WorldWideScience

Sample records for play developing self-concept

  1. The Development and Validation of the Physical Self-Concept Scale for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Wen; Lu, Frank Jing-Horng

    2013-01-01

    Physical self-concept plays a central role in older adults' physical health, mental health and psychological well-being; however, little attention has been paid to the underlying dimensions of physical self-concept in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a new measurement for older adults. First, a qualitative…

  2. Art Education and the Development of Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Jerome J.

    References are often made in art education literature about how art can enhance individuals' self-concepts. This document discusses the work of authors, Manuel Barkan, George Herbert Mead, and Sigmund Freud, who support this concept. Barkan's theory concerning how an individual's personality develops and changes by interacting socially is…

  3. Art Education and the Development of Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Jerome J.

    References are often made in art education literature about how art can enhance individuals' self-concepts. This document discusses the work of authors, Manuel Barkan, George Herbert Mead, and Sigmund Freud, who support this concept. Barkan's theory concerning how an individual's personality develops and changes by interacting socially is…

  4. Processes Of Self-Concept Development Among Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael

    Interviews and observations from a longitudinal study (from 1998 - 2009) has been analyzed to approach a contextual understanding of children's identity and self-concept development (Spaten 2007). Bronfenbrenner assumed (2005) that scientific limitations in widespread approaches to research...... on childrens's development may be conquered by broader perspectives in theory and, methodology. He proposed a scientific perspective as the ecology of human development and, the Person-Process-Context-Time model (ibid). Our results includes that childrens's and adolescent's active internalization (Valsiner...... & Van der Veer, 1988). amd dialogical, cultural self-autorship are important themes for an understanding of processes of self-concept development among Danish children and adolescents from diverse cultual backgrounds. Limitations for this research as well as further directions for new studies...

  5. Processes Of Self-Concept Development Among Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael

    Interviews and observations from a longitudinal study (from 1998 - 2009) has been analyzed to approach a contextual understanding of children's identity and self-concept development (Spaten 2007). Bronfenbrenner assumed (2005) that scientific limitations in widespread approaches to research...... on childrens's development may be conquered by broader perspectives in theory and, methodology. He proposed a scientific perspective as the ecology of human development and, the Person-Process-Context-Time model (ibid). Our results includes that childrens's and adolescent's active internalization (Valsiner...... & Van der Veer, 1988). amd dialogical, cultural self-autorship are important themes for an understanding of processes of self-concept development among Danish children and adolescents from diverse cultual backgrounds. Limitations for this research as well as further directions for new studies...

  6. Self-concept deficits in massively multiplayer online role-playing games addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leménager, Tagrid; Gwodz, Alexander; Richter, Anne; Reinhard, Iris; Kämmerer, Nina; Sell, Madlen; Mann, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies on Internet addiction point towards a particular constellation of personality traits and deficits in social competence of players addicted to massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs), which are hypothesized to result from impairments in self-concept. The aim of this study was to examine differences in self-concept and degree of avatar identification in World of Warcraft addicted, non-addicted and naive (nonexperienced) participants. Participants (n = 45) completed interviews and self-report questionnaires on social, emotional and physical aspects of self-concept. Attributes of participants' 'actual self', 'ideal self' and their avatar were assessed using the Giessen test. The extent of avatar identification was examined by assessing differences between 'ideal self' and avatar evaluations. In contrast to nonaddicted and naive participants, addicted players showed a more negative body appraisal and lower self-esteem as well as lower permeability, social response, general mood and social potency on the Giessen test subscales. They further showed significantly lower discrepancies between 'ideal self' and avatar ratings on nearly all Giessen test subscales. The results point towards impairments in self-concept and a higher degree in avatar identification in addicted MMORPG players compared to the remaining participants. These results could have important implications for the treatment of addicted MMORPG players. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The role of pre-school children motor behavior in developing their self-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Dušan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of motor behavior and general intellectual abilities were performed on a sample of 42 pre-school children (22 boys and 20 girls aged 6 (±3 months; moreover, the self-concept of those children was analysed. For the assessment of their motor behavior six movement tasks were chosen and the Mary Gutrich scale was applied for the analysis of the results. The children's intellectual abilities were assessed by the means of Raven's colored progressive matrices so as to enable the groups to homogenise, as well as to eliminate potential parasite factors when drawing conclusions. The self-concept analysis was performed using the pshychological interview during the course of which the children described their impression of their own abilities with regard to the past, present and future. The data related to the self-concept were complemented with the analysis of the children's drawings. The statistical analysis of the data gathered showed that motor behavior plays a significant role in developing one's self-concept, which is especially true of boys. Even though there is no significant statistical difference between boys and girls with respect to the quality of their motor behavior, there are significant differences between them pertaining to the vocabulary they use when describing their own selves, i.e. their self-concept, especially with respect to the present and future. Boys seem to use more extensive motor-related vocabulary when describing themselves, especially those with greater motor skills. Both boys and girls show a tendency to describe themselves as incapable in the past. When describing their present moment capabilities, girls tend to use vocabulary related to play and independence, whereas they mostly use vocabulary related to professions and sex roles when referring to the future. These findings indicate that social factors are of immense importance from a very early age, especially among girls. Moreover, the results show that

  8. Self-concept in youth with congenital facial differences: development and recommendations for medical providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marik, Patricia K; Hoag, Jennifer A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital facial differences may impact a child's self-perception, activities and valuation, and what has been termed their "self-concept." This article reviews what constitutes self-concept, and its development during childhood and adolescence. The literature examining the role of physical appearance, specifically congenital facial differences on individuals' perceptions of self are reviewed in the context of psychosocial development. Positive self-concept can impact healthy behaviors, positive interactions with peers, and academic achievement. The role of mental health professionals in evaluating self-concept and objective measures of self-concept are discussed, and recommendations are made to assist medical practitioners regarding monitoring and encouragement of positive self-concept in children with congenital facial differences.

  9. Avatar's neurobiological traces in the self-concept of massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, Julia; Hill, Holger; Sell, Madlen; Reinhard, Iris; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Kiefer, Falk; Mann, Karl; Leménager, Tagrid

    2015-02-01

    Psychometric studies suggest that observed self-concept deficits in addicted massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) are compensated through the replacement of their ideal (i.e., how an individual would like to be) by their own avatar (i.e., graphical agent in the virtual world). Neurobiological studies indicate that increased identification with their own avatar in regular MMORPG gamers is possibly reflected by enhanced avatar-referential brain activation in the left angular gyrus (AG). However, the neurobiological correlates reflecting the relations of the avatar to addicted gamers' self and ideal are still unexplored. Therefore, we compare these relations between addicted and nonaddicted MMORPG gamers. A sample of n = 15 addicted and n = 17 nonaddicted players underwent functional MRI (fMRI) while completing a Giessen-Test (GT)-derived paradigm assessing self-, ideal-, and avatar-related self-concept domains. Neurobiological analyses included the comparisons avatar versus self, avatar versus ideal, and avatar versus self, ideal. Psychometrically, addicts showed significantly lower scores on the self-concept subscale of 'social resonance,' that is, social popularity. In all avatar-related contrasts, within-group comparisons showed addicted players to exhibit significantly higher brain activations in the left AG. The between-groups comparisons revealed avatar-related left AG hyperactivations in addicts. Our results may suggest that addicted MMORPG players identify significantly more with their avatar than nonaddicted gamers. The concrete avatar might increasingly replace the rather abstract ideal in the transition from normal- controlled to addictive-compulsive MMORPG usage.

  10. Self-concept of people with intellectual disabilities: Implications for support program development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Boban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-concept is defined as a sum of perception, thoughts, feelings, evaluation and prediction about oneself as an experienced object, as a participant in the interaction with physical and social environment. As such, this topic is often encountered in working with children, young people and adults with intellectual disabilities (PWID. However, self-concept of PWID has been investigated mainly through psychometric paradigm, using different types of questionnaires for assessment. This did not provide either enough possibilities for active participation of people with ID in the research process, or the possibilities to reach adequate initial information about self-concept of PWID, which may serve as a baseline for development of support programs for self-determination of PWID. Therefore, this study aimed to examine self-concept of PWID in various domains of interest for PWID: global self-image, personality traits, competencies, difficulties in everyday life, awareness of one's own (intellectual disabilities. The research was conducted through a series of five focus groups, with active participation of PWID, through combined workshop activities and discussions in small groups. Focus groups were conducted once a week and 16 participants were divided into two groups, of different ages (22 to 53 years, sex, type and degree of difficulties. All participants spent most of their lives in institutions. Since 2004, they have been living at supported housing for people with disabilities. Based on the analysis of the participants' testimony, there were three global issues with regard to general self-concept: competences and interests, physical appearance, and social roles. With regard to personality traits, attributes such as 'good', 'obedient', 'valuable' occur most frequently. With regard to their competencies and difficulties, those which are most important for full daily life in supported housing have been cited most often. While they recognize their

  11. Self-concept and Ego Development in Deaf Adolescents: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gent, T. van; Goedhart, A.W.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Westenberg, P.M.; Treffers, P.D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-concept and ego development, two intertwined aspects of self-indicating well-being and social-cognitive maturation, respectively, were examined in a representative sample of deaf adolescents of normal intelligence (N = 68), using translated and adapted versions of Harter's (1988, Manual for the

  12. Self-Concept and Ego Development in Deaf Adolescents: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gent, Tiejo; Goedhart, Arnold W.; Knoors, Harry E. T.; Westenberg, P. Michiel; Treffers, Philip D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-concept and ego development, two intertwined aspects of self-indicating well-being and social-cognitive maturation, respectively, were examined in a representative sample of deaf adolescents of normal intelligence (N = 68), using translated and adapted versions of Harter's (1988, "Manual for the self-perception profile for adolescents".…

  13. Self-Concept Development in Inclusive Classroom Settings focusing on Children with and without Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Wieckert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The encouragement of the development of a realistic self-concept of the children in their classes is an important challenge for school teachers. Children who know about their strengths and weaknesses can work on the competences, which need to be improved, more effectively. This contribution presents a study which focuses on the special time of first-grade when primary school children get to know their new learning environment. In that context a survey takes place in Germany and accompanies children with and without special needs in the field of vision which learn together in school.

  14. Self-concept in children with spina bifida compared with typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F; Dodd, Karen J

    2008-10-01

    The literature was systematically reviewed to determine if children with spina bifida have lower self-concept compared with their peers with typical development. Relevant trials were identified by searching electronic databases, supplemented by citation tracking. Of 803 papers initially identified, 15 met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis revealed children with spina bifida scored significantly lower than children with typical development for the domains of global self-worth (d=-0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.65 to -0.12); physical appearance (d=-0.26, 95% CI -0.46 to -0.06); athletic competence (d=-0.45, 95% CI -0.67 to -0.22); social acceptance (d=-0.33, 95% CI -0.55 to -0.11); and scholastic competence (d=-0.43, 95% CI -0.66 to -0.21). There was no difference between the groups for the behavioural conduct domain. Children with spina bifida on average have a lower self-concept than their peers with typical development. Clinicians need to take account of this information in planning the assessment and treatment of this group.

  15. Fostering Gifted Students' Affective Development: A Look at the Impact of Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinn, Anne N.; Plucker, Jonathan A.; Stocking, Vicki B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide educators and counselors with a framework for understanding the academic self-concepts of gifted students. As academic self-concept is theoretically linked with other constructs, including academic achievement and aspirations, it is vital that educators and counselors are aware of the experiences gifted…

  16. Development and validation of an instrument to measure the impact of genetic testing on self-concept in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esplen, M J; Stuckless, N; Gallinger, S

    2011-01-01

    with two dimensions identified through factor analysis: stigma/vulnerability and bowel symptom-related anxiety. The scale showed excellent reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.93), good convergent validity by a high correlation with impact of event scale (r(102) = 0.55, p self-esteem scale......Esplen MJ, Stuckless N, Gallinger S, Aronson M, Rothenmund H, Semotiuk K, Stokes J, Way C, Green J, Butler K, Petersen HV, Wong J. Development and validation of an instrument to measure the impact of genetic testing on self-concept in Lynch syndrome. A positive genetic test result may impact...... on a person's self-concept and affect quality of life. The purpose of the study was to develop a self-concept scale to measure such impact for individuals carrying mutations for a heritable colorectal cancer Lynch syndrome (LS). Two distinct phases were involved: Phase 1 generated specific colorectal self...

  17. School-Based Extracurricular Activities, Personality, Self-Concept, and College Career Development Skills in Chinese Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Yung-Jong; Huang, Ying; Chang, Frances; Chang, Chuan-Feng; Yeh, Lun-Chang

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we examined in Chinese society the association of school-based extracurricular activities (SBEAs) in both high school and college with students' career development skills in college, as well as with various personality characteristics and self-concept. Each of 281 college students administered the Lai Personality Inventory,…

  18. Visual Impairment and Its Effect on the Development of the Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, R. Brian

    This doctoral dissertation compares the self-concept of people with visual impairments with that of normally sighted individuals in 14 studies from various geographical regions in the United States. Discussion of methodological issues examines first, definitions regarding the self (self-image, self-perception, self-evaluation, self-esteem,…

  19. The Effect of Track Changes on the Development of Academic Self-Concept in High School: A Dynamic Test of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sofie; De Fraine, Bieke; Colpin, Hilde; Van Damme, Jan; Verschueren, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Academic self-concept has received a great deal of attention in recent educational research because it mediates many other educational outcomes. Therefore, it is important to find out how students' academic self-concept develops. We examined the big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) dynamically by investigating the effect of track changes in high…

  20. Attachment to parents and friends as a context for development of self-concept in adolescence: The personality traits as mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to study developmental relations between attachment to mother, father and friends and dimensions of adolescents’ self-concept. More specifically, we examine if this relation is direct or mediated by some personality construct. A sample of 878 students (13 and 16 years old from Belgrade urban lower secondary and upper secondary schools participated in this research. Participants completed ECR for mother, father and friend; Selfperception profile for adolescents and NEOFFI. The results have indicated that dimensions of attachment are correlated with dimensions of self-concept, and that they can explain 13% of variance in dimensions of self-concept. When the personality traits are introduced as mediators, attachment dimensions explain only 4.5% of variance in self-concept. The quality of attachment relations with parents is not related to adolescents’ self-concept, while attachment to friends is correlated with social dimensions of self-concept. Hence, this study suggests that adolescents with particular parental attachment styles differ according to their self-concept profiles, but that peer attachment is important for adolescents’ social self. Beside that, this study reveals significant gender differences: relation between parental and peer attachment and adolescents’ self-concepts is not the same for boys and girls. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018: Identification, measurement and development of cognitive and emotional competences important for a society oriented toward European integrations

  1. The Professional Self-Concept of Music Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadushin, Charles

    1969-01-01

    Study indicates that, "Socialization to a professional self-concept does happen during music school attendance. This self-concept is developed through participation in professional performances. (Author)

  2. Biological Aspects of the Development and Self-Concept in Adolescents Living in Single-Parent Families

    OpenAIRE

    Veček, Andrea; Vidović, Vesna; Miličić, Jasna; Špoljar-Vržina, Sanja; Veček, Nenad; Arch-Veček, Branka

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigate whether there are differences between adolescents who grow up in single-parent families and those who grow up in nucleus families. We have decided that there are no differences in the physical development between the adolescents who are growing up in single parent families and those growing up in nucleus families. There is no difference in the self-concept between these two groups, except in the ethical and moral self-image of adolescents living with one parent. A...

  3. Becoming physics people: Development of physics identity in self-concept and practice through the Learning Assistant experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor

    2016-03-01

    The physics department at Texas State University has implemented a Learning Assistant (LA) program with reform-based instructional changes in our introductory course sequences. We are interested in how participation in the LA program influences LAs' identity both as physics students and as physics teachers; in particular, how being part of the LA community changes participants' self-concepts and their day-to-day practice. We analyze video of weekly LA preparation sessions and interviews with LAs as well as written artifacts from program applications, pedagogy course reflections, and evaluations. Our analysis of self-concepts is informed by the identity framework developed by Hazari et al., and our analysis of practice is informed by Lave and Wenger's theory of Communities of Practice. Regression models from quantitative studies show that the physics identity construct strongly predicts intended choice of a career in physics; the goal of our current project is to understand the details of the impacts of participation in the LA experience on participants' practice and self-concept, in order to identify critical elements of LA program structure that positively influence physics identity and physics career intentions for students. Our analysis suggests that participation in the LA program impacts LAs in ways that support both stronger ``physics student'' identity and stronger ``physics instructor'' identity, and that these identities are reconciled into a coherent integrated physics identity. In addition to becoming more confident and competent in physics, LAs perceive themselves to have increased competence in communication and a stronger sense of belonging to a supportive and collaborative community; participation in the LA program also changes their ways of learning and of being students, both within and beyond physics. This research and the TXST LA program are supported by NSF DUE-1240036, NSF DUE-1431578, and the Halliburton Foundation.

  4. The relation between math self-concept, test and math anxiety, achievement motivation and math achievement in 12 to 14-year-old typically developing adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Timmerman, H.L.; Toll, S.W.M.; van Luit, J.E.H.

    2017-01-01

    :This study examines the relation between math self-concept, test and math anxiety, achievement motivation, and math achievement in typically developing 12 to 14-year-old adolescents (N = 108) from a school for secondary education in the Netherlands. Data was obtained using a math speed test, achievement motivation test, and the math experience questionnaire. A significant positive correlation was found between math self-concept and math achievement in all four math domains (measurement, rela...

  5. [Development of a questionnaire for the assessment of the voice self-concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusseck, M; Richter, B; Echternach, M; Spahn, C

    2015-02-01

    Common self-assessment questionnaires on voice diagnostics focus mostly on functionality of the voice and the impact on the quality of life. Personal aspects such as the relationship with one's own voice and its self-perception are for the most part not taken into consideration. In this article a questionnaire for the assessment of the voice self-concept (Fragebogen zur Erfassung des stimmlichen Selbstkonzepts, FESS) is introduced. Reliability and validity were tested with a sample of 308 student teachers. For external validity, the scales were correlated with standardized questionnaires of vocal, physical, and mental health. The scale reliability was also retested in 94 participants. The principal component analysis confirmed the internal consistency of three subscales on the relationship with one's own voice, the awareness of the use of one's own voice, and the perception of the connection between voice and emotional changes. The FESS questionnaire was shown to be a reliable and valid instrument which supplements existing voice questionnaires by self-related aspects of the voice.

  6. Association between self-concept and body weight, gender, and pubertal development among male and female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, J A; Abraham, S

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the effects and interactions of gender, pubertal status, and body weight on the self-concept of 462 young adolescent Australian students from two different schools. All students enrolled in Years 7 and 8 completed the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents, which includes several self-concept subscales and ratings of the importance of each subscale. The self-concept subscales ranked as most important by male and female students were Close Friendship, Scholastic Competence, and Job Competence. Females rated their ability to form close friendships significantly higher and of greater importance than did males. Standard body weight was related to students' Physical Appearance subscale scores, with higher weight students having lower self-concept, and postmenarcheal females having the poorest opinion of their physical appearance. Higher body weight males had lower scores on Athletic Competence, Job Competence, and Behavioral Conduct than did other males. Overweight females and normal weight males considered athletic competence to be more important than did other students. Pubertal status was related to students' scores on Athletic Competence, with postpubertal males who were not overweight scoring highest, and on Physical Appearance, with postmenarcheal females having the lowest opinion of their appearance. The mean self-concept score was significantly related to students' standard body weight, and there was an interaction between gender and puberty, with postpubertal males having the highest and postmenarcheal females the lowest self-concept score. The discrepancy score suggested that females felt they had failed to meet their ideal self-concept significantly more than did males. The results suggest that school programs should be implemented to provide exercise and job skill training suitable for all students, especially those who are overweight. These programs, while taking into account students' pubertal status, should aim to improve self

  7. Influence of culture on tripartite self-concept development in adolescence: a comparison between Han and Uyghur cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdukeram, Ziwida; Mamat, Marhaba; Luo, Wei; Wu, Yanhong

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the development of cultural variability in interdependent self-construal by comparing the differences in the tripartite self-concept of adolescent samples from the Han and Uyghur cultures. Participants (460 males, 522 females; M age = 16.3 yr., SD = 4.8) in the sub-phases of pre-, early-, mid-, late- and post-adolescence were asked to completed the revised Twenty Statements Test, and the items generated by the participants were coded into private, relational, and collective self-statements. The private self-statements were further differentiated by personal and social orientation, and the relational self-statements were further coded into family and friend focus. The relational aspect of an individual's self, or personal relationship, became increasingly important with age in the Han cultural groups, whereas the collective aspect of an individual's self, or social identity, became increasingly important with age in the Uyghur cultural groups. These findings seem to show the development of differences between relational and collective interdependent self-construals. Furthermore, these findings emphasize the need for further research into the development of within-cultural differences in self-construal.

  8. Parent-Child Communication and Its Perceived Effects on the Young Child's Developing Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banham, Victoria; Hanson, Jane; Higgins, Alice; Jarrett, Michelle

    In Australia, an exploratory study was grounded in U. Bronfenbrenner's ecological perspective of human development and his principles of reciprocity, affective tone, and developmental opportunity and developmental risk. It used D. Baumrind's (1979) work on child rearing styles (authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive) to explore the effect of…

  9. The relation between math self-concept, test and math anxiety, achievement motivation and math achievement in 12 to 14-year-old typically developing adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, H.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412462435; Toll, S.W.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32819820X; van Luit, J.E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072499672

    2017-01-01

    :This study examines the relation between math self-concept, test and math anxiety, achievement motivation, and math achievement in typically developing 12 to 14-year-old adolescents (N = 108) from a school for secondary education in the Netherlands. Data was obtained using a math speed test,

  10. 自我概念引领下的高校外语教师自主专业发展%Under the guidance of self concept of College English teachers ' professional development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁桂红

    2012-01-01

      This paper discusses the current situation of college foreign language teachers' professional development importance, from the teacher occupation self-concept related theory, analysis of self concept plays an important role in foreign language teachers' professional development , and on this basis, put forward the self concept theory under the guidance of effective ways to promote the professional development.%  论述了在当今形势下高校外语教师自主专业发展的重要性,从教师职业自我概念的相关理论出发,分析了自我概念在外语教师自主专业发展中的重要作用,并在此基础上,提出了在自我概念理论引领下自主专业发展的有效途径。

  11. A curricular frame for physics education: Development, comparison with students' interests, and impact on students' achievement and self-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussler, Peter; Hoffmann, Lore

    2000-11-01

    This article presents three interlinked studies aimed at: (1) developing a curricular frame for physics education; (2) assessing the students' interest in the contents, contexts, and activities that are suggested by that curricular frame; and (3) developing a curriculum that is in line with that frame and measuring its cognitive and emotional effects on students. The curricular frame was developed by adopting the Delphi technique and drawing on the expertise of 73 persons selected according to specified selection criteria. Interest data of some 8000 students and information of the presently taught physics curriculum were sampled longitudinally as well as cross-sectionally in various German Länder (states) by questionnaire. The third study comprised 23 experimental and 7 control classes. As a result of the comparison between the features of the curricular frame, the interest structure of students, and the current physics curriculum, there is a remarkable congruency between students' interest in physics and the kind of physics education identified in the Delphi study as being relevant. However, there is a considerable discrepancy between students' interest and the kind of physics instruction practiced in the physics classroom. Regression analysis revealed that students' interest in physics as a school subject is hardly related to their interest in physics, but mainly to the students' self-esteem of being good achievers. The data strongly suggest physics be taught so that students have a chance to develop a positive physics-related self-concept and to link physics with situations they encounter outside the classroom. A curriculum based on these principles proved superior compared to a traditional curriculum.

  12. The Impact of Gymnastics on Children's Physical Self-Concept and Movement Skill Development in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, J. R.; Barnett, L. M.; Farrow, D.; Berry, J.; Borkoles, E.; Polman, Remco

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an 8-week gymnastics curriculum on children's movement competence and their physical self-concept. There were 113 children (46% girls, 49% intervention) with a mean age of 9.4 years (SD = 1.8) that participated. Intervention children underwent 8 weeks of gymnastics and the comparison group continued with…

  13. Self-Concept Development of Students with Disabilities: Disability Category, Gender, and Racial Differences from Early Elementary to High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Marder, Camille

    2012-01-01

    Developmental trajectories of two self-concept constructs (self-confidence and importance beliefs) in three domains (academic, social, and self-image) were estimated in a nationally representative sample of approximately 3,500 students with disabilities ages 8 to 17 representing 11 federal disability categories. Students' self-confidence in the…

  14. Academic self-concept, gender and single-sex schooling

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, A

    2009-01-01

    This article assesses gender differences in academic self-concept for a cohort of children born in 1958 (the National Child Development Study). It addresses the question of whether attending single-sex or co-educational schools affected students' perceptions of their own academic abilities (academic self-concept). Academic self-concept was found to be highly gendered, even controlling for prior test scores. Boys had higher self-concepts in mathematics and science, and girls in English. Single...

  15. Academic Self-Concept, Gender and Single-Sex Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Alice

    2009-01-01

    This article assesses gender differences in academic self-concept for a cohort of children born in 1958 (the National Child Development Study). It addresses the question of whether attending single-sex or co-educational schools affected students' perceptions of their own academic abilities (academic self-concept). Academic self-concept was found…

  16. Musical elite gymnasia as learning environments and settings for personality development in secondary students? The case of musical self-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Susanne Fritzsche

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elite gymnasia with a main focus on musical education are special institutional learning environ-ments for the students attending those schools: Their curricula differ considerably from those of non-specialized schools regarding the emphasis that is placed on musical activities. Thus, if effects of intensive musical education on personality development proposed in musical education research are to be found, then examining students from such elite schools seems pertinent. However, beyond institutional impact, effects of variables from the students’ individual learning environment are to be expected. Thus, reanalysing data from Bernecker, Haag and Pfeiffer (2006, we investigated effects of both the institutional and the individual learning environment on different facets of the self-concept of ability with n = 509 students from 91 classes including class-levels 5 to 10 (corresponding to an age of 10 to 16 years. Classes were located either at musical elite gymnasia providing intensive musical education and including the opportunity to participate in an internationally recognised choir or at non-specialized gymnasia without such an elite musical profile. As expected, multilevel analyses revealed strong effects of school type (i.e., institutional effects on musical activities. However, in line with Schellenberg (2006, our results did not provide evidence either for substantial institutional effects on the musical self-concept, or for such effects on the academic or general self-concept. Rather, variance in self-concept facets could better be explained via aspects of the individual learning environment or by personal characteristics like school grades or the intrinsic value of musical activities. The implications for potential effects of attending a musical elite gymnasium on personality development as well as avenues for further research are discussed.

  17. Motivation for learning and self-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Lebarič

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyse motivation for learning. In the sample was included 287 students fourth grade of Slovenian upper secondary schools. Our main questions were focused on the relationships between students motivation and their self-concept on the one side and on differences between students motivational factors on the other side. In further we analyse relations between learning success and motivation. The results of ours research show, that the self concept, in particular its academic self-concept, is significantly correlated with motivational factors. The particular part (dimension of academic self-concept is students self-perception about their own abilities for learning and it is in relation with individuals value system. That can be seen when we observed students attitudes to acquire knowledge. Academic self-concept is basic factor for development and for the selection of learning strategies and it has the role of motivational factor. On the other side in academic self-concept are included very differentabilities, what is helping students not only for better understanding in the processes of acquiring knowledge, but also for more qualitative production of new knowledge from acquiring information's. Our results show that obtain differences between students in motivation for learning and that higher learning success is in correlation with higher level of motivation.

  18. The Musical Self-Concept of Chinese Music Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suse ePetersen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between self-concept and societal settings has been widely investigated in several Western and Asian countries, with respect to the academic self-concept in an educational environment. Although the musical self-concept is highly relevant to musical development and performance, there is a lack of research exploring how the musical self-concept evolves in different cultural settings and societies. In particular, there have been no enquiries yet in the Chinese music education environment. This study’s goal was the characterization of musical self-concept types among music students at a University in Beijing, China. The Musical Self-Concept Inquiry (MUSCI—including ability, emotional, physical, cognitive, and social facets—was used to assess the students’ musical self-concepts (N=97. The data analysis led to three significantly distinct clusters and corresponding musical self-concept types. The types were especially distinct, in the students’ perception of their musical ambitions and abilities; their movement, rhythm and dancing affinity; and the spiritual and social aspects of music. The professional aims and perspectives, and the aspects of the students’ sociodemographic background also differed between the clusters. This study is one of the first research endeavors addressing musical self-concepts in China. The empirical identification of the self-concept types offers a basis for future research on the connections between education, the development of musical achievement, and the musical self-concept in societal settings with differing understandings of the self.

  19. The Musical Self-Concept of Chinese Music Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Suse; Camp, Marc-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between self-concept and societal settings has been widely investigated in several Western and Asian countries, with respect to the academic self-concept in an educational environment. Although the musical self-concept is highly relevant to musical development and performance, there is a lack of research exploring how the musical self-concept evolves in different cultural settings and societies. In particular, there have been no enquiries yet in the Chinese music education environment. This study's goal was the characterization of musical self-concept types among music students at a University in Beijing, China. The Musical Self-Concept Inquiry-including ability, emotional, physical, cognitive, and social facets-was used to assess the students' musical self-concepts (N = 97). The data analysis led to three significantly distinct clusters and corresponding musical self-concept types. The types were especially distinct, in the students' perception of their musical ambitions and abilities; their movement, rhythm and dancing affinity; and the spiritual and social aspects of music. The professional aims and perspectives, and the aspects of the students' sociodemographic background also differed between the clusters. This study is one of the first research endeavors addressing musical self-concepts in China. The empirical identification of the self-concept types offers a basis for future research on the connections between education, the development of musical achievement, and the musical self-concept in societal settings with differing understandings of the self.

  20. Play in Evolution and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Dupuis, Danielle; Smith, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of play in human ontogeny and phylogeny, following Surplus Resource Theory. We consider how juveniles use play to sample their environment in order to develop adaptive behaviors. We speculate about how innovative behaviors developed in play in response to environmental novelty may influence subsequent evolutionary…

  1. A Model for the Growth of Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Gerald R.; Thomson, Eric W.

    1972-01-01

    Teachers must play a more consciously active role in fostering healthy self esteem in children. To make such action more likely to occur successfully, a model is presented to conceptualize the dynamics of growth in positive self concept. (Author)

  2. Symbolic play and language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Edna; Geva, Ronny

    2015-02-01

    Symbolic play and language are known to be highly interrelated, but the developmental process involved in this relationship is not clear. Three hypothetical paths were postulated to explore how play and language drive each other: (1) direct paths, whereby initiation of basic forms in symbolic action or babbling, will be directly related to all later emerging language and motor outputs; (2) an indirect interactive path, whereby basic forms in symbolic action will be associated with more complex forms in symbolic play, as well as with babbling, and babbling mediates the relationship between symbolic play and speech; and (3) a dual path, whereby basic forms in symbolic play will be associated with basic forms of language, and complex forms of symbolic play will be associated with complex forms of language. We micro-coded 288 symbolic vignettes gathered during a yearlong prospective bi-weekly examination (N=14; from 6 to 18 months of age). Results showed that the age of initiation of single-object symbolic play correlates strongly with the age of initiation of later-emerging symbolic and vocal outputs; its frequency at initiation is correlated with frequency at initiation of babbling, later-emerging speech, and multi-object play in initiation. Results support the notion that a single-object play relates to the development of other symbolic forms via a direct relationship and an indirect relationship, rather than a dual-path hypothesis.

  3. Academic Self-Concept: Modeling and Measuring for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Graham

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the author developed a model to describe academic self-concept (ASC) in science and validated an instrument for its measurement. Unlike previous models of science ASC, which envisage science as a homogenous single global construct, this model took a multidimensional view by conceiving science self-concept as possessing distinctive…

  4. Individual differences in self-concept among smokers attempting to quit: Validation and predictive utility of measures of the smoker self-concept and abstainer self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadel, W G; Mermelstein, R

    1996-09-01

    We tested a theoretical model of individual differences in smoking cessation using a social-cognitive conception of the self-concept. We developed and validated measures of the smoker self-concept and the abstainer self-concept. Each scale was shown to have good internal reliability and construct validity and was distinct from other important predictive measures used in smoking research (e.g. Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire, smoking rate, motivation, self-efficacy). Importantly, we demonstrated the predictive validity of the self-concept scales. The interaction of baseline measures of the smoker self-concept and abstainer self-concept predicted smoking status three months after treatment; subjects were most likely to be abstinent if they began treatment with a strong abstainer selfconcept and a weak smoker self-concept. This interaction held over and above baseline smoking rate, Fagerstrom Tolerance scores, and measures of motivation and self-efficacy to quit. The utility of social-cognitive individual difference models and potential patient-treatment matching interventions are discussed.

  5. Gender differences in the causal relation between adolescents' maths self-concept and scholastic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Antunes

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics is a core subject in every school curriculum and it is strongly correlated with maths self-concept, which is defined as the subjective feelings and beliefs about one's competence in maths. In general, boys tend to report higher maths self-concept than girls, but the difference between boys and girls' maths scholastic performance is low or even inexistent. Some authors maintain that academic self-concept can play an important role as a motivational variable, promoting self-confidence and investment in the learning process. This study examined the causal relations between maths self-concept and maths scholastic performance in four cohorts of boys and girls within a three-wave longitudinal study. The first two cohorts were composed of 187 girls and 139 boys attending grades 7 and 8 at Time 1 and the third and fourth cohorts were composed of 167 girls and 123 boys attending grades 9 and 10 at Time 1. Structural Equation Modelling was used to test the fit of several models of causal relations. The results revealed that for the first two cohorts the best models were reciprocal and skill-development for both boys and girls. However, for the older students, a reciprocal model gave a best fit for the boys, but for the girls there was only one significant effect from maths self-concept to maths scholastic performance. Results are discussed on the basis of gender-related differential learning expectancies.

  6. More Than Only Skin Deep: Appearance Self-Concept Predicts Most of Secondary School Students' Self-Esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Gabriele Baudson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One important goal of education is to develop students' self-esteem which, in turn, hinges on their self-concept in the academic, physical, and social domains. Prior studies have shown that physical self-concept accounts for most of the variation in self-esteem, with academic and social self-concepts playing a much lesser role. As pressure towards perfection seems to be increasing in education, appearance, and social relationships (three aspects that relate to crucial developmental tasks of adolescence, the goal of the present field study was to examine whether former findings still hold true in the light of the changing societal context. A sample of 2,950 students from a broad range of German secondary schools (47% girls, age 10–19 years responded to a recently validated German-language questionnaire assessing multiple self-concept facets (Weber & Freund, 2016. We examined which self-concept aspects predict self-esteem best and whether the pattern is comparable across genders and achievement levels using latent regression analyses. Results show that self-concept of appearance is still by far the strongest predictor (total sample: B = 0.77, SE = 0.02, p < .01 and that this is especially the case for girls and students from special educational schools. Other aspects play a much lesser role. The discussion explores why appearance is so neglected, compared to the more academic subjects, and what school can do to account for its vast importance for students' self-esteem.

  7. The influence of traditional values of education of Greek students' real and ideal self-concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gari, A; Kalantzi-Azizi, A

    1998-02-01

    Students' real and ideal self-concepts were studied with respect to their acceptance or rejection of the traditional values of Greek education. The relationship between the real and the ideal components of self-concept was also examined. A sample of Athenian students who answered a questionnaire accepted most of the traditional values of education. The students' internalization of such values predicted their moderately satisfied real self-concepts and their extremely developed ideal self-concepts, which symbolized their hopes and ambitions for academic achievement. The factor-analyzed items of self-concept revealed a disparity between the real and the ideal components of the participants' self-concepts.

  8. The career aspirations of adolescents with eating disorders: an exploratory study and suggested links to adolescent self-concept development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsika, Artemis K; Tzavela, Eleni C; Apostolidou, Eftychia; Antonogeorgos, George; Sakou, Irine-Ikbale; Bakoula, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The health effects of eating disorders (EDs) in adolescence have been widely studied, but their impact on present adolescent psychosocial adjustment and development have been overseen. This study aimed to investigate the association between EDs and career aspirations in middle adolescence. The participants were 147 adolescents diagnosed with EDs. Participants reported on their future career aspirations, and these were coded according to the International Standard Classification of Education of 1997. Of the participants, 83 adolescents were followed up longitudinally, and their aspirations were reassessed and compared for stability across the two assessments. Moreover, participants' career aspirations were compared to those of healthy (non-ED) best-friend controls. Health-related and social-behavioral science careers were chosen significantly more by adolescents with an ED as compared to their non-ED counterparts. For adolescents with an ED, career choices were consistent across reassessments. These findings suggest that adolescents with an ED gravitate toward careers associated with their pathology, namely, both facets of their mind-body pathology. This finding may indicate restricted identity development for adolescents with an ED. Suggestions for treatments protocols to include identity exploration are discussed.

  9. Investigation and Research on the Development of Middle School Students’Self -Concept%中学生自我概念的发展特征调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪显利; 张渝

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究中学生自我概念,对于提高中学生的自我概念水平、完善自我、促进中学生心理健康具有重要意义。方法:本研究采用田纳西自我概念问卷对950名中学生进行测试,探讨中学生自我概念的发展特征。结果:(1)中学生的自我概念总体来讲是积极的;(2)中学生的自我概念呈现出差异性的特点,表现为:中学女生较男生具有更积极的自我概念;城市学生比农村学生拥有更积极的自我概念;重点中学学生的自我概念总体水平显著高于非重点中学学生。(3)中学生的自我概念发展具有阶段性,呈现出不规则的U型趋势。(4)中学生自我概念发展受多种因素共同影响。研究结果也提示我们家庭、学校和社会相关部门应联合起来,促进对中学生形成积极的自我概念,尤其应重视对初二年级、农村中学生、非重点中学生加强心理健康辅导。%To study the self-concept of middle school students is of great importance for raising the level of middle school students’self-concept,self-perfection and promoting their psychological health .Meth-ods:This study used a questionnaire called Tennessee Self-concept scale to test on 950 middle school students and explored the characteristics of middle school students’self-concept development.Results:First,in general,self-concept of middle school students is positive.Second,self-concept of middle school students exist significant differences.The characteristics of it are as follows:in middle schools,girls have more positive self-concept than boys;urban students have more positive self-concept than rural ones;over-all level of self-concept of key middle school students are significantly higher than those from non-key mid-dle schools.Third,the development of middle school students exist different stage and shows an irregular U-trend.Fourth,the development of middle school students’self-concept

  10. Afro-western art: Instrumental in the support and development of a positive self-concept as integral part of mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Van Der Watt

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-concept is at the basis of almost all human achievement. A positive self-concept is one of the most important motivating forces in promoting higher scholastic achievement as well as promoting mental health. In this article the results of a quasi-experiment are described.

    Opsomming
    Selfkonsep is onderliggend aan bykans alle menslike prestasie sowel as die bevordering van geestesgesondheid. 'n Positiewe selfkonsep is een van die belangrikste motive ringskragte in die bevordering van beter skolastiese prestasie. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  11. More Than Only Skin Deep: Appearance Self-Concept Predicts Most of Secondary School Students' Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudson, Tanja G; Weber, Kira E; Freund, Philipp A

    2016-01-01

    One important goal of education is to develop students' self-esteem which, in turn, hinges on their self-concept in the academic, physical, and social domains. Prior studies have shown that physical self-concept accounts for most of the variation in self-esteem, with academic and social self-concepts playing a much lesser role. As pressure toward perfection seems to be increasing in education, appearance, and social relationships (three aspects that relate to crucial developmental tasks of adolescence), the goal of the present field study was to examine whether former findings still hold true in the light of the changing societal context. A sample of 2,950 students from a broad range of German secondary schools (47% girls, age 10-19 years) responded to a recently validated German-language questionnaire assessing multiple self-concept facets (Weber and Freund, 2016). We examined which self-concept aspects predict self-esteem best and whether the pattern is comparable across genders and achievement levels using latent regression analyses. Results show that self-concept of appearance is still by far the strongest predictor (total sample: B = 0.77, SE = 0.02, p self-esteem.

  12. More Than Only Skin Deep: Appearance Self-Concept Predicts Most of Secondary School Students’ Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudson, Tanja G.; Weber, Kira E.; Freund, Philipp A.

    2016-01-01

    One important goal of education is to develop students’ self-esteem which, in turn, hinges on their self-concept in the academic, physical, and social domains. Prior studies have shown that physical self-concept accounts for most of the variation in self-esteem, with academic and social self-concepts playing a much lesser role. As pressure toward perfection seems to be increasing in education, appearance, and social relationships (three aspects that relate to crucial developmental tasks of adolescence), the goal of the present field study was to examine whether former findings still hold true in the light of the changing societal context. A sample of 2,950 students from a broad range of German secondary schools (47% girls, age 10–19 years) responded to a recently validated German-language questionnaire assessing multiple self-concept facets (Weber and Freund, 2016). We examined which self-concept aspects predict self-esteem best and whether the pattern is comparable across genders and achievement levels using latent regression analyses. Results show that self-concept of appearance is still by far the strongest predictor (total sample: B = 0.77, SE = 0.02, p self-esteem. PMID:27803681

  13. The Development and Construct Validation of a Spanish Version of an Academic Self-Concept Scale for Middle School Hispanic Students from Families of Low Socioeconomic Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menjares, Pete C.; Michael, William B.; Rueda, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the reliability and construct validity of scores on a Spanish version of an academic self-concept measure for economically disadvantaged Hispanic middle school, English as a Second Language students. Results did not completely support five hypothesized constructs corresponding to five factor subscales on the English version. Students…

  14. Self-concept clarity in adolescents and parents: A six-wave longitudinal and multi-Informant study on development and intergenerational transmission.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crocetti, E; Rubini, M; Branje, S; Koot, H; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to disentangle patterns of change and stability in self-concept clarity (SCC) in adolescents and in their parents and (b) to examine processes of intergenerational transmission of SCC in families with adolescents. Participants were 497 Dutch families

  15. The Development and Construct Validation of a Spanish Version of an Academic Self-Concept Scale for Middle School Hispanic Students from Families of Low Socioeconomic Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menjares, Pete C.; Michael, William B.; Rueda, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the reliability and construct validity of scores on a Spanish version of an academic self-concept measure for economically disadvantaged Hispanic middle school, English as a Second Language students. Results did not completely support five hypothesized constructs corresponding to five factor subscales on the English version. Students…

  16. Academic Self-Concept: Modeling and Measuring for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Graham

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the author developed a model to describe academic self-concept (ASC) in science and validated an instrument for its measurement. Unlike previous models of science ASC, which envisage science as a homogenous single global construct, this model took a multidimensional view by conceiving science self-concept as possessing distinctive facets including conceptual and procedural elements. In the first part of the study, data were collected from 1,483 students attending eight secondary schools in England, through the use of a newly devised Secondary Self-Concept Science Instrument, and structural equation modeling was employed to test and validate a model. In the second part of the study, the data were analysed within the new self-concept framework to examine learners' ASC profiles across the domains of science, with particular attention paid to age- and gender-related differences. The study found that the proposed science self-concept model exhibited robust measures of fit and construct validity, which were shown to be invariant across gender and age subgroups. The self-concept profiles were heterogeneous in nature with the component relating to self-concept in physics, being surprisingly positive in comparison to other aspects of science. This outcome is in stark contrast to data reported elsewhere and raises important issues about the nature of young learners' self-conceptions about science. The paper concludes with an analysis of the potential utility of the self-concept measurement instrument as a pedagogical device for science educators and learners of science.

