 18) and youth soccer coaches (N = 34). We found medium to strong automatic associations between body size and player giftedness (baseball: MD = 0.62; soccer: MD = 0.51). Specifically, taller players were associated with positive performance-related attributes, whereas smaller players were associated with negative attributes. The results are in line with theories of grounded cognition by showing that the abstract concept of "sport giftedness" is partly grounded in the perception of physical height amongst youth sports coaches. We argue that this grounded cognition has the potential to influence coaches' selection decisions and in turn account for RAE as coaches are biased towards physically more matured players, even when no apparent performance advantage is evident.

  11. Achievement goals and sportsmanlike attitudes in young soccer players and its association with perceived pressure from significant social agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Trindade Vaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to characterize the achievement goals and sportsmanlike attitudes in young soccer players and their association with perceived pressure from different significant social agents (parents/family, coaches, teammates and friends. The sample of the study was comprised of 118 young soccer players, aged between 11 and 19 years (M= 14.68, SD= 2.16. Athletes had 5.40 ± 2.39 years of sport experience and 71 (60.2% of the athletes had competed at a regional level, while 47 (39.8% had participated in national competitions. Participants completed a socio-demographic survey, the Task and Ego Orientation in Sports Questionnaire and the Sports Values Questionnaire. The statistical analyses involved univariate normality and descriptive, comparative and correlational analyses. Results revealed that task orientation was positively correlated with sportsmanlike attitudes (r= 0.47, p<0.01 and negatively associated with unsportsmanlike attitudes (r= −0.46, p<0.01, whereas ego orientation effects were contrary (sportsmanlike attitudes: r= −0.33, p<0.01 and unsportsmanlike attitudes: r= 0.42, p<0.01. Perceived pressures from all significant social agents were positively and significantly associated with unsportsmanlike attitudes (p<0.05, with perceived pressure from coaches also being associated with higher ego orientation scores and with lower task orientation and sportsmanlike attitudes in young soccer players. In summary, these results indicate the need for coaches and other social agents to promote a competition climate that reinforces selfreferenced improvements and the expression of positive social attitudes in sports contexts.

  12. CLASSIC APPROACH TO BUSINESS COACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Żukowska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present business coaching in a classical way. An overview of coaching definitions will be provided. Attention will be drawn to coaching components and varieties. Moreover, a brief description of coach competences and tools supporting their work will be offered. Joanna Żukowska

  13. Coaching Conversations: Enacting Instructional Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed coaching conversations and interviews of four coach/teacher partnerships for specific ways in which kindergarten and first-grade teachers, and coaches, conceptualized instructional scaffolding for guided reading. Interview transcripts were coded for coaches' and teachers' specific hypotheses/ ideas regarding instructional…

  14. COACH – EXPLORER - MANAGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđe Nićin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowdays technologies are characterised by the expert specialists. In training technologies there are also coaches-experts for some sports. Aport from governing training technology, thus he performs manager’s work (planning, programing, accomplishing, controlling, correcting the coach also performs the work of an explorer, because the work of the coach is creative, creating, exploring and it is necessary to include innovation into training process, and innovations are nothing but rehearse of someting new, what is but scientific approach to the training. More the coach succeeds in controlling more factors which influence the sport achievement, he will be more successful. To be able to do all that, the coach must observe, follow, control and correct sportist’s reactions on exercises and loads all the time. The coach demonstrates his activity even through marketing, educational psychological, administrative- technical, nutritional and entire useful social role, so his work is interdisciplinary very complex, important, public, and thus it is a subject to critics. In order to be successful, a modern coach must be an exellent expert-specialist, but also an explorer and manager, and before all a creator of training technology

  15. Coaching Methodsfor SME's

    OpenAIRE

    Kovanen, Anne; Dunn, Katriina

    2010-01-01

    The idea for this thesis was given by the founder and owner of PJHA – Piha ja Hyvinvointi Akseli, Tuula Rahkonen. This company is in the process of changing the business idea and structure, and the owner is hoping to gain some fresh ideas through coaching. The aim of this thesis was to research different coaching methods and further implement a case study on PJHA using an evolutionary coaching approach. The main focus in the thesis was on the case study and different ways to explore the evol...

  16. Coaching er varm luft!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molly, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    In this essay a new model is presented as an attempt to operationalize the otherwise slightly abstract concept of ”suitable disturbances” (coined by Humberto Maturana), which is a central concept in systemic coaching. The argument stated is that the process of ’reading’ and ’recognizing’ a coachee......’s use of a word is a necessary skill for the coach to master, in order to introduce a language game in which it becomes possible to ‘disturb’ this use in a constructive manner. This argument is exemplified in a specific coaching conversation with a school leader, whose use of the word recognition...

  17. The Sports Background, Personality, Att Itudes, and Social Competencies of Coaches and Assistant Coaches in the Just Soccer Program for Pupils with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schliermann Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to empirically analyze the sports background, personality dimensions, attitudes, and social competencies of adult head coaches and young assistant coaches involved in the German Einfach Fußball (Just Soccer program, which promotes the participation of pupils with intellectual disabilities in soccer/sports and society. Methods. The study recruited 28 head coaches and 29 assistant coaches who completed a questionnaire battery of standardized instruments (NEO Five-Factor Inventory, Interpersonal Reactivity Index, Social Self-Efficacy as well as self-developed instruments. Analysis of the data involved descriptive and inferential statistical procedures. A descriptive comparison of the assistant coaches with a normative sample of males aged 16-20 years was performed. Results. The head coaches were found with little soccer/sports experience with persons with disabilities prior to participation in the Just Soccer program. However, the majority were familiar with these persons through personal/vocational contacts. Overall, the head coaches were differentiated by formal coaching levels and playing backgrounds, with very few holding any additional formal qualifications in special education. The assistant coaches presented below average scores in the analyzed five personality dimensions when compared with the normative sample. Their attitudes and social competencies did not change during their 8-month involvement in Just Soccer. Conclusions. The findings highlight the important role of the coaching staff in the success of the Just Soccer program. Coaches involved in such activities should be familiarized with needs of people with disabilities, be stress-resistant, and possess a balanced set of personality traits. In addition, the results suggest that such individuals should be coaches/players from conventional soccer clubs instead of special school physical education teachers.

  18. Coaching effectiveness: the coach-athlete relationship at its heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Sophia

    2017-08-01

    Coaching has been often viewed as a context within which coaches operate to largely bring about changes in athlete's performance and wellbeing. One key factor to successful outcomes in coaching is the quality of the relationship between coaches and athletes. In this article, I propose that the coach-athlete relationship is at the heart of coaching. Moreover, the aim is to describe and explain how the quality of the relationship coaches and athletes develop and maintain over the course of their sporting partnership alongside coaches and athletes' knowledge and outcomes, form a system that is capable of defining coaching effectiveness and success. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Profile of childrens' hockey coaches and motives of participation and resignation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallanzani, C

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to outline a demographic profile of Quebec minor hockey coaches and (b) to identify their motives of involvement and resignation. A questionnaire was completed by 333 current coaches and by 175 former coaches from the Quebec City area. Results showed that these volunteers are very similar on all counts. They are fathers of at least one boy who is a hockey player, and they come from all socio-economic strata. They are former hockey players and are well aware of the activities of the professional teams. They perceive themselves as being competent coaches and are satisfied with their results. They highly value hockey as a means of education and perceive their own role of volunteer as being an unselfish one geared toward youth education. On the other hand, they perceive the other volunteers' involvement as being self-interested and mainly due to the child's primary participation.

  20. Technical player profiles related to the physical fitness of young female volleyball players predict team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Romero, C; Hernández-Mocholí, M A; García-Hermoso, A

    2015-03-01

    This study is divided into three sequential stages: identification of fitness and game performance profiles (individual player performance), an assessment of the relationship between these profiles, and an assessment of the relationship between individual player profiles and team performance during play (in championship performance). The overall study sample comprised 525 (19 teams) female volleyball players aged 12-16 years and a subsample (N.=43) used to examine study aims one and two was selected from overall sample. Anthropometric, fitness and individual player performance (actual game) data were collected in the subsample. These data were analyzed through clustering methods, ANOVA and independence chi-square test. Then, we investigated whether the proportion of players with the highest individual player performance profile might predict a team's results in the championship. Cluster analysis identified three volleyball fitness profiles (high, medium, and low) and two individual player performance profiles (high and low). The results showed a relationship between both types of profile (fitness and individual player performance). Then, linear regression revealed a moderate relationship between the number of players with a high volleyball fitness profile and a team's results in the championship (R2=0.23). The current study findings may enable coaches and trainers to manage training programs more efficiently in order to obtain tailor-made training, identify volleyball-specific physical fitness training requirements and reach better results during competitions.

  1. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  2. Tredje generations coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    , vi dagligt skal forholde os til. Forfatterens forestilling om coaching tager udgangspunkt i en analyse af vort samfund – et samfund, der er kendetegnet af diversificering, identitetsudfordringer, ophævelse af vidensmonopolet, livslang uddannelse, nødvendighed til selvrefleksion mm. Bogen skal har...... dermed et særligt profil. Den skal markere (og skubbe til) en ny trend i coaching, som afgrænser sig fra pop coaching og GROW model o.l.. Coaching kan aldrig være ”the quick fix”. Vores tid tillader det bage ikke. Disse samfundsmæssige forandringer er grundlaget for coachingens eksistens og udbredelse......, men de skal også være fundament for den måde vi bedriver coaching. Derfor plæderer bogens forfatter for en 3. generations coaching i en form, hvor coachen og fokuspersonen mindre er fokuseret på løsninger, men i højere grad optaget af at skabe et rum til (selv)refleksion gennem en samskabende praksis....

  3. Tredje generations coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    ”Tredje generations coaching” udfolder et nyt univers for coaching og coachingpsykologi gennem en bearbejdelse af aktuel samfundsforskning, nye læringsteorier og diskurser om det personlige lederskab. ”Tredje generations coaching” er funderet på en samfundsmæssig forståelse af coaching. Coaching er...... blevet så betydningsfuld, fordi samfundet opleves som uoverskueligt og hyperkomplekst. Viden skal nu udformes og anvendes i specifikke kontekster og situationer, og både i privatliv og i det offentlige rum skal vi lære at forhandle os til rette. Coaching kan hjælpe os til at skabe ny viden og mestre...... sociale forhandlinger. Coaching er dermed en slags fødselshjælp til nye refleksioner og perspektiver, en hjælp til selvhjælp og en støtte til ens egen selvdannelsesproces. ”Tredje generations coaching” fremhæver coach og coachee i deres narrativ-samskabende partnerskab. Til forskel fra første generations...

  4. Tredje generations coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    ”Tredje generations coaching” udfolder et nyt univers for coaching og coachingpsykologi gennem en bearbejdelse af aktuel samfundsforskning, nye læringsteorier og diskurser om det personlige lederskab. ”Tredje generations coaching” er funderet på en samfundsmæssig forståelse af coaching. Coaching er...... blevet så betydningsfuld, fordi samfundet opleves som uoverskueligt og hyperkomplekst. Viden skal nu udformes og anvendes i specifikke kontekster og situationer, og både i privatliv og i det offentlige rum skal vi lære at forhandle os til rette. Coaching kan hjælpe os til at skabe ny viden og mestre...... sociale forhandlinger. Coaching er dermed en slags fødselshjælp til nye refleksioner og perspektiver, en hjælp til selvhjælp og en støtte til ens egen selvdannelsesproces. ”Tredje generations coaching” fremhæver coach og coachee i deres narrativ-samskabende partnerskab. Til forskel fra første generations...

  5. Tredje generations coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    , vi dagligt skal forholde os til. Forfatterens forestilling om coaching tager udgangspunkt i en analyse af vort samfund – et samfund, der er kendetegnet af diversificering, identitetsudfordringer, ophævelse af vidensmonopolet, livslang uddannelse, nødvendighed til selvrefleksion mm. Bogen skal har...... dermed et særligt profil. Den skal markere (og skubbe til) en ny trend i coaching, som afgrænser sig fra pop coaching og GROW model o.l.. Coaching kan aldrig være ”the quick fix”. Vores tid tillader det bage ikke. Disse samfundsmæssige forandringer er grundlaget for coachingens eksistens og udbredelse......, men de skal også være fundament for den måde vi bedriver coaching. Derfor plæderer bogens forfatter for en 3. generations coaching i en form, hvor coachen og fokuspersonen mindre er fokuseret på løsninger, men i højere grad optaget af at skabe et rum til (selv)refleksion gennem en samskabende praksis....

  6. Relationship between performance variables and baseball ability in youth baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hiroki; Nagami, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Kiwako; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated the relationship of performance variables and anthropometric measurements on baseball ability in 164 youth baseball players (age: 6.4-15.7 years). To evaluate their baseball performance, ball speeds in pitching and batting were recorded and kinetic energies of the pitched and hit balls were calculated. To record anthropometric and physical fitness characteristics, height and weight were measured and a battery of physical fitness tests covering standing long jump, side steps, sit-ups, 10-m sprint, trunk flexion, back strength, and grip strengths of both hands were conducted. The results of a multiple regression analysis revealed several significant predictors: age, body mass index (BMI), standing long jump, 10-m sprint, and grip strength for pitched ball kinetic energy and age, BMI, standing long jump, and back strength for hit ball kinetic energy. This study provides scientific evidence that relates certain specific physical performance tests and body characteristics with high achievement in the actual performance of pitching and batting. Youth players, their parents, coaches, and trainers would benefit by addressing these characteristics when planning training programs to improve the baseball performance of youth players.

  7. DAS COACHING FUR DIE KARRIERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleseriu Cristina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coaching means change and transformation. This is the people`s ability to change their behavior, to rediscover and to create a new identity and new plans for the future. The coaching is divided, at this moment, in three categories: business coaching, executive coaching and live skills coaching. If we are talking about career coaching, we can say that this one is present in all its stages: if the person is choosing the first job, if the person is changing the workplace during the career and if the person is retiring.

  8. Coaches' Preferences for Continuing Coaching Education in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubayi, Alliance; Coopoo, Yoga; Morris-Eyton, Heather

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine coaches' preferences for continuing coaching education. The sample consisted of 122 male and 102 female coaches from the Gauteng Province of South Africa who were purposively recruited to participate in this study. The results of this study showed that the coaches wanted to learn more about motivational techniques, advanced instructional drills, advanced first aid, goal setting, character building and conditioning drills. The results further indicated that sport coaches would be more likely to continue their coaching education if they had a desire to coach at a high level, if topics were relevant and if courses were in line with league requirements and were available online. The practical implications of the findings for the development of coaching education programmes in South Africa were discussed.

  9. A competence executive coaching model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Koortzen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Psychologists in industry are increasingly required to provide executive coaching services in their organisations or as part of their consulting services. An evaluation of coaching models as well as the development needs of individuals being trained as coaches, both locally and internationally, has led the authors to believe that there is a need for a competence executive coaching model.Research purpose: The purpose of this article is to address the training and development needs of these consulting psychologists by presenting a competence executive coaching model for the planning, implementation and evaluation of executive coaching interventions.Research design, approach and method: The study was conducted while one of the authors was involved in teaching doctoral students in consulting psychology and executive coaching, specifically in the USA. The approach involved a literature review of executive coaching models and a qualitative study using focus groups to develop and evaluate the competence executive coaching model.Main findings: The literature review provided scant evidence of competence executive coaching models and there seems to be a specific need for this in the training of coaches in South Africa. Hence the model that was developed is an attempt to provide trainers with a structured model for the training of coaches.Contribution/value-add: The uniqueness of this competence model is not only described in terms of the six distinct coaching intervention phases, but also the competencies required in each.

  10. Telephone-Based Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Mindy; Sanna, Rashel S; Adams, Sara R; Goler, Nancy C; Brown, Susan D; Neugebauer, Romain S; Ferrara, Assiamira; Wiley, Deanne M; Bellamy, David J; Schmittdiel, Julie A

    2017-03-01

    Many Americans continue to smoke, increasing their risk of disease and premature death. Both telephone-based counseling and in-person tobacco cessation classes may improve access for smokers seeking convenient support to quit. Little research has assessed whether such programs are effective in real-world clinical populations. Retrospective cohort study comparing wellness coaching participants with two groups of controls. Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large integrated health care delivery system. Two hundred forty-one patients who participated in telephonic tobacco cessation coaching from January 1, 2011, to March 31, 2012, and two control groups: propensity-score-matched controls, and controls who participated in a tobacco cessation class during the same period. Wellness coaching participants received an average of two motivational interviewing-based coaching sessions that engaged the patient, evoked their reason to consider quitting, and helped them establish a quit plan. Self-reported quitting of tobacco and fills of tobacco cessation medications within 12 months of follow-up. Logistic regressions adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and primary language. After adjusting for confounders, tobacco quit rates were higher among coaching participants vs. matched controls (31% vs. 23%, p Coaching participants and class attendees filled tobacco-cessation prescriptions at a higher rate (47% for both) than matched controls (6%, p coaching was as effective as in-person classes and was associated with higher rates of quitting compared to no treatment. The telephonic modality may increase convenience and scalability for health care systems looking to reduce tobacco use and improve health.

  11. Evaluation of sports nutrition knowledge of New Zealand premier club rugby coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Caryn; Schofield, Grant; Wall, Clare

    2006-04-01

    Little is known about if and how team coaches disseminate nutrition information to athletes. In a census survey, New Zealand premier rugby coaches (n = 168) completed a psychometrically validated questionnaire, received by either Internet or standard mail (response rate, 46%), identifying their nutrition advice dissemination practices to players, their level of nutrition knowledge, and the factors determining this level of knowledge. The majority of coaches provided advice to their players (83.8%). Coaches responded correctly to 55.6% of all knowledge questions. An independent t-test showed coaches who imparted nutrition advice obtained a significantly greater score, 56.8%, than those not imparting advice, 48.4% (P = 0.008). One-way ANOVA showed significant relationships between total knowledge score of all coaches and qualifications [F(1,166) = 5.28, P = 0.001], own knowledge rating [F(3,164) = 6.88, P = 0.001] and nutrition training [F(1,166) = 9.83, P = 0.002]. We conclude that these rugby coaches were inadequately prepared to impart nutrition advice to athletes and could benefit from further nutrition training.

  12. Coaching the Coach: A Program for Development of Faculty Portfolio Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopechek, Jack; Bardales, Cheryl; Lash, A Todd; Walker, Curtis; Pfeil, Sheryl; Ledford, Cynthia H

    2017-01-01

    Faculty coaching is recognized as an essential element for effective use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education, yet best practices for training these coaches are uncertain. New portfolio coaches participated in a multifaceted training program that included orienting modules, a 7.5-hr training workshop featuring analysis of reflective writing, an Observed Structured Teaching Exercise (OSTE), and subsequent longitudinal coaches' meetings for timely task training. Four desired coaching skills were emphasized in the initial training: creating a safe environment, explicitly using performance data, asking questions that elicit reflection, and guiding the student to develop future goals and plans. We collected and analyzed several outcomes: (a) coaches' self-assessment at key intervals, (b) open-ended written responses to three coaching vignettes, (c) video recordings of the OSTE, and (d) subsequent student evaluation of the coach. In an attempt to capture learning from the workshop, both the responses to written vignettes and the video-recorded encounters were coded for presence or absence of the four desired skills. Our portfolio and coaching program was instituted as part of a major undergraduate medical education reform. A new cohort of 25 coaches is enrolled with each matriculating student class, and each coach is assigned to work individually with 8-10 students, forming a coaching relationship that continues over 4 years. Coaches are compensated at 5% full-time equivalent. On coach self-assessment, the majority of coaches reported significant improvement in their perceived ability to assess a student's level of reflection, enhance reflection, use performance data, and guide a student to develop goals and plans. After two semesters, coach perception of improved abilities persisted. Students rated coaches as excellent (82%), reporting that coaches created safe environments (99%), promoted insight (92%), and aided in goal setting (97%). Written responses to

  13. Coaching Considerations: FAQs Useful in the Development of Literacy Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The National Advisory Board for the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse have identified a number of considerations that it believed needed further discussion as schools, districts, and states embrace literacy coaching. It negotiated and discussed a number of issues surrounding coaching and agreed on 10 key ideas that should be part of the discussions…

  14. Advances in coaching: family therapy with one person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, M; Carter, B

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the process of "coaching" individuals in their efforts to change themselves in the context of their nuclear and parental family systems. Although this approach is regarded as one of the major modes of intervention in family therapy, the actual methods and techniques for intervention are not widely understood. Moreover, we have expanded the Bowen approach to address powerful cultural and family life cycle influences. The goal of coaching is to help clients define themselves proactively in relationship to others in their families without emotionally cutting off or giving in. Coaching begins by training clients to become observers and researchers of their own role in the family and of family patterns of behavior. Coaching then moves to help them bring their behavior more in line with their deepest beliefs, even if this means upsetting family members by disobeying family "rules."

  15. Peer Coaching: Teachers Supporting Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donegan, Mary M.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Fowler, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes peer coaching as a method for teacher improvement and offers guidelines for establishing a peer coaching program for early childhood and early childhood special education teachers and related services professionals. It also identifies common problems and possible solutions of peer coaching programs. Sample forms for use in…

  16. The Principal as Formative Coach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidus, Gabrielle; Sadder, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Formative coaching, an approach that uses student work as the foundation for mentoring and professional development, can help principals become more effective instructional leaders. In formative coaching, teaches and coaches analyze student work to determine next steps for instruction. This article shows how a principal can use the steps of the…

  17. The Power of Virtual Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

  18. A Comparison of Players’ and Coaches’ Perceptions of the Coach-Created Motivational Climate within Youth Soccer Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerløkken, Nina Elise; Lorås, Håvard; Pedersen, Arve Vorland

    2017-01-01

    The coach-created motivational climate within youth sports teams has been shown to be of great importance for the quality of youths’ sports experiences as well as their motivation for continuing or discontinuing sport participation. While the player’s perspective on motivational climates has been studied extensively, the coach’s perspective has received considerably less attention. Thus, little is known about the concordance of perceptions of the motivational climate between coaches and their players, or the lack thereof. The purpose of the present study was to directly compare players’ and coaches’ perceptions of the motivational climate within their respective teams. To this end, 256 male and female soccer players (15–17 years of age) from 17 different teams and their coaches (n = 29) responded to the Perceived Motivational Climate in Sports Questionnaire-2 (PMCSQ-2). The study design included responses from both coaches and players to the same questionnaire, and both groups were aware of the other part’s participation. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences between players’ and coaches’ perceptions of the motivational climate. Specifically, players of both sexes perceived the motivational climate to be significantly more performance-oriented and significantly less mastery-oriented compared with the coaches. These findings may advance our understanding of the coach-athlete relationship, and may be of importance for understanding players’ motivation for persistence or discontinuation of the sport. PMID:28203217

  19. Advancing the Practice of Health Coaching: Differentiation From Wellness Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Melinda H

    2016-09-01

    The increasing demand for health coaches and wellness coaches in worksite health promotion and the marketplace has resulted in a plethora of training programs with wide variations in coaching definitions, content, attributes, and eligibility of those who may train. It is in the interest of public awareness and safety that those in clinical practice take the lead in this discussion and offer a reasonable contrast and comparison focusing on the risks and responsibilities of health coaching in particular. With the endorsement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the National Society of Health Coaches, whose membership is primarily nurses, discusses the issue and states its position here.

  20. Evaluating Australian football league player contributions using interactive network simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jonathan; Bedford, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL) players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line ". Key pointsA simulated interaction matrix for Australian Rules football players is proposedThe simulations were carried out by fitting unique negative binomial distributions to each player pairing in a sideEigenvector centrality was calculated for each player in a simulated matrix, then for the teamThe team centrality measure adequately predicted the team's winning marginA player's net effect on margin could hence be estimated by replacing him in

  1. Leder som coach

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, John Kurt; Kornerup, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Through the last century there have been great changes in the relation between managers and em-ployees. Now company and employee want development special personal development. Many com-panies choose to make the manager coach for his employees. Whitmore says that the coach should not be partial toward the employee and there may not be any power. According to Foucault this is not possible because the manager has personal interests and decides how the employee shall work so he can not been neut...

  2. Coaching er varm luft!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molly, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    ’s use of a word is a necessary skill for the coach to master, in order to introduce a language game in which it becomes possible to ‘disturb’ this use in a constructive manner. This argument is exemplified in a specific coaching conversation with a school leader, whose use of the word recognition...... is explored using questions based on keywords and the mirror technique, and thereby stimulating a change in the coachee’s perception of the word, which gives rise to new possibilities of action....

  3. Coaching under pressure: a study of Olympic coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusoga, Peter; Maynard, Ian; Hays, Kate; Butt, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The Olympic environment has been identified as particularly stressful and unlike any other in terms of the media attention and focus placed on the competition. While the potential negative consequences of stress for coaches and their athletes have been explored, relatively little is known about the factors underpinning successful Olympic coaching performance. We explored elite coaches' perceptions of the factors that enable them to coach in a stressful Olympic environment. Eight coaches from one of Great Britain's most successful Olympic teams (i.e. consistent medal winners in the previous three Olympics) were interviewed. Inductive content analysis indicated that psychological attributes (e.g. emotional control), preparation (e.g. strategic approach), and coping at the event (e.g. team support) were factors that coaches perceived as important for successful Olympic coaching. In addition, coaches offered specific suggestions for training and development. Key themes included coach interaction (e.g. mentoring, formalizing contact) and simulating Olympic pressure. These findings offer suggestions for the education of developing coaches on the pathway to elite sports coaching.

  4. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach

    OpenAIRE

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete’s behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample ...

  5. Mellemlederes erfaringer med coaching af medarbejdere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Michael Spaten

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available 15 middle managers from a major Danish, nationwide company were trained to coach by two coaching psychologiststhrough theoretical presentations, individual coaching and peer coaching sessions with direct supervision(learning-by-doing, (see Spaten, 2011b. Until now there has been conducted rather limited empiricalresearch on managers who coach their employees. The aim was to investigate the managers challenging andsuccessful experiences when coaching their employees and how these coaching sessions were assessed by theiremployees. The qualitative analysis elicited three main themes: 1 coaching skills, 2 professional and personaldevelopment, and 3 the coaching relationship and power relations. Middle managers’ coaching skills were assessedvery positively by employees across all coaching sessions. One key finding of the study is that the manageras coach, should be very sensitive and empathetic in building the coaching relationship, be aware of the powerrelations and make clear boundaries between the role as leader and the role as coach.

