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Sample records for plausible drug targets

  1. Plausible Drug Targets in the Streptococcus mutans Quorum Sensing Pathways to Combat Dental Biofilms and Associated Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Rajesh, Shrinidhi; Princy, S Adline

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram positive facultative anaerobe, is one among the approximately seven hundred bacterial species to exist in human buccal cavity and cause dental caries. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density dependent communication process that respond to the inter/intra-species signals and elicit responses to show behavioral changes in the bacteria to an aggressive forms. In accordance to this phenomenon, the S. mutans also harbors a Competing Stimulating Peptide (CSP)-mediated quorum sensing, ComCDE (Two-component regulatory system) to regulate several virulence-associated traits that includes the formation of the oral biofilm (dental plaque), genetic competence and acidogenicity. The QS-mediated response of S. mutans adherence on tooth surface (dental plaque) imparts antibiotic resistance to the bacterium and further progresses to lead a chronic state, known as periodontitis. In recent years, the oral streptococci, S. mutans are not only recognized for its cariogenic potential but also well known to worsen the infective endocarditis due to its inherent ability to colonize and form biofilm on heart valves. The review significantly appreciate the increasing complexity of the CSP-mediated quorum-sensing pathway with a special emphasis to identify the plausible drug targets within the system for the development of anti-quorum drugs to control biofilm formation and associated risks.

  2. Encoding the target or the plausible preview word? The nature of the plausibility preview benefit in reading Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinmian; Li, Nan; Wang, Suiping; Slattery, Timothy J; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a plausible preview word can facilitate the processing of a target word as compared to an implausible preview word (a plausibility preview benefit effect) when reading Chinese (Yang, Wang, Tong, & Rayner, 2012; Yang, 2013). Regarding the nature of this effect, it is possible that readers processed the meaning of the plausible preview word and did not actually encode the target word (given that the parafoveal preview word lies close to the fovea). The current experiment examined this possibility with three conditions wherein readers received a preview of a target word that was either (1) identical to the target word (identical preview), (2) a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, but the post-target text in the sentence was incompatible with it (initially plausible preview), or (3) not a plausible continuation of the pre-target text, nor compatible with the post-target text (implausible preview). Gaze durations on target words were longer in the initially plausible condition than the identical condition. Overall, the results showed a typical preview benefit, but also implied that readers did not encode the initially plausible preview. Also, a plausibility preview benefit was replicated: gaze durations were longer with implausible previews than the initially plausible ones. Furthermore, late eye movement measures did not reveal differences between the initially plausible and the implausible preview conditions, which argues against the possibility of misreading the plausible preview word as the target word. In sum, these results suggest that a plausible preview word provides benefit in processing the target word as compared to an implausible preview word, and this benefit is only present in early but not late eye movement measures.

  3. Exploring apposite therapeutic target for apoptosis in filarial parasite: a plausible hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hande, Sneha; Goswami, Kalyan; Jena, Lingaraj; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2014-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis is a parasitic disease with profound socioeconomic encumbrance owing to its associated disability, affecting predominantly but not limited to the developing nations of tropics and subtropics. There are several technical issues like poor therapeutic and preventive repertoire as well as administrative and infrastructural limitations which jeopardize the salvage measures and further complicate the plight. Therefore, considering the gravity of the problem, WHO has mandated (under tropical disease research scheme) for placing emphasis on validation of novel therapeutic targets against this disease with the unfortunate tag of 'neglected tropical disease'. However, dearth of knowledge of parasite biology viciously coupled with difficulty of access to parasitic material from suitable animal model along with growing cost burden of high end research poses formidable challenge. Based on the recent research evidences, here we propose a premise with targeted apoptotic impact as a novel rationale to be exploited towards anti-parasitic drug development. The new era of bioinformatics ushers in new optimism with a wide range of genomic and proteomic database in public domain. Such platform might offer wonders for drug research, but needs highly selective criterion specificity. In order to test our hypothesis presumptively, we deployed a scheme for identification of target proteins from filarial parasitic origin through wide database search with precise criteria of non-homology against the host along with functional essentiality for the parasite. Further screening for proteins with growth potential from such list of essential non-homologous proteins was undertaken to mine out suitable representative target for ensuing apoptotic impact though effective inhibitors. A unique protein enzyme, RNA dependent RNA polymerase, which besides its vital role in RNA virus is believed to have regulatory role in gene expression, emerged as a plausible target. This protein

  4. Plausible antioxidant biomechanics and anticonvulsant pharmacological activity of brain-targeted β-carotene nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohammad; Khan, Riaz A; Khan, Maria; Ahmed, Bahar

    2012-01-01

    increased in P-80-BCNP to 231.0 ± 16.30 seconds, as compared to PTZ (120.10 ± 4.50 seconds) and placebo control (120.30 ± 7.4 seconds). The results of this study demonstrate a plausible novel anticonvulsant activity of β-carotene at a low dose of 2 mg/kg, with brain-targeted nanodelivery, thus increasing its bioavailability and stability.

  5. Plausible antioxidant biomechanics and anticonvulsant pharmacological activity of brain-targeted β-carotene nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf M

    2012-08-01

    general tonic–clonic seizures reduced significantly to 2.90 ± 0.98 seconds by the use of BCNP and was further reduced on P-80-BCNP to 1.20 ± 0.20 seconds as compared to PTZ control and PTZ-placebo control (8.09 ± 0.26 seconds. General tonic–clonic seizures latency was increased significantly to 191.0 ± 9.80 seconds in BCNP and was further increased in P-80-BCNP to 231.0 ± 16.30 seconds, as compared to PTZ (120.10 ± 4.50 seconds and placebo control (120.30 ± 7.4 seconds. The results of this study demonstrate a plausible novel anticonvulsant activity of β-carotene at a low dose of 2 mg/kg, with brain-targeted nanodelivery, thus increasing its bioavailability and stability.Keywords: anticonvulsant, blood–brain barrier (BBB, targeted brain delivery, polysorbate-80-coated β-carotene nanoparticles (P-80-BCNP, maximal electroshock seizure (MES, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ

  6. Magnetic targeted drug delivery

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    Timothy Wiedmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women. Treatment by intravenous or oral administration of chemotherapy agents results in serious and often treatment-limiting side effects. Delivery of drugs directly to the lung by inhalation of an aerosol holds the promise of achieving a higher concentration in the lung with lower blood levels. To further enhance the selective lung deposition, it may be possible to target deposition by using external magnetic fields to direct the delivery of drug coupled to magnetic particles. Moreover, alternating magnetic fields can be used to induce particle heating, which in turn controls the drug release rate with the appropriate thermal sensitive material.With this goal, superparamagetic nanoparticles (SPNP were prepared and characterized, and enhanced magnetic deposition was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. SPNPs were also incorporated into a lipid-based/SPNP aerosol formulation, and drug release was shown to be controlled by thermal activation. Because of the inherent imaging potential of SPNPs, this use of nanotechnology offers the possibility of coupling the diagnosis of lung cancer to drug release, which perhaps will ultimately provide the “magic bullet” that Paul Ehrlich originally sought.

  7. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Peter J

    2017-07-14

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  8. Antimicrobial drug use in Austrian pig farms: plausibility check of electronic on-farm records and estimation of consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauffler, M; Griesbacher, A; Fuchs, K; Köfer, J

    2014-10-25

    Electronic drug application records from farmers from 75 conventional pig farms were revised and checked for their plausibility. The registered drug amounts were verified by comparing the farmers' records with veterinarians' dispensary records. The antimicrobial consumption was evaluated from 2008 to 2011 and expressed in weight of active substance(s), number of used daily doses (nUDD), number of animal daily doses (nADD) and number of product-related daily doses (nPrDD). All results were referred to one year and animal bodyweight (kg biomass). The data plausibility proof revealed about 14 per cent of unrealistic drug amount entries in the farmers' records. The annual antimicrobial consumption was 33.9 mg/kg/year, 4.9 UDDkg/kg/year, 1.9 ADDkg/kg/year and 2.5 PrDDkg/kg/year (average). Most of the antimicrobials were applied orally (86 per cent) and at group-level. Main therapy indications were metaphylactic/prophylactic measures (farrow-to-finish and fattening farms) or digestive tract diseases (breeding farms). The proportion of the 'highest priority critically important antimicrobials' was low (12 per cent). After determination of a threshold value, farms with a high antimicrobial use could be detected. Statistical tests showed that the veterinarian had an influence on the dosage, the therapy indication and the active substance. Orally administered antimicrobials were mostly underdosed, parenterally administered antimicrobials rather correctly or overdosed.

  9. Target Oriented Drugs against Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-31

    the leishmanial source. Leishmanial strains L32 Leishmania tropica LRC L32 L137 Leishmania tropica LRC L137 L52 Leishmania donovani LRC L52 These...RESOLUTION TEST CHAR] 0REPORT NUMBER I TARGET ORIENTED DRUGS AGAINST LEISHMANIA (First Annual Summary Report) 0URI ZEHAVI, PhD and JOSEPH EL-ON, PhD...GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RE PIENT.S CATALOG NUMBER A....*( - ) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED TARGET ORIENTED DRUGS AGAINST LEISHMANIA 6 FIRST

  10. E. coli Group 1 Capsular Polysaccharide Exportation Nanomachinary as a Plausible Antivirulence Target in the Perspective of Emerging Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Palur, Raghuvamsi V.; Sudhakar, Karpagam U.; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria evolving resistance against the action of multiple drugs and its ability to disseminate the multidrug resistance trait(s) across various strains of the same bacteria or different bacterial species impose serious threat to public health. Evolution of such multidrug resistance is due to the fact that, most of the antibiotics target bacterial survival mechanisms which exert selective pressure on the bacteria and aids them to escape from the action of antibiotics. Nonetheless, targeting bacterial virulence strategies such as bacterial surface associated polysaccharides biosynthesis and their surface accumulation mechanisms may be an attractive strategy, as they impose less selective pressure on the bacteria. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) or K-antigen that is located on the bacterial surface armors bacteria from host immune response. Thus, unencapsulating bacteria would be a good strategy for drug design, besides CPS itself being a good vaccine target, by interfering with CPS biosynthesis and surface assembly pathway. Gram-negative Escherichia coli uses Wzy-polymerase dependent (Groups 1 and 4) and ATP dependent (Groups 1 and 3) pathways for CPS production. Considering E. coli as a case in point, this review explains the structure and functional roles of proteins involved in Group 1 Wzy dependent CPS biosynthesis, surface expression and anchorage in relevance to drug and vaccine developments. PMID:28217109