  17. How does exposure to cigarette advertising contribute to smoking in adolescents? The role of the developing self-concept and identification with advertising models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadel, William G; Tharp-Taylor, Shannah; Fryer, Craig S

    2009-11-01

    Increased exposure to cigarette advertisements is associated with increases in adolescent smoking but the reasons for this association are not well established. This study evaluated whether self-concept development (operationalized as level of self-conflict) and identifying with the models used in cigarette print advertising contributed to smoking intentions among adolescents. Ninety-five adolescents (ages 11-17) participated in this two session study. In session 1, they rated the extent to which they identified with the models used in 10 current cigarette print ads (the models were isolated digitally from the cigarette advertisements) and their level of self-conflict was assessed. In session 2, participants viewed each of the 10 cigarette advertisements from which the models were drawn and rated their intentions to smoke following exposure to each ad. Model identification was associated with similar levels of post ad exposure smoking intentions for both younger and older adolescents when they also exhibited no self-conflict. A contrasting set of findings emerged for younger and older adolescents when they exhibited high levels of self-conflict: Young adolescents who strongly identified with the models used in cigarette advertisements had higher post ad exposure smoking intentions compared to younger adolescents who weakly identified with the models used in the advertisements; in contrast, older adolescents who weakly identified with the models used in cigarette advertisements had stronger post ad exposure smoking intentions compared to older adolescents who strongly identified with the models used in the advertisements. These results point to the importance of examining developmentally-relevant moderators for the effects of cigarette advertising exposure.

  18. The development and construct validation of a Spanish version of an Academic Self-Concept scale for middle school Hispanic students from families of low socioeconomic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menjares, P C; Michael, W B; Rueda, R

    2000-05-01

    For a sample of 305 6th, 7th and 8th grade students, of whom 95% was from economically disadvantaged Hispanic families and for whom English was their second language, evidence was sought regarding the reliability and construct validity of scores on a Spanish version of an academic self-concept measure entitled Dimensions of Self-Concept (DOSC), comprising five subscales bearing the same names as those of the five hypothesized constructs that they were intended to operationalize: Level of Aspiration, Anxiety, Academic Interest and Satisfaction, Leadership and Initiative, and Identification versus Alienation. Reliability estimates varying between .72 and .80 were judged to be reasonably satisfactory. Results from oblique factor analysis lent empirical support for the hypothesized constructs of Anxiety, Leadership and Initiative, and Identification versus Alienation. Scores associated with the subscales of Level of Aspiration and Academic Interest and Satisfaction generated a factor interpreted as a fusion of the two constructs of Level of Aspiration and Academic Interest and Satisfaction.

  19. Self-concept in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sayoni; Doran, Eric; Osann, Kathryn E; Hom, Christy; Movsesyan, Nina; Rosa, Diana D; Tournay, Anne; Lott, Ira T

    2014-08-01

    Self-concept is a critical indicator of quality of life but few studies have examined this subject in children with Down syndrome (DS). In this study, we propose a novel methodology to assess the self-concept of children with DS by analyzing their responses towards two dolls, one with a "typically developing" (TD) appearance and one with the phenotypic features of DS. Fifty-four children with DS participated in play sessions with both dolls and were then interviewed to assess doll preference, resemblance, and attribution of positive qualities. We observed that children with DS: (i) exhibited a preference for the TD doll regardless of age, gender, IQ or self-awareness; (ii) attributed more positive qualities to the TD doll than the DS doll; and (iii) believed that they resembled the TD doll, rather than the more phenotypically accurate representation of themselves. Older participants were more likely to exhibit self-recognition by this technique. These findings contribute to current understandings of how people with DS view themselves and their disability.

  20. Self-concept and academic achievement: a meta-analysis of longitudinal relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-10-01

    The relation between self-concept and academic achievement was examined in 39 independent and longitudinal samples through the integration of meta-analysis and path analysis procedures. For relations with more than 3 independent samples, the mean observed correlations ranged from .20 to .27 between prior self-concept and subsequent academic achievement and from .19 to .25 between prior academic achievement and subsequent self-concept. Globality/specificity of self-concept was the only significant moderating factor in the relation between (a) prior self-concept and subsequent academic achievement and (b) prior academic achievement and subsequent self-concept. As high self-concept is related to high academic performance and vice-versa, intervention programs that combine self-enhancement and skill development should be integrated.

  1. The impact of self-concept and college involvement on the first-year success of medical students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-03-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a psychological perspective to synthetically explore the causal relationship of specific types of self-concept and college involvement with academic success of medical students. A longitudinal study was conducted using 519 matriculates at a medical university in mainland China. We conducted the Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshmen survey and the Your First College Year survey to collect data of the pre-college and college academic and social self-concept, college involvement components, and some input characteristics. The academic success was measured by the first-year grade point average. A pathway analysis was conducted and showed the following results. Having high academic self-concept, being engaged in class and putting effort in homework or study directly contributes to increasing college achievement. Students' pre-college achievement and self-concept, faculty interaction, and homework involvement positively affected students' college academic self-concept development, which indirectly improved average grade point. These findings contribute to our understanding of a student's ability to interact with his or her collegiate environment and to experience academic success.

  2. The role of disability self-concept in adaptation to congenital or acquired disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Kathleen R

    2014-02-01

    Current theories of adaptation to disability do not address differences in adaptation to congenital or acquired disability. Although people with congenital disabilities are generally assumed to be better adapted than people with acquired disabilities, few studies have tested this, and even fewer have attempted to explain the mechanisms behind these differences. This study tested the proposition that whether a disability is congenital or acquired plays an important role in the development of the disability self-concept (consisting of disability identity and disability self-efficacy), which in turn, affects satisfaction with life. It was predicted that disability self-concept would be better developed among people with congenital, compared with acquired disabilities, predicting greater satisfaction with life in those with acquired conditions. 226 participants with congenital and acquired mobility disabilities completed a cross-sectional online questionnaire measuring satisfaction with life, self-esteem, disability identity, disability self-efficacy, and demographic information. Self-esteem, disability identity, disability self-efficacy, and income were significant predictors of satisfaction with life. Congenital onset predicted higher satisfaction with life; disability identity and disability self-efficacy, but not self-esteem, partially mediated the relationship. Findings highlight the distinction between adaptation to congenital versus acquired disability and the importance of disability self-concept, which are underresearched constructs. Results suggest that rather than attempting to "normalize" individuals with disabilities, health care professionals should foster their disability self-concept. Possible ways to improve disability self-concept are discussed, such as involvement in the disability community and disability pride. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. The influence of a ropes course development programme on the self-concept and self-efficacy of young career officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Stadler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether adventure training could be utilised to enhance the self-concepts and self-efficacy of young career officers in the South African National Defence Force. A quasi-experimental design with a pre-test, post-test and post-post-test was used. Two measuring instruments were administered, namely the Self-description Questionnaire III and the General Self-efficacy Scale. No statistically significant improvement was measured in the various dimensions of the self-concepts and self-efficacy of members of the experimental group, but some encouraging indications of change in the experimental group were observed after the intervention. The implications of the findings are discussed further. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie studie was om te bepaal of avontuurgerigte opleiding gebruik kan word om die selfkonsep en selfdoeltreffendheid van jong beroepsoffisiere in die Suid-Afrikaanse Nasionale Weermag te bevorder. ’n Kwasieksperimentele ontwerp met ’n voortoets, na-toets en na-na-toets is gebruik. Twee meetinstrumente is aangewend, naamlik die 'Self-description Questionnaire III' en die 'General Self-efficacy Scale'. Hoewel geen statisties beduidende verbetering in die verskillende dimensies van die selfkonsep en selfdoeltreffendheid van lede van die eksperimentele groep gemeet is nie, is bemoedigende aanduidings van verandering in die eksperimentele groep na die intervensie waargeneem. Die implikasies van die bevindinge word verder bespreek.

  4. Self-concept, self-esteem, gender, race, and information technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Linda A; Zhao, Yong; Witt, Edward A; Fitzgerald, Hiram E; von Eye, Alexander; Harold, Rena

    2009-08-01

    This research addressed two fundamental questions regarding self-concept, self-esteem, gender, race, and information technology use. First, is technology use related to dimensions of self-concept and/or to self-esteem? Second, are there gender and/or race differences in self-concept, self-esteem, and technology use? Five hundred youth, average age 12 years old, one third African American and two thirds Caucasian American, completed multidimensional measures of self-concept, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and measures of frequency of Internet use, Internet use for communication (e-mail and instant messaging), video game playing, and cell phone use. Findings indicated that technology use predicted dimensions of self-concept and self-esteem, with video game playing having a negative influence and Internet use having a positive influence on self-concept dimensions. Gender differences were observed on several self-concept dimensions, but contrary to expectations, girls did not score higher than boys in social self-concept. Only one race difference was observed: African Americans had lower behavioral self-concept than did Caucasian Americans. Implications of the benefits and liabilities of youth's current and projected technology use are discussed.

  5. Loneliness, Self-Concept, and Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswick, Ruth Ann; Jones, Warren H.

    1981-01-01

    In two studies, college students completed the UCLA Loneliness Scale, the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, and an inventory which assessed the degree of other-focused attention. Results indicated that loneliness was related to more negative self-concepts, possibly less adjustment, and more self-focus. (Author/MP)

  6. The Self Concept: Mini, Maxi, Multi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Louise M.; Soares, Anthony T.

    The main objective of the research was to define and dimensionalize the self concept. In a theoretical approach similar to the debates on the meaning of intelligence, this study attempted to determine whether the self concept is a general factor which explains more specific selves, whether it connotes a hierarchical structure, or whether it is…

  7. Native Language Self-Concept and Reading Self-Concept: Same or Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, A. Katrin; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    In assessing verbal academic self-concept with preadolescents, researchers have used scales for students' self-concepts in reading and in their native language interchangeably. The authors conducted 3 studies with German students to test whether reading and German (i.e., native language) self-concepts can be treated as the same or different…

  8. Significance of librarian’s self-concept in the communication process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Kobal-Grum

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the significance of the librarian’s self-concept in the communication process. First, it underlines the meaning of reference interviews, and second, it focuses on other micro and macro aspects of communication. The analysis shows that the librarian’s self-concept is hierarchically organised, structured, and therefore it consists of different areas. Each area equally contributes to the development and preservation of the appropriate librarian’s self-concept; although some areas have more direct influence than others. To attain a high self-concept, it is of fundamental importance, that the librarian develops all self-concept areas, from individual ones to social ones. It was found that a structured and positive specialist’s self-concept is highly significant for the contribution of effective reference interviews, and finally, the article offers some directions for a successful development of the communication process.

  9. Attachment styles and self-concept: basis for positive adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria S. Martínez Festorazzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature and characteristics of the primary bonds and attachment styles wwhich are established with parental figures and / or their surrogates in the first years of life, without doubt are one of the basis and models for later relationships. Intense changes will be produce particularly during adolescence in the parental bonds and the scenario, which defines and reinforces personal autonomy to be extended. In this way, self-concept is probably one of the most researched constructs in psychological tradition if we compare it with other psychological and contextual variables. Nevertheless, a few studies explore especially the relationship between attachment and self-concept in adolescents. The aim of this empirical study was to analyze the relationship between attachment styles and self-concept dimensions in adolescents, from a salutogenic approach in order to identify if certain attachment characteristics are associated with more positive aspects of self-concept. A sample of 583 adolescents aged 15- 18 years from public and private schools in Mar del Plata completed the AF5 and IPPA scales. Significant positive relationships were confirmed between secure attachment style and self- concept dimensions. These results provide empirical support to advance in the research about which characteristics are specifically related to positive and healthy development in adolescents. 

  10. The relationship between junior high school student's interpersonal relationship development and their self concept%初中生人际关系的发展及其与自我概念的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林巧明; 石向实

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between junior high school student's interpersonal relationship development and their self concept.Method Middle school students interpersonal questionnaire and TSCS were used to survey 2189 junior high school students.Findings Different relationships of grade main effect was found remarkable( F=44.98,P<0.01).Significant differences were found of junior middle school students self concept(F=12.04,P<0.01);Significant correlation was found between different types of interpersonal relationship and self concept(r =0.533,P<0. 01) .Conclusion Junior high school students have good partner relations.The relationship between teachers and students and parent-child relationship development level are low.Junior high school students’ interpersonal relationship development is positively correlated to their self concept.%目的:调查初中生人际关系的情况以及与自我概念的关系。方法采用中学生人际关系调查问卷与田纳西自我概念量表,对2187名初中生进行问卷调查。结果不同人际关系的年级主效应显著(F=44.98,P<0.01);初中生的自我概念存在显著差异( F=12.04,P<0.01);不同类型的人际关系与自我概念显著相关( r=0.533,P<0.01)。结论初中生的同伴关系发展较好,师生关系和亲子关系发展水平较低;初中生人际关系与自我概念显著正相关。

  11. Self-concept and coping skills of female early adolescents in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kyung Mi

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the coping strategies and self-concept of Korean female early adolescents. These adolescents (n = 351) were enrolled in a middle school in Seoul. The subjects completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale and Coping Responses Inventory questionnaires. The subjects exhibited the greatest positivity with regard to family self-concept and the greatest negativity with regard to academic self-concept. The subjects most frequently used the seeking guidance strategy of approach coping and the seeking alternative rewards strategy of avoidance coping. Self-concept was positively or negatively related with various coping skills. Using content analysis, seven categories including discord in family relationships were identified. The results of this study provide information that will aid school nurses working with adolescents with regard to helping the adolescents develop a positive self-concept and more effective coping strategies.

  12. 建构中的自我概念:形成及发展%The Self-concept from the Perspective of Constructivism:Formation and Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕; 林镇超; 钱啸云

    2015-01-01

    As an important and traditional conception in the field of psychology, the definition of self-conceptvaries from theory to theory. This conception can be understood more clearly from the view point of social comparison theory, temporal comparison theory, and dimensional comparison theory. Both the self-concept’s developmental trends across different ages and the Big-Fish-Small-Pond Effects emphasize that the formation of the self-concept can be recognized well from the perspective of constructivism.%自我概念是心理学领域一个非常传统且重要的概念。基于不同的理论视角和研究取向,其定义并不完全相同。社会比较理论、时序比较理论和维度比较理论都从建构的角度对自我概念进行了多方位阐释。不管是教育领域的大鱼小塘效应,还是发展视角下自我概念的变化轨迹,都强调了自我概念存在于动态的建构之中。

  13. Self-concept clarity across adolescence: longitudinal associations with open communication with parents and internalizing symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Marloes P A; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Hawk, Skyler T; Hale, William W; Meeus, Wim

    2014-11-01

    Higher self-concept clarity is related to several adjustment indices and may be promoted by open communication with parents, while problems with self-concept clarity development could enhance internalizing problems (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms) in adolescence. This longitudinal study examined linkages between self-concept clarity, adolescents' open communication with parents, and adolescent depressive and anxiety symptoms. Dutch youths (N = 323; 51.1 % girls; mean age Time 1 = 13.3 years) reported on these constructs over four consecutive annual measurements. Concurrent positive links between open communication and self-concept clarity were found at Time 1. Over time, higher levels of open communication with parents predicted higher self-concept clarity only in middle adolescence (mean age between 14 and 15 years). We also found concurrent associations between self-concept clarity and both depressive and anxiety symptoms. Longitudinally, lower self-concept clarity predicted relatively higher levels of depressive symptoms across all waves, and also higher anxiety levels from Time 1 to Time 2. Conversely, higher levels of anxiety also predicted lower levels of self-concept clarity during the first three waves. Self-concept clarity did not mediate the longitudinal associations between open communication and internalizing symptoms. This study is one of the first to investigate self-concept clarity across adolescence. It highlights the possible importance of both anxiety symptoms and communication with parents in understanding the development of a clear self-concept, and demonstrates an association between lower self-concept clarity and higher levels of later depressive and anxiety symptoms.

  14. Self-concept in adolescence: a longitudinal study on reciprocal effects of self-perceptions in academic and social domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preckel, Franzis; Niepel, Christoph; Schneider, Marian; Brunner, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Fostering social and academic self-concepts are central educational goals. During mid-adolescence academic engagement and success seem to be devalued by peers and to be negatively associated with students' social standing. For this age group, is the development of a positive academic self-concept compatible with the development of a positive social self-concept? We investigated relations among academic self-concept, social self-concept, and academic achievement. 1282 students (47.60% female) participated in three-waves of measurement in Grade 5, 6, and 8. Earlier social self-concept of acceptance negatively predicted changes in academic self-concept over time while earlier social self-concept of assertion positively predicted changes in academic self-concept. There were no significant relations between social self-concepts and achievement but positive reciprocal relations between academic self-concept and achievement. Results indicate that fostering adolescents self-concept in social and academic domains are compatible goals. However, some students need support in managing the challenge to coordinate social and academic goals.

  15. Underachievers, overachievers and student's self-concept

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga, Feliciano

    2009-01-01

    Research has related good and poor academic performance-underachievers and overachievers-to the students self-concept so thar sibjects with high academic levels organize and express information concerning themselves in higher levels of competency.

  16. Executive Functions Development and Playing Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Ana Lucia; de Souza, Maria Thereza C. Coelho

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss executive functions and playing games, considering Piaget's work (1967) and the neuropsychological framework (Barkley, 1997, 2000; Cypel, 2007). Two questions guide the discussion: What are the intersections between playing games and the development of executive functions? Can we stimulate children with learning…

  17. The structure of the Social Self-Concept (SSC Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantza Fernández-Zabala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the factorial structure of the newly-created Cuestionario de Autoconcepto Social - AUSO (from here on the Social Self-concept Questionnaire, or AUSO, which consists of two scales measuring social responsibility and social competence. The theoretical proposal which posits that social self-concept is the result of the combination of two basic self-perceptions: competence in social relations and response to the demands of social functioning, is based on a review of human social development theories and previous attempts to measure social self-concept. Participants were 818 students aged between 17 and 52. The results obtained though confirmatory factor analyses support the hypothesis of a structure made up of two correlated factors. In addition to providing a new measurement instrument with appropriate psychometric characteristics and valid criteria that justify its use in both applied practice and research, this study also enhances our understanding of the internal nature of the social domain of self-concept.

  18. Relational Aggression, Victimization and Self-Concept: Testing Pathways from Middle Childhood to Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely-McClure, Sarah J; Ostrov, Jamie M

    2016-02-01

    When studying adolescent development, it is important to consider two key areas that are salient for teens, which are self-concept and peer relations. A secondary analysis of the National Institute of Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development was conducted to examine the prospective bidirectional associations between self-concept and peer relations. To date, how social development broadly and peer relations in particular (e.g., relational aggression and victimization) affect self-concept domains is not fully understood. Using a large sample (N = 1063; 532 girls; M = 11.14 years; SD = .59) with multiple informants, the present study examined whether fifth grade relational aggression and sixth grade relational victimization was associated with adolescent self-concept in three key domains (i.e., academic, sports, physical appearance). A significant direct effect emerged, such that relational aggression in middle childhood was associated with decreases in academic self-concept and increases in sports self-concept in adolescence. Analyses also revealed that having higher levels of domain specific self-concept led to decreases in relational aggression across the transition to adolescence. The findings highlight the importance of examining bidirectional prospective associations between relational aggression, relational victimization, and domain specific self-concept. Implications for future research and clinical intervention are discussed.

  19. A Program to Enhance Self-Concept of Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, James H.

    This research analyzes the results of a program to enhance the self concepts of junior high students. Subjects were 80 students identified as having low self concepts. They participated in an eight-week program to develop skills in personal and social awareness. Pretest posttest scores on the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory indicated that…

  20. Self-concept clarity across adolescence : Longitudinal associations with open communication with parents and internalizing symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Marloes P. A.; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Hawk, Skyler T.; Hale, William W., III; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Higher self-concept clarity is related to several adjustment indices and may be promoted by open communication with parents, while problems with self-concept clarity development could enhance internalizing problems (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms) in adolescence. This longitudinal study

  1. Self-Concept Clarity Across Adolescence : Longitudinal Associations With Open Communication With Parents and Internalizing Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marloes; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Hawk, Skyler T.; Hale, William W.; Meeus, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Higher self-concept clarity is related to several adjustment indices and may be promoted by open communication with parents, while problems with self-concept clarity development could enhance internalizing problems (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms) in adolescence. This longitudinal study exami

  2. Self-concept clarity across adolescence : Longitudinal associations with open communication with parents and internalizing symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Marloes P. A.; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Hawk, Skyler T.; Hale, William W., III; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Higher self-concept clarity is related to several adjustment indices and may be promoted by open communication with parents, while problems with self-concept clarity development could enhance internalizing problems (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms) in adolescence. This longitudinal study exami

  3. Gender Differences in Children's Math Self-Concept in the First Years of Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Sven; Linkersdörfer, Janosch; Ehm, Jan-Henning; Hasselhorn, Marcus; Lonnemann, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the course of elementary school, children start to develop an academic self-concept reflecting their motivation, thoughts, and feelings about a specific domain. For the domain of mathematics, gender differences can emerge which are characterized by a less pronounced math self-concept for girls. However, studies are rather sparse regarding the…

  4. Curricular Treatment of Body Image, Self-Esteem and Self-Concept in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Antonio V.; Estévez, Manuel; Palomares, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of human development in which problems with the perception of body image, self-esteem and self-concept proliferate, while the child is studying for Secondary Education. This study analyses the curricular treatment given to body image, self-esteem and self-concept in different legislative elements in the region of Valencia…

  5. Self-concept and depression among children who experienced the death of a family member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong T; Scott, Amy N

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigates the moderating effects of physical and academic self-concept on depression among children who experienced the death of a family member. Data from Phase III of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care was used in the present study. Having a higher physical self-concept moderated the relationship between death of a family member and depression. However, an unexpected relationship indicated that having higher math self-concept increased the probability of developing symptoms of depression. Interventions that target children's self-concept, especially physical self-concept, after a death in the family may result in fewer depression symptoms later in life.

  6. The Impact of Vision Impairment on Students' Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Poulomee; Talukdar, Joy

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the self-concept of students with vision impairment who were placed in specialist and mainstream educational settings in South Australia. Self-Concept was explored across six dimensions, namely Physical, Moral, Personal, Family, Social and Academic Self-Concepts and the Total Self-Concept. The "Tennessee Self-Concept…

  7. How Urban Youth Perceive Relationships Among School Environments, Social Networks, Self-Concept, and Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudovitz, Rebecca N; Perez-Aguilar, Giselle; Kim, Grace; Wong, Mitchell D; Chung, Paul J

    2017-03-01

    Studies suggest adolescent substance use aligns with academic and behavioral self-concept (whether teens think of themselves as good or bad students and as rule followers or rule breakers) as well as peer and adult social networks. Schools are an important context in which self-concept and social networks develop, but it remains unclear how school environments might be leveraged to promote healthy development and prevent substance use. We sought to describe how youth perceive the relationships among school environments, adolescent self-concept, social networks, and substance use. Semistructured interviews with 32 low-income minority youth (aged 17-22 years) who participated in a prior study, explored self-concept development, school environments, social networks, and substance use decisions. Recruitment was stratified by whether, during high school, they had healthy or unhealthy self-concept profiles and had engaged in or abstained from substance use. Youth described feeling labeled by peers and teachers and how these labels became incorporated into their self-concept. Teachers who made students feel noticed (eg, by learning students' names) and had high academic expectations reinforced healthy self-concepts. Academic tracking, extracurricular activities, and school norms determined potential friendship networks, grouping students either with well-behaving or misbehaving peers. Youth described peer groups, combined with their self-concept, shaping their substance use decisions. Affirming healthy aspects of their self-concept at key risk behavior decision points helped youth avoid substance use in the face of peer pressure. Youth narratives suggest school environments shape adolescent self-concept and adult and peer social networks, all of which impact substance use. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-concept mediates the relation between achievement and emotions in mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Beek, Jojanneke P J; Van der Ven, Sanne H G; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Leseman, Paul P M

    2017-09-01

    Mathematics achievement is related to positive and negative emotions. Pekrun's control-value theory of achievement emotions suggests that students' self-concept (i.e., self-appraisal of ability) may be an important mediator of the relation between mathematics achievement and emotions. The aims were (1) to investigate the mediating role of mathematical self-concept in the relation between mathematics achievement and the achievement emotions of enjoyment and anxiety in a comprehensive model, and (2) to test possible differences in this mediating role between low-, average-, and high-achieving students. Participants were ninth-grade students (n = 1,014) from eight secondary schools in the Netherlands. Through an online survey including mathematical problems, students were asked to indicate their levels of mathematics enjoyment, anxiety, and self-concept. Structural equation modelling was used to test the mediating role of self-concept in the relation between mathematics achievement and emotions. Multigroup analyses were performed to compare these relations across the three achievement groups. Results confirmed full mediation of the relation between mathematics achievement and emotions by mathematical self-concept. Furthermore, we found higher self-concepts, more enjoyment and less math anxiety in high-achieving students compared to their average and low-achieving peers. No differences across these achievement groups were found in the relations in the mediational model. Mathematical self-concept plays a pivotal role in students' appraisal of mathematics. Mathematics achievement is only one factor explaining students' self-concept. Likely also classroom instruction and teachers' feedback strategies help to shape students' self-concept. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Children's Self-Concept: Parental School Engagement and Student-Teacher Relationships in Rural and Urban Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavidia-Payne, Susana; Denny, Bianca; Davis, Kate; Francis, Andrew; Jackson, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Self-concept is one important yet understudied construct, often associated with healthy children's well-being, and particularly crucial for those raised in rural disadvantaged communities. Also, commonly acknowledged is that adults, including parents and teachers, play an important role in fostering self-concept. The overall aim of the current…

  10. Teachers and Coaches in Adolescent Social Networks Are Associated with Healthier Self-Concept and Decreased Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudovitz, Rebecca N.; Chung, Paul J.; Wong, Mitchell D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Poor academic (eg, "I am a bad student") and behavioral (eg, "I am a troublemaker") self-concepts are strongly linked to adolescent substance use. Social networks likely influence self-concept. However, little is understood about the role teachers and athletic coaches play in shaping both academic and behavioral…

  11. Eating disorder detection through personality traits and self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Guarnido, A J; Herruzo Cabrera, F J; Pino Osuna, M J

    2012-12-01

    The current scientific evidence suggests that certain dimensions of the personality and self-concept act as risk factors of eating disorder (ED). However, there is little investigation that explores the different elements involved in both groups of variables together and in an exhaustive way. Our aim is to be able to discriminate between individuals diagnosed with ED and controls free of symptoms according to these personality traits and selfconcept. To accomplish our objective, the Inventory of Eating Disorders 2 (EDI-2), Inventory of Personality NEO Revised (NEO-PI-R) and Self-Concept Form-5 (AF-5) were administered to a sample composed of 69 cases of ED and 89 controls, and an analysis of logistic regression was carried out. The pattern obtained could correctly classify 96.2% of the people diagnosed with ED and, consistent with the previous research, it should work in the same way to detect people at risk of developing ED in the future.

  12. Predictive model of nicotine dependence based on mental health indicators and self-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kazemi Zahrani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this research was to investigate the predictive power of anxiety, depression, stress and self-concept dimensions (Mental ability, job efficiency, physical attractiveness, social skills, and deficiencies and merits as predictors of nicotine dependency among university students in Isfahan. Methods: In this correlational study, 110 male nicotine-dependent students at Isfahan University were selected by convenience sampling. All samples were assessed by Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS, self-concept test and Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation and stepwise regression. Results: The result showed that anxiety had the highest strength to predict nicotine dependence. In addition, the self-concept and its dimensions predicted only 12% of the variance in nicotine dependence, which was not significant. Conclusion: Emotional processing variables involved in mental health play an important role in presenting a model to predict students’ dependence on nicotine more than identity variables such as different dimensions of self-concept.

  13. [Self concept, sex and marital status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, A

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the influence of sex and marital status on the self-concept. The Factorial Selfconcept Scale was administered to a sample of 855 university students. The 2 X 2 ANOVAS revealed a significant main effect of the two independent variables on several factors of the Scale, as well as an interaction sex X marital status. Results are consistent with a coherent body of previous research.

  14. 5-9岁儿童自传记忆与自我概念的发展及其关系%The Development of Autobiographical Memory and Self-Concept of Children Aged from Five to Nine and Their Relationship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳琳; 秦金亮

    2012-01-01

    Many researches indicate that self-concept plays an important role in one’s autobiographical memories. And the relationship of autobiographical memory and self-concept is complicated. But almost all of researchers started from a cross-culture perspective. To examine the purer relationship of them, this article controled the cultural effects so as to discover something new. 98 Chinese children aged from 5-9 participated in the interview. And 81 valid data were used for analysis because 17 children didn’t finish the interview. Before the procedure began, 12 postgraduate interviewers, all preschool education majors, spent several days in classrooms to become familiar with the children. At the beginning of the interview, the interviewer chatted with the child to establish rapport. When the children seemed relaxed and comfortable, the interview began. The first step was autobiographical memory interview. The children were asked two questions:1) Could you please tell me one thing that happened to you recently? 2) Many children remember what happened to them when they were very young. Do you remember yours? Would please tell me one thing that happened to you when you were very young? After that, the examiners played with the child for 5 minutes. And then the second step started. During the self-concept interview, the child was asked, " (the child’s name), your Mom/ principle (head teacher) wants me to write about all of the children in our class. And there must be something about you. So could you tell me what I should write about you?" After that, the examiners asked the children to complete sentences "I am ____"and " I like____" and " (the child’s name) ______" until the child indicated by speech or gesture that he or she was finished. At the end of the interview, the interviewer gave each child a small gift to keep. The interviews were transcribed verbatim onto paper. The volume of the memory narrative was coded by

  15. The Developmental Association of Sexual Self-Concept with Sexual Behavior among Adolescent Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; O’Sullivan, Lucia F.; Orr, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Developing a sexual self-concept is an important developmental task of adolescence; however, little empirical evidence describes this development, nor how these changes are related to development in sexual behavior. Using longitudinal cohort data from adolescent women, we invoked latent growth curve analysis to: (1) examine reciprocal development in sexual self-concept (sexual openness, sexual esteem and sexual anxiety) over a four year time frame; (2) describe the relationship of these trajectories with changes in sexual behavior. We found significant transactional effects between these dimensions and behavior: sexual self-concept evolved during adolescence in a manner consistent with less reserve, less anxiety and greater personal comfort with sexuality and sexual behavior. Moreover, we found that sexual self-concept results from sexual behavior, as well as regulates future behavior. PMID:20970178

  16. The developmental association of sexual self-concept with sexual behavior among adolescent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Devon J; Fortenberry, J Dennis; O'Sullivan, Lucia F; Orr, Donald P

    2011-08-01

    Developing a sexual self-concept is an important developmental task of adolescence; however, little empirical evidence describes this development, nor how these changes are related to development in sexual behavior. Using longitudinal cohort data from adolescent women, we invoked latent growth curve analysis to: (1) examine reciprocal development in sexual self-concept (sexual openness, sexual esteem and sexual anxiety) over a four year time frame; (2) describe the relationship of these trajectories with changes in sexual behavior. We found significant transactional effects between these dimensions and behavior: sexual self-concept evolved during adolescence in a manner consistent with less reserve, less anxiety and greater personal comfort with sexuality and sexual behavior. Moreover, we found that sexual self-concept results from sexual behavior, as well as regulates future behavior. Copyright © 2010 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Musical Self-Concept of Chinese Music Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petersen, Suse; Camp, Marc-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between self-concept and societal settings has been widely investigated in several Western and Asian countries, with respect to the academic self-concept in an educational environment...

  18. The development of early sociodramatic play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deunk, M.I.; Berenst, J.; de Glopper, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we study the beginnings of sociodramatic play. We examine the pretend play interactions of a Dutch girl, Peggy, and focus on her transition into sociodramatic play. Initially, Peggy interprets only some elements of her play interactions at the pretend level. At age 2;9, Peggy shows s

  19. Self-Concept Clarity and the Management of Social Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Zapf, Dieter

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between self-concept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher self-concept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with

  20. Grade and Gender Differences in Gifted Students' Self-Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Capper, Marla Read; Foust, Regan Clark; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Albaugh, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Gifted adolescents are poised to make important decisions that will determine the trajectory of their futures. A positive self-concept may lead to higher educational and career aspirations, whereas a poorer self-concept may negatively influence choices and outcomes. Research points to self-concept differences among gifted students of different…

  1. Self-Concept Clarity and the Management of Social Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Zapf, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between self-concept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher self-concept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with conte

  2. Self-Concept Clarity and the Management of Social Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Zapf, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between self-concept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher self-concept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with conte

  3. Self-Concept Development: An Abstract Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Barbara, Comp.

    This bibliography with abstracts has been compiled from documents in the ERIC microfiche collection and from journal literature. The abstracts of selected documents have been taken from "Research in Education" and journal citations have been taken from the "Current Index to Journals in Education." The material contained in the…

  4. Changes in stress and nurse self-concept among baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Desiree; Stoelting-Gettelfinger, Wendy

    2011-05-01

    This pilot study's purpose was to investigate the relationship between stress and nurse self-concept. Specifically, it examined whether enrollment in a wellness course affected stress levels and self-concept acquisition among sophomore baccalaureate nursing students (N = 52). The findings showed that early in the curriculum these students had a fairly well developed sense of professional self-concept but made gains in facets of leadership and communication over the course of the semester. Students demonstrated high levels of stress that remained unchanged over the semester, regardless of self-concept acquisition. This study concluded that enrollment in a wellness course was insufficient to prepare nursing students to manage stress as they transition to professional roles, and it was possible that undergraduate education perpetuated the internalization of stress as part of a nurse's professional identity. Future studies are needed to determine effective ways to teach stress management and best design nursing curricula to reduce stressors.

  5. Self-Concept Clarity and Online Self-Presentation in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, Chris; James, Billie May; Chen-Wilson, Chao-Hwa Josephine

    2016-12-01

    The Internet may be conceptualized as a social laboratory, providing freedom to experiment with different presentations of self. Adolescence is an important time in the development of self-concept; however, little is known about how clarity of self-concept relates to online behavior. The principal aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that self-concept clarity would be associated with adolescents' inclination to experiment with online self-presentation. One hundred forty-eight participants aged 13-18 completed the Self-Concept Clarity Scale, the Facebook Intensity Scale, and the Presentation of Online Self Scale (POSS). Adolescents possessing a less stable sense of self reported experimenting with online self-presentation more regularly, presenting an idealized version of self and a preference for presenting themselves online. Adolescents with a more stable self-concept reported presenting an online self which was more consistent with their offline self-presentation. Younger adolescents were more likely to present an inconsistent self, whereas older adolescents presented themselves more consistently across different communication contexts. Finally, adolescents who spent more time on Facebook and had fewer Facebook friends were more likely to present multiple versions of self while online. The implications of these findings will be discussed in terms of the development of self-concept during adolescence and the potential for the online world to facilitate flexible identity construction and self-presentation.

  6. Supporting the self-concept with memory: insight from amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Matthew D; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the extent to which personal semantic memory supports the self-concept in individuals with medial temporal lobe amnesia and healthy adults. Participants completed eight 'I Am' self-statements. For each of the four highest ranked self-statements, participants completed an open-ended narrative task, during which they provided supporting information indicating why the I Am statement was considered self-descriptive. Participants then completed an episodic probe task, during which they attempted to retrieve six episodic memories for each of these self-statements. Supporting information was scored as episodic, personal semantic or general semantic. In the narrative task, personal semantic memory predominated as self-supporting information in both groups. The amnesic participants generated fewer personal semantic memories than controls to support their self-statements, a deficit that was more pronounced for trait relative to role self-statements. In the episodic probe task, the controls primarily generated unique event memories, but the amnesic participants did not. These findings demonstrate that personal semantic memory, in particular autobiographical fact knowledge, plays a critical role in supporting the self-concept, regardless of the accessibility of episodic memories, and they highlight potential differences in the way traits and roles are supported by personal memory.

  7. Developing a virtual piano playing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersen, Alexander; Nijholt, Anton; Petrushin, V.; Kommers, P.A.M.; Kinshuk, X.; Galeev, I.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the framework for a multimedia platform called ADRI is described which aids in playing the piano. A 3D-piano with visualisation of notes was built in a virtual environment and connected with a real synthesizer using Midi to interact with a user. Multiple users can play together on the

  8. Developing a virtual piano playing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrushin, V.; Broersen, Alexander; Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Nijholt, Antinus; Kinshuk, X.; Galeev, I.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the framework for a multimedia platform called ADRI is described which aids in playing the piano. A 3D-piano with visualisation of notes was built in a virtual environment and connected with a real synthesizer using Midi to interact with a user. Multiple users can play together on the

  9. Obesidade e aspectos psicológicos: maturidade emocional, auto-conceito, locus de controle e ansiedade Obesity and psyhological aspects: emotional and cognitive development, self concept, locus of control and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Cataneo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigou-se, neste trabalho, variáveis psicológicas como locus de controle, auto-conceito, ansiedade, maturação cognitiva e emocional e problemas comportamentais em crianças obesas e não obesas. Participaram do trabalho 54 crianças, com idades entre 10 e 12 anos, sendo 27 crianças obesas, 14 meninas e 13 meninos com índices de massa corporal situados acima do percentil 85, e 27 não obesas, 15 meninas e 12 meninos, com índices de massa corporal entre os percentis 5 e 85. Os grupos não se diferenciaram em relação às variáveis estudadas. Foram verificados resultados indicativos de sofrimento psicológico tanto num grupo quanto no outro, não permitindo associar obesidade e problemas psicológicos ou comportamentais.The present research aimed to evaluate if obese children showed different results in regard to some psychological variables such as emotional and cognitive development, locus of control, self concept , anxiety and behavioral problems compared to non obese children of same age, sex and school achievement. Subjects were 57 children with ages between 10 and 12 years old. The obese group had 27 children, 14 girls and 13 boys. The criterion for assignment to this group was the value of body mass above 85 percentile. The group of non obese had also 27 children, 15 girls and 12 boys and their body mass index was between 5 and 85 percentiles. There were no differences between the groups in regard to the variables approached. There were signs of psychological suffering in children of both groups. These results do not allow us to associate obesity with psychological or behavioral problems.

  10. Self-concept in adult children of schizophrenic parents: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M; Raguram, A

    2009-09-01

    Much of the work on children of schizophrenic parents has primarily focused on the risk of developing various kinds of psychiatric disorders, behavioural problems and cognitive vulnerability factors. There has been inadequate attention given to children without a clinical diagnosis and particularly the adult offspring of schizophrenic parents. It would be worthwhile to study the wellness or otherwise of these children, especially in terms of the self-concept of these individuals. To study the impact of parental mental illness on the self-concept of adult children. Thirty subjects who had one parent diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia formed the study group, and 30 subjects, matched on age and gender with the study group, formed the control group. Subjects were assessed using a socio-demographic and clinical data sheet and a self-concept scale. The results showed that the study group had significantly poorer self-concept compared to the control group. The current clinical status of the parents had an impact on the family self-esteem of the children. Subjects who were above 10 years of age at the onset of the parental mental illness had a poorer self-concept, as compared to those who were below 10 years at the onset of illness in their parents. The results provide evidence for poor self-concept in adult children of schizophrenic parents compared to children of normal parents.

  11. Sexual self-concept and intended sexual behavior of young adolescent Taiwanese girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu; Lee, Sheuan; Chang, Ting

    2010-01-01

    People begin to become aware of their sexual drive and erotic feelings as young adolescents. Such activity often has been overlooked in Taiwan, a traditional society, because sexuality is viewed as a private issue. The purpose of this study was to explore the sexual self-concept and intended sexual behavior of young adolescent girls in Taiwan. Participants included 372 girls, 12 to 14 years old, from junior high schools in Taiwan who completed two questionnaires on sexual experience and sexually related items: the Sexual Self-Concept Inventory, the Parental Approval of Sexual Behavior Scale, and the Friends' Approval of Sexual Behavior Scale, which were combined into one scale, with separate scores. Girls' self-reports showed low (negative) sexual self-concept, high perceived parental disapproval, and somewhat high perceived friends' disapproval of sexual activities. Sexual self-concept is associated with perceived parental and peer approval of sexual activities, and it is associated with sexual experience and intended sexual activities as well. A young adolescent girl who has a high score on the perceived sexual arousability factor of the Sexual Self-Concept Inventory is more likely to report the strongest intention toward sexual behavior. Sexual self-concept may play a key role in girls' intended sexual activities, including engaging in low-level sexual activities (e.g., kissing and breast fondling) that occur before intercourse, even when associated with intercourse intention. The research suggests that addressing sexual self-concept needs to be a priority to prevent young girls from engaging in sexual intercourse.

  12. Hierarchical and Multidimensional Academic Self-Concept of Commercial Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung; Chui; Lau

    1999-10-01

    Adapting the Marsh (1990) Academic Self-Description Questionnaire (ASDQ), this study examined the academic self-concept of students in a school of commerce in Hong Kong (N = 212). Confirmatory factor analysis found that students clearly distinguished among self-concept constructs in English, Chinese, Math and Statistics, Economics, and Principles of Accounting, and each of these constructs was highly associated with a global Academic self-concept construct, reflecting the validity of each construct in measuring an academic component of self-concept. Domain-specific self-concepts were more highly related with students' intention of course selection in corresponding areas than in nonmatching areas, further supporting the multidimensionality of the students' academic self-concept. Students' self-concepts in the five curriculum domains can be represented by the global Academic self-concept, supporting the hierarchical structure of students' academic self-concept in an educational institution with a specific focus, such as commercial studies. The academic self-concepts of the commercial students are both multidimensional and hierarchical. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. A comparison of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students on the inter-related dimensions of self-concept, strengths and achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Whitley

    2014-01-01

    Self-concept has been found to play a key role in academic and psychosocial outcomes for students. Appreciating the factors that have a bearing upon self-concept may be of particular importance for Aboriginal students, many of whom experience poorer outcomes than non-Aboriginal Canadians. The current study explored the relationships between multidimensional self-concept, perceived strengths and academic achievement among a sample Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. Results indicated that ...