  6. Working with values in coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    : - Existential coaching - Protreptic coaching as a philosophically inspired coaching approach - Third-generation coaching as a narrative-collaborative practice The overall objective of this chapter is to present and discuss the state of knowledge about values as a central aspect of the coaching process...... to stay on track, value reflections are seen as a fundamental basis for our sensemaking and our fundamental orientation in life. Values are the entrance point to our lived knowledge and practical wisdom. According to Flyvbjerg (2001, p. 4), instrumental rationality needs to be balanced by value...

  7. Coaching: the art of creating exceptional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack, M L

    1997-01-01

    Functioning as a Coach is a key role for a manager and, in fact, distinguishes the manager as a leader. Coaching focuses on two distinct areas: 1) coaching to orient employees to new situations, and 2) coaching for performance with employees who are showing marginal performance, who are meeting expectations, or who are showing high performance. This article describes coaching for orientation and for performance, identifies coaching skills, and provides a coaching self-assessment.

  8. Mellemlederes erfaringer med coaching af medarbejdere

    OpenAIRE

    Ole Michael Spaten

    2012-01-01

    15 middle managers from a major Danish, nationwide company were trained to coach by two coaching psychologiststhrough theoretical presentations, individual coaching and peer coaching sessions with direct supervision(learning-by-doing, (see Spaten, 2011b)). Until now there has been conducted rather limited empiricalresearch on managers who coach their employees. The aim was to investigate the managers challenging andsuccessful experiences when coaching their employees and how these coaching se...

  9. EVALUATING AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYER CONTRIBUTIONS USING INTERACTIVE NETWORK SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sargent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line".

  10. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  11. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching fr

  12. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  13. Coaching af sygedagpengemodtagere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coop Henriksen, Annemette

    SFI gennemførte i foråret 2008 til foråret 2009 en pilotundersøgelse om coaching. Undersøgelsen var designet som et lodtrækningsforsøg og omfattede 42 kvindelige sygedagpengemodtagere fra Rødovre Jobcenter, der var sygemeldt med psykiske lidelser i form af stress, depression eller udbrændthed eller...... med lidelser i bevægeapparatet. Undersøgelsen er bestilt og finansieret af Rødovre Jobcenter. I rapporten undersøges, om coaching kan bidrage til at bringe sygedagpengemodtagere i arbejde eller tættere på arbejdsmarkedet målt ved, om deltagerne får fx øget motivation, mere selvtillid, øget afklaring...... og færre symptomer på sygdom. Undersøgelsen viser, at gruppen, der har modtaget coaching, oplever en positiv udvikling i forhold til stress, depression og udbrændthed. Gruppen, der modtog coaching, har den tydeligste positive udvikling, men begge grupper har oplevet en helbredsmæssig fremgang i...

  14. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  15. Evaluating the heading in professional soccer players by playing positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Nurtekin

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and coordination of heading in professional soccer players of different positions. A total of 243 professional soccer players were examined for the study. The Federation Internationale de Football Association Medical Assessment and Research Center (F-MARC) test battery was used to evaluate heading in soccer players. In the heading of the ball thrown from middle of the goal, forwards were better than goalkeepers (p heading of the ball thrown from the right side of the goalpost, defenders were better than goalkeepers (p heading of goalkeepers being worse than the others; goalkeepers use their hands in both training and matches, whereas for forwards and defensive players being better than goalkeepers depends mainly on their positions in soccer. Trainers and coaches should give place specific training programs to improve heading ability in the training schedule of soccer players at a professional level.

  16. Child Sleep Coaches: Current State and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jodi A; Owens, Judith A; Babcock, Debra; Crabtree, Valerie McLaughlin; Ingram, David

    2016-11-20

    Given the genuine gaps in the availability of clinical sleep services for children, sleep coaching as a field has emerged and appears to be significantly increasing. Sleep coaches are typically individuals who provide individualized services, often via the Internet or phone, to families of infants and young children (and increasingly to older children, adolescents, and adults as well) with sleep problems. At this time, there is no universally accepted definition of sleep coach, nor are there clear guidelines regarding educational background, training requirements, scope of practice, or credentialing. To start to address the needs of families seeking the services of a sleep coach, educational materials were developed for parents and health care providers regarding issues to consider. Furthermore, there is a need going forward that (1) the designation sleep coach or consultant be clear and well defined, with a clear standard of care and scope of practice; (2) there is a standard core body of knowledge included in all training programs; (3) a certification process is developed for sleep coaches that is reputable and has recognizable and clear standards; and (4) that care for sleep problems in infants and young children are available to diverse populations, irrespective of socioeconomic status.

  17. Concussion knowledge and management practices among coaches and medical staff in Irish professional rugby teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, M R; Coughlan, G F; Hart, E C; McCarthy, C

    2015-06-01

    Self-reported concussion rates among U-20 and elite rugby union players in Ireland are 45-48%. Half of these injuries go unreported. Accurate knowledge of concussion signs and symptoms and appropriate management practices among coaches and medical staff is important to improve the welfare of players. Examine concussion knowledge among coaches, and management techniques among medical staff of professional Irish rugby teams. Surveys were administered to 11 coaches and 12 medical staff at the end of the 2010-2011 season. Coaches demonstrated an accurate knowledge of concussion with a good understanding of concussion-related symptoms. Medical staff reported using a variety of methods for assessing concussion and making return-to-play decisions. Reliance on subjective clinical methods was evident, with less reliance on objective postural stability performance. Overall, the coaches in this investigation have accurate knowledge of concussion and medical staff use effective techniques for managing this injury. On-going education is needed to assist coaches in identifying concussion signs and symptoms. It is recommended that medical staff increase their reliance on objective methods for assessment and return-to-play decision making.

  18. Safety Tips: Basketball (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that he or she is playing too much basketball, work with coaches to try a reduced or modified schedule. A Few Other Reminders If it's on-court and serious, make sure a responsible adult — be it a coach, parent, or referee — is on hand. Kids probably won't need ...

  19. Behavioral Coaching to Improve Offensive Line Pass-Blocking Skills of High School Football Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, John V.; Luiselli, James K.; Reed, Derek D.; Fleming, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated several behavioral coaching procedures for improving offensive line pass-blocking skills with 5 high school varsity football players. Pass blocking was measured during practice drills and games, and our intervention included descriptive feedback with and without video feedback and teaching with acoustical guidance (TAG). Intervention…

  20. Coaching as a tool of managerial support

    OpenAIRE

    Żukowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The article is the introduce to coaching empirical research. There will be shown the coaching definition, perfect coaching process, all procedures and ways to deal coaching conversation. Moreover the paper will present the skills of asking questions in coaching. Joanna Żukowska

  1. Coaching Discourse: Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Sally F.

    2013-01-01

    Although coaching is used in many schools to facilitate teachers' professional learning, few studies look closely at coaching discourse. Exploring how coaching facilitates teachers' professional development, this study used tape-recorded coaching sessions and individual post-interviews to examine the one-on-one coaching interactions of 4…

  2. When middel managers are doing employee coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Flensborg, Winnie

    2013-01-01

    and personal development; and (3) the coaching relationship and power relation. Results: The study found that the manager as coach should be highly sensitive and empathetic in building the coaching relationship, should be aware of the power relation, and should draw clear boundaries between their role...... as leader and their role as coach. The middle managers’ coaching skills were assessed very positively by employees....

  3. Nutritional knowledge of UK coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

    2014-04-10

    Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice.

  4. Nutritional Knowledge of UK Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Cockburn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163 completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a if they provided nutritional advice; (b their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%, even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05. Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05. In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice.

  5. Coaching af sygedagpengemodtagere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coop Henriksen, Annemette

    SFI gennemførte i foråret 2008 til foråret 2009 en pilotundersøgelse om coaching. Undersøgelsen var designet som et lodtrækningsforsøg og omfattede 42 kvindelige sygedagpengemodtagere fra Rødovre Jobcenter, der var sygemeldt med psykiske lidelser i form af stress, depression eller udbrændthed eller...... med lidelser i bevægeapparatet. Undersøgelsen er bestilt og finansieret af Rødovre Jobcenter. I rapporten undersøges, om coaching kan bidrage til at bringe sygedagpengemodtagere i arbejde eller tættere på arbejdsmarkedet målt ved, om deltagerne får fx øget motivation, mere selvtillid, øget afklaring...

  6. Executive Coaching Practices in the Adult Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campone, Francine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of key principles and practices in executive coaching. Coaching is discussed as a reflective learning opportunity and offers the theoretical grounding, strategies, and case studies for each of four key elements of a coaching engagement.

  7. Mentoring & coaching: It perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Colomo-Palacios, Ricardo; Casado-Lumbreras, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The development of the intellectual capital of the corporations nowadays represents one of the most significant challenges for the managers of and one of the most fertile fields for the enterpreneurial innovation. The present article shows a vision over two of the techniques of formation of people with greater impact at the present time: the Mentoring and the Coaching. Both terms have been object of debates regarding to their applications, existing, in spite of their notoriety, great confusio...

  8. Masculinity, moral atmosphere, and moral functioning of high school football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A; Rutkowski, Leslie A; Vaughan, Ellen L; Steinfeldt, Matthew C

    2011-04-01

    In order to identify factors associated with on-field moral functioning among student athletes within the unique context of football, we examined masculine gender role conflict, moral atmosphere, and athletic identity. Using structural equation modeling to assess survey data from 204 high school football players, results demonstrated that moral atmosphere (i.e., the influence of coaches and teammates) was significantly associated with participants' process of on-field moral functioning across the levels of judgment, intention, and behavior. Neither masculine gender role conflict nor athletic identity significantly predicted moral functioning, but the results indicated that participants' identification with the athlete role significantly predicted conflict with socialized gender roles. Results suggest that in the aggressive and violent sport of football, coaches can have a direct influence on players' moral functioning process. Coaches can also have an indirect effect by influencing all the players so that a culture of ethical play can be cultivated among teammates and spread from the top down.

  9. Managerial coaching: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Vicki D; Yoder, Linda H

    2012-07-01

    This article presents a report of a concept analysis of managerial coaching. Managerial coaching has been identified as a means for managers to give support to staff nurses, however, no clear delineation of what behaviours and attributes constitute managerial coaching or differentiate it from other career development relationships is provided in the current nursing literature. The CINAHL, ProQuest, Business Source Complete and PscyhIFNO databases were searched for articles published between 1980-2009 using the keywords coaching, managerial coaching, nurse manager support, nursing leadership, self-efficacy, work environment and empowerment. A hybrid approach was used, incorporating both Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis and King's conceptual system and Theory of Goal Attainment to explore the meaning of managerial coaching. Inclusive years of search ranged from 1980-2009. Managerial coaching is a specific dyadic relationship between the nurse manager and staff nurse intended to improve skills and knowledge as they relate to expected job performance. Antecedents and consequences are categorized at the individual and organizational level. Defining attributes, empirical referents and a model case are presented. The theoretical definition for this concept helps to differentiate it from other types of career development relationships and will give a basis for nurse managers to understand what skills and attributes are necessary to establish an effective managerial coaching relationship with staff nurses. Conceptualization will also assist in developing empirical studies examining managerial coaching behaviours in the work environment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Elements of an Art - Agile Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, Erik

    This tutorial gives you a lead on becoming or redefining yourself as an Agile Coach. Introduction to elements and dimensions of state-of-the-art Agile Coaching. How to position the agile coach to be effective in a larger setting. Making the agile transition - from a single team to thousands of people. How to support multiple teams as a coach. How to build a coaches network in your company. Challenges when the agile coach is a consultant and the organization is large.

  11. Intention to use sport concussion guidelines among community-level coaches and sports trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Joshua D; White, Peta E; Ewing, Michael T; Makdissi, Michael; Davis, Gavin A; Donaldson, Alex; Sullivan, S John; Seward, Hugh; Finch, Caroline F

    2014-09-01

    Sporting bodies have developed guidelines for managing community-level players with suspected concussion in response to international consensus statements on concussion in sport. The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that influence the intended use of concussion guidelines among community-level coaches and sports trainers from two popular football codes in Australia: Australian football and rugby league. Cross-sectional survey. The survey, based on an extended theory of planned behaviour model, was completed by 183 Australian football coaches, 121 Australian football sports trainers, 171 rugby league coaches, and 142 rugby league sports trainers. Personal norms and self-efficacy were significant predictors of intention to use concussion guidelines, although the relationship between self-efficacy and intention was stronger among Australian football coaches than rugby league coaches. Analysis of the salient beliefs that underpin self-efficacy found that coaches, irrespective of football code, felt less familiar (χ(2)=25.70, psports trainers in using the concussion guidelines. At the same time, Australian football personnel, irrespective of their team role, felt that they had insufficient time (χ(2)=8.04, psport concussion guidelines should focus on enhancing self-efficacy and leveraging personal norms. Increasing coaches' familiarity and experience in using the concussion guidelines would also be warranted, as would finding ways to overcome the perceived time and resource constraints identified among Australian football personnel. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coaching: A Philosophy, Concept, Tool and Skill

    OpenAIRE

    John BAX; Magdalena NEGRUTIU; CALOTĂ Traian-Ovidiu

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays you will come across the word ‘coaching’ anytime and anywhere in the world. It is used in education, but also in business. It is used in big organizations, but also in small ones. It is used in non-profit organizations, but also in profit ones. It is used on an executive level, but also on the work floor. You come across various types of coaching, like personal coaching, buddy coaching, peer coaching, executive coaching, board coaching, business coaching, performance coaching, etc. B...

  13. Mellemlederes erfaringer med coaching af medarbejdere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael

    2012-01-01

    rather limited empirical research on managers who coach their employees. The aim was to investigate the managers challenging and successful experiences when coaching their employees and how these coaching sessions were assessed by their employees. The qualitative analysis elicited three main themes: 1......) coaching skills, 2) professional and personal development, and 3) the coaching relationship and power relations. Middle managers’ coaching skills were assessed very positively by employees across all coaching sessions. One key finding of the study is that the manager as coach, should be very sensitive...

  14. Coaching: A Philosophy, Concept, Tool and Skill

    OpenAIRE

    John BAX; Magdalena NEGRUTIU; Traian-Ovidiu CALOTĂ

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays you will come across the word ‘coaching’ anytime and anywhere in the world. It is used in education, but also in business. It is used in big organizations, but also in small ones. It is used in non-profit organizations, but also in profit ones. It is used on an executive level, but also on the work floor. You come across various types of coaching, like personal coaching, buddy coaching, peer coaching, executive coaching, board coaching, business coaching, performance coaching, etc. B...

  15. How Coaching Forensics Made Me a Better Writing Coach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    The author, a high school teacher and forensics coach, describes ways to teach writing--including on-demand essays--that draw on successful practices she developed in coaching. Students learn the importance of using personal conviction and qualified thesis statements to build arguments, as well as learning "The Debater Four-Step," an effective…

  16. How Coaching Forensics Made Me a Better Writing Coach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    The author, a high school teacher and forensics coach, describes ways to teach writing--including on-demand essays--that draw on successful practices she developed in coaching. Students learn the importance of using personal conviction and qualified thesis statements to build arguments, as well as learning "The Debater Four-Step," an effective…

  17. L’essenza del coaching. [The essence of coaching].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Luigi Bragazzi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Both Alessandro Pannitti and Franco Rossi have a solid and reputed experience of several years in the field of Coaching, and in this book they have provided the readers with their expert, authoritative overview on the different coaching techniques...

  18. Coaching: A Philosophy, Concept, Tool and Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John BAX

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays you will come across the word ‘coaching’ anytime and anywhere in the world. It is used in education, but also in business. It is used in big organizations, but also in small ones. It is used in non-profit organizations, but also in profit ones. It is used on an executive level, but also on the work floor. You come across various types of coaching, like personal coaching, buddy coaching, peer coaching, executive coaching, board coaching, business coaching, performance coaching, etc.But what exactly is coaching? Is it a philosophy, a concept, a tool or a skill? When is it useful, and when not. And how can coaching be applied in everyday life? In this article I will give a short summary of important elements of coaching.

  19. Coaches Guide to Sport Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, Larry M.

    This guide for athletic coaches offers a practical approach to the administrative functions of organizing, planning, leading, and controlling. Included are chapters on coaching administration, fund raising, organizing competitions, and designing effective budgets and controls. The guide addresses the following topics: (1) the categories of…

  20. Coaching for Tests. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, Barbara

    The term "coaching" applies to a variety of types of test preparation programs which vary in length, instructional method, and content. Most research on the effectiveness of coaching has examined the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), a measure of academic abilities used to predict college performance. This ERIC Digest reviews studies of…

  1. Coaches Guide to Sport Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, Larry M.

    This guide for athletic coaches offers a practical approach to the administrative functions of organizing, planning, leading, and controlling. Included are chapters on coaching administration, fund raising, organizing competitions, and designing effective budgets and controls. The guide addresses the following topics: (1) the categories of…

  2. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  3. Embracing Coaching as Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    Because the author and his colleagues at the Center for Leadership and Learning Communities believe that instructional coaching is one of the most exciting developments in education in a long time, they have examined the questions this new strategy has raised for education leaders: Should coaching replace some traditional forms of teacher…

  4. Analysis of motor activities of professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Marcin; Chmura, Jan; Pluta, Beata; Kasprzak, Andrzej

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distance covered by professional soccer players during matches with the use of the computerized match analysis system Amisco Pro® (version 1.0.2, Nice, France). Kinematic examination included the specification of the distance covered by 31 players participating in 4 matches in the Union of European Football Association Cup competitions during the 2008-2009 season. Data were analyzed based on players' positions on the pitch, changes in the players' motor activity intensity level, and match period (first or second half). The results of statistical analysis revealed that the average total distance covered by all players (n = 31) was 11,288 ± 734 m. With respect to the player's position on the pitch, the midfielders traveled the longest average distance (11,770 ± 554 m) during the game. This was 3% longer than the distance achieved by the attackers at 11,377 ± 584 m, and 7% longer than that achieved by the defenders 10,932 ± 728 m. The analysis of physical loads on soccer players during a match is highly useful for training individualization. It provides a tool for effective planning and for recording the loads on players, which is an indispensable element of modern coaching.

  5. Intermittent Testing and Training for High-Level Football Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    Football is the most popular sport in the world, played by over 400 million men and women. In addition to the wide range of sport-specific technical and tactical skills needed, several physical components have been shown to be necessary to perform at a high level. The present PhD thesis is based...... on four articles that focus on physical testing and training for elite and sub-elite football players.The first article (Study I) aims to identify and establish aerobic capacities and anthropometric characteristics of elite female football players with the use of laboratory tests, and to examine whether...... with other field tests the Yo-Yo IR2 has become an important tool for monitoring the physical fitness of football players. However, the burden of testing, for players (physically and mentally) and the coaching staff (time consuming), is large and there is a probability that the tests may contain overlapping...

  6. Between coaching and social counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Vrana

    2012-03-01

    The basic difference between coaching and social counselling lies in a different interpretation of the client' starting situation. Social counselling understands the client' starting situation as problematic and attempts to normalize it, while coaching understands it as normal and attempts to develop it. The key similarity of the two approaches is encour- agement of the clients' own initiative. Coaching needs to be investigated within the field of developmental conceptions, since its focus on results supports, unintentionally, the dominant developmental paradigm. Focusing on solutions in coaching is questionable also within an organization, where its interests may channel the course of clients' search for their own solutions. The counselling doctrine of coaching can gain valuable insights by a reassessment of the concepts of development and normality, a domain in which it is likely to encounter social counselling.

  7. Differences Between Perceived and Registered Behavior of Basketball Coaches After Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Longarela Pérez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the behavior of youth club basketball coaches after a shot in real-competition situations. Six licensed coaches of the Spanish Basketball Federation took part in this study; all the teams competed in the Galician league (Spain in the 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 seasons. There were five men’s teams and one women’s team, with players between 11 and 17 years old. To record the behavior, a new instrument was used based mainly on the Coach Behaviour Assessment System (CBAS, which also incorporates some of the adjustments made in the SOCE (Sistema Observación Conductas Entrenador developed by Montero. The instrument was designed to analyze the behavior of coaches after their players have taken shots. In total, 38 official matches were analyzed. Registered behaviors were compared with auto-perceived data in the same situation. From the results obtained, significant differences between the registered behavior and the auto-perception of the coaches are evident.

  8. In Pursuit of Becoming a Senior Coach: The Learning Culture for Australian Football League Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Clifford J.; Rossi, Tony; Rynne, Steven B.; Tinning, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the turbulent and highly contested environment in which professional coaches work, a prime concern to coach developers is how coaches learn their craft. Understanding the learning and development of senior coaches (SCs) and assistant coaches (ACs) in the Australian Football League (AFL--the peak organisation for…

  9. In Pursuit of Becoming a Senior Coach: The Learning Culture for Australian Football League Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Clifford J.; Rossi, Tony; Rynne, Steven B.; Tinning, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the turbulent and highly contested environment in which professional coaches work, a prime concern to coach developers is how coaches learn their craft. Understanding the learning and development of senior coaches (SCs) and assistant coaches (ACs) in the Australian Football League (AFL--the peak organisation for…

  10. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  11. Factors influencing the implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention strategies by girls soccer coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Elizabeth A; Taylor, John R; Novak, Melissa A; Chen, Michael; Fink, Barbara P; Porucznik, Christina A

    2013-08-01

    Women are 3 times more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while playing soccer than men. ACL injury prevention programs (IPPs) involving stretching and strengthening drills can reduce the incidence of ACL injury when incorporated into routine training. The rate of implementation among coaches is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of implementation of ACL IPP, to identify factors that influence implementation, and to acquire information to assist in design dissemination and implementation strategies. Study subjects were coaches of woman soccer players aged 11-22 years in Utah (n = 756). Data were gathered using a Web-based survey followed by a qualitative study in which "best practice coaches"-coaches who met criteria for successful implementation of ACL IPP-were interviewed via telephone. A minority of survey respondents, 19.8% (27/136), have implemented ACL IPP. Factors associated with successful implementation include length of coaching experience and presence of additional support staff such as a strength and conditioning coach or athletic trainer. Best practice coaches (14/136) unanimously agreed on the following: (a) there are performance-enhancing benefits of ACL IPP, (b) education on ACL injury prevention should be required for licensure, and (c) dissemination and implementation will require soccer associations to enact policies that require IPPs. In conclusion, a minority of girls soccer coaches have implemented ACL IPP and those that have do so because they believe that prevention improves performance and that soccer organizations should enact policies requiring ACL injury prevention education and implementation. Efforts to implement ACL IPP should be driven by soccer organizations, emphasize performance-enhancing benefits, and engage additional coaching staff.

  12. A guide to third generation coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    Introduces a new conceptual framework for coaching practice Unique approach connects coaching to societal changes in society, work and life Strong focus on the importance of values and meaning in the coaching process Provides excellent material for ambitious practitioners and high level coaching...

  13. A Gift to Self: Leadership Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the distinction between mentoring, therapy, and coaching is made, with a focus on the value of leadership coaching. Seven attributes to consider when selecting a coach and a framework describing the value proposition for retaining a coach are presented.

  14. Background Review of Existing Literature on Coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Nikki Aikens; Lauren Akers

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we identify studies that link coaching and specific coaching models with outcomes for classrooms, providers, and children, while also highlighting critical aspects of coaching. Specifically, we summarize the research base for coaching as a professional development tool, including the strengths and weaknesses of this research.

  15. Coaching af ph.d.-studerende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    Rapporten danner grundlag for at etablere et koncept for ph.d.-coaching. Erfaringerne fra et 2-årigt projekt om ph.d.-coaching i SCKK regi beskrives. De centrale temaer er tilrettelæggelse af den individuelle coaching, typiske temaer i coachingen og arbejdsdeling mellem coach og vejleder. Der er...

  16. Danish health professionals' experiences of being coached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne I; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze he...... health professionals' experiences from coaching-what coaching meant to them and how it influenced different aspects of their lives....

  17. Instructional Coaching in One Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Cheryl Ann

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines a model of instructional coaching in a middle school using interviews and observations of both teachers and their coaches. During the 2012-2013 school year, Creekside Middle School implemented a new model of instructional coaching that differed from the traditional model of coaching; it focused on student learning…

  18. Understanding good practice in workplace coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Skoumpopoulou, Dimitra

    2017-01-01

    Workplace coaching is growing rapidly and many organisations use it as a way to motivate and support their employees in their careers. This paper is a theoretical paper that draws upon the authors' experiences of workplace coaching. The author discusses the main aspects of successful workplace coaching while it summarises the most important behaviours and attitudes of an effective workplace coach.

  19. Communication Strategies Used by Physical Education Teachers and Coaches in Residential Schools for the Deaf in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurková Petra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine what communication and instructional techniques including coaching strategies were being implemented by coaches and physical education (PE teachers working in residential or day schools for the deaf throughout the U. S. Further, to share this information with coaches and PE teachers in general education classrooms. Questionnaire was answered electronically from 32 coaches and PE teachers (38 % return rate. Topics in the survey included: a types of sports/PE classes; b mode of communication used; c coaching and teaching techniques; d coaching and teaching strategies; e breakdowns in communication; f advice to new coaches a teachers starting out in the field. Advice for new coaches, who had not previously worked with the individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH, six themes emerged: become fluent in ASL, remember to get the student’s attention before you start signing, use a lot of modelling, role playing, and videos (when needed, keep it simple, stress the fundamentals and insist on repetition until skills are mastered, and be flexible, each player will learn differently. Our results suggest that targeted and adapted communication strategies in PE and physical activities play important role for individuals who are D/HH.

  20. The future of coaching as a profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lane, David A.; Stelter, Reinhard; Rostron, Sunny Stout

    2010-01-01

    of the potential benefits to the industry of professional status has led to participation in international dialogues, such the Global Convention on Coaching (GCC) and the International Coaching Research Forum (ICRF). The GCC was established with the explicit aim of promoting consultation and exploration of areas......The popularity of coaching worldwide is seen in an array of international coaching conferences, burgeoning coach training and education, and emergent professional bodies for coach practitioners. This escalating demand has motivated coach practitioners, consumers and educators of coaching...... to advocate the professionalisation of the industry to ensure the quality of coaching services. Coaching as a form of practice is now widely adopted, although recognition as a profession remains contentious and patchy with different jurisdictions taking contrary views on its legitimacy. A growing awareness...