  11. Molecular docking and dynamic simulation studies evidenced plausible immunotherapeutic anticancer property by Withaferin A targeting indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

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    Reddy, S V G; Reddy, K Thammi; Kumari, V Valli; Basha, Syed Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is emerging as an important new therapeutic drug target for the treatment of cancer characterized by pathological immune suppression. IDO catalyzes the rate-limiting step of tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway. Reduction in local tryptophan concentration and the production of immunomodulatory tryptophan metabolites contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of IDO. Presence of IDO on dentritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes leading to the activation of T cells toward forming immunosuppressive microenvironment for the survival of tumor cells has confirmed the importance of IDO as a promising novel anticancer immunotherapy drug target. On the other hand, Withaferin A (WA) - active constituent of Withania Somnifera ayurvedic herb has shown to be having a wide range of targeted anticancer properties. In the present study conducted here is an attempt to explore the potential of WA in attenuating IDO for immunotherapeutic tumor arresting activity and to elucidate the underlying mode of action in a computational approach. Our docking and molecular dynamic simulation results predict high binding affinity of the ligand to the receptor with up to -11.51 kcal/mol of energy and 3.63 nM of IC50 value. Further, de novo molecular dynamic simulations predicted stable ligand interactions with critically important residues SER167; ARG231; LYS377, and heme moiety involved in IDO's activity. Conclusively, our results strongly suggest WA as a valuable small ligand molecule with strong binding affinity toward IDO.

  12. Evaluation and validation of drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-huaDU

    2004-01-01

    Drug target is one of the key factors for discovering and developing new drugs. To find and validate drug targets is a crucial technique required in drug discovery by the strategy of high throughput screening. Based on the knowledge of molecular biology, human genomics and proteomics, it has been predicted that 5000 to 10000 drug targets exist in human. So, it is important orocedure to evaluate and validate the drug targets.

  13. Antibiotic drugs targeting bacterial RNAs

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    Weiling Hong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available RNAs have diverse structures that include bulges and internal loops able to form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The recent increase in structural and functional information related to RNAs has put them in the limelight as a drug target for small molecule therapy. In addition, the recognition of the marked difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA has led to the development of antibiotics that specifically target bacterial rRNA, reduce protein translation and thereby inhibit bacterial growth. To facilitate the development of new antibiotics targeting RNA, we here review the literature concerning such antibiotics, mRNA, riboswitch and tRNA and the key methodologies used for their screening.

  14. Diagnostic Plausibility of MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl Line Probe Assays for Rapid Drug Susceptibility Testing of Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains in Pakistan

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    Javaid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background World health organization (WHO recommends the use of line probe assays (LiPAs for rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST. However, only a limited number of studies from Pakistan have documented the performance characteristics of line probe assays in testing multi-drug resistant (MDR strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. Objectives The objective of this work is to evaluate the diagnostic plausibility of the LiPA tests MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl on MDR MTB isolates from Pakistan. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Indus hospital, Karachi. LiPA testing was performed on 196 smear-positive samples using BACTEC MGIT 960 as a gold standard. Results The sensitivity of MTBDRplus for isoniazid and rifampicin was found to be 88.8% and 90.2%, respectively, while sensitivity of MTBDRsl for fluoroquinolones, amikacin/capreomycin, and ethambutol was found to be 72.9%, 81.8%, and 56.6%, respectively. Conclusions The MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl genotypic testing can serve as useful additional tools for DST in a high-burden country like Pakistan provided it is used in combination with phenotypic testing.

  15. NEW DRUG TARGETING TREATMENT - GLIVEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xue-mei(孙雪梅); BRADY Ben

    2003-01-01

    This review evaluates the role of Glivec in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and other malignant tumors. Preclinical and clinical evidence showed that Glivec demonstrated a potent and specific inhibition on BCR-ABL positive leukemias and other malignant tumors in which overexpression of c-kit and PDGFR-β played a major role in their pathogenesis. Glivec has induced complete hematologic responses in up to 98% of patients evaluated in clinical trials. It's a very successful drug that supported the idea of targeted therapy through inhibition of tyrosine kinases. Although it's still in the early stages of clinical development and the resistance to Glivec remains to be a problem needed further study, a great deal has been learned from these research and observation. And with the increasing data, molecular targeting therapy will play much more important role in the treatment of malignant tumors. With the better understanding of the pathogenesis of malignant tumors, well-designed drugs targeting the specific molecular abnormalities with higher efficacy and lower side effect will benefit numerous patients with malignant tumors.

  16. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

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    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery.

  17. Aquaporins as potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang WANG; Xue-chao FENG; Yong-ming LI; Hong YANG; Tong-hui MA

    2006-01-01

    The aquaporins (AQP) are a family of integral membrane proteins that selectively transport water and,in some cases,small neutral solutes such as glycerol and urea.Thirteen mammalian AQP have been molecularly identified and localized to various epithelial,endothelial and other tissues.Phenotype studies of transgenic mouse models of AQP knockout,mutation,and in some cases humans with AQP mutations have demonstrated essential roles for AQP in mammalian physiology and pathophysiology,including urinary concentrating function,exocrine glandular fluid secretion,brain edema formation,regulation of intracranial and intraocular pressure,skin hydration,fat metabolism,tumor angiogenesis and cell migration.These studies suggest that AQP may be potential drug targets for not only new diuretic reagents for various forms of pathological water retention,but also targets for novel therapy of brain edema,inflammatory disease,glaucoma,obesity,and cancer.However,potent AQP modulators for in vivo application remain to be discovered.

  18. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

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    Vihang S. Chawan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and drug administration (USFDA has approved eslicarbazepine acetate, ezogabine, perampanel and brivaracetam which have shown a promising future as better AEDs and drugs like ganaxolone, intranasal diazepam, ICA- 105665, valnoctamide, VX-765, naluzotan are in the pipeline. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 587-592

  19. Properties of protein drug target classes.

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    Simon C Bull

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of drug targets is a crucial part of any drug development program. We mined the human proteome to discover properties of proteins that may be important in determining their suitability for pharmaceutical modulation. Data was gathered concerning each protein's sequence, post-translational modifications, secondary structure, germline variants, expression profile and drug target status. The data was then analysed to determine features for which the target and non-target proteins had significantly different values. This analysis was repeated for subsets of the proteome consisting of all G-protein coupled receptors, ion channels, kinases and proteases, as well as proteins that are implicated in cancer. Machine learning was used to quantify the proteins in each dataset in terms of their potential to serve as a drug target. This was accomplished by first inducing a random forest that could distinguish between its targets and non-targets, and then using the random forest to quantify the drug target likeness of the non-targets. The properties that can best differentiate targets from non-targets were primarily those that are directly related to a protein's sequence (e.g. secondary structure. Germline variants, expression levels and interactions between proteins had minimal discriminative power. Overall, the best indicators of drug target likeness were found to be the proteins' hydrophobicities, in vivo half-lives, propensity for being membrane bound and the fraction of non-polar amino acids in their sequences. In terms of predicting potential targets, datasets of proteases, ion channels and cancer proteins were able to induce random forests that were highly capable of distinguishing between targets and non-targets. The non-target proteins predicted to be targets by these random forests comprise the set of the most suitable potential future drug targets, and should therefore be prioritised when building a drug development programme.

  20. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

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    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  1. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  2. Looking for plausibility

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan

    2010-01-01

    In the interpretation of experimental data, one is actually looking for plausible explanations. We look for a measure of plausibility, with which we can compare different possible explanations, and which can be combined when there are different sets of data. This is contrasted to the conventional measure for probabilities as well as to the proposed measure of possibilities. We define what characteristics this measure of plausibility should have. In getting to the conception of this measure, we explore the relation of plausibility to abductive reasoning, and to Bayesian probabilities. We also compare with the Dempster-Schaefer theory of evidence, which also has its own definition for plausibility. Abduction can be associated with biconditionality in inference rules, and this provides a platform to relate to the Collins-Michalski theory of plausibility. Finally, using a formalism for wiring logic onto Hopfield neural networks, we ask if this is relevant in obtaining this measure.

  3. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

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    Huwyler, Jörg; Drewe, Jürgen; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles) have been used with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of application include lipid-based formulations to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble antitumor drugs, the use of pegylated liposomes for passive targeting of solid tumors as well as vector-conjugated liposomal carriers for active targeting of tumor tissue. Such formulation and drug targeting strategies enhance the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy and reduce at the same time the risk of toxic side-effects. The present article reviews the principles of different liposomal technologies and discusses current trends in this field of research. PMID:18488413

  4. Discovering drug targets through the web.

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    Wishart, David S

    2007-03-01

    Traditionally, drug-target discovery is a "wet-bench" experimental process, depending on carefully designed genetic screens, biochemical tests and cellular assays to identify proteins and genes that are associated with a particular disease or condition. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing, transcript profiling, protein identification and protein quantification are leading to a flood of genomic and proteomic data that is, or potentially could be, linked to disease data. The quantity of data generated by these high throughput methods is forcing scientists to re-think the way they do traditional drug-target discovery. In particular it is leading them more and more towards identifying potential drug targets using computers. In fact, drug-target identification is now being done as much on the desk-top as on the bench-top. This review focuses on describing how drug-target discovery can be done in silico (i.e. via computer) using a variety of bioinformatic resources that are freely available on the web. Specifically, it highlights a number of web-accessible sequence databases, automated genome annotation tools, text mining tools; and integrated drug/sequence databases that can be used to identify drug targets for both endogenous (genetic and epigenetic) diseases as well as exogenous (infectious) diseases.

  5. Drug Repurposing: Far Beyond New Targets for Old Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Mestres, J.

    2012-01-01

    Repurposing drugs requires finding novel therapeutic indications compared to the ones for which they were already approved. This is an increasingly utilized strategy for finding novel medicines, one that capitalizes on previous investments while derisking clinical activities. This approach is of ...... relevance to the disease in question and the intellectual property landscape. These activities go far beyond the identification of new targets for old drugs.......Repurposing drugs requires finding novel therapeutic indications compared to the ones for which they were already approved. This is an increasingly utilized strategy for finding novel medicines, one that capitalizes on previous investments while derisking clinical activities. This approach...... is of interest primarily because we continue to face significant gaps in the drug–target interactions matrix and to accumulate safety and efficacy data during clinical studies. Collecting and making publicly available as much data as possible on the target profile of drugs offer opportunities for drug...