  14. Academic self-concept and academic achievement: relations and causal ordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W; Martin, Andrew J

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND. A positive self-concept is valued as a desirable outcome in many disciplines of psychology as well as an important mediator to other outcomes. AIMS. The present review examines support for the reciprocal effects model (REM) that posits academic self-concept (ASC) and achievement are mutually reinforcing, each leading to gains in the other - and its extension to other achievement domains. METHOD. We review theoretical, methodological, and empirical support for the REM. Critical features in this research are a theoretical emphasis on multidimensional perspectives that focus on specific components of self-concept and a methodological focus on a construct validity approach to evaluating the REM. RESULTS. Consistent with these distinctions, REM research and a comprehensive meta-analysis show that prior ASC has direct and indirect effects on subsequent achievement, whilst the effects of self-esteem and other non-academic components of self-concept are negligible. We then provide an overview of subsequent support for the generality of the REM for: young children, cross-cultural, health (physical activity), and non-elite (gymnastics) and elite (international swimming championships) sport. CONCLUSION. This research is important in demonstrating that increases in ASC lead to increases in subsequent academic achievement and other desirable educational outcomes. Findings confirm that not only is self-concept an important outcome variable in itself, it also plays a central role in affecting other desirable educational outcomes. Implications for educational practice are discussed.

  15. Conformity to sex-typed norms, affect, and the self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W; Christensen, P N; Hebl, M R; Rothgerber, H

    1997-09-01

    The self-concept plays an important role in conformity to sex-typed social norms. Normative beliefs that men are powerful, dominant, and self-assertive and that women are caring, intimate with others, and emotionally expressive represent possible standards for whom people ought to be and whom they ideally would like to be. In the present research, to the extent that sex role norms were personally relevant for participants, norm-congruent experiences (i.e., those involving dominance for men and communion for women) yielded positive feelings and brought their actual self-concepts closer to the standards represented by ought and ideal selves.

  16. Adolescents’ Self-concept Short Scale: A version of PHCSCS

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga, Feliciano; Leite, António

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The adolescents’ self-concept has remained as a powerful issue in educational context. The lack of assessment instruments, especially in shorted version and with studied psychometric characteristics, has constituted a problem. Purpose of Study: This study presents the construction of “Adolescents’ Self-concept Short Scale” (ASCSS), using the Portuguese adaptation (Veiga & Domingues, 2012) of the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (Piers & Hertzberg, 2002). Res...

  17. Some antecedents of academic self-concept: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J W; Lambourne, R; Silva, P A

    1990-06-01

    The influence of cognitive, achievement, and family background variables on academic self-concept was examined for 435 students participating in a major longitudinal study in New Zealand. Family background variables included mother's marital status at the birth of the child, family socio-economic status at the time the child was born, and family environment when the child was 7 years and 9 years of age. These factors were not significantly related to academic self-concept at ages 9 and 11. In addition, the general emotional status of mothers when their child was 3 years and 5 years old was not significantly related to academic self-concept at ages 9 and 11. Mother's intelligence when the child was 3 years, and mother's expectations for school performance when the child started school at age 5 were not significantly related to academic self-concept. Similarly, cognitive and intellectual functioning at ages 3, 5, 7, and 9 years were not significantly related to academic self-concept at ages 7 and 9 years. Rather, academic self-concept at age 11 appeared to be influenced primarily by reading achievement and academic self-concept at age 9, and academic self-concept at age 9 was influenced primarily by reading achievement at age 7. It was concluded that academic self-concept is mainly a product of school achievement, and that any influence home background factors may have are likely to occur by means of their effect on school achievement.

  18. Effect of the Intervention based on Partnership Care Model on Self-Concept Promotion in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sajjadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As a chronic worldwide spreading disease, diabetes negatively affects the persons’ self-concept. Since self-concept plays an important role in daily life, it should be under consideration especially in the patients with chronic diseases. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of the partnership-care model intervention on self-concept enhancement in persons with type II diabetes. Materials & Methods: In the controlled randomized clinical trial, 60 patients with type II diabetes referred to Imam Zaman Hospital were studied in Mashhad in 2015. The subjects, selected via available sampling method, were divided into two groups including control and experimental groups. Data was collected using a three-section questionnaire including demographic information, the disease information, and Beck self-concept test sections. The self-concept of the subjects having been determined, seven 90-minute partnership-care intervention sessions were conducted in experimental group. Then, the self-concept was measured in both groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS 20 software using paired T, independent T, and Chi-square tests. Findings: Before and after the intervention, the mean self-concept scores were not significantly different in control group (p=0.066. However, the difference was significant in experimental group (p<0.001. In addition, the mean scores of control and experimental groups were not significantly different before the intervention (p=0.537. Nevertheless, the mean self-concept scores of the groups were significantly different after the intervention (p<0.001. Conclusion: The intervention based on the partner-ship care model enhances the self-concept in patients with type II diabetes.

  19. Self-Concept Measures; Grade 7 and Above.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Pamela, Ed.

    This 34-item annotated test bibliography deals with a variety of currently available measures of self-concept and self-esteem. For the purposes of this listing, self-concept was defined as a multidimensional construct encompassing the range of an individual's perceptions and evaluations of himself. Many of the devices contained herein emphasize…

  20. Multidimensional Physical Self-Concept of Athletes with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Deborah R.; Martin, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were first to predict reported PA (physical activity) behavior and self-esteem using a multidimensional physical self-concept model and second to describe perceptions of multidimensional physical self-concept (e.g., strength, endurance, sport competence) among athletes with physical disabilities. Athletes (N =…

  1. Measures of Self-Concept Grades 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Pamela, Ed.

    This 31-item test bibliography deals with a variety of currently available measures of self-concept and self-esteem. For the purposes of this listing, self concept was defined as a multidimensional construct encompassing the range of an individual's perceptions and evaluations of himself. Many of the devices contained herein emphasize the…

  2. A Rasch Analysis of the Academic Self-Concept Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Tan Bei Yu; Yates, Shirley M.

    2007-01-01

    This study used the Rasch model to assess the unidimensionality and item-person fit of an Academic Self-Concept Questionnaire (ASCQ) that is based on the Confucian Heritage Culture (CHC) perspective. Knowledge of the relationship between academic achievement and academic self-concept is particularly useful because academic achievement is…

  3. Domain-Specific Verbal Self-Concepts of Trilingual Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Wong, Edwin King Por

    Researchers have emphasized the domain specificity of academic self-concept. For monolingual students, verbal and math self-concepts have been found to be distinct constructs. However, the assumption of a single distinct verbal construct may be questionable for individuals speaking multiple languages. Primary and secondary school teachers from…

  4. Structural and Interpersonal Family Influences on Adolescent Self-Conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelter, Jon; Harper, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Tested a model linking structural and interpersonal family variables with self-concept variables of self-esteem and son/daughter identity salience (relative importance of being a son or daughter for defining one's self) for 655 high school students. Family support was found to have largest effects on self-concept variables (yielding positive…

  5. [Aerobic capacity, weight status and self-concept in schoolchildren].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez Casas, Arancha; Rodríguez García, Pedro Luis; Rosa Guillamón, Andrés; García-Cantó, Eliseo; Pérez Soto, Juan José; Tárraga López, Pedro; Tárraga Marcos, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between self-concept, aerobic capacity and weight status in schoolchildren. Relational descriptive design in which was assessed the weight status and aerobic capacity of 256 schoolchildren among 8-11 years. Aerobic capacity (low vs high) and the body mass index (normal-weight vs overweight-obesity) were categorized using standard criteria. The self-concept was assessed through the Piers Harris self-concept scale for children. Schoolchildren with normal-weight and high fitness level showed better levels of conductual self-concept (P=.030), physical (P<.001), lack of anxiety (P=.048), and global self-concept (P=.002). The schoolchildren with normal-weight show higher levels of conductual self-concpt (P=.016), intellectual (P=.050), physical (P<.001), life satisfaction (P=.036), and global self-concept (P=.001). The schoolchildren with a higher fitness level showed better conductual self-concept (P=.024), physical (P=.004), lack of anxiety (P=.011), social (P=.024), and global (P=.003). The results of the study strengthen the importance to transmit to the educative community the knowledge of the relationship between the variables analyzed aiming to improve the schoolchildren self-concept. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of Self-Concept in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Li, Bingyi; Wilson, Ian; Craven, Rhonda G.

    2014-01-01

    Much research has acknowledged the importance of self-concept for adolescents' academic behaviour, motivation and aspiration, but little is known about the role of self-concept underpinning the motivation and aspiration of higher education students in a specialised field such as medical education. This article draws upon a programme of…

  7. Reciprocal Relationships between Math Self-Concept and Math Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans; Van der Werf, Greetje

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the reciprocal relationships between self-concept and anxiety in mathematics. A sample of 495 grade 7 students (51% girls) completed self-report measures assessing self-concept and anxiety three times in a school year. Structural equation modeling was used to test a cross-

  8. Self-Concept among Hearing Chinese Children of Deaf Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lik Man; Lui, Brian

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was administered to 42 Hong Kong Chinese deaf couples, their 70 hearing children, 41 hearing couples, and their 82 hearing children. No differences were found in the self-concepts of children of deaf parents compared to children of hearing parents, but deaf parents reported lower self-concepts than hearing parents. (Author/JDD)

  9. Reciprocal Relationships between Math Self-Concept and Math Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans; Van der Werf, Greetje

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the reciprocal relationships between self-concept and anxiety in mathematics. A sample of 495 grade 7 students (51% girls) completed self-report measures assessing self-concept and anxiety three times in a school year. Structural equation modeling was used to test a cross-

  10. Self-concept in children with attention deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljusberg, Anna-Lena; Brodin, Jane

    2007-09-01

    This study focuses on the BASTA project (basic skills, social interaction and training of the working memory), which studied children with attention deficits and hyperactive behaviour attending remedial classes in regular schools. The project is interdisciplinary, with research teams from both social science and medicine. Our study is both qualitative and quantitative with a socio-cultural approach, and focuses on the pupil's social interaction, self-concept and the classroom climate. This article reports on the results of the study on self-concept. Our supposition was that the pupil's self-concept should change when they improved their skills in reading, writing and mathematics, but this was not the case. The results showed the dominating pattern to be that the differences between data from the BASTA project and comparison data from a similar study on academic self-concept, social self-concept, personal self-concept and global self-concept are small to nonexistent. Our results indicate that the children studied report higher degrees of self-concept than were warranted and that entering remedial classes was often linked to previous academic failures, social failures or both.

  11. Reciprocal Relationships between Math Self-Concept and Math Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the reciprocal relationships between self-concept and anxiety in mathematics. A sample of 495 grade 7 students (51% girls) completed self-report measures assessing self-concept and anxiety three times in a school year. Structural equation modeling was used to test a cross-lagged panel model of reciprocal effects between…

  12. Reciprocal Relationships between Math Self-Concept and Math Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans; Van der Werf, Greetje

    The present study examined the reciprocal relationships between self-concept and anxiety in mathematics. A sample of 495 grade 7 students (51% girls) completed self-report measures assessing self-concept and anxiety three times in a school year. Structural equation modeling was used to test a

  13. Fundamental movement skills proficiency in children with developmental coordination disorder: does physical self-concept matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Sit, Cindy H P; Capio, Catherine M; Burnett, Angus; Ha, Amy S C; Huang, Wendy Y J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) examine differences in fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency, physical self-concept, and physical activity in children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and (2) determine the association of FMS proficiency with physical self-concept while considering key confounding factors. Participants included 43 children with DCD and 87 age-matched typically developing (TD) children. FMS proficiency was assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development - second edition. Physical self-concept and physical activity were assessed using self-report questionnaires. A two-way (group by gender) ANCOVA was used to determine whether between-group differences existed in FMS proficiency, physical self-concept, and physical activity after controlling for age and BMI. Partial correlations and hierarchical multiple regression models were used to examine the relationship between FMS proficiency and physical self-concept. Compared with their TD peers, children with DCD displayed less proficiency in various components of FMS and viewed themselves as being less competent in physical coordination, sporting ability, and physical health. Physical coordination was a significant predictor of ability in object control skills. DCD status and gender were significant predictors of FMS proficiency. Future FMS interventions should target children with DCD and girls, and should emphasize improving object control skills proficiency and physical coordination. Children with DCD tend to have not only lower FMS proficiency than age-matched typically developing children but also lower physical self-concept. Self-perceptions of physical coordination by children with DCD are likely to be valuable contributors to development of object control skills. This may then help to develop their confidence in performing motor skills. Children with DCD need supportive programs that facilitate the development of object control skills. Efficacy of training

  14. Developing networks play a similar melody.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2001-01-01

    International audience; During development, when synapses start to be established, a primitive form of network-driven activity provides most of the synaptic activity. This pattern enables a high degree of synchrony in immature neurons in spite of the small number of functional synapses and could participate in activity-dependent growth and synapse formation. Relying on the giant depolarizing potentials that provide most of the synaptic activity in the developing hippocampus, this article revi...

  15. Childhood sexual abuse and multiple dimensions of self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, Meera; Servaty-Seib, Heather L; Elliott, Ann N

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship between child sexual abuse (CSA) and self-concept in a nonclinical sample of female college students. Participants with a history of CSA had lower scores than participants without a history of CSA on four domains of self-concept: familial, affect, competence, and physical. History of CSA was not associated with lower self-concept in the social and academic domains. The primary conclusions to be drawn from this study are that CSA may be differentially associated with various domains of self-concept, and thus multidimensional assessment of self-concept can yield useful information that cannot be gathered from global measures which yield a single composite score.

  16. The self concept of the adolescent with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, B S; Gaier, E L

    1977-01-01

    The Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory (CSEI) was administered to 23 Ss diagnosed to have learning disabilities, and normally achieving seventh graders (N = 70) to investigate: a) whether differences exist between the self-esteem of the adolescent with learning disabilities and the normally achieving adolescent, b) the dimensions of self concept in which these differences occur, and c) the relationship between self concept and the number of years in the special classroom for the adolescent with learning disabilities. The data were fitted to a 2 X 2 (ability X school) fixed effects non-orthogonal multivariate analysis of variance model. A significant difference (p less than .05) in "social self-peer" self concept favoring the "normally" achieving S's was found. A trend was evidenced for more negative "general self" and "school-academic" self concepts for the learning disabilities sample. Number of years in the special class did not appear associated with self concept as measured by the CSEI.

  17. Conceptualizing and measuring illness self-concept: a comparison with self-esteem and optimism in predicting fibromyalgia adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morea, Jessica M; Friend, Ronald; Bennett, Robert M

    2008-12-01

    Illness self-concept (ISC), or the extent to which individuals are consumed by their illness, was theoretically described and evaluated with the Illness Self-Concept Scale (ISCS), a new 23-item scale, to predict adjustment in fibromyalgia. To establish convergent and discriminant validity, illness self-concept was compared to self-esteem and optimism in predicting health status, illness intrusiveness, depression, and life satisfaction. The ISCS demonstrated good reliability (alpha = .94; test-retest r = .80) and was a strong predictor of outcomes, even after controlling for optimism or self-esteem. The ISCS predicted unique variance in health-related outcomes; optimism and self-esteem did not, providing construct validation. Illness self-concept may play a significant role in coping with fibromyalgia and may prove useful in the evaluation of other chronic illnesses. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Developmental Association of Sexual Self-Concept with Sexual Behavior among Adolescent Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Orr, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sexual self-concept is an important developmental task of adolescence; however, little empirical evidence describes this development, nor how these changes are related to development in sexual behavior. Using longitudinal cohort data from adolescent women, we invoked latent growth curve analysis to: (1) examine reciprocal development…

  19. Developing networks play a similar melody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Y

    2001-06-01

    During development, when synapses start to be established, a primitive form of network-driven activity provides most of the synaptic activity. This pattern enables a high degree of synchrony in immature neurons in spite of the small number of functional synapses and could participate in activity-dependent growth and synapse formation. Relying on the giant depolarizing potentials that provide most of the synaptic activity in the developing hippocampus, this article reviews the common properties and generating mechanisms of these patterns, and particularly the role of the early depolarizing action of GABA(A) and glycine receptors and the sequential expression of GABA and glutamate synapses. Patterns similar to giant depolarizing potentials have been observed in a wide range of structures and species suggesting that there is a temporal template throughout evolution that constitutes an essential step in the formation of functional networks.

  20. An Examination of the Relationship between Academic Achievement, Peer Tutoring, Academic Self-Concept, and Personal Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Keba Marguerita

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between academic achievement, as measured by high school GPA and cumulative undergraduate GPA, peer tutoring, academic self-concept, and personal self-concept. A total of 50 students (treatment=29, control=21) from a university in Western, NY participated in this study. The results…

  1. Guided play and free play in an enriched environment: Impact on motor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Stock Palma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of guided play and free play in an enriched environmentintervention programs using motor skill development in kindergarten children. Seventy-one children attending kindergarten classes were assigned to two experimental groups and one control group. Participants performed the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 before and after the intervention period. Results revealed that both boys and girls in the guided play group showed motor skill improvement, whereas no changes were observed in motor development in the boys and girls assigned to the free play in enriched environment group, nor in those in the control group. These findings indicate that the teacher's role in the guided play intervention was crucial to help preschool children to improve their performance.

  2. Self-concept, self-esteem and psychopathological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Pérez, José Ignacio; Mozaz, María

    2008-02-01

    This study has two objectives: 1) to analyse the characteristics of self-concept, self-esteem and psychopathological symptoms in accordance with age and gender in a representative sample from the Basque Country; and 2) to explore the relationships of self-concept and self-esteem with psychopathological symptoms. The sample is made up of 1,579 participants, aged 12 to 65, of whom 732 are males (46.4%) and 847 are females (53.6%). The study uses a descriptive and correlational methodology. For the measurement of psychopathological symptoms, self-concept and self-esteem, three assessment instruments are applied. The ANOVAs indicated significant differences associated with age in self-concept, self-esteem, and quantity of psychopathological symptoms. As regards gender, no significant differences were found for self-concept and self-esteem, but there were differences in psychopathological symptoms, with females scoring higher in various disorders (somatization, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, phobic anxiety, and total quantity of symptoms). The results of the correlational analyses confirmed significant inverse relationships between self-concept/self-esteem and psychopathological symptoms. The discussion considers the potential role of intervention programmes that promote self-concept and self-esteem in the prevention of psychopathological problems.

  3. [Self-concept and drug use in adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María C; García, Fernando; Gracia, Enrique; Lila, Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between a multidimensional measure of self-concept, the Self-concept Form-5 Questionnaire (AF5), and drug use among adolescents. From the responses of 632 participants (47.5% females) aged 12 to 17 years (M = 14.88 years, SD = 1.71 years), results showed negative relationships between family, academic and physical self-concept, and drug use. Although a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use was found, this significant relationship disappeared once the age and sex of adolescents was controlled statistically. Moreover, the study includes other adjustment indicators in adolescence (psychological adjustment, personal competence, antisocial behavior and parenting). Results support the idea of self-concept as an important correlate of psychological well-being and a basic theoretical construct for explaining adjusted and adaptive behaviors in adolescence. Likewise, our results underline the need for statistical control of the effect of a third variable (sex), which could explain some contradictory results reported in the literature (a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use), so as to avoid reaching conclusions based on spurious relationships. self-concept, multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, adolescence, psychosocial adjustment, drug use.

  4. Parenting Styles, Young Adults' Self-Concepts, and Evaluations of Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Thomas S.; McCluskey, James J.

    1993-01-01

    Research shows that parenting style may strongly influence children's and adolescents' development. The present study reexamined this association, using a sample of 123 midwestern college students enrolled in a human development class. Participants' self-concepts varied directly with the perceived level of warmth displayed by both their fathers…

  5. The Vicious Cycle of Family Atmosphere, Interpersonal Self-concepts, and Paranoia in Schizophrenia—A Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hesse, Klaus; Kriston, Levente; Mehl, Stephanie; Wittorf, Andreas; Wiedemann, Wolfgang; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Klingberg, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recent cognitive models of paranoid delusions highlight the role of self-concepts in the development and maintenance of paranoia. Evidence is growing that especially interpersonal self-concepts are relevant in the genesis of paranoia. In addition, negative interpersonal life-experiences are supposed to influence the course of paranoia. As dysfunctional family atmosphere corresponds with multiple distressing dyadic experiences, it could be a risk factor for the development and maintenance of p...

  6. The effect of high school chemistry instruction on students' academic self-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter Wallace

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extended instruction in high school chemistry on the academic self-concept of students and determine what parts of the learning experience need to be addressed to make the interaction a more positive one. Fifty-seven students from three metropolitan public schools, who were enrolled in college preparatory chemistry classes, were asked to complete a written instrument, before and after extended chemistry instruction, that measures academic self-concept. Twenty-one of the students who took part in the written task volunteered to answer some in-depth interview questions concerning their academic self-concept and its relationship to chemistry instruction. Student responses, instrument scores, and student chemistry grades were analyzed for a variety of chemistry learning--academic self-concept connections and interactions. Results showed that there was a positive interaction for less than half of the students involved in the interview sessions. The results from the written instrument showed similar findings. Comparing chemistry grades and academic self-concept revealed an uncertain connection between the two, especially for students with strong academic self-concepts. Students felt that the laboratory experience was often disconnected from the remainder of chemistry instruction and recommended that the laboratory experience be integrated with classroom work. Students also expressed concerns regarding the volume of algorithmic mathematical calculations associated with college preparatory chemistry instruction. Results of this study suggest that secondary chemistry instruction must become more aware of the affective domain of learning and develop a mindful awareness of its connection to the cognitive domain if chemistry teaching and learning is going to better facilitate the intellectual growth of secondary students.

  7. Running on Empty? Observing Causal Relationships of Play and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul L.; Jalloul, Malak

    2013-01-01

    In an article in the January 2013 "Psychological Review," Lillard, Lemer, Hopkins, Dore, Smith, and Palmquist set out to critique the customary claim that pretend play contributes to healthy child development. Following Peter Smith, they distinguished three possibilities for the impact of pretend play. Pretend play, they proposed, might…

  8. Influence of self-concept and social acceptance on academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of self-concept and social acceptance on academic achievement of students with ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... is paid to the impact of certain factors affecting their academic achievement.

  9. 365 Self-Concept and Secondary School Students' Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... on physics students' academic achievement in secondary schools. The study ... that students with high self-concept achieved academically higher than those with low .... Chemistry Students Learning Outcomes. Purkey, W. W. ...

  10. Self-concept and Academic Achievement of Delinquent and Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    secondary schools and 60 delinquent inmate from Boys Approved. Remand home for ... self concept of their students for better academic achievement. Introduction ... schools where not only teaching and learning take place but the delinquents ...

  11. Exploring international gender differences in mathematics self-concept

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldman, Amy D; Penner, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an international perspective on mathematics by examining mathematics self-concept, achievement, and the desire to enter a career involving mathematics among eighth graders in 49 countries...

  12. The Relationship between Self-Concept and Academic Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Relationship between Self-Concept and Academic Performance of Nigerian ... of students while 20 questions pertaining to mathematics (5 questions) English or ... They were tested using the Pearson product moment correlation statistic.

  13. Students' Self-Concept and Their Achievement in Basic Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' Self-Concept and Their Achievement in Basic Science. ... African Research Review ... Theadapted Version of Adolescent Personal Data Inventory (APDI) and Students Achievement Test in Basic showed Science (SATBS) were ...

  14. Cool Girls, Inc. and Self-Concept: The Role of Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Jessica D.; Kuperminc, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Social capital was examined as a mediator of the association between youth development program participation and gains in self-concept in a sample of 86 primarily African American female adolescents in the Cool Girls, program, and 89 comparisons. Two dimensions of social capital (the diversity of girls' social networks and the number of life…

  15. The nursing profession : public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2014-01-01

    Aim To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Background Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always va

  16. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity : a discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Yvonne ten; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses’ self-concept and professional identity. Background. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  17. 100 Ways to Enhance Self-Concept in the Classroom: A Handbook for Teachers and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Jack; Wells, Harold C.

    This handbook for teachers and parents presents 100 practical and easily applicable ways to enhance the self-concept of children in the classroom or at home. The techniques are drawn from many of the newer approaches to self-development such as gestalt therapy, psychosynthesis, guided fantasy, sensory awareness, transactional analysis, expressive…

  18. Children's Moral Self-Concept: The Role of Aggression and Parent-Child Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengsavang, Sonia; Krettenauer, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of aggressiveness and parenting in the development of children's moral self-concept. Participants were 198 elementary school children and their parents (M = 8.65 years, SD = 2.44). Participants completed a structured moral self puppet interview and a questionnaire about their relationship to parents. Parents completed…

  19. Children's Moral Self-Concept: The Role of Aggression and Parent-Child Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengsavang, Sonia; Krettenauer, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of aggressiveness and parenting in the development of children's moral self-concept. Participants were 198 elementary school children and their parents (M = 8.65 years, SD = 2.44). Participants completed a structured moral self puppet interview and a questionnaire about their relationship to parents. Parents completed…

  20. Cool Girls, Inc. and Self-Concept: The Role of Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Jessica D.; Kuperminc, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Social capital was examined as a mediator of the association between youth development program participation and gains in self-concept in a sample of 86 primarily African American female adolescents in the Cool Girls, program, and 89 comparisons. Two dimensions of social capital (the diversity of girls' social networks and the number of life…

  1. Self Concept: Should We Follow Cognitive or Social Construction with Students with Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Initial investigations into the development of self-concept have been largely descriptive and focused primarily on the concept of self-representation, namely, how the me-self evolves across childhood and adolescence. Investigators sought to document developmental differences in self-representation through coding of spontaneously generated…

  2. Impact of Student Leadership Engagement on Early Adolescents' Self-Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollar, Christine Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a paradigm shift in an attempt to examine early adolescent self-concept while in a student leadership role. Positive Youth Development intertwined with Personal Construct Theory and Social Learning Theory framed the study. Students from a rural Wisconsin high school participated in a two-day leadership retreat. The…

  3. Cool Girls, Inc. and Self-Concept: The Role of Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Jessica D.; Kuperminc, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Social capital was examined as a mediator of the association between youth development program participation and gains in self-concept in a sample of 86 primarily African American female adolescents in the Cool Girls, program, and 89 comparisons. Two dimensions of social capital (the diversity of girls' social networks and the number of life…

  4. Reciprocal influences of victimization, perceived social preference, and self-concept in adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellmore, A.D.; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2006-01-01

    In order to better understand self-concept development, the association between adolescents' social self-perceptions and their peers' perceptions of them was examined in a three-year longitudinal study of 491 middle school students. Each spring for three years, adolescents' peer-perceived victimizat

  5. Relationship of Academic, Physical and Social Self-Concepts of Students with Their Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, Asma-Tuz; Arif, Manzoor H.; Yousuf, Muhammad Imran

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated relationship between self-concept and academic achievement of bachelor degree students. Female students at bachelor were considered the target population. A sample of 1500 students was selected by using two stage cluster sampling technique. An amended form of Self-Descriptive Questionnaire developed by Marsh (1985) was used…

  6. Self-Concept and Depression among Children Who Experienced the Death of a Family Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong T.; Scott, Amy N.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the moderating effects of physical and academic self-concept on depression among children who experienced the death of a family member. Data from Phase III of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care was used in the present study. Having a higher physical self-concept…

  7. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yvonne ten Hoeve; Prof. Dr. Petrie F. Roodbol; Gerard Jansen

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses’ self-concept and professional identity. Background. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  8. The nursing profession : public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    Aim To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Background Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  9. [Self-concept and psychosocial adjustment in adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María C; García, José Fernando; Gracia, Enrique; Lila, Marisol

    2011-02-01

    This study analyses the relationship between a multidimensional measure of self-concept, Self-concept Form-5 Questionnaire (AF5), and a broad set of adolescents' psychosocial adjustment indicators. From the responses of 1,281 participants (53.7% females) aged 12 to 17 years ( M = 14.98 years, SD = 1.74 years), results indicated that higher self-concept scores corresponded to better psychological adjustment, good personal skills and fewer behavioral problems. Although a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use was found, this significant relationship disappeared once the adolescent's age and sex was controlled for. These results support the idea that the self-concept is a basic theoretical construct closely related to the psychosocial adjustment in adolescence. Also this study helps explain some contradictory results reported in the literature (i.e., a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use), by showing how the statistical control of a third variable effect (i.e., age) avoids reaching conclusions based on spurious relationships.

  10. A comparison of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students on the inter-related dimensions of self-concept, strengths and achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Whitley

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Self-concept has been found to play a key role in academic and psychosocial outcomes for students. Appreciating the factors that have a bearing upon self-concept may be of particular importance for Aboriginal students, many of whom experience poorer outcomes than non-Aboriginal Canadians. The current study explored the relationships between multidimensional self-concept, perceived strengths and academic achievement among a sample Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. Results indicated that perceived self-concept and strengths were largely similar across groups. However, students in the two groups drew on different strengths to comprise their general self-concept. Findings are explored within the context of existing research and theory.

  11. The Vicious Cycle of Family Atmosphere, Interpersonal Self-concepts, and Paranoia in Schizophrenia—A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Klaus; Kriston, Levente; Mehl, Stephanie; Wittorf, Andreas; Wiedemann, Wolfgang; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Klingberg, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recent cognitive models of paranoid delusions highlight the role of self-concepts in the development and maintenance of paranoia. Evidence is growing that especially interpersonal self-concepts are relevant in the genesis of paranoia. In addition, negative interpersonal life-experiences are supposed to influence the course of paranoia. As dysfunctional family atmosphere corresponds with multiple distressing dyadic experiences, it could be a risk factor for the development and maintenance of paranoia. A total of 160 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were assessed twice within 12 months. Standardized questionnaires and symptom rating scales were used to measure interpersonal self-concepts, perceived family atmosphere, and paranoia. Data were analyzed using longitudinal cross-lagged structural equation models. Perceived negative family atmosphere was associated with the development of more pronounced negative interpersonal self-concepts 12 months later. Moreover, paranoia was related to negative family atmosphere after 12 months as well. As tests revealed that reversed associations were not able to explain the data, we found evidence for a vicious cycle between paranoia, family atmosphere, and interpersonal self-concepts as suggested by theoretical/cognitive model of paranoid delusions. Results suggest that broader interventions for patients and their caretakers that aim at improving family atmosphere might also be able to improve negative self-concepts and paranoia. PMID:25925392

  12. The Vicious Cycle of Family Atmosphere, Interpersonal Self-concepts, and Paranoia in Schizophrenia-A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Klaus; Kriston, Levente; Mehl, Stephanie; Wittorf, Andreas; Wiedemann, Wolfgang; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Klingberg, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Recent cognitive models of paranoid delusions highlight the role of self-concepts in the development and maintenance of paranoia. Evidence is growing that especially interpersonal self-concepts are relevant in the genesis of paranoia. In addition, negative interpersonal life-experiences are supposed to influence the course of paranoia. As dysfunctional family atmosphere corresponds with multiple distressing dyadic experiences, it could be a risk factor for the development and maintenance of paranoia. A total of 160 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were assessed twice within 12 months. Standardized questionnaires and symptom rating scales were used to measure interpersonal self-concepts, perceived family atmosphere, and paranoia. Data were analyzed using longitudinal cross-lagged structural equation models. Perceived negative family atmosphere was associated with the development of more pronounced negative interpersonal self-concepts 12 months later. Moreover, paranoia was related to negative family atmosphere after 12 months as well. As tests revealed that reversed associations were not able to explain the data, we found evidence for a vicious cycle between paranoia, family atmosphere, and interpersonal self-concepts as suggested by theoretical/cognitive model of paranoid delusions. Results suggest that broader interventions for patients and their caretakers that aim at improving family atmosphere might also be able to improve negative self-concepts and paranoia.

  13. Winnicott and Derrida: development of logic-of-play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitan, Shachaf

    2012-02-01

    In this essay I develop the logic of play from the writings of the British psychoanalyst Donald W. Winnicott and the French philosopher Jacques Derrida. The logic of play serves as both a conceptual framework for theoretical clinical thinking and a space of experiencing in which the therapeutic situation is located and to which it aspires. I argue that both Winnicott and Derrida proposed a playful turn in Western thinking by their attitude towards oppositions, viewing them not as complementary or contradictory, but as 'peacefully-coexisting'. Derrida criticizes the dichotomous structure of Western thought, proposing playful movement as an alternative that does not constitute itself as a mastering construction. I will show that Winnicott, too, proposes playful logic through which he thinks and acts in the therapeutic situation. The therapeutic encounter is understood as a playful space in which analyst and analysand continuously coexist, instead of facing each other as exclusionary oppositions. I therefore propose the logic of play as the basis for the therapeutic encounter. The playful turn, then, is crucial for the thought and praxis expressed by the concept of two-person psychology. I suggest the term playful psychoanalysis to characterize the present perspective of psychoanalysis in the light of the playful turn. I will first present Derrida's playful thought, go on to Winnicott's playful revolutionism, and conclude with an analysis of Winicott's clinical material in the light of the logic of play. Copyright © 2012 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  14. A preliminary examination of self-concept in older adolescents and young adults with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Paola R; Chiarotti, Flavia; Baglioni, Valentina; Neri, Valeria; Cardona, Francesco; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2017-05-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterised by multiple tics and often associated with behavioural problems. Although there is evidence of significantly reduced self-esteem in children and adolescents with GTS, little is known about perceived self-concept and its clinical determinants at the transition age between adolescence and adulthood. We therefore set out to investigate self-concept in a clinical sample of young patients with GTS at this crucial age for personal development. In addition to standard demographic and clinical data, we collected self-ratings using a standardised battery of psychometric instruments, as well as the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale, a comprehensive questionnaire developed to assess self-concept in subjects aged 9- to 19 years, tapping into the social, competence, affect, academic, family, and physical domains. We found that patients diagnosed with at least one co-morbid psychiatric disorder ("GTS-plus" phenotype) reported significantly lower self-concept than patients with "pure GTS", whereas tic-related variables had no impact on self-concept. Anxiety symptoms were the main determinants of self-concept, especially trait anxiety with regard to social and affective domains. Affective symptoms could also have a negative impact on the physical, affective, competence, and social domains of self-concept. Routine screening for anxiety and affective symptoms should be recommended in all patients with GTS seen at transition clinics from paediatric to adult care, in order to implement effective treatment interventions whenever possible. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The storm and stress (or calm) of early adolescent self-concepts: within- and between-subjects variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Lauren E; Ram, Nilam; Gest, Scott D

    2011-11-01

    This study uses intraindividual variability and change methods to test theoretical accounts of self-concept and its change across time and context and to test the developmental implications of this variability. The 5-year longitudinal study of 541 youths in a rural Pennsylvania community from 3rd through 7th grade included twice-yearly assessments of self-concept (academic and social), corresponding external evaluations of competence (e.g., teacher-rated academic skills, peer-nominated "likeability"), and multiple measures of youths' overall adjustment. Multiphase growth models replicate previous research, suggesting significant decline in academic self-concept during middle school but modest growth in social self-concept from 3rd through 7th grade. Next, a new contribution is made to the literature by quantifying the amount of within-subject variability (i.e., "lability") around these linear self-concept trajectories as a between-subjects characteristic. Self-concept lability was found to associate with a general profile of poorer competence and adjustment and to predict poorer academic and social competence at the end of 7th grade above and beyond level of self-concept. Finally, there was substantial evidence that wave-to-wave changes in youths' self-concepts correspond to teacher and peer evaluations of youths' competence, that attention to peer feedback may be particularly strong during middle school, and that these relations may be moderated by between-subjects indicators of youths' general adjustment. Overall, findings highlight the utility of methods sensitive to within-subject variation for clarifying the dynamics of youths' self-system development.

  16. Predictive validity of Perceived Emotional Intelligence on nursing students' self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto Landa, José María; López-Zafra, Esther; Aguilar-Luzón, Maria del Carmen; de Ugarte, Maria Fe Salguero

    2009-10-01

    This study examines the role of Perceived Emotional Intelligence, in nursing students' self-concept, controlling personality dimensions. Self-image is a cognitive component of the self that contains images of who we are, what we want to be and what we express and wish to express to others. Likewise, there is also an emotional and assessable component known as self-esteem. For a profession that requires not only technical expertise but also psychologically oriented care, knowledge about the self in nursing would be crucial to further development and growth of the profession. However, the role of emotions in the formation of nursing professionals has been scarcely studied. One hundred and thirty five undergraduates from nursing studies voluntarily participated in our study. They completed a questionnaire that comprises several scales. Our results show positive correlations between the Clarity and Emotional Repair components of Perceived Emotional Intelligence and all scales of the self-concept scale. Furthermore, we found positive relationships between the Extraversion and Accountability components of personality with almost all the scales of the self-concept and negative relationships with personality and neuroticism components of the self-concept.

  17. Self-Concept and Sport Participation in Sixth Grade Basic School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Virag

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine self-concept in relation to sport participation among basic school children. The sample included 109 sixth grade students of different Slovenian basic schools. The participants completed the Slovenian version of the SelfPerception Profile for Children – SPPC. The results show significant gender differences in some specific components of self-concept. Boys exhibited higher scores in perceived physical appearance and athletic competence, whereas girls exhibited higher levels in perceived behavioural conduct. Mean values show that students, engaged in organized sport practice, reported higher scores in all self-concept subscales than their inactive peers, although significant differences between these two groups were found in perceived scholastic competence and athletic competence. The study offers a detailed insight into the multidimensional self-perceptions of sixth grade basic school students. The results highlight the importance of physical/sports activity in the self-concept development and can be useful in promoting an active lifestyle among youth.

  18. Work for Play: Careers in Video Game Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming, Drew; Vilorio, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Video games are not only for play; they also provide work. Making video games is a serious--and big--business. Creating these games is complex and requires the collaboration of many developers, who perform a variety of tasks, from production to programming. They work for both small and large game studios to create games that can be played on many…

  19. Adolescent self-concept among Han, Mongolian, and Korean Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpes, D K; Wang, X

    1997-01-01

    Studies of self-concept have suffered from a lack of both a solid theoretical base and a clear definition of the term. It is not clear whether self-concept is a construct from the cognitive sciences, an active part of personality or of the ego and unconscious, or a physiological process as indicated from neurological research. Nor is it clear whether the psychological construct of self is related to other concepts, such as personal identity, self-esteem, and the ego, as sometimes these refer to the whole person or a structure or element within a person. What is evident is that the majority of researchers continue to assume that self-concept, however defined in theory, is primarily governed by environmental determinants despite abundant evidence from the neurosciences of the strong influence of its genetic heritability. This study assumed a genetic hypothesis, that self-concept is developmental and that adolescent perception of personal, relational, and academic self-identity occurs uniformly across cultures and environmental circumstances. Data were collected using a validated survey instrument, translated into Chinese, from majority and minority adolescents in the People's Republic of China. High similarity was found between the majority and minority adolescents, suggesting developmental propensities in the formation of self-concept.

  20. A longitudinal study of perceptions of self-concept and professional self-concept in Turkish nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayişe Karadağ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the relationship between self-concept and professional self-concept amongst nursing students undertaking a four year degree. A descriptive longitudinal study was applied amongst all nursing students undertaking a four year degree starting in the academic year 2006-2007. The sample consists of total 78 students. The data collection was via two Likert scale type questionnaires about the self description of students and their descriptions of the professional qualities of nurses which were issued a week apart. The first questionnaire consisted of a self-report form of 40 adjectives and students were asked to rate the suitability of each adjective for describing their personality. The second questionnaire employed the same adjectives as the first questionnaire. Students were asked to rate how necessary it was for professional nurses to possess these qualities. SPSS was used to analyse the data via percentages and Cohen’s Kappa method. The data for first year students showed 77.6% were happy to have chosen nursing but significant nearly a quarter were not. 85.9% thought they had similar characteristics to those required by nursing but there was a significant minority of almost one sixth who felt they did not have the required characteristics. The congruence between self-concept and professional self-concept was highest in the fourth year followed by the first year with the second year being the lowest. Congruence between self-concept and professional self-concept across all four years was evident from our study. Some implications of these findings for nursing education and practice are considered. A realistic approach to what is involved in both the study and practice of nursing can increase the self and professional self-concept congruence. It is important for nursing educators to effectively manage student expectations as a better alignment of these with actual situations helps students cope with the demands

  1. Analysis of a human phenomenon: self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMone, P

    1991-01-01

    This analysis of self-concept includes an examination of definitions, historical perspectives, theoretical basis, and closely related terms. Antecedents, consequences, defining attributes, and a definition were formulated based on the analysis. The purpose of the analysis was to provide support for the use of the label "self-concept" as a broad category that encompasses the self-esteem, identity, and body-image nursing diagnoses within Taxonomy I. This classification could allow the use of a broad diagnostic label to better describe conditions that necessitate nursing care. It may also further explain the relationships between and among those diagnoses that describe human responses to disturbance of any component of the self-concept.

  2. Play and Cognitive Development: Formal Operational Perspective of Piaget's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saghir; Ch, Abid Hussain; Batool, Ayesha; Sittar, Khadija; Malik, Misbah

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive development is the construction of thought processes, including remembering, problem solving and decision making, from childhood through adolescence to adulthood. Play contributes to cognitive development in a number of ways. It helps children to develop imaginary and memory which is essential for thinking about past, present and future.…

  3. Effect of professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China: the mediator role of organisational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu; Hu, Xiuying

    2015-10-01

    To examine the associations among professional self-concept, organisational commitment and burnout, and to analyse the mediating role of organisational commitment on the relationship between professional self-concept and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Previous studies have focused on work environmental variables that contributed to burnout in nurses. However, no study has explored the mediating effect of organisational commitment on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout in community health nurses. A cross-sectional descriptive study. This study was conducted at 36 community health centres in Chengdu, China with 485 nurses sampled using a two-stage sampling method. The measures used in our study included Nurses' Self-concept Questionnaire, Organisational Commitment Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. The results of structural equation model techniques indicated that, in the direct approach, positive professional self-concept resulted in increased organisational commitment and reduced burnout. Higher organisational commitment resulted in less burnout. In the indirect approach, organisational commitment performed as a partial mediator on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout. Positive perception of professional self-concept can result in reduced burnout via enhancing organisational commitment. It is crucial for nursing administrators to develop effective intervention strategies such as skills escalator training and assertive training, and establishing a supportive working environment to enhance nurses' professional self-concept and organisational commitment, and decrease burnout. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. On the Role of Discipline-Related Self-Concept in Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platow, Michael J.; Mavor, Kenneth I.; Grace, Diana M.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined the role that students' discipline-related self-concepts may play in their deep and surface approaches to learning, their overall learning outcomes, and continued engagement in the discipline itself. Using a cross-lagged panel design of first-year university psychology students, a causal path was observed in which…

  5. The Impacts of Friendship Groups' Racial Composition When Perceptions of Prejudice Threaten Students' Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Literature on racially prejudiced stereotypes suggests that students' academic self-concepts (ASC) can be damaged when a stereotype demeans the intelligence of their racial or ethnic group. There is little research on how students overcome this burden, but there is some evidence that the racial composition of friendship groups play a role. One…

  6. On the Role of Discipline-Related Self-Concept in Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platow, Michael J.; Mavor, Kenneth I.; Grace, Diana M.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined the role that students' discipline-related self-concepts may play in their deep and surface approaches to learning, their overall learning outcomes, and continued engagement in the discipline itself. Using a cross-lagged panel design of first-year university psychology students, a causal path was observed in which…

  7. Academic self-concept as a predictor of achievement for a sample of elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M A; MacDonald, N T

    1990-06-01

    This study examined the relationship of academic self-concept scores of 122 children with their achievement in Grade 6 as compared to general self-concept and locus of control. Academic self-concept correlated significantly higher with teachers' grades and standardized measures of achievement than either general self-concept or locus of control. A multiple regression analysis also confirmed the potential usefulness of academic self-concept for predicting students' achievement. Academic self-concept may be a more useful construct in helping understand students' achievement than frequently administered measures of general self-concept.