  1. Long-Term Prognostic Validity of Talent Selections: Comparing National and Regional Coaches, Laypersons and Novices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schorer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In most sports, the development of elite athletes is a long-term process of talent identification and support. Typically, talent selection systems administer a multi-faceted strategy including national coach observations and varying physical and psychological tests when deciding who is chosen for talent development. The aim of this exploratory study was to evaluate the prognostic validity of talent selections by varying groups 10 years after they had been conducted. This study used a unique, multi-phased approach. Phase 1 involved players (n = 68 in 2001 completing a battery of general and sport-specific tests of handball ‘talent’ and performance. In Phase 2, national and regional coaches (n = 7 in 2001 who attended training camps identified the most talented players. In Phase 3, current novice and advanced handball players (n = 12 in each group selected the most talented from short videos of matches played during the talent camp. Analyses compared predictions among all groups with a best model-fit derived from the motor tests. Results revealed little difference between regional and national coaches in the prediction of future performance and little difference in forecasting performance between novices and players. The best model-fit regression by the motor-tests outperformed all predictions. While several limitations are discussed, this study is a useful starting point for future investigations considering athlete selection decisions in talent identification in sport.

  2. Coaching for creativity, imagination, and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiello, Jolanta

    2006-01-01

    The Chartered Institute of Personal Development (CIPD) has acknowledged the rise of coaching, and has developed a set of standards to guide the coaching profession. The aim of this discussion paper is to explore the potential of creative coaching. What it could offer professional practitioners, and to investigate what professionals understand to be the components of creative coaching. In order, to reach conclusions and recommendations on how the professional coach can practically engage with ...

  3. Effects of Peer-Assessed Feedback, Goal Setting and a Group Contingency on Performance and Learning by 10-12-Year-Old Academy Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Josh E.; Kinchin, Gary; Clarke, Gill

    2012-01-01

    Background: Coaches developing young talent in team sports must maximise practice and learning of essential game skills and accurately and continuously assess the performance and potential of each player. Relative age effects highlight an erroneous process of initial and on-going player assessment, based largely on subjective opinions of game…

  4. The Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S): A psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, A; Lundqvist, C

    2016-01-01

    The present study validated a Swedish version of the 47-item Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S). Sample 1 consisted of 506 team sport athletes [262 men and 244 women; mean age: 22.20, standard deviation (SD) = 3.90] distributed across 41 coaches at the two highest national levels of various sports. Athletes completed the CBS-S and established questionnaires of coaching behaviors (LSS), self-confidence (CSAI-2R), and coach-athlete relationship (CART-Q). An additional sample of 39 basketball players (21 men and 18 women; mean age = 17.40, SD = 2.39) completed the CBS-S twice, approximately 4 weeks apart. Confirmatory factor analysis showed an acceptable model fit for the seven-factor version of the CBS-S, although two items of the negative personal rapport subscale displayed insufficient factor loadings. Correlations between the subscales of the CBS-S and established instruments were in accordance with theoretical expectations, supporting the concurrent validity. Cronbach's alpha (> 0.82) for all dimensions provided support for the reliability of the CBS-S, and test-retest correlations indicated moderate stability over time. Cultural differences in the assessment of coaching behaviors and the usability of the CBS-S by coaches for self-reflection and development are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The effectiveness of workplace coaching: A meta-analysis of learning and performance outcomes from coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, RJ; Woods, SA; Guillaume, YRF

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a meta-analysis synthesizing the existing research on the effectiveness of workplace coaching. We exclusively explore workplace coaching provided by internal or external coaches and therefore exclude cases of manager-subordinate and peer coaching. We propose a framework of potential outcomes from coaching in organizations, which we examine meta-analytically (k = 17). Our analyses indicated that coaching had positive effects on organizational outcomes overall (δ = 0.36), an...

  6. The Effectiveness of Workplace Coaching: A Meta-analysis of Learning and Performance Outcomes from Coaching.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Rebecca J.; Woods, S.A.; Guillaume, Y.R.F.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a meta-analysis synthesizing the existing research on the effectiveness of workplace coaching. We exclusively explore workplace coaching provided by internal or external coaches and therefore exclude cases of manager-subordinate and peer coaching. We propose a framework of potential outcomes from coaching in organizations, which we examine meta-analytically (k = 17). Our analyses indicated that coaching had positive effects on organizational outcomes overall ( = 0.36), an...

  7. Effective Strategies for Communicating with Parents in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mullem, Pete; Cole, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Participation in athletics provides student-athletes a place to develop autonomy and grow socially through interactions with peers, parents, and coaches (Torres & Hager 2013). Coaches entrusted by parents to guide and nurture their child's sport experience fulfill the role of teacher, counselor, colleague, mentor, supervisor, and leader…

  8. Tuning in to Kids: An Emotion-Focused Parenting Program--Initial Findings from a Community Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Sophie S.; Wilson, Katherine R.; Harley, Ann E.; Prior, Margot R.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated a new group parenting program, Tuning in to Kids, which taught emotion coaching skills to parents of preschool children. In a randomized control trial, 218 primary caregiver parents of children aged 4.0-5.11 years completed questionnaires assessing parent emotion socialization (emotion coaching vs. emotion dismissing), parent…

  9. Managing player load in professional rugby union: a review of current knowledge and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrie, Kenneth L; Raftery, Martin; Blackie, Josh; Cook, Christian J; Fuller, Colin W; Gabbett, Tim J; Gray, Andrew J; Gill, Nicholas; Hennessy, Liam; Kemp, Simon; Lambert, Mike; Nichol, Rob; Mellalieu, Stephen D; Piscione, Julien; Stadelmann, Jörg; Tucker, Ross

    2017-03-01

    The loads to which professional rugby players are subjected has been identified as a concern by coaches, players and administrators. In November 2014, World Rugby commissioned an expert group to identify the physical demands and non-physical load issues associated with participation in professional rugby. To describe the current state of knowledge about the loads encountered by professional rugby players and the implications for their physical and mental health. The group defined 'load' as it relates to professional rugby players as the total stressors and demands applied to the players. In the 2013-2014 seasons, 40% of professional players appeared in 20 matches or more, and 5% of players appeared in 30 matches or more. Matches account for ∼5-11% of exposure to rugby-related activities (matches, team and individual training sessions) during professional competitions. The match injury rate is about 27 times higher than that in training. The working group surmised that players entering a new level of play, players with unresolved previous injuries, players who are relatively older and players who are subjected to rapid increases in load are probably at increased risk of injury. A mix of 'objective' and 'subjective' measures in conjunction with effective communication among team staff and between staff and players was held to be the best approach to monitoring and managing player loads. While comprehensive monitoring holds promise for individually addressing player loads, it brings with it ethical and legal responsibilities that rugby organisations need to address to ensure that players' personal information is adequately protected. Administrators, broadcasters, team owners, team staff and the players themselves have important roles in balancing the desire to have the 'best players' on the field with the ongoing health of players. In contrast, the coaching, fitness and medical staff exert significant control over the activities, duration and intensity of training

  10. Health coaching: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeanette M

    2014-01-01

    Variations in the use of health coaching documented in the literature indicate a lack of conceptual clarity. The purpose of this article was to clarify the meaning of health coaching and propose an operational definition. Seven attributes were identified and used to propose an operational definition of health coaching as a goal-oriented, client-centered partnership that is health-focused and occurs through a process of client enlightenment and empowerment. This operational definition and the proposed empirical measures of each attribute can be used to validate the presence of health coaching, develop theory-based applications, and consistently test the effectiveness of interventions using this concept. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Identifying competencies of boxing coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tasiopoulos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out the management skills required by boxing coaches to administrate their clubs. For the purposes of this study a scale was constructed which was answered by 98 boxing coaches. Explanatory factor analysis revealed seven factors: Communication-public relations (5 items, event management (4 items, management techniques (4 items, new technologies (4 items, prevention-safety (2 items, sport (5 items and sports facilities (2 items. The Cronbach of the scale was 0.85. The five competencies that rated by the coaches were: Supervisors of the area of training, maintaining excellent communication with athletes, using new technologies (e-mail, internet, handling disciplinary matters, accidents, complaints and reports on some sporting games and promoted harmony among athletes. We concluded that boxing coaches understand that the competencies required for meeting their obligations, were related to sports, prevention, safety and communications-public relations.

  12. Knowledge and management of sports concussions among coaches and certified athletic trainers in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftel, Kimberly G; Yust, Elizabeth M; Nichols, Michele H; King, William D; Davis, Drew

    2014-07-01

    To identify modifiable barriers in resources, knowledge, and management that may improve the care of young athletes with concussions in the state of Alabama. An electronic survey was distributed to 2668 middle and high school coaches of contact sports in Alabama, and a paper survey was completed by 79 certified athletic trainers (ATCs) in 2010. Questions focused on their resource availability, knowledge of concussions based on the 2008 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport: the 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sport (commonly known as the Zurich consensus statement), and management of concussions. A total of 402 (16% response rate) coaches and 55 ATCs (70% response rate) responded to the survey. This study highlights that ATC coverage often is limited to the high school level, football, and competitions. Both coaches and ATCs primarily use physicians to make return-to-play decisions, although coaches (43.7%) usually refer to primary care physicians, whereas ATCs (43.6%) refer to orthopedic or sports medicine physicians. The study also revealed that coaches and ATCs desire education and could expand concussion awareness by providing education to parents and athletes. No overall difference was seen in the knowledge and management of concussions between coaches and ATCs; however, ATCs were more likely to identify symptoms that are positive for concussions (P = 0.04). Both groups had difficulty recognizing subtle symptoms such as trouble sleeping, personality changes, and dizziness; they also were unaware that strenuous mental activities could delay concussion recovery, although ATCs scored significantly better than coaches (P Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (7.5% vs 56.4%) or neuropsychological testing (5.3% vs 14.5%). This study describes coaches' and ATCs' varying knowledge and management techniques and highlights areas in which targeted interventions and outreach could be useful. These areas include increased ATC availability, coach/ATC concussion

  13. Self-Regulation of Practice Behavior Among Elite Youth Soccer Players : An Exploratory Observation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toering, Tynke; Elferink-Gemser, Marije; Jordet, Geir; Jorna, Casper; Pepping, Gert-Jan; Visscher, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to measure behavioral correlates of self-regulation in elite youth soccer players. Behaviors regarded as indicative of self-regulated learning were identified by interviewing six expert youth soccer coaches. These behaviors were observed during practice of eight elite youth soccer

  14. Self-Regulation of Practice Behavior Among Elite Youth Soccer Players : An Exploratory Observation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toering, Tynke; Elferink-Gemser, Marije; Jordet, Geir; Jorna, Casper; Pepping, Gert-Jan; Visscher, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to measure behavioral correlates of self-regulation in elite youth soccer players. Behaviors regarded as indicative of self-regulated learning were identified by interviewing six expert youth soccer coaches. These behaviors were observed during practice of eight elite youth soccer p

  15. DAS COACHING FÜR DIE KARRIERE

    OpenAIRE

    Fleseriu Adam; Fleseriu Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Coaching means change and transformation. This is the people`s ability to change their behavior, to rediscover and to create a new identity and new plans for the future. The coaching is divided, at this moment, in three categories: business coaching, executive coaching and live skills coaching. If we are talking about career coaching, we can say that this one is present in all its stages: if the person is choosing the first job, if the person is changing the workplace during the career and if...

  16. A team fares well with a fair coach: Predictors of social loafing in interactive female sport teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, M; Boen, F; De Cuyper, B; Høigaard, R; Vande Broek, G

    2015-12-01

    The present research aimed to develop and test a theoretical model that links players' perceived justice of the coach to a more optimal motivational climate, which in turn increases players' team identification and cohesion, and results in lower levels of social loafing in female sport teams. Belgian elite female basketball, volleyball, and football players (study 1; N = 259; M(age)  = 22.6) and Norwegian world-class female handball players (study 2; N = 110; M(age)  = 22.8) completed questionnaires assessing players' perceived justice (distributive and procedural), motivational climate, team identification, team cohesion (task and social), and social loafing (perceived and self-reported). In both studies, confirmatory and exploratory path analyses indicated that perceived justice was positively related to a mastery climate (P social loafing decreased (P < 0.05). The findings of both independent studies demonstrated the impact of coaches' fairness, and consequently, the motivational climate created by the coach on the optimal functioning of female sport teams. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Athlete Characteristics and Team Competitive Performance as Moderators for the Relationship Between Coach Transformational Leadership and Athlete Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Kai C; Schulte-Coerne, Paul; Diebig, Mathias; Rowold, Jens

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the effects of coaches' transformational leadership on player performance. To advance existing research, we examine (a) effects on individual and team performance and (b) consider joint moderating effects of players' win orientation and teams' competitive performance on the leadership- individual performance link. In a three-source sample from German handball teams, we collected data on 336 players and 30 coaches and teams. Results showed positive main effects of transformational leadership's facet of articulating a vision (AV) on team and individual performance and negative main effects of providing an appropriate model (PAM) on team performance. With regard to moderating effects, AV increased and PAM decreased individual performance when both moderators were low, and intellectual stimulation had a positive effect when both were high. This study expands insights into the potential and limitation of transformational leadership with a strong focus on the role of situational contingencies.

  18. Catching the Bug: How Virtual Coaching Improves Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Megan

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author describes virtual coaching and why it is so effective. The following six points of virtual coaching are explained: (1) Also known as bug-in-ear coaching, virtual coaching is not new; (2) Virtual coaching can save money and time; (3) Bug-in-ear coaching increases the frequency of observations for novice teachers; (4) It…

  19. Planning the diffusion of a neck-injury prevention programme among community rugby union coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Alex; Poulos, Roslyn G

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a theory-informed and evidence-informed, context-specific diffusion plan for the Mayday Safety Procedure (MSP) among community rugby coaches in regional New South Wales, Australia. Step 5 of Intervention Mapping was used to plan strategies to enhance MSP adoption and implementation. Coaches were identified as the primary MSP adopters and implementers within a system including administrators, players and referees. A local advisory group was established to ensure context relevance. Performance objectives (eg, attend MSP training for coaches) and determinants of adoption and implementation behaviour (eg, knowledge, beliefs, skills and environment) were identified, informed by Social Cognitive Theory. Adoption and implementation matrices were developed and change-objectives for coaches were identified (eg, skills to deliver MSP training to players). Finally, intervention methods and specific strategies (eg, coach education, social marketing and policy and by-law development) were identified based on advisory group member experience, evidence of effective coach safety behaviour-change interventions and Diffusion of Innovations theory. This is the first published example of a systematic approach to plan injury prevention programme diffusion in community sports. The key strengths of this approach were an effective researcher-practitioner partnership; actively engaging local sports administrators; targeting specific behaviour determinants, informed by theory and evidence; and taking context-related practical strengths and constraints into consideration. The major challenges were the time involved in using a systematic diffusion planning approach for the first time; and finding a planning language that was acceptable and meaningful to researchers and practitioners.

  20. EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR THE ACQUISITION OF PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE BY YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Feu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the educational means that coaches of school-aged children utilize to acquire their professional knowledge. Youth basketball coaches (n=118 with a heterogeneous education coming from different educational means participated in the study. Of them, 81.7% were previously basketball players. As a measurement instrument, a modified version of the scale by Feu (2006 was utilized to determine the coach's professional knowledge. The new scale had 21 items distributed in seven dimensions that corresponded to three theoretical factors. The items were answered with a 5-point Likert scale. The statistical analysis consisted of an exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation and self-values >1 in order to determine the latent structure of the relationships between the scale's items. Previously, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin index and Bartlett's sphere test were analyzed. The reliability of the scale and the sub-scales was studied through the Cronbach's Alpha coefficient. The means, standard deviations, and correlations between item and scale as well as item and ub-scale were analyzed. The exploratory factor analysis, after the elimination of five items, and the Cronbach's Alpha coefficients demonstrated that the scale and sub-scales had some adequate psychometric properties (a>.70. All the items obtained item and sub-scale correlations greater than .40. Formal education was the factor that had the greatest acceptance among the coaches (M=21.71+,-4.63 followed by acquired experiences as a player (M=16.70+,-5.64, and then the acquired experiences and innovations as a coach (M=13.45+,-2.97. The scale that was utilized has adequate validity and reliability to determine how the coach constructs his/her professional knowledge.

  1. Intermittent Testing and Training for High-Level Football Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    systematic differences between the playing positions can be detected. Lately, field tests have become more frequently used in football than the laboratory tests used in Study I. Study II therefore aims to assess the validity of one of them, the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2). Along...... with other field tests the Yo-Yo IR2 has become an important tool for monitoring the physical fitness of football players. However, the burden of testing, for players (physically and mentally) and the coaching staff (time consuming), is large and there is a probability that the tests may contain overlapping...... on the Yo-Yo IR2 test and other field- and laboratory tests of intermittent interval training performed as anaerobic speed-endurance production training is very limited for football players. Hence, this latter question is examined in Study IV.In Study I we find no differences in anthropometric...

  2. Exploring Coaching Actions Based on Developed Values: A Case Study of a Female Hockey Coach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callary, Bettina; Werthner, Penny; Trudel, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    There are few empirical studies that demonstrate how values are developed and how they are linked to coaching actions. There can be a discrepancy between the statement of coaches' values and their actual coaching actions. In order to examine how coaching actions are influenced by values that are developed over a lifetime, the purpose of this…

  3. Implementation of a Coaching Program for School Principals: Evaluating Coaches' Strategies and the Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Jason; Preston, Courtney; Goldring, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-phase coaching model that was implemented to help principals improve their instructional leadership practices. We then discuss a rubric based on this coaching model that we used to evaluate coaches' implementation of key model phases and to identify principals' responses to the coaching. After presenting the leadership…

  4. Coaching in style: A sequential analysis of interpersonal styles in coach-client interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ianiro, P.M.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Kauffeld, S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - Despite calls for studying interaction processes in coaching, little is known about the link between coach-client interactions and coaching success. In particular, interpersonal behavior in coaching remains unexplored, although it is considered highly relevant to social relationships and

  5. Coaching Conversations in Early Childhood Programs: The Contributions of Coach and Coachee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Marvin, Christine; Knoche, Lisa; Bainter, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Studies to date have linked early childhood (EC) coaching to child, family, and teacher outcomes but have not investigated "what" is happening in a coaching conversation. This exploratory study specifically unpacks nuances associated with the coaching conversation process and associations between the EC coaches' behaviors and coachees'…

  6. Implementation of a Coaching Program for School Principals: Evaluating Coaches' Strategies and the Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Jason; Preston, Courtney; Goldring, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-phase coaching model that was implemented to help principals improve their instructional leadership practices. We then discuss a rubric based on this coaching model that we used to evaluate coaches' implementation of key model phases and to identify principals' responses to the coaching. After presenting the…

  7. Coaching in style: A sequential analysis of interpersonal styles in coach-client interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ianiro, P.M.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Kauffeld, S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - Despite calls for studying interaction processes in coaching, little is known about the link between coach-client interactions and coaching success. In particular, interpersonal behavior in coaching remains unexplored, although it is considered highly relevant to social relationships and i

  8. Coaches' and Principals' Conceptualizations of the Roles of Elementary Mathematics Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkind, Gwenanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Many schools employ coaches to support mathematics instruction and student learning. This research study investigated the roles of coaches from five school districts in Virginia. Participants included 125 elementary mathematics coaches and 59 principals. Results from cross-sectional surveys revealed that most coaches did not have a degree in…

  9. Informal Math Coaching by Instant Messaging: Two Case Studies of How University Students Coach K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Edman, Anneli; Andersson, Fredrik; Kawnine, Tanvir; Soames, Carol-Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and explore how instant messaging (IM) can be used to support informal math coaching. We have studied two projects where university students use IM to coach K-12 students in mathematics. The coaches were interviewed with a focus on how informal coaching works by examining coaching challenges, how coaching can…

  10. ANTROPOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS AND MOTOR SKILLS OF YOUNG MONTENEGRO BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovan Ljubojević

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Testing and measurement in basketball is basically supposed to help in the initial evaluation and interpretation of features and capabilities of players that are important for their activity. The main objective of testing is the possibility of obtaining information about the three general indicators in basketball practice, namely: the level of current results in certain ability, the pace of results improvement in the ability and stability of the results in tests of ability. For this purpose, testing and measurement of young basketball players, members of the Montenegro under-18 team, was carried out. The aim of this paper is to present the basic features and capabilities of young basketball players of Montenegro and their comparison with some other teams. Variables from anthropometry space were measured: body height, arm span, reach height, body mass. Motor skills were observed by variables: the last squat, thrust from a flat bench, rear thrust, lying-sitting for 30 seconds, sargent test, long jump, 20 yard test, kamikaze, špagat, sitting bow. Based on the processed results it can be concluded that the motor skills of our young players, tested in this study, are at the level of the young players of other representations. The results will be of great help to coaches who work with these players.

  11. Partner randomized controlled trial: study protocol and coaching intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbutt Jane M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with asthma live with frequent symptoms and activity limitations, and visits for urgent care are common. Many pediatricians do not regularly meet with families to monitor asthma control, identify concerns or problems with management, or provide self-management education. Effective interventions to improve asthma care such as small group training and care redesign have been difficult to disseminate into office practice. Methods and design This paper describes the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate a 12-month telephone-coaching program designed to support primary care management of children with persistent asthma and subsequently to improve asthma control and disease-related quality of life and reduce urgent care events for asthma care. Randomization occurred at the practice level with eligible families within a practice having access to the coaching program or to usual care. The coaching intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Targeted behaviors included 1 effective use of controller medications, 2 effective use of rescue medications and 3 monitoring to ensure optimal control. Trained lay coaches provided parents with education and support for asthma care, tailoring the information provided and frequency of contact to the parent's readiness to change their child's day-to-day asthma management. Coaching calls varied in frequency from weekly to monthly. For each participating family, follow-up measurements were obtained at 12- and 24-months after enrollment in the study during a telephone interview. The primary outcomes were the mean change in 1 the child's asthma control score, 2 the parent's quality of life score, and 3 the number of urgent care events assessed at 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes reflected adherence to guideline recommendations by the primary care pediatricians and included the proportion of children prescribed controller medications

  12. Coaching the Mentor: Facilitating Reflection and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen P.; Brobeck, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the process of coaching a mentor of experienced teachers. In particular, we sought to determine if coaching would help a mentor to compare her espoused beliefs about mentoring to her mentoring behaviors and possibly resolve any dissonance. The mentor and coach (the co-researchers) participated in a platform…

  13. Toward a Theory of Coaching Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple tensions exist as part of the coaching process. How a coach responds to these tensions is a fundamental determinant of an athlete or team's fate. In today's highly competitive, socially demanding, and ever-changing sports environment, and as the expectations on coaches become more complex, the paradox becomes a critical lens to…

  14. Developing Reflection and Teaching through Peer Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlin, Rebecca P.

    2000-01-01

    This newsletter highlights the development of reflection and teaching skills in preservice teachers via peer coaching. Peer coaching in preservice programs can serve as an induction program, while with experienced teachers it can serve as professional development. Research suggests that peer coaching contributes to the development of effective…

  15. Preservice Teacher Observations in Peer Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jayne M.; Garn, Alex; Jenkins, Patience

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify what and how preservice teachers observe when peer coaching during an early field experience. Twenty-three male and 14 female preservice teachers trained in peer coaching participated in the study. Coaches observed a peer partner teach five 40-min lessons to small groups of elementary or junior high school…

  16. Peer Coaching: Students Teaching To Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Robin D.; Reid, Melanie S.; Rhine, Barbara G.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a peer coaching model implemented in two elementary schools that included the following steps: identify coaches and their needs; identify learning buddies with similar needs; set up a schedule; determine supervision process; plan lessons; implement coaching sessions; reflect on lesson; and evaluate the model. (Contains…

  17. Preservice Teachers' PCK Development during Peer Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jayne M.; Veal, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Examined preservice teacher knowledge during peer coaching activities, noting how the roles of teacher and coach contributed to the development of teacher knowledge during an elementary physical education field-based methods course. Pedagogical content knowledge developed differently in the teaching and coaching roles. Growth in the teaching role…

  18. Assessing the Cost of Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David S.

    2012-01-01

    School-based instructional coaching is an increasingly popular approach to professional development used to support in-service learning for teachers. However, little is known about the cost of coaching. The following study aims to fill this gap. First, the study describes a framework for measuring the cost of an instructional coaching program;…

  19. Content-Focused Coaching: Five Key Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Cobb, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Many districts are using content-focused coaching as a strategy to provide job-embedded support to teachers. However, the current coaching literature provides little guidance on what coaches need to know and be able to do to engage teachers in activities that will support their development of ambitious instructional practices. Furthermore, little…

  20. Professional Development: Identifying Effective Instructional Coaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the instructional coaching activities most used by instructional coaches in southeast Texas school districts and to test if there was a relationship between the use of instructional coaching and perceived improvement in the instructional practices of teachers and student achievement. The participants for…

  1. Instructional Coaching: Leadership Styles and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Maurisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Principals are traditionally the instructional leaders of a school. However, instructional coaching moves the emphasis from principals to instructional coaches by charging instructional coaches with improving the effectiveness of teachers who are critical to ensuring the successful education of a student. This research analyzed the leadership…

  2. The Magic of Coaching: Art Meets Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froelich, Kathy S.; Puig, Enrique A.

    2007-01-01

    There is so much more that goes into literacy coaching that we do not think about when working with colleagues. When we think about literacy coaching, we think about someone who comes into our classrooms and provides support for our instruction. High-quality literacy coaching requires that there be superior levels of overt assessment and covert…

  3. Toward a Theory of Coaching Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple tensions exist as part of the coaching process. How a coach responds to these tensions is a fundamental determinant of an athlete or team's fate. In today's highly competitive, socially demanding, and ever-changing sports environment, and as the expectations on coaches become more complex, the paradox becomes a critical lens to…

  4. Athletes' perceptions of role ambiguity and coaching competency in sport teams: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosselut, Grégoire; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Eys, Mark A; Fontayne, Paul; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between athletes' perceptions of role ambiguity and two theoretically derived dimensions of coaching competency (i.e., game strategy and technique competencies). A total of 243 players from 26 teams representing various interdependent sports completed French versions of the Role Ambiguity Scale and the Coaching Competency Scale. Multilevel analyses supported the existence of relationships between the four dimensions of role ambiguity and the two dimensions of coaching competency at both individual and team levels. When the levels were considered jointly, athletes perceiving greater ambiguity in their role in both offensive and defensive contexts were more critical of their coach's capacities to lead their team during competitions and to diagnose or formulate instructions during training sessions. The results also indicated that the dimension of scope of responsibilities was the main contributor to the relationship with coaching competency at an individual level, whereas role evaluation was the main contributor to this relationship at a group level. Findings are discussed in relation to the role episode model, the role ambiguity dimensions involved in the relationships according to the level of analysis considered, and the salience of ambiguity perceptions in the offensive context.