  6. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Ray

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX. SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  7. Drug targeting using solid lipid nanoparticles.

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    Rostami, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Azandaryani, Abbas H; Faramarzi, Hossain; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Omidfar, Kobra

    2014-07-01

    The present review aims to show the features of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) which are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Because of some unique features of SLNs such as their unique size dependent properties it offers possibility to develop new therapeutics. A common denominator of all these SLN-based platforms is to deliver drugs into specific tissues or cells in a pathological setting with minimal adverse effects on bystander cells. SLNs are capable to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers which lead to a new prototype in drug delivery which maybe used for drug targeting. Hence solid lipid nanoparticles hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of targeted solid lipid nanoparticles discussing their types such as antibody SLN, magnetic SLN, pH sensitive SLN and cationic SLN.

  8. NIOSOMES- A NOVEL DRUG CARRIER FOR DRUG TARGETING

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    A.KRISHNA SAILAJA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are vesicular drug delivery systems made of cholesterol and non ionic surfactants. Various novel drug delivery systems available for targeting of drugs include liposomes, nanoparticles, and resealed erythrocytes. Because of the instability and higher cost liposomes are less preferred over niosomes. The application of vesicular systems in cosmetics and for therapeutic purpose may offer several advantages for niosomes. They improve the therapeutic performance of the drug molecules by delayed clearance from the circulation, protecting the drug from biological environment and restricting effects to target cells. Niosomes have great drug delivery potential for targeted delivery of anti-cancer, anti-infective agents. Drug delivery potential of niosome can enhance by using novel concepts like proniosomes and aspasome. Niosomes also serve better aid in diagnostic imaging and as a vaccine adjuvant. Thus these areas need further exploration and research so as to bring out commercially available niosomal preparation. This article mainly focuses on the significance, advantages over other drug delivery systems, manufacturing methods, characterization methods, current research in niosomal drug delivery and their limitations.

  9. Mathematical modelling of magnetically targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grief, Andrew D. [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.grief@nottingham.ac.uk; Richardson, Giles [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giles.richardson@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-05-15

    A mathematical model for targeted drug delivery using magnetic particles is developed. This includes a diffusive flux of particles arising from interactions between erythrocytes in the microcirculation. The model is used to track particles in a vessel network. Magnetic field design is discussed and we show that it is impossible to specifically target internal regions using an externally applied field.

  10. Atypical GTPases as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Meera; Eswaran, Jeyanthy

    2012-01-01

    The Ras GTPases are the founding members of large Ras superfamily, which constitutes more than 150 of these important class of enzymes. These GTPases function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary switches that control many fundamental cellular processes. There are a number of GTPases that have been identified recently, which do not confine to this prototype termed as "atypical GTPases" but have proved to play a remarkable role in vital cellular functions. In this review, we provide an overview of the crucial physiological functions mediated by RGK and Centaurin class of multi domain atypical GTPases. Moreover, the recently available atypical GTPase structures of the two families, regulation, physiological functions and their critical roles in various diseases will be discussed. In summary, this review will highlight the emerging atypical GTPase family which allows us to understand novel regulatory mechanisms and thus providing new avenues for drug discovery programs.

  11. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Battisti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  12. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  13. MODELING OF TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY PART II. MULTIPLE DRUG ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zaborovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology practice, despite significant advances in early cancer detection, surgery, radiotherapy, laser therapy, targeted therapy, etc., chemotherapy is unlikely to lose its relevance in the near future. In this context, the development of new antitumor agents is one of the most important problems of cancer research. In spite of the importance of searching for new compounds with antitumor activity, the possibilities of the “old” agents have not been fully exhausted. Targeted delivery of antitumor agents can give them a “second life”. When developing new targeted drugs and their further introduction into clinical practice, the change in their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics plays a special role. The paper describes a pharmacokinetic model of the targeted drug delivery. The conditions under which it is meaningful to search for a delivery vehicle for the active substance were described. Primary screening of antitumor agents was undertaken to modify them for the targeted delivery based on underlying assumptions of the model.

  14. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  15. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3.

  16. P-glycoprotein targeted nanoscale drug carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang

    2013-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a trend whereby tumor cells exposed to one cytotoxic agent develop cross-resistance to a range of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. P -glycoprotein (P -gp) efflux pump is one of the mostly studied drug carrying processes that shuttle the drugs out of tumor cells. Thus, P -gp inhibitors have attracted a lot of attention as they can stop cancer drugs from being pumped out of target cells with the consumption of ATP. Using quantitive structure activity relationship (QSAR), we have successfully synthesized a series of novel P -gp inhibitors. The obtained dihydropyrroloquinoxalines series were fully characterized and then tested against bacterial and tumor assays with over-expressed P -gps. All compounds were bioactive especially compound 1c that had enhanced antibacterial activity. Furthermore, these compounds were utilized as targeting vectors to direct drug delivery vehicles such as silica nanoparticles (SNPs) to cancerous Hela cells with over expressed P -gps. Cell uptake studies showed a successful accumulation of these decorated SNPs in tumor cells compared to undecorated SNPs. The results obtained show that dihydropyrroloquinoxalines constitute a promising drug candidate for targeting cancers with MDR. Copyright © 2013 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.

  17. Targeting molecular networks for drug research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of molecular networks has recently moved into the limelight of biomedical research. While it has certainly provided us with plenty of new insights into cellular mechanisms, the challenge now is how to modify or even restructure these networks. This is especially true for human diseases, which can be regarded as manifestations of distorted states of molecular networks. Of the possible interventions for altering networks, the use of drugs is presently the most feasible. In this mini-review, we present and discuss some exemplary approaches of how analysis of molecular interaction networks can contribute to pharmacology (e.g., by identifying new drug targets or prediction of drug side effects, as well as listing pointers to relevant resources and software to guide future research. We also outline recent progress in the use of drugs for in vitro reprogramming of cells, which constitutes an example par excellence for altering molecular interaction networks with drugs.

  18. Co-targeting cancer drug escape pathways confers clinical advantage for multi-target anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that anticancer therapeutics may be enhanced by co-targeting the primary anticancer target and the corresponding drug escape pathways. Whether this strategy confers statistically significant clinical advantage has not been systematically investigated. This question was probed by the evaluation of the clinical status and the multiple targets of 23 approved and 136 clinical trial multi-target anticancer drugs with particular focus on those co-targeting EGFR, HER2, Abl, VEGFR2, mTOR, PI3K, Alk, MEK, KIT, and DNA topoisomerase, and some of the 14, 7, 13, 20, 6, 5, 7, 2, 4 and 10 cancer drug escape pathways respectively. Most of the approved (73.9%) and phase III (75.0%), the majority of the Phase II (62.8%) and I (53.6%), and the minority of the discontinued (35.3%) multi-target drugs were found to co-target cancer drug escape pathways. This suggests that co-targeting anticancer targets and drug escape pathways confer significant clinical advantage and such strategy can be more extensively explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    . Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development...

  20. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    further newly identified drug-induced differential regulation of Lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, Endoplasmin, DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha and Calmodulin 1. The feedback regulation in these and other targets is likely to be relevant for the success or failure of the molecular intervention....

  1. Amphotericin B formulations and drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, J J; Espada, R; Ballesteros, M P; Torrado-Santiago, S

    2008-07-01

    Amphotericin B is a low-soluble polyene antibiotic which is able to self-aggregate. The aggregation state can modify its activity and pharmacokinetical characteristics. In spite of its high toxicity it is still widely employed for the treatment of systemic fungal infections and parasitic disease and different formulations are marketed. Some of these formulations, such as liposomal formulations, can be considered as classical examples of drug targeting. The pharmacokinetics, toxicity and activity are clearly dependent on the type of amphotericin B formulation. New drug delivery systems such as liposomes, nanospheres and microspheres can result in higher concentrations of AMB in the liver and spleen, but lower concentrations in kidney and lungs, so decreasing its toxicity. Moreover, the administration of these drug delivery systems can enhance the drug accessibility to organs and tissues (e.g., bone marrow) otherwise inaccessible to the free drug. During the last few years, new AMB formulations (AmBisome, Abelcet, and Amphotec) with an improved efficacy/toxicity ratio have been marketed. This review compares the different formulations of amphotericin B in terms of pharmacokinetics, toxicity and activity and discusses the possible drug targeting effect of some of these new formulations.

  2. New targets for drug discovery against malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Santos

    Full Text Available A mathematical model which predicts the intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum infection was developed using data from malaria-infected mice. Variables selected accounted for levels of healthy red blood cells, merozoite (Plasmodium asexual phase infected red blood cells, gametocyte (Plasmodium sexual phase infected red blood cells and a phenomenological variable which accounts for the mean activity of the immune system of the host. The model built was able to reproduce the behavior of three different scenarios of malaria. It predicts the later dynamics of malaria-infected humans well after the first peak of parasitemia, the qualitative response of malaria-infected monkeys to vaccination and the changes observed in malaria-infected mice when they are treated with antimalarial drugs. The mathematical model was used to identify new targets to be focused on drug design. Optimization methodologies were applied to identify five targets for minimizing the parasite load; four of the targets thus identified have never before been taken into account in drug design. The potential targets include: 1 increasing the death rate of the gametocytes, 2 decreasing the invasion rate of the red blood cells by the merozoites, 3 increasing the transformation of merozoites into gametocytes, 4 decreasing the activation of the immune system by the gametocytes, and finally 5 a combination of the previous target with decreasing the recycling rate of the red blood cells. The first target is already used in current therapies, whereas the remainders are proposals for potential new targets. Furthermore, the combined target (the simultaneous decrease of the activation of IS by gRBC and the decrease of the influence of IS on the recycling of hRBC is interesting, since this combination does not affect the parasite directly. Thus, it is not expected to generate selective pressure on the parasites, which means that it would not produce resistance in Plasmodium.