  8. Developing Fayetteville shale gas plays : focus on geology and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marble, B. [Hallwood Petroleum, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation provided details of the underlying geology of the Fayetteville shale gas plays and discussed engineering strategies used to improve productivity. Like the Barnett shale gas play, the Fayetteville play is comprised of Mississippian shale, and contains both free and adsorbed gas. Operators in Fayetteville use seismic data in order to avoid faults in the play, which has large variations in structure and depth over short distances. A typical well is drilled in 40 days. Microseismic aids will be used to plan future horizontal development and for 3-dimensional fracture analysis. Multiple short wings are used to create more concentrated frac patterns. However, once broken, the laminated shales will not re-align when frac pressure is released. The high clay content of the shale reduces frac efficiency. It was concluded that modified slick water fracs are now being used at the play along with air drilling to reduce costs, and straighten holes. tabs., figs.

  9. Self-esteem, academic self-concept, and achievement: how the learning environment moderates the dynamics of self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Köller, Olaf; Baumert, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    The authors examine the directionality of effects between global self-esteem, domain-specific academic self-concepts, and academic achievement. Special emphasis is placed on learning environments as potential moderators of the direction of these effects. According to the meritocracy principle presented here, so-called bottom-up effects (i.e., self-esteem is influenced by academic self-concept) are more pronounced in meritocratic learning environments than in ego-protective learning environments. This hypothesis was examined using a three-wave cross-lagged panel design with a large sample of 7th graders from East and West Germany, a total of 5,648 students who were tested shortly after German reunification. Reciprocal effects were found between self-esteem, academic self-concept, and academic achievement. In conformance with the meritocracy principle, support for bottom-up effects was stronger in the meritocratic learning environment.

  10. The Relationship Between Self Concept and Marital Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William M., Jr.; Valine, Warren J.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self concept and marital adjustment for married students and their spouses in a commuter college setting. The sample consisted of a random selection of 50 "both spouses commuting" couples, 50 "husband only commuting" couples, and 50 "wife only commuting" couples (300 subjects).…

  11. Adolescents' Emotion Regulation Strategies, Self-Concept, and Internalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Manying; Stright, Anne Dopkins

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among adolescents' emotion regulation strategies (suppression and cognitive reappraisal), self-concept, and internalizing problems using structural equation modeling. The sample consisted of 438 early adolescents (13 to 15 years old) in Taiwan, including 215 boys and 223 girls. For both boys and girls,…

  12. Anxiety and Self-Concept of Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Malka; Zak, Itai

    1984-01-01

    One hundred learning disabled (LD) and 118 nondisabled children (six-13 years old) participated in the study which demonstrated significantly higher anxiety and lower self-concept in the first group. The differences emphasized the self-dissatisfaction of the LD group and their pawning related anxiety. (Author/CL)

  13. Singing Ability, Musical Self-Concept, and Future Music Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M.; Kelley, Jamey; Pfordresher, Peter Q.

    2017-01-01

    Research on adults who identify as "tone deaf" suggest that their poor musical self-concept is shaped by a view of themselves as nonsingers even when their perceptual skills and singing ability are not significantly worse than the general population. Many of these adults self-selected out of further participation as children but…

  14. Perfectionism and Self Concept among Primary School Children in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofaha, Gamal Al Sayed; Ramon, Patricia Robledo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The main purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between dimensions of perfectionism and self-concepts among school aged students in Egypt. Method: Two hundred-eighty four children (fifth and sixth graders) participated in this study. The mean age of the participants was 144.37 months, SD 6.36. Pearson correlation…

  15. Sense of coherence and self-concept in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Ladelund, Steen; Carlsson, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Most individuals who learn about hereditary cancer manage well, but identification of subgroups who find this knowledge burdening would allow psychosocial intervention. The objective of the study was to assess sense of coherence (SOC) in individuals with Lynch syndrome with comparison to a genera...... population and correlation to self-concept....

  16. Self-concept clarity and the management of social conflict.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, M.N.; de Dreu, C.K.W.; Nijstad, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between selfconcept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher selfconcept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with

  17. Addressing Self-Concept and Reading Needs of Elementary Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMoulin, Donald F.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an innovative supplemental curriculum program that generates positive self-concept growth while reinforcing fundamental reading processes, improving reading comprehension, and fostering reading enjoyment. How to implement this program by networking with the Telephone Pioneers of America and local school and business partners is…

  18. Self-Concept and Participation in School Activities Reanalyzed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winne, Philip H.; Walsh, John

    1980-01-01

    Yarworth and Gauthier (EJ 189 606) examined whether self-concept variables enhanced predictions about students' participation in school activities, using unstructured stepwise regression techniques. A reanalysis of their data using hierarchial regression models tested their hypothesis more appropriately, and uncovered multicollinearity and…

  19. Dance Movement: Effects on Elderly Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman-Miller, Sherrill

    1988-01-01

    An investigation into the effects of dance/movement programs on self-concept in older retired adults indicated that participants had higher, more positive self-esteem than nonparticipants and also had a heightened awareness of joint and muscle usage and body habits. (CB)

  20. Peer Tutoring Effects on Omani Students' English Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrajhi, Marwa N.; Aldhafri, Said S.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the social cognitive learning theory (1997), peer learning can be viewed as an effective way of enhancing learning. In this study, peer tutoring, a form of peer learning, was examined. The current study investigated the influence of a peer tutoring program implemented at Sultan Qaboos University on students' English self-concept. 125…

  1. Relations with parents and school and Chinese adolescents' self-concept, delinquency, and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S; Leung, K

    1992-06-01

    Current research and theory have suggested that the relational domains of family and school experiences are important to children's development. The present study thus examined how relations with parents and school were related to Chinese students' psychosocial and cognitive development in self-concept, delinquency, and academic performance. A total of 1668 secondary school students were studied, and results showed that better relation with parents was associated with higher general, academic, appearance, social, and physical ability self-concepts. Better relation with school was associated with higher academic performance, as shown in higher class rank, higher grand total exam scores, and higher scores in Chinese, English, mathematics, physical education, and music. Both poorer relations with parents and school were found to associate with more self-reported delinquency as well as more school records of misconduct.

  2. Computer Tablet Games' Effect on Young Children's Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moawad, Ruba Abdel Matloub

    2017-01-01

    Playing in general has a positive effect on child development; yet with the advancement of technology, the way children play has changed, and the effects of their play have changed as well. Some studies have shown an overall negative effect of electronic games, while others have reported the opposite. This study aims to investigate the effects of…

  3. North Sea development action brisk; plays expand elsewhere off Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, D.J.

    1996-08-19

    The North Sea may be a mature play, but operators are continually searching for new ways to develop small finds near existing infrastructure and to develop discoveries in new areas at low cost. As they fill in gaps in the North Sea oil and gas infrastructure, companies are also exploring and planning developments in new plays such as the U.K.`s West of Shetlands area, the Irish Sea, and the Atlantic Margin from off western Ireland to northern Norway. Floating production systems and subsea technology are vital parts of many of Northwest Europe`s recently sanctioned field developments, for both large and small reservoirs. The paper discusses the dominant role of floating production units, the niche for subsea developments, new production, the Harding field, the Schieballion and Clair fields (UK), Norway`s plans, the Elgin/Franklin field, small fields, frontier work, in-field projects, flexible floating platforms, deepwater technology, a gas monotower, and subsea control.

  4. The relationship between body mass index and self-concept among adolescent black female university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Bodiba

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between body mass index and self-concept among adolescent black female university students. The study used a mixed research design (quantitative and qualitative methods. Media images of handsome faces and beautiful bodies are used to sell almost everything, from clothes and cosmetic to luncheon, meats, and so on. These images reinforce the western cultural stereotype that women should be thin and shapely to be attractive. Thus, as some girls go through puberty they may become dissatisfied with their weight, and to a lesser extent, with their shape, thus, developing low self-concept or imae of themselves. It is in this context that the study was conceptualised.

  5. Low self-concept in poor readers: prevalence, heterogeneity, and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Genevieve; Castles, Anne; Kohnen, Saskia; Banales, Erin

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that poor readers are at increased risk for various types of low self-concept-particularly academic self-concept. However, this evidence ignores the heterogeneous nature of poor readers, and hence the likelihood that not all poor readers have low self-concept. The aim of this study was to better understand which types of poor readers have low self-concept. We tested 77 children with poor reading for their age for four types of self-concept, four types of reading, three types of spoken language, and two types of attention. We found that poor readers with poor attention had low academic self-concept, while poor readers with poor spoken language had low general self-concept in addition to low academic self-concept. In contrast, poor readers with typical spoken language and attention did not have low self-concept of any type. We also discovered that academic self-concept was reliably associated with reading and receptive spoken vocabulary, and that general self-concept was reliably associated with spoken vocabulary. These outcomes suggest that poor readers with multiple impairments in reading, language, and attention are at higher risk for low academic and general self-concept, and hence need to be assessed for self-concept in clinical practice. Our results also highlight the need for further investigation into the heterogeneous nature of self-concept in poor readers.

  6. Self-concept evaluation and migraine without aura in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Laura Castaldo,1 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Giovanni Mazzotta,5 Michele Roccella,3 Marco Carotenuto11Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 5Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, AUSL Umbria 2, Terni, ItalyIntroduction: Self-esteem is related to the broadly understood concept of self-schemas and is a crucial mechanism for a correct psychological development in children and adolescents. The impact of the many psychological difficulties linked to the migraine without aura (MoA and recurrent headache attacks, such as anger and separation anxiety, on self-esteem has not yet been well investigated. The aims of the present study were to assess self-esteem levels in an objective way and to verify their possible relationship and correlation with the frequency and intensity of migraine attacks, in a population of children and adolescents affected by MoA.Methods: The study population was comprised of 185 children (88 males [M], 97 females [F] aged between 6 and 12 years (mean 9.04 ± 2.41 years referred consecutively for MoA to the Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Second University of Naples and of 203 healthy controls (95 M, 108 F with mean age 9.16 ± 2.37 years, recruited from schools in Campania. The monthly headache frequency and the mean headache duration were assessed from daily headache diaries kept by all the children, and MoA intensity was assessed on a VAS (visual analog scale. To further evaluate their level of self-concept, all

  7. Exploring the Concept of Sustainable Development through Role-Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Arnaud; Blanchard, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development is used in everyday life by the general public, alongside researchers, institutions, and private companies. Nevertheless, its definition is far from being unequivocal. Clarifying the outline of the concept seems necessary. We have created a role-play for this purpose. Our article aims at depicting its main…

  8. The influence of epilepsy on children's perception of self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatolini, Flora Lopes; Zanni, Karina Piccin; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara

    2017-02-22

    The diagnosis of epilepsy can lead to changes in the patient's perception due to factors such as learning and behavioral problems, lack of academic motivation, and low self-esteem. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the knowledge of self-concept in children with epilepsy and those with typical development and verify whether gender and age influence this perception. Eighty children of both sexes, aged between 8 and 14years, participated in this study. The children were divided into two groups: the epilepsy group, which consisted of 40 children diagnosed with epilepsy, and the control group, which consisted of 40 children with typical development and comparable to group 1 according to sex and age. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale, translated and adapted for the Brazilian population, was used as the evaluation instrument. In total, there were 23 boys and 17 girls in each group, with a mean age of 10.7years. There were significant differences in the overall score (p=0.000) and the subareas "behavior" (p=0.006), "intellectual and academic status" (p=0.001), and "popularity" (p=0.004). The group of children with epilepsy had a lower average score in self-concept. Children with epilepsy were observed to perceive themselves as clumsy, without many friends, with low academic performance and problems at school, and to experiencing feelings of unhappiness. These findings suggest that, in addition to the treatment of the clinical manifestations of epilepsy, it is extremely important to provide treatment focused on improving the self-concept of school-aged children with this condition.

  9. Orthodontic treatment need for adolescents in the Campania region: the malocclusion impact on self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Letizia; Esposito, Maria; Caprioglio, Alberto; Attanasio, Stefania; Santini, Annamaria Chiara; Carotenuto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Dental malocclusions can be considered not only as an oral health problem, because they are linked to quality of life perception. Many factors related to malocclusion have strong influences on the perception of facial esthetics (eg, anterior tooth alignment, tooth shape and position, lip thickness, symmetric gingival or tooth contour, lip profile, and overjet). Many reports have shown that the perception of facial esthetics can influence psychological development from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dental malocclusion on self-esteem in a sample of adolescents. The study population was composed of 516 orthodontically untreated subjects (256 males) mean ages 13.75±1.977 years recruited from schools in the Campania region of Italy between January 2011 and July 2011. To evaluate the self-esteem grade in our population, all subjects filled out the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire and attended an orthodontic clinical evaluation to estimate dental occlusal aspects. Pearson's analysis shows the relationship in our sample between some occlusal characteristics (crossbite and dental crowding) and aspects of self-concept evaluation (social, competence, academic, physical, and global score) of the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire. Moreover, logistic regression analysis shows the potential role of dental crowding (odds ratio 5.359; 95% confidence interval 3.492-8.225) and crossbite (odds ratio 6.153; 95% confidence interval 3.545-10.678) as risk factors for development of global self-concept score abnormalities. Our findings confirm the relationship between psychosocial well-being, self-esteem, and dental malocclusion among adolescents.

  10. Preserving self-concept in the burn survivors: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burn injury is a devastating experience affecting all aspects of a person′s essence, including his/her identity and perception. These patients require complex cognitive efforts to redefine their identity to deal with difficult condition after burn injury and preserve self-concept. The experience of life after burn injury is generally a solitary one, closely related to the patients′ cultural and religious context. Therefore, this study was conducted aiming at investigating burn patients′ experiences regarding how to preserve self-concept in life after burn injury in Iran. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was carried out using qualitative content analysis and in-depth unstructured interviews with 17 surviving burn subjects. Results: During the qualitative content analysis process, the concept of "locating" as the essence of the participants′ experience was extracted as follows: (A self-exploration (exploring the changes in one′s life, (B others′ exploration (exploring the changes in the life of family members and the relationship between self and others, (C position evaluation (self-position analysis, and (D self-concept preservation. Conclusion: The present study has developed new understandings of mental experiences of burn patients′ self-concept by describing the concept of "self-locating." It helps us in classifying and understanding the concepts described in comprehensive theories developed in this area. They do this by focusing on what burn patients experience for choosing self-preservation strategies and having a meaningful life. The finding can be used as a conceptual framework for palliative care program in Iran.

  11. Differences in self-concept in children and adolescents in the Czech Republic based on their age and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Orel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem: The article presents a study of the differences in self-concept of children and adolescents based on their sex and age. Self-concept is an integral part of each personality. The level of self-concept in pupils may reflect significantly on their overall life satisfaction as well as influence their subjective success (individually experienced and their objective success (evaluated externally. Methods: The diagnostic tool used was the Czech adaptation of Children's and adolescents self-concept scale PHCSCS-2 (Obereignerů et al., 2015. The original American version of Piers-Harris Children Self-concept Scale 2 (PHCSCS-2 is a 60-item self-report scale which comprises 7 areas of self-assessment. It includes the subscale of overall self-concept: Total Score (TOT - which represents the level of the respondent’s overall self-concept and six subscales evaluating specific areas of self-concept: Behavioural Adjustment (BEH, Intellectual and School Status (INT, Physical Appearance and Attributes (PHY, Freedom from Anxiety (FRE, Popularity (POP, Happiness and Satisfaction (HAP. The Czech standardization which took place in recent years, respected all requirements for the conversion of a foreign diagnostic tool. The research group included 4901 pupils and students at primary and secondary schools in the Czech Republic aged 9-21. The group was divided into twelve groups based on sex and age - group 1 (9-10 years, group 2 (11-12 years, group 3 (13-14 years, group 4 (1516 years, group 5 (17-18 years, group 6 (19-21 years, equivalently for boys/men and girls/women. The study presents the differences of seven self-concept dimensions, as mentioned above (the Total Score and six subscales in Self-Concept in Children and Adolescent based on sex. Most attention is paid to the Total Score (TOT as a most reliable indicator. The study also reveals development curves of all six subscales of girls/women and boys/men based on age. Results: Statistically

  12. Differences In Self-concept in Children and Adolescents in the Czech Republic Based On Their Age and Sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Orel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem: The article presents a study of the differences in self - concept of children and adolescents based on their sex and age. Self - concept is an integral part of each personality. The level of self - concept in pupils may reflect significantly on their overall life satisfaction as wel l as influence their subjective success (individually experienced and their objective success (evaluated externally. Methods: The diagnostic tool used was the Czech adaptation of Children's and adolescents self - concept scale PHCSCS - 2 (Obereignerů et al., 2015. The original American version of Piers - Harris Children Self - concept Scale 2 (PHCSCS - 2 is a 60 - item self - report scale which comprises 7 areas of self - assessment. It includes the subscale of overall self - concept: Total Score (TOT - which represents the level of the respondent’s overall self - concept and six subscales evaluating specific areas of self - concept: Behavioural Adjustment (BEH, Intellectual and School Status (INT, Physical Appearance and Attributes (PHY, Freedom from Anxiety (FRE, Popularity (POP, Happiness and Satisfaction (HAP. The Czech standardization which took place in recent years, respected all requirements for the conversion of a foreign diagnostic tool. The research group included 4901 pupils and students at primary and secondary schools in the Czech Republic aged 9 - 21. The group was divided into twelve groups based on sex and age - group 1 (9 - 10 years, group 2 (11 - 12 years, group 3 (13 - 14 years, group 4 (15 - 16 years, group 5 (17 - 18 years, group 6 (19 - 21 years, equivalently for boys/men and girls/women. The study presents the differences of seven self - concept dimensions, as mentioned above (the Total Score and six subscales in Self - Concept in Children and Adolescent based on sex. Most attention is paid to the Total Score (TOT as a most reliable indicator. The study also reveals development curves of all six subscales of girls/women and boys

  13. Conversational skills in a semistructured interview and self-concept in deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Núria; Ramspott, Anna; Pareto, Irenka D

    2007-01-01

    The starting point for this study is the importance of linguistic competence in deaf students as part of their process of socialization and the formation of their self-concept. With the 56 deaf students who participated in the research, we consider the following sociodemographic variables: age, sex and degree of hearing loss, and the educational factor with respect to the mode of mainstream schooling. Self-concept was explored using the Spanish version of the Self Development Questionnaire (SDQ; I. Elexpuru, 1992) and the TST-Who Am I? test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland (1954). To obtain the data for conversational competence, a conversation was held with a hearing adult. An explanation is given of the criteria for pragmatic analysis. The main results highlight the relationship between positive self-concept and most aspects of conversational competence. The study concludes with pedagogical procedures for integration, including specific strategies for teaching conversational skills to deaf pupils through nondeaf pupils and vice versa.

  14. Who Wants to Play? Sport Motivation Trajectories, Sport Participation, and the Development of Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Te; Chow, Angela; Amemiya, Jamie

    2017-03-15

    Although sport involvement has the potential to enhance psychological wellbeing, studies have suggested that motivation to participate in sports activities declines across childhood and adolescence. This study incorporated expectancy-value theory to model children's sport ability self-concept and subjective task values trajectories from first to twelfth grade. Additionally, it examined if sport motivation trajectories predicted individual and team-based sport participation and whether sport participation in turn reduced the development of depressive symptoms. Data were drawn from the Childhood and Beyond Study, a cross-sequential longitudinal study comprised of three cohorts (N = 1065; 49% male; 92% European American; M ages for youngest, middle, and oldest cohorts at the first wave were 6.42, 7.39, and 9.36 years, respectively). Results revealed four trajectories of students' co-development of sport self-concept and task values: congruent stable high, incongruent stable high, middle school decreasing, and decreasing. Trajectory membership predicted individual and team-based sports participation, but only team-based sport participation predicted faster declines in depressive symptoms. The use of a person-centered approach enabled us to identify heterogeneity in trajectories of sport motivation that can aid in the development of nuanced strategies to increase students' motivation to participate in sports.

  15. Influence of Precollege Experience on Self-Concept among Community College Students in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos

    Female and minority students have historically been underrepresented in the field of science, mathematics, and engineering at colleges and universities. Although a plethora of research has focused on students enrolled in 4-year colleges or universities, limited research addresses the factors that influence gender differences in community college students in science, mathematics, and engineering. Using a target population of 1,599 aspirants in science, mathematics, and engineering majors in public community colleges, this study investigates the determinants of self-concept by examining a hypothetical structural model. The findings suggest that background characteristics, high school academic performance, and attitude toward science have unique contributions to the development of self-concept among female community college students. The results add to the literature by providing new theoretical constructs and the variables that predict students' self-concept.

  16. Relation between self-concept and students alcohol drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vasconcelos-Raposo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relation between multiple self-concept dimensions and alcohol consumption within the adolescent schooling. A sample of 642 students (263 boys and 379 girls aged between 15 and 23 years completed the Self-Description Questionnaire II (SDQ II and an alcohol drinking measure. Results reveal an absence of significant relationships between global self-esteem and alcohol consumption and a small relation, found only in the female, between alcoholic drinking and global self-concept, supporting the assumption that supports the low sensitivity and the consequent use of scarce global dimensions of the self. In contrast, there are significant relations between some specific dimensions of the self and alcohol consumption, whilst the correlation coefficients vary according to subject’s gender, suggesting a cultural involvement based analysis.

  17. Relation between self-concept and students alcohol drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relation between multiple self-concept dimensions and alcohol consumption within the adolescent schooling. A sample of 642 students (263 boys and 379 girls aged between 15 and 23 years completed the Self-Description Questionnaire II (SDQ II and an alcohol drinking measure. Results reveal an absence of significant relationships between global self-esteem and alcohol consumption and a small relation, found only in the female, between alcoholic drinking and global self-concept, supporting the assumption that supports the low sensitivity and the consequent use of scarce global dimensions of the self. In contrast, there are significant relations between some specific dimensions of the self and alcohol consumption, whilst the correlation coefficients vary according to subject’s gender, suggesting a cultural involvement based analysis.

  18. Low self-concept in poor readers: prevalence, heterogeneity, and risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve McArthur

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that poor readers are at increased risk for various types of low self-concept—particularly academic self-concept. However, this evidence ignores the heterogeneous nature of poor readers, and hence the likelihood that not all poor readers have low self-concept. The aim of this study was to better understand which types of poor readers have low self-concept. We tested 77 children with poor reading for their age for four types of self-concept, four types of reading, three types of spoken language, and two types of attention. We found that poor readers with poor attention had low academic self-concept, while poor readers with poor spoken language had low general self-concept in addition to low academic self-concept. In contrast, poor readers with typical spoken language and attention did not have low self-concept of any type. We also discovered that academic self-concept was reliably associated with reading and receptive spoken vocabulary, and that general self-concept was reliably associated with spoken vocabulary. These outcomes suggest that poor readers with multiple impairments in reading, language, and attention are at higher risk for low academic and general self-concept, and hence need to be assessed for self-concept in clinical practice. Our results also highlight the need for further investigation into the heterogeneous nature of self-concept in poor readers.

  19. Supporting the self-concept with memory: insight from amnesia

    OpenAIRE

    Grilli, Matthew D.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which personal semantic memory supports the self-concept in individuals with medial temporal lobe amnesia and healthy adults. Participants completed eight ‘I Am’ self-statements. For each of the four highest ranked self-statements, participants completed an open-ended narrative task, during which they provided supporting information indicating why the I Am statement was considered self-descriptive. Participants then completed an episodic probe task, during which ...

  20. Limited impact on self-concept in individuals with Lynch syndrome; results from a national cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Esplen, Mary Jane; Ladelund, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals seek genetic counseling and hereby learn about hereditary cancer in the family. Lynch syndrome is associated with an inherited high risk for colorectal and gynecological cancer, but knowledge about how family members at risk perceive their situation is limited....... We used the national Danish HNPCC register to collect data on self-concept from 413 individuals with Lynch syndrome. The recently developed Lynch syndrome self-concept scale contains 20 items within two subscales related to stigma-vulnerability and bowel symptom-related anxiety. Significantly higher...

  1. Developing and Understanding Intelligent Contexts for Playing and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Helms, Niels Henrik

    This paper outlines experiences and reflections on the research and development project “Octopus” in order to describe and illustrate how intelligent context facilitates and embody learning and play. The framework is a research and development project where we have tried to work we new kinds...... structure and process (or flow) or it could be formulated in a more philosophical way: The relationship between epistemology and ontology in a designed set up for learning i.e. a classroom setting with learning mediated through intelligent tangible learning media. The tangible learning media...... is an intelligent environment, which is intentionally designed as a dynamic field between structure and flow. Structures regarded as a scaffolding learning principle and flow understood as cross between play and game experiences. Octopus embeds a dialogical principle in order to establish clear sense of progression...

  2. Orthodontic treatment need for adolescents in the Campania region: the malocclusion impact on self-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perillo L

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Letizia Perillo,1 Maria Esposito,2 Alberto Caprioglio,3 Stefania Attanasio,1 Annamaria Chiara Santini,2 Marco Carotenuto2 1Department of Orthodontics, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 3Department of Orthodontics, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy Background: Dental malocclusions can be considered not only as an oral health problem, because they are linked to quality of life perception. Many factors related to malocclusion have strong influences on the perception of facial esthetics (eg, anterior tooth alignment, tooth shape and position, lip thickness, symmetric gingival or tooth contour, lip profile, and overjet. Many reports have shown that the perception of facial esthetics can influence psychological development from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dental malocclusion on self-esteem in a sample of adolescents. Materials and methods: The study population was composed of 516 orthodontically untreated subjects (256 males mean ages 13.75±1.977 years recruited from schools in the Campania region of Italy between January 2011 and July 2011. To evaluate the self-esteem grade in our population, all subjects filled out the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire and attended an orthodontic clinical evaluation to estimate dental occlusal aspects. Results: Pearson's analysis shows the relationship in our sample between some occlusal characteristics (crossbite and dental crowding and aspects of self-concept evaluation (social, competence, academic, physical, and global score of the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire. Moreover, logistic regression analysis shows the potential role of dental crowding (odds ratio 5.359; 95% confidence interval 3.492–8.225 and crossbite (odds ratio 6.153; 95% confidence

  3. Self-Concept in Adolescents—Relationship between Sport Participation, Motor Performance and Personality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Klein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between sport participation, personality development, self-concept and self-esteem has been discussed repeatedly. In this research, a standardized written survey together with tests on motor performance were carried out with 1399 students (707 male; 692 female in school years 7 (12.9 ± 0.6 years and 10 (15.8 ± 0.6 years to measure the extent of a relationship between physical self-concept (self-developed short scale and sporting activity, measured motor performance (German motor performance test DMT (Deutscher Motorik-Test 6–18 and report mark in physical education. Relationships were also analyzed between physical self-concept and general personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experiences, compatibility, and conscientiousness, measured with NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI. The assessment of own physical attractiveness and own athleticism differs by sex (F(1, 962 = 35.21; p < 0.001, whereby girls assess themselves more critically. Weak significant relationships are displayed between motor performance and the assessment of own physical attractiveness (r(395 = 0.31; p < 0.01. Motor performance is given a higher predictive value with regard to a subject’s own self-concept, (physical attractiveness β = 0.37; t(249 = 5.24; p < 0.001; athleticism β = 0.40; t(248 = 6.81; p < 0.001 than the mark achieved in physical education (physical attractiveness β = −0.01; n.s.; athleticism β = −0.30; t(248 = 5.10; p < 0.001. Relationships were found overall between personality traits and physical self-concept. The influence of the ‘neuroticism’ trait is particularly strong (physical attractiveness β = −0.44; t(947 = −13.58; p < 0.001; athleticism β = −0.27; t(948 = −7.84; p < 0.001. The more pronounced this trait, the lower the assessment of own physical attractiveness and own athleticism.

  4. The Relationship Between Self-Concept and Marital Adjustment for Commuter College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William M.; Valine, Warren J.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made of the relationship between self-concept and the adjustment of commuter college students. Instruments used were the Tennessee Self Concept Scale and the Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test. There was a significant relationship between self-concept and marital adjustment. (Author)

  5. The Cross-Cultural Generalizability of a New Structural Model of Academic Self-Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich; Hornung, Caroline; Reichert, Monique; Martin, Romain

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on the structure of academic self-concepts has demonstrated academic self-concepts to be domain-specific and hierarchically organized, but has largely failed to support the hypothesis that general academic self-concept is at the apex of the hierarchy. The present study investigates a new multidimensional nested-factor model of…

  6. Academic Self-Concept, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and Academic Achievement: Mediating and Additive Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Frederic; Ratelle, Catherine F.; Roy, Amelie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between…

  7. The Structure of Academic Self-Concepts Revisited: The Nested Marsh/Shavelson Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich; Dierendonck, Christophe; Reichert, Monique; Ugen, Sonja; Fischbach, Antoine; Martin, Romain

    2010-01-01

    The nested Marsh/Shavelson (NMS) model integrates structural characteristics of academic self-concepts that have proved empirically incompatible in previous studies. Specifically, it conceives of academic self-concepts to be subject specific, strongly separated across domains, and hierarchically organized, with general academic self-concept at the…

  8. Academic Self-Concepts in Adolescence: Relations with Achievement and Ability Grouping in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireson, Judith; Hallam, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ability grouping in schools on students' self-concept were examined in a sample of 23 secondary schools with a range of structured ability groupings. Measures of general self-concept, academic self-concept, and achievement were collected from over 1600 students aged 14-15 years and again two years later. Students' academic…

  9. Relationships between Self-Concept and Resilience Profiles in Young People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriá Martínez, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The present study aims to identify different profiles in self-concept and resilience. In addition, statistically significant differences in self-concept domains among the profiles previously identified are analyzed. Method: The AF5 Self-Concept Questionnaire ("Cuestionario de Autoconcepto AF5") and the Resilience Scale were…

  10. Self-Concept of Students in Higher Education: Are There Differences by Faculty and Gender?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie-Davies, C. M.; Lee, K.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies examine student self-concept during compulsory schooling but few have explored the self-concept of students in higher educational settings. The current study examined self-concept by faculty and gender among higher education students in New Zealand. Participants were 929 undergraduate students from a large New Zealand university. The…

  11. Self-Concept and Self-Esteem: A Cross-Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Describes issues of self-concept and self-esteem that arise when people find themselves living in a cross-cultural environment. Discusses Western definition of self-concept and other self-concept models. Discusses self-esteem and integration and adjustment as it relates to bicultural persons. (ABL)

  12. Patterns of Word Reading Skill, Interest and Self-Concept of Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljaranta, Jaana; Kiuru, Noona; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Silinskas, Gintautas; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2017-01-01

    The majority of previous research on academic skills, self-concept of ability and interest has deployed the variable-oriented approach and focused on self-concept, or ability, or interest only. This study examined the patterns and dynamics of pattern change in Finnish children's word reading skill, self-concept of ability and interest from…

  13. Relationships between Self-Concept and Resilience Profiles in Young People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriá Martínez, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The present study aims to identify different profiles in self-concept and resilience. In addition, statistically significant differences in self-concept domains among the profiles previously identified are analyzed. Method: The AF5 Self-Concept Questionnaire ("Cuestionario de Autoconcepto AF5") and the Resilience Scale were…

  14. Factors Related to the Self-Concept of Institutionalized, White, Male, Adolescent Drug Abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Barbara; Griffing, Penelope

    1983-01-01

    Examined factors related to the self-concept of institutionalized male drug abusers (N=140). The Tennessee Self Concept Scale, a family questionnaire, and an interview were administered. Results yielded several predictors of self-concept, including parent-adolescent relationship, number of prior status offenses, and preference for nondepressant…

  15. Do Delinquent Young Adults have a High or a Low Level of Self-concept?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Schoot, Rens; Wong, Thessa M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the levels of self-concept of delinquent young adults (n = 873). This question is of theoretical and practical importance, as therapeutic programs addressing the self-concept must be based on clear evidence. The present study demonstrated that self-concept is related to delinquen

  16. Self-Concept and Self-Esteem: A Cross-Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Describes issues of self-concept and self-esteem that arise when people find themselves living in a cross-cultural environment. Discusses Western definition of self-concept and other self-concept models. Discusses self-esteem and integration and adjustment as it relates to bicultural persons. (ABL)

  17. Hypnosis-Induced Mental Training Programmes as a Strategy to Improve the Self-Concept of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, H. M.; Louw, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    The creation and implementation of strategies that could improve student development is receiving new research interest. The main objective of the research was to establish whether hypnosis-induced mental training programmes as a strategy could alter the self-concept of students which in turn could improve their overall academic functioning. Two…

  18. Self-Concept and Social Anxiety as Predictor Variables of Academic Performance of Spanish Adolescents with Divorced Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgiles, Mireia; Johnson, Blair T.; Huedo-Medina, Tania B.; Espada, Jose P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: According to previous studies, when parents divorce it may increase the vulnerability of children to develop personal problems, such as lowering academic performance. This research examines the academic performance of Spanish children with divorced parents and its relation to academic self-concept and social anxiety. Method: The…

  19. Influence of a Catalan Peer Tutoring Programme on Reading Comprehension and Self-Concept as a Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Marta; Duran, David

    2016-01-01

    This study relates to the results obtained in the development of reading comprehension (RC) and self-concept as a reader in students who participated in "Llegim en parella" ("Reading in pairs"), a Catalan peer tutoring programme. The research combines a quasi-experimental design with the use of comparison groups and…

  20. Gender Disparities in Sciences: The Question of Parental Influence on Children's Self-Concept and Utility-Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwinya, Noel M.; Hofman, Roelande H.

    2015-01-01

    Self-concept and utility-values are thought to influence differences in choices, participation and performance in schools-careers between students of different genders and ages. This study was investigating existence of gender differences in such constructs regarding science. Further, the study investigated whether development of such constructs…

  1. Hypnosis-Induced Mental Training Programmes as a Strategy to Improve the Self-Concept of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, H. M.; Louw, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    The creation and implementation of strategies that could improve student development is receiving new research interest. The main objective of the research was to establish whether hypnosis-induced mental training programmes as a strategy could alter the self-concept of students which in turn could improve their overall academic functioning. Two…

  2. Developing and Understanding Intelligent Contexts for Playing and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Helms, Niels Henrik

    This paper outlines experiences and reflections on the research and development project “Octopus” in order to describe and illustrate how intelligent context facilitates and embody learning and play. The framework is a research and development project where we have tried to work we new kinds...... of tangible learning media and develop didactic approaches for teachers in a primary school and furthermore to use the user experiences in a structured process where children participated in the innovation process. This has raised a fundamental question: How should we understand the relationship between...... structure and process (or flow) or it could be formulated in a more philosophical way: The relationship between epistemology and ontology in a designed set up for learning i.e. a classroom setting with learning mediated through intelligent tangible learning media. The tangible learning media...

  3. Native voice, self-concept and the moral case for personalized voice technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose (1) To explore the role of native voice and effects of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and survey the state of assistive voice technology; (2) to establish the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Methods This narrative review examines published literature on the human significance of voice, the impact of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and the strengths and limitations of current voice technology. Based on the impact of voice loss on self and identity, and voice technology limitations, the moral case for personalized voice technology is developed. Results Given the richness of information conveyed by voice, loss of voice constrains expression of the self, but the full impact is poorly understood. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices facilitate communication but, despite advances in this field, voice output cannot yet express the unique nuances of individual voice. The ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence and equality of opportunity establish the moral responsibility to invest in accessible, cost-effective, personalized voice technology. Conclusions Although further research is needed to elucidate the full effects of voice loss on self-concept, identity and social functioning, current understanding of the profoundly negative impact of voice loss establishes the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation of voice-disordered patients should facilitate self-expression, interpersonal connectedness and social/occupational participation. Proactive questioning about the psychological and social experiences of patients with voice loss is a valuable entry point for rehabilitation planning. Personalized voice technology would enhance sense of self, communicative participation and autonomy and promote shared healthcare decision-making. Further research is needed to identify the best strategies to preserve and strengthen identity and sense of

  4. The Reciprocal Relations between Self-Concept, Motivation and Achievement: Juxtaposing Academic Self-Concept and Achievement Goal Orientations for Mathematics Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Marjorie; Parker, Philip; Marsh, Herbert W.; Craven, Rhonda G.; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that motivated students and those with high academic self-concepts perform better academically. Although substantial evidence supports a reciprocal relation between academic self-concept and achievement, there is less evidence supporting a similar relation between achievement goal orientations and achievement. There is also a…

  5. Understanding the relationship between nutritional knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-concept of high-school students suffering from overweight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Leila; Sharifirad, Gholam Reza; Azadbakht, Leila; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Adolescents’ overweight problems have been paid much attention due to their significant increase in recent decades in developed countries. Poor eating patterns subsequently affect their self-efficacy and self-concept. Therefore, paying attention to the nutritional knowledge of overweight students in this period is essential. This study examines the relationship between self-efficacy, self-concept, and nutritional knowledge of overweight students in the city of Isfahan. Materials and Methods: The 140 overweight students who participated in this descriptive, analytical study with were randomly selected from one of five areas of Isfahan city in the year 2011-2012. Questionnaires for data collection in this study included demographic form, nutrition knowledge, Cooper Smith self-esteem, and general self-efficacy questionnaire. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, regression, and Pearson's correlation coefficient with statistical package in social sciences version 18. Results: There was a significant correlation between whole nutritional knowledge and self-efficacy (r = 0.29, P > 0.001) and self-concept (r = 0.26, P = 0.002). There was a significant correlation between self-efficacy and self-concept (r = 0.3, P = 0.001). Furthermore, in the selection of food section there was no significant correlation with the self-concept (r = 0.147, P = 0.083). Regression analysis between self-concept, self-efficacy, family dimension, father's education, mother's education, father's occupation, mother's occupationa and income with nutrition knowledge showed that these eight variables explain 17.7% of the variance in health behaviors totally. Conclusion: By conducting this study, and revealing the direct relationship between nutritional knowledge, self-concept, and self-efficacy, we could conclude that if nutritional knowledge of overweight students is promoted, this factor would lead to an increase their self-concept and self-efficacy in order to adopt healthy behaviors

  6. Encouraging the development of children's oral communicative competences through play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrillón Olga Lucía

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available When children start to learn a foreign language they already have some communicative competence in their mother tongue. Thus a classroom research project was carried out in order to study the development of children¿s competence in communicating in other languages. The main theme explored was if it was possible to help kids acquire and develop their competence in the new code through the use of play activities. The concepts related to competences, play and some children's characteristics when learning a second language will be presented in this article. Also, the results of the implementation of play activities in the classroom as well as some pedagogical implications will be analyzed as a means to promote improvement in the foreign language teaching-learning process. Key words: English-Primary School, Children Second Language Acquisition, Learning Ability in Children-Research, Educational Games-Teaching-Research Inglés-Escuela Primaria, Adquisición de Segundo Lenguaje en Niños, Aptitud de Aprendizaje en niños-Investigación, Cuando los niños empiezan el aprendizaje de una lengua extranjera ya poseen alguna competencia comunicativa en su lengua materna. De lo que se trata, por tanto en este proyecto de investigación en el aula es de promover esta competencia para comunicarse en otras lenguas. El propósito fundamental de esta investigación fue explorar si era posible ayudar a los estudiantes a adquirir y desarrollar su competencia en este nuevo código, mediante la implementación de actividades lúdicas. En este artículo se presentaran los conceptos de competencias, lúdica y algunas de las características de los niños en el aprendizaje de una segunda lengua. También se presentaran los resultados que surgieron a partir de la implementación de las actividades lúdicas y se mencionaran algunas implicaciones pedagógicas que promueven el mejoramiento del proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua extranjera.

  7. An Investigation into the Effect of Play-Based Instruction on the Development of Play Skills and Oral Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnitti, Karen; Bailey, Alison; Hudspeth Stevenson, Edwina; Reynolds, Emily; Kidd, Evan

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the influence of a play-based curriculum on the development of pretend play skills and oral language in children attending their first year of formal schooling. In this quasi-experimental design, two groups of children were followed longitudinally across the first 6 months of their first year at school. The children…

  8. Early influences and childhood development. Does helicobacter play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    In the late 1960s, Rene Dubos showed that a variety of nutritional stress in utero or in early infancy could have dramatic impact on childhood development that was irreversible. This included detectable changes in the brain. Since that time, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has been identified as one of the major nutritional stresses that leads to permanent behavioral changes in both experimental animals and humans resulting in poorer cognitive, motor, and social-emotional function. It has been proposed that these changes play an important part in the inter-generational transmission of poverty. More recently, it is becoming clear that Helicobacter pylori causes IDA in populations on an iron-limiting diet. The main thesis of this article is that H. pylori infection may indeed have an impact on childhood development and that much more research is needed in this area as intervention via immunization or antimicrobial therapy in populations in the developing world may have major positive benefits via cure of IDA and prevention of brain damage in the young.

  9. Do Demodex mites play a role in pterygium development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Witold; Moneta-Wielgoś, Joanna; Młocicki, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Numerous reports point to Demodex mites as the aetiology of certain eye and skin conditions, hence it is highly probable that infestation with these mites may also play a role in the aetiology and pathogenesis of pterygium. Therefore here we present a hypothesis: whether the presence of Demodex mites in eyelash hair follicles significantly correlates with the presence of pterygia, which could point to a potential role of these mites in the development of such lesions. We present preliminary data for supporting this hypothesis. These results were collected from a group of 69 subjects, including 39 with pterygium. Subjects were studied for the presence of Demodex folliculorum and/or D. brevis within eyelash follicles. The sample was defined as positive if at least one parasite, larva or egg were present. Preliminary statistical analyses were performed, and indicated a significant relationship between Demodex mite infestation and the presence of pterygium (pDemodex infestation formed a dominant group. The proportion of subjects with both pterygia and Demodex presence is high at 93.33%, while the proportion of subjects without pterygia who have mites is low at 20.51%. Aforementioned results support our working hypothesis that infestation with Demodex mites may result in pterygium development and therefore patients diagnosed with pterygium should be assessed for the presence of Demodex to verify our preliminary results. In the present paper, we discuss potential influence of Demodex on conjunctiva and propose a hypothetical pathological mechanism linking the development of pterygia with demodicosis.