  5. Parents as Writing Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenworth, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Parents know that writing is essential to their children's success, and they're eager to help their children become good writers. But often, they're at a loss about how to help. Instead of leaving them in the dark, schools can make parents into valuable writing partners by giving them a toolkit of guidelines for coaching writers.…

  6. The Wild West of executive coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Stratford; Freas, Alyssa

    2004-11-01

    Annual spending on executive coaching in the United States is estimated at 1 billion dollars. Yet information about coaching's effectiveness is scarce and unreliable. No one has yet demonstrated conclusively what qualifies an executive coach or what makes one approach to executive coaching better than another. Barriers to entry are nonexistent--many executive coaches know little about business, and some know little about coaching. The coaching certifications offered by various self-appointed bodies are difficult to assess, and methods of measuring return on investment are questionable. But strategic coaching can provide critical help both to individuals and to organizations. In this article, Stratford Sherman, a senior vice president of Executive Coaching Network, and Alyssa Freas, the founder and CEO, explore the popularity of executive coaching and investigate ways to make the most of the experience. They argue that coaching is inevitably a triangular relationship between the client, the "coachee," and the coach. Its purpose is to produce behavioral change and growth in the coachee for the economic benefit of the client. The best way to maximize the likelihood of good results is to qualify all the people involved. Even so, many triangular relationships continue to generate conflict among all three parties. At the most basic level, coaches serve as suppliers of candor, providing leaders with the objective feedback they need to nourish their growth. Coaching gets executives to slow down, gain awareness, and notice the effects of their words and actions. On a larger scale, the best coaching fosters cultural change for the benefit of the entire organization. It provides a disciplined way for businesses to deepen relationships with their most valued employees while also increasing their effectiveness.

  7. Breaking into the World of Coaching: The Graduate Student Coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Tom; Kirch, Michael W.

    A pilot study examined whether there is a "caste system" within the forensics community; what graduate students, faculty coaches, and tournament administrators can do to foster a sense of community and break down the caste system; and the role that formal and informal mentoring can play in this process. A survey was completed by 17…

  8. A Comparison of Behavioral Parent Training Programs for Fathers of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Chacko, Anil; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Robb, Jessica; Walker, Kathryn S.; Wymbs, Frances; Sastry, Amber L.; Flammer, Lizette; Keenan, Jenna K.; Visweswaraiah, Hema; Shulman, Simon; Herbst, Laura; Pirvics, Lauma

    2009-01-01

    Few behavioral parent training (BPT) treatment studies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have included and measured outcomes with fathers. In this study, fathers were randomly assigned to attend a standard BPT program or the Coaching Our Acting-Out Children: Heightening Essential Skills (COACHES) program. The COACHES program…

  9. Organizational and media stress among professional football players: testing an achievement goal theory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, E; Halvari, H; Roberts, G C

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate media and coach-athlete stress experienced by professional football players and their relationship to motivational variables by testing an achievement goal theory (AGT) stress model. In order to do so, we developed scales specifically designed to assess media and coach-athlete stress. Eighty-two elite football players (M(age) =25.17 years, SD=5.19) completed a series of questionnaires. Correlations and bootstrapping were used as primary statistical analyses, supplemented by LISREL, to test the hypotheses. Results revealed that a mastery climate was directly and negatively associated with coach-athlete stress, while a performance climate was directly and positively associated with coach-athlete stress. In addition, an indirect positive path between the performance climate and media stress was revealed through ego orientation. These findings support some of the key postulates of AGT; a mastery climate reduces the perception of stress among athletes, and the converse is true for a performance climate. Coaches of elite footballers are advised to try to reduce the emphasis on performance criteria because of its stress-reducing effects.

  10. Coaching for College Students with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevatt, Frances

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that ADHD can impair academic achievement in college students and throughout the life span. College students with ADHD are an at-risk population who might benefit from interventions. An offshoot of CBT-oriented therapy that has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years is ADHD coaching. ADHD coaching is a psychosocial intervention that helps individuals develop skills, strategies, and behaviors to cope with the core impairments associated with ADHD. Most coaching programs are primarily based on a CBT approach and target planning, time management, goal setting, organization, and problem solving. This paper describes ADHD coaching for college students and discusses how coaching is different from standard CBT treatment. This is followed by a review of empirical studies of the effectiveness of ADHD coaching for college students. Finally, some specific considerations and procedures used in coaching are described.

  11. Coaching - fokus på samtalen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coaching – fokus på samtalen præsenterer forskellige filosofiske og teoretiske perspektiver på coachingsamtalen og indeholder desuden analyser af autentiske coachingsamtaler, som finder sted i en organisatorisk kontekst. Bogens kapitler beskæftiger sig med forskellige tilgange til coaching, som de...... i coachingsamtalen. Coaching – fokus på samtalen er den tredje bog i serien om Organisatorisk Coaching. Den er skrevet af konsulenter, ledere og forskere, som arbejder med coaching i private og offentlige organisationer. Coaching – fokus på samtalen kan bruges på mellemlange og videregående...... uddannelser og henvender sig samtidig til ledere, konsulenter og andre forandringsagenter, der arbejder med coaching i en organisatorisk praksis....

  12. Can life coaching improve health outcomes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Angel, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    for an overview of the evidence regarding coaching interventions used in patient care, the effect of the interventions, and the quality of the studies published. However, in order to provide a clear definition of the coaching interventions selected for this review, we have found it necessary to distinguish...... between health coaching and life coaching. In this review, we will only focus on the latter method and on that basis assess the health related outcomes of life coaching. METHODS Intervention studies using quantitative or qualitative methods to evaluate the outcome of the life coach interventions were...... suggest that the description and categorisation of the coaching methods are described more comprehensively, and that research into this area is supplemented by a more qualitative approach....

  13. Outlining a typology of sports coaching careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to extend our understanding of sports coaching careers and challenge related stage-based models by outlining and describing a typology of careers in high-performance sports coaching. A constructivist research approach is applied that intends to gain insight into the realities...... of coaches’ careers.Datawere drawn fromin-depth interviews with 10 Danish high-performance sports coaches. Results identified four classifying features that pave the way for the establishment of a typology consisting of three ideal types: (1) the elite-athlete coach; (2) the academic coach; and (3) the early......-starter coach. The findings are theorized throughWenger’s concept of paradigmatic pathways and Bourdieu’s concept of cultural capital. The study illuminates paradigmatic trajectories and conversions of cultural capital in high-performance sports coaching careers that may act as models for young athletes...

  14. Coaching - fokus på samtalen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coaching – fokus på samtalen præsenterer forskellige filosofiske og teoretiske perspektiver på coachingsamtalen og indeholder desuden analyser af autentiske coachingsamtaler, som finder sted i en organisatorisk kontekst. Bogens kapitler beskæftiger sig med forskellige tilgange til coaching, som de...... i coachingsamtalen. Coaching – fokus på samtalen er den tredje bog i serien om Organisatorisk Coaching. Den er skrevet af konsulenter, ledere og forskere, som arbejder med coaching i private og offentlige organisationer. Coaching – fokus på samtalen kan bruges på mellemlange og videregående...... uddannelser og henvender sig samtidig til ledere, konsulenter og andre forandringsagenter, der arbejder med coaching i en organisatorisk praksis....

  15. The Discourse Universe of Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ellerup; Nørreklit, Hanne

    2005-01-01

    management guidebook in order to examine whether it matches the general development of society into high modernity. By means of a critical discourse analysis (Fairclough's model) we examine the rhetorical articulation of the coaching concept in terms of established discourses of management. Our analysis...

  16. Virtual coaches for healthy lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker, op den H.J.A.; Klaassen, R.; Nijholt, A.; Esposito, Anna; Jain, Lakhmi C.

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of the idea of the software interface agent the question recurs whether these agents should be personified and graphically visualized in the interface. In this chapter we look at the use of virtual humans in the interface of healthy lifestyle coaching systems. Based on theory

  17. Embedded Instructional Coaching: What Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, Shelly; Hodanbosi, Philip

    2011-01-01

    How are administrators leveraging the expertise and passion in their buildings? How do they inspire enthusiasm in their teachers and improve student achievement? How do they act as an agent for change? Those are the tasks the authors are given as instructional coaches. In the beginning, they were unsure how to tackle those tasks--or even if it was…

  18. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  19. Strategies for Effective Classroom Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, S. Andrew; Lannie, Amanda L.; Jeffrey-Pearsall, Jennifer L.; Truckenmiller, Adrea J.

    2015-01-01

    Although implementation of evidence-based behavioral and instructional practices has been identified as an educational priority, popular methods for increasing implementation of evidence-based practices (i.e., professional development) have not had the desired effect. This article aimed to present frameworks and practices coaches can use with…

  20. Sinn als Thema im Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Die Sinnfrage ist zentral für den Menschen. Warum sollte man deshalb Coaching auf Zielsetzungen und Performance reduzieren? Es erscheint wichtig, den aktuellen gesellschaftlichen Diskurs aufzuweichen, der den einzelnen zu Selbstdisziplinierung zwingt und zu Depression, Selbstzweifel, Burn-out und...

  1. Reference Values and Gender Differences of the Functional Parameters in Romanian Elite Junior Tennis Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian NAGEL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To establish the reference values and gender differences regarding fitness, strength, and time reaction of the Romanian elite junior tennis players. Material and Methods: Thirty four junior tennis players (19 male, 15 female with a mean age of 15 years were selected from the database of the Cardiopulmonary Effort Testing and Physical Performance Laboratory from Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, West University of Timisoara. To be included in the study, a tennis player had to belong to the Romanian Tennis Federation as a junior, be among the 50 best players in his/her category, and have no pathology at the evaluation moment. All subjects underwent functional evaluation by performing a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, the counter movement jump test and complex opto-acoustic reaction test. Results: The functional performance are significantly different for males and females in all parameters studied, with male tennis players showing better performance than female tennis players. Conclusions: The mean values of functional parameters of the Romanian elite junior tennis players are lower than international competitive tennis athletes. There are significant gender differences in junior tennis players. We hope that the present study results provide useful reference values for coaches and physical trainers in order to improve functional performance of their junior tennis players.

  2. Physical and physiological attributes of female volleyball players--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidor, Ronnie; Ziv, Gal

    2010-07-01

    The main objective of this article was to review a series of studies (n = 31) on physical attributes, physiological attributes, and on-court performances of female volleyball players. Empirical and practical knowledge emerging from studies on training-related issues in volleyball, such as body mass, fat-free mass, aerobic profile, strength, and agility and speed, should be integrated and applied when planning annual training programs for volleyball players. Based on our review, it was found that (a) players of a higher skill level are taller, somewhat heavier, and have higher vertical jump values than players of a lower level; (b) the aerobic profile of female volleyball players is similar to that of female basketball players; (c) ballistic resistance training can increase vertical jump values in female volleyball players; and (d) preseason conditioning should be conducted to prevent fatigue and reduced performance at the beginning of the season. Among the research concerns discussed in the article are that there is a lack data for on-court performance and time-motion analysis in female volleyball players and that more experimental/manipulative studies are needed to examine the effectiveness of different training programs on physiological attributes of female volleyball players. Two practical implications are suggested for volleyball and strength and conditioning coaches: (a) functional and nonfunctional overreaching should be carefully monitored when planning strength and conditioning programs, and (b) volleyball programs should include ballistic-type training.

  3. Player Load, Acceleration, and Deceleration During Forty-Five Competitive Matches of Elite Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalen, Terje; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Ettema, Gertjan; Hjelde, Geir Havard; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-02-01

    The use of time-motion analysis has advanced our understanding of position-specific work rate profiles and the physical requirements of soccer players. Still, many of the typical soccer activities can be neglected, as these systems only examine activities measured by distance and speed variables. This study used triaxial accelerometer and time-motion analysis to obtain new knowledge about elite soccer players' match load. Furthermore, we determined acceleration/deceleration profiles of elite soccer players and their contribution to the players' match load. The data set includes every domestic home game (n = 45) covering 3 full seasons (2009, 2010, and 2011) for the participating team (Rosenborg FC), and includes 8 central defenders (n = 68), 9 fullbacks (n = 83), 9 central midfielders (n = 70), 7 wide midfielders (n = 39), and 5 attackers (A, n = 50). A novel finding was that accelerations contributed to 7-10% of the total player load for all player positions, whereas decelerations contributed to 5-7%. Furthermore, the results indicate that other activities besides the high-intensity movements contribute significantly to the players' total match workload. Therefore, motion analysis alone may underestimate player load because many high-intensity actions are without a change in location at the pitch or they are classified as low-speed activity according to current standards. This new knowledge may help coaches to better understand the different ways players achieve match load and could be used in developing individualized programs that better meet the "positional physical demands" in elite soccer.

  4. Psychological and Anthropometric Characteristics of a Hungarian Elite Football Academy’s Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csáki István

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that neither physical nor physiological and anthropometric differences in adolescents can serve as definitive differentiating factors in terms of choosing successful and non-successful players, coaches are encouraged to focus more on thepsychological characteristics ofyoung players. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine football players’ psychological skills in an elite football academy as related to age and position. Every young player at one of the most successful football academies in the country participated in this study (N=119, M=16.44±1.17. The sample was divided into four age groups according to the championship system (U16, U17, U18, U21, and into specific football positions (goalkeeper, defender, midfielder, and striker. Basedonthe results, the young academy football players had a low level ofamotivation (1.45±0.68, a high level of extrinsic motivation (5.96±0.64, and can be characterized with a higher level task (4.02±0.62 than ego orientation (3.01±0.62. All of the results for coping skills were in the mid-range (M=3.00-3.41. There were no differences in motivation, perceived motivational climate, and coping among the football players regarding their positions. However, there were significant differences among the age groups in perceived motivation and coping skills. Older players were more egooriented and had a higher level of peaking under pressure, while younger players demonstrated higher level task, ego, and coach ability levels. Football coaches need to focus less on positions and more on age differences when dealing with motivation, perceived motivation, and coping.

  5. Design and interpretation of anthropometric and fitness testing of basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Eric J; Pyne, David B; McKenna, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The volume of literature on fitness testing in court sports such as basketball is considerably less than for field sports or individual sports such as running and cycling. Team sport performance is dependent upon a diverse range of qualities including size, fitness, sport-specific skills, team tactics, and psychological attributes. The game of basketball has evolved to have a high priority on body size and physical fitness by coaches and players. A player's size has a large influence on the position in the team, while the high-intensity, intermittent nature of the physical demands requires players to have a high level of fitness. Basketball coaches and sport scientists often use a battery of sport-specific physical tests to evaluate body size and composition, and aerobic fitness and power. This testing may be used to track changes within athletes over time to evaluate the effectiveness of training programmes or screen players for selection. Sports science research is establishing typical (or 'reference') values for both within-athlete changes and between-athlete differences. Newer statistical approaches such as magnitude-based inferences have emerged that are providing more meaningful interpretation of fitness testing results in the field for coaches and athletes. Careful selection and implementation of tests, and more pertinent interpretation of data, will enhance the value of fitness testing in high-level basketball programmes. This article presents reference values of fitness and body size in basketball players, and identifies practical methods of interpreting changes within players and differences between players beyond the null-hypothesis.

  6. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rijken, Noortje H.; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance, recovery and sleep quality in elite athletes. A prospective pilot study was performed with two distinct cohorts. Soccer players were provided with four sessions of mental coaching combined with daily...

  7. Fitness Profiles of Elite Portuguese Rugby Union Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaz Luís

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the fitness profiles of senior elite Portuguese rugby players. Forty-six senior Portuguese rugby players, classified as backs (n=22; age 26.2±2.8 and forwards (n=24; age 26.7±2.9 were assessed during physical testing sessions carried out for the Portuguese National rugby team. The body composition, maximum strength and anaerobic capacity of players are hypothesized to be important physical characteristics as successful performance in rugby is predicated on the ability to undertake skilled behaviours both quickly and whilst withstanding large forces when in contact situations. No absolute differences were found between the backs and forwards for the speed performance variables although positional differences were found across all speeds when assessed relative to body mass since the forwards were significantly heavier. Coaches and the management team can use this information for monitoring progressive improvements in the physiological capacities of rugby players. These physical characteristics of elite rugby players provide normative profiles for specific positions and should form the basis of developmental programmes for adolescents.

  8. Fitness Profiles of Elite Portuguese Rugby Union Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Luís; Morais, Tomaz; Rocha, Henrique; James, Nic

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the fitness profiles of senior elite Portuguese rugby players. Forty-six senior Portuguese rugby players, classified as backs (n=22; age 26.2±2.8) and forwards (n=24; age 26.7±2.9) were assessed during physical testing sessions carried out for the Portuguese National rugby team. The body composition, maximum strength and anaerobic capacity of players are hypothesized to be important physical characteristics as successful performance in rugby is predicated on the ability to undertake skilled behaviours both quickly and whilst withstanding large forces when in contact situations. No absolute differences were found between the backs and forwards for the speed performance variables although positional differences were found across all speeds when assessed relative to body mass since the forwards were significantly heavier. Coaches and the management team can use this information for monitoring progressive improvements in the physiological capacities of rugby players. These physical characteristics of elite rugby players provide normative profiles for specific positions and should form the basis of developmental programmes for adolescents. PMID:25114750

  9. Coaching Discourse: Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Sally F.

    2013-01-01

    Although coaching is used in many schools to facilitate teachers' professional learning, few studies look closely at coaching discourse. Exploring how coaching facilitates teachers' professional development, this study used tape-recorded coaching sessions and individual post-interviews to examine the one-on-one coaching interactions of 4…

  10. Case Study: eCoaching in a Corporate Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Teri L. C.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative particularistic case study was an exploration and evaluation of an online, asynchronous, non-human coaching system called an "eCoaching system." Developed by the researcher, the eCoaching system combined performance coaching with the latest technologies in eLearning. The coaching was based on the appreciative inquiry approach, and…

  11. SPORT NUTRITION KNOWLEDGE OF COACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Vasiljević

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Decades of research support the theory that when there are sports competitions the question of what to eat and drink in order to enhance sport performance. Nutrition is one of the most important factors in achieving top performance athletes. According to most studies conducted in the world's top athletes receive information from their coaches when it comes to sports nutrition, especially of the coaches involved in fitness training. (Burns, Schiller, Merrick & Wolf, 2004.The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge of sports nutrition in sports coaching. Mthods: The sample was composed of 30 licensed coaches from Montenegro (football, handball, basketball, volleyball, athletics and tennis. Knowledge of sports nutrition was tested by means of a standardized questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed to determine the knowledge manager on sports nutrition, the ingredients that are necessary in order to provide a sufficient amount of energy to training and competition, the dietary supplements, meal prior to the competition as well as dehydration and rehydration during training and competition. The survey was anonymous. The data were analyzed by statistical methods, using the statistical software STATISTICA for WINDOWS. Results: According to the results as a whole, it can be concluded that the trainer's knowledge of sports nutrition at a satisfactory level. Out of 600 responses was achieved 469 correct answers, or 78.1%. However, when looking at individual responses then satisfaction with the relative high percentage loss since the observed large gaps on very important issues related to sports nutrition. Discussion: By analyzing and comparing research results (Matkovic, Prince & Cigrovski, 2006 that in a sample of 56 coaches basketball and skiing, received 77.8% of correct answers and insight into the results of our study, it is clear that the results of the approximate value of both work, which is an indicator of quality

  12. Aspire Project - an integrated wellness coaching model facilitated by an online coaching technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Thomas Pook

    2015-10-01

    PT Aspire provides personal trainers and coaches with a powerful facilitator of client goal achievement and behaviour change. It encourages an innovative approach to coaching that considers the key elements of wellness delivered via digital technology.

  13. Role Behavior of the Coach and the Participants as Essential for the Results of Individual Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Møller

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individual coaching has become a popular intervention tool to increase manager’s (named coaches) affective commitment, competences and effectiveness in conducting healthy organizational changes. The aim of this chapter is to explore the influence of the role behavior of the coach...... succeeded and supported substantial changes in the Company’s approach to safety. The safety manager solved 69% of the coaching tasks. However, the safety manager did not change her role behavior substantially and this intervention was categorized as partly failed. In this case, the role behaviors...... of the coach and the safety manager and the power relation between these lead to implementation failure. Lessons learned and possible solutions: Role behaviors of the coach and the participants are important for the implementation of individual coaching interventions. The theory of individual coaching needs...

  14. A RESEARCH ON HEALTHY LIVING BEHAVIORS OF ARCHERY COACHES AND BOXING COACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Bahadır

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to assess healthy living behaviors of archery coaches and boxing coaches in terms of sportive branch, sportive experience and gender. The study was conducted with boxing coaches (n=119 and archery coaches (n=131. As the data collection tool; “ The Health - Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP - II which was developed by Walker et al . and validity and reliability tests of which were performed by Bahar et al . (2008 was employed. In the study; it was found out that mean score of boxing coaches on P hysical activity subscale was higher than archery coaches . Besides; no statistically significant difference s existed between archery coaches and boxing coaches in terms of gender and sportive experience.

  15. A computer vision based web application for tracking soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, J. M. F.; Cardoso, Pedro J. S.; Vilas, Tiago; Silva, Bruno; Rodrigues, Pedro; Belguinha, António; Gomes, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Soccer is a sport where everyone that is involved with it make all the efforts aiming for excellence. Not only the players need to show their skills on the pitch but also the coach, and the remaining staff, need to have their own tools so that they can perform at higher levels. Footdata is a project to build a new web application product for soccer (football), which integrates two fundamental components of this sport's world: the social and the professional. While the former is an enhanced so...

  16. Handball coaches' perceptions about the value of working competences according to their coaching background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Isabel; Borges, Mario; Rosado, Antonio; Souza, Adriano De

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value attributed to given working competences, by Portuguese handball coaches according to their coaching background, certification level, coaching experience, and level of education. A sample of 207 handball coaches responded to a questionnaire which included demographic characteristics and a scale focused on perceptions of the level of importance attributed to working competences. Data analysis included an exploratory factorial analysis applying Maximum Likelihood Factoring (MLF) and Oblimin rotation. These factors were submitted to a One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparisons to analyse coaches' perceptions according to their coaching background. A six factor solution was found where three major domains of competences were highlighted; the first one related to training and competition (e.g. planning and conducting the training, team administration in competition, annual and multi-annual planning, and coaching methodology); the second one related to social and cultural issues and management (e.g. implementation of youth sport development projects, team leadership and coach education) and the third one related to the cognitive background (meta-cognitive competences). The importance ascribed to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level. Highly experienced and qualified coaches perceived competences of everyday practice, social, cultural and management issues related to training and competition as more important than the other coaches. This study suggests the need to consider some working competences, until now not explicitly present in the Portuguese coaching education curriculum which could enable coaches to choose the best way to practice/work in a manner that will foster and support their professional development. Key pointsThree major domains of competences were highlighted by Portuguese handball coaches. The first one related to training and competition

  17. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Wierike, Sanne C M; de Jong, Mark C; Tromp, Eveline J Y; Vuijk, Pieter J; Lemmink, Koen A P M; Malina, Robert M; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated in a mixed-longitudinal sample of 48 elite basketball players 14-19 years of age (16.1 ± 1.7 years). Players were observed on 6 occasions during the 2008-09 and 2009-10 seasons. Three following basketball-specific field tests were administered on each occasion: the shuttle sprint test for RSA, the vertical jump for lower body explosive strength (power), and the interval shuttle run test for interval endurance capacity. Height and weight were measured; body composition was estimated (percent fat, lean body mass). Multilevel modeling of RSA development curve was used with 32 players (16.0 ± 1.7 years) who had 2 or more observations. The 16 players (16.1 ± 1.8 years) measured on only 1 occasion were used as a control group to evaluate the appropriateness of the model. Age, lower body explosive strength, and interval endurance capacity significantly contributed to RSA (p ≤ 0.05). Repeated sprint ability improved with age from 14 to 17 years (p ≤ 0.05) and reached a plateau at 17-19 years. Predicted RSA did not significantly differ from measured RSA in the control group (p ≥ 0.05). The results suggest a potentially important role for the training of lower body explosive strength and interval endurance capacity in the development of RSA among youth basketball players. Age-specific reference values for RSA of youth players may assist basketball coaches in setting appropriate goals for individual players.

  18. Pre-training perceived wellness impacts training output in Australian football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Tania F; Cormack, Stuart J; Gabbett, Tim J; Lorenzen, Christian H

    2016-08-01

    The impact of perceived wellness on a range of external load parameters, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and external load:RPE ratios, was explored during skill-based training in Australian footballers. Fifteen training sessions involving 36 participants were analysed. Each morning before any physical training, players completed a customised perceived wellness questionnaire (sleep quality, fatigue, stress, mood and muscle soreness). Microtechnology devices provided external load (average speed, high-speed running distance, player load and player load slow). Players provided RPE using the modified Borg category-ratio 10 RPE scale. Mixed-effect linear models revealed significant effects of wellness Z-score on player load and player load slow. Effects are reported with 95% confidence limits. A wellness Z-score of -1 corresponded to a -4.9 ± 3.1 and -8.6 ± 3.9% reduction in player load and player load slow, respectively, compared to those without reduced wellness. Small significant effects were also seen in the average speed:RPE and player load slow:RPE models. A wellness Z-score of -1 corresponded to a 0.43 ± 0.38 m·min(-1) and -0.02 ± 0.01 au·min(-1) change in the average speed:RPE and player load slow:RPE ratios, respectively. Magnitude-based analysis revealed that the practical size of the effect of a pre-training perceived wellness Z-score of -1 would have on player load slow was likely negative. The results of this study suggests that monitoring pre-training perceived wellness may provide coaches with information about the intensity of output that can be expected from individual players during a training session.

  19. The nurse manager: change agent, change coach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefancyk, Amanda; Hancock, Beverly; Meadows, Mary T

    2013-01-01

    Change in today's health care landscape is a daily, if not hourly, reality. The nurse manager must have strong leadership skills to navigate through change with a focus on the patient and the provision of safe and reliable care. The historical term for those leading change is "change agent." In this article, the authors introduce the idea of a change coach, building on the nurse manager foundational skill of coaching and weaving this concept into the manager's role in change. A change coach uses the coaching behaviors including guidance, facilitation, and inspiration to inspire others toward change, altering human capabilities, and supporting and influencing others toward change. An exemplar of the nurse manager's role as a change coach in practice is provided using American Organization of Nurse Executives' Care Innovation and Transformation initiative. It is the agile manager that is able to successfully move between the roles of change agent and change coach to continuously transform the environment and how care is delivered.