  3. Complementary Approaches to Existing Target Based Drug Discovery for Identifying Novel Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Vasaikar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, it was observed that the relationship between the emerging New Molecular Entities and the quantum of R&D investment has not been favorable. There might be numerous reasons but few studies stress the introduction of target based drug discovery approach as one of the factors. Although a number of drugs have been developed with an emphasis on a single protein target, yet identification of valid target is complex. The approach focuses on an in vitro single target, which overlooks the complexity of cell and makes process of validation drug targets uncertain. Thus, it is imperative to search for alternatives rather than looking at success stories of target-based drug discovery. It would be beneficial if the drugs were developed to target multiple components. New approaches like reverse engineering and translational research need to take into account both system and target-based approach. This review evaluates the strengths and limitations of known drug discovery approaches and proposes alternative approaches for increasing efficiency against treatment.

  4. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan Trang Nguyen, Ngoc; Thi Le, Ly

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people.

  5. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical pr

  6. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development....... The greatest need is for new prophylactic drugs, and it seems likely that such compounds will be developed in the coming decade....

  7. Targets for anti-metastatic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Anna-Maria; Troost, Gabriele; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Entschladen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    With a constant focus on the primary tumor, the current approaches in drug development in oncology yield dismal results. However over 90 percent of cancer deaths today are due to metastasis formation and yet there is no anti-metastatic drug on the market. Tumor cell migration is the essential prerequisite for invasion and metastasis formation. It is regulated by signal substances in terms of the grade of activity and in terms of direction (chemotaxis). The latter is important for the organotropism, the localization of metastasis in certain organs. Ligands to G protein-coupled receptors, mainly chemokines and neurotransmitters, as well as ligands to receptor kinases, mainly cytokines and growth factors, form the most important group of such regulators. We provide an overview of currently available agonists and antagonists to these receptors, which have a potential as anti-metastatic targets. Moreover we provide with the example of beta-blockers, how established drugs in other indications are possibly effective and can be co-opted as such anti-metastatics. The increasing knowledge of such regulators opens new opportunities to target cancer spreading and may put forth the development of antimetastatic drugs for oncological therapy.

  8. Prediction of potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Luhua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decades, research and development in drug discovery have attracted much attention and efforts. However, only 324 drug targets are known for clinical drugs up to now. Identifying potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery for developing novel therapeutic agents. Therefore, the identification and validation of new and effective drug targets are of great value for drug discovery in both academia and pharmaceutical industry. If a protein can be predicted in advance for its potential application as a drug target, the drug discovery process targeting this protein will be greatly speeded up. In the current study, based on the properties of known drug targets, we have developed a sequence-based drug target prediction method for fast identification of novel drug targets. Results Based on simple physicochemical properties extracted from protein sequences of known drug targets, several support vector machine models have been constructed in this study. The best model can distinguish currently known drug targets from non drug targets at an accuracy of 84%. Using this model, potential protein drug targets of human origin from Swiss-Prot were predicted, some of which have already attracted much attention as potential drug targets in pharmaceutical research. Conclusion We have developed a drug target prediction method based solely on protein sequence information without the knowledge of family/domain annotation, or the protein 3D structure. This method can be applied in novel drug target identification and validation, as well as genome scale drug target predictions.

  9. Endocrine receptors as targets for new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly detailed knowledge of cellular signalling pathways is providing a sound basis for the development of specific drugs aimed at selected components of the pathways. Many of these targets are receptors and the multitude of hormone receptors makes endocrine functions a rich proving ground for this research. This article reviews a recent meeting (Insights into Receptor Function and New Drug Development Targets; 5th Endocrinology Colloquium of the Fondation Ipsen, Paris, December 5, 2005) where progress in defining suitable targets for drug therapies in the endocrine system and in designing drugs for some of these targets was discussed. Although the family of G-protein-coupled receptors, ubiquitous in the endocrine system, was the central focus, comparisons with other receptor families were made. Many mutations affecting genes coding for receptors or other components of signalling pathways have been found in a wide range of endocrine disorders including obesity, parathyroid malfunction, disorders involving thyroid-stimulating hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, and tumours in the anterior pituitary, as well as in many types of cancer. These are being used to dissect the normal control mechanisms as well as to provide information for the development of selective drugs. Recently identified mutations that affect the intracellular traffic in newly synthesised receptors open up possibilities of another dimension of cellular regulation of signalling. Both the discovery of hormones such as apelin and its pairing with an 'orphan' receptor, and the unexpected action of a drug against cannabinoid receptors point to further levels of complexity in cardiovascular regulation. Deeper understanding of the evolution of receptor families and of the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction is enabling the design of highly specific agonists and antagonists. Pharmacological intervention is not limited to the ligand-receptor interaction but can extend to inhibition of

  10. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  11. New drugs and treatment targets in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic in the next years. Biologics are costly, require injections, and some patients experience tacaphylaxis, thus, the development of orally available, small-molecule inhibitors is desirable. Among small-molecules under investigation are A3 adenosine receptor agonists, Janus kinase inhibitors, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming years. We need to be aware of the limitations of drug safety data when selecting new novel treatments. Monitoring and clinical registries are still important tools.

  12. New Drugs and Treatment Targets in Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic......, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming...

  13. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Piazza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  14. Drug Target Protein-Protein Interaction Networks: A Systematic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghe Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and validation of drug targets are crucial in biomedical research and many studies have been conducted on analyzing drug target features for getting a better understanding on principles of their mechanisms. But most of them are based on either strong biological hypotheses or the chemical and physical properties of those targets separately. In this paper, we investigated three main ways to understand the functional biomolecules based on the topological features of drug targets. There are no significant differences between targets and common proteins in the protein-protein interactions network, indicating the drug targets are neither hub proteins which are dominant nor the bridge proteins. According to some special topological structures of the drug targets, there are significant differences between known targets and other proteins. Furthermore, the drug targets mainly belong to three typical communities based on their modularity. These topological features are helpful to understand how the drug targets work in the PPI network. Particularly, it is an alternative way to predict potential targets or extract nontargets to test a new drug target efficiently and economically. By this way, a drug target’s homologue set containing 102 potential target proteins is predicted in the paper.

  15. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  16. The Research Progress of Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jiayin; Ting, Xizi Liang; Zhu, Junjie

    2017-06-01

    Targeted drug delivery system (DDS) means to selectively transport drugs to targeted tissues, organs, and cells through a variety of drugs carrier. It is usually designed to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and to overcome problems such as limited solubility, drug aggregation, poor bio distribution and lack of selectivity, controlling drug release carrier and to reduce normal tissue damage. With the characteristics of nontoxic and biodegradable, it can increase the retention of drug in lesion site and the permeability, improve the concentration of the drug in lesion site. at present, there are some kinds of DDS using at test phase, such as slow controlled release drug delivery system, targeted drug delivery systems, transdermal drug delivery system, adhesion dosing system and so on. This paper makes a review for DDS.

  17. Dynamics of target-mediated drug disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peletier, Lambertus A; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2009-12-08

    We present a mathematical analysis of the basic model underlying target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) in which a ligand is supplied through an initial bolus or through a constant rate infusion and forms a complex with a receptor (target), which is supplied and removed continuously. Ligand and complex may be eliminated according to first-order processes. We assume that the total receptor pool (free and bound) is constant in time and we give a geometrical description of the evolution of the concentrations of ligand, receptor and receptor-ligand complex which offers a transparent way to compare the full model with simpler models such as the quasi-steady-state (QSS) model, the quasi-equilibrium (QE) model and the empirical Michaelis-Menten (MM) model; we also give precise conditions on the parameters in the TMDD model for the validity of these reduced models. We relate characteristic properties of time courses to parameter regimes and, in particular, we identify and explain non-monotone dependence of the time-to-steady-state on the infusion rate. Finally, we discuss how the volume of the central compartment may be overestimated because of singular initial behaviour of the time course of the ligand concentration.

  18. Drug target identification using side-effect similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2008-01-01

    Targets for drugs have so far been predicted on the basis of molecular or cellular features, for example, by exploiting similarity in chemical structure or in activity across cell lines. We used phenotypic side-effect similarities to infer whether two drugs share a target. Applied to 746 marketed...... drugs, a network of 1018 side effect-driven drug-drug relations became apparent, 261 of which are formed by chemically dissimilar drugs from different therapeutic indications. We experimentally tested 20 of these unexpected drug-drug relations and validated 13 implied drug-target relations by in vitro...... binding assays, of which 11 reveal inhibition constants equal to less than 10 micromolar. Nine of these were tested and confirmed in cell assays, documenting the feasibility of using phenotypic information to infer molecular interactions and hinting at new uses of marketed drugs....

  19. Novel Methods for Drug-Target Interaction Prediction using Graph Mining

    KAUST Repository

    Ba Alawi, Wail

    2016-08-31

    The problem of developing drugs that can be used to cure diseases is important and requires a careful approach. Since pursuing the wrong candidate drug for a particular disease could be very costly in terms of time and money, there is a strong interest in minimizing such risks. Drug repositioning has become a hot topic of research, as it helps reduce these risks significantly at the early stages of drug development by reusing an approved drug for the treatment of a different disease. Still, finding new usage for a drug is non-trivial, as it is necessary to find out strong supporting evidence that the proposed new uses of drugs are plausible. Many computational approaches were developed to narrow the list of possible candidate drug-target interactions (DTIs) before any experiments are done. However, many of these approaches suffer from unacceptable levels of false positives. We developed two novel methods based on graph mining networks of drugs and targets. The first method (DASPfind) finds all non-cyclic paths that connect a drug and a target, and using a function that we define, calculates a score from all the paths. This score describes our confidence that DTI is correct. We show that DASPfind significantly outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in predicting the top ranked target for each drug. We demonstrate the utility of DASPfind by predicting 15 novel DTIs over a set of ion channel proteins, and confirming 12 out of these 15 DTIs through experimental evidence reported in literature and online drug databases. The second method (DASPfind+) modifies DASPfind in order to increase the confidence and reliability of the resultant predictions. Based on the structure of the drug-target interaction (DTI) networks, we introduced an optimization scheme that incrementally alters the network structure locally for each drug to achieve more robust top 1 ranked predictions. Moreover, we explored effects of several similarity measures between the targets on the prediction

  20. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU MingZhu; GAO Lei; LI Xia; LIU ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation Inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly Intercon-nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action In terms of informatice. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac-tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins In the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem-onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  1. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly intercon- nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action in terms of informatics. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac- tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins in the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem- onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  2. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-03-13

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  3. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  4. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  5. Target based drug design - a reality in virtual sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Saroj; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S

    2015-01-01

    The target based drug design approaches are a series of computational procedures, including visualization tools, to support the decision systems of drug design/discovery process. In the essence of biological targets shaping the potential lead/drug molecules, this review presents a comprehensive position of different components of target based drug design which include target identification, protein modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, binding/catalytic sites identification, docking, virtual screening, fragment based strategies, substructure treatment of targets in tackling drug resistance, in silico ADMET, structural vaccinology, etc along with the key issues involved therein and some well investigated case studies. The concepts and working of these procedures are critically discussed to arouse interest and to advance the drug research.