  10. Me, Myself, and Money II: Relative Deprivation Predicts Disordered Gambling Severity via Delay Discounting, Especially Among Gamblers Who Have a Financially Focused Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabri, Nassim; Will Shead, N; Wohl, Michael J A

    2017-02-02

    In the current research, we examined whether the known link between relative deprivation and disordered gambling (via delay discounting; i.e., preferences for immediate smaller rewards relative to delayed larger rewards) is moderated by the extent to which gamblers have a financially focused self-concept. Specifically, we hypothesized that delay discounting would be a strong predictor of disordered gambling among those who base their self-worth on their financial success. To test this moderated-mediation model, a community sample of gamblers (N = 239) completed measures that assessed relative deprivation, delay discounting, financially focused self-concept, and disordered gambling severity. As predicted, people who felt more relative deprivation reported more severe symptoms of disordered gambling and this association was mediated by delay discounting. Importantly, this mediated relationship was moderated by the extent to which participants' self-concept was focused on financial success. Among participants whose self-concept was high in financial focus, greater delay discounting (stemming from relative deprivation) was a strong predictor of disordered gambling. Among people whose self-concept was low in financial focus, delay discounting (stemming from relative deprivation) was a weak predictor of disordered gambling. Thus, the magnitude of the indirect effect of relative deprivation on disordered gambling severity was larger among people with a more financially focused self-concept-an effect mediated by delay discounting. These findings suggest that targeting gamblers' financial focus in prevention and treatment interventions may be instrumental in curtailing the development and maintenance of disordered gambling.

  11. The development of fatigue during match-play tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Machar; Duffield, Rob

    2014-04-01

    Data describing the activity profile and physiological characteristics of tennis match-play are extensive. However, these data have generally provided descriptive accounts of the one-off match-play of amateur or lowly ranked professional players lasting tennis match-play, particularly in the men's game where matches can last >5 h. Furthermore, there is a distinct lack of evidence-based insight regarding the manifestation of fatigue within and between tennis matches, notwithstanding that skeletal muscle function has been reported to reduce following prolonged match-play. Moreover, it is evident that match-play evokes pronounced and prolonged physiological, neuromuscular and psychological perturbations that may be exacerbated with consecutive days of match-play. Separate to these internal load responses, a collection of non-uniform movement and technical performance changes are reported, though rarely from match-play data. Consequently, direct or causal links between altered physiological or muscle contractile function and subsequent match-play outcomes are lacking. Indeed, emerging evidence seems to infer that players adjust their game strategy, and the resultant execution of stroke play, to accommodate any such deterioration in physiological function. The purpose of this review was to discuss the available literature in terms of the physiological, mechanical and psychological responses that occur during prolonged match-play in the context of their likely effect on match-play performance.

  12. Collective school-type identity: predicting students' motivation beyond academic self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Michel; Hannover, Bettina

    2011-06-01

    In Germany, according to their prior achievement students are tracked into different types of secondary school that provide profoundly different options for their future educational careers. In this paper we suggest that as a result, school tracks clearly differ in their social status or reputation. This should translate into different collective school-type identities for their students, irrespective of the students' personal academic self-concepts. We examine the extent to which collective school-type identity systematically varies as a function of the school track students are enrolled in, and the extent to which students' collective school-type identity makes a unique contribution beyond academic self-concept and school track in predicting scholastic motivation. In two cross-sectional studies a measure of collective school-type identity is established and applied to explain motivational differences between two school tracks in Berlin. In Study 1 (N = 39 students) the content of the collective school-type identity is explored by means of an open format questionnaire. Based on these findings a structured instrument (semantic differential) to measure collective school-type identity is developed. In Study 2 (N = 1278 students) the assumed structure with four subscales (Stereotype Achievement, Stereotype Motivation, Stereotype Social, and Compensation) is proved with confirmatory factor analysis. This measure is used to compare the collective school-type identity across school tracks and predict motivational outcomes. Results show large differences in collective school-type identity between students of different school tracks. Furthermore, these differences can explain motivational differences between school tracks. Collective school-type identity has incremental predictive power for scholastic motivation, over and above the effects of academic self-concept and school track.

  13. The relationship between body mass index and self-concept among adolescent black female university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodiba, P; Madu, S N; Ezeokana, J O; Nnedum, O A U

    2008-03-01

    The study investigated the relationship between body mass index and self-concept among adolescent black female university students. The study used a mixed research design (quantitative and qualitative methods). Media images of handsome faces and beautiful bodies are used to sell almost everything, from clothes and cosmetic to luncheon, meats, and so on. These images reinforce the western cultural stereotype that women should be thin and shapely to be attractive. Thus, as some girls go through puberty they may become dissatisfied with their weight, and to a lesser extent, with their shape, thus, developing low self-concept or imae of themselves. It is in this context that the study was conceptualised. First year female students from three different Schools and Faculties at the University of Limpopo, Turfloop Campus, South Africa, participated in the study. Using the availability and convenient sampling method, 75 students were selected for this study. For the quantitative aspect of the study, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Measure was used to measure self-esteem. For the qualitative part, a topic guide was used for the focus group discussions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Pearson's Product Moment Correlation were used to analyse the quantitative data, while the phenomenological principle of open coding used for the thematic analysis. Results showed that there is a relationship between body mass and self-concept and that overweight participants tend to have a low self-esteem. Low self-esteem was perceived to be aggravated by a number of factors, like the attitude of the media and the society. Participants who are overweight also indicated that they are limited in certain activities of daily living (e.g., sports) as a result of their body mass. They expressed mixed feelings and frustration when it comes to such activities. The above results did not differ from those reported from western cultures. Support groups, life-skills programmes and psychotherapy should be

  14. The development of fatigue during match-play tennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Machar; Duffield, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Data describing the activity profile and physiological characteristics of tennis match-play are extensive. However, these data have generally provided descriptive accounts of the one-off match-play of amateur or lowly ranked professional players lasting 5 h. Furthermore, there is a distinct lack of evidence-based insight regarding the manifestation of fatigue within and between tennis matches, notwithstanding that skeletal muscle function has been reported to reduce following prolonged match-play. Moreover, it is evident that match-play evokes pronounced and prolonged physiological, neuromuscular and psychological perturbations that may be exacerbated with consecutive days of match-play. Separate to these internal load responses, a collection of non-uniform movement and technical performance changes are reported, though rarely from match-play data. Consequently, direct or causal links between altered physiological or muscle contractile function and subsequent match-play outcomes are lacking. Indeed, emerging evidence seems to infer that players adjust their game strategy, and the resultant execution of stroke play, to accommodate any such deterioration in physiological function. The purpose of this review was to discuss the available literature in terms of the physiological, mechanical and psychological responses that occur during prolonged match-play in the context of their likely effect on match-play performance. PMID:24668384

  15. Women, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life: Self-concept as a Mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo Silvestre, Tamara; Ubillos Landa, Silvia

    2016-02-22

    The objectives of this research are: (a) analyze the incremental validity of physical activity's (PA) influence on perceived quality of life (PQL); (b) determine if PA's predictive power is mediated by self-concept; and (c) study if results vary according to a unidimensional or multidimensional approach to self-concept measurement. The sample comprised 160 women from Burgos, Spain aged 18 to 45 years old. Non-probability sampling was used. Two three-step hierarchical regression analyses were applied to forecast PQL. The hedonic quality-of-life indicators, self-concept, self-esteem, and PA were included as independent variables. The first regression analysis included global self-concept as predictor variable, while the second included its five dimensions. Two mediation analyses were conducted to see if PA's ability to predict PQL was mediated by global and physical self-concept. Results from the first regression shows that self-concept, satisfaction with life, and PA were significant predictors. PA slightly but significantly increased explained variance in PQL (2.1%). In the second regression, substituting global self-concept with its five constituent factors, only the physical dimension and satisfaction with life predicted PQL, while PA ceased to be a significant predictor. Mediation analysis revealed that only physical self-concept mediates the relationship between PA and PQL (z = 1.97, p multidimensional view of self-concept, and represent a more accurate image of the relationship between PQL, PA, and self-concept.

  16. Longitudinal relations between symptoms, neurocognition and self-concept in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus eHesse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cognitive models suggest that the self-concept of persons with psychosis can be fundamentally affected. Self-concepts were found to be related to different symptom domains when measured concurrently. Longitudinal investigations to disentangle the possible causal associations are rare. Method: We examined a sample of 160 people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who took part in a psychotherapy study. All participants had the DSM-IV diagnosis of a schizophrenia and pronounced negative symptoms. Neurocognition, symptoms and self-concepts were assessed at two time points twelve months apart. Structural equation modelling was used to test whether symptoms influence self-concepts (scar-model or self-concepts affect symptoms (vulnerability model. Results: Negative symptoms correlated concurrently with self-concepts. Neurocognitive deficits are associated with more negative self-concepts twelve months later. Interpersonal self-concepts were found to be relevant for paranoia. Conclusion: The findings implicate that if deficits in neurocognition are present, fostering a positive self-concept should be an issue in therapy. Negative interpersonal self-concept indicates an increased risk for paranoid delusions in the course of one year. New aspects for cognitive models in schizophrenia and clinical implications are discussed

  17. Black adolescents: a descriptive study of their self-concepts and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboya, M M

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationships among global self-concept, self-concept of academic ability, and academic achievement of black American adolescents. The subjects were 211 tenth-grade students in five public high schools in the Pacific Northwest school district who volunteered to participate in the study. Global self-concept was measured by the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI), self-concept of academic ability by the Brookover Self-Concept of Ability (General) Scale, and academic achievement by the California Achievement Test (CAT). The major statistical tools were the Pearson product-moment correlations and Fisher Z statistic. In all of the tests the decision was made to reject the null hypothesis at the .05 level of significance. No significant relationship was found between global self-concept and academic achievement, although the relationship between self-concept of academic ability and academic achievement reached significance. The relationship between self-concept of academic ability and academic achievement correlated more strongly than the relationship between global self-concept and academic achievement. These results suggest that the enhancement of global self-concept might not be a potent intervention for academic improvement for black adolescents.

  18. Using dramatic role-play to develop emotional aptitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Dinapoli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As university educators, we need to prepare students for the transition from the information age to what Daniel H. Pink (2005 calls the conceptual age, which is governed by artistry, empathy and emotion, by including in the curricula activities that stimulate both hemispheres of the brain. This can be done by promoting activities that energize what Daniel Goleman (1995 refers to as emotional intelligence, and it further maintains that, as Paul Ekman (2003 suggests, the ability to detect feelings improves communication. Recognizing the need to include in the curricula procedures that help develop students’ right brain aptitudes and enhance their communication skills, I have endeavoured to introduce dramatic scene study as a sustained activity in my English for Specific Purposes courses at the Universidad de Valencia. My aim was to energize the students’ creative and emotional aptitudes, as well as to dynamize effective teamwork. This article sustains that dramatic role-play, based on scripted scene study and related improvisational activities, is one way of achieving this.

  19. Utilizing Rogers' Theory of Self-Concept in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, P

    1993-06-01

    The work of mental health nurse is interactive in nature, the priority of which is the effective development and maintenance of a therapeutic relationship with clients. This field of nursing bases its practice on theories from many schools of thought in order to provide clients with the highest quality of care. One such theory is that of Carl Rogers whose practice as a psychotherapist was based on his Theory of Self-Concept. This paper examines the development of the Theory of Self-Concept from the works of Cooley, Mead, Allport and Rogers and relates to the therapeutic alliance between a primary nurse and a client who has been medically diagnosed as being 'depressed'. The implications for practice are considered and some of the difficulties of utilizing Rogers' theory on an in-patient unit are explored. The paper emphasizes the need for nurses to be aware of the use of such theories in order to enrich the care that clients receive. It also highlights the need for nurses to be aware of their own 'self' when working with clients, a state that can only be achieved if the nurses themselves have adequate clinical supervision and an environment which is supportive of such work.

  20. Learning to Play: Cognitive and Physical Development of Children and the Requirements of Playing the Piano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Carmichael

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Musical learning and performance has traditionally been understood as the process of cognitive ability and physical action. If a musician lacks or is underdeveloped in one of these areas it will either be harder or almost impossible to create music. In this presentation I will focus on the connection between them. Cognitive ability and knowledge increases with age as we gain more facts and experiences. Likewise, a child’s physical abilities expand and become more advanced with age. There is an increasing amount of evidence that cognitive abilities and physical developments are linked in children’s development.

  1. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: An empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał eStyła

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-concept clarity describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of self-concept clarity change (especially stable increase and V shape observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable self-concept clarity increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while self-concept clarity change characterized by a V shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Method: Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M=5.8 was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale, Symptoms’ Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The Self-Concept Clarity Scale was also administered every two weeks during psychotherapy. Results: As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable self-concept clarity increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and V shape of self-concept clarity change. Conclusions: The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of self-concept clarity is a sign of a good treatment prognosis.

  2. Academic self-concept, interest, grades, and standardized test scores: reciprocal effects models of causal ordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W; Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Köller, Olaf; Baumert, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Reciprocal effects models of longitudinal data show that academic self-concept is both a cause and an effect of achievement. In this study this model was extended to juxtapose self-concept with academic interest. Based on longitudinal data from 2 nationally representative samples of German 7th-grade students (Study 1: N = 5,649, M age = 13.4; Study 2: N = 2,264, M age = 13.7 years), prior self-concept significantly affected subsequent math interest, school grades, and standardized test scores, whereas prior math interest had only a small effect on subsequent math self-concept. Despite stereotypic gender differences in means, linkages relating these constructs were invariant over gender. These results demonstrate the positive effects of academic self-concept on a variety of academic outcomes and integrate self-concept with the developmental motivation literature.

  3. Relation of self-concept in kindergarten and first grade to school adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulou, Maria; Sotiriou, Apostolos; Mitsiouli, Vasiliki

    2007-06-01

    The present aim was to investigate changes in self-concept and self-concept stability during children's transition from kindergarten to primary school, and the relationship between children's self-concept and their adjustment to elementary school. 346 children took part in this 2-yr. longitudinal study. The Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance for Young Children was used to assess children's self-concept. Children's school adjustment was assessed using the schools' academic, behavioral, and social-emotional procedures. Children's self-concept appeared relatively stable and the decline in scores appeared to be practically unimportant. Analysis showed that children's school adjustment mainly affects the academic dimension of self-concept.

  4. A Structural Equation Modelling of the Academic Self-Concept Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Musa MATOVU

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at validating the academic self-concept scale by Liu and Wang (2005) in measuring academic self-concept among university students. Structural equation modelling was used to validate the scale which was composed of two subscales; academic confidence and academic effort. The study was conducted on university students; males and females from different levels of study and faculties. In this study the influence of academic self-concept on academic achievement was assessed, tested w...

  5. Self-esteem, self-concept and life satisfaction of dyslexic students at university

    OpenAIRE

    Shek, Emma

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies with dyslexic children have consistently found that they have lower self-esteem, lower academic self-concept and lower reading self-concept but not a lower non-academic self-concept than non-dyslexic children. This study therefore, intends to examine whether similar findings could be replicated in dyslexic university students. Given the lack of studies investigating the effects dyslexia has upon ones’ satisfaction with life, this study also looked at life satisfaction. 28 dys...

  6. Friendship group identification, multidimensional self-concept, and experience of developmental tasks in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Mark; MacKenzie, Liam; Hewitt, Lisa A

    2006-08-01

    This study applied a social identity perspective to the study of adolescent self-concept and social development. British adolescents aged 14-15 years (N=114) completed a questionnaire which asked them to: (i) rate their degree of identification with a school-based friendship group; (ii) complete a measure of multi-dimensional self-concept; and (iii) report their experiences of a variety of personal, relational and socio-institutional (e.g., achieving economic independence) developmental tasks. Compared to low identifiers, participants who were highly identified with a friendship group reported highest levels of self-esteem; and these differences were most marked in non-academic domains of self. High identifiers also displayed higher levels of general self-esteem and reported more positive experiences of personal and relational developmental tasks. The discussion focuses on the potential benefits to understanding of social developmental processes that can be derived from a consideration of adolescents' subjective appraisals of their peer relations.

  7. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always value the skills and competences nurses have acquired through education and innovation. Discussion paper. We identified 1216 relevant studies by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases in the period 1997-2010. Finally, 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. The included studies show that the actual public image of nursing is diverse and incongruous. This image is partly self-created by nurses due to their invisibility and their lack of public discourse. Nurses derive their self-concept and professional identity from their public image, work environment, work values, education and traditional social and cultural values. Nurses should work harder to communicate their professionalism to the public. Social media like the Internet and YouTube can be used to show the public what they really do. To improve their public image and to obtain a stronger position in healthcare organizations, nurses need to increase their visibility. This could be realized by ongoing education and a challenging work environment that encourages nurses to stand up for themselves. Furthermore, nurses should make better use of strategic positions, such as case manager, nurse educator or clinical nurse specialist and use their professionalism to show the public what their work really entails. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The effect of altering self-descriptive behavior on self-concept and classroom behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J; Muller, D

    1977-09-01

    This research examined the impact of operant reinforcement of positive self-descriptive behavior on the self-concepts and classroom behavior of 60 fifth-grade students. Three groups of 10 male and 10 female low self-concept students wrote a series of eight essays describing their school performance. The first group (P) received written reinforcement for positive self-descriptions of their school performance. The second group (G) received an equal number of reinforcements for general statements. The third group (C) received no reinforcement for written statements. Three areas of self-concept were measured with the Primary Self-Concept Inventory: personal-self, social-self, and intellectual-self. A frequency count was also made of nine classroom behaviors thought to be influenced by self-concept. The P group displayed increases in the frequency of positive self-descriptive statement and in intellectual self-concept but no changes in personal self-concept, social self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors. The G and C groups showed no change in self-description, self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors.

  9. Low self-concept in poor readers: prevalence, heterogeneity, and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve McArthur; Anne Castles; Saskia Kohnen; Erin Banales

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that poor readers are at increased risk for various types of low self-concept—particularly academic self-concept. However, this evidence ignores the heterogeneous nature of poor readers, and hence the likelihood that not all poor readers have low self-concept. The aim of this study was to better understand which types of poor readers have low self-concept. We tested 77 children with poor reading for their age for four types of self-concept, four types of reading, three types...

  10. Effects of Aging Stereotype Threat on Working Self-Concepts: An Event-Related Potentials Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoshan Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the influence of stereotype threat (ST on working self-concepts has been highlighted in recent years, its neural underpinnings are unclear. Notably, the aging ST, which largely influences older adults’ cognitive ability, mental and physical health, did not receive much attention. In order to investigate these issues, electroencephalogram (EEG data were obtained from older adults during a modified Stroop task using neutral words, positive and negative self-concept words in aging ST vs. neutral control conditions. Results showed longer reaction times (RTs for identifying colors of words under the aging ST compared to the neutral condition. More importantly, the negative self-concept elicited more positive late P300 amplitudes and enhanced theta band activities compared to the positive self-concept or neutral words under the aging ST condition, whereas no difference was found between these self-concepts and neutral words in the control condition. Furthermore, the aging ST induced smaller theta band synchronization and enhanced alpha band synchronization compared to the control condition. Moreover, we also observed valence differences in self-concepts where the negative self-concept words reduced early P150/N170 complex relative to neutral words. These findings suggest that priming ST could activate negative self-concepts as current working self-concept, and that this influence occurred during a late neural time course.

  11. Thine own self: true self-concept accessibility and meaning in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Rebecca J; Hicks, Joshua A; Arndt, Jamie; King, Laura A

    2009-02-01

    A number of philosophical and psychological theories suggest the true self is an important contributor to well-being. The present research examined whether the cognitive accessibility of the true self-concept would predict the experience of meaning in life. To ensure that any observed effects were due to the true self-concept rather than to the self-concept more generally, the authors used actual self-concept accessibility as a control variable in all studies. True and actual self-concepts were defined as including those traits that are enacted around close others vs. most others (Studies 1 through 3) or as traits that refer to "who you really are" vs. "who you are during most of your activities" (Studies 4 and 5), respectively. Studies 1, 2, and 4 showed that individual differences in true self-concept accessibility, but not differences in actual self-concept accessibility, predicted meaning in life. Studies 3 and 5 showed that priming traits related to the true self-concept enhanced perceptions of meaning in life. Implications for the study of the true self-concept and authenticity are discussed.

  12. Relationship Between Self-Concept, Self-esteem, Anxiety, Depression and Academic Achievement in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ejei, Javad; Khodapanahi, Mohammad-Karim; Tarkhorani, Hamid

    This study is surveying some of personality characteristics of adolescents and their associations with academic achievement: Accordingly, 1314 randomly allocated students of Tehran`s high schools were assessed by Beck self-concept inventory, Coopersmith self-esteem inventory, Spielberger State-Trait anxiety inventory, Beck depression inventory. Results indicate that self-concept is correlated with self-esteem and these two have positive impacts on augment of academic achievement. Moreover, the increase of self-concept and self-esteem are related to the decrease of anxiety and a negative significant relation exists between self-concept, self-esteem and depression which will ensue decrease in academic achievement.

  13. Correlation of self-concept and self-esteem with aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Marčič

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We were interested in the correlation of aggressiveness with independent self-concept, codependent self-concept and level of self-esteem. Some previous research gave contradictory results about correlations between aggressiveness, self-concept and self-esteem. Researchers report of negative correlation, but also of positive and no correlation. One hundred and fifty-eight participants, aged from 19 to 51, with average age of 21 participated in the research. Fifty participants were males and 108 were females. Self-concept was measured with the Adult Sources of Self-Esteem Inventory – ASSEI (Elovson & Fleming, 1989, level of self-esteem with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale – RSES (Rosenberg, 1965 and aggressiveness with The Aggression Questionnaire – AQ (Buss & Perry, 1992. The results showed that aggressiveness is negatively correlated with co-dependent self-concept, but is not correlated with independent self-concept, even if we control for the level of self-esteem. The level of self-esteem is negatively correlated with anger, hostility, and overall aggression, but not with physical and verbal aggression, even if we control for the self-concept. We can conclude that only certain areas of self-concept are relevant in the research of the relationship between self-concept and aggressiveness, and that the level of self-esteem is to be taken into account only in some forms of aggressiveness, like anger and hostility, but not in physical and verbal aggression.

  14. Peer Attachment, Perceived Parenting Style, Self-concept, and School Adjustments in Adolescents with Chronic Illness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sunhee

    2016-01-01

    .... Multiple-group structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the difference of relations for peer attachment, parenting style, self-concept, and school adjustment variable between adolescents...

  15. The effect of academic self-concept on ADHD and antisocial behaviors in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisecco, S; Wristers, K; Swank, P; Silva, P A; Baker, D B

    2001-01-01

    Using structural equation modeling techniques, we evaluated the effect of academic self-concept (ASC) on the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and antisocial behaviors in early adolescence. Participants (n = 445) were recruited from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research study. Eligibility was determined by the presence of complete data for the following variables at the specified time periods: reading at age 7, teacher reports of ADHD and antisocial behaviors at age 7, self-ratings of ASC at ages 9 and 11, and teacher reports of ADHD and antisocial behaviors at age 13. The results indicated that ASC is an important construct that directly contributes to the development of antisocial behaviors rather than to symptoms of ADHD. The results also indicated that children's early history of behavioral problems and academic performance contribute to the development of a more robust understanding of the impact of ASC on the development of disruptive behaviors in early adolescence.

  16. Intolerance of uncertainty, causal uncertainty, causal importance, self-concept clarity and their relations to generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusec, Andrea; Tallon, Kathleen; Koerner, Naomi

    2016-06-01

    Although numerous studies have provided support for the notion that intolerance of uncertainty plays a key role in pathological worry (the hallmark feature of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)), other uncertainty-related constructs may also have relevance for the understanding of individuals who engage in pathological worry. Three constructs from the social cognition literature, causal uncertainty, causal importance, and self-concept clarity, were examined in the present study to assess the degree to which these explain unique variance in GAD, over and above intolerance of uncertainty. N = 235 participants completed self-report measures of trait worry, GAD symptoms, and uncertainty-relevant constructs. A subgroup was subsequently classified as low in GAD symptoms (n = 69) or high in GAD symptoms (n = 54) based on validated cut scores on measures of trait worry and GAD symptoms. In logistic regressions, only elevated intolerance of uncertainty and lower self-concept clarity emerged as unique correlates of high (vs. low) GAD symptoms. The possible role of self-concept uncertainty in GAD and the utility of integrating social cognition theories and constructs into clinical research on intolerance of uncertainty are discussed.

  17. Developing Competencies by Playing Digital Sports-Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The idea of digital game-based learning (DGBL) is that students (or players) learn something by playing a computer or video game and that an educator can employ digital games to assist and boost both formal and informal learning. There is game software that is not specifically produced for educational use but which is nonetheless regularly…

  18. Academic self-concept of ability and cortisol reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkley, N; Westerholt, D M; Kirchner, W H

    2014-05-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the relationship between a school-specific trait (academic self-concept of ability [ASCA]) and hormonal stress response by using a trait-compatible stressor (test). First, we determined 52 students' ASCA scores for biology and measured their salivary cortisol concentration before and after a biology test (experimental group, n=28) or a free writing task (control group, n=24). For participants who took the test, statistical analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between ASCA score and cortisol response. In contrast, the control group showed a decrease in cortisol concentrations between test times and no correlation between cortisol concentration and ASCA scores were found. These findings indicated an interaction between ASCA scores and hormonal stress response when an academic-related stressor is present. Furthermore, these variables might influence each other adversely: high cortisol concentrations during a test situation may lead to greater feelings of insecurity, resulting in low ASCA scores and awareness of these low scores may lead to a further increase in cortisol, creating a vicious cycle.

  19. Self-concept organisation and mental toughness in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggs, Jennifer; Ditzfeld, Christopher; Golby, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the relationship between individual differences in evaluative self-organisation and mental toughness in sport, proposing that motivation and emotional resiliency (facets of mental toughness) stem from differences in core self. A cross-sectional assessment of 105 athletes competing at a range of performance levels took part in an online study including measures of self-reported mental toughness (Sport Mental Toughness Questionnaire; Sheard, M., Golby, J., & van Wersch, A. (2009). Progress towards construct validation of the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire (SMTQ). European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 25(3), 186-193. doi:10.1027/1015-5759.25.3.186) and self-organisation (self-descriptive attribute task; Showers, C. J. (2002). Integration and compartmentalisation: A model of self-structure and self-change. In D. Cervone & W. Mischel (Eds.), Advances in personality science (pp. 271-291). New York, NY: Guilford Press). As predicted, global mental toughness was associated with self-concept positivity, which was particularly high in individuals with positive-integrative self-organisation (individuals who distribute positive and negative self-attributes evenly across multiple selves). Specifically, positive integration was associated with constancy (commitment to goal achievement despite obstacles and the potential for failure), which extends presumably from positive integratives' emotional stability and drive to resolve negative self-beliefs.

  20. 大学生自我概念研究概述%Research on Self-concept of College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊永兵; 王俊萍

    2011-01-01

    Self-concept is one of the important propositions of the modem psychology research. From self evolution, the self-concept may decide whether self-development and self-perfecting process is strong or weak and positive or negative. Its development level marks the sound personality, and has an important effect on the healthy development of personality. This paper focuses on the structure and the characteristic of college students' self-concept hoping for promoting further research on it.%自我概念是现代心理学研究中的重要命题之一,是从自我沿革而来,自我概念可决定自我发展和自我完善过程的强弱以及积极还是消极,其发展水平标志着人格的健全程度,对人格的健康发展有着重要的影响.本文主要对大学生自我概念的结构及特点研究情况进行梳理,以期能对大学生自我概念进一步研究有所启发.

  1. The self-perception of a learning disability and its relationship to academic self-concept and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, W B

    1990-10-01

    Eighty-seven children with learning disabilities, aged 9 through 11 years 11 months, completed measures of self-esteem, academic self-concept, and self-perception of their learning disability. The Self-Perception of Learning Disability (SPLD) instrument measures the extent to which children with learning disabilities perceive their disability as (a) delimited rather than global, (b) modifiable rather than permanently limiting, and (c) not stigmatizing. It was hypothesized that self-perception of one's learning disability would be related positively to both academic self-concept and self-esteem, and that each of these relationships would remain significant when controlling for sex, ethnicity, age, reading and math achievement, self-contained versus mainstreamed classroom setting, and age at diagnosis. Correlations and multiple regression analyses confirmed these hypotheses. Results were discussed in terms of helping children to develop less negative self-perceptions of their disabilities.

  2. An explanatory model of academic achievement based on aptitudes, goal orientations, self-concept and learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñano Pérez, Pablo; Castejón Costa, Juan-Luis; Gilar Corbí, Raquel

    2012-03-01

    As a result of studies examining factors involved in the learning process, various structural models have been developed to explain the direct and indirect effects that occur between the variables in these models. The objective was to evaluate a structural model of cognitive and motivational variables predicting academic achievement, including general intelligence, academic self-concept, goal orientations, effort and learning strategies. The sample comprised of 341 Spanish students in the first year of compulsory secondary education. Different tests and questionnaires were used to evaluate each variable, and Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was applied to contrast the relationships of the initial model. The model proposed had a satisfactory fit, and all the hypothesised relationships were significant. General intelligence was the variable most able to explain academic achievement. Also important was the direct influence of academic self-concept on achievement, goal orientations and effort, as well as the mediating ability of effort and learning strategies between academic goals and final achievement.

  3. The Academic Self-Concept of African American and Latina(o) Men and Women in STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Lorelle L.

    If we are to respond to the call for equity in the representation of minority men and women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines, we must be concerned with those college experiences that impact students' sense of self. This study addresses the 4-year development of academic self-concept for African American and Latina(o) students graduating with STEM degrees, with an emphasis placed on gender differences. Ordinary Least Squares regression was utilized to explore predictors of academic self-concept for male and female students. Findings emphasize the paramount role of the college environment as compared to background and precollege characteristics. Significant predictors exclusive to women include having positive academic self-expectations and valuing group work in a classroom setting. Significant predictors for men include being given the opportunity to work on a professor's research project and finding satisfaction with science and math coursework.

  4. Effect of Weight Training on Self-Concept: A Profile of Those Influenced Most.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Larry A.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted to: (1) determine the effect of a four-month weight training program on college males' self-concepts; and (2) identify the types, in terms of extroversion, neuroticism, body cathexis, somatotype, and muscular strength, who benefit most. Training generally favorably affected self-concept. (Author/PP)

  5. Perceived Attachment Security to Father, Academic Self-Concept and School Performance in Language Mastery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacro, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations between 8-12-year-olds' perceived attachment security to father, academic self-concept and school performance in language mastery. One hundred and twenty two French students' perceptions of attachment to mother and to father were explored with the Security Scale and their academic self-concept was assessed with…

  6. A Structural Equation Modelling of the Academic Self-Concept Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matovu, Musa

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at validating the academic self-concept scale by Liu and Wang (2005) in measuring academic self-concept among university students. Structural equation modelling was used to validate the scale which was composed of two subscales; academic confidence and academic effort. The study was conducted on university students; males and…

  7. Preservice Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Its Relation to Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulick, Isabell; Großschedl, Jörg; Harms, Ute; Möller, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the factorial structure of preservice teachers' academic self-concept with regard to three domains of professional knowledge (content knowledge [CK], pedagogical content knowledge [PCK], and pedagogical/psychological knowledge [PPK]). We also analyzed the relation between preservice teachers' academic self-concept and their…

  8. A Psychometric Investigation of the Academic Self-Concept of Asian American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, Kevin; Patel, Nima

    2007-01-01

    The psychometric properties of scores from the Academic Self-Concept Scale are examined in a group of 198 Asian American college students. Using parallel analysis, a four-factor solution accounting for 46% of the variance was found. In a test of construct validity, academic self-concept was found to be negatively related to adherence to Asian…

  9. A Structural Equation Modelling of the Academic Self-Concept Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa MATOVU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at validating the academic self-concept scale by Liu and Wang (2005 in measuring academic self-concept among university students. Structural equation modelling was used to validate the scale which was composed of two subscales; academic confidence and academic effort. The study was conducted on university students; males and females from different levels of study and faculties. In this study the influence of academic self-concept on academic achievement was assessed, tested whether the hypothesised model fitted the data, analysed the invariance of the path coefficients among the moderating variables, and also, highlighted whether academic confidence and academic effort measured academic self-concept. The results from the model revealed that academic self-concept influenced academic achievement and the hypothesised model fitted the data. The results also supported the model as the causal structure was not sensitive to gender, levels of study, and faculties of students; hence, applicable to all the groups taken as moderating variables. It was also noted that academic confidence and academic effort are a measure of academic self-concept. According to the results the academic self-concept scale by Liu and Wang (2005 was deemed adequate in collecting information about academic self-concept among university students.

  10. Study on Correlation of English Pronunciation Self-Concept to English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Zhang, Shengqi; Li, Yucong; Zhao, Miqiang

    2013-01-01

    English pronunciation self-concept is formed in the process of pronunciation learning, which refers to the learners' self-conception and assessment of one's English pronunciation proficiency and pronunciation (Gimson, A. C. 1980). This paper reports an investigation on 237 non-English major college students into the relationship between English…

  11. The Effects of a Museum Art Program on the Self-Concept of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Ryan; Rinehardt, Eric; Hine, Hank; Wilkinson, Berney; Tush, Peter; Mead, Bethany; Fernandez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that art programs have positive therapeutic effects on children, including improved self-concept. This pretest/posttest intervention study examined changes in self-concept in children (N = 176) who participated in an art program at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. Results indicated significant, positive increases in…

  12. A Longitudinal Study of Depressive Symptomology and Self-Concept in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Marjorie; Enders, Craig; Dietz, Samantha; Dixon, Jennifer; Cavendish, Wendy Morrison

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the trajectories of depressive symptomology and self-concept in adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17 and to determine whether primary school teacher ratings of adaptive and maladaptive behavior predict self-reported depressive symptoms and self-concept in adolescence. This study is part of an…

  13. Clinical Correlates and Mediators of Self-Concept in Youth with Chronic Tic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Camille E; McGuire, Joseph F; Lewin, Adam B; Storch, Eric A; Murphy, Tanya K

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the clinical correlates and mediators of self-concept in youth with Chronic Tic Disorders (CTD). Ninety-seven youth aged 6-17 (M = 11.1 ± 2.89; 79.4 % male) with CTD were administered the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale, the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale-Second Edition, and self-report and clinician-administered measures assessing behavioral and psychological difficulties and comorbid conditions. Youth with CTD had a slightly below average level of self-concept, with 20 % (n = 19) exhibiting low self-concept. Youth with CTD-only had greater self-concept relative to youth with CTD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (p = 0.04) or CTD, OCD, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) combined (p = 0.009). Medium-to-large-sized associations were observed between youth's self-concept and clinical characteristics (e.g., severity of ADHD, OCD and depressive symptoms). Youth's self-concept partially mediated the relationship between tic severity and depressive symptom severity, and the interaction between tic impairment and youth's reliance on avoidant coping strategies moderated youth's self-concept. Implications, limitations, and recommendations for future interventions are discussed.

  14. The Meaning of Self-Concept in a Sheltered Workshop Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetlin, Andrea G.; And Others

    Systematic observations and ratings by self and others were part of an ethnographic approach to studying the self-concept of 48 severely to mildly mentally retarded adults in a sheltered workshop setting. Ss completed both the Self-Esteem Inventory for Adults and "The Way I Feel About Myself" Self-Concept Scale. Rehabilitation counselors completed…

  15. Study of the Relationship Between Nurse Self-Concept and Clinical Performance Among Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Badiyepeymaie Jahromi; Kargar; Ramezanli

    2015-01-01

    Background Scholars believe that if nursing students appreciate the value of their services, their sense of professionalism will increase and performance will improve. Nevertheless, little is known about the relationship between nursing students’ professional self-concept and clinical performance. Objectives This study examines the relationship between nurse self-concept and clinical performance among nursing students. ...

  16. Study of the Relationship Between Nurse Self-Concept and Clinical Performance Among Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badiyepeymaie Jahromi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Scholars believe that if nursing students appreciate the value of their services, their sense of professionalism will increase and performance will improve. Nevertheless, little is known about the relationship between nursing students’ professional self-concept and clinical performance. Objectives This study examines the relationship between nurse self-concept and clinical performance among nursing students. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional analytical study employed the census method. The sample comprised 86 senior and junior nursing students at Jahrom university of medical sciences. Nurse self-concept and clinical performance were measured by using the nurses’ self-concept questionnaire (NSCQ, and the 6-dimension scale of nurse performance (6-DSNP, respectively. Results The mean and standard deviation of nurse self-concept and clinical performance scores were 5.46 ± 1.11 and 2.94 ± 1.45, respectively. Nurse self-concept was related to clinical performance (r = 0.24, P = 0.02. Total NSCQ scores were significantly related to four of the 6-DSNP dimensions: planning and evaluation, interpersonal relations and communication, critical care, and leadership. Conclusions Attempts should be made to enhance students’ nurse self-concept during their education. Counseling, improving public respect for nurses, and implementing measures to enhance students’ professional self-concept are essential for improving their performance.

  17. Paranoia and self-concepts in psychosis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiernan, Bridget; Tracey, Rebecca; Shannon, Ciaran

    2014-05-30

    The purpose of the present study was to review systematically, research exploring the relationship between self-concepts and paranoia in psychosis. A literature search was performed by two independent raters in relevant databases (MedLine, PsychInfo and Web of Science) and articles meeting the inclusion criteria were cross-referenced. Following scrutiny according to inclusion criteria, 18 studies were selected for review. A narrative synthesis of findings, in which methodological variability is discussed, is presented relative to three key areas: the nature of the relationship between paranoia and self-concepts; the association between paranoia and discrepancies in self-concepts; the nature of the relationship between paranoia and self-concepts when other, dimensional aspects of these constructs are taken into account. The systematic literature review indicated relatively consistent findings, that paranoia is associated with more negative self-concepts when measured cross-sectionally. Results are somewhat more mixed in regards to research on paranoia and self-concept discrepancies. Studies investigating dimensional aspects of self-concepts and paranoia yield findings of particular interest, especially in regards to the association indicated between instability of self-concepts and paranoia. Limitations in research and of the present systematic review are discussed. Clinical and theoretical implications of findings are outlined and possible directions for future research are suggested.

  18. The Impact of Divorce and Subsequent Father Absence on Children's and Adolescents' Self-Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Thomas S.; Taylor, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Over 400 students, grades 3-8, who had experienced father loss through divorce and whose mothers had not remarried demonstrated significantly lower self-concepts than those who were from intact families. Students whose mothers had remarried had slightly lower self-concepts than those from intact families. (Author/CP)

  19. Longitudinal Study of Preadolescent Sport Self-Concept and Performance: Reciprocal Effects and Causal Ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Gerlach, Erin; Trautwein, Ulrich; Ludtke, Oliver; Brettschneider, Wolf-Dietrich

    2007-01-01

    Do preadolescent sport self-concepts influence subsequent sport performance? Longitudinal data (Grades 3, 4, and 6) for young boys and girls (N = 1,135; mean age = 9.67) were used to test reciprocal effects model (REM) predictions that sport self-concept is both a cause and a consequence of sport accomplishments. Controlling prior sport…

  20. The Self-Concept of Women in Educational and Student Affairs Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nancy J.

    1986-01-01

    Examined the self-concept of women engaged in careers in educational and student affairs administration. Interviews were conducted with 48 women involved in administration in Indiana. These women exhibited positive self-concepts incorporating both stereotypically masculine and feminine qualities. Differences in self-descriptors were associated…

  1. Self-concept and self-esteem after acquired brain injury: a control group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie; Kelly, Amber; Couchman, Grace

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the multidimensional self-concept, global self-esteem and psychological adjustment of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) as compared with healthy controls. Group comparison on self-report questionnaires. Forty-one individuals who had sustained a TBI were compared with an age- and gender-matched sample of 41 trauma-free control participants on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (second edition) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS). Participants with TBI rated significantly lower mean levels of global self-esteem and self-concept on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale and Tennessee Self Concept Scale than the control group. Survivors of TBI rated themselves more poorly on a range of self-dimensions, including social, family, academic/work and personal self-concept compared to controls. They also reported higher mean levels of depression and anxiety on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Overall self-concept was most strongly associated with depressive symptoms and anxiety. Self-concept may be lowered following TBI and is associated with negative emotional consequences. Clinicians may improve the emotional adjustment of survivors of TBI by considering particular dimensions of self-concept for intervention focus.

  2. Relations between Academic Achievement and Self-Concept among Adolescent Students with Disabilities over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emenheiser, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that academic achievement and self-concept among adolescents in the general education population are positively related (e.g., Huang, 2011). For students with disabilities, however, the correlation between academic achievement and self-concept is sometimes negative and non-significant (Daniel & King, 1995; Feiwell,…

  3. Adolescents and Music Media: Toward an Involvement-Mediational Model of Consumption and Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Michelle; Rodgers, Kathleen Boyce; Power, Thomas; Austin, Erica Weintraub; Hill, Laura Griner

    2010-01-01

    Using social cognitive theory and structural regression modeling, we examined pathways between early adolescents' music media consumption, involvement with music media, and 3 domains of self-concept (physical appearance, romantic appeal, and global self-worth; N=124). A mediational model was supported for 2 domains of self-concept. Music media…

  4. Effects of Summer Programs on the Self-Concepts of Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolloff, Penny Britton; Moore, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    The self-concepts of 508 gifted students in grades 5-10 who participated in 3 summer residential programs were examined. Self-concept scores across all grade levels and programs were significantly higher at the end of the programs, compared to the beginning. In one program the scores of sixth-grade boys declined somewhat. (Author/JDD)

  5. Structure of Physical Self-Concept: Elite Athletes and Physical Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    The Physical Self-Description Questionnaire (PSDQ) was administered to 1,514 elite athletes and nonelite high school students. Physical self-concept was higher for the elite athletes, but gender differences were smaller in this group. Results support the usefulness of the PSDQ and extend understanding of self-concept in school settings. (SLD)

  6. Mother-Child Play: Children with Down Syndrome and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, P.; de Falco, S.; Esposito, G.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2009-01-01

    Child solitary and collaborative mother-child play with 21 children with Down syndrome and 33 mental-age-matched typically developing children were compared. In solitary play, children with Down syndrome showed less exploratory but similar symbolic play compared to typically developing children. From solitary to collaborative play, children with…

  7. Reading self-concept and Arab-American students: a three-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M; Abushihab, Eiman F

    2008-02-01

    Data were collected over a 3-yr. period from 110 Arab-American students, 38 boys and 72 girls, whose ages ranged between 9 and 12 years (M = 10.6 yr., SD = 1.1) and who were living in the USA and attending a private Arabic/Islamic weekend Sunday school. A self-report questionnaire, the Reading Self-concept scale of the Self-description Questionnaire, measuring students' perceptions of their reading self-concept was translated from English to Arabic and administered on the present sample in both languages. Although these students scored high on both versions, analysis showed that they scored significantly higher on the English reading self-concept than the Arabic reading self-concept. The English and Arabic reading self-concepts were highly correlated. Results were discussed in terms of providing appropriate reading programs for especially the boys, parents' education and expectations, and the Quran.