  20. Når coaching swinger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Fredens

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes and analyzes the improvisational and innovative process that takes place between pro-fessional musicians during the extraordinary concert. The aim is to draw parallels to the professional coachingconversation in order to examine what new angles this analogy can contribute in proportion to coaching asa practice. In other words, how can an analysis of the musician’s communication during a successful concertshed light on what is happening in a successful professional dialogue.The article contains both empirical data and theory. The empirical data comes to results from a qualitativestudy undertaken in connection with my thesis within the Master of Learning Processes Specializing in Orga-nizational Coaching at Aalborg University, and is based on interviews with five professional orchestra musi-cians from the Royal Danish Orchestra, the Copenhagen Phil and the Danish National Symphony Orchestra

  1. "The strength of Nebraska": Boyd Epley, Husker Power, and the formation of the strength coaching profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurley, Jason P; Todd, Jan S

    2012-12-01

    Boyd Epley was hired as the first full-time strength and conditioning coach at the University of Nebraska in 1969. Epley's hiring was the result of his extensive knowledge of strength training, an injury, and several disappointing seasons for the Cornhusker football team. An enterprising young coach, Tom Osborne, recognized that injured football players who trained with Epley, then an injured varsity pole-vaulter, returned to the team stronger than when they left. Osborne and Epley were able to convince head football coach and athletic director, Bob Devaney, that his belief that weight training was detrimental to athletic performance was unfounded. After starting the Husker Power program, Epley consistently worked to make it more scientific and specific to the demands of football. The results of Epley's work speak for themselves, over a career that spanned 35 years, football teams under his tutelage recorded 356 wins, 5 national championships, and a host of national player of the year award winners. In addition to his work as a practitioner of strength and conditioning, Epley also played an integral role in organizing a disparate group of individuals into a recognizable profession. He was the driving force in founding the National Strength and Conditioning Association in 1978. The organization would go on to fund and disseminate research in the field, resulting in the highly skilled practitioners of strength and conditioning practicing today.

  2. Investigating the Teaching Styles of Tennis Coaches Using The Spectrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell Hewitt; Ken Edwards; Sarah Ashworth; Shane Pill

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown what teaching styles (range of pedagogies) coaches are employing during coaching sessions and whether these teaching styles are associated with recommended pedagogical principles advocated by sport and coaching scholars...

  3. Coaches Made-in-China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China’s latest exportan overseas coaching legion,received lots of attention as well as understanding in Beijing 0n the evening of August 23, one day before the closing of the Beijing Olympics, the Chinese diving team was only one gold short of its dream. The last diving event was the men’s 10 meters platform. The Chinese audience was confident that their divers would secure this gold.

  4. Peer coaching: an overlooked resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuiston, Linda Smith; Hanna, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    The authors present an innovative pedagogical approach to peer coaching using senior leadership and junior medical/surgical nursing students within the acute care clinical setting. The collaboration among faculty, staff, and students developed awareness of thinking critically, reasoning, and using effective clinical judgment. Through the use of Lasater's Clinical Judgment Rubric, student reflections provided insight to the program's effectiveness and use of alternative clinical experiences.

  5. Coaching as a Tool Supporting Trainers’ Talents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Mesjasz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Coaching is a well-known term both in sport and business. The purpose of this article is to present coaching as a useful tool for improving the competence of the trainer. The article presents not only theoretical justification but also discusses the results of a pilot project which aim was to support the talents of the national team coaches. The above mentioned project was conducted in 2012 on behalf of the Ministry of Sport.

  6. Peer Coaching and Technology Integration: An Evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Ann E.; Dawson, Kara; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on an evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching (MPC) program in Florida, USA. First, the design of the MPC materials was analyzed using characteristics of exemplary peer coaching and technology integration models. Second, facilitators (n = 14) and coaches (n = 46) who attended the MPC workshops in Florida were surveyed…

  7. Towards a Psychology of Coaching: The Impact of Coaching on Metacognition, Mental Health and Goal Attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Anthony M.

    A theoretical framework for a psychology of coaching was developed. First, the literature on cognitive approaches to coaching, behavioral approaches to coaching, and combinations of the cognitive and behavioral approaches was reviewed. Next, two studies examined the development and validation of a new measure of private self-consciousness called…

  8. Coaches' Coaching Competence in Relation to Athletes' Perceived Progress in Elite Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Frode; Federici, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at whether higher levels of perceived coaching competencies focusing on relational issues, were associated with higher satisfaction among elite athletes with their progress in sport. In order to explore this, we investigated elite athletes' perceptions of their coaches' coaching competence (CCS) and how these perceptions related…

  9. The Manager Coaching in Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Díaz Cardozo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to make contributions to the Manager Coaching, optimization of management in all areas in which it develops and operates the human being, in that sense, devotes part of its content to the figure of the manager, and Coaching as a leader, manager, director and conductor of processes, identified as largely responsible, you must have knowledge and experience in such functions, in addition to meeting a set of skills that will allow you to efficiently fulfill their activities. It relies on documentary research, in obtaining information were used as data collection instruments, bibliographic documents, which provided the necessary information applied to the particular study. Subsequently content analysis was conducted, investigates informational meanings. To obtain the following conclusions, most relevant is: understand and accept that coaching at international level is a methodology that has managed to grab the attention of big transnational companies, very successful companies, large-scale, relying on the good use and management to achieve the manager, a momentous change in his personality, and the effect on people is responsible in the organization.

  10. RELATION IN PERCEPTION OF THE STYLE OF BEHAVIOUR OF THE COACH AND THE LEVEL OF STRESS IN FOOTBALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Tišma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress is an occurrence that is increasingly taken care of, as it can significantly influence both the outcome of the game and the outcome of the training process and the entire career of an athlete or a team. It leads to a drop of immunity, frequent injuries, makes recovery difficult, leads to a drop in motivation, self-confidence and concetration in players. When it comes to combatting athletic stress, sport psychologists are usually consulted, although there are ways in which the coach himself can help with stress prevention, as well. The main goal of the paper is to establish whether there is a significant link between the athletes’ perception of the style of behaviour of the coach and their level of stress. The secondary goals lies in obtaining the answers to the questions of whether there is a significant difference in the stress level and the perception of the style of behaviour of the coach in regard to the competitive level of the athlete and/or the age and state of development of the athlete. The sample of the examinees is comprised of 192 football players from the territory of Vojvodina and of various ages (12 to 35 and various competitive levels (top class / professional athlete; average / standard athlete; recreational athlete. Obtained results partially answer the question of what the attitude of the coach should be during the training process and during the match in order to reduce the level of stress in his players to a minimum. As highly valued behavioural traits of the coach, we can single out: offering support and comfort, clear communication, dedication to the athletes, while as the negative sides emphasized are: instilling fear, neglecting of athletes and being stern.

  11. The Player Engagement Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Engagement is an essential element of the player experience, and the concept is described in various ways in the literature. To gain a more detailed comprehension of this multifaceted concept, and in order to better understand what aspects can be used to evaluate engaging game play and to design...... engaging user experiences, this study investigates one dimension of player engagement by empirically identifying the components associated with the desire to continue playing. Based on a description of the characteristics of player engagement, a series of surveys were developed to discover the components......, categories and triggers involved in this process. By applying grounded theory to the analysis of the responses, a process-oriented player engagement framework was developed and four main components consisting of objectives, activities, accomplishments and affects as well as the corresponding categories...

  12. Parental influence on tennis players: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Delforge

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio es comprender mejor el fracaso de jóvenes deportistas dotados y la influencia de las relaciones padres niños sobre este fracaso. Se describen tres casos para presentarlos en su contexto. Se han realizado entrevistas a los jugadores, los padres y entrenadores. El no haber logrado a alcanzar un nivel superior de práctica a pesar de comienzos muy prometedores en los jóvenes es la principal característica de los deportistas. El análisis de contenido ha puesto en evidencia actitudes positivas y negativas de los padres. La influencia de los padres se manifiesta en numerosos factores como sus valores o motivaciones, las relaciones padres / hijos o padres / entrenadores... Los estudios de caso ponen también de relieve la importancia de las opciones que se tienen que hacer y su vínculo con los valores parentales. Las implicaciones prácticas de este estudio deben tenerse en cuenta para favorecer las carreras deportivas de los deportistas jóvenes.

  13. The quest for research in the coaching relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Broin, Alanna; Spaten, Ole Michael; Løkken, Lillith Olesen

    2016-01-01

    With the aim to enabling a deeper understanding, of coaching relationship research, this collection of articles is further intended to expand a perspective on approaching evidence-based coaching research in this area and on engaging your coachees in the coaching relationships in your own coaching...... practice. In this article, the contributions from all authors are each reviewed, with a further discussion and integration of themes arising that are germane to future coaching relationship research, and to building effective coaching relationships with coachees....

  14. Personel and life coaching In Stephen Palmer & Alison Whybrow (Eds.) Coaching Handbook. New York: Routledge, Francis Taylor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael

    2017-01-01

    Personal coaching and life-coaching psychology is for assisting individuals clarify values, visions and meaning of life, through a systematic process in which the coach facilitates improvement of satisfying and fruitful life experiences and achievement of personal life goals....

  15. A new game plan for C players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Beth; Handfield-Jones, Helen; Michaels, Ed

    2002-01-01

    It's a big driver of business success, but one that executives are loath to talk about: upgrading the talent pool by weeding out "C" players from management. These aren't the incompetent or unethical managers whom organizations dismiss without a backward glance; C performers deliver results that are acceptable--barely--but they fail to innovate or to inspire the people they lead. The authors of The War for Talent have studied what it takes to upgrade an organization's talent pool. In this article, they explore the hidden costs of tolerating under-performance and acknowledge the reasons why executives may shy away from dealing decisively with C players. They recommend that organizations take an "iron hand in a velvet glove" approach to managing subpar performers. That is, companies should establish rigorous, disciplined processes for assessing and dealing with low-performing managers but still treat them with respect. The authors outline three ironhanded steps. First, executives must identify C players by evaluating their talents and distributing employee performances along an assessment curve. Second, executives must agree on explicit action plans that articulate the improvements or changes that C performers must achieve within six to 12 months. And third, executives should hold managers accountable for carrying out the action plans. Without such discipline, procrastination, rationalization, and inaction will prevail. The authors also emphasize the need for the "velvet glove." Executives must ensure that low performers are treated with dignity, so they should offer candid feedback, instructive coaching, and generous severance packages and outplacement support. The authors' approach isn't about being tough on people; it's about being relentlessly focused on performance.

  16. The coach as a fellow-human companion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The coach-coachee relationship is the essential factor for change and development in coaching. However, in times of hypercomplexity, the relational issue gets a new twist. As a coach, it is no longer enough to facilitate through questions; coaching requires becoming involved in a dialo......Objective: The coach-coachee relationship is the essential factor for change and development in coaching. However, in times of hypercomplexity, the relational issue gets a new twist. As a coach, it is no longer enough to facilitate through questions; coaching requires becoming involved...

  17. The Relationship Between Coaches`Leadership Styles With The Athletes` Sex and Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Mousavi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between Coaches` leadership styles with the sporting field, sex and age of the athletes in Zanjan-Iran. The study was carried out in basketball , football , athletics and kung fu in-season training. The study is applied and descriptive - correlational. The Statistical population were athletes in sports clubs including basketball, soccer, track and field, and Kung Fu in Zanjan. The Sample was chosen through stratified sampling with optimal assignment with 200 people (50 per field.Our measuring tool was leadership scale (RLSS, presented by Zhang, Jensen, and Mann (1997. Of course, Validity and reliability of the instrument were approved by experts. The data were analyzed using SPSS and descriptive data analysis of the mean, frequency, percentage deviation ,one way ANOVA and Pearson correlation. The research findings indicate a significant difference between the average of the coaches` leadership roles in various sports. Also, there was a negative relationship between players` age and coaches` leadership styles. However,there was no significant relationship between the athletes`sporting background and coaches` leadership styles.

  18. Pilot study of female high school basketball players' anterior cruciate ligament injury knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, M D; Friden, C

    2009-08-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention program was evaluated. One hundred and thirteen female high school varsity and junior varsity basketball players and 12 coaches participated in an 8-week educational and skills program. Demographic and injury history data were collected. At pre-intervention and at the end of season, knowledge, attitudes, and practices about ACL risk and injury prevention were assessed via questionnaires, and frequency of two-footed landings were videotaped during games. Univariate statistics described the sample. Paired t-tests evaluated the program's impact. Cronbach's alpha, correlations, and kappa statistics assessed the validity and reliability of questionnaires and video analysis. Of the 113 players, 74 completed the study. The players' mean age was 16.25 years (SD=1.07; range=14.2-18.8). Baseline knowledge score was 57.2%, practice 58.4%, and attitude 73.5%. The mean baseline knowledge score of the 12 coaches (mean age=40.8 years; SD=10.3; range=26.9-56.3) was 68.7%. Players' knowledge about ACL injury prevention improved (t=2.57; Pinjury prevention were found (t(diff)=1.88; PACL injury risk and improved player's landing skills.

  19. Modern way of training high-level volleyball players in a university.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshin V.A.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The issues of improving the effectiveness of preparing volleyball players in a university were considered. The questionnaire date of coaches and student-sportsmen were used. The experience of sports training of several hundred volleyball players, athletes and swimmers, who successfully participated in international arenas was summarized. It is stated that high sport results effectively provide hard sport selection, motivation and mobilization of student-sportsmen, hard workloads, frequent, up to 30-40 times a year, participation in important competitions, system of recovering event, combining sport and study.

  20. Biomechanical Assessment of the Strength of Volleyball Players in Different Stages of the Training Macrocycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwa Marcin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In order to help volleyball players achieve superior results, their coaches are constantly seeking new training methods. One of the methods used to improve the effectiveness of the training that is being implemented is conducting tests which make it possible to assess the player’s locomotor system in terms of its motor and biomechanical functions. The aim of the study was to determine the torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles of volleyball players in three stages of the annual macrocycle.

  1. A time analysis of badminton doubles games in college level male badminton players

    OpenAIRE

    加藤, 幸司

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the features of badminton doubles games and obtain fundamental information regarding the games for the badminton coach. Six doubles matches from the college league match were chosen for the study. A time analysis of these matches was performed and the resulting data were compared with those from the matches played by first class players. The mean work time (5.0±0.9 s) was found to be significantly shorter than that of the first class players (p 0.05). The mean re...

  2. New Understanding of Physical Training for Ice Hockey Players--Thoughts on Participating in National Coaches Training Class%冰球运动员体能训练的新认识--参加国家级教练员培训班学习有感

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷积武

    2014-01-01

    Learning,using new ideas of physical training from foreign countries plays an important role in improving the training level of athlete's physical ability,ice hockey coach only update the training concept so that they can have a deep understanding the special characteristics of ice hockey,in order to continuously improve Chinese ice hockey competitive level. Different thoughts of coaches for physical fitness will influence the training arrangement,mainly for the difference of combined mode with different key points of training arrangement,physical training and sport specification. The primary task of physical training is to prevent sports injuries,withe improving coaches’ability,personalized design of training plans,the core strength training to improve the quality of physical fitness training.%学习、借鉴国外体能训练的新理念对提高运动员的体能训练水平具有重要作用,冰球教练员只有及时更新训练理念才能深刻认识冰球项目的专项特征,才能不断提高我国冰球运动的竞技水平。教练员对体能认识的不同会对训练安排产生较大的影响,主要表现为训练安排重点的不同、体能训练与运动专项结合方式的差异。体能训练的首要任务就是要防止运动员运动损伤,通过提高教练员自身的能力、训练计划的个性化设计、核心力量训练的合理安排等途径提高体能训练的质量。

  3. DEFENSE ELEMENTS ANALYSIS IN BASKETBALL APPLIED BY WELL-KNOWN COACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naid Kadušić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how to create a man to man defense, how to train it and how to perform a man to man defense from a 2-3 zone defense. Creating a man to man defense is commonly mistaken for oponent press tactics. Coaches tend to devote less attention to defense tactics creation, which can be main weakness in a team. It is important for a team that a coach is aware of the training techniques in order to explain them and present in proper manner. Once player comprehends the training techniques, the period of training comes, which includes helping out at every moment, as well as taking the responsibility. Match outcome and play realization provide a great insight into the players’ game understanding.

  4. Speed and agility of 12- and 14-year-old elite male basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Sasa T; Karalejic, Milivoje S; Pajic, Zoran B; Macura, Marija M; Erculj, Frane F

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to identify and compare the speed and agility of 12- and 14-year-old elite male basketball players and (b) to investigate relations between speed and agility for both age groups of basketball players, to help coaches to improve their work. Sixty-four players aged 12 (M = 11.98 years, SD = 0.311) and 54 players aged 14 (M = 14.092 years, SD = 0.275) were tested. Three agility tests: agility t-test, zigzag agility drill, and agility run 4 × 15 m and 3 speed tests: 20-m run, 30-m run, and 50-m run were applied. Fourteen-year-old players achieved significantly better results in all speed and agility tests compared with 12-year-old players. The correlation coefficient (r = 0.81, p = 0.001) showed that 12-year-old players have the same ability in the 30- and 50-m runs. The other correlation coefficient (r = 0.59, p = 0.001) indicated that 20- and 30-m runs had inherently different qualities. The correlation coefficients between agility tests were year-old players, the correlation coefficients between the speed test results were 0.71, which means that all the 3 tests represent the same quality. During the speed training of 12-year-old players, it is advisable to focus on shorter running distances, up to 30 m. During the agility training of the same players, it is useful to apply exercises with various complexities. In speed training of the 14-year-old players, the 30- and 50-m runs should be applied, and agility training should include more specific basketball movements and activities.

  5. Not all players are equally motivated: The role of narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ross; Woodman, Tim; Lofthouse, Sian; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Research on motivational climates consistently demonstrates that mastery-focused climates are associated with positive outcomes and ego-involving performance climates lead to maladaptive outcomes. However, the role of personality within such a framework has been largely ignored. To redress this imbalance, we examined the potential role of narcissism in moderating the effects of different motivational climates on leader-inspired extra effort in training. Training is where rugby players spend most of their rugby time and we were keen to examine the combination of personality and climate that might maximise the yield of such training environments. Female rugby players (n = 126) from 15 clubs completed measures of narcissism, motivational climate and effort. Moderated regression analyses revealed that narcissism moderated the relationship between motivational climate and effort. Increases in either performance or mastery climates were associated with increases in effort for narcissists; no such relationship was revealed for low narcissists. The findings demonstrate the importance of considering personality within rugby training environments, as it is clear that not every player will respond the same way to specific training conditions. Coaches who understand this and are able to tailor individualised motivational climates will likely gain the greatest benefits from their different players.

  6. Analysis of football player's motion in view of fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, Micael; Clemente, Filipe; Martins, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Accurately retrieving the position of football players over time may lay the foundations for a whole series of possible new performance metrics for coaches and assistants. Despite the recent developments of automatic tracking systems, the misclassification problem (i.e., misleading a given player by another) still exists and requires human operators as final evaluators. This paper proposes an adaptive fractional calculus (FC) approach to improve the accuracy of tracking methods by estimating the position of players based on their trajectory so far. One half-time of an official football match was used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed approach under different sampling periods of 250, 500 and 1000 ms. Moreover, the performance of the FC approach was compared with position-based and velocity-based methods. The experimental evaluation shows that the FC method presents a high classification accuracy for small sampling periods. Such results suggest that fractional dynamics may fit the trajectory of football players, thus being useful to increase the autonomy of tracking systems.

  7. Reimagining Khan Analytics for Student Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jim

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I describe preliminary work on a new research project in learning analytics at Arizona State University. In conjunction with an innovative remedial mathematics course using Khan Academy and student coaches, this study seeks to measure the effectiveness of visualized data in assisting student coaches as they help remedial math…

  8. A Multidisciplinary Framework of Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Alexander; Reddy, Linda A.; Glover, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    Across a wide variety of disciplines, coaching has become the universal practice for improving the professional performance of individuals and, consequently, the effectiveness of their organizations. Despite these shared outcomes, the coaching of individuals such as executives, athletes, and teachers features a variety of approaches, each with its…

  9. The Coaching Kaleidoscope Insights from the Inside

    CERN Document Server

    Kets de Vries, Manfred; Korotov, Konstantin; Florent-Treacy, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Through sharing the research methodologies, and describing intervention and change techniques used in leadership development, this book, written by IGLC-INSEAD professors and leadership coaches, contributes to a better understanding of how organizations may go beyond coaching in order to create best places to work

  10. "Safeguarding" Sports Coaching: Foucault, Genealogy and Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a genealogical account of safeguarding in sport. Drawing specifically on Foucault's work, it examines the "politics of touch" in relation to the social and historical formation of child protection policy in sports coaching. While the analysis has some resonance with the context of coaching as a whole, for illustrative…

  11. New Principal Coaching as a Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celoria, Davide; Roberson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    This study examines new principal coaching as an induction process and explores the emotional dimensions of educational leadership. Twelve principal coaches and new principals--six of each--participated in this qualitative study that employed emergent coding (Creswell, 2008; Denzin, 2005; Glaser & Strauss, 1998; Spradley, 1979). The major…

  12. Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Blacks in Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Fitzgerald

    2004-01-01

    During the 2003 football season, African Americans were employed as head coaches at five of the 117 NCAA Division I-A colleges and universities. At the conclusion of the 2003 season, there were 13 head coaching vacancies at Division I-A football programs; one African American was hired. Today, five African Americans have the responsibility of…

  13. A formalization of the coach problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, G. Y R; Meyer, J. J Ch; Ramamoorthy, S.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination is an important aspect of multi-agent teamwork. In the context of robot soccer in the RoboCup Standard Platform League, our focus is on the coach as an external observer of the team, aiming to provide his teammates with effective tactical advice during matches. The coach problem can be

  14. Peer Coaching in TEFL/TESL Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacilotto, Silvana; Cummings, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the peer coaching model as a professional development tool for pre-service ESL/EFL teachers, and its possible applicability to the Binational Centres in Brazil, as well as to teacher development programmes in general. Peer coaching, a reflective approach to teacher development,…

  15. Peer Coaching: Professional Development for Experienced Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Therese; Weaver, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    The professoriate, as a whole, is growing older and more experienced; yet institutions often overlook the professional development needs of mid-career and senior faculty. This article, based on a review of the literature and the development of a peer coaching project, examines peer coaching as a professional development opportunity for experienced…

  16. A Multidisciplinary Framework of Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Alexander; Reddy, Linda A.; Glover, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    Across a wide variety of disciplines, coaching has become the universal practice for improving the professional performance of individuals and, consequently, the effectiveness of their organizations. Despite these shared outcomes, the coaching of individuals such as executives, athletes, and teachers features a variety of approaches, each with its…

  17. Exploring Biographical Learning in Elite Soccer Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Qualified and skilled sport coaches are vital to the development of sport in general and of elite sport in particular. Research suggests that the development of coaching expertise in elite sport is a complex matter involving mediated, unmediated and internal learning situations. However, it is less clear to what extent and in which ways these…

  18. Older people's experiences of dream coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadensten, Barbro

    2009-12-01

    Recalling and talking about dreams could initiate dream work among older people and provide an opportunity for self-confrontation and personal growth, which could in turn promote gerotranscendental development. The present article describes older people's opinions about participating in a dream-coaching group; it also briefly describes the theoretical foundation of dream coaching. The study aim was to investigate older people's experience of participating in a dream-coaching group based on Jungian psychology. A descriptive design was used. Retrospective interviews were explored using qualitative content analysis. The participants were satisfied with the arrangement of the dream-coaching groups. All participants believed that they had recalled their dreams and thought much more about their dreams during the period in which the dream-coaching group met. Three diverse appraisals of participating in a dream-coaching group, which had different effects on the participants, were identified: "An activity like any other activity," "An activity that led to deeper thoughts about the meaning of dreams," and "An activity that led to deeper thoughts both about the meaning of dreams and about how dreams can improve one's understanding of the life situation." It is possible to arrange dream-coaching groups for older people and could be a way to promote personal development using this type of intervention. The study provides some guidance as to how such a group could be organized, thus facilitating use of dream-coaching groups in gerontological care.

  19. A formalization of the coach problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, G. Y R; Meyer, J. J Ch; Ramamoorthy, S.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination is an important aspect of multi-agent teamwork. In the context of robot soccer in the RoboCup Standard Platform League, our focus is on the coach as an external observer of the team, aiming to provide his teammates with effective tactical advice during matches. The coach problem can be

  20. Outlining a typology of sports coaching careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    -starter coach. The findings are theorized throughWenger’s concept of paradigmatic pathways and Bourdieu’s concept of cultural capital. The study illuminates paradigmatic trajectories and conversions of cultural capital in high-performance sports coaching careers that may act as models for young athletes...

  1. Coaching Development: Methods for Youth Sport Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Brad; Schoenstedt, Linda

    2011-01-01

    There are increasing demands and requirements in the coaching profession, and as a result, coaching education programs worldwide have seen an increase in overall participation. In addition, many schools and sport programs in the United States have begun to require a minimum standard of certification. This, in turn, has created sport-specific…

  2. Enhancing "OJT" Internships with Interactive Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoho, Alan R.; Barnett, Bruce G.; Martinez, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to examine how the best type of internship, i.e., the full-time, job-embedded model can be enhanced using coaching. Before illustrating an exemplary internship program with coaching, this paper describes what an exemplary full-time, job-embedded internship experiences looks like and expounds on the importance of…

  3. Use of Sports Science Knowledge by Turkish Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Koray; Ince, Mustafa Levent

    The purpose of this study is to examine the following research questions in Turkish coaching context: a) What are coaches' perceptions on the application of sport science research to their coaching methods? b) What sources do coaches utilize to obtain the knowledge they need? c) What barriers do coaches encounter when trying to access and apply the knowledge they need for their sport? In addition, differences in research questions responses were examined based on gender, years of coaching experience, academic educational level, coaching certificate level, coaching team or individual sports, and being paid or unpaid for coaching. The participants were 321 coaches (255 men, 66 women) from diverse sports and coaching levels working in Ankara. The questionnaire "New Ideas for Coaches" by Reade, Rodgers and Hall (2008) was translated, adapted into Turkish, and validated for the current study. According to our findings among Turkish coaches, there is a high prevalence of beliefs that sport science contributes to sport (79.8%);however, there are gaps between what coaches are looking for and the research that is being conducted. Coaches are most likely to attend seminars or consult other coaches to get new information. Scientific publications were ranked very low by the coaches in getting current information. The barriers to coaches' access to sport science research are finding out the sources of information, being able to implement the sport science knowledge into the field of coaching, lack of monetary support in acquiring knowledge, and language barriers. Also, differences in perceptions and preferences for obtaining new information were identified based on coaches' gender, coaching contexts (i.e., professional-amateur), coaching settings (i.e., team/individual), and their other demographic characteristics (i.e., coaching experience, coaching educational level, and coaching certificate level). Future coach education programs should emphasize the development of coaches

  4. In-season training periodization of professional soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Los Arcos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify the seasonal perceived respiratory and muscular training loads (i.e., sRPEres-TL and sRPEmus-TL completed by elite-oriented young professional soccer players. Twentyfour players (20.3 ± 2.0 years belonging to the same reserve team of a Spanish La Liga club participated in this study. Only the players that were available to train for a whole week with the team and also to play the weekly game were considered: Starters, players that participated in the match for at least 45 min and Non- Starters, players that did not participate or played less than 45 minutes in the match. The competitive period was analysed after the division into 5x6-8 week blocks and 35x1 week microcycles. Data were also analysed with respect to number of days before the immediate match. Weekly TL variation across the in-season blocks was trivial-small for both groups except between Block 2 and Block 3 (ES= moderate. Substantial TL differences (ES= small–very likely were found between training days, the TL pattern being a progressive increase up to MD-3 followed by a decrease until MD-1. Except for the match, sRPEres-/sRPEmus-TL was very similar between Starters and Non-Starters. In summary, perceived TL across the season displayed limited variation. Coaches periodized training contents to attain the highest weekly TL 72 hours before the match to progressively unload the players between MD-3 and the match day. The data revealed that the TL arising from the weekly game was solely responsible for the observed higher weekly TL of Starters in comparison with Non-Starters.