  6. Iontophoresis across the proximal nail fold to target drugs to the nail matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Prashanth; Sammeta, Srinivasa M; Repka, Michael A; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-07-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the plausibility of iontophoretic delivery of drugs to the nail matrix via proximal nail fold. The in vitro drug transport studies were performed in Franz diffusion cells across folded epidermis, which is used as a model for the proximal nail fold. The amount of drug transported into the receiver compartment following iontophoresis for 3 h at 0.5 mA/cm(2) was 150-fold higher than the control (0.008 ± 0.002 μg/cm(2)). The amount of drug present in the skin after iontophoresis (0.45 ± 0.12 μg/mg) was approximately fivefold higher as compared with that of the control (0.08 ± 0.01 μg/mg). Iontophoresis of terbinafine across the proximal nail fold was assessed using excised cadaver toe model as well. A custom-designed foam-pad-type patch system was used for iontophoresis in cadaver toes. The amount of the drug delivered into the nail matrix following iontophoresis for 3 h was significantly higher than the minimum inhibition concentration of terbinafine. However, on the contrary, passive delivery for about 24 h did not result in any detectable drug levels in the nail matrix. Iontophoresis across the proximal nail fold could be developed as a potential method to target drugs to nail matrix.

  7. Assessing drug target association using semantic linked data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing amount of public data in chemistry and biology provides new opportunities for large-scale data mining for drug discovery. Systematic integration of these heterogeneous sets and provision of algorithms to data mine the integrated sets would permit investigation of complex mechanisms of action of drugs. In this work we integrated and annotated data from public datasets relating to drugs, chemical compounds, protein targets, diseases, side effects and pathways, building a semantic linked network consisting of over 290,000 nodes and 720,000 edges. We developed a statistical model to assess the association of drug target pairs based on their relation with other linked objects. Validation experiments demonstrate the model can correctly identify known direct drug target pairs with high precision. Indirect drug target pairs (for example drugs which change gene expression level are also identified but not as strongly as direct pairs. We further calculated the association scores for 157 drugs from 10 disease areas against 1683 human targets, and measured their similarity using a [Formula: see text] score matrix. The similarity network indicates that drugs from the same disease area tend to cluster together in ways that are not captured by structural similarity, with several potential new drug pairings being identified. This work thus provides a novel, validated alternative to existing drug target prediction algorithms. The web service is freely available at: http://chem2bio2rdf.org/slap.

  8. Assessing drug target association using semantic linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Ding, Ying; Wild, David J

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of public data in chemistry and biology provides new opportunities for large-scale data mining for drug discovery. Systematic integration of these heterogeneous sets and provision of algorithms to data mine the integrated sets would permit investigation of complex mechanisms of action of drugs. In this work we integrated and annotated data from public datasets relating to drugs, chemical compounds, protein targets, diseases, side effects and pathways, building a semantic linked network consisting of over 290,000 nodes and 720,000 edges. We developed a statistical model to assess the association of drug target pairs based on their relation with other linked objects. Validation experiments demonstrate the model can correctly identify known direct drug target pairs with high precision. Indirect drug target pairs (for example drugs which change gene expression level) are also identified but not as strongly as direct pairs. We further calculated the association scores for 157 drugs from 10 disease areas against 1683 human targets, and measured their similarity using a [Formula: see text] score matrix. The similarity network indicates that drugs from the same disease area tend to cluster together in ways that are not captured by structural similarity, with several potential new drug pairings being identified. This work thus provides a novel, validated alternative to existing drug target prediction algorithms. The web service is freely available at: http://chem2bio2rdf.org/slap.

  9. In silico analysis and prioritization of drug targets in Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashanmugam, Muthukumaran; Nagarajan, Hemavathy; Vetrivel, Umashankar; Ramasubban, Gayathri; Therese, Kulandai Lily; Narahari, Madhavan Hajib

    2015-02-01

    Mycotic keratitis has emerged as a major ophthalmic problem and a leading cause of blindness, since its recognition in 1879. Filamentous fungi are major causative of mycotic keratitis. In India, the main etiological organism responsible for mycotic keratitis is Aspergillus species followed by Fusarium species. In South India, Fusarium based keratitis scales up to 43%. Nearly one-third of mycotic keratitis treatment results in failure, as fungal infections are highly resistant to antibiotic therapies. Therefore, there is need to determine novel and specific targets to constrain Fusarium infections in human eye. In this study, we implemented subtractive proteomics coupled with in silico functional annotation to prioritize potential and specific drug targets which can be used to modulate the virulence of Fusarium solani subsp.pisi (Nectria haematococca MPVI). The results infer that Thiamine thiazole synthase (Thi4), an intracellular membrane bound protein as the potential target, which is a core protein in biological and metabolic process of this pathogen. Moreover, this protein occurs in the thiamine thiazole biosynthesis pathway which is unique to F.solani and devoid in human. Hence, we predicted a plausible structure for this protein and also performed ligand-binding cavity analysis which can be for a strong base for drug designing studies. This study will pave way in better understanding of potential drug targets in F.solani and also leading to therapeutic interventions of fungal keratitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Dong Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development.

  11. New receptor targeted drugs : pharmaceutical aspects and molecular imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn Nicolette

    2006-01-01

    A new generation of innovative receptor targeted drugs rapidly enters the market. However, since these drugs target a specific receptor, they are not of value for all cancer patients, but only for specific tumor types or a subset within a tumor type. This makes it increasingly important to select

  12. Hydrodynamic modeling of ferrofluid flow in magnetic targeting drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Han-dan; XU Wei; WANG Shi-gang; KE Zun-ji

    2008-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific locations within human body, magnetic drug targeting prevails due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Magnetic targeting drug delivery is a method of carrying drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles to a target tissue target under the applied magnetic field. This method increases the drug concentration in the target while reducing the adverse side-effects. Although there have been some theoretical analyses for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel. A mathematical model is presented to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. In this model, magnetic force and asymmetrical force are added, and an angular momentum equation of magnetic nanoparticles in the applied magnetic field is modeled. Engineering approximations are achieved by retaining the physically most significant items in the model due to the mathematical complexity of the motion equations. Numerical simulations are performed to obtain better insight into the theoretical model with computational fluid dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the important parameters leading to adequate drug delivery to the target site depending on the magnetic field intensity, which coincident with those of animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide important information and suggest strategies for improving delivery in clinical application.

  13. Large-scale prediction of drug-target relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Michael; Campillos, Mónica; González, Paula

    2008-01-01

    , but also provides a more global view on drug-target relations. Here we review recent attempts to apply large-scale computational analyses to predict novel interactions of drugs and targets from molecular and cellular features. In this context, we quantify the family-dependent probability of two proteins...... to bind the same ligand as function of their sequence similarity. We finally discuss how phenotypic data could help to expand our understanding of the complex mechanisms of drug action....

  14. Target-based drug discovery for human African trypanosomiasis: selection of molecular target and chemical matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    Target-based approaches for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and related parasites can be a valuable route for drug discovery for these diseases. However, care needs to be taken in selection of both the actual drug target and the chemical matter that is developed. In this article, potential criteria to aid target selection are described. Then the physiochemical properties of typical oral drugs are discussed and compared to those of known anti-parasitics.

  15. Targeted drug-carrying bacteriophages as antibacterial nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoby, Iftach; Bar, Hagit; Benhar, Itai

    2007-06-01

    While the resistance of bacteria to traditional antibiotics is a major public health concern, the use of extremely potent antibacterial agents is limited by their lack of selectivity. As in cancer therapy, antibacterial targeted therapy could provide an opportunity to reintroduce toxic substances to the antibacterial arsenal. A desirable targeted antibacterial agent should combine binding specificity, a large drug payload per binding event, and a programmed drug release mechanism. Recently, we presented a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages as targeted drug carriers that could partially inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. This partial success was due to limitations of drug-loading capacity that resulted from the hydrophobicity of the drug. Here we present a novel drug conjugation chemistry which is based on connecting hydrophobic drugs to the phage via aminoglycoside antibiotics that serve as solubility-enhancing branched linkers. This new formulation allowed a significantly larger drug-carrying capacity of the phages, resulting in a drastic improvement in their performance as targeted drug-carrying nanoparticles. As an example for a potential systemic use for potent agents that are limited for topical use, we present antibody-targeted phage nanoparticles that carry a large payload of the hemolytic antibiotic chloramphenicol connected through the aminoglycoside neomycin. We demonstrate complete growth inhibition toward the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli with an improvement in potency by a factor of approximately 20,000 compared to the free drug.

  16. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Lancz, G; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; Miskuf, J [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, M, E-mail: akasard@saske.s [Hameln rds a.s., 900 01 Modra (Slovakia)

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  17. Predicting the Reliability of Drug-target Interaction Predictions with Maximum Coverage of Target Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peón, Antonio; Naulaerts, Stefan; Ballester, Pedro J

    2017-06-19

    Many computational methods to predict the macromolecular targets of small organic molecules have been presented to date. Despite progress, target prediction methods still have important limitations. For example, the most accurate methods implicitly restrict their predictions to a relatively small number of targets, are not systematically validated on drugs (whose targets are harder to predict than those of non-drug molecules) and often lack a reliability score associated with each predicted target. Here we present a systematic validation of ligand-centric target prediction methods on a set of clinical drugs. These methods exploit a knowledge-base covering 887,435 known ligand-target associations between 504,755 molecules and 4,167 targets. Based on this dataset, we provide a new estimate of the polypharmacology of drugs, which on average have 11.5 targets below IC50 10 µM. The average performance achieved across clinical drugs is remarkable (0.348 precision and 0.423 recall, with large drug-dependent variability), especially given the unusually large coverage of the target space. Furthermore, we show how a sparse ligand-target bioactivity matrix to retrospectively validate target prediction methods could underestimate prospective performance. Lastly, we present and validate a first-in-kind score capable of accurately predicting the reliability of target predictions.