  8. Academic Self-Concept in Black Adolescents: Do Race and Gender Stereotypes Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ashley B; Copping, Kristi; Rowley, Stephanie J; Kurtz-Costes, Beth

    2011-04-01

    We examined the relation between race- and gender-group competence ratings and academic self-concept in 252 Black seventh- and eighth-graders. On average, youth reported traditional race stereotypes, whereas gender stereotypes were traditional about verbal abilities and were nontraditional regarding math/science abilities. Among boys, in-group gender and in-group race-based competence ratings (i.e. ratings of boys and Blacks) were related to math/science and verbal self-concepts. However, only gender-based ratings (i.e. ratings of girls' abilities for reading/writing) were related to girls' self-concepts. These findings suggest that the influence of race stereotypes on Black adolescents' academic self-concepts is different for girls than boys. Whereas self-relevant gender groups were associated with both Black girls' and boys' academic self-concept, race-based competence ratings were only relevant for the academic self-views of Black boys.

  9. Correlation of Self Concept and Students’ Motivation at University of Cokroaminoto Palopo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Adiwijaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Self – concept and motivation are two important terms in educational world. Self concept is a one of dominant factor influences the students motivation in learning Englsih as foreign or second language. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe: the correlation between self concept and students’ motivation at English students of Cokroaminoto Palopo University. The research used correlational design. The population was the sixth semester of English Departement of Cokroaminoto Palopo University. The sample of this research was selected by using random sampling. The collection of the data was done by using questionnaire. The result of the research shows that there is a significant correlation between self concept and students motivation in learning English at English Departement of Cokroaminoto Palopo University. It can be concluded that the correlation between self concept and students’ motivation is significant. The significant was smaller than 0.05 . it indicates that if self concept of students increases, therefore students motivation also increases.

  10. Ecocultural effects on self-concept. A study with young indigenous people from different sociodemographic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Guitart, Moisès; Borke, Jörn; Monreal-Bosch, Pilar

    2015-08-01

    This study explores self-concept among indigenous young people from different ecocultural niches in Chiapas (Mexico) through a particular self-concept task. Previous theory and research has described 3 cultural models linked with specific sociodemographic settings that foster particular psychologies. Our aim was to compare the results of the self-concept test among indigenous groups from different sociodemographic settings in order to observed possible differences. We predicted that individuals from rural communities with little formal education (hypothesised to be Interdependent) would have self-concepts with more social and less personal components than would those with an urban, highly educated (hypothesised to be Independent), and we expected a third group of highly educated young people living in an urban context but with a rural background (hypothesised to be autonomous-related group) to value social and personal components equally. The results supported this hypothesis. Based on ecocultural theory, it is suggested that sociodemographic contexts affect the self-concept.

  11. Parenting stress, perceived parenting behaviors, and adolescent self-concept in European American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnick, Diane L; Bornstein, Marc H; Hendricks, Charlene; Painter, Kathleen M; Suwalsky, Joan T D; Collins, W Andrew

    2008-10-01

    This study assesses whether the stresses associated with parenting a child are indirectly related to adolescent self-concept through parenting behaviors. We examined longitudinal associations among mothers' and fathers' parenting stress at age 10, children's perceptions of parenting at age 10, and adolescents' self-concept at age 14 in 120 European American families. Mothers' and fathers' parenting stress was related to children's perceptions of acceptance and psychologically controlling behavior, and psychologically controlling behavior (and lax control for fathers) was related to adolescent self-concept. We further examined which domains of parenting stress and perceived parenting behaviors were associated with adolescents' scholastic competence, social acceptance, physical appearance, and behavioral conduct. Parenting stress was related to specific parenting behaviors, which were, in turn, related to specific domains of self-concept in adolescence. Parenting stress appears to exert its effects on early adolescent self-concept indirectly through perceived parenting behavior.

  12. Playing with expectations: a contextual view of humor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Airenti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developmental literature it has been advanced that young children would not understand the specificity of nonliteral communicative acts. In this article I shall focus on young children’s ability to produce and understand different forms of humor. I shall explore children’s acquisition of the communicative contexts that constitute the background enabling them to perform humorous interactions before being able to analyze them in the terms allowed by a full fledged ToM. I consider that different forms of humor share a number of basic features and that we can draw a continuum from simple forms to sophisticated ones. In particular I shall focus on teasing, a form of humor already present in preverbal infants but also considered as a typical feature of irony. I shall argue that all forms of humor can be described in the terms of a kind of interaction that I propose to call playing with expectations.

  13. Developing and Understanding Intelligent Contexts for Playing and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2009-01-01

    This short paper outlines experiences and reflections on the research and development project “Octopus” in order to describe and illustrate how intelligent context facilitates and embody learning. The framework is a research and development project where we have tried to work with new kinds of ta...

  14. Early Learning and Development: Cultural-Historical Concepts in Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    "Early Learning and Development" provides a unique synthesis of cultural-historical theory from Vygotsky, Elkonin and Leontiev in the 20th century to the ground-breaking research of scholars such as Siraj-Blatchford, Kratsova and Hedegaard today. It demonstrates how development and learning are culturally embedded and institutionally defined, and…

  15. Developmental experiences during extracurricular activities and Australian adolescents' self-concept: particularly important for youth from disadvantaged schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, Corey J; Barber, Bonnie L

    2011-05-01

    Extracurricular activities provide adolescents with a number of positive personal and interpersonal developmental experiences. This study investigated whether developmental experiences that occurred during extracurricular activities were linked to a more positive self-concept for Australian adolescents, and whether this link was particularly salient for youth from disadvantaged schools. Adolescents (N = 1,504, 56% Female) from 26 diverse high schools across Western Australia were surveyed. The findings revealed that adolescents from low socio-economic status schools who participated in extracurricular activities had a more positive general self-worth and social self-concept than adolescents from similar socio-economic schools who did not participate in any extracurricular activities. Furthermore, the positive developmental experiences that occurred during extracurricular activities predicted a more positive general self-worth and social and academic self-concept, and this link was stronger for youth from low SES schools. These findings suggest that the developmental experiences afforded by extracurricular activities may foster positive adolescent development.

  16. Racial microstressors, racial self-concept, and depressive symptoms among male African Americans during the transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Steven M; Yu, Tianyi; Allen, Kimberly A; Brody, Gene H

    2015-04-01

    Racial discrimination is a pervasive stressor that can undermine mental health among African American youth and young adults. Several studies identify links between racial discrimination and depressive symptoms; however, this research base does not focus on male African American youth who experience significant racism-related stress during the transition to young adulthood. Moreover, few prospective studies consider significant confounding variables that affect exposure to and perception of discriminatory treatment. In response to this need, we examined the effect of exposure to racial discrimination from ages 16 to 18 on depressive symptoms among male African Americans at age 20. Racial self-concept, one's sense of positivity about one's race, was examined as a mediator and self-control as a moderator. Hypotheses were tested with 222 participants, age 16 at baseline and age 20 at the endpoint. Participants provided self-report data at five time points. Exposure to racial discrimination from ages 16 to 18 predicted depressive symptoms at age 20, net of confounding influences. Racial self-concept mediated this effect. Self-control moderated the influence of discrimination on racial self-concept. This study underscores the salience of racial discrimination in the development of depressive symptoms among African American male youth and the clinical utility of interventions targeting racial pride and self-control.

  17. Enhancing Children's Development through Play: a Task that Must ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    tongue or the language of the immediate community and to this end will: Vol. ... and cognitive development of children and in essence it is a learning experience. ... degree of social acceptance children enjoy will determine the length of time.

  18. Parliamentarians play key role in linking population and social development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Hirofunti Ando, Deputy Executive Director of the UNFPA, delivered the statement of Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the UNFPA at the International Meeting of Parliamentarians on Population and Social Development. The International Conference of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (ICPPD) in Cairo in September 1994 made a significant impact on the attitudes and support of parliamentarians regarding population issues. The Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (AFPPD) brought together a group of parliamentarians from all over the world to discuss population issues and social development. The World Summit included in its deliberations the accumulated experiences of earlier international conferences dealing with social economic issues. The ICPD Program of Action addressed concerns relevant to the agenda of the Social Summit: the crucial contribution that early population stabilization will make towards the attainment of sustainable development; the significant role of integrated policies on population and development in creating employment; the importance of population policies and programs in alleviating poverty; the contributions of reproductive health policies, including high-quality family planning services, to the enhancement of the status of women and to the achievement of gender equality; the synergy between education, family planning, and the general improvement of the human condition; and the relationship between population pressures, poverty, and environmental degradation. The ICPD Program of Action also identified critically important population and development objectives, such as ensuring access to education, especially of girls; reducing infant, child, and maternal mortality; and providing universal access to reproductive health and family planning services. Now the challenge is to mobilize the necessary resources for the Social Summit.

  19. Developing and Understanding Intelligent Contexts for Playing and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2009-01-01

    This short paper outlines experiences and reflections on the research and development project “Octopus” in order to describe and illustrate how intelligent context facilitates and embody learning. The framework is a research and development project where we have tried to work with new kinds...... of tangible learning media and develop didactic approaches for teachers in primary school and furthermore to use the user experiences in a structured process where children participated in the innovation process. This has raised a fundamental question: How should we understand the relationship between......, embodiment, intelligent contexts, structure and flow. This paper does this through Bachtins concept of “Chronotopos” or how time and space influence and structure experience and learning....

  20. The self-regulated nature of self-concept and the Life World – investigating the process of personal change and transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Smith

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the systemic (dynamic nature of self-concept to determine how the experience, and associated understandings, of change(s in self-concept might be researched amongst Beginning Teachers (BT’s who are undertaking a long course of education and training. Self-concept has been extensively researched over many years and across a large number of fields; formulating a coherent overview of the topic has been difficult, however, because of the varied traditions and perspectives operating within different research communities. By adopting an approach similar to that used by Sternberg; this paper attempts to identify and map the many metaphors relating to self-concept according to their systemic properties, ie, structure, pattern and process, also their internal, external and boundary relationships within the individual person. The paper then examines self-regulation as a key feature of the autopoietic self, a systems based view of the human as a self-bounded, self-regulating and self-perpetuating entity, and develops a systemic perspective of self-concept as the basis for an integrated conceptual framework. This, essentially descriptive, view of self-concept is then further developed by introducing two process based ideas from Life Span Developmental Psychology – the notion of the life course as a evolving structure and the concept of the developmental life task. The paper ends by examining the role of possible selves as the dynamic force that ‘powers’ the process of everyday living and suggests ways in which the original research question might be further investigated.

  1. Aspects of self-concept and their relationship to language performance and verbal reasoning ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermitzaki, I; Efklides, A

    2000-01-01

    It has been claimed that self-concept is multidimensional, with dimensions such as mathematical self-concept and self-concept in language. The present study investigated the relationship of academic self-concept in language with performance on school-related language tasks and verbal reasoning ability. A total of 512 students in grades 7, 9, and 11 rated four aspects of their academic self-concept in language: self-perception, self-efficacy, self-esteem, and others' perception of their abilities. Verbal reasoning ability and performance on language tasks were assessed. Path analysis showed that performance on language tasks was influenced strongly by verbal reasoning abilities. Self-esteem and others' perception of one's abilities were affected directly by language performance. No direct relationship was found between academic self-concept in language and verbal reasoning ability. The results suggest that adolescents do not construe their academic self-concept according to their abilities but according to their performance in school and others' response to it.

  2. Self-concept clarity and religious orientations: prediction of purpose in life and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażek, Magdalena; Besta, Tomasz

    2012-09-01

    The present study concerns the relationship between self-concept clarity, religiosity, and well-being, as well as the mediating influence of religiosity on the relationship between self-concept clarity and sense of meaning in life and self-esteem. Self-concept clarity was found to be a significant predictor of sense of meaning in life and self-esteem; intrinsic religious orientation was found to be a predictor of sense of meaning in life, while the quest religious orientation was a predictor for self-esteem. The cross-products of self-concept clarity and intrinsic religious orientation were found to be related to the sense of purpose in life, which would point to religiosity being a mediator of the relationship between self-concept clarity and sense of purpose in life. The cross-products of self-concept clarity and quest religious orientation were found to be a predictor of self-esteem, which indicates a mediating effect of this religious orientation in the relationship of self-concept clarity and self-esteem.

  3. Relationships with mother, teacher, and peers: unique and joint effects on young children's self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschueren, Karine; Doumen, Sarah; Buyse, Evelien

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the unique and joint effects of three significant relationships in young children's social lives, namely their relationships with mother, teacher, and peers, on three dimensions of self-concept (general, academic, and social). A sample of 113 children participated. Mother-child attachment quality was observed in preschool. In first grade, teacher ratings of teacher-child relationship quality, peer ratings of peer acceptance, and child reports of self-concept were administered. The results revealed domain-specific links between social relationships and self-concept dimensions. Specifically, academic self-concept related to teacher-child relationship quality, social self-concept to peer acceptance, and general self-concept to the quality of attachment to mother. Moreover, an indirect effect was revealed of earlier mother-child attachment quality on the academic dimension of self through its effect on current adult-child relationships in school. This way, the study uncovered the pathways through which significant social relationships shape the formation of young children's self-concept.

  4. Academic self-concept in high school: predictors and effects on adjustment in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sofie; Germeijs, Veerle; Colpin, Hilde; Verschueren, Karine

    2011-12-01

    Academic self-concept is considered a relevant psychological construct influencing many educational outcomes directly or indirectly. Therefore, the major focus of the current study is on the predictors and effects of academic self-concept in late adolescence. First, we studied the simultaneous effects of individual, class-average and school-average achievement (i.e., assessed by school grades) on academic self-concept in the final year of high school, thereby replicating and extending previous research on the big-fish-little-pond effect model. Second, the predictive value of high school academic self-concept for academic adjustment and success in the first year of higher education was examined. The sample comprised 536 twelfth grade students (44% boys) recruited from 24 schools (67 classes) that were representative with regard to geographical region and educational network in Flanders. Structural equation modeling showed that, when examining the joint contribution of school- and class-average achievement, only class-average achievement was significantly and negatively associated with academic self-concept. Furthermore, a significant effect of academic self-concept in high school on academic adjustment and success in higher education (in addition to any effects of high school academic achievement) was found. These results highlight the importance of considering academic self-concept in educational research and policy.

  5. Self-esteem, academic self-concept, and aggression at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Laramie D; Davis-Kean, Pamela; Malanchuk, Oksana

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the relation between academic self-concept, self-esteem, and aggression at school. Longitudinal data from a racially diverse sample of middle-school students were analyzed to explore how academic self-concept influenced the likelihood of aggressing at school and whether high self-concept exerted a different pattern of influence when threatened. Data include self-reported academic self-concept, school-reported academic performance, and parent-reported school discipline. Results suggest that, in general, students with low self-concept in achievement domains are more likely to aggress at school than those with high self-concept. However, there is a small sample of youth who, when they receive contradictory information that threatens their reported self-concept, do aggress. Global self-esteem was not found to be predictive of aggression. These results are discussed in the context of recent debates on whether self-esteem is a predictor of aggression and the use of a more proximal vs. general self-measure in examining the self-esteem and aggression relation.

  6. Comparative study based on the physical self-concept in teenagers regarding gender and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Molero López-Barajas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this article are to evaluate the physical self-concept in adolescence and to get to know the outcomes in the perceptions of the different dimensions in the physical self-concept. Furthermore, we aim to check the existence of noticeable differences in the outcomes regarding gender variables and regarding the level of physical activity of those polled. The sample consists of 81 individuals divided in two groups: secondary school teenager students and swimmers in adolescence. We use the Physical Self-concept Questionnaire (PSQ as a tool for getting information; there are six scales: physical skills, physical conditions, physical charming, strength, and general physical self-concept. We use the Physical Self-concept Questionnaire (PSQ as an instrument of collection of information which consists of 6 different scales: physical skills, physical condition, physical attractiveness, strength and general self-concept. We will show the results in two different analysis of the variant. In the first one we have found remarkable differences as far as the statistic point of view is concerned in gender perceptions in the scales of physical skills, physical condition, strength and general physical self-concept in favour of men (p<0,05. In the second analysis we have checked the existence of noticeable differences between the two groups of young people within the scales of physical skills and strength in favour of those who practice physical activity regularly (p<0,05.

  7. Self-concept as a significant determinant of brand choice and consumer buying behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starčević Slađana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to predict consumer behavior outcomes is considered to be a very important issue for marketers. Today, one of the most popular psychological constructs in social sciences and marketing is the self-concept, as the total sum of ideas, thoughts and feelings through which individual can describe themselves in regards to other individuals in socially determined environment. The importance of self-concept in predicting consumer behavior and choice of brands has been recognized by many researchers. People tend to maintain and reinforce their self-concept by consumption of brands that have an image and personality in accordance to their own self-concept. Many studies have confirmed that high level of congruency between brand image/personality and consumer self-concept have positive influence on brand attitudes, preferences, evaluation of brands, buying intentions, satisfaction and brand loyalty. In this study, we have researched how has self-concept, as a psychological construct, gained in importance in the field of marketing research and practice. The concept is analyzed simultaneously as a psychological and marketing construct. By presenting literature review, we have also analysed the consequences of congruence between brand image/brand personality and consumer self-concept on consumer behavior and choice of brands. We have also pointed out the significance and references connected with the use of this concept for practical purposes in the realm of brand management. .

  8. Haptic Glove Technology: Skill Development through Video Game Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargerhuff, Mary Ellen; Cowan, Heidi; Oliveira, Francisco; Quek, Francis; Fang, Bing

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a recently developed haptic glove system and describes how the participants used a video game that was purposely designed to train them in skills that are needed for the efficient use of the haptic glove. Assessed skills included speed, efficiency, embodied skill, and engagement. The findings and implications for future…

  9. DNA methylation plays a crucial role during early Nasonia development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, M. V.; Verhulst, E. C.; Zwahlen, R. D.; Beukeboom, L. W.; van de Zande, L.

    2012-01-01

    Although the role of DNA methylation in insect development is still poorly understood, the number and role of DNA methyltransferases in insects vary strongly between species. DNA methylation appears to be widely present among the social hymenoptera and functional studies in Apis have suggested a cru

  10. Adaptive Role-Play Exercises for a Leader Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    effort addresses development of high-level requirements such that shipboard content management system functionality can be implemented using SCORM and...ALS) is composed of a simplistic Learner Management System (LMS), a simplistic Learning Content Management System (LCMS) and a reference Simulation

  11. [Self-concept level in children with burns sequelae: A comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo C, Carmen; Santander M, Dolores; Solís F, Fresia

    2015-01-01

    Self-concept is the set of ideas and attitudes that a person has about him/herself. To evaluate whether there are differences in the level of self-concept in children 8-12 years old with and without burns sequelae. To identify predictive variables of self-concept in children with sequelae. A comparative cross-sectional study of self-concept in 109 children with burns sequelae, from 8 to 12 years old, with 109 children without burns sequelae, and of the same age and socioeconomic status. The Piers-Harris self-concept scale is used, which provides a general measurement of self-concept and behavioural, intellectual and school status, appearance, and physical attributes, anxiety, popularity, happiness and satisfaction dimensions. There were no significant differences in the level of general self-concept or their dimensions (P>.05). In the group with burns sequelae, the protective factor was the variable number of sequels was associated with the dimensions of anxiety, popularity, happiness-satisfaction and general self-concept. The location variable emerged as a risk factor for the behavioural dimension. The absence of differences in self-concept between children with burns sequelae and children without them is similar to that reported in the literature. The finding in the risk and protective factors encourages to further research, and perhaps incorporating pre-morbidity and family background. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Implicit attitudes and self-concepts towards transgression and aggression: differences between male community and offender adolescents, and associations with psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Maya; Pihet, Sandrine; de Ridder, Jill; Zimmermann, Grégoire; Stephan, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Research suggests that implicit attitudes play a key role in the occurrence of antisocial behaviours. This study assessed implicit attitudes and self-concepts related to aggression and transgression in community and offender adolescents, using a new set of Implicit Association Tests (IATs), and examined their association with of psychopathic traits. Thirty-six offenders and 66 community adolescents performed 4 IATs assessing 1) implicit attitudes about a) aggression and b) transgression as good, and 2) implicit self-concepts about a) aggression and b) transgression as self-descriptive. They filled in self-report questionnaires: the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory, the Child Behaviour Checklist, and explicit measures of their attitudes and self-concepts towards transgression and aggression. Results showed few differences between community and offender adolescents on implicit attitudes and self-concepts, and unexpected negative associations between some implicit attitudes and psychopathic traits, while the association was positive for the corresponding explicit attitudes. Possible explanations of these findings are discussed.

  13. Gender differences in teachers' behaviors in relation to adolescents' self-concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboya, M M

    1995-12-01

    Gender differences in the relationship between teachers' behaviors and adolescents' self-concepts were investigated in 276 (156 boys and 120 girls) Standard Ten students from two coeducational high schools in Langa, Cape Town, South Africa. The Perceived Teacher Behavior Inventory was used to measure adolescents' self-concepts. Analysis indicated significant differences in perceived teachers' behavior and adolescents' self-description scale scores between boys and girls. Further, students' self-concept dimensions most strongly associated with teachers' behaviors were relations with family, general school, and health.

  14. The Interplay Among Academic Self-Concept, Self-Efficacy, Self-Regulation and Academic Achievement of Higher Education L2 Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan KIRMIZI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-concept, self efficacy, and self-regulation are three important factors that predict the success of L2 learners to a large extent. Therefore, the present study was designed to measure the academic self-concept, self efficacy, self-regulation level of higher education students in relation to academic achievement and self-evaluation and secondarily to investigate the correlation between academic self-concept, selfefficacy, and self-regulation. In the present study, academic self-concept was conceptualized as comprising of two main components: academic confidence and academic effort. The participants of the study are 130 higher education EFL (English as a Foreign Language learners enrolled in English Language and Literature department. Liu and Wang's (2005 academic self-concept scale was used as the main data collection tool. It consists of two sub-scales; academic confidence and academic effort scales. A four-item questionnaire was formed by examining the literature in order to measure self-efficacy and Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ, developed by Pintrich et al. (1991, was used to measure self-regulation beliefs of students. Descriptive, variance, correlation and regression analyses were conducted in order to analyze the data. The results indicated that higher education Turkish EFL learners have a moderate-to-high level of self-concept, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-evaluation. High achieving students were found to have higher levels of selfregulation, self-evaluation and academic confidence. Correlation analysis indicated that all of the variables of the study are highly correlated with academic success and regression analysis revealed that self-efficacy was the most important predictor of academic success.

  15. A developmental examination of the psychometric properties and predictive utility of a revised psychological self-concept measure for preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rongfang; Lang, Sarah N; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J

    2016-02-01

    Accurate assessment of psychological self-concept in early childhood relies on the development of psychometrically sound instruments. From a developmental perspective, the current study revised an existing measure of young children's psychological self-concepts, the Child Self-View Questionnaire (CSVQ; Eder, 1990), and examined its psychometric properties using a sample of preschool-age children assessed at approximately 4 years old with a follow-up at age 5 (N = 111). The item compositions of lower order dimensions were revised, leading to improved internal consistency. Factor analysis revealed 3 latent psychological self-concept factors (i.e., sociability, control, and assurance) from the lower order dimensions. Measurement invariance by gender was supported for sociability and assurance, not for control. Test-retest reliability was supported by stability of the psychological self-concept measurement model during the preschool years, although some evidence of increasing differentiation was obtained. Validity of children's scores on the 3 latent psychological self-concept factors was tested by investigating their concurrent associations with teacher-reported behavioral adjustment on the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation Scale-Short Form (SCBE-SF; LaFreniere & Dumas, 1996). Children who perceived themselves as higher in sociability at 5 years old displayed less internalizing behavior and more social competence; boys who perceived themselves as higher in control at age 4 exhibited lower externalizing behavior; children higher in assurance had greater social competence at age 4, but displayed more externalizing behavior at age 5. Implications relevant to the utility of the revised psychological self-concept measure are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Academic self-concept, academic achievement, and leadership in university students studying in a physical therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Rosemary J; Rogers, Janet L

    2002-01-01

    Students enrolled in a selected admissions program, in which there are a limited number of student positions available, were assessed for academic self-concept using the Dimensions of Self-Concept upon entry into the program. This study was performed to explore whether academic self-concept scores could predict successful completion of an academic program and the impact of self-concept scores on academic achievement and professional leadership.

  17. How Much Do We Know about the Importance of Play in Child Development? Review of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Ling-Ling

    2002-01-01

    Discusses children's play in conjunction with intellectual development, language, and social benefits. Suggests that play develops personality, encourages personal relations, stimulates creativity, adds to happiness, and advances learning. Encourages parents and teachers to provide children with richly varied play experiences to promote cognition,…

  18. A Comparison of Multiple Facets of Self-Concept in Gifted vs. Non-Identified Israeli Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Moshe; Shani-Zinovich, Inbal

    2015-01-01

    This study compares facets of self-concept in gifted and non-identified Israeli adolescent students. The self-concept mean score profile of gifted vs. non-selected Israeli students was significantly different, with gifted students reporting higher mean levels of academic self-concept, but lower mean levels of social, personal, and physical…

  19. The Twofold Multidimensionality of Academic Self-Concept: Domain Specificity and Separation between Competence and Affect Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, A. Katrin; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Craven, Rhonda G.; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Academic self-concept is consistently proven to be multidimensional rather than unidimensional as it is domain specific in nature. However, each specific self-concept domain may be further separated into competence and affect components. This study examines the twofold multidimensionality of academic self-concept (i.e., its domain specificity and…

  20. Discriminant and Incremental Validity of Self-Concept and Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined the discriminant and incremental validity of self-concept and academic self-efficacy. Study 1, which meta-analysed 64 studies comprising 74 independent samples (N = 24,773), found a strong mean correlation of 0.43 between self-concept and academic self-efficacy. The domains of self-concept and self-efficacy, and the domain…

  1. Discriminant and Incremental Validity of Self-Concept and Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined the discriminant and incremental validity of self-concept and academic self-efficacy. Study 1, which meta-analysed 64 studies comprising 74 independent samples (N = 24,773), found a strong mean correlation of 0.43 between self-concept and academic self-efficacy. The domains of self-concept and self-efficacy, and the domain…

  2. The relationship of professional self-concept and job satisfaction among the HIV/AIDS department nurses%艾滋病科护士专业自我概念与工作满意度相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘聪; 胡爱玲; 李俊彬; 农菲; 钟燕萍; 颜婵; 李义青; 徐国红; 杨莉

    2015-01-01

    professional self-concept and a little bit high job satisfaction. Management ability, professional skills, lfexibility, and satisfaction of professional self-concept are the inlfuencing factors of job satisfaction. The hospital should cultivate HIV/AIDS department nurse's positive self-concept to improve their job satisfaction, to give play to nurses' enthusiasm and creativity, and to promote the development of HIV/AIDS care.

  3. Sex differences in self-concept in Spanish secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, M J

    2000-12-01

    The aims of the study were to examine differences between boys and girls in global self-esteem and in specific domains of self-concept. Several measures of global self-esteem and multidimensional self-concept were administered to 61 boys and 64 girls. Analysis showed that boys reported higher scores than girls on global self-esteem, measured on the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory and the Feelings of Inadequacy Scale by Janis-Field, but this result was not reproduced when self-esteem was measured on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. No differences have been found in domain-specific self-concepts, except for the ethical-moral self-concept, on which girls reported higher scores than boys.

  4. Effects of Students' Attitude and Self-Concept on Achievement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Students' Attitude and Self-Concept on Achievement in Senior Secondary ... are said to constitute a great part of the predictors of academic achievement. ... status, students' attitude, personality determinants, peer group influence, ...

  5. A Comparison of Delinquent Prostitutes and Delinquent Non-Prostitutes on Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Daria S.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared social and demographic statistics and self-concept in 50 delinquent females (25 prostitutes and 25 nonprostitutes). Results indicated early sexual intercourse and a positive physical self-image were related to prostitution. (JAC)

  6. 492 Study Habit, Self-Concept and Science Achievement of Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Key Words: Study habit, self-concept, science achievement, public and private schools ... teacher commitment and sometimes better facilities than government schools. ... skills like note-taking, time management, organizing for a test, recording.

  7. Relationships between intrinsic motivation, physical self-concept and satisfaction with life: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Albo, José; Núñez, Juan L; Domínguez, Evelia; León, Jaime; Tomás, José M

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationships between intrinsic motivation, physical self-concept, and satisfaction with life using cross-lagged panel models analysed via structural equation models. The sample consisted of 293 participants (148 men, 145 women) aged 18-70 years who performed diverse types of physical exercise. Three alternative models were tested. The data were better represented by a model in which physical self-concept mediates the relationships between intrinsic motivation and satisfaction with life. Specifically, the direct effects of intrinsic motivation on physical self-concept, and of physical self-concept on satisfaction with life were significant, with the amount of explained variance increasing over time. In conclusion, people who perform physical exercise regularly, and who have fun over time will tend to have a better physical self-perception and, consequently, more psychological well-being.

  8. effects of peer group counselling and sex on the self -concept of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth

    psychologically and socially well adjusted individuals who can compete favourably in the .... public single sex and co-educational Senior Secondary Schools with population .... Self-concept and school achievement: Interaction dynamics and a ...

  9. Linking leader personality traits to motivation to lead: a self-concept approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Lu

    2016-01-01

    ... (narcissism and humility). I proposed that leader traits would influence individuals' motivation to lead through the self-concept construction processes of leadership self-efficacy and positivity in leader identity...

  10. Personal self-concept and satisfaction with life in adolescence, youth and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi Palacios, Eider; Esnaola Echaniz, Igor; Rodríguez Fernández, Arantzazu; Camino Ortiz de Barrón, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to explore the relationships between personal self-concept and satisfaction with life, with the latter as the key indicator for personal adjustment. The study tests a structural model which encompasses four dimensions of self-concept: self-fulfillment, autonomy, honesty and emotions. The 801 participants in the study, all of whom were aged between 15 and 65 (M = 34.03, SD = 17.29), completed the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and the Personal Self-Concept (APE) Questionnaire. Although the four dimensions of personal self-concept differ in their weight, the results show that, taken together, they explain 46% of the differences observed in satisfaction with life. This implies a weight that is as significant as that observed for general self-esteem in previous research studies. This issue should be dealt with early on, during secondary education, in order to help prevent psychological distress or maladjustment.

  11. Longitudinal study of preadolescent sport self-concept and performance: reciprocal effects and causal ordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W; Gerlach, Erin; Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Brettschneider, Wolf-Dietrich

    2007-01-01

    Do preadolescent sport self-concepts influence subsequent sport performance? Longitudinal data (Grades 3, 4, and 6) for young boys and girls (N= 1,135; mean age = 9.67) were used to test reciprocal effects model (REM) predictions that sport self-concept is both a cause and a consequence of sport accomplishments. Controlling prior sport performance (performance-based measures and teacher assessments), prior sport self-concept had positive effects on subsequent sport performance in both Grade 4 and Grade 6 and for both boys and girls. Coupled with previous REM studies of adolescents in the academic domain, this first test for preadolescents in the sport domain supports the generalizability of REM predictions over gender, self-concept domain, preadolescent ages, and the transition from primary to secondary school.

  12. Physical Self-Concept and Physical Activity Enjoyment in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbeck, Annette; Tietjens, Maike; Bund, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined gender differences and relationships of seven specific domains of physical self-concept (PSC) ("Strength," "Endurance," "Speed," "Flexibility," "Coordination," "Global Sport Competence," and "Appearance") and physical activity enjoyment (PAE) in 447…

  13. Personal Capacity Building for the Human Services: The Roles of Curriculum and Individual Differences in Predicting Self-Concept in College/University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Philip D.; Martin, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    While much research has outlined the importance of intra-psychic factors in predicting workplace success, it is rare that attention is given to the development of these factors in training for human service professions (e.g. psychology, clergy, nursing). Accordingly, the present study explores differences in self-concept, a key intra-psychic…

  14. The Relationship Between Social Capital and Self-Concept in Adolescents With Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alijani Renani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Thalassemia is among the most common hematological diseases, but it has no definitive cure. The self-concept in adolescents with thalassemia major changes due to changes in their facial form. Among the factors affecting the patient’s self-concept is social capital. Objectives The study aims to examine the relationship between social capital and self-concept in adolescents with thalassemia major, using a sample of patients admitted to Shafa hospital in Ahvaz, Iran in 2014. Patients and Methods This descriptive-analytical study was performed on 146 adolescents (age range, 13 - 18 years with thalassemia major who were referred to the hemoglobinopathy ward of Shafa hospital in Ahvaz, Iran to receive blood. The sampling method was a census. Data collection was completed using the Onyx and Bullen social capital questionnaire and Piers Harris’s children’s self-concept scale. After obtaining the informed consent of the patients’ parents, questionnaires were handed to patients in different shifts and answered in the presence of the researcher. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics and analytical statistics (mean, std. deviation, and Pearson correlation were carried out (CI 95%. Results The mean and standard deviation of patients’ age was 1.76 ± 15.88. 53.4% were male. 58.7% of the sample had an average self-concept and 63.2% had average social capital. The mean score of the total sample’s self-concept was 11.50 ± 53.36, which is moderate. The average social capital of all adolescents with thalassemia major was 17.02 ± 87.38, i.e. in the mid-range. Among the aspects of self-concept, about 70% of participants had an average or poor appearance, attitude, and anxiety. For social trust, more than 90% of participants were average or weak and 75.2% had poor social participation. The dimensions of fame and popularity, appearance, and happiness all had maximal correlation with social capital (P = 0.0001. All aspects of social

  15. ADOLESCENTS’ SELF-CONCEPT AND SOCIAL STATUS IN THEIR SCHOOL CLASS AND PEER CLIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Ļevina, Jeļena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the relations between multiple aspects of adolescents’ self-concept and various dimensions of their social status in the classroom and in the peer clique. It was found that there was a positive relationship (1) between physical abilities selfconcept and social preference, perceived popularity, and social dominance; (2) between physical appearance self-concept and perceived popularity and social dominance; (3) between oppositesex ...

  16. Humour as a moderator of the relationship between academic expectancy stress and academic self-concept

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    M.A. (Counselling Psychology) A correlation between academic achievement and academic self-concept has been well established during past studies. Academic self-concept may be influenced by the experience of academic stress, especially academic expectancy stress which is stress derived from the expectations of the self and significant others. With debilitating effects that academic expectancy stress may have on students, interventions need to be put in place to assist students in coping wit...

  17. Academic self-concept and emotion relations : domain specificity and age effects

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations between academic self-concepts and the emotions of enjoyment, pride, anxiety, anger, and boredom as experienced in mathematics, physics, German, and English classes (N = 1710; grades 8 and 11). In line with our hypotheses derived from appraisal-based emotion theories and self-efficacy research, within-domain relations between self-concepts and emotions were relatively strong and notably stronger within quantitative domains (mathematics and physics)...

  18. ADOLESCENTS’ SELF-CONCEPT AND SOCIAL STATUS IN THEIR SCHOOL CLASS AND PEER CLIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Ļevina, Jeļena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the relations between multiple aspects of adolescents’ self-concept and various dimensions of their social status in the classroom and in the peer clique. It was found that there was a positive relationship (1) between physical abilities selfconcept and social preference, perceived popularity, and social dominance; (2) between physical appearance self-concept and perceived popularity and social dominance; (3) between oppositesex ...

  19. Prevalence of Asthma in a Portuguese Countryside Town:Repercussions on Absenteeism and Self-Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Borrego, Lm; Leiria-Pinto, P; César, M.; Rosado-Pinto, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Childhood asthma represents an increasing health problem and is the leading cause of hospital admission and absenteeism in children with chronic disease. It also compromises quality of life, eventually contributing to disturbances in self-concept. Self-concept is a recent and global perspective of “the self” and relates to skills, self-image and self-esteem. Little information is available on this topic and there are no data from Portuguese countryside towns. Objective: T...

  20. Prosocial behavior and self-concept of Spanish students of Compulsory Secondary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Cándido J. Inglés; Martínez-González, Agustín Ernesto; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Torregrosa, María S.; Cecilia RUIZ ESTEBAN

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between prosocial behavior and self-concept dimensions in a sample of 2022 Spanish students (51.1% males) of Compulsory Secondary Education. The prosocial behavior was measured with the Prosocial Behavior scale of the Teenage Inventory of Social Skills (TISS) and the self-concept was measured with the Self-Description Questionnaire-II (SDQ-II). Logistic regression analyses revealed that prosocial behavior is a positive and significant statistically predict...

  1. Ability grouping of gifted students : effects on academic self-concept and boredom

    OpenAIRE

    Preckel, Franzis; Götz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the effects of full-time ability grouping on students academic self-evaluations and their experiences of boredom in class within special classes for the gifted. The effect of ability grouping on the academic self-concept of gifted students has been investigated in several studies. Our study addresses a less frequently observed angle of this line of research by focusing on changes in academic self concept over time (longitudinal approach). In addition, our study enha...

  2. CAREER ASPIRATION OF SCHOOL GOING SLUM ADOLESCENTS IN RELATION TO THEIR SELF-CONCEPT

    OpenAIRE

    Parkash Chandra Jena

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to find out the difference in career aspiration of school going slum adolescents in relation to their self-concept. Survey method has been used. The investigator has selected 200 school going slum adolescents from 10 secondary schools by using purposive sampling technique. For collection of data, the investigator has used, self-concept questionnaire by R. K. Saraswat and career aspiration scale constructed by the investigator. For analysis of data the t-test...

  3. Age and gender differences in the relation between self-concept facets and self-esteem

    OpenAIRE

    Arens, A. Katrin; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This study tested whether the gender intensification hypothesis applies to relations between multiple domain-specific self-concept facets and self-esteem. This hypothesis predicts gender-stereotypic differences in these relations and assumes they intensify with age. Furthermore, knowledge about gender-related or age-related differences in self-concept-self-esteem relations might provide valuable knowledge for designing effective self-esteem enhancement interventions. We investigated grade and...

  4. Parenting Stress, Perceived Parenting Behaviors, and Adolescent Self-Concept in European American Families

    OpenAIRE

    Putnick, Diane L.; Bornstein, Marc H.; Hendricks, Charlene; Painter, Kathleen M.; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.; Collins, W. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This study assesses whether the stresses associated with parenting a child are indirectly related to adolescent self-concept through parenting behaviors. We examined longitudinal associations among mothers’ and fathers’ parenting stress at age 10, children’s perceptions of parenting at age 10, and adolescents’ self-concept at age 14 in 120 European American families. Mothers’ and fathers’ parenting stress was related to children’s perceptions of acceptance and psychologically controlling beha...

  5. Profile formation of academic self-concept in elementary school students in grades 1 to 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Isabelle; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Lena; Scherrer, Vsevolod; Wollschläger, Rachel; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Preckel, Franzis

    2017-01-01

    Academic self-concept (ASC) is comprised of individual perceptions of one’s own academic ability. In a cross-sectional quasi-representative sample of 3,779 German elementary school children in grades 1 to 4, we investigated (a) the structure of ASC, (b) ASC profile formation, an aspect of differentiation that is reflected in lower correlations between domain-specific ASCs with increasing grade level, (c) the impact of (internal) dimensional comparisons of one’s own ability in different school subjects for profile formation of ASC, and (d) the role played by differences in school grades between subjects for these dimensional comparisons. The nested Marsh/Shavelson model, with general ASC at the apex and math, writing, and reading ASC as specific factors nested under general ASC fitted the data at all grade levels. A first-order factor model with math, writing, reading, and general ASCs as correlated factors provided a good fit, too. ASC profile formation became apparent during the first two to three years of school. Dimensional comparisons across subjects contributed to ASC profile formation. School grades enhanced these comparisons, especially when achievement profiles were uneven. In part, findings depended on the assumed structural model of ASCs. Implications for further research are discussed with special regard to factors influencing and moderating dimensional comparisons. PMID:28542384

  6. Reciprocal effects between academic self-concept, self-esteem, achievement, and attainment over seven adolescent years: unidimensional and multidimensional perspectives of self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W; O'Mara, Alison

    2008-04-01

    In their influential review, Baumeister, Campbell, Krueger, and Vohs (2003) concluded that self-esteem--the global component of self-concept--has no effect on subsequent academic performance. In contrast, Marsh and Craven's (2006) review of reciprocal effects models from an explicitly multidimensional perspective demonstrated that academic self-concept and achievement are both a cause and an effect of each other. Ironically, both reviews cited classic Youth in Transition studies in support of their respective claims. In definitive tests of these counter claims, the authors reanalyze these data-including self-esteem (emphasized by Baumeister et al.), academic self-concept (emphasized by Marsh & Craven), and postsecondary educational attainment-using stronger statistical methods based on five waves of data (grade 10 through 5 years after graduation; N=2,213). Integrating apparently discrepant findings under a common theoretical framework based on a multidimensional perspective, academic self-concept had consistent reciprocal effects with both achievement and educational attainment, whereas self-esteem had almost none.

  7. Physical self-concept of adolescents in Western Balkan countries: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janić, Snežana Radisavljević; Jurak, Gregor; Milanović, Ivana; Lazarević, Dušanka; Kovač, Marjeta; Novak, Dario

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore physical self-concept of adolescents of the Western Balkans (Serbia, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina) according to sex and country. The participants were 2,606 students, ages 13 and 14 years (M = 13.5, SD = 0.9). The Physical Self-Description Questionnaire (PSDQ) was used to assess multidimensional physical self-concept. The results show the interaction of sex and country for three dimensions of physical self-concept (Appearance, Global Physical Self-Concept, and Self-Esteem). It was shown that female and male adolescents' perception of physical appearance, self-esteem, and global physical self-concept is more susceptible to influences of socio-cultural factors in the monitored countries. In all other dimensions of Physical self-concept, sex differences were consistently manifested in favour of male adolescents, except in Flexibility. Regardless of adolescents' sex, under the increasing influence of Western culture in the Western Balkan countries, adolescents more critically evaluate their body and motor abilities.

  8. Sexual Self-concept and Its Relationship to Depression, Stress and Anxiety in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh; Rafiei, Hossein

    2017-04-01

    Women in menopause have the more mood swings than before menopause. At the same time seem to sexual self-concept and sexual aspects of self-knowledge has a great impact on their mental health. This study aimed to investigate the sexual self-concept and its relationship to depression, stress and anxiety in postmenopausal women's. In this descriptive correlation research, 300 of postmenopausal women referred to healthcare and medical treatment centers in Abadeh city were selected by convenience sampling method. The information in this study was collected by using questionnaires of multidimensional sexual self-concept and depression anxiety stress scale 21 (DASS-21). For data analysis, SPSS/17 software was used. The results showed the mean score positive sexual self-concept was 41.03 ± 8.66 and the average score of negative sexual self in women's was 110.32 ± 43.05. As well as scores of depression, stress, and anxiety, 35.67%, 32.33% and 37.67% respectively were in severe level. Positive and negative sexual self-concept scores with scores of stress, anxiety, and depression, of post-menopausal women in the confidence of 0.01, is significantly correlated (P < 0.05). Being stress, anxiety, and depression in severe level and also a significant correlation between increased stress, anxiety and depression with negative and weak self-concept of women's, it is necessary to devote more careful attention to mental health issues of women's and have appropriate interventions.