  5. The effect of coach education on reporting of concussions among high school athletes after passage of a concussion law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivara, Frederick P; Schiff, Melissa A; Chrisman, Sara P; Chung, Shana K; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Herring, Stanley A

    2014-05-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to concussions and especially sports-related concussions in youth. To prevent an inappropriate return to play while symptomatic, nearly all states have now passed legislation on youth sports-related concussions. To determine (1) the incidence of sports-related concussions in high school athletes using a unique system to collect reports on concussions, (2) the proportion of athletes with concussions who play with concussive symptoms, and (3) the effect of the type and modality of coach education on the likelihood of athletes reporting symptoms to the coach or playing with concussive symptoms. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. This study was conducted with high school football and girls' soccer athletes playing in fall 2012 and their coaches and parents in 20 urban or rural high schools in Washington State. The main outcome was the incidence of concussions per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), the proportion of concussed athletes who played with concussive symptoms, and the association of coach concussion education with coach awareness of athletes with concussive symptoms. Among the 778 athletes, the rate of concussions was 3.6 per 1000 AEs and was identical for the 2 sports studied. The cumulative concussion incidence over the course of the season was similar in girls' soccer (11.1%) and football (10.4%). Sixty-nine percent of concussed athletes reported playing with symptoms, and 40% reported that their coach was not aware of their concussion. Most measures of coach concussion education were not associated with coach awareness of concussions in their athletes, although the modalities of a video and quiz were associated with a lower likelihood of coach awareness. More objective and accurate methods are needed to identify concussions. Changes in athlete attitudes on reporting concussive symptoms will likely not be accomplished through legislation alone.

  6. The coach as a fellow human companion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    ) The narrative-collaborative dimension, (3) The protreptic dimension; (4) Mentalization and (5) Feedback as collaborative and outcome-oriented practice. The intention of this chapter is to show the importance of relationship with a ‘human face’ as the most important influencing factor in coaching, a factor......The relationship between coach and coaching partner is presented as a main condition for successful coaching. The role of this relationship seems to be even more important when current societal changes are taken into account, changes which are often the pivotal point for the understanding...... and necessity of coaching in our society: We live in a hypercomplex society in which both individuals and organizations struggle with increasing diversity and organizational challenges, and where it has become impossible to reach unequivocal and long-lasting solutions to these challenges. The agenda...

  7. Pedagogical Experience of Teaching Financial Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy M. Delgadillo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the pedagogical experience of teaching a financial coaching course to personal and family finance undergraduate students at XXXX State University. The paper describes the conceptualization of the class, including theoretical frameworks, ethical considerations, practitioner’s models, learning objectives, and competencies. The assessment of the course provided data used by the instructor to refine and adjust future course content and assignments. Quantitative data was collected in pre- and post-tests assessments. The quantitative assessment shows statistically significant gains in specific coaching skills and competencies. The qualitative assessment indicates that, at the end of the course, students had better understanding of the coaching code of ethics and better communication and listening skills. The peer-to-peer coaching exercise was apparently very fear-provoking but valuable for the students. Challenges for teaching financial coaching by future instructors are discussed in the last section

  8. Empowering Muslim Women Though Executive Coaching & Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadila Grine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role and effect of executive coaching and mentoring on the empowerment of Muslim women and enhancing their levels of contribution. It further substantiates the manner in which executive coaching can accommodate both the nature and needs of Muslim women while further unleashing her respective talents, creativity and skills. The study further highlights the role and significance of coaching in spheres relevant to family, as well as social and career development. This study highlights the use of the strategic technique for personal and leadership development set to explore talents, leaders and implicit abilities. Moreover, it exhibits the flexibility of self-coaching and its appropriateness for Muslim women, especially concerning self-development, which in turn influences social and institutional development. This inquiry highlights a number of practical results which emphasizes the viability and efficacy of executive coaching on personal and institutional levels as far as the making of better world for Muslim women is concerned.

  9. The Discourse Universe of Coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ellerup; Nørreklit, Hanne

    2005-01-01

    management guidebook in order to examine whether it matches the general development of society into high modernity. By means of a critical discourse analysis (Fairclough's model) we examine the rhetorical articulation of the coaching concept in terms of established discourses of management. Our analysis......In recent years, it has been argued that the society in which we live is in a stage of high modernity (Giddens, 1991) generating an explosion of new management models. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the ideological assumptions embedded in the management model described in a Danish...

  10. Concussion knowledge in high school football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournoyer, Janie; Tripp, Brady L

    2014-01-01

    Participating in sports while experiencing symptoms of a concussion can be dangerous. An athlete's lack of knowledge may be one factor influencing his or her decision to report symptoms. In an effort to enhance concussion education among high school athletes, legislation in Florida has attempted to address the issue through parental consent forms. To survey high school varsity football players to determine their level of knowledge about concussions after the initiation of new concussion-education legislation. Cross-sectional study. Descriptive survey administered in person during a team meeting. A total of 334 varsity football players from 11 high schools in Florida. Participants completed a survey and identified the symptoms and consequences of a concussion among distractors. They also indicated whether they had received education about concussions from a parent, formal education, neither, or both. The most correctly identified symptoms were headache (97%), dizziness (93%), and confusion (90%), and the most correctly identified consequence was persistent headache (93%). Participants reported receiving education from their parents (54%) or from a formal source (60%). Twenty-five percent reported never receiving any education regarding concussions. No correlations were found between the method of education and the knowledge of symptoms or consequences of concussion. The high school football players we surveyed did not have appropriate knowledge of the symptoms and consequences of concussions. Nausea or vomiting, neck pain, grogginess, difficulty concentrating, and personality or behavioral changes were often missed by participants, and only a small proportion correctly identified brain hemorrhage, coma, and death as possible consequences of inappropriate care after a concussion. Even with parents or guardians signing a consent form indicating they discussed concussion awareness with their child, 46% of athletes suggested they had not.

  11. Parent-Implemented Communication Intervention: Sequential Analysis of Triadic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer A.; Woods, Juliann J.

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration with parents and caregivers to support young children's communication development is an important component to early intervention services. Coaching parents to implement communication support strategies is increasingly common in parent-implemented interventions, but few studies examine the process as well as the outcomes. We explored…

  12. Parental attitudes toward mouthguards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, N; Mourino, A P

    1997-01-01

    An 11-item, one-page questionnaire was mailed to 1800 parents chosen at random in the Henrico County, VA public school system. Parents were asked questions such as "who should be responsible for mouthguard wear?" "what sports should require mouthguards?" and "has [their] child ever sustained an oral or facial injury?" The parental responses indicate that mouthguard enforcement is the responsibility of both parents and coaches. Of the total injuries reported, 19% were sustained in basketball, 17% in baseball, and 11% in soccer. Despite these high injury rates, however, there was a lack of perceived need for mouthguard use in these sports. When asked which sports should require a mouthguard rule, the sports that generated the most responses were, in decreasing order, football, boxing, ice hockey, wrestling, field hockey, and karate. Parents were more likely to require mouthguards for their sons than daughters, and more likely to require them for their children who participated in a mandatory mouthguard sport, a contact sport, or who had been previously injured. The authors conclude that because parents view themselves as equally responsible as coaches for maintaining mouthguard use, both groups should be targeted and approached as a possible source for the recommendation of mandatory mouthguard rules in basketball, baseball, and soccer.

  13. Causal Attributions of Success and Failure and Mood States in Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepaniak Joanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to determine the causal attributions of success and failure in a football match in a group of football players, as well as to investigate the association of the players’ attributions with their level of achievement and the relationships between their causal attributions and affective states. Material and methods. The study involved 75 football players, including 44 players from the first league and 31 players from the third league. The research was carried out using the Profile of Mood States (POMS by D.M. McNair, M. Lorr, and L.F. Droppleman and a specially designed questionnaire concerning the causal attributions of success and failure. Results. It was found that the football players who participated in the study tended to attribute success to internal causes and failure to external causes. More frequent use of external attributions most likely had an adverse impact on the mood state of the players. Conclusion. Information concerning the attributions that a given player makes can be useful for coaches, as it can help them develop the athlete’s mental abilities more effectively. Beliefs related to attributions can be modified. It is worth considering the benefits of encouraging internal attributions in the case of success and external attributions in situations of failure.

  14. Infectious diseases in rugby players: incidence, treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, A; Atkins, B

    2000-03-01

    Participation in rugby football can expose individuals to a variety of infectious diseases both on and off the field of play. The close physical contact and trauma inherent in playing rugby facilitates the transmission of viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens between players and may also lead to the acquisition of potentially lethal infections from the environment, such as tetanus. In the past few years there have been a number of reported outbreaks of infection amongst rugby players in the medical literature. The appearance of HIV infection has focused attention on the potential for transmission of this and other blood-borne viruses such as hepatitis B and C viruses from bleeding wounds sustained on the rugby field. As a result, various expert bodies have produced guidelines on the management of players with bleeding wounds. Opportunities are now available to rugby players to play outside their own countries, including the third world. This can bring them into contact with a wide range of travel-associated infections, some of which may be life threatening. In view of the above it is clear that rugby players and those who coach and manage rugby teams require information and education on the subject of infection and its prevention, as well as access to appropriate medical care and expertise. Many of the infections seen in rugby players are preventable, e.g. by promoting hygienic facilities and conduct in changing rooms and on the field of play, by exclusion of infected players from contact with others and, in some cases, by immunisation or chemoprophylaxis. Players who present with infections should be assessed, correctly diagnosed (using laboratory investigations where appropriate) and treated, and measures should be taken to prevent spread to team-mates and other contacts while respecting the confidentiality of the individual. Any outbreaks of infection should be reported to the appropriate authorities. There is evidence to suggest that strenuous physical exercise

  15. HANDBALL COACHES' PERCEPTIONS ABOUT THE VALUE OF WORKING COMPETENCES ACCORDING TO THEIR COACHING BACKGROUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Mesquita

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the value attributed to given working competences, by Portuguese handball coaches according to their coaching background, certification level, coaching experience, and level of education. A sample of 207 handball coaches responded to a questionnaire which included demographic characteristics and a scale focused on perceptions of the level of importance attributed to working competences. Data analysis included an exploratory factorial analysis applying Maximum Likelihood Factoring (MLF and Oblimin rotation. These factors were submitted to a One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparisons to analyse coaches' perceptions according to their coaching background. A six factor solution was found where three major domains of competences were highlighted; the first one related to training and competition (e.g. planning and conducting the training, team administration in competition, annual and multi-annual planning, and coaching methodology; the second one related to social and cultural issues and management (e.g. implementation of youth sport development projects, team leadership and coach education and the third one related to the cognitive background (meta-cognitive competences. The importance ascribed to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level. Highly experienced and qualified coaches perceived competences of everyday practice, social, cultural and management issues related to training and competition as more important than the other coaches. This study suggests the need to consider some working competences, until now not explicitly present in the Portuguese coaching education curriculum which could enable coaches to choose the best way to practice/work in a manner that will foster and support their professional development.

  16. Financial Coaching's Potential for Enhancing Family Financial Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. Michael; Olive, Peggy; O'Rourke, Collin M.

    2013-01-01

    Financial coaching is an emerging complement to financial education and counseling. As defined in this article, financial coaching is a process whereby participants set goals, commit to taking certain actions by specific dates, and are then held accountable by the coach. In this way, financial coaching is designed to help participants bridge the…

  17. E-Coaching Systems: Convenient, Anytime, Anywhere, and Nonhuman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Technologies continue to evolve to provide more compelling and interactive learning opportunities. Coaching has traditionally been face-to-face or by email. By combining the new technologies with coaching, learning developers now have the opportunity to develop an asynchronous, online, nonhuman coaching system, or e-coaching system. An e-coaching…

  18. Charting the Research on the Policies and Politics of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Facing relentless pressure to improve student achievement, many states and districts are using coaching as a policy lever to promote changes in practice. This special issue centers on the policies and politics of coaching, and this editorial commentary highlights what we know about the role of coaches and coaching in the field of education. Then I…

  19. Mentoring and Coaching in Schools: Professional Learning through Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Suzanne; Pomphrey, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Can mentoring and coaching really improve professional practice? How can research and inquiry improve mentoring and coaching practice? "Mentoring and Coaching in Schools" explores the ways in which mentoring and coaching can be used as a dynamic collaborative process for effective professional learning. It demonstrates how the use of practitioner…

  20. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  1. Coaching Strategies for Helping Adolescent Athletes Cope with Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jenelle N.; Gilbert, Wade; Morawski, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the various sources of athlete stress and the strategies that coaches can use to help young athletes cope with it. The information is based on a study with a competitive adolescent soccer team and its two coaches, and a review of the coaching and sport psychology literature. The suggested coaching strategies can help to…

  2. Truth and Courage: Implementing a Coaching Culture. White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Many leaders recognize that coaching is more than a collection of effective techniques. This recognition has led them to strive for a corporate culture that reflects a coaching mindset and the kind of relationships that coachees find liberating. As many more leaders have experienced the benefits of coaching (by professional coaches or mentors) the…

  3. Instructional Coaching: Teachers' Perceptions of Practice and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Jason Brock

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate K-12 teachers' perceptions of instructional coaching. Specifically, this researcher assessed the perception of instructional coaching as a whole, support for hiring practices for instructional coaches, the value of instructional coaching for improving teaching practices, the value of…

  4. Financial Coaching's Potential for Enhancing Family Financial Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. Michael; Olive, Peggy; O'Rourke, Collin M.

    2013-01-01

    Financial coaching is an emerging complement to financial education and counseling. As defined in this article, financial coaching is a process whereby participants set goals, commit to taking certain actions by specific dates, and are then held accountable by the coach. In this way, financial coaching is designed to help participants bridge the…

  5. Quantifying the high-speed running and sprinting profiles of elite female soccer players during competitive matches using an Optical Player Tracking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Jocelyn K; Thompson, Kevin G; Pumpa, Kate L; Morgan, Stuart

    2016-09-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the high-speed running and sprinting profiles of elite female soccer players during competitive matches using a new Optical Player Tracking System. Eight stationary video cameras were positioned at vantage points surrounding the soccer field so that when each camera view was combined the entire field could be viewed simultaneously. Following each match, an optical player tracking system detected the coordinates (x,y) of each player for every video frame. Algorithms applied to the x and y coordinates were used to determine activity variables for twelve elite female players across seven competitive matches. Players covered 9,220-10,581 m of total distance, 1,772-2,917 m of high-speed running (3.4-5.3 m·s) distance and 417-850 m of sprinting (>5.4 m·s) distance, with variations between positional groups (p sprints (71-78 %) were performed over distances less than 10 m. Mean time between high-speed runs (13.9 s ± 4.4) and sprints (86.5 s ± 38.0) varied according to playing position (p drills, and shows that coaches should take an individualised approach to training load monitoring according to position.

  6. How Three Schools View the Success of Literacy Coaching: Teachers', Principals' and Literacy Coaches' Perceived Indicators of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates how the participants in literacy coaching (teachers, literacy coaches, and principals) perceive the success of their literacy coaching programs. This qualitative study uses data from interviews and observations of literacy coaching from three schools in Ontario, Canada. Four perceived indicators of success were found:…

  7. How the Framing of Instructional Coaching as a Lever for Systemic or Individual Reform Influences the Enactment of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Dunsmore, KaiLonnie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Instructional coaching is framed as both a means for systemic and individual reform. These competing conceptualizations of coaching as a mechanism for change have not been systematically examined, and therefore, we know little about how the framing of instructional coaching initiatives affects the enactment of coaching. In response to…

  8. Parenting Talent: A Qualitative Investigation of the Roles Parents Play in Talent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Amanda L.; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kasson, Sarah C.; Perry, Kyle R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has linked talent development to four factors--early experience, coaching, practice, and motivation. In addition to these factors, contemporary talent experts suggest that parents play a critical role in talent development. The purpose of the present study was to uncover parents' in-time perspectives on the talent development…

  9. The Mindful Coach Seven Roles for Facilitating Leader Development

    CERN Document Server

    Silsbee, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Written for executive coaches, teachers, and other development professionals, the book explores the  seven roles or "Voices" that coaches assume while working with a client. The "Voices" are: Master, Partner, Investigator, Reflector, Teacher, Guide and Contractor. Silsbee illuminates the dynamic relationship between these roles, and integrates them in an intelligent roadmap for any coaching conversation. This book offers a helpful resource for internal and external executive coaches as well as leader coaches, consultants, trainers, teachers, and facilitators.

  10. Coaching som inspiration til dialogbaseret lederskab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    I erkendelse af, at lederen meget vanskeligt kan fungere som coach i rendyrket form, vil forfatteren diskutere de særlige udfordringer, der ligger i at være leder og coach på én gang. Som fundament til forståelse af coaching og lederskab tages udgangspunkt i en beskrivelse af coachingens tre gene...... den stigende nødvendighed i, at lederen kan fungere dialogorienteret og mod udvikling af den relationsskabte organisation (jf. Helth i denne bog)....

  11. Enhancing nursing students' education by coaching mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, David

    2016-04-01

    To address some of the recommendations of the Willis Commission ( Royal College of Nursing 2012 ), and in response to local evaluation of mentor and nursing student experiences, the University of East Anglia has implemented a project to teach mentors coaching skills. The aim is to enhance mentor support of nursing students during practice placements and improve student learning in practice. This article describes the project and discusses the similarities and differences between mentoring and coaching. It shows how coaching has reduced the 'burden' of mentoring by reducing mentors' workloads, and has helped students to take responsibility for identifying learning needs and delivering supervised patient care.

  12. Morphology of young handball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair da Silva Lopes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare anthropometric and body composition variables from the best male handball athletes competing in the Santa Catarina state youth competition to variables from the other athletes in the same competition, by game position. Seven of the twelve coaches participating in the Santa Catarina Open Youth Games 2004 (up to 18 years freely consented to select the seven best athletes in the competition (one goalkeeper, one pivot, two wingers and three backcourt players. In addition to these seven players, there were a further 79 team members taking part, bringing the total sample size to 86 athletes. The following variables were analyzed: body weight (MC, height (ES, arm span (ENV, hand breadth (DPA, wrist breadth (DRU, forearm circumference (PA, percentage fat (%G, fat mass (MG and lean body mass (MCM. Descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations were employed to classify the athletes according to court position. The chosen athletes were compared with the others using the single-sample t test (p RESUMO Este estudo objetivou comparar variáveis antropométricas e da composição corporal dos melhores atletas de uma competição juvenil (até 18 anos de handebol masculino de Santa Catarina, em relação aos demais atletas da competição por posição de jogo. Sete dentre os doze técnicos participantes dos Joguinhos Abertos de Santa Catarina 2004 aceitaram, voluntariamente, realizar a escolha da seleção dos sete melhores atletas da competição (um goleiro, um pivô, dois extremas e três armadores. Contabilizou-se, além dos sete atletas da seleção, mais 79 atletas titulares de suas equipes, totalizando na amostra, 86 atletas. Foram analisadas as variáveis: massa corporal (MC, estatura (ES, percentual de gordura (%G, massa de gordura (MG, massa corporal magra (MCM, envergadura (ENV, diâmetro palmar (DPA, diâmetro biestilóide rádio-ulnar (DRU e perímetro do antebraço (PA. Utilizou-se a estat

  13. Reflective practice in sport coaching: an autoethnographic exploration into the lived experiences of one coach

    OpenAIRE

    Ang, Denis

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to contribute to the growing pool of knowledge on the use of alternative representation of lived experiences to advance practical understandings in sport coaching. Documenting a self-inquiry into my coaching practice, this study demonstrates the value of autoethnography as a methodology to deepen knowledge from experiences. By illuminating my coach-researcher voice through a self-narrative, this study shows how autoethnography is able to immerse the sport researcher in his or...

  14. Analysis of cohesion and collective efficacy profiles for the performance of soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Francisco M; Sánchez-Miguel, Pedro A; Sánchez-Oliva, David; Amado, Diana; García-Calvo, Tomás

    2013-12-18

    The principal aims of the study were to define different profiles of cohesion and perceived efficacy in soccer players and to measure their differences in performance. The subjects were 235 soccer players in the under-18 category who played in the National League in Spain and 15 coaches whose ages ranged from 29 to 45 years. Diverse instruments to assess cohesion, perceived efficacy, and expectations of success were used in the study. Moreover, we measured playing time and performance. The results of the study proved the existence of four cohesion and efficacy profiles that presented significant differences in expectations of success, playing time, and performance. Furthermore, significant differences were found in the distribution of players in the teams as a function of performance. The main conclusion of this study is that soccer players with higher cohesion and collective efficacy levels belonged to teams that completed the season at the top-level classification. In contrast, athletes with low cohesion and collective efficacy usually played in unsuccessful teams. Coaches and sports psychologists are encouraged to promote both social and task cohesion and collective efficacy to enhance team performance.

  15. A coaching supervision programme to facilitate the mental health in business coaches in South African practice

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    D.Cur. Supervision is not a new concept in psychiatric nursing. It has a long history in clinical practice to bridge the gap between theory and practice. However, supervision is fairly new and still emerging in the coaching profession. Bluckert (2005:1) says that if one has to trace the references to supervision in coaching books, one will barely find anything before the millennium. It is only now recently that a demand is growing in coaching professions for coaching supervision. The pract...

  16. "Coaching the Camp Coach: Leadership Development for Small Organizations" Resource Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hedrick

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coaching is an important component of successful professional growth for leaders within any organization. However, organizations with limited resources may have challenges providing such coaching opportunities. This can be especially true for small business, non profit organizations and summer camps. “Coaching the Camp Coach; Leadership Development for Small Organizations” by Shelton, M. (2003 provides a framework, both in theory and practice, for camp leaders to improve interpersonal and intrapersonal skills through self evaluation. Accompanying the book is a CD-ROM that has multiple worksheets to be used in conjunction with the text.

  17. A Grounded Theory Examination of Coaching and Mentoring: Human Agency Expressed in the One-with-One Development Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    In American context personal coaching and mentoring are used extensively in the fields of business, athletics and Christian discipleship. This one with one approach to personal improvement is applied in multiple contexts within education, business, athletics, discipleship, counseling, and parenting. This study implemented grounded theory…

  18. A Grounded Theory Examination of Coaching and Mentoring: Human Agency Expressed in the One-with-One Development Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    In American context personal coaching and mentoring are used extensively in the fields of business, athletics and Christian discipleship. This one with one approach to personal improvement is applied in multiple contexts within education, business, athletics, discipleship, counseling, and parenting. This study implemented grounded theory…

  19. The Role of Communications in Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Dziewulska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is presenting one of the development tools, that is coaching. There were bringing up the basic definitions and described coaching stages, styles and techniques used in conversation by trainers in the article. In the article were presented the main roles that should be kept by coach as well as the barriers that he can meets during his work. There were indicated the crucial role of interpersonal communication in conversation between two persons in that case coach and pupil and also the most popular mistakes. There were given also the roles of listening that are the most important in keeping positive vocational and private contacts with others. Moreover in the article prescribed “good trainer” features and the sense of such skills as building the positive relations with pupil, listening, using the intuition, asking and giving the feedback.

  20. Coaching as a Strategy for Helping Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Dorothy M.; Wertheim, Judith

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of coaching for adult learners, the specific characteristics adults bring to the learning environment, and strategies for dealing with the obstacles adult learners may face.

  1. The philosophy and practice of coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    As coaching contunies to grow, there is a need for a deeper conversation about its current state and its future directions. This book makes an important contribution to this conversation in provocative yet grounded ways....

  2. Coaching as a Strategy for Helping Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Dorothy M.; Wertheim, Judith

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of coaching for adult learners, the specific characteristics adults bring to the learning environment, and strategies for dealing with the obstacles adult learners may face.

  3. The effects of resistance training on explosive strength indicators in adolescent basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a lower- and upper-body 10-week in-season resistance training program on explosive strength development in young basketball players. Twenty-five adolescent male athletes, aged 14-15 years old, were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG; n = 15) and a control group (CG; n = 10). The subjects were assessed at baseline and after training for squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), Abalakov test, drop jump, and seated medicine ball throw (MBT). The EG showed significant increases (p training program with moderate volume and intensity loads increased vertical jump and MBT performance in adolescent male basketball players. Coaches should know that such a short resistance training program specifically designed for young basketball players induce increased explosivity levels, which are essential to a better basketball performance, with no extra overload on adolescents' skeletal muscle development.

  4. Comparison of the Anaerobic Power of Brazilian Professional Football Players Grouped by Tactical Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Renato Cruz dos Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe anthropometric characteristics and body composition of elite handball and basketball players as well as to make comparisons between them. Fifty-nine males were enrolled in the study, divided into three groups: fifteen handball players, fourteen basketball players and thirty healthy sedentary subjects. The descriptive statistics were expressed as a mean (SD for each variable, while the ANOVA and LSD Post Hoc tests were carried out to detect the effects of each type of sport. The results showed there was no significant difference in body mass index among the groups, while a significant difference was found for body height and body weight as well as for all three of the body contents measured (muscle, bone and fat among the groups. These findings may give coaches from the region better working knowledge and suggest to them to follow recent selection process methods and to be more careful during the recruitment.