  18. Drug efflux pump deficiency and drug target resistance masking in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fange, David; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that drug efflux pump deficiency not only increases the susceptibility of pathogens to antibiotics, but also seems to “mask” the effects of mutations, that decrease the affinities of drugs to their intracellular targets, on the growth rates of drug-exposed bacteria. That is, in the presence of drugs, the growth rates of drug-exposed WT and target mutated strains are the same in a drug efflux pump deficient background, but the mutants grow faster than WT in a drug efflux pump proficient background. Here, we explain the mechanism of target resistance masking and show that it occurs in response to drug efflux pump inhibition among pathogens with high-affinity drug binding targets, low cell-membrane drug-permeability and insignificant intracellular drug degradation. We demonstrate that target resistance masking is fundamentally linked to growth-bistability, i.e., the existence of 2 different steady state growth rates for one and the same drug concentration in the growth medium. We speculate that target resistance masking provides a hitherto unknown mechanism for slowing down the evolution of target resistance among pathogens. PMID:19416855

  19. The influence of drug distribution and drug-target binding on target occupancy: The rate-limiting step approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, W E A; Vauquelin, G; van der Graaf, P H; de Lange, E C M

    2017-05-12

    The influence of drug-target binding kinetics on target occupancy can be influenced by drug distribution and diffusion around the target, often referred to as "rebinding" or "diffusion-limited binding". This gives rise to a decreased decline of the drug-target complex concentration as a result of a locally higher drug concentration that arises around the target, which leads to prolonged target exposure to the drug. This phenomenon has been approximated by the steady-state approximation, assuming a steady-state concentration around the target. Recently, a rate-limiting step approximation of drug distribution and drug-target binding has been published. However, a comparison between both approaches has not been made so far. In this study, the rate-limiting step approximation has been rewritten into the same mathematical format as the steady-state approximation in order to compare the performance of both approaches for the investigation of the influence of drug-target binding kinetics on target occupancy. While both approximations clearly indicated the importance of kon and high target concentrations, it was shown that the rate-limiting step approximation is more accurate than the steady-state approximation, especially when dissociation is fast compared to association and distribution out of the binding compartment. It is therefore concluded that the new rate-limiting step approximation is to be preferred for assessing the influence of binding kinetics on local target site concentrations and target occupancy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (CRMP2) is a Plausible Etiological Factor and Potential Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease: Comparison and Contrast with Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kenneth; Kursula, Petri

    2016-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has long been viewed as a pathology that must be caused either by aberrant amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) processing, dysfunctional tau protein processing, or a combination of these two factors. This is a reasonable assumption because amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation are the defining histological features in AD, and because AβPP and tau mutations can cause AD in humans or AD-like features in animal models. Nonetheless, other protein players are emerging that one can argue are significant etiological players in subsets of AD and potentially novel, druggable targets. In particular, the microtubule-associated protein CRMP2 (collapsin response mediator protein-2) bears striking analogies to tau and is similarly relevant to AD. Like tau, CRMP2 dynamically regulates microtubule stability; it is acted upon by the same kinases; collects similarly in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs); and when sequestered in NFTs, complexes with critical synapse-stabilizing factors. Additionally, CRMP2 is becoming recognized as an important adaptor protein involved in vesicle trafficking, amyloidogenesis and autophagy, in ways that tau is not. This review systematically compares the biology of CRMP2 to that of tau in the context of AD and explores the hypothesis that CRMP2 is an etiologically significant protein in AD and participates in pathways that can be rationally engaged for therapeutic benefit.

  1. Evaluation of Giardia lamblia thioredoxin reductase as drug activating enzyme and as drug target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leitsch

    2016-12-01

    Our results constitute first direct evidence for the notion that TrxR is an activator of metronidazole and furazolidone but rather question that it is a relevant drug target of presently used antigiardial drugs.

  2. Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0030 TITLE: Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D...Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design DAMD17-03-1-0030 6. A UTHOR(S) Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZA TION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...Report: by Principal Investigator - Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D. DAMD1 7-03-1-0030: "Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design " INTRODUCTION

  3. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  4. Chemical signatures and new drug targets for gametocytocidal drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Magle, Crystal T.; Huang, Wenwei; Southall, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Williamson, Kim C.; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Control of parasite transmission is critical for the eradication of malaria. However, most antimalarial drugs are not active against P. falciparum gametocytes, responsible for the spread of malaria. Consequently, patients can remain infectious for weeks after the clearance of asexual parasites and clinical symptoms. Here we report the identification of 27 potent gametocytocidal compounds (IC50 malaria transmission-blocking reagents.

  5. Drug targeting to tumors using HPMA copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, T.G.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Copolymers based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) are prototypic and well-characterized polymeric drug carriers that have been broadly implemented in the delivery of anticancer agents. HPMA copolymers circulate for prolonged periods of time, and by means of the Enhance Permeability and Re

  6. Chemical proteomics: terra incognita for novel drug target profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuqiang Huang; Boya Zhang; Shengtao Zhou; Xia Zhao; Ce Bian; Yuquan Wei

    2012-01-01

    The growing demand for new therapeutic strategies in the medical and pharmaceutic fields has resulted in a pressing need for novel druggable targets.Paradoxically,however,the targets of certain drugs that are already widely used in clinical practice have largely not been annotated.Because the pharmacologic effects of a drug can only be appreciated when its interactions with cellular components are clearly delineated,an integrated deconvolution of drug-target interactions for each drug is necessary.The emerging field of chemical proteomics represents a powerful mass spectrometry (MS)-based affinity chromatography approach for identifying proteome-wide small molecule-protein interactions and mapping these interactions to signaling and metabolic pathways.This technique could comprehensively characterize drug targets,profile the toxicity of known drugs,and identify possible off-target activities.With the use of this technique,candidate drug molecules could be optimized,and predictable side effects might consequently be avoided.Herein,we provide a holistic overview of the major chemical proteomic approaches and highlight recent advances in this area as well as its potential applications in drug discovery.

  7. A review on target drug delivery:magnetic microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Chandna; Deepa Batra; Satinder Kakar; Ramandeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system aims to deliver the drug at a rate directed by the needs of the body during the period of treatment, and target the active entity to the site of action.A number of novel drug delivery systems have emerged encompassing various routes of administration, to achieve controlled and targeted drug delivery, magnetic micro carriers being one of them. Magnetic microsphere is newer approach in pharmaceutical field.Magnetic microspheres as an alternative to traditional radiation methods which use highly penetrating radiation that is absorbed throughout the body.Its use is limited by toxicity and side effects.The aim of the specific targeting is to enhance the efficiency of drug delivery & at the same time to reduce the toxicity & side effects.This kind of delivery system is very much important which localises the drug to the disease site.In this larger amount of freely circulating drug can be replaced by smaller amount of magnetically targeted drug.Magnetic carriers receive magnetic responses to a magnetic field from incorporated materials that are used for magnetic microspheres are chitosan, dextran etc. magnetic microspheres can be prepared from a variety of carrier material. One of the most utilized is serum albumin from human or other appropriate species.Drug release from albumin microspheres can be sustained or controlled by various stabilization procedures generally involving heat or chemical cross-linking of the protein carrier matrix.

  8. Enhanced cellular transport and drug targeting using dendritic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2003-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorable, peripheral' functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug delivery. The large density of end groups can also be tailored to create enhanced affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, drug/ligand conjugation, in vitro cellular and in vivo drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Results on PAMAM dendrimers and polyol hyperbranched polymers suggest that: (1) These materials complex/encapsulate a large number of drug molecules and release them at tailorable rates; (2) The drug-dendrimer complex is transported very rapidly through a A549 lung epithelial cancel cell line, compared to free drug, perhaps by endocytosis. The ability of the drug-dendrimer-ligand complexes to target specific asthma and cancer cells is currently being explored using in vitro and in vivo animal models.

  9. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  10. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  11. Progress and perspectives on targeting nanoparticles for brain drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huile Gao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB to prevent the entry of drugs into the brain, it is a challenge to treat central nervous system disorders pharmacologically. The development of nanotechnology provides potential to overcome this problem. In this review, the barriers to brain-targeted drug delivery are reviewed, including the BBB, blood–brain tumor barrier (BBTB, and nose-to-brain barrier. Delivery strategies are focused on overcoming the BBB, directly targeting diseased cells in the brain, and dual-targeted delivery. The major concerns and perspectives on constructing brain-targeted delivery systems are discussed.

  12. Mitochondrial drug targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoun

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main culprit in neurodegenerative diseases. Given the fact that mitochondria participate in diverse cellular processes, including energetics, metabolism, and death, the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in neuronal cells are inevitable. In fact, new strategies targeting mitochondrial dysfunction are emerging as potential alternatives to current treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on mitochondrial proteins that are directly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We also examine recently identified small molecule modulators of these mitochondrial targets and assess their potential in research and therapeutic applications.

  13. Leveraging big data to transform target selection and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  14. Drug targeting to tumors using HPMA copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Lammers, T.G.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Copolymers based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) are prototypic and well-characterized polymeric drug carriers that have been broadly implemented in the delivery of anticancer agents. HPMA copolymers circulate for prolonged periods of time, and by means of the Enhance Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect, they localize to tumors both effectively and selectively. As a consequence, the concentrations of attached active agents in tumors can be increased, and their accumulation in ...