  9. Trauma and psychosis: The mediating role of self-concept clarity and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gavin John; Reid, Graeme; Preston, Phil; Palmier-Claus, Jasper; Sellwood, William

    2015-08-30

    Childhood trauma (CT) and psychosis may be associated. Drawing on the dissociation and social psychological literature, the current study examined the mediating role of structural aspects of self in explaining the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis. Twenty-nine individuals with psychosis were compared with 31 healthy volunteers regarding childhood trauma, dissociation and self-concept clarity (SCC). High rates of maltreatment were found in the psychosis sample. Additionally, clinical participants reported more dissociation and less self-concept clarity. Mediational analyses were carried out on pooled data from across both clinical and non-clinical samples. These suggested that the influence of physical neglect in increasing the likelihood of experiencing psychosis was explicable through the effects of increased dissociation. Self-concept clarity mediated the relationship between psychosis and total childhood trauma, emotional abuse, physical abuse, emotional and physical neglect. Furthermore, dissociation and self-concept clarity were strongly correlated providing evidence that they may form a unitary underlying concept of 'self-concept integration'. The study provides further evidence of the link between childhood trauma and psychosis. Self-concept integration may be adversely affected by negative childhood experiences, which increases psychosis risk. Methodological limitations, clinical implications and suggestions for future research are considered.

  10. Self-Concept in Student Learning and Motivation Truant : Descriptive-Correlational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlina Harahap

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed describ the learning motivation and self-concept of students who truant. This study used a descriptive quantitative method. The research conducted by the students of SMAN 5 Padangsidimpuan in the period of 2015/2016 with the total of the population was 420 students. Amount of research sample was 36 students and had been chosen by using purposive sampling technique. An instrument employed in this study was a Likert-scaled questionnaire. Data were analyzed by using percentage technique and the relationship between the two variables was analyzed by using nonparametric statistic, that is Spearman’s Coefficient of Rank Correlation. Results of this research are just like the following: 1 participants’ level of achievement on self-concept of students who truant is about 69,8%, 2 participants’ level of achievement on learning motivation of students who truant is about 69,2%, and 3 correlation coefficient of self-concept and learning motivation of students who truant is about 0,581. Therefore, it can be concluded that students who truancy have very low self-concept and learning motivation, and there is a significant relationship between self-concept and learning motivation. The implication in guidance counseling services is to create a service program which can increase self-concept and be learning motivation of students who truant

  11. A Taxonomy of Pretend Play Activity with Some Implications for Literacy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskos, K.

    A 6-month, qualitative study of the nature of literate behavior in the pretend play episodes of eight preschool children resulted in a taxonomy of their pretend play activity. Data were gathered in a setting where teachers implemented a cognitively oriented curriculum that encouraged language development and problem solving through play.…

  12. Exploring the Potential of Role Play in Higher Education: Development of a Typology and Teacher Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Deepa; Stupans, Ieva

    2012-01-01

    Role-play, in which learners act out roles in case scenarios, appears to be used across a broad range of discipline areas to address learning across the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. This paper describes the development of a prospective typology of role-play learning opportunities derived from role-play scenarios used at one large…

  13. Influences of Technology-Related Playful Activity and Thought on Moral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Doris; Davis, Darrel

    2011-01-01

    Many early developmental theorists such as Freud, Erikson, Piaget, and Vygotsky suggested that play--which the authors of this article define as both playful activity and playful thought--had the power to influence the moral emotions, behaviors, and reasoning of children. More recent researchers have also found evidence of moral development in…

  14. Brief report: Performing on the stage, the field, or both? Australian adolescent extracurricular activity participation and self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, Corey J; Barber, Bonnie L

    2009-06-01

    The relationship between Australian adolescents' participation in extracurricular activities and their self-concepts was investigated. A total of 1489 adolescents (56% female; mean age 13.8 years) completed measures of social self-concept, academic self-concept, and general self-worth, and reported on their extracurricular activity participation. In general, participation in any type of extracurricular activity was associated with a higher social and academic self-concept, and general self-worth, compared to no participation. Adolescents who participated in both sports and non-sports also reported a more positive social self-concept and general self-worth, compared to those who only participated in one of the activity types. This research provides support for extracurricular activities as a context facilitative of positive self-concept, and demonstrates the importance of a mixed participation profile for an adolescent's self-concept.

  15. Self-concept Characteristics and Self-Perceptions Accuracy of Children with Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity of Buenos Aires.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the characteristics of the self-concept of children with ADHD in the Área Metropolitana Bonaerense (AMBA, Argentine) and the accuracy in their self-perceptions. Participants were 100 boys and girls aged 7 to 13 years and one of their parents. Children formed three groups: children diagnosed as ADHD (DSM IV criteria), children who assist to psycho- therapy but did not meet diagnostic criteria for ADHD and normally developed children. Children completed the Se...

  16. Mother-Child Play: A Comparison of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentenuto, Arianna; De Falco, Simona; Venuti, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze mother-child collaborative play in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) compared to children with Down Syndrome (DS) and typical developing children (TD). Children with ASD are often described as having deficient play skills, particularly in the symbolic domain. Caregivers' involvement in child play activities increases the structural complexity of playing in both typically developing children and children with disabilities. Participants included 75 mothers and their children with ASD (n = 25), with down syndrome (n = 25) and with typical development (n = 25). Mother-child play sessions were analyzed using a coding system for exploratory and symbolic play. Results indicated that children with ASD showed more exploratory play compared to children in the other groups. No significant differences emerged between the three groups for child symbolic play or for mother play. These findings are discussed in relation to the debate about functional and symbolic play in children with ASD and in relation to the importance of setting and age for play assessment.

  17. Sexually dimorphic role for vasopressin in the development of social play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Paul

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-established role of vasopressin (AVP in adult social behavior, its role in social development is relatively unexplored. In this paper, we focus on the most prominent social behavior of juvenile rats, social play. Previous pharmacological experiments in our laboratory suggested that AVP regulates play in a sex- and brain region-specific manner in juvenile rats. Here we investigate the role of specific AVP systems in the emergence of social play. We first characterize the development of play in male and female Wistar rats and then ask whether the development of AVP mRNA expression correlates with the emergence of play. Unexpectedly, play emerged more rapidly in weanling-aged females than in males, resulting in a sex difference opposite of that typically reported for older, juvenile rats. AVP mRNA and play were correlated in males only, with a negative correlation in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and a positive correlation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These findings support the hypothesis that AVP acts differentially on multiple systems in a sex-specific manner to regulate social play and suggest a role for PVN and BNST AVP systems in the development of play. Differential neuropeptide regulation of male and female social development may underlie well-documented sex differences in incidence, progression, and symptom severity of behavioral disorders during development.

  18. Specific Play Behaviors and the Development of Communication in Children with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lynn S.; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1999-01-01

    This study, with 180 deaf or hard of hearing infants and toddlers grouped into four age ranges, found highly significant interrelationships among the four categories of play and the four aspects of communicative development studied. The development of autosymbolic play, age of hearing loss identification, and symbolic object distribution accounted…

  19. Play and Concept Development in Infants and Young Children with Severe Visual Impairments: A Constructivist View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the impact of severe visual impairment on the development of play skills that facilitate concept development and discusses interventions that can enhance play experiences for infants and young children with severe visual impairments. Strategies encourage intrinsic motivation, spontaneity, active engagement, positive effect,…

  20. Impact of a family-focused intervention on self-concept after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amber; Ponsford, Jennie; Couchman, Grace

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of a family inclusive intervention on the multidimensional self-concept of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty one individuals with TBI and a matched control group completed the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale: Second Edition (TSCS: 2), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), the Family Assessment Device (FAD), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) on two occasions: at immediate contact (pre-group, T1) and post-group (3 months after initial contact, T2). Controls did not attend the intervention. Total scores for the measures, as well as scores on subdomains of self-concept, taken pre- and post-intervention for the TBI sample and at the same time for matched controls were compared between groups using Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA); followed by a series of repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVA) to determine whether significant changes occurred. Contrary to the main aim, the use of a family-focused intervention did not result in self-concept improvement, either globally or across self-concept domains. Nor did mood or family functioning improve for the TBI sample. Measures remained stable across time for the controls.

  1. The effect of composition (art or music) on the self-concept of hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Cynthia M; Davis, Kathy; Schroeder, Linda K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of composition (art or music) on the self-concept of hospitalized children. The music composition was created using the program Making More Music. The art composition was a drawing using standard medium. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale was used to measure self-concept. When examining subjects as one group, a significant difference from pre- to posttest for the Total score indicated an improved self-concept. Further analyses on each of the 6 categories indicated no significant differences. The art composition group had a significant difference from pre- to posttest for the Total score and for Popularity (POP). Although not significant, scores increased from pre- to posttest for Behavioral Adjustment (BEH), Physical Appearance (PHY), Freedom from Anxiety (FRE), and Happiness and Satisfaction (HAP). The music composition group had no significant difference from pre- to posttest for the Total score but a significant difference from pre- to posttest on Intellectual and School Status (INT) and Physical Appearance (PRY). Although not significant, scores increased from pre- to posttest for TOT, BEH, and HAP. There was a significant difference between the groups on 2 categories that indicated an improved self-concept for the music group under Intellectual and School Status and for the art group under Popularity.

  2. Reciprocal feedback between self-concept and goal pursuit in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alexander E; Vallacher, Robin R

    2017-07-21

    We hypothesized that self-knowledge and goal perseverance are mutually reinforcing because of the roles of self-knowledge in directing goal pursuit, and of goal pursuit in structuring the self-concept. To test this hypothesis, we used a daily diary design with 97 college-aged participants for 40 days to assess whether daily self-concept clarity and grit predict one another's next-day levels. Data were analyzed using multilevel cross-lagged panel modeling. Results indicated that daily self-concept clarity and grit had positive and symmetric associations with each other across time, while controlling for their respective previous values. Similar crossed results were also found when testing the model using individual daily self-concept clarity and grit items. The results are the first to indicate the existence of reinforcing feedback loops between self-concept clarity and grit, such that fluctuations in the clarity of self-knowledge are associated with fluctuations in goal resolve, and vice versa. Discussion centers on the implications of these results for the functional link between mind and action and on the study's heuristic value for subsequent research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The dialectical self-concept: contradiction, change, and holism in East asian cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer-Rodgers, Julie; Boucher, Helen C; Mori, Sumi C; Lei Wang; Kaiping Peng

    2009-01-01

    Naïve dialecticism refers to a set of East Asian lay beliefs characterized by tolerance for contradiction, the expectation of change, and cognitive holism. In five studies, the authors examined the cognitive mechanisms that give rise to global self-concept inconsistency among dialectical cultures. Contradictory self-knowledge was more readily available (Study 1) and simultaneously accessible (Study 2) among East Asians (Japanese and Chinese) than among Euro-Americans. East Asians also exhibited greater change and holism in the spontaneous self-concept (Study 1) and inconsistency in their implicit self-beliefs (Study 3). Cultural differences in self-concept inconsistency were obtained when controlling for alternative explanatory variables, including self-criticism (Study 4) and self-concept certainty (Studies 2 and 3) and were fully mediated by a direct measure of dialecticism (Study 5). Naïve dialecticism provides a comprehensive theoretical framework for understanding these cultural differences and the contradictory, changeable, and holistic nature of the East Asian self-concept.

  4. Peer Attachment, Perceived Parenting Style, Self-concept, and School Adjustments in Adolescents with Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sunhee

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify how peer attachment and parenting style differentially affect self-concept and school adjustment in adolescents with and without chronic illness. A cross-sectional study using multiple group analysis on the Korean panel data was used. A nationwide stratified multistage cluster sampling method was used and the survey was conducted in 2013 on 2,092 first-year middle school students in Korea. We used standardized instruments by the National Youth Policy Institute to measure peer attachment, parenting style, self-concept, and school adjustment. Multiple-group structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the difference of relations for peer attachment, parenting style, self-concept, and school adjustment variable between adolescents with chronic illness and those without chronic illness. The model fit of a multiple-group structural equation modeling was good. The difference of the path from negative parenting style to self-concept between the two groups was significant, and a significant between-group difference in the overall path was found. This indicated that self-concept in adolescents with chronic illness was more negatively affected by negative parenting style than in adolescents without chronic illness. Healthcare providers can promote the process of school adjustment in several ways, such as discussing this issue directly with adolescent patients, along with their parents and peers, examining how the organization and content of the treatment can be modified according to the adolescents' school life. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Social phobia and self-concept: a correlational study with physical activity practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christi Noriko Sonoo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze social phobia in teenagers aged 14 to 20 years and its possiblerelationship with regular practice of physical activity and their self-concept. This study enrolled 191 students from privateand public schools and the measurement instruments used were a test of social phobia, a test of self-concept and a physicalactivity questionnaire. The results indicate that students from private schools are shyer than students from public schools. Inrelation to self-concept, there were significant differences in security factor for boys and moral factor for girls. This indicatesthat boys are more stable, brave and secure, while girls are more influenced by moral and ethical rules. These resultsdemonstrate that no relationship was detected between social phobia and physical activity, but it was possible to observea relationship between social phobia and some of the self-concept factors, and a relationship between physical activityand some of the self-concept factors. It is therefore concluded that the negative influence of high levels of social phobia onthe receptivity and security factors of men and women suggests a need for further studies in the area, which could help inthe prevention and treatment of social phobia, which could worsen over the years and compromise these young people’sability to socialize.

  6. Psychometric properties of a shortened version of the Physical Self-Concept Questionnaire (PSQ-S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Arantzazu; Axpe, Inge; Goñi, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The four-dimensional model of physical self-concept which differentiates the physical self-perceptions of ability, condition, attractiveness and strength is widely accepted. In the last two decades much research has been done on the physical self-concept and its relations with the psychological well-being/distress, anxiety disorders or Eating Behavior Disorders (EBD). To validate a shortened version of the Physical Self-Concept Questionnaire (PSQ-S) and verify its ability to discriminate between people with different levels of EBD. Responses of 1478 subjects between 13 and 21 years old to the shortened version of the PSQ were analyzed in order to check indexes of reliability and validity. Furthermore, the scores of 96 women aged 14 to 23 years old diagnosed of EBD were compared to 96 others without clinical diagnosis. The results indicate a reliability of 0.93 and confirm the tetrafactorial structure of the physical selfconcept. The highest physical self-concept is that of those without a clinical diagnosis of EBD. The Shortened-PSQ is a simple, reliable and suitable screening tool both for educational and clinical settings. It also provides a sufficient measure of physical self-concept for research purposes.

  7. A comparative study on undergraduate students' academic motivation and academic self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiksal, Mine

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Turkish and American undergraduate students' academic motivation and academic self-concept scores regarding the years that they spent in university. The analysis was based on 566 (284 Turkish, 282 American) undergraduate students where, Academic Motivation Scale and Academic Self-Concept Scale were used as measuring instruments. The results showed that there was a statistical significant effect of nationality and number of years spent in university on undergraduate students' intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and self-concept scores. Turkish students had higher intrinsic scores whereas American students had higher extrinsic scores and more positive academic-self concept compared to Turkish partners. Regarding grade level, senior students from both cultures had higher intrinsic motivation and academic self-concept scores compared to other grade levels. In terms of extrinsic motivation, there is steady decline in American students' scores as grade level increases. On the other hand, Turkish undergraduates' extrinsic scores decrease in the second year but increase in the third and fourth year of university education. Results were discussed by taking into consideration the social and cultural differences between two nations.

  8. myTREEHOUSE Self-Concept Assessment: preliminary psychometric analysis of a new self-concept assessment for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Sau Kuan; Lang, Cathryne P; Hemphill, Sheryl A; Johnston, Leanne M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the preliminary validity and reliability of the myTREEHOUSE Self-Concept Assessment for children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 8 to 12 years. The myTREEHOUSE Self-Concept Assessment includes 26 items divided into eight domains, assessed across three Performance Perspectives (Personal, Social, and Perceived) and an additional Importance Rating. Face and content validity was assessed by semi-structured interviews with seven expert professionals regarding the assessment construct, content, and clinical utility. Reliability was assessed with 50 children aged 8 to 12 years with CP (29 males, 21 females; mean age 10y 2mo; Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] level I=35, II=8, III=5, IV=1; mean Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition [WISC-IV]=104), whose data was used to calculate internal consistency of the scale, and a subset of 35 children (20 males, 15 females; mean age 10y 5mo; GMFCS level I=26, II=4, III=4, IV=1; mean WISC-IV=103) who participated in test-retest reliability within 14 to 28 days. Face and content validity was supported by positive expert feedback, with only minor adjustments suggested to clarify the wording of some items. After these amendments, strong internal consistency (Cronbach's α 0.84-0.91) and moderate to good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.64-0.75) was found for each component. The myTREEHOUSE Self-Concept Assessment is a valid and reliable assessment of self-concept for children with CP aged 8 to 12 years. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Fact or fiction? A longitudinal study of play and the development of reflective functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, V P; Normandin, L; Ensink, K; Fonagy, P

    2016-01-01

    In Fonagy and Target's (1996, 2000) developmental model of mentalization, play is theorized as a precursor of later mentalization and reflective function (RF); however, the relationship between play and later mentalization and RF has yet to be empirically tested. These processes are particularly important in the context of trauma, but an empirical model of the relationships among mentalization, play, and trauma is currently lacking. The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine whether children's capacity to engage in pretend play, to symbolize, and to make play narratives was associated with later RF in those children. Thirty-nine sexually abused children and 21 nonabused children (aged 3 to 8) participated in the study. The Children's Play Therapy Instrument was used to assess children's free play. Three years after the play assessment, children's RF was assessed using the Child Attachment Interview, coded with the Child and Adolescent Reflective Functioning Scale. Pretend play completion was associated with later other-understanding. Play was also found to mediate the relationship between sexual abuse and children's later mentalization regarding others. These findings are consistent with Fonagy and Target's emphasis on the role of pretend play in the development of a nuanced sense of the qualities of the mind and reality. In sum, the findings lend support to Fonagy and Target's account of playing with reality, and the development of mentalization suggests that it may be more than "fiction." Furthermore, these results suggest that children's ability to create meaningful and coherent play sequences after sexual abuse is associated with the development of a better understanding of their relationships with others. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.

  10. Efficacy of a cognitive program for improving the physical self-concept of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Inge; Goñi, Alfredo; Infante, Guillermo

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a 6-wk. educational program designed to improve physical self-concept, which was carried out in the classrooms of a university physical activity and sports faculty. The experimental group comprised 45 students (M age = 18.8 yr., SD = 1.5) and a control group (N = 41; M age = 21.7 yr., SD = 1.2). The Autokontzeptu Fisikoaren Itaunketa/Physical Self-concept Questionnaire (AFI) was administered pre- and post-intervention, with a statistically significant increase being observed in the post-test scores of the experimental group on the General physical self-concept scale, as well as on the Condition, Attractiveness, and Strength scales. No statistically significant changes were observed in the control group.

  11. Achievement-related expectancies, academic self-concept, and mathematics performance of academically underprepared adolescent students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, J D

    1993-03-01

    The relationship between achievement-related expectancies, academic self-concept, and mathematics performance of 191 academically underprepared adolescent students was examined. After the effects of prior academic achievement were controlled for, a significant main effect for academic self-concept was found; as expected, students with higher academic self-concept earned significantly higher mathematics grades. In addition, after the effects of prior achievement were controlled for, female students were found to earn significantly higher mathematics grades than did male students. A significant three-way (Sex x Ethnic Group x Achievement-Related Expectancies) interaction was also noted. Unlike in several previous studies, no significant racial differences in mathematics performance were found. These students had a similar socioeconomic status (SES), and the effects of prior academic achievement were controlled for, suggesting that racial and gender differences in mathematics achievement may be partially explained by prior schooling and SES background, as posited by Reyes and Stanic (1988).

  12. Relationship between academic self-concept, causal attribution for success and raílure,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Moreano

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between academic self-concept, causal attribution for success and raílure, and academic achievement in pre-adolescents. This study shows the relationship between the variables mentioned above in 284 primary school students in Lima (5"' aId 6"' grades. The Self Description Questionnaire (SDQ-I and the Sydney Attribution Scale (SAS were applied with a previous validation process. Mathematics and Language final grades were assumed as academic achievement indicators. SAS exploratory factorial analysis showed five factors, tbree of them demonstrated that children do not discriminate between effort and ability. About SDQ, results confirmed that children can differentiate between self-concept dimensions. Participants showed a favorable self-concept in a11 dimensions and a strong intemal locus of control. In the same way, there was a tendency for studems to accept success for internal causes and totally deny failure.

  13. Teaching self-concept and self-esteem in a clinical communications course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Melissa S

    2006-10-15

    Effective interpersonal communication skills are needed for pharmacists to deliver patient-centered care. To achieve this outcome with pharmacists, communication skills are emphasized in pharmacy school in required coursework, such as a clinical communication course. One important concept to include in communication coursework is content on perceptions because perceptions influence communication interactions. Specific emphasis should include a focus on self-perceptions and self-concept, because related empirical literature demonstrates that accurate academic self-concepts predict academic success. These results were extrapolated to a pharmacy clinical communications course where a lecture and laboratory series was designed to emphasize self-concept and facilitate communication skills improvement. The instructional design of this series promoted the advancement of students' communication skills by using communication inventories, self-reflection activities, peer and class discussion, and lecture content. Class discussions, self-reflections, and baseline, and follow-up counseling activities throughout the semester provided evidence of improvements.

  14. Socioeconomic status, physical fitness, self-concept, attitude toward physical education, and academic achievement of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktop, Abdurrahman

    2010-04-01

    The goal was to analyze the physical fitness, self-concept, attitudes toward physical education, and academic achievement of Turkish elementary school children by socioeconomic status. 198 (101 boys, 97 girls) students from Grades 7 and 8 completed the Children's Attitude Inventory towards Physical Education, the Piers-Harris Children's Self-concept Scale, and Eurofit Physical Fitness Test Battery. Significant differences were found between the groups of Low and High socioeconomic status (SES) in terms of physical fitness and academic achievement. While the Low SES group had higher mean scores on physical fitness, mean academic achievements of the High SES group were higher. Mean differences in height, self-concept, and children's attitudes toward physical education by socioeconomic status were not statistically significant. Particular attention should be paid to physical fitness in children of high socioeconomic status and the academic achievement of children with low socioeconomic status.

  15. A Study of Prosocial Behaviour and Self Concept of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepty; Thapliyal, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a vital period in social development, because adolescents can be easily influenced by the people they develop close relationships with. At the stage of adolescence peer groups offer the opportunity to develop social skills such as empathy, sharing, and leadership. A number of family characteristics are also related to the…

  16. A Study of Prosocial Behaviour and Self Concept of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepty; Thapliyal, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a vital period in social development, because adolescents can be easily influenced by the people they develop close relationships with. At the stage of adolescence peer groups offer the opportunity to develop social skills such as empathy, sharing, and leadership. A number of family characteristics are also related to the…

  17. The effects of fantastical pretend-play on the development of executive functions: An intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Rachel B; Gilpin, Ansley T; Brown, Melissa M; Meyer, Brooke A

    2016-05-01

    Although recent correlational studies have found a relationship between fantasy orientation (FO; i.e., a child's propensity to play in a fantastical realm) and higher order cognitive skills called executive functions (EFs), no work has addressed the causality and directionality of this relationship. The current study experimentally examined the directionality of the observed relationship between FO and EF development in preschool-aged children through an innovative play intervention employing a randomized controlled design. A sample of 110 children between the ages of 3 and 5years were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: fantastical pretend-play intervention, non-imaginative play intervention, or business-as-usual control. Results revealed that children who participated in a 5-week fantastical pretend-play intervention showed improvements in EFs, whereas children in the other two conditions did not. Within the fantastical pretend-play condition, children who were highly engaged in the play and those who were highly fantastical demonstrated the greatest gains in EFs. These data provide evidence for the equifinal relationship between fantasy-oriented play and EF development, such that engaging in fantasy-oriented play may be one of many ways to directly enhance EF development.

  18. Physical self-concept in adolescents from Seville in relation with gender and the evolution of sport career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Ries

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the physical capacities and the physical attractiveness of Seville adolescent athletes and whether these perceptions vary by gender and sport career development. 90 adolescents from 12 to 18 years (50 girls and 40 boys completed a Spanish adaptation of the Physical Self Description Questionnaire (Marsh, Richards, Johnson, Roche y Tremaye, 1994; Tomás, 1998 and a scale to collect physical attractiveness perceived (Alfermann, Saborowski y Würth, 1997. The results show that males have a more positive physical self-concept than females. There were no relationships of the variables with the level of sports performance. The follow-up survey, one year later, noted an increase in some subdomains of self-concept in terms of positive developments in the sport career. In this study the physical changes associated with maturation in adolescence seem to have fewer influences on the perception of the body as it has been reported in other studies

  19. Development of Young Peoples Abilities in Learning to Play Percussion Instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Gžibovskis, Tālis

    2009-01-01

    ANNOTATION Tālis Gžibovskis' doctoral thesis "Development of Young People's Abilities in Learning to Play Percussion Instruments" in the area of music pedagogy has been worked out in the University of Latvia, Faculty of Pedagogy and Psychology, Department of Pedagogy during the period 2004-2008. Research object: the process of learning to play percussion instruments. Research subject: development of young people's abilities. Research objective: to study and test the development of young...

  20. Sexual self-concept as influencing intended sexual health behaviour of young adolescent Taiwanese girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu; Lee, Sheuan

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a process model that assesses the relationship of sexual health knowledge and normative beliefs to sexual health behavioural intention, with sexual self-concept as a mediating variable. The model is intended to assist in the prediction of which adolescents would exhibit a lower intention to engage in protective sexual health behaviour. Previous research has shown that sexual-related behaviours are associated with sexual self-concept, sexual health knowledge and perceived parental/peer approval of sexual behaviour. This study is a cross-sectional research. This study was conducted with 545 adolescent girls, aged 12-15 years, from eight junior high schools in Taiwan. Participants were assessed using the Sexual Self-Concept Inventory, the Sexual Health Behavior Intention Scale, the Parental Approval of Sexual Behavior Scale (PASB), the Friends' Approval of Sexual Behavior Scale and the Sexual Health Knowledge Scale. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling, with the maximum likelihood estimate determined by the LISREL 8.52 program. The model exhibited adequate fit (goodness-of-fit index = 0.96, adjusted goodness-of-fit index = 0.94, normed fit index = 0.96, comparative fit index = 0.98, standardised root mean square residual = 0.049 and root mean square error of approximation = 0.048) and the findings indicate that sexual self-concept was a significant influence on the relationship of sexual health knowledge and normative beliefs to sexual health behavioural intention. The results of this study revealed the importance of sexual self-concept for adolescent girls' sexual health behaviour. Evidence-based strategies that reinforce and clarify sexual self-concept as a mediating factor may aid in adolescent females' intention to engage in protective sexual health behaviour. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Autoconceito e dificuldades de aprendizagem na escrita Self-concept and learning disabilities of writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermino Fernandes Sisto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O autoconceito vem sendo considerado na literatura como um constructo multidimensional e um dos aspectos afetivo-emocionais relacionados às dificuldades de aprendizagem. Considerando a importância desse constructo, o objetivo deste estudo foi verificar se haveria diferenças significativas entre níveis de dificuldade de aprendizagem na escrita e o autoconceito geral, escolar, social, familiar e pessoal de crianças do ensino fundamental. Utilizou-se uma escala para avaliar a dificuldade de aprendizagem na escrita e outra para avaliação do autoconceito. A amostra foi composta por 277 estudantes, de ambos os sexos, com idade entre 9 e 10 anos, da 3ª série do ensino fundamental. Os resultados evidenciaram que a dificuldade de aprendizagem na escrita está significativamente relacionada com o autoconceito geral e com o escolar, verificando-se que conforme aumenta o nível de dificuldade de aprendizagem na escrita diminui o autoconceito.The self-concept as the individual's perception of himself has been considered in the literature as a multidimensional construct and as one of the most influential emotional aspect in learning disabilities. So, the aim of this study was to verify if there were significant differences between the levels of learning disabilities related to writing and general, school, social, family and personal self-concepts. Two scales were used, the first assessing the level of learning disabilities of writing and the other assessing self-concept. The sample was composed by 277 9-10 years old students, of both genders, from the third grade of elementary school. The results showed that the learning disabilities of writing are significantly related with general self-concept and with school self-concept, suggesting that the increase of learning disabilities levels means decrease of general and school self-concepts.

  2. The effects of dance team participation on female adolescent physical fitness and self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, L; Hunter, G; Hilyer, J; Harrison, P

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent female physical fitness and self-concept are affected by dance team participation in high school. Eight dancers were tested once prior to and once four months after dance team participation. Eight participants from physical education classes, matched for age, weight, height, grade, and race, were tested once at the same time as the second dance team test. Physiological tests were maximum oxygen uptake, sit-and-reach, one-repetition maximum bench press, skinfolds, and hydrostatic weighing. The self-concept tests were Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, and Body Cathexis Scale. Dependent one-tailed t tests were run to determine differences between dance team pre- and posttests and control and dance team posttests. Dance subjects increased maximum oxygen uptake and one-repetition maximum bench press in addition to improving their body composition as evidenced by a significant decrease in total skinfolds and a near significant decrease in percent body fat. The dance team had a significantly higher maximum oxygen uptake than did controls. No other significant differences were seen between groups. Dance team participants significantly improved physical self and social self on the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale. No other significant differences were seen. A factor that may have affected the self-concept results in this study was low dance team status, due to a combination of unsuccessful previous dance teams and a losing football season. Within the limitations of this study, these results indicate that physical fitness is improved as a result of dance team participation; however, self-concept seems to be affected only minimally, if at all, as compared with participation in physical education classes.

  3. Peer relations in adolescents: effects of parenting and adolescents' self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deković, M; Meeus, W

    1997-04-01

    In this study we examined the link between the parent-adolescent relationship and the adolescent's relationship with peers. The proposed model assumes that the quality of the parent-child relationship affects the adolescent's self-concept, which in turn affects the adolescent's integration into the world of peers. The sample consisted of 508 families with adolescents (12- to 18-years-old). The data were obtained at the subjects' homes, where a battery of questionnaires was administered individually to mothers, fathers and adolescents. Several constructs relating to the quality of parent-child relationship were assessed: parental acceptance, attachment, involvement, responsiveness, love withdrawal and monitoring of the child. The measures of the adolescent's self-concept included Harter's Perceived Competence Scale for Adolescents and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale. The indicators of the quality of peer relations were: degree of peer activity, having a best friend, perceived acceptance by peers and attachment to peers. Assessment of the hypothesized model showed that the adolescent's self-concept serves a mediating role in the relationship between maternal child-rearing style and involvement with peers. The mediating role of self-concept was greatest for maternal acceptance. Paternal child-rearing style, however, appeared to have an independent effect on the adolescent's involvement with peers that is not accounted for by the adolescent's self-concept. The prediction of the quality of adolescents' peer relations yielded similar results for both mothers and fathers. The results suggest that a positive self-concept and warm supportive parenting each contribute unique variance to satisfactory peer relations.

  4. [Being old is occurring later: age-related norms and self-concepts in the second half of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graefe, S; van Dyk, S; Lessenich, S

    2011-10-01

    Our contribution focuses on the question of how aging subjects experience and interpret biographic transitions into old age - specifically against the background of the current sociodiscursive revaluation of the so-called young old. The results of our qualitative interviews with elderly men and women in Germany indicate that the self-description "young elderly" does not play a role in identity-building in higher age, although norms of "active" or "productive aging" are widely accepted by the elderly. On the other hand, notions of "very old age" in need of care appear as something that can barely be integrated into the self-concepts and life plans of the interviewees. The transition from adulthood into the "third" (i.e., old age) stage is, thus, subjectively being postponed by elderly people into the (imagined) very last stage of their lives.

  5. Comparison of the effects of auditory subliminal stimulation and rational-emotive therapy, separately and combined, on self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, A T; Kotzé, H F; Sieberhagen, K J

    1993-02-01

    The present study investigated the effects on self-concept of Rational-Emotive Therapy and auditory subliminal stimulation (separately and in combination) on 141 undergraduate students with self-concept problems. They were randomly assigned to one of four groups receiving either Rational-Emotive Therapy, subliminal stimulation, both, or a placebo treatment. Rational-Emotive Therapy significantly improved scores on all the dependent measures (cognition, self-concept, self-esteem, anxiety), except for behavior. Results for the subliminal stimulation group were similar to those of the placebo treatment except for a significant self-concept improvement and a decline in self-concept related irrational cognitions. The combined treatment yielded results similar to those of Rational-Emotive Therapy, with tentative indications of continued improvement in irrational cognitions and self-concept from posttest to follow-up.

  6. An Investigation of Participation in Weekly Music Workshops and Its Relationship to Academic Self-Concept and Self-Esteem of Middle School Students in Low-Income Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jihae

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how I Am A Dreamer Musician Program (IDMP) affected academic self-concept and self-esteem of middle school students in low-income communities. During the seven weeks of the weekly music workshops, students participated in different musical activities including playing percussion instruments, singing,…

  7. Language and Social Development in a Multilingual Classroom: A Dinosaur Project Enriched with Block Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Monique

    2009-01-01

    With the implementation of the natural approach, the dinosaur study and facilitated block play gave dual language learners many opportunities to acquire a new language, develop social skills, and improve communication abilities. Once teachers identified the barriers to children playing and talking together, they created a classroom environment…

  8. The Impact of Dramatic Play Centre on Promoting the Development of Children's Early Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of dramatic play centre (DPC) on promoting the development of children's early writing skills in the Jordanian context. It also intends to investigate the forms of children's writing skills that emerge through the use of dramatic play. Observations and interviews were conducted to obtain…

  9. The Impact of Dramatic Play Centre on Promoting the Development of Children's Early Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of dramatic play centre (DPC) on promoting the development of children's early writing skills in the Jordanian context. It also intends to investigate the forms of children's writing skills that emerge through the use of dramatic play. Observations and interviews were conducted to obtain…

  10. Measuring change in academic self-concept resulting from curricular and instructional innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L W

    1977-09-01

    The paper begins with a discussion of the psychometric and psychological problems involved in attempts to measure changes in human characteristics. The Rasch psychometric model is proposed as a model which has the potential of alleviating or eliminating many of the problems. The model is applied to a set of responses to an academic self-concept instrument administered to seventh-, eighth-, and ninth-grade students. Items that failed to conform adequately to the model at every grade level were eliminated from the scale. The resulting scale was found to possess several properties which permitted its use in the measurement of school-induced change in academic self-concept.

  11. Structured role orientation and academic self-concept in the secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, J; Todman, J

    1989-06-01

    Gordon's (1978) School Environment Preference Survey (SEPS) and Cohen's (1976) six-item adaptation of the Brookover (1967) Self-Concept of Academic Ability Scale were administered to 25 pupils in each of the first four years in a Scottish secondary school. The correlations obtained provide support for Gordon's (1971) hypothesis that pupils with a high degree of structured role orientation, as measured by the SEPS, lack confidence in their academic ability. In addition, there was a decrease in SEPS scores and an increase in academic self-concept over successive year levels.

  12. Possible Major Influences of Children Learning Social Studies on Academic Self Concept and Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens Kaluge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at finding the best model to explain pupil academic attainment in learning social studies. The data came from pupils learning Social Studies at grade 3 and 4 of primary schools. The structural equation model contained 2 exogenous constructs–attitudes toward school and locus of control–and 2 endogenous constructs–self-concept and academic achievement. It was confirmed that the academic self-concept and achievement related to each other and both were influenced by attitudes toward school and internal locus of control. The model was fitting differently for different grade.

  13. Sexual Self-Concept Ambiguity and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Amelia E; Brown, Sarah L; Cukrowicz, Kelly; Bagge, Courtney L

    2016-04-01

    Mechanisms (i.e., thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, hopelessness) derived from the interpersonal theory of suicide which are hypothesized to account for the relation between sexual orientation self-concept ambiguity and active suicide ideation were examined. Participants included 349 women, among whom 42% currently self-ascribed a non-exclusively heterosexual sexual identity. Among women reporting higher levels of sexual self-concept ambiguity, greater risk for active suicide ideation is found when perceptions of burden and feelings of thwarted belonging co-occur with feelings of hopelessness. Results support relevant theory useful for understanding suicide risk among sexual minority women who acknowledge ambiguity with regard to their sexual orientation.

  14. Self-esteem, general and sexual self-concepts in blind people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mehrdad; Azarbayejani, Abas; Shafiei, Katayoun; Ziaei, Tayebe; Shayegh, Bahar

    2015-10-01

    People with visual disability have lower self-esteem and social skills than sighted people. This study was designed to describe self-esteem and general and sexual self-concepts in blind people. This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013-2014. In this study, 138 visually impaired people participated from Isfahan Province Welfare Organization and were interviewed for measuring of self-esteem and self-concept using Eysenck self-esteem and Rogers' self-concept questionnaires. The correlation between above two variables was measured using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software by Pearson correlation test. Mean [± standard deviation (SD)] age of patients was 30.9 ± 8 years. The mean (±SD) of general self-concept score was 11 ± 5.83. The mean (±SD) of self-esteem score was 16.62 ± 2.85. Pearson correlation results showed a significant positive correlation between self-esteem and general self-concept (r = 0.19, P = 0.025). The mean of sexual self-concept scores in five subscales (sexual anxiety, sexual self-efficacy, sexual self-esteem, sexual fear, and sexual depression) were correspondingly 11 ± 4.41, 19.53 ± 4.53, 12.96 ± 4.19, 13.48 ± 1.76, and 5.38 ± 2.36. Self-esteem and self-concept had significant positive correlation with sexual anxiety (r = 0.49; P < 0.001) (r = -.23; P < 0.001) and sexual fear (r = 0.25; P = 0.003) (r = 0.18; P = 0.02) and negative correlation with sexual self-efficacy (r = -0.26; P = 0.002) (r = -0.28; P = 0.001) and sexual-esteem (r = -0.34; P < 0.001) (r = -0.34; P < 0.001). Self-esteem and self-concept had significant correlation with sexual anxiety and sexual fear; and negative correlation with sexual self-efficacy and sexual-esteem.

  15. Self-esteem, general and sexual self-concepts in blind people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Salehi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with visual disability have lower self-esteem and social skills than sighted people. This study was designed to describe self-esteem and general and sexual self-concepts in blind people. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013-2014. In this study, 138 visually impaired people participated from Isfahan Province Welfare Organization and were interviewed for measuring of self-esteem and self-concept using Eysenck self-esteem and Rogers′ self-concept questionnaires. The correlation between above two variables was measured using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software by Pearson correlation test. Results: Mean [± standard deviation (SD] age of patients was 30.9 ± 8 years. The mean (±SD of general self-concept score was 11 ± 5.83. The mean (±SD of self-esteem score was 16.62 ± 2.85. Pearson correlation results showed a significant positive correlation between self-esteem and general self-concept (r = 0.19, P = 0.025. The mean of sexual self-concept scores in five subscales (sexual anxiety, sexual self-efficacy, sexual self-esteem, sexual fear, and sexual depression were correspondingly 11 ± 4.41, 19.53 ± 4.53, 12.96 ± 4.19, 13.48 ± 1.76, and 5.38 ± 2.36. Self-esteem and self-concept had significant positive correlation with sexual anxiety (r = 0.49; P < 0.001 (r = -.23; P < 0.001 and sexual fear (r = 0.25; P = 0.003 (r = 0.18; P = 0.02 and negative correlation with sexual self-efficacy (r = -0.26; P = 0.002 (r = -0.28; P = 0.001 and sexual-esteem (r = -0.34; P < 0.001 (r = -0.34; P < 0.001. Conclusion: Self-esteem and self-concept had significant correlation with sexual anxiety and sexual fear; and negative correlation with sexual self-efficacy and sexual-esteem.

  16. Self-esteem, general and sexual self-concepts in blind people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mehrdad; Azarbayejani, Abas; Shafiei, Katayoun; Ziaei, Tayebe; Shayegh, Bahar

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with visual disability have lower self-esteem and social skills than sighted people. This study was designed to describe self-esteem and general and sexual self-concepts in blind people. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013-2014. In this study, 138 visually impaired people participated from Isfahan Province Welfare Organization and were interviewed for measuring of self-esteem and self-concept using Eysenck self-esteem and Rogers’ self-concept questionnaires. The correlation between above two variables was measured using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software by Pearson correlation test. Results: Mean [± standard deviation (SD)] age of patients was 30.9 ± 8 years. The mean (±SD) of general self-concept score was 11 ± 5.83. The mean (±SD) of self-esteem score was 16.62 ± 2.85. Pearson correlation results showed a significant positive correlation between self-esteem and general self-concept (r = 0.19, P = 0.025). The mean of sexual self-concept scores in five subscales (sexual anxiety, sexual self-efficacy, sexual self-esteem, sexual fear, and sexual depression) were correspondingly 11 ± 4.41, 19.53 ± 4.53, 12.96 ± 4.19, 13.48 ± 1.76, and 5.38 ± 2.36. Self-esteem and self-concept had significant positive correlation with sexual anxiety (r = 0.49; P < 0.001) (r = –.23; P < 0.001) and sexual fear (r = 0.25; P = 0.003) (r = 0.18; P = 0.02) and negative correlation with sexual self-efficacy (r = –0.26; P = 0.002) (r = –0.28; P = 0.001) and sexual-esteem (r = –0.34; P < 0.001) (r = –0.34; P < 0.001). Conclusion: Self-esteem and self-concept had significant correlation with sexual anxiety and sexual fear; and negative correlation with sexual self-efficacy and sexual-esteem. PMID:26929756

  17. Differences In Self-concept in Children and Adolescents in the Czech Republic Based On Their Age and Sex

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslav Orel; Radko Obereignerů; Eva Reiterová; Marek Malůš; Ondřej Fac

    2015-01-01

    Problem: The article presents a study of the differences in self - concept of children and adolescents based on their sex and age. Self - concept is an integral part of each personality. The level of self - concept in pupils may reflect significantly on their overall life satisfaction as wel l as influence their subjective success (individually experienced) and their objective success (evaluated externally). Methods: The diagnostic too...