  5. MANDALA: Developing Parenting Skills Through a Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bryan E.

    A simulation game designed as a tool for teaching parenting skills is described. This board game, called MANDALA, guides participants through the process of rearing a child from conception to adolescence. Assuming the parenting role, players must cope with true-life experiences of their child. A throw of the dice sends players through the various…

  6. MANDALA: Developing Parenting Skills Through a Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bryan E.

    A simulation game designed as a tool for teaching parenting skills is described. This board game, called MANDALA, guides participants through the process of rearing a child from conception to adolescence. Assuming the parenting role, players must cope with true-life experiences of their child. A throw of the dice sends players through the various…

  7. Consumer Perceptions of Digital Health Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Volkova-Volkmar

    2015-10-01

    - The likelihood of the participant to consider general coaching for health and wellness, designed and tailored for them, on a 5-point Likert scale from 1- “extremely unlikely” to 5 – “extremely likely”, where 24.72% chose the “extremely likely” option. The perceived role of technology accounted for 13.5% (F(5,4880=152.86,p<.001 of the variance in the perceived usefulness of a digital coach. Post-hoc Tukey's HSD tests showed that participants who saw the role of technology as “coach” were significantly more likely to perceive digital coaching as useful (p<.01 for all group comparisons. New technology adopter levels accounted for 9.9% (F(4, 4878 = 134.70, p <.001 of the variance in the perceived usefulness of a digital coach. Post-hoc Tukey’s HSD tests showed that participants who reported to be “first adopters” were more likely to perceive digital coaching as useful (p<.001 for all group comparisons. Willingness to receive general health and wellness coaching, including programs tailored and designed for each specific user accounted for 25.3% (F(4, 4887 = 414.49, p<.001 and 22.1% (F(4, 4881 = 346.52, p<.001 respectively. For both factors, participants who ranked highest in their willingness to consider general health coaching found digital coaching more useful than other groups (p<.001 for all group comparisons. Gender, age, country of origin, income, reported state of general health, and other factors had negligible to no effect. Conclusions Our research shows that the perception of digital coaching does not vary between clean cut demographic groups, defined by gender or country of origin. Neither does the general health state pay a decisive factor. The factors that do impact user perception on digital coaching are mostly related to their attitude towards health coaching in general. Another set of influential factors are their opinion in digital technology and their readiness to explore new technological solutions.

  8. Leadership coaching experiences of clients with Alexithymia

    OpenAIRE

    Frans Cilliers

    2012-01-01

    Orientation: Leaders who find it difficult to connect emotionally with colleagues are often seen as incompetent, the idea that they may suffer from alexithymia – an inability to feel – is not taken into account. This coaching model seemed to be not successful in changing this behaviour pattern.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to describe the coaching experiences of leaders with symptoms of alexithymia and to formulate hypotheses around their leadership experiences.Motivation ...

  9. COACHING A MINI-BASKETBALL TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar\\u00EDa Ca\\u00F1adas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study arises from the importance of analyzing the coaching process and knowing how to coach in the first stages of sports initiation. The purpose of this study was to analyze how a basketball coach establishes teaching the game phases in youth categories, through the relationship between the pedagogical variables that define each of the coaching tasks. A total of 452 tasks, organized in 80 training sessions that were planned by a coach of mini-basketball (10-11 yearolds from the 2004-2005 season were analyzed. After a descriptive analysis of the game phase variable, a non-parametric inferential analysis (chi-square and contingency coefficient was carried out to study the relationships between the variables of the study (game phase, game situation, type of content, and content.The results make clear that for the coach that was analyzed, there is a disproportionate amount of work done on phases of offense to the detriment of defensive work. The aspects of the attack that are developed most are those without opposition, 1-on-0 (RAS=9.7 and to a lesser degree 1-on-1 (RAS=-10.7, although the opposite happens in the case of defensive fundamentals, 1-on-0 (RAS=-5.4 and 1-on-1 (RAS=12.3. A higher proportion of tasks without opposition, 1- on-0, were planned to work on individual offense technique (RAS=15.7, such as shooting. The analysis of the coaching process provides much information when generating sport teaching principles. The results have an important practical application, and they facilitate the process of continuing education and reflection on coaches' actions.

  10. Conceptualizing the adventure-sports coach

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, L; Collins, D.

    2012-01-01

    As a comparatively recent development, the adventure-sports coach struggles for a clear and distinct identity. The generic term ‘instructor’ no longer characterizes the role and function of this subgroup of outdoor professionals. Indeed, although the fields of adventure/outdoor education and leadership are comparatively well researched, the arrival of this ‘new kid on the block’ appears to challenge both the adventure-sports old guard and traditional views of sports coaching. In an attempt to...

  11. Coaching for improved personal and organizational effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, K. [Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada); Williams, R.A. [Briant-Williams, (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Leadership ability and highly developed interpersonal skills are essential for both organizational and personal effectiveness. High-performance organizations have typically taken an integrated approach to address these critical needs. One element of a comprehensive strategy to improve these key competencies is to provide both individual and work-group coaching. This paper describes what leaders at the Pt. Lepreau NGS have experienced while receiving personal and small group coaching, and the effect it has had on their overall performance effectiveness. (author)

  12. Coaching im Zeitalter der Hyperkomplexität

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    müssen wir damit leben, dass es immer schwieriger wird, einen Zustand von Klarheit, Sicherheit und Gewissheit zu erreichen. Dieses Defizit ist oft Ausgangspunkt für Coaching und coachinginspirierte Dialoge. Ein auf enge Ziele gerichtetes Coaching ist da oftmals fehl am Platz. Es gilt Nachhaltigkeit auch...... im Coaching anzustreben, eine Nachhaltigkeit, die auf Sinnhaftigkeit, Lebenswerte, Selbstidentität und transformatives Lernen gerichtet ist. Coach und Coachee treffen sich auf einer Meta-Position, und hier erfährt ein Coaching der dritten Generation, das Third-Generation Coaching (Stelter, 2014......), seine Brauchbarkeit. Beim Third Generation Coaching treffen sich Coach und Coachee in einer zeitweise symmetrischen Beziehung, sind füreinander Mit-Menschen, die sich über für sie bedeutungsvolle Werte und Sinngebungen austauschen. Coach und Coachee formen Sinn und Wirklichkeit in ihrer Dialog...

  13. Task familiarity and task efficacy: a study of sports coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lena

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish a profile of coaching efficacy with Hong Kong community coaches who differ in knowledge and hours spent in coaching. Coaching efficacy can be described in four dimensions, namely, Motivation, Strategy, Technique, and Character Building. It was hypothesized that coaches who had spent more time coaching and were more knowledgeable about the sport and coaching would score higher on those four dimensions of a Coaching Efficacy Scale. The scale was administered to 252 coaches working with beginning and district-level athletes in a variety of sports. Analysis suggested that their self-reported efficacy on Strategy was least strong. This means that the coaches were not confident in analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of opposing teams, making decisions on the type of game strategy to employ, and maximizing athletes' strength in competitions. Coaches with less coaching experience were also less confident about motivating athletes. This information on coaching efficacy may be useful in deciding content for a program of education for coaching.

  14. Relative age effect in FIFA U17 Emirates 2013 World Cup: analysis of players who effectively participated in the matches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Amorim Andrade-Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to verify the date of birth is a decisive factor for the success of players selected by the coaches to participate in the FIFA U-17 World Cup Emirates 2013. The players' date of birth were classified into four quartiles of three months each (Q1 to Q4. In the qualifying round, 46.5% of the selected players born in Q1, while 12.5% in Q4. This significantly different distribution occurred until the semi-finals. However, in the final match, there were no significant differences between Q1 and Q4. A similar relative age effect also occurred when analyzed only players who actually participated to the matches. Interestingly, despite there was birth date effect on performance in all World Cup stages except in the final, other issues should take into consideration for a team became champion.

  15. The ambidextrous potential in soccer, and the trainability of the non-preferred foot of young elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koertz, Rune; Andersen, T. Bull

    2014-01-01

    . METHODS: Participants were 23 male elite soccer players, 13-16 years of age. They trained 6 times a week. The participants, who were randomly divided into a training group (N.=12) and a control group (N.=11), completed a pre and post test, which for each player consisted of 16 shots with their non-preferred......AIM: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if players and coaches should focus more on the non-preferred foot. The hypothesis of this study is that a small amount of training focusing on the non-preferred foot will improve the performance of the non-preferred foot for young elite players...... foot towards a goal corner in a soccer goal. Velocity and accuracy were measured. The training intervention for the training group consisted of 7-13 training sessions. RESULTS: The result showed only few statistic significant differences (P

  16. Physician burnout: coaching a way out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazelle, Gail; Liebschutz, Jane M; Riess, Helen

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five to sixty percent of physicians report burnout across all specialties. Changes in the healthcare environment have created marked and growing external pressures. In addition, physicians are predisposed to burnout due to internal traits such as compulsiveness, guilt, and self-denial, and a medical culture that emphasizes perfectionism, denial of personal vulnerability, and delayed gratification. Professional coaching, long utilized in the business world, provides a results-oriented and stigma-free method to address burnout, primarily by increasing one's internal locus of control. Coaching enhances self-awareness, drawing on individual strengths, questioning self-defeating thoughts and beliefs, examining new perspectives, and aligning personal values with professional duties. Coaching utilizes established techniques to increase one's sense of accomplishment, purpose, and engagement, all critical in ameliorating burnout. Coaching presumes that the client already possesses strengths and skills to handle life's challenges, but is not accessing them maximally. Although an evidence base is not yet established, the theoretical basis of coaching's efficacy derives from the fields of positive psychology, mindfulness, and self-determination theory. Using a case example, this article demonstrates the potential of professional coaching to address physician burnout.

  17. Correlates of tackling ability in high-performance rugby league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J; Jenkins, David G; Abernethy, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the tackling ability of high-performance rugby league players and determined the relationship between physiological and anthropometric qualities and tackling ability in these athletes. Twenty professional (National Rugby League) and 17 semiprofessional (Queensland Cup) rugby league players underwent a standardized 1-on-1 tackling drill in a 10-m grid. Video footage was taken from the rear, side, and front of the defending player. Tackling proficiency was assessed using standardized technical criteria. In addition, all players underwent measurements of standard anthropometry (height, body mass, and sum of 7 skinfolds), acceleration (10-m sprint), change of direction speed (505 test), and lower body muscular power (vertical jump). Professional players had significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) tackling proficiency than semiprofessional players (87.5 ± 2.0 vs. 75.0 ± 2.3%). Professional players were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) older, more experienced, leaner, and had greater acceleration than semiprofessional players. The strongest individual correlates of tackling ability were age (r = 0.41, p ≤ 0.05), playing experience (r = 0.70, p ≤ 0.01), skinfold thickness (r = -0.59, p ≤ 0.01), acceleration (r = 0.41, p ≤ 0.05), and lower body muscular power (r = 0.38, p ≤ 0.05). When hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to determine which of the variables predicted tackling ability, playing experience and lower body muscular power were the only variables that contributed significantly (r2 = 0.60, p ≤ 0.01) to the predictive model. From a practical perspective, strength and conditioning coaches should emphasize the development of acceleration, lower body muscular power, and lean muscle mass to improve tackling ability in high-performance rugby league players.

  18. Dribbling determinants in sub-elite youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Matteo; Piovan, Andrea Gianluca; Annoni, Isabella; Ciprandi, Daniela; Iaia, F Marcello; Sforza, Chiarella

    2016-01-01

    Dribbling speed in soccer is considered critical to the outcome of the game and can assist in the talent identification process. However, little is known about the biomechanics of this skill. By means of a motion capture system, we aimed to quantitatively investigate the determinants of effective dribbling skill in a group of 10 Under-13 sub-elite players, divided by the median-split technique according to their dribbling test time (faster and slower groups). Foot-ball contacts cadence, centre of mass (CoM), ranges of motion (RoM), velocity and acceleration, as well as stride length, cadence and variability were computed. Hip and knee joint RoMs were also considered. Faster players, as compared to slower players, showed a 30% higher foot-ball cadence (3.0 ± 0.1 vs. 2.3 ± 0.2 contacts · s(-1), P run with the ball through a shorter path in a more economical way. To effectively develop dribbling skill, coaches are encouraged to design specific practices where high stride frequency and narrow run trajectories are required.

  19. MUSCLE DAMAGE AFTER A TENNIS MATCH IN YOUNG PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Gomes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated changes in indirect markers of muscle damage following a simulated tennis match play using nationally ranked young (17.6 ± 1.4 years male tennis players. Ten young athletes played a 3-hour simulated match play on outdoor red clay courts following the International Tennis Federation rules. Muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity (CK, serum myoglobin concentration (Mb, one repetition maximum (1RM squat strength, and squat jump (SJ and counter movement jump (CMJ heights were assessed before, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after the simulated match play. All parameters were also evaluated in a non-exercised group (control group. A small increase in the indirect markers of muscle damage (muscle soreness, CK and Mb was detected at 24-48 hours post-match (p<0.05. A marked acute decrement in neuromuscular performance (1RM squat strength: -35.2 ± 10.4%, SJ: -7.0 ± 6.0%, CMJ: -10.0 ± 6.3% was observed immediately post-match (p<0.05. At 24 h post-match, the 1RM strength and jump heights were not significantly different from the baseline values. However, several players showed a decrease of these measures at 24 h after the match play. The simulated tennis match play induced mild muscle damage in young players. Coaches could monitor changes in the indirect markers of muscle damage to assess athletes’ recovery status during training and competition.

  20. Growth and maturity status of elite British junior tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Gillian K; Cumming, Sean P; Coelho E Silva, Manuel; Cooke, Karl; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Growth and maturation impact the selection, development and progression of youth athletes. Individual differences in the growth and maturity may afford a performance advantage, clouding coaches and practitioners' perceptions regarding current ability and future potential. This may result in the exclusion of talented, yet less physically gifted athletes. Participants were 91 male (n = 47) and female (n = 44) elite British Junior tennis players, 8-17 years of age (12.5 ± 1.9 years). Height and body mass were measured and compared to growth charts; hand-wrist radiographs were taken. Skeletal age (SA) was estimated with the Fels method and contrasted to chronological age (CA). Mean height and body mass of individual players ranged between the 50th and 90th centiles for age and sex. Females were advanced in SA relative to CA (0.3-0.89 years.) from 8 years. Males were average to delayed in maturation from 8 to 12 years, but advanced in SA from 14 to 16 years (0.75-1.23 years). Individual differences in growth and maturation appear to contribute towards the selection of elite junior tennis players, with a bias towards males and females who are advanced in maturation and comparatively tall and heavy for their age. This has important implications for talent identification and development.

  1. Predicting Player Position for Talent Identification in Association Football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Nazim; Mustapha, Aida; Yatim, Faiz Ahmad; Aziz, Ruhaya Ab

    2017-08-01

    This paper is set to introduce a new framework from the perspective of Computer Science for identifying talents in the sport of football based on the players’ individual qualities; physical, mental, and technical. The combination of qualities as assessed by coaches are then used to predict the players’ position in a match that suits the player the best in a particular team formation. Evaluation of the proposed framework is two-fold; quantitatively via classification experiments to predict player position, and qualitatively via a Talent Identification Site developed to achieve the same goal. Results from the classification experiments using Bayesian Networks, Decision Trees, and K-Nearest Neighbor have shown an average of 98% accuracy, which will promote consistency in decision-making though elimination of personal bias in team selection. The positive reviews on the Football Identification Site based on user acceptance evaluation also indicates that the framework is sufficient to serve as the basis of developing an intelligent team management system in different sports, whereby growth and performance of sport players can be monitored and identified.

  2. Psychological predictors of sport injuries among junior soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, U; Ivarsson, A

    2011-02-01

    Previous researches have established models that specify psychological factors that could predict sport injuries. One example is Williams and Andersen's stress-injury model stressing factors such as anxiety, negative life stress and few coping resources. The purpose of the current study was to find psychological factors that could lead to an increased injury risk among junior soccer players, in addition to construct an empirical model of injury risk factors for soccer players. The participants were 108 male and female soccer players (m=17, 6) studying at soccer high schools in southwest Sweden. Five questionnaires were used, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Sport Anxiety Scale, Life Events Survey for Collegiate Athletes, Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 and Swedish universities Scales of Personality. Injury record was collected by athletic trainers at the schools during a period of 8 months. The result suggested four significant predictors that together could explain 23% of injury occurrence. The main factors are life event stress, somatic trait anxiety, mistrust and ineffective coping. These findings partly support Williams and Andersen's stress-injury model and are organized into an empirical model. Recommendations are given to sport medicine teams and coaches concerning issues in sport injury prevention.

  3. A new physical performance classification system for elite handball players: cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bautista Iker J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify different cluster groups of handball players according to their physical performance level assessed in a series of physical assessments, which could then be used to design a training program based on individual strengths and weaknesses, and to determine which of these variables best identified elite performance in a group of under-19 [U19] national level handball players. Players of the U19 National Handball team (n=16 performed a set of tests to determine: 10 m (ST10 and 20 m (ST20 sprint time, ball release velocity (BRv, countermovement jump (CMJ height and squat jump (SJ height. All players also performed an incremental-load bench press test to determine the 1 repetition maximum (1RMest, the load corresponding to maximum mean power (LoadMP, the mean propulsive phase power at LoadMP (PMPPMP and the peak power at LoadMP (PPEAKMP. Cluster analyses of the test results generated four groupings of players. The variables best able to discriminate physical performance were BRv, ST20, 1RMest, PPEAKMP and PMPPMP. These variables could help coaches identify talent or monitor the physical performance of athletes in their team. Each cluster of players has a particular weakness related to physical performance and therefore, the cluster results can be applied to a specific training programmed based on individual needs.

  4. A new physical performance classification system for elite handball players: cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Iker J; Chirosa, Ignacio J; Robinson, Joseph E; van der Tillaar, Roland; Chirosa, Luis J; Martín, Isidoro Martínez

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify different cluster groups of handball players according to their physical performance level assessed in a series of physical assessments, which could then be used to design a training program based on individual strengths and weaknesses, and to determine which of these variables best identified elite performance in a group of under-19 [U19] national level handball players. Players of the U19 National Handball team (n=16) performed a set of tests to determine: 10 m (ST10) and 20 m (ST20) sprint time, ball release velocity (BRv), countermovement jump (CMJ) height and squat jump (SJ) height. All players also performed an incremental-load bench press test to determine the 1 repetition maximum (1RMest), the load corresponding to maximum mean power (LoadMP), the mean propulsive phase power at LoadMP (PMPPMP) and the peak power at LoadMP (PPEAKMP). Cluster analyses of the test results generated four groupings of players. The variables best able to discriminate physical performance were BRv, ST20, 1RMest, PPEAKMP and PMPPMP. These variables could help coaches identify talent or monitor the physical performance of athletes in their team. Each cluster of players has a particular weakness related to physical performance and therefore, the cluster results can be applied to a specific training programmed based on individual needs.

  5. Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and time-motion analysis of female basketball players during competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Dionne; Delextrat, Anne

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the physiological demands and movement patterns of female basketball players after changes in the rules of the game. Nine varsity players were studied during nine official games. Each game was videotaped to identify the frequencies of the main movements performed, heart rate was recorded continuously, and blood samples were collected to determine blood lactate concentration when the competition rules allowed. The main results showed that the players performed on average 652 +/- 128 movements per game, which corresponded to a change in activity every 2.82 s. Mean heart rate was 165 +/- 9 beats . min(-1) (89.1% of maximum heart rate) for total time and 170 +/- 8 beats . min(-1) (92.5% of maximum) for live time. Mean blood lactate concentration was 5.2 +/- 2.7 mmol . l(-1) (55.9% of maximum blood lactate concentration). In addition, heart rates were significantly higher in the first half than the second half of games. These results indicate: (1) a greater physiological load compared with previous studies on female players tested before the rules modification (Beam & Merrill, 1994; McArdle et al., 1971) and (2) lower movement frequencies compared with male players competing under modern rules (Ben Abdelkrim et al., 2007). These observations must be taken into account by coaches and conditioning specialists working with female players.

  6. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction among Coaches in Premier Under-20 Football League

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moradi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present study was to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction among coaches in premier Under-20 football league. The research method was descriptive-correlative, the performance method was survey, and data collection was done through field study. Research population consisted of 56 coaching staff in 14 teams participating in premier Under-20 football league. Finally, there were 48 questionnaires useable in data analysis. Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (Syber Yashring and JDI (Wysocki & Kromm were used to collect the data. Descriptive statistics was used to describe data, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to know whether the distribution of data was normal, and Pearson correlation and stepwise regression were applied to investigate the significance of hypotheses. Results showed that there was significant association between emotional intelligence, subscale self-awareness, subscale empathy, and subscale social skills with job satisfaction (p≤0.05. However, there was not significant association between subscale self-motivation and subscale self-control with job satisfaction. Self-awareness, empathy, and social skills (predictors predicted job satisfaction (criterion significantly. Predicted value of self-awareness, empathy, and social skills was 0.4, 0.29, and 0.26 respectively. Training and aging increase emotional intelligence so it is predicted more job satisfaction over the time. From other side, clubs and football federation as the head can create scientific atmosphere and instruct psychological coaching principles. It will lead to enjoy creative, willing players as output.

  7. Soccer and homosexuality: The conflicts that lie within the affective game of the coach-adolescent athlete relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altair Moioli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Discussions regarding homosexuality within a sports context are mediated by emotional nuances, especially in the world of soccer, where practitioners are required to have attributes such as strength, masculinity and aggressiveness. As a consequence, this work aimed to analyze the symbolic representation of homosexual relationships between adolescent soccer players and their coaches; and, furthermore, to understand the intention behind homoerotic relationships that are established between members of the management team and its players. In this study, researchers used the life history methodology, with participation from three adolescent athletes, ages 14, 15 and 16, and three former athletes, ages 26, 28 and 45, who we called speakers. Based on the collection and analysis of research participants' testimonies, homosexual relations were found to have occurred between athletes and coaches, or between athletes and other members of the management team, as a part of a "social contract" that is exclusively linked to their professional objectives. These relationships appear to be purely objective; authentic affective links are absent, due apparently to the transient nature of the athletes in these groups. Too, this context is usually marked by the athlete's physical and emotional vulnerability, and the agreements he makes within this context are accompanied with moral dilemmas, because such adolescents idealize the coach as a paternal archetype.

  8. Position-Related Differences in Selected Morphological Body Characteristics of Top-Level Female Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Marta; Pori, Primoz; Sibila, Marko

    2015-09-01

    . Players in the Pivot position were significantly taller than the Wplayers but were not significantly different from G and B. They had high values of body mass which were significantly higher than that of W but did not differ significantly from the body mass values of B and G. The average values of their circumferences were the highest among all the player groups and the same is true for transversal measures of the skeleton. It is very interesting that, compared to the players in other playing positions, they achieved low values of subcutaneous fat. Their values of the somatotype revealed an endo-mesomorphic somatotype, with a pronounced mesomorphic component. Back players were tall and had the lowest share of subcutaneous fat of all the player groups. Significant differences were established mainly in terms of the structure of the lower extremities. The values of the somato-type characteristics were very balanced between all three components. The results of our study confirm that groups of handball players occupying different positions differed amongst themselves in terms of many measurements. This is a result of the specific requirements of handball play which are to be met by particular players. The tallest players should thus be oriented to back player positions. As regards pivots, the coaches must, besides body height, consider robustness. For goal-keepers, body height is very important; however, the robustness criteria are slightly lower. For wings, body height is not a decisive factor and smaller players can also occupy this position. Both of the above (also taking other criteria into account) facilitate coaches' decisions when orienting players into their playing positions.

  9. Coaching teachers to improve implementation of the good behavior game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kimberly D; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Domitrovich, Celene; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2013-11-01

    This study explored the association between coaching and the implementation of the Good Behavior Game (GBG) by 129 urban elementary school teachers. Analyses involving longitudinal data on coaching and teacher implementation quality indicated that coaches strategically varied their use of coaching strategies (e.g., modeling, delivery) based on teacher implementation quality and provided additional support to teachers with low implementation quality. Findings suggest that coaching was associated with improved implementation quality of the GBG. This work lays the foundation for future research examining ways to enhance coach decision-making about teacher implementation.

  10. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Australian Football Coaches' Experience with Game Sense Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a project framed as a strengths-based case study in the field of sport coaching. The aim of this research was twofold. First, the project trialled. Appreciate Inquiry (AI) for sport pedagogy research and explain how AI can be used in sport coaching research. Second, using an appreciative perspective, the aim of the research…

  11. Lessons Learned Coaching Teachers in Behavior Management: The PBIS"plus" Coaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershfeldt, Patricia A.; Pell, Karen; Sechrest, Richard; Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in coaching as a means of promoting professional development and the use of evidence-based practices in schools. This article describes the PBIS"plus" coaching model used to provide technical assistance for classroom- and school-wide behavior management to elementary schools over the course of 3 years. This Tier…

  12. Exploring Literacy Coaches' Relationships with Teachers: Balancing Responsive and Directive Coaching Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Jacy C.

    2009-01-01

    Literacy coaching has become an increasingly popular form of literacy professional development in the United States based on the common assumption that strong relationships between coaches and teachers will drive instructional improvement and gains in student achievement. However, there is little empirical research describing how literacy coaches…

  13. SPED 590 Peer Coaching Seminar: An Online Course about Peer Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askvig, Brent A.; Garnes, Lori

    This manual presents an online course about peer coaching derived from the Interactive Peer Coaching/Mentoring (IPCM) Project, a program designed to prepare teachers of students with severe behavioral disorders residing in a rural, remote area in North Dakota. The IPCM project was conducted from July 1997 through July 2000 and developed an…

  14. Classroom Strategies Coaching Model: Integration of Formative Assessment and Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A.; Dudek, Christopher M.; Lekwa, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the theory, key components, and empirical support for the Classroom Strategies Coaching (CSC) Model, a data-driven coaching approach that systematically integrates data from multiple observations to identify teacher practice needs and goals, design practice plans, and evaluate progress towards goals. The primary aim of the…

  15. How to Be a Wise Consumer of Coaching: Strategies Teachers Can Use to Maximize Coaching's Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, David; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Heidema, Clare; Mitchell, Arlene; Sutton, John

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching is gaining popularity as a school-based effort to increase teacher effectiveness and student achievement. A coach can be broadly defined as a person who works collaboratively with a teacher to improve that teacher's practice and content knowledge, with the ultimate goal of affecting student achievement. By its very nature,…

  16. Make the Case for Coaching: Bolster Support with Evidence That Coaching Makes a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Ellen; Medrich, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Policymakers want to see evidence that coaching makes a difference for teachers and students. To this group, making a difference means improving performance on standardized tests. In the current fiscal climate, leaders want to know not only that their investments are based on firm grounds theoretically, but also that instructional coaching works.…

  17. Coaching in Context: The Role of Relationships in the Work of Three Literacy Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenhaupt, Rebecca; McKinney, Sarah; Reeves, Todd

    2014-01-01

    In the United States and internationally, instructional coaching has been implemented as a mechanism to increase professional capacity, and in so doing improve student achievement. However, instructional coaches often face resistance from the teachers with whom they work; a manifestation of the egalitarian, isolated culture of teaching in many…

  18. Dispositions of Elite-Level Australian Rugby Coaches towards Game Sense: Characteristics of Their Coaching Habitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard L.; Evans, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Bourdieu's analytic concept of "habitus" has provided a valuable means of theorising coach development but is yet to be operationalised in empirical research. This article redresses this oversight by drawing on a larger study that inquired into how the "coaching 'habitus'" of elite-level Australian and New Zealand rugby coaches…

  19. Exploring Literacy Coaches' Relationships with Teachers: Balancing Responsive and Directive Coaching Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Jacy C.