  15. Chemokine receptors: attractive targets for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godessart, Nuria

    2005-06-01

    Studies of two antibodies, efalizumab and natalizumab, have recently demonstrated that the blockade of leukocyte migration is of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of diseases such as psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. The role of chemokines in the control of cell traffic led to their receptors being considered one of the most promising family of targets aimed at disrupting cell recruitment in chronic inflammatory processes. Choosing the appropriate chemokine receptor for each disease was not easy, and the interpretation of target validation studies proved to be extremely difficult. Despite an intense effort in the search for chemokine receptor antagonists in the last decade, no compounds in advanced clinical trials exist as such. The inherent complexity of the family, the differences between the chemokine system in mice and men, and the species selectivity of small-molecule compounds could account for this fact. Pharmaceutical companies still believe in chemokine receptors as therapeutic targets, as demonstrated by the number of compounds reported to be in development. In the next years, the developmental progression of these compounds will reveal which target within the chemokine family is of real therapeutic value.

  16. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barar, Jaleh; AGHANEJAD, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis...

  17. Using Click Chemistry to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0429 TITLE: Using "Click Chemistry" to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Purnima...SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-1 3-1-0429 Using "Click Chemistry" to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Sporozo ite infection of the liver is the first obl igate step of the Plasmodium

  18. Brain targeted transcranial route of drug delivery of diazepam

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The term transcranial route means the brain targeted transfer of drug molecules across the cranium through the layers of the skin and skin appendages of the head, arteries and veins of the skin of the head, the cranial bones along with the diploe, the cranial bone sutures, the meninges and specifically through the emissary veins. The administration of drugs through the scalp in ayurvedic system for the diseases associated with the brain was evaluated with a view to develop a novel targeted ro...

  19. CNIO cancer conference: targeted search for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter M

    2003-06-01

    The topics discussed at the conference covered many aspects of cancer research, from the genetic search for new targets, target validation and drug discovery, all the way to preclinical and clinical development of oncology drugs. Here the presentations on new metabolic, angiogenic, cell cycle and other molecular targets, as well as recent developments with experimental drugs with action on some of these targets, are summarised. Particular emphasis is placed on the emerging realisation that changes in the metabolic phenotype lie at the heart of cellular transformation. New insights into the biological links between cancer cell metabolism and the balance between survival and death signalling are likely to lead to the identification of a new category of anticancer targets.

  20. REVIEW ON ADVANCES IN COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunena Sethi, SL Harikumar* and Nirmala

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The colon is the terminal part of the GIT which has gained in recent years as a potential site for delivery of various novel therapeutic drugs, i.e. peptides. However, colon is rich in microflora which can be used to target the drug release in the colon. Colon is a site where both local and systemic drug delivery can take place. Local delivery allows the topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. If drug can be targeted directly into the colon, treatment can become more effective and side effects can be minimized. These systemic side effects can be minimized by primary approaches for CDDS (Colon specific drug delivery namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems and microbially triggered system which gained limited success and have limitations as compared with recently new CDDS namely pressure controlled colon delivery capsules (PCDCS, CODESTM (Novel colon targeted delivery system osmotic controlled drug delivery system, Pulsincap system, time clock system, chronotropic system. This review is to understand the pharmaceutical approaches to colon targeted drug delivery systems for better therapeutic action without compromising on drug degradation (or its low bioavailability.

  1. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Trudy M.; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  2. Targeting autophagic pathways for cancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liu; Jin-Ku Bao; Jin-Ming Yang; Yan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process,has drawn an increasing amount of attention in recent years for its role in a variety of human diseases,such as cancer.Notably,autophagy plays an important role in regulating several survival and death signaling pathways that determine cell fate in cancer.To date,substantial evidence has demonstrated that some key autophagic mediators,such as autophagy-related genes (ATGs),PI3K,mTOR,p53,and Beclin-1,may play crucial roles in modulating autophagic activity in cancer initiation and progression.Because autophagy-modulating agents such as rapamycin and chloroquine have already been used clinically to treat cancer,it is conceivable that targeting autophagic pathways may provide a new opportunity for discovery and development of more novel cancer therapeutics.With a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing autophagy,we will have a better opportunity to facilitate the exploitation of autophagy as a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer.This review discusses the current status of targeting autophagic pathways as a potential cancer therapy.

  3. Prediction of drug-target interactions for drug repositioning only based on genomic expression similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI. However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap. Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1 some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2 in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects.

  4. Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    COVERED 26 September 2011 25 September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant...will be necessary for the fragment based screening and subsequent design of new drug lead compounds. To accompany and validate the structural studies

  5. Drug targeting systems for cancer therapy: nanotechnological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigli Aydin, R Seda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in cancer treatment remains challenging because of the great nature of tumor cells to be drug resistant. However, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled the delivery of drugs for cancer treatment by passively and actively targeting to tumor cells with nanoparticles. Dramatic improvements in nanotherapeutics, as applied to cancer, have rapidly accelerated clinical investigations. In this review, drug-targeting systems using nanotechnology and approved and clinically investigated nanoparticles for cancer therapy are discussed. In addition, the rationale for a nanotechnological approach to cancer therapy is emphasized because of its promising advances in the treatment of cancer patients.

  6. Large-scale Direct Targeting for Drug Repositioning and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunli; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Wu, Ziyin; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Fu, Yingxue; Ru, Jinlong; Ali Shar, Piar; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    A system-level identification of drug-target direct interactions is vital to drug repositioning and discovery. However, the biological means on a large scale remains challenging and expensive even nowadays. The available computational models mainly focus on predicting indirect interactions or direct interactions on a small scale. To address these problems, in this work, a novel algorithm termed weighted ensemble similarity (WES) has been developed to identify drug direct targets based on a large-scale of 98,327 drug-target relationships. WES includes: (1) identifying the key ligand structural features that are highly-related to the pharmacological properties in a framework of ensemble; (2) determining a drug’s affiliation of a target by evaluation of the overall similarity (ensemble) rather than a single ligand judgment; and (3) integrating the standardized ensemble similarities (Z score) by Bayesian network and multi-variate kernel approach to make predictions. All these lead WES to predict drug direct targets with external and experimental test accuracies of 70% and 71%, respectively. This shows that the WES method provides a potential in silico model for drug repositioning and discovery. PMID:26155766

  7. Network output controllability-based method for drug target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Shen, Yichao; Li, Min; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Biomolecules do not perform their functions alone, but interactively with one another to form so called biomolecular networks. It is well known that a complex disease stems from the malfunctions of corresponding biomolecular networks. Therefore, one of important tasks is to identify drug targets from biomolecular networks. In this study, the drug target identification is formulated as a problem of finding steering nodes in biomolecular networks while the concept of network output controllability is applied to the problem of drug target identification. By applying control signals to these steering nodes, the biomolecular networks are expected to be transited from one state to another. A graph-theoretic algorithm has been proposed to find a minimum set of steering nodes in biomolecular networks which can be a potential set of drug targets. Application results of the method to real biomolecular networks show that identified potential drug targets are in agreement with existing research results. This indicates that the method can generate testable predictions and provide insights into experimental design of drug discovery.

  8. A Review of Computational Methods for Predicting Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guohua; Yan, Fengxia; Tan, Duoduo

    2016-11-14

    Drug discovery and development is not only a time-consuming and labor-intensive process but also full of risk. Identifying targets of small molecules helps evaluate safety of drugs and find new therapeutic applications. The biotechnology measures a wide variety of properties related to drug and targets from different perspectives, thus generating a large body of data. This undoubtedly provides a solid foundation to explore relationships between drugs and targets. A large number of computational techniques have recently been developed for drug target prediction. In this paper, we summarize these computational methods and classify them into structure-based, molecular activity-based, side-effect-based and multi-omics-based predictions according to the used data for inference. The multi-omics-based methods are further grouped into two types: classifier-based and network-based predictions. Furthermore,the advantages and limitations of each type of methods are discussed. Finally, we point out the future directions of computational predictions for drug targets.

  9. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-10

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  10. The endocannabinoid system as a target for novel anxiolytic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sachin; Hill, Mathew N; Cheer, Joseph F; Wotjak, Carsten T; Holmes, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has attracted attention for its role in various behavioral and brain functions, and as a therapeutic target in neuropsychiatric disease states, including anxiety disorders and other conditions resulting from dysfunctional responses to stress. In this mini-review, we highlight components of the eCB system that offer potential 'druggable' targets for new anxiolytic medications, emphasizing some of the less well-discussed options. We discuss how selectively amplifying eCBs recruitment by interfering with eCB-degradation, via fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), has been linked to reductions in anxiety-like behaviors in rodents and variation in human anxiety symptoms. We also discuss a non-canonical route to regulate eCB degradation that involves interfering with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Next, we discuss approaches to targeting eCB receptor-signaling in ways that do not involve the cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1R); by targeting the CB2R subtype and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1). Finally, we review evidence that cannabidiol (CBD), while representing a less specific pharmacological approach, may be another way to modulate eCBs and interacting neurotransmitter systems to alleviate anxiety. Taken together, these various approaches provide a range of plausible paths to developing novel compounds that could prove useful for treating trauma-related and anxiety disorders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Coating nanoparticles with cell membranes for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery allows drug molecules to preferentially accumulate at the sites of action and thus holds great promise to improve therapeutic index. Among various drug-targeting approaches, nanoparticle-based delivery systems offer some unique strengths and have achieved exciting preclinical and clinical results. Herein, we aim to provide a review on the recent development of cell membrane-coated nanoparticle system, a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine both the functionalities of cellular membranes and the engineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective drug delivery and novel therapeutics. This review is particularly focused on novel designs of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles as well as their underlying principles that facilitate the purpose of drug targeting. Three specific areas are highlighted, including: (i) cell membrane coating to prolong nanoparticle circulation, (ii) cell membrane coating to achieve cell-specific targeting and (iii) cell membrane coating for immune system targeting. Overall, cell membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a novel class of targeted nanotherapeutics with strong potentials to improve on drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for treatment of various diseases.

  12. Improved nanoparticles preparation and drug release for liver targeted delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Weili

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nTargeted delivery of drugs and proteins to liver can be achieved via asialoglycoprotein receptor, which can recognize and combine the galactose- and N-acetygalatosamine-terminated glycoproteins. Glycosyl is usually conjugated with drugs directly to fabricate prodrugs or with nanoparticles encapsulated drugs via forming covalent bonds, while the covalent bonds may lead to some shortages for drug release. Therefore, we have a hypothesis that we can prepare nanoparticles for efficient targeting by glycosylation using galactosylated poly (L-glutamic acid (Gal-PLGA as a carrier to entrap the model drugs in nanoparticles core physically rather than forming covalent drug conjugation. The means of incorporation of drug in nanoparticles may improve drug release to maintain its activity, raise its therapeutic index and diminish the adverse effect. Based on previous researches, it is achievable to obtain nanoparticles that we hypothesize to prepare. Due to their nanometer-size and galactosyl, the nanoparticles may be a potential delivery system for passive and active targeting to liver parenchymal cells for therapy of hepatitis and liver cancer.