  18. THE CONTRIBUTION OF PLAY FIGHTING TO THE EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan TRIFA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Play fighting is a form of behavior in which partners compete with each other to gain an advantage. Behavior during play fighting largely resembles the behavior in a real fight, where partners encounter, push and pull down onto the ground, trying to get into a position whereby to control or to dominate the opponent. In the play, unlike the fight, movements are exaggerated and performed at a lower intensity, muscles being somewhat less tensed, and certain actions that can cause injury to the partner are inhibited or modified, while offensive-defensive roles will be reversed quite frequently. Play fighting can be considered a type of evolutionary adaptation designed to facilitate those experiences that will shape the cognitive and emotional development necessary for living in social communities. Research undertaken on different mammal species shows that play fighting offers many opportunities for expression and decoding emotions, improves emotional regulation and contributes to the development of coping mechanisms.

  19. The impact of pretend play on children's development: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S; Lerner, Matthew D; Hopkins, Emily J; Dore, Rebecca A; Smith, Eric D; Palmquist, Carolyn M

    2013-01-01

    Pretend play has been claimed to be crucial to children's healthy development. Here we examine evidence for this position versus 2 alternatives: Pretend play is 1 of many routes to positive developments (equifinality), and pretend play is an epiphenomenon of other factors that drive development. Evidence from several domains is considered. For language, narrative, and emotion regulation, the research conducted to date is consistent with all 3 positions but insufficient to draw conclusions. For executive function and social skills, existing research leans against the crucial causal position but is insufficient to differentiate the other 2. For reasoning, equifinality is definitely supported, ruling out a crucially causal position but still leaving open the possibility that pretend play is epiphenomenal. For problem solving, there is no compelling evidence that pretend play helps or is even a correlate. For creativity, intelligence, conservation, and theory of mind, inconsistent correlational results from sound studies and nonreplication with masked experimenters are problematic for a causal position, and some good studies favor an epiphenomenon position in which child, adult, and environment characteristics that go along with play are the true causal agents. We end by considering epiphenomenalism more deeply and discussing implications for preschool settings and further research in this domain. Our take-away message is that existing evidence does not support strong causal claims about the unique importance of pretend play for development and that much more and better research is essential for clarifying its possible role. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. 职业自我概念与大学生就业观念教育%Vocational Self-concept and College Students′ Employment Concept Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖昌南

    2017-01-01

    Vocational Self-concept, first proposed by overseas career guidance researches, has undergone constant development since then.However, there are still some shortcomings and deficiencies, and it is of practical significance to redefine the concept of career self-concept.Three aspects of the new concept of self occupation include anchor and person job matching, practitioners′ occupation social roles and functions of the view, practitioners′ understanding of the value of life and the value of the corresponding occupation, which relates to psychology, sociology and philosophy thinking, and clarifies the concept of logical structure.The new concept plays a very important guiding role in college students′ employment concept education.The practice can better support the employment guidance in colleges and universities, and cultivate students′ sense of occupation identity and occupation responsibility, and strengthen the occupation career outlook as well.%职业自我概念首先由国外的职业指导研究者提出,此后不断发展变化,但仍存在缺陷和不足,重新定义职业自我概念具有现实意义.新的职业自我概念涵盖职业锚定和人职匹配、从业者对职业的社会角色和功用的看法、从业人员对人生价值的认识和职业价值的理解三个方面,分别对应心理学、社会学和哲学领域的思考,厘清了概念的逻辑结构.新的概念的提出对开展大学生就业观念教育有着重要的引领作用,能更好地支持高校就业指导的工作实践,培养大学生的职业认同感、职业责任感,强化职业生涯观.

  1. Academic Achievement, Self-Concept and Depression in Taiwanese Children: Moderated Mediation Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chen; Kuo, Shin-Ting

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to utilize a multidimensional perspective to examine whether children's self-concept served as a mediator between academic achievement and depression, and to further investigate whether this mediation effect was moderated by the ages of children. The participants consisted of 632 Taiwanese children in the…

  2. Adolescents’ identity experiments on the internet: consequences for social competence and self-concept unity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adolescents' online identity experiments on their social competence and self-concept unity. An online survey was conducted among 1,158 Dutch adolescents between 10 and 17 years of age. Using structural equation modeling, the authors investigate

  3. Insights into Self-Concept of the Adolescents Who Are Visually Impaired in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Santoshi; Datta, Poulomee

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to explore the nature of selected domains of self-concept (namely behaviour, Intellectual and school status, physical appearance and attributes, anxiety, happiness and satisfaction) of the sighted adolescents and the adolescents with a visual impairment. The sample (N = 160) have been drawn by simple random sampling from 100 sighted…

  4. The Effect of Compensation Studies on Disadvantaged Children's Self Concept Levels and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadioglu, Ömür

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of "Bir Umut Ol Benim Için" (Be My Hope) project which was prepared for the children who were disadvantaged by being influenced from several risk factors as compared to their peers on the self-concepts and locus of controls of the children. The study group consisted of 33 children who were…

  5. Self-Concept in Childhood: The Role of Body Image and Sport Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendo-Lázaro, Santiago; Polo-Del-Río, María I; Amado-Alonso, Diana; Iglesias-Gallego, Damián; León-Del-Barco, Benito

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in satisfaction with body image depending on whether the subject practices organized sport or not, as well as the gender of the children. In addition, the study aims to examine the role of body image and the practice of organized sport on the process of building the academic, social, emotional, family and physical dimensions of self-concept in childhood. To do so, a sample of 944 pupils was used. These children were attending primary school in different centers of the Autonomous Community of Extremadura (Spain) and were between 9 and 12 years of age. The main results of the study show that three out of every four children participating in this study were not satisfied with their figure and one out of every five was very dissatisfied. The satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the figure was similar in boys and girls, although it could be appreciated that the ideal body image is partly conditioned by gender stereotypes. The children most satisfied with their body image had a greater academic and physical self-concept. The children that practiced organized sports had a greater physical and emotional self-concept. The children most dissatisfied with their body image and practiced organized sports had a lower family self-concept. All these findings are discussed with reference to previous research literature.

  6. Forms of Self-Concept in Gifted High School Students Enrolled in Heterogeneous Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatte, Aude; Hugon, Mandarine; de Leonardis, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has been devoted to understanding how to facilitate the integration of gifted young people (Intelligence Quotient, greater than or equal to 130) into classroom settings. This study investigated a typology of self-concept in gifted French high school students. Eighty-four participants, between the ages of 13 and 18 (mean age, 15.5;…

  7. The Effect of Weight on Self-Concept, and Psychosocial Correlates of Physical Activity in Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Gregory J.; Joens-Matre, Roxane

    2007-01-01

    Much more attention has been given to the health implications of overweight and obesity than to the psychosocial implications. In order to combat obesity effectively, it is important to understand the implications of overweight on self-concept, self-esteem, and physical activity levels. Youth obesity has been associated with negative psychosocial…

  8. Dietary Habits and Physical Self-Concept of Elite Rhythmic Gymnasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Szilvia

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To identify main differences in nutrient patterns, food preferences and physical self-concept between the world's elite rhythmic gymnasts and untrained controls. Material and methods: A group of elite rhythmic gymnasts (n = 103) aged 15-21 years volunteered to participate in the study during the 2003 World Championships in Rhythmic…

  9. Teacher-Child Interactions: Relations with Children's Self-Concept in Second Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leflot, Geertje; Onghena, Patrick; Colpin, Hilde

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether teacher-child interactions characterized by teacher involvement, structure, and autonomy support at the beginning of second grade predicted children's global, academic, social, and behavioural self-concept at the end of second grade. The study was conducted in 30 second grade classrooms with 570 children and their…

  10. Academic Race Stereotypes, Academic Self-Concept, and Racial Centrality in African American Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Ndidi A.; Howard, Lionel C.; Kurtz-Costes, Beth; Rowley, Stephanie J.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between academic race stereotype endorsement and academic self-concept was examined in two studies of seventh- and eighth-grade African Americans. Based on expectancy-value theory, the authors hypothesized that academic race stereotype endorsement would be negatively related to self-perceptions. Furthermore, it was anticipated that…

  11. Ability Grouping of Gifted Students: Effects on Academic Self-Concept and Boredom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preckel, Franzis; Gotz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Background: Securing appropriate challenge or preventing boredom is one of the reasons frequently used to justify ability grouping of gifted students, which has been shown to have beneficial effects for achievement. On the other hand, critics stress psychosocial costs, such as detrimental effects on academic self-concept (contrast or…

  12. A Model of Academic Self-Concept for High School Hispanic Students in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Flor R.; Dalley, Christopher; Fernandez, Nicole; Davenport-Dalley, Tania Marie; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Tatum, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how Hispanic students' academic self-concept influences the independent variables of family academic expectations, peer relationships, schoolwork, and student-teacher relationships. A survey was administered to 222 ninth-grade students in Long Island, New York, 99 of whom self-identified as Hispanic. A structural equation model…

  13. The Effects of Using Ticks and Crosses on Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Robert; de Fockert, Jan W.

    2012-01-01

    Behaviour, including academic performance, can be influenced by implicit primes; and both objective performance and subjective ratings are susceptible to priming effects. Here, we report a new priming effect on academic self-ratings. Participants twice completed a measure of academic self-concept. In the first session, they all used circles to…

  14. Causal Ordering of Academic Self-Concept and Achievement: Effects of Type of Achievement Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinxten, Maarten; De Fraine, Bieke; Van Damme, Jan; D'Haenens, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Background: The relation between academic self-concept and achievement has been examined in a large number of studies. The majority of these studies have found evidence for a reciprocal effects model. However, there is an ongoing debate on how students' achievement should be measured and whether the type of achievement indicator (grades, tests,…

  15. Implications of Overlapping Difficulties in Mathematics and Reading on Self-Concept and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Leena; Taipale, Airi; Savolainen, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between adolescents' difficulty in mathematics and reading and the influence on academic self-concept and school grades was examined. The participants (N = 585; 299 girls, 286 boys) were one age group of ninth-graders whose mathematics and reading skills were assessed at the end of comprehensive school at age…

  16. Academic Self-Concept and Learning Strategies: Direction of Effect on Student Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Dennis M.; Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Lam, Amy Kwok Hap

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prediction of academic self-concept (English and Mathematics) and learning strategies (deep and surface), and their direction of effect, on academic achievement (English and Mathematics) of 8,354 students from 16 secondary schools in Hong Kong. Two competing models were tested to ascertain the direction of effect: Model A…

  17. The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction on Academic Self-Concept: Does Academic Major Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young K.; Sax, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Using cross-classified multilevel modeling, this study attempted to improve our understanding of the group-level conditional effects of student-faculty interaction by examining the function of academic majors in explaining the effects of student-faculty interaction on students' academic self-concept. The study utilized data on 11,202…

  18. Endorsing Achievement Goals Exacerbates the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect on Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sofie; Colpin, Hilde; Van Damme, Jan; Verschueren, Karine

    2015-01-01

    The big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) model predicts students' academic self-concept to be negatively predicted by the achievement level of their reference group, controlling for individual achievement. Despite an abundance of empirical evidence supporting the BFLPE, there have been relatively few studies searching for possible moderators.…

  19. Academic Self-Concept and Emotion Relations: Domain Specificity and Age Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Thomas; Cronjaeger, Hanna; Frenzel, Anne C.; Ludtke, Oliver; Hall, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations between academic self-concepts and the emotions of enjoyment, pride, anxiety, anger, and boredom as experienced in mathematics, physics, German, and English classes (N=1710; grades 8 and 11). In line with our hypotheses derived from appraisal-based emotion theories and self-efficacy research,…

  20. The Relationship between Academic Self-Concept and Achievement: A Multicohort-Multioccasion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ssu-Kuang; Yeh, Yu-Chen; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Marsh and Koller (2004) combined the reciprocal-effects model and the internal/external frame-of-reference model into a unified model of relationships between academic self-concept and achievement. However, this model has only been examined with German adolescents. We decided to test this model with two-wave data drawn from a national survey of…

  1. Correlation of adolescents' self-concept and self-esteem with some unwholesome behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Marčič

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate the correlations between self-image, self-esteem and some unwholesome behavior (alcohol consumption, cigarette and marihuana smoking, overeating at a meal, television watching and computer use in spare time in Slovenian adolescents. We used Offer Self-image Questionnaire for adolescents, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and Unwholesome behaviour Questionnaire that was made for the purpose of this research. In the research 392 high school students participated, aged around 15 and 18 years, approximately evenly represented by gender and age. Data was attained in class groups. The results showed low, but statistically significant correlations between some self-concept areas and unwholesome behavior. The highest correlations emerged between the sexual attitudes and all unwholesome behavior. Students with more positive sexual self-concept behave unhealthier. Family self, morals and vocational-educational goals were significantly negatively correlated with most of unwholesome behavior, which suggests that individuals with better family, moral and academic self-concept behave healthier. Significant negative correlations emerged also with coping self: individuals with better self-concept in mastery of the external world and superior adjustment behaved healthier. None of the unwholesome behavior correlated with self-esteem. Results are mainly consistent with previous studies, but also contribute to new comprehensions in psychological theory and practice.

  2. Testing the Twofold Multidimensionality of Academic Self-Concept: A Study with Chinese Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lan; Arens, A. Katrin; Watkins, David A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to extend previous research on the twofold multidimensionality of academic self-concept (i.e. its domain-specific structure and separation into competence and affect components), the present study tests its generalisability among vocational students from mainland China. A Chinese version of self-description questionnaire I was…

  3. Self-Concept and Psychological Adjustment Differences Between Self-Identified Male Transexuals and Male Homosexuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, Howard B.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Self-concept and adjustment data from anatomical males seeking sexual reassignment surgery were compared with that from a male homosexual group. Findings indicated that the homosexual group had a better self-image and was better adjusted than the sex change group. (Author)

  4. The impact of obesity on the perception of self-concept in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Serassuelo Junior

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on the perception of self-concept in children and adolescents. A total of 785 schoolchildren, 410 girls (11.44 ± 1.84 years, participated in the study. The sample was divided into normal weight, overweight and obese groups according to the BMI criteria proposed by Cole et al. (2000. Socioeconomic status (SES was evaluated according to the ABEP (2010 and self-concept was rated using the Piers-Harris 2 Scale. The results showed that for the overall self-concept variable the overweight and obese groups were within the average recommended by the instrument; however, the lowest scores were observed in obese boys and girls. On the basis of specific predictors (BMI, age, SES and skin color, obese boys were significantly more likely to present imbalance in the Behavioral Adjustment and Freedom From Anxiety domains (2.6 and 3.1 times, respectively than the normal weight group, irrespective of age, SES and skin color. For girls, the obese group was 2.0 to 2.7 times more likely to present imbalance in the TOT and Intellectual Status, Popularity and Happiness domains than the normal weight group, irrespective of age, SES and skin color. The results demonstrated a negative impact of overweight and obesity on the perception of overall self-concept and its domains.

  5. Art Counseling in an Educational Setting: Self Concept Change Among Pre-Adolescent Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kinnard; Allen, Richard

    This study was designed to test the hypotheses that (1) pre-adolescent boys show greater growth in positive self-concept when subjected to an art counseling program than when they receive a traditional non-directive counseling program having the same goal; and (2) this difference will continue to exist on into adolescence. Thirty boys who had just…

  6. Adventure Camp Programs, Self-Concept, and Their Effects on Behavioral Problem Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an adventure camp program on the self-concept of adolescents with behavioral problems. Subjects in the study included 61 randomly selected male and female adolescents ranging in age from 9 to 17 years with behavioral problems. The treatment group of 31 adolescents was randomly selected from a…

  7. Academic Self-Concept and Motivation in Young Talents of a Private University in Tarapoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo F. Carranza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between academic self-concept and academic motivation in young talents (Scholarship 18 at a Private University in Tarapoto city, Peru. The sample was obtained through a probabislitic sampling and there were 92 young talents, being 47,8% male and 52,2% female between 17 and 22 years old. I used a descriptive, correlational and non-experimental design. The sample was evaluated using the AF5 Self-concept Scale (García and Musitu academic section that consists of 6 items, and the Academic Motivation Scale that consists of 28 items. The psychometric properties of the instruments indicated that they are valid and reliable. Data were processed in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. The results show that there is a direct and highly significant relationship between academic self-concept and academic motivation in young talents (r = .301**, p<.004, which indicates the higher the academic self-concept, the greater the academic motivation.

  8. Deafness, Teacher-of-the-Deaf Support and Self-Concept in Australian Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remine, Maria D.; Care, Esther; Grbic, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether self-concept scores of deaf students vary according to age at diagnosis of deafness, the degree of deafness and the number of visits students receive from a teacher of the deaf. Thirty-seven deaf students between the ages of 12 and 18 attending inclusive educational settings in Western Australia participated in the…

  9. Reliability and Validity of a Self-Concept Scale for Researchers in Family Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathus, Spencer A.; Siegel, Larry J.

    1976-01-01

    Self-concept questionnaire was shown to have high test-retest reliability, but only fair to moderate split-half (odd-even) reliability. Validity was adequate. The scale will serve as a heuristic device for family counselors who require a rapid assessment of a child's self-esteem. (Author)

  10. Peer Group Counselling and School Influence on Adolescents' Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbochuku, E. O.; Aihie, N. O.

    2009-01-01

    The study focused on the influence of peer group counselling and school influence on the self-concept of adolescents' in Nigerian secondary schools. Sixty-eight Senior Secondary School II students from three schools--a boys' school, a girls' school and a co-educational school in Benin City participated in the study. A pre-test, post-test control…

  11. Teaching Students about Their Disabilities: Increasing Self-Determination Skills and Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to report the results of a pilot study that examined changes in self-awareness and self-concept. Seven self-determination lessons were implemented with 13 elementary, middle and high schoolers with disabilities in learning (i.e., learning disabilities and mild mental impairments). The lessons focused on teaching…

  12. Self-Concept and African-American Student Achievement: Related Issues of Ethics, Power and Privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Comer, James

    2000-01-01

    This article explores how pre-existing structures within the educational system impede the academic achievement of many African-American learners and contribute to low self-concept, mislabeling, and placement in lower academic tracks. Methodologies and strategies needed to change these practices and/or to limit their ill effects are suggested.…

  13. Locus of Control, Academic Self-Concept, and Academic Dishonesty among High Ability College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinn, Anne N.; Boazman, Janette

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to evaluate a measure of academic dishonesty and examine high ability college students' loci of control and its effect on behaviors of academic dishonesty, as moderated by academic self-concept. A total of 357 high ability college students enrolled at two universities in the southwestern United States took…

  14. Self-Concept, Social Position and Social Participation of Pupils with SEN in Mainstream Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramidis, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on a recent research project, this paper questions the literature's dominant representation of children with special educational needs (SEN) as holding negative perceptions of themselves and being socially isolated. The study examined dimensions of pupils' self-concept and their social position in their class network. Contrary to previous…

  15. Age Differences in Life Satisfaction, Locus of Control, and Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrke, Milton F.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Veterans Administration domiciliary residents in three age groups over age 50 completed measures of life satisfaction, locus of control and self-concept. Older veterans had resolved ego integrity v despair crisis more adequately than younger veterans. An institutional environment that facilitates self-esteem and satisfaction of elderly residents…

  16. Do Interracial Interactions Matter? An Examination of Student-Faculty Contact and Intellectual Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Darnell

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal, multi-institution study was to examine through multilevel analyses the influence of: (1) interracial interactions on student-faculty interactions; and (2) interracial interactions and student-faculty interactions on intellectual self-concept. Social participation and involvement theory, as they are constructed…

  17. An Investigation of Self-Concept, Clothing Selection, and Life Satisfaction among Disabled Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyo Jung

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the relationships between various aspects of self-concept (i.e., generalized self-efficacy, public self-consciousness, state hope, and self-esteem), clothing selection (i.e., clothing that expresses individuality, clothing that improves the emotional state, clothing that camouflages the body), and life satisfaction…

  18. The Prospective Assessment of Self-Concept in Neglectful and Physically Abusive Low Income Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Myra J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Pregnant women completed the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, and protective service records were reviewed three years later. Of 459 women, 29 had maltreated their children. Neglectful mothers had lower scores on self-esteem, moral self-worth, and personal and social adequacy than nonreported mothers. Both neglectful and physically abusive mothers…

  19. Age and Gender Differences in the Relation between Self-Concept Facets and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, A. Katrin; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This study tested whether the gender intensification hypothesis applies to relations between multiple domain-specific self-concept facets and self-esteem. This hypothesis predicts gender-stereotypic differences in these relations and assumes they intensify with age. Furthermore, knowledge about gender-related or age-related differences in…

  20. Incorporating Learning Motivation and Self-Concept in Mathematical Communicative Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagukguk, Waminton

    2016-01-01

    This research is trying to determine of the mathematical concepts, instead by integrating the learning motivation (X[subscript 1]) and self-concept (X[subscript 2]) can contribute to the mathematical communicative ability (Y). The test instruments showed the following results: (1) simple regressive equation Y on X[subscript 1] was Y = 32.891 +…

  1. Reading, Writing, and Math Self-Concept in Elementary School Children: Influence of Dimensional Comparison Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehm, Jan-Henning; Lindberg, Sven; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The internal/external (I/E) frame of reference model (Marsh, "Am Educ Res J" 23:129-149, 1986) conceptualizes students' self-concepts as being formed by dimensional as well as social comparison processes. In the present study, the I/E model was tested and extended in a sample of elementary school children. Core academic skills of…

  2. Classroom Racial Proportion: Influence on Self-Concept and Social Competence in Zimbabwean Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, Elias; Thomas, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    The authors measured self-concept and social competence relationships in 372 Zimbabwean adolescents (41% Black, 59% White) who attended classrooms in which they were either a racial minority or a racial majority (M age = 12.95 years, SD = 1.47). The authors used self-, peer-, and teacher-rating scale sociometric measures of social competence and a…

  3. Self-concept in fairness and rule establishment during a competitive game: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Sung-Phil; Cho, Yang Seok

    2015-01-01

    People consider fairness as well as their own interest when making decisions in economic games. The present study proposes a model that encompasses the self-concept determined by one's own kindness as a factor of fairness. To observe behavioral patterns that reflect self-concept and fairness, a chicken game experiment was conducted. Behavioral data demonstrates four distinct patterns; "switching," "mutual rush," "mutual avoidance," and "unfair" patterns. Model estimation of chicken game data shows that a model with self-concept predicts those behaviors better than previous models of fairness, suggesting that self-concept indeed affects human behavior in competitive economic games. Moreover, a non-stationary parameter analysis revealed the process of reaching consensus between the players in a game. When the models were fitted to a continuous time window, the parameters of the players in a pair with "switching" and "mutual avoidance" patterns became similar as the game proceeded, suggesting that the players gradually formed a shared rule during the game. In contrast, the difference of parameters between the players in the "unfair" and "mutual rush" patterns did not become stable. The outcomes of the present study showed that people are likely to change their strategy until they reach a mutually beneficial status.

  4. Self-Conception and Life Satisfaction: Integrating Aged Subculture and Activity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Kent A.

    1982-01-01

    Integrates the traditional activity theory explanation of adjustment to aging with the aged subculture theory advanced by Rose. A path model to data from two subsamples of older adults. Self-conception is shown to be an important intervening variable between social activity and life satisfaction. (Author)

  5. The Effects of a Self-Esteem Counseling Group on Male Prisoners' Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Judith R.; Good, Roland

    1983-01-01

    Studied the effectiveness of a self-esteem counseling workshop for fifteen male inmates. The program emphasized family related self-concept, using experiential and discussion strategies. Results indicated a significant increase in the participants' family-based self-esteem scores from pre- to posttest, while no change occurred in peer or…

  6. Academic Self-Concept and Motivation in Young Talents of a Private University in Tarapoto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Renzo F.; Apaza, Effer E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between academic self-concept and academic motivation in young talents (Scholarship 18) at a Private University in Tarapoto city, Peru. The sample was obtained through a probabislitic sampling and there were 92 young talents, being 47.8% male and 52.2% female between 17 and 22 years…

  7. The Effects of Abortion on the Self-Concept of Unwed Pregnant Teenage Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Teresa B.

    This research study compared the self-concept of women who had chosen first trimester abortion to those who were sexually active but had never experienced pregnancy. Subjects were stratified according to age groups: 13-19, 20-29, and 30 years of age and over. The sample was selected from clients of an intercity abortion agency and students of an…

  8. A Model of Academic Self-Concept for High School Hispanic Students in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Flor R.; Dalley, Christopher; Fernandez, Nicole; Davenport-Dalley, Tania Marie; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Tatum, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how Hispanic students' academic self-concept influences the independent variables of family academic expectations, peer relationships, schoolwork, and student-teacher relationships. A survey was administered to 222 ninth-grade students in Long Island, New York, 99 of whom self-identified as Hispanic. A structural equation model…

  9. Adolescents’ identity experiments on the internet: consequences for social competence and self-concept unity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adolescents' online identity experiments on their social competence and self-concept unity. An online survey was conducted among 1,158 Dutch adolescents between 10 and 17 years of age. Using structural equation modeling, the authors

  10. Does nurses’ self-concept mediate the relationship between job satisfaction and burnout among Nigerian nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidozie E. Nwafor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the mediating role of nurses’ general self-concept on the relationship between job satisfaction and burnout among a sample of 170 nurses in two Nigerian public health facilities. Three self-report measures were used to collect data for nurses’ general self-concept, job satisfaction and burnout from the participants. The study combined correlation and cross-sectional survey design. The result of the Pearson r correlation showed that nurses’ general self-concept correlated positively with job satisfaction but both of them correlated negatively with burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Further analysis with conditional process analysis (Hayes, 2013 showed that nurses’ general self-concept mediated the relationship between job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction and reduced personal accomplishment, but it did not mediate the relationship between job satisfaction and depersonalization. The discussion was based on the findings while limitations, suggestions for future studies and implications of the findings were highlighted.

  11. Achievement Differences and Self-Concept Differences: Stronger Associations for above or below Average Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Jens; Pohlmann, Britta

    2010-01-01

    Background: On the one hand, achievement indicators like grades or standardized test results are strongly associated with students' domain-specific self-concepts. On the other hand, self-evaluation processes seem to be triggered by a self-enhancing means of information processing. As a consequence, above average students have more positive…

  12. Self-Concept in Arab American Adolescents: Implications of Social Support and Experiences in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbah, Rhonda; Miranda, Antoinette Halsell; Wheaton, Joe E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate three domains (Scholastic Competence, Social Acceptance, and Global Self-Worth) of self-concept in Arab American adolescents in relation to their school experiences, including discrimination, self-perceived teacher social support, and self-perceived classmate social support. Half of the sample either…

  13. Gender Compatibility, Math-Gender Stereotypes, and Self-Concepts in Math and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Ravinder; Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita; Poondej, Chanut

    2016-01-01

    Positive self-assessment of ability in the quantitative domains is considered critical for student participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics field studies. The present study investigated associations of gender compatibility (gender typicality and contentedness) and math-gender stereotypes with self-concepts in math and…

  14. School Counselors Connecting the Dots between Disruptive Classroom Behavior and Youth Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidell, Markus P.; Deacon, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Students exhibiting emotional and behavioral problems in the classroom can significantly impact the learning environment and often are referred to school counselors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between high school students' self-concept and disruptive classroom behaviors (DCB). High school students (N = 92)…

  15. Factors Influencing Academic Self-Concept of High-Ability Girls in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Melissa Mui Mei; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact of entering high-ability classes on the academic self-concept of high-ability primary girls in Singapore. Participants in this study are 91 Primary 4 girls, 30 high-ability pupils, and 61 pupils from classes that include high-, middle-, and low-ability pupils. This study utilized a mixed-method…

  16. KONTRIBUSI SELF CONCEPT MATEMATIS DAN MATHEMATICS ANXIETY TERHADAP HASIL BELAJAR MAHASISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aan Subhan Pamungkas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini mengkaji hubungan antara self concept dan kecemasan matematika dengan hasil belajar mahasiswa tingkat awal. Penelitian ini didasari oleh sebagian besar mahasiswa awal program studi pendidikan matematika masih merasa cemas ketika berhadapan dengan persoalan matematika dalam mata kuliah kalkulus I, selain itu dilihat dari performa mahasiswa ketika menyelesaikan persoalan matematika timbulnya rasa tidak pecaya diri atas kemampuan yang dimilikinya. Sehingga ketika akan menyelesaikan persoalan mahasiswa selalu bergantung kepada temannya, dengan tujuan memperoleh keyakinan atas jawabannya. Metode penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode korelasional, metode ini digunakan untuk melihat seberapa kuat dan seberapa besar pengaruh self concept dan kecemasan matematika dengan hasil belajar mahasiswa. Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah seluruh mahasiswa program studi pendidikan matematika tahun akademik 2013/2014, sampel penelitian diambil dengan teknik purposive sampling sebanyak 88 mahasiswa yang mengontrak mata kuliah Kalkulus I. Instrument yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah skala self concept matematis dan skala kecemasan matematika. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa terdapat hubungan yang positif antara self concept dan kecemasan terhadap matematika dengan hasil belajar mahasiswa.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jpm.9.1.2191.01 - 10

  17. Adolescent Thinking: Self-Concept, Relationships and Punk. Unit for Child Studies. Selected Papers Number 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shelley

    Beginning with the principle that self-concept and self-esteem are learned, this paper describes the adolescent self and its social concomitants. The depiction of adolescence emphasizes adolescents' ability to think abstractly and their knowledge of the mind's ability to process, direct, and manipulate experience. In contrast with the…

  18. Tracking Effects Depend on Tracking Type: An International Comparison of Students' Mathematics Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Anna K.; Dumont, Hanna; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine how different types of tracking--between-school streaming, within-school streaming, and course-by-course tracking--shape students' mathematics self-concept. This was done in an internationally comparative framework using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). After…

  19. Personality Characteristics and Self-Concept of Preservice Teachers Related to Their Pupil Control Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Glennelle; And Others

    1982-01-01

    In a study of teacher trainees' personality characteristics related to pupil control, humanistically oriented educators tended to be emotionally stable, expedient, positive, imaginative, venturesome, relaxed and had high self-concepts. Authoritarian educators were more affected by feelings, conscientious, sober, practical, shy, reserved, tense and…

  20. An Investigation of Self-Concept, Clothing Selection, and Life Satisfaction among Disabled Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyo Jung

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the relationships between various aspects of self-concept (i.e., generalized self-efficacy, public self-consciousness, state hope, and self-esteem), clothing selection (i.e., clothing that expresses individuality, clothing that improves the emotional state, clothing that camouflages the body), and life satisfaction…

  1. Academic Achievement in First Generation College Students: The Role of Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFreitas, Stacie Craft; Rinn, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether verbal and math self-concepts could help explain the academic performance of first generation college students. Participants were 167 ethnically diverse students at an inner city, commuter, open-enrollment, four-year university in the southwestern United States. Results indicated that students with lower verbal and…

  2. Understanding the Relationship between Undergraduate Housing Environments and Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between where undergraduate students live and their academic, math, and verbal self concepts. Students living in on-campus residence halls, a campus-affiliated apartment community, within walking distance to campus, and within driving distance to campus completed the Self-Description Questionnaire III (SDQIII)…

  3. Parental influences on students' self-concept, task value beliefs, and achievement in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senler, Burcu; Sungur, Semra

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: firstly, to investigate the grade level (elementary and middle school) and gender effect on students' motivation in science (perceived academic science self-concept and task value) and perceived family involvement, and secondly to examine the relationship among family environment variables (fathers' educational level, mothers' educational level, and perceived family involvement), motivation, gender and science achievement in elementary and middle schools. Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) showed that elementary school students have more positive science self-concept and task value beliefs compared to middle school students. Moreover, elementary school students appeared to perceive more family involvement in their schooling. Path analyses also suggested that family involvement was directly linked to elementary school students' task value and achievement. Also, in elementary school level, significant relationships were found among father educational level, science self-concept, task value and science achievement. On the other hand, in middle school level, family involvement, father educational level, and mother educational level were positively related to students' task value which is directly linked to students' science achievement. Moreover, mother educational level contributed to science achievement through its effect on self-concept.

  4. Self-Esteem and Self-Concept Examination among Gifted Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Rickels, Heather; Assouline, Susan G.; Richards, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Intellectually gifted students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) face unique academic and social challenges, yet little research has been conducted with this population. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-esteem and self-concept of intellectually gifted children with and without a coexisting diagnosis of ADHD.…

  5. Exploring the Self-concept of Adults with Mild Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to add to the research on the self-concept of adults with mild learning disabilities and to generate a deeper understanding of their self-perceptions rather than draw generalised quantitative conclusions. Eight adults diagnosed with mild learning disabilities receiving support from a supported living project were…

  6. Why Multicollinearity Matters: A Reexamination of Relations Between Self-Efficacy, Self-Concept, and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Dowson, Martin; Pietsch, James; Walker, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Multicollinearity is a well-known general problem, but it also seriously threatens valid interpretations in structural equation models. Illustrating this problem, J. Pietsch, R. Walker, and E. Chapman (2003) found paths leading to achievement were apparently much larger for self-efficacy (.55) than self-concept (-.05), suggesting--erroneously, as…

  7. Perfectionism, shame, and self-concept in dancers: a mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusanio, Jacqueline; Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Perfectionism has been linked to various forms of physiological and psychological maladjustment. This study examined the inter-relationships between multi-dimensional aspects of perfectionism (self-oriented, other-oriented, and socially prescribed), internalized shame, and total self-concept in elite dancers (N = 24) as compared to a control group of healthy, active non-dancers (N = 23). All participants completed psychometric self-report measures targeting the variables of interest. Multivariate analysis of covariance (gender as covariate) indicated that the dancers had higher levels of self-oriented perfectionism than the control group. Building on the findings of Ashby, Rice, and Martin, we examined a model in which dancers' shame mediates the relationship between maladaptive aspects of perfectionism and self-concept. Analysis revealed internalized shame to fully mediate the relationship between dancers' socially prescribed perfectionism and total self-concept; however, shame did not mediate self-concept in the control group. We conclude that dancers would benefit from programs that enhance self-esteem and reduce the negative effects of internalized shame and self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism.

  8. Self-Conception and Life Satisfaction: Integrating Aged Subculture and Activity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Kent A.

    1982-01-01

    Integrates the traditional activity theory explanation of adjustment to aging with the aged subculture theory advanced by Rose. A path model to data from two subsamples of older adults. Self-conception is shown to be an important intervening variable between social activity and life satisfaction. (Author)

  9. Perfectionism and Children's Self-Concept: Further Validation of the Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Kubal, Anne E.; Preusser, Karen J.

    2004-01-01

    The Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale (AMPS) for children measures different dimensions of perfectionism. In this study, subscales derived from the AMPS were compared with results of the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale (PHSCS) in a sample of fourth- and fifth-grade students (9 to 11 years old). The AMPS dimensions accounted for significant…

  10. Physical self-concept of normal-weight and overweight adolescents: Gender specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Dušanka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous researchers have described the relation between physical self-concept and body mass in adolescents, but those relationships have not been clearly specified by gender. The purpose of this study is to explore physical self-concepts of normal-weight and over-weight Serbian adolescents with respect to gender. The sample consisted of 417 primary school students (229 boys and 188 girls with the average age 13.6 (SD=0.73 years who were divided into normal-weight and overweight groups according to body mass index. To assess the multidimensional physical self-concept, Physical Self-Description Questionnaire (PSDQ was administered. Results showed that overweight adolescents had significantly lower scores than normal-weight on all PSDQ scales except Health and Strength. Differences were greater among girls than boys. Discriminant analysis showed that the scales Body Fat, Endurance and Sports Competence best differentiated normal-weight boys from other students. Also, discriminant analysis showed that, besides the scale Body Fat, scales Flexibility, Self-Esteem, and Coordination best differentiated normal-weight girls from other students. Results indicate that for better understanding of the relationship between adolescent’s physical self-concept and body mass one must take gender into account. Results are potentially valuable for preventing overweight through physical education.

  11. Psychological Correlates of School Bullying Victimization: Academic Self-Concept, Learning Motivation and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims at detecting the association between students' bullying victimization at school and some psychological dimensions, referred to academic self-concept (for both Mathematics and Reading), learning motivation (intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, commitment to study) and test anxiety. A questionnaire including these measures was…

  12. Psychological Separation, Attachment Security, Vocational Self-Concept Crystallization, and Career Indecision: A Structural Equation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, David M.; Withrow, Jason R.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Moradi, Bonnie

    2003-01-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to test theoretically based models in which psychological separation and attachment security variables were related to career indecision and those relations were mediated through vocational self-concept crystallization. Results indicated that some components of separation and attachment security did relate to…

  13. Self-Concept, Disposition, and Resilience of Poststroke Filipino Elderly with Residual Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Tan, Eleanor Lourdes C.; Tan, Ernestine Faye S.; Tan, Justin Ryan L.; Tan, Mervyn C.; Tanciano, Daris Mae M.; Lee Say, Matthew L. Tang

    2012-01-01

    The interplay among self-concept, disposition, and resilience mirrors how the condition affects the emotional status of poststroke Filipino elderly with residual paralysis. Despite healthcare professionals' understanding of these clients' physical conditions, little is known regarding these clients' emotional health status related to stroke.…

  14. Effects of self-concept and perceived disapproval of delinquent behavior in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K; Lau, S

    1988-08-01

    It is argued that a multidimensional approach to self-concept may reveal intricate relations between self-concept and delinquent behavior, and that perceived approval of delinquent behaviors from referent groups may be related to the frequency of their occurrence. To evaluate these hypotheses, 1668 students from Grade 7 to Grade 9 responded to a questionnaire that measured their general self-esteem; their self-concept with regard to physical ability, social ability, physical appearance, and academic ability; the frequency they committed 15 delinquent acts; and the perceived approval of committing these acts from their parents, teachers, and friends. Regression analyses indicated that poor academic self-concept and poor relationship with school and parents were related to a higher frequency of delinquent behavior. However, a higher frequency of delinquent behavior was related to a more positive selfconcept with regard to social ability and physical ability. Finally, higher perceived approval from parents and peers was related to more delinquent behavior. Implications of these findings for identifying the antecedents and consequences of delinquent behavior were discussed.

  15. Adolescents' Perceptions of Chronic Self-Concept, Peer Relations, and Learning Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Eckert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Based on Lewin's Field Theory, Bronfenbrenner's Bioecological Systems Theory and social network analysis, the authors collected data from 405 Chinese adolescents about their peer relations, chronic self-concept levels and learning condition variables through questionnaire distributing, and from their teachers about their annual average…

  16. Age and Gender Differences in the Relation between Self-Concept Facets and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, A. Katrin; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This study tested whether the gender intensification hypothesis applies to relations between multiple domain-specific self-concept facets and self-esteem. This hypothesis predicts gender-stereotypic differences in these relations and assumes they intensify with age. Furthermore, knowledge about gender-related or age-related differences in…

  17. Self-regulation during pretend play in children with intellectual disability and in normally developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieillevoye, Sandrine; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the symbolic behavior and the self-regulation in dyads of children with intellectual disability and of normally developing children. Specifically, these processes were studied in link with the children's characteristics (mental age, linguistic level, individual pretend play level). The sample included 80 participants, 40 children with intellectual disability and 40 normally developing children, matched according to their mental age, ranged from 3 to 6 years old. First, a developmental assessment was performed (about cognitive, language and pretend play dimensions); then, in peers dyads, the children were elicited to pretend play by means of four kinds of material referring to four types of scripts (tea party, doctor, transportation, substitute objects eliciting creativity). The average symbolic behavior in individual and dyadic play contexts did not differ in both groups, but the average self-regulation in the group with intellectual disability was lower than in the normally developing group. Some positive partial correlations were obtained between mental age, language abilities, individual pretend play, dyadic pretend play and several self-regulatory strategies in both groups although they varied in importance between groups. Clusters analyses showed that individual and dyadic pretend play explained self-regulation in children of both groups. Specifically, in both groups, the higher was symbolic behavior in creativity context, the higher was self-regulation.

  18. Analysis of the Relationship between Physical Self-Concept and Body Image Dissatisfaction in Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirus Alipoor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Body image is a psychological construct which refers to self-concept including self image and feelings an individual perceives about his or her body. Body image can significantly affect the way an individual perceives about his or her body. Studies on relationship between physical self-concept and body image in some countries showed that the women's body dissatisfaction has led to increase in eating disorders. The question was raised whether such a relationship may exist in Iran. Approach: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical self-concept and body Image dissatisfaction in female. The importance of body image in Iranian culture has, recently, became more significant to the extent that tremendous expenditure of time, effort and money has been paid by people, particularly by women, seeking to alert their appearances to resemble an idea image. A survey of 140 female students selected through random sampling was conducted in Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, southern Iran. To collect data, a questionnaire including Demographic Information form the Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP and Nine Figure Silhouette Scale was used. The physical self-perception profile have five subscales, which were sport competence (SPORT, body attractiveness (BODY, physical condition (CONDITION and physical strength (STRENGTH and one subscale that assesses a global perception of overall Physical Self-Worth (PSW. Results: The finding of the research indicated that there is a significant negative correlation between the physical self-concept and body image dissatisfaction. The correlations magnitude ranged between 0.49-0.79 for body image dissatisfaction. Body image dissatisfaction correlated strongest with physical self-worth and with body physical self-concept in female students in Iran. Thinness had the most influential impact on body image dissatisfaction. The findings also showed discrepancy between the

  19. The Morality of Men Convicted of Domestic Violence: How It Supports the Maintenance of the Moral Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzana, Daniela; Vecina, María L; Alfieri, Sara

    2016-12-01

    The phenomenon of abuse toward women is a prevalent social problem in most societies. In the present work, we take into consideration the abusive man's point of view with particular reference to the sphere of their morality and set as aims: (a) to show that high levels of self-deception are mediating between an extreme moral worldview, called moral absolutism, and a functional high moral self-concept, (b) to analyze the relation of the five moral foundations (Harm, Fairness, Ingroup, Authority, and Purity) with this moral absolutism, and (c) to test a comprehensive model of the relationships between the individuated variables in the preceding hypotheses. Participants are 264 men convicted of domestic violence offenses, who, having begun court-mandated psychological treatment lasting 12 weeks, have filled out a self-report questionnaire during the second meeting. The results reveal that (a) self-deception is as a full mediator between moral absolutism and moral self-concept in men convicted of domestic violence and in such a way that the more they felt right about their moral beliefs, the more they deceived themselves, and the more they felt good about themselves, (b) the moral foundations could be explaining moral absolutism understood as a rigid moral vision of the world, and (c) the tested model produces satisfying fit indices. Finally, we discuss the applied implications, for example, a key role can be played by the family and the school: Moral socialization begins within the family and there finds the first push that will accompany it the rest of life.

  20. Playing Active Video Games may not develop movement skills: An intervention trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Lisa M.; Ridgers, Nicola D; John Reynolds; Lisa Hanna; Jo Salmon

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the impact of playing sports Active Video Games on children's actual and perceived object control skills. Methods: Intervention children played Active Video Games for 6 weeks (1 h/week) in 2012. The Test of Gross Motor Development-2 assessed object control skill. The Pictorial Scale of Perceived Movement Skill Competence assessed perceived object control skill. Repeated measurements of object control and perceived object control were analysed for the whole sample, u...