    2009-01-01

    Literacy coaching has become an increasingly popular form of literacy professional development in the United States based on the common assumption that strong relationships between coaches and teachers will drive instructional improvement and gains in student achievement. However, there is little empirical research describing how literacy coaches…

  20. Lessons Learned Coaching Teachers in Behavior Management: The PBIS"plus" Coaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershfeldt, Patricia A.; Pell, Karen; Sechrest, Richard; Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in coaching as a means of promoting professional development and the use of evidence-based practices in schools. This article describes the PBIS"plus" coaching model used to provide technical assistance for classroom- and school-wide behavior management to elementary schools over the course of 3 years. This Tier…

  1. Peter Pan in Coach's Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Thomas J.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses physical activities for six age groups in the 4-month to 6-year range which emphasize the interaction between parent and child. Briefly describes those exercises which are appropriate for each age group. (BR)

  2. Peter Pan in Coach's Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Thomas J.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses physical activities for six age groups in the 4-month to 6-year range which emphasize the interaction between parent and child. Briefly describes those exercises which are appropriate for each age group. (BR)

  3. [Psychometric evaluation of the Coach Orientation Questionnaire with a Spanish sample of handball coaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feu, Sebastián; Ibáñez, Sergio José; Graça, Amândio; Sampaio, Jaime

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire to investigate volleyball coaches' orientations toward the coaching process. The study was preceded by four developmental stages in order to improve user understanding, validate the content, and refine the psychometric properties of the instrument. Participants for the reliability and validity study were 334 Spanish volleyball team coaches, 86.5% men and 13.2% women. The following 6 factors emerged from the exploratory factor analysis: team-work orientation, technological orientation, innovative orientation, dialogue orientation, directive orientation, and social climate orientation. Statistical results indicated that the instrument produced reliable and valid scores in all the obtained factors (a> .70), showing that this questionnaire is a useful tool to examine coaches' orientations towards coaching.

  4. Active Learning for Player Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Learning models of player behavior has been the focus of several studies. This work is motivated by better understanding of player behavior, a knowledge that can ultimately be employed to provide player-adapted or personalized content. In this paper, we propose the use of active learning for player...... experience modeling. We use a dataset from hundreds of players playing Infinite Mario Bros. as a case study and we employ the random forest method to learn mod- els of player experience through the active learning approach. The results obtained suggest that only part of the dataset (up to half the size...... of the full dataset) is necessary for the construction of accu- rate models that are as accurate as those constructed from the full dataset. This indicates the potential of the method and its benefits in cases when obtaining the data is expensive or time, storage or effort consuming. The results also indicate...

  5. Active Learning for Player Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Learning models of player behavior has been the focus of several studies. This work is motivated by better understanding of player behavior, a knowledge that can ultimately be employed to provide player-adapted or personalized content. In this paper, we propose the use of active learning for player...... experience modeling. We use a dataset from hundreds of players playing Infinite Mario Bros. as a case study and we employ the random forest method to learn mod- els of player experience through the active learning approach. The results obtained suggest that only part of the dataset (up to half the size...... of the full dataset) is necessary for the construction of accu- rate models that are as accurate as those constructed from the full dataset. This indicates the potential of the method and its benefits in cases when obtaining the data is expensive or time, storage or effort consuming. The results also indicate...

  6. Developing a Successful Coaching Philosophy: A Step-by-Step Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mullem, Pete; Brunner, Dave

    2013-01-01

    The coaching profession demands a high level of accountability and responsibility for the coach. Challenged to achieve success on the scoreboard and promote the positive personal growth of the athlete, a coach seeks guidance from their coaching philosophy. A coaching philosophy is built on a set of standards by which a coach influences, teaches,…

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Health Coaching: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Rachel; Giese, Jeannie

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate published literature to distinguish how health coaching influences the cost of chronic disease management in insured adults with chronic conditions. An integrated literature review was conducted. MEDLINE, Business Source Complete, and OneSearch were searched for the years 2001-2016 utilizing the following key words: health coaching, health coaching AND insurance companies, health coaching AND cost, health coaching AND health insurance, and health coaching AND insurance cost. A total of 67 articles met inclusion criteria and were assessed for applicability. Of those, 27 articles were found to be relevant to the research question. The practice settings of these articles are mostly primary care and wellness programs. Throughout the literature, health coaching has been found effective in chronic disease management such as hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. Studies evaluating the cost-effectiveness of health coaching are limited. The current literature does not clearly demonstrate that health coaching lowers expenditures and patient copayments in the short term but projects future savings. Health coaching has the potential to improve chronic disease management and lower health care expenditures. Further long-term research is needed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of health coaching. It has been projected that the cost-effectiveness of health coaching will be long-term or over 12 months after initiating the health coaching program.

  8. Leadership coaching experiences of clients with Alexithymia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Leaders who find it difficult to connect emotionally with colleagues are often seen as incompetent, the idea that they may suffer from alexithymia – an inability to feel – is not taken into account. This coaching model seemed to be not successful in changing this behaviour pattern.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to describe the coaching experiences of leaders with symptoms of alexithymia and to formulate hypotheses around their leadership experiences.Motivation for the study: Effective leadership is strongly associated with emotional connections with colleagues. Leaders suffering from alexithymia, struggle with making these connections. It was thought that coaching might help them bridge the gap towards building effective relationships.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design using case studies was used. Three participants underwent 10 months of systems psychodynamic leadership coaching, including role analysis. Researcher’s field notes and participant essays were discourse analysed. The researcher’s unconscious experiences were included in the interpretations.Main findings: Five themes manifested themselves namely, leaders’ difficult experiences with coaching, the dynamics underlying their normative, experiential and phenomenal roles and the coach’s unconscious experiences affecting the relationship. The research hypothesis referred to the differences between the role parts and the resulting anxiety.Practical/managerial implications: This coaching model did not provide sufficient opportunities for the participating leaders with regard to emotional reactivity and regulation. Contribution/value-add: The research created awareness of how alexithymia amongst leaders manifests in organisations. Unfortunately the coaching was unsuccessful in addressing the emotional task. Other ways need to be explored.

  9. The very real dangers of executive coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglas, Steven

    2002-06-01

    A personal coach to help your most promising executives reach their potential--sounds good, doesn't it? But, according to Steven Berglas, executive coaches can make a bad situation worse. Because of their backgrounds and biases, they ignore psychological problems they don't understand. Companies need to consider psychotherapeutic intervention when the symptoms plaguing an executive are stubborn or severe. Executives with issues that require more than coaching come in many shapes and sizes. Consider Rob Bernstein, an executive vice president of sales at an automotive parts distributor. According to the CEO, Bernstein had just the right touch with clients but caused personnel problems inside the company. The last straw came when Bernstein publicly humiliated a mail clerk who had interrupted a meeting to ask someone to sign for a package. At that point, the CEO assigned Tom Davis to coach Bernstein. Davis, a former corporate lawyer, worked with Bernstein for four years. But Davis only exacerbated the problem by teaching Bernstein techniques for "handling" employees--methods that were condescending at best. While Bernstein appeared to be improving, he was in fact getting worse. Bernstein's real problems went undetected, and when his boss left the company, he was picked as the successor. Soon enough, Bernstein was again in trouble, suspected of embezzlement. This time, the CEO didn't call Davis; instead, he turned to the author, a trained psychotherapist, for help. Berglas soon realized that Bernstein had a serious narcissistic personality disorder and executive coaching could not help him. As that tale and others in the article teach us, executives to be coached should at the very least first receive a psychological evaluation. And company leaders should beware that executive coaches given free rein can end up wreaking personnel havoc.

  10. Coaching Expertise: Science or Skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander PAVLOV

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today in most of Russian sport universit ies, the biological disciplines are carried out in accordance with traditional old - fashion ideas that have been formed half a century ago and do not correspond to reality. The sport theory and methods fundamentals are taught only in accordance with the the ory of periodization. Sporting theorists neglect many facts of low efficiency in the use of training periodization theory and results of research. They do not take into account the research of some sports specialists who developed and implemented more effe ctive method of training for elite athletes. One of the main aspects that a coach works with is the human organism. The foundation of the training process should be based on the law of development and human adaptation. Most of nowadays existing concepts of sports training ignore system laws of organism functions construction and existing laws adaptation. The laws of adaptation provide a basis for science - based integrated construction of training process. The modern theory and methodology of sports should be built on the basis of current scientific knowledge about the laws of functioning, adaptation, and development of the human organism. Adaptation laws provide opportunities for effective preparation of the athletes .

  11. Women's football: Player characteristics and demands of the game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Martínez-Lagunas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of scientific investigations on women's football specific to the topics of player characteristics and demands of the game has considerably increased in recent years due to the increased popularity of the women's game worldwide, although they are not yet as numerous as in the case of men's football. To date, only two scientific publications have attempted to review the main findings of studies published in this area. However, one of them was published about 20 years ago, when women's football was still in its infancy and there were only a few studies to report on. The other review was more recent. Nonetheless, its main focus was on the game and training demands of senior elite female players. Thus, information on female footballers of lower competitive levels and younger age groups was not included. Consequently, an updated review is needed in this area. The present article therefore aims to provide an overview of a series of studies that have been published so far on the specific characteristics of female football players and the demands of match-play. Mean values reported in the literature for age (12–27 years, body height (155–174 cm, body mass (48–72 kg, percent body fat (13%–29%, maximal oxygen uptake (45.1–55.5 mL/kg/min, Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 (780–1379 m, maximum heart rate (189–202 bpm, 30 m sprint times (4.34–4.96 s, and counter-movement jump or vertical jump (28–50 cm vary mostly according to the players' competitive level and positional role. There are also some special considerations that coaches and other practitioners should be aware of when working with female athletes such as the menstrual cycle, potential pregnancy and lactation, common injury risks (particularly knee and head injuries and health concerns (e.g., female athlete triad, iron deficiency, and anemia that may affect players' football performance, health or return to play. Reported mean values for total distance

  12. Comparing the Effectiveness of Individual Coaching, Self-Coaching, and Group Training: How Leadership Makes the Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losch, Sabine; Traut-Mattausch, Eva; Mühlberger, Maximilian D; Jonas, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Few empirical studies have used a randomized controlled design to evaluate the impact of coaching, and there are even fewer that have compared coaching with other interventions. In the current field study, we investigated the relative effectiveness of coaching as an intervention to reduce procrastination. In a randomized controlled study, participants (N = 84) were assigned to an individual coaching, a self-coaching, a group training, or a control group condition. Results indicate that individual coaching and group training were effective in reducing procrastination and facilitating goal attainment. Individual coaching created a high degree of satisfaction and was superior in helping participants attaining their goals, whereas group training successfully promoted the acquisition of relevant knowledge. The results for the self-coaching condition show that independently performing exercises without being supported by a coach is not sufficient for high goal attainment. Moreover, mediation analysis show that a coach's transformational and transactional leadership behavior influenced participants' perceived autonomy support and intrinsic motivation, resulting in beneficial coaching outcomes. The results may guide the selection of appropriate human resource development methods: If there is a general need to systematically prepare employees to perform on specific tasks, group training seems appropriate due to lower costs. However, when certain aspects of working conditions or individual development goals are paramount, coaching might be indicated. However, further research is needed to compare the relative effectiveness of coaching with other interventions in different contexts.

  13. The Application of Coaching Techniques to Financial Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Michael Collins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Financial coaching is emerging as a distinct approach to building personal financial capability. However, the term financial coaching refers to a wide array of interventions. This article reviews the literature in order to define financial coaching. Financial coaching includes helping individuals define financial goals, develop plans of action, and implement steps toward their goals. The coaching approach is designed to help people develop and sustain positive financial behaviors. This article also presents findings from three financial coaching field studies; the results suggest that working with a financial coach increases clients’ ability to focus on their financial goals and engage in positive financial behaviors. Despite these beneficial outcomes, the coaching field faces several challenges including a lack of practice standards and consistent outcomes measures.

  14. First Steps in Using REBT in Life Coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dryden, Windy

    2011-01-01

    This step-by-step guide shows the Life Coach how to help coachees deal with any emotional problems that might prevent them from achieving their life goals, using the theory and practice of REBT adapted to a coaching setting.

  15. Experienced teacher learning within the context of reciprocal peer coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, R.C.; Wubbels, T.; Bergen, Th.C.M.; Bolhuis, S.

    2007-01-01

    A considerable amount of literature on peer coaching suggests that the professional development of teachers can be improved through experimentation, observation, reflection, the exchange of professional ideas, and shared problem-solving. Reciprocal peer coaching provides teachers with an opportunity

  16. Applying Humanistic Learning Theory: The "Art" of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Graeme J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to apply specific principles of psychology to the coaching process. More specifically, it is about becoming a productive and effective coach, who positively affects the athletic careers and lives of young people.

  17. Applying Humanistic Learning Theory: The "Art" of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Graeme J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to apply specific principles of psychology to the coaching process. More specifically, it is about becoming a productive and effective coach, who positively affects the athletic careers and lives of young people.

  18. Coaching a Leader: Leveraging Change at the Top.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Leo; Diamante, Thomas; Urban, Julie M.

    1998-01-01

    Coaching can help executives deal with organizational change by focusing on objectives, developing resilience, and building interpersonal skills. Coach and executive move through phases of building commitment and facilitating personal transformation. (SK)

  19. Match Analysis an undervalued coaching tool

    CERN Document Server

    Sacripanti, Attilio

    2010-01-01

    From a Biomechanical point of view, Judo competition is an intriguing complex nonlinear system, with many chaotic and fractals aspects, It is also the test bed in which all coaching capabilities and athlete's performances are evaluated and put to the test. Competition is the moment of truth of all conditioning time, preparation and technical work, before developed, and it is also the climax of the teaching point of view. Furthermore, it is the most important source of technical assessment. Studying it is essential to the coaches because they can obtain useful information for their coaching. Match Analysis could be seen as the master key in all situation sports (dual or team) like Judo, to help in useful way the difficult task of coach or best for National or Olympic coaching equips. In this paper it is presented a short summary of the most important methodological achievement in judo match analysis. It is also presented, at light of the last technological improvement, the first systematization toward new fiel...

  20. Analysis of male volleyball players' motor activities during a top level match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczek, Dariusz; Januszkiewicz, Aleksander; Kawczyński, Adam S; Borysiuk, Zbigniew; Chmura, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The present study aims to assess motor activity of volleyball players using an original video recording method developed by the authors. Twenty-eight volleyball players taking part in 4 matches of the Polish Volleyball League were examined. The recorded data were analyzed in view of the mean total distance covered by volleyball players on different court positions during a match, set, and rally. The results showed that volleyball players cover the mean total distance of 1221 ± 327 m (mean ± SD) in a 3-set match, and 1757 ± 462 m in a 4-set match. A statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.005) was found between the distance covered by the middle blockers and setters, defenders, spikers, and libero players in a match and in a set. The study revealed a tendency to lengthen the distance by the players in the final sets, which is indicative of the extended time of individual rallies. The mean distance covered in a single rally amounted to 10.92 ± 0.9 m in 4 matches (between 9.12 and 12.56 m). Considering the limited size of the field of play, volleyball players cover relatively long distances during a match and individual sets, with the shortest distance covered by middle blockers, and the longest by setters. From a practical application point of view, detailed topographic analysis of a player's movements on the court as well as precise data on the time of activity and rest breaks provide the coach with valuable information on the ways of development of arrhythmic, changing and dynamic training loads.

  1. Kinetic Post-match Fatigue in Professional and Youth Soccer Players During the Competitive Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djaoui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background No previous research has analysed kinetic fatigue of elite adult players and elite youth players during the competitive period. Objectives The aim of the present study was to analyse kinetic post-match fatigue in professional and youth soccer players during the competitive period. Materials and Methods resting heart rate (HRrest, post-effort recovery heart rate (HRrecovery, rate of perceived exertion fatigue (RPEf, muscle soreness and blood samples with creatine kinase (CK and resting lactate (La from nine professional soccer players were measured immediately before, 24 hour and 48 hour after two official French first league matches (Ligue 1 whereas RPEf, HRrest, and 20m speed performance (speed-20 m were measured in ten U-17 elite players immediately before, 24 hour and 48h after a friendly match. Results for professionals, a soccer match elevated all physiological markers during the next 24 hours (P < 0.05; only HRrecovery remained significantly different 48 hours after the match (P < 0.05 whereas there was no variation of HRrest, RPEf, and speed-20m, which were elevated until 24h and got back to reference values 48 hours after the match (P < 0.05 for the U17 players. Comparing the two groups, HRrest results remained lower all the time for professionals, and RPEf was lower for U-17, 24 hours after the match (P < 0.05. Conclusions Independent of their level, professional soccer players, need 48 hours to recover after an official match. Professionals gain more fatigue than young players after a match, but recover as fast. Thus, they recover more efficiently especially due to a better physical condition and fitness training. It is expected that the results showed in the study help elite soccer and fitness coaches to manage the training load of the team according to the match.

  2. Eine ökonomische Analyse der wissensintensiven Dienstleistung Coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Peter-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Über die letzten 20 Jahre hat sich Coaching zu einer der gefragtesten Personalentwicklungsdienstleistungen entwickelt. Aus dem Sport kommend, wurde Coaching zunächst als exklusive Maßnahme für Top-Führungskräfte konzipiert. In den 1980er Jahren wurden erste Angebote von Top-Executive-Coaching, orientiert an amerikanischen Vorbildern, in Deutschland angeboten. Bis heute hat Coaching darauf einen unglaublichen Boom erlebt. Da ...

  3. Taekwondo Coaches Knowledge about Prevention and Management Of Dental Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Vidović, Dina; Goršeta, Kristina; Bursač, Danijel; Glavina, Domagoj; Škrinjarić, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess level of knowledge about prevention and dental trauma management among taekwondo coaches in Croatia. The questionnaire submitted to the taekwondo coaches contained 16 items about dental trauma prevention and management. The questionnaires were filled in by 131 taekwondo coaches; 28 females and 103 males. Descriptive statistics was used to describe and analyze the obtained data. The coaches were familiar with dental injuries in high percentage: 41 (31.3%) ha...

  4. A survey of orofacial injuries among basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, Clement Chinedu; Odai, Chukwuemeka Danielson; Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba; Obuekwe, Ozoemene Ndubuisi

    2011-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of orofacial injuries among basketball players in Benin City, Nigeria and to survey the athletes' awareness, attitude and use of mouthguards. A cross-sectional survey of basketball players in the standard basketball arena in Benin City was conducted between November 2009 and January 2010. A self-administered questionnaire elicited information on demography, the prevalence of oral and facial injuries, distribution of site and cause of orofacial injuries, athletes' knowledge, attitudes and usage of mouthguards. Data were subjected to descriptive statistics and Chi square test. The response rate was 78%. Of the 156 respondents, 79.5% were male and 20.5% female, with a mean age of 23.1 years. The distributions was amateurs (61.5%) professionals (38.5%). The mean number of injuries in previous 12 months was 3.7 ± 1.8. The prevalence of both facial and oral injuries among the respondents was 62.8% with the lip and gingiva most commonly involved respectively. The common causes of the orofacial injury reported were from elbows of opponents, falling and collisions with other players. The prevalence of injury was not significantly associated with demography, category, competition and duration of participation. More than half had heard and seen mouthguards and the coach was the leading source of information. The reasons for non-use of mouthguard were mostly ignorance, non-availability and non-affordability. The high prevalence of orofacial injury among basketball players reported in this study justifies the need for multidisciplinary injury prevention interventional approach with emphasis on the rules of the games. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  5. The role of culture in parents' socialization of children's emotional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Bonnie H; Carrère, Sybil; Cooke, Cheryl; Valdivia, Guadalupe; McAllister, Brittany; Doohan, Eve-Anne

    2013-04-01

    Parents' emotion coaching of children and modeling of effective emotional responses are associated with children's positive emotional development. However, much of the research in this area has been with European American families. This study examined parents' self-reports about their emotion regulation patterns and coaching their children about emotions, across three racial and ethnic groups (African American, European American, and Multiracial), to determine how well these parental behaviors predicted their children's self-reports of depressive and anxiety symptoms 18 to 24 months later (N = 99). For the African American families, a higher level of coaching about anger and sadness by mothers was linked with lower depressive symptoms in their children. A higher level of anger coaching by fathers within the Multiracial group was also associated with lower anxiety and depressive symptoms. This study supports the importance of cultural values, within racial and ethnic groups, in parenting approaches associated with children's mental health outcomes.

  6. Examining the relationships between challenge and threat cognitive appraisals and coaching behaviours in football coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Martin; Turner, Martin J; Gillman, Jamie

    2016-12-26

    Previous research demonstrates that sports coaching is a stressful activity. This article investigates coaches' challenge and threat cognitive appraisals of stressful situations and their impact on coaching behaviour, using Blascovich and Mendes' (2000) biopsychosocial model as a theoretical framework. A cross-sectional correlational design was utilised to examine the relationships between irrational beliefs (Shortened general attitude and belief scale), challenge and threat appraisals (Appraisal of life events scale), and coaching behaviours (Leadership scale for sports) of 105 professional football academy coaches. Findings reveal significant positive associations between challenge appraisals and social support, and between threat appraisals and autocratic behaviour, and a significant negative association between threat appraisals and positive feedback. Results also show that higher irrational beliefs are associated with greater threat, and lesser challenge cognitive appraisals. However, no associations were revealed between irrational beliefs and challenge cognitive appraisals. Additionally, findings demonstrate a positive relationship between age and training and instruction. Results suggest that practitioners should help coaches to appraise stressful situations as a challenge to promote positive coaching behaviours.

  7. Effects of multiple concussions on retired national hockey league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions.

  8. Everyday Miracles: Supporting Parents of Infants in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotherspoon, Evelyn; McInnis, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a model for supporting parents and their infants during separations due to temporary foster care. Using a case example, the authors describe a model for visit coaching, including their process for assessment and strategies used for intervention. The lessons learned are: (a) that individual parents can present very…

  9. What Motivates the Motivators? An Examination of Sports Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kristy N.; Mallett, Clifford J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Motivation is central to successful performance. In the case of sports coaches, drive is a prerequisite to sustained successful engagement in a complex, dynamic, and turbulent work environment. What fuels these coaches' drive to pursue this vocational activity? Coach motivation has been underrepresented in previous research which has…

  10. Program Orientation for High School Sport Coaches. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) believes that prior to the start of each season, all high school head coaches, assistant coaches, and volunteer coaches should be required to participate in a comprehensive orientation to the sport program. This orientation should be planned and conducted by the athletic director or…

  11. Coaching Students to Academic Success and Engagement on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Claire; Gahagan, Jimmie

    2010-01-01

    Academic coaching can be a crucial step in helping students transition to college. Coaches work with students to be strategic in establishing and achieving their academic goals as well as becoming engaged on campus. At the University of South Carolina, academic coaching is defined as a one-on-one interaction with a student focusing on strengths,…

  12. Exploring Student Perceptions of Academic Mentoring and Coaching Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    While there is an abundant amount of research relative to coaching and mentoring programs, there is little understanding about the interaction between coaches/mentors and students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate student perceptions of their academic coaching and mentoring experiences at two Southern California community…

  13. Playoffs & Payoffs: The College Football-Coaching Carousel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer Lee

    2015-01-01

    The circulation of head football coaches is a well-established practice, and with it, salary costs are significantly outpacing other spending as institutions compete in the pursuit of prestige. This movement of college football coaches is known in the popular press as the "coaching carousel." The carousel is a fitting metaphor for a…

  14. Playoffs & Payoffs: The College Football-Coaching Carousel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer Lee

    2015-01-01

    The circulation of head football coaches is a well-established practice, and with it, salary costs are significantly outpacing other spending as institutions compete in the pursuit of prestige. This movement of college football coaches is known in the popular press as the "coaching carousel." The carousel is a fitting metaphor for a…

  15. Initiating a National Coaching Curriculum: A Paradigmatic Shift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Tania; Kidman, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Background: A number of countries have heavily invested in the provision of large scale coach education programmes, often framed by elaborate qualification frameworks. Despite this investment, scant research has been conducted on coach education programmes. Given the limited amount of literature on coach education, and the relatively recent…

  16. Benefits of a Teacher and Coach Collaboration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Jim

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of a math teacher working with a math coach and the effects of their interaction. A guiding question was whether the coaching intervention had affected the teacher's classroom practices and, if so, in what way. The study utilized data from teacher/coach planning sessions, classroom lessons, follow-up debriefing…

  17. Coaching for Performance. Second Edition. People Skills for Professionals Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, John

    This book teaches the skills and art of good coaching and how to realize its value in unlocking people's potential to maximize their own performance. Chapters 1-3 define coaching and its business application, discuss the manager as coach and the manager's role, and examine the context of change. Chapter 4 considers the two key elements of…

  18. Courage to Love: Coaching Dialogically toward Teacher Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Heather; Palmer, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Instructional coaches continue to be an important part of school reform and professional development, and yet few studies have examined the impact of the language coaches use when working with teachers. The authors work to contribute towards filling this gap by describing a self-study examining their own language as instructional coaches and its…

  19. Lived Experience and Community Sport Coaching: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Colum; Armour, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Coaching in the participation domain is the act of coaching participants that are less intensely engaged in sport than performance orientated athletes. This form of coaching is a popular activity occurring in community settings such as schools or sport clubs, and it is often undertaken with a broad range of social and health outcomes in mind. The…

  20. The role of coaching in creating cultures of engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Walker, Catherine

    2002-09-01

    This article examines "just in time learning" from a coaching perspective. It explores the organizational and managerial skills that are necessary requirements for coaching to succeed. It considers the benefits of coaching for organizations that are committed to deeply engaging their employees to produce sustainable, high-quality results while increasing their personal and professional satisfaction on the job.