  13. How do antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eBasore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Drugs represent the primary treatment available for human malaria, as caused by Plasmodium spp. Currently approved drugs and antimalarial drug leads generally work against parasite enzymes or activities within infected erythrocytes. To reach their specific targets, these chemicals must cross at least three membranes beginning with the host cell membrane. Uptake at each membrane may involve partitioning and diffusion through the lipid bilayer or facilitated transport through channels or carriers. Here, we review the features of available antimalarials and examine whether transporters may be required for their uptake. Our computational analysis suggests that most antimalarials have high intrinsic membrane permeability, obviating the need for uptake via transporters; a subset of compounds appear to require facilitated uptake. We also review parasite and host transporters that may contribute to drug uptake. Broad permeability channels at the erythrocyte and parasitophorous vacuolar membranes of infected cells relax permeability constraints on antimalarial drug design; however, this uptake mechanism is prone to acquired resistance as the parasite may alter channel activity to reduce drug uptake. A better understanding of how antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets is critical to prioritizing drug leads for antimalarial development and may reveal new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps.

  15. Cytotoxicity of liver targeted drug-loaded alginate nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this study, novel liver targeted doxorubicin (DOX) loaded alginate (ALG) nanoparticles were prepared by CaCl2 crosslinking method. Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA, a liver targeted molecule) modified alginate (GA-ALG) was synthesized in a heterogeneous system, and the structure of GA-ALG and the substitu-tion degree of GA were analyzed by 1H NMR, FT-IR and elemental analysis. The drug release profile under the simulated physiological condition and cytotoxicity experiments of drug-loaded GA-ALG nanoparticles were carried out in vitro. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed that drug-loaded GA-ALG nanoparticles have spherical shape structure with the mean hydrodynamic diameter around 214 ± 11 nm. The drug release was shown to last 20 days, and the MTT assay suggested that drug-loaded GA-ALG nanoparticles had a distinct kill-ing effect on 7703 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  16. Cytotoxicity of liver targeted drug-loaded aiginate nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ChuangNian; WANG Wei; WANG ChunHong; TIAN Qin; HUANG Wei; YUAN Zhi; CHEN XueSi

    2009-01-01

    In this study,novel liver targeted doxorubicin (DOX) loaded alginate (ALG) nanoparticles were prepared by CaCl2 crosslinking method.Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA,a liver targeted molecule) modified alginate (GA-ALG) was synthesized in a heterogeneous system,and the structure of GA-ALG and the substitution degree of GA were analyzed by 1H NMR,FT-IR and elemental analysis.The drug release profile under the simulated physiological condition and cytotoxicity experiments of drug-loaded GA-ALG nanoparticles were carried out in vitro.Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed that drug-loaded GA-ALG nanoparticles have spherical shape structure with the mean hydrodynamic diameter around 214±11 nm.The drug release was shown to last 20 days,and the MTT assay suggested that drug-loaded GA-ALG nanoparticles had a distinct killing effect on 7703 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  17. Novel colon targeted drug delivery system using natural polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel colon targeted tablet formulation was developed using pectin as carrier and diltiazem HCl and indomethacin as model drugs. The tablets were coated with inulin followed by shellac and were evaluated for average weight, hardness and coat thickness. In vitro release studies for prepared tablets were carried out for 2 h in pH 1.2 HCl buffer, 3 h in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer and 6 h in simulated colonic fluid. The drug release from the coated systems was monitored using UV/Vis spectroscopy. In vitro studies revealed that the tablets coated with inulin and shellac have limited the drug release in stomach and small intestinal environment and released maximum amount of drug in the colonic environment. The study revealed that polysaccharides as carriers and inulin and shellac as a coating material can be used effectively for colon targeting of both water soluble and insoluble drugs.

  18. Meningococcal disease and future drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, Hanne; Hartzen, S H; Penkowa, Milena;

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) causes sepsis, epidemic meningitis, and sometimes also meningoencephalitis. Despite early antibiotic treatment, mortality and morbidity remain significant. We present recent studies on meningococcal disease with focus on the pathophysiology caused by bacte......Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) causes sepsis, epidemic meningitis, and sometimes also meningoencephalitis. Despite early antibiotic treatment, mortality and morbidity remain significant. We present recent studies on meningococcal disease with focus on the pathophysiology caused......-host interactions are key determinants of the clinical course and risk of fatal outcome. Accordingly, successful treatment of severe meningococcal disease requires not only antibiotics but also adjuvants targeting the released endotoxins and the host immune/inflammatory responses. This review highlights the most...

  19. Drug treatment and novel drug target against Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargala G.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis emergence triggered the screening of many compounds for potential anti-cryptosporidial activity in which the majority were ineffective. The outbreak of cryptosporidiosis which occurred in Milwaukee in 1993 was not only the first significant emergence of Cryptosporidium spp. as a major human pathogen but also a huge waterborne outbreak thickening thousands of people from a major city in North America. Since then, outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis are regularly occurring throughout the world. New drugs against this parasite became consequently urgently needed. Among the most commonly used treatments against cryptosporidiosis are paromomycin, and azithromycin, which are partially effective. Nitazoxanide (NTZ’s effectiveness was demonstrated in vitro, and in vivo using several animal models and finally in clinical trials. It significantly shortened the duration of diarrhea and decreased mortality in adults and in malnourished children. NTZ is not effective without an appropriate immune response. In AIDS patients, combination therapy restoring immunity along with antimicrobial treatment of Cryptosporidium infection is necessary. Recent investigations focused on the potential of molecular-based immunotherapy against this parasite. Others tested the effects of probiotic bacteria, but were unable to demonstrate eradication of C. parvum. New synthetic isoflavone derivatives demonstrated excellent activity against C. parvum in vitro and in a gerbil model of infection. Newly synthesized nitroor non nitro- thiazolide compounds, derived from NTZ, have been recently shown to be at least as effective as NTZ against C. parvum in vitro development and are promising new therapeutic agents.

  20. Aquaporins as targets for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, Antonio; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular hydric balance is an essential process of mammalian cells. The water movement across cell membranes is driven by osmotic and hydrostatic forces and the speed of this process is dependent on the presence of specific aquaporin water channels. Since the molecular identification of the first water channel, AQP1, by Peter Agre's group, 13 homologous members have been found in mammals with varying degree of homology. The fundamental importance of these proteins in all living cells is suggested by their genetic conservation in eukaryotic organisms through plants to mammals. A number of recent studies have revealed the importance of mammalian AQPs in both physiology and pathophysiology and have suggested that pharmacological modulation of aquaporins expression and activity may provide new tools for the treatment of variety of human disorders, such as brain edema, glaucoma, tumour growth, congestive heart failure and obesity in which water and small solute transport may be involved. This review will highlight the physiological role and the pathological involvement of AQPs in mammals and the potential use of some recent therapeutic approaches, such as RNAi and immunotherapy, for AQP-related diseases. Furthermore, strategies that can be developed for the discovery of selective AQP-drugs will be introduced and discussed.

  1. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Drug Elucidation: Invertebrate Genetics Sheds New Light on the Molecular Targets of CNS Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donard S. Dwyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts.

  3. The sodium channel as a target for local anesthetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry A Fozzard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Na channels are the source of excitatory currents for the nervous system and muscle. They are the target for a class of drugs called local anesthetics (LA, which have been used for local and regional anesthesia and for excitatory dysfunction problems such as epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. LA drugs are prototypes for new analgesic drugs. The LA drug binding site has been localized to the inner pore of the channel, where drugs interact mainly with a phenylalanine in domain IV S6. Drug affinity is both voltage- and use-dependent. Voltage-dependency is the result of changes in the conformation of the inner pore during channel activation and opening, allowing high energy interaction of drugs with the phenylalanine. LA drugs also reduce the gating current of Na channels, which represents the movement of charged residues in the voltage sensors. Specifically, drug binding to phenylalanine locks the domain III S4 in its outward (activated position, and slows recovery of the domain IV S4. Although strongly affecting gating, LA drugs almost certainly also block by steric occlusion of the pore. Molecular definition of the binding and blocking interactions may help in new drug development.

  4. [Progress of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in targeting drug delivery system of antitumor drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-min; Mo, Shu; Liu, Xiao-qian; Han, Fu-man; Wang, Jin-yu; Wang, Zhi-min

    2015-09-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is one of the main therapy for cancer. But the traditional antitumor drugs are systemic distribution in vivo, they are difficult to achieve an effective drug concentration in the tumor tissue and don't have the ability to distinguish normal cells and tumor cells by themselves, that cause systemic toxicity easily and can not meet the clinical needs. With the research on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) deepening, more and more attention in the drug delivery system have been payed to in recent years, because of its unique physicochemical structure characteristics, it has the effect on specific targets, directly inhibits the tumor cell growth, reduces the side effects to normal cells, tissues and organs and can be long-term medication, etc. It is expected to be excellent carriers of antitumor drugs. MSNs application in the field of cancer treatment has now become a hot research field of medicine. In this paper, the latest research about MSNs in antitumor drugs targeting delivery system from 2008 to 2015 is summarized, including the application of MSNs separately in antitumor drug targeting, passive targeting, active targeting, physical or chemical conditions response targeting and other compound targeting drug delivery system. We expect it to provide a reference to the toxicity reducing and efficacy enhancing and further development of chemical medicine, natural medicine and monomeric compound of chinese herbal medicine.

  5. Process Modeling of Ferrofluids Flowfor Magnetic Targeting Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Handan; WANG Shigang; XU Wei

    2009-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific sites within the human body, magnetic targeting drug delivery surpasses due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Although there have been some analyses theoretically for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel of human body. This paper presents a mathematical model to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. A 3D flow field of magnetic particles in a blood vessel model is numerically simulated in order to further understand clinical application of magnetic targeting drug delivery. Simulation results show that magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a target region depending on the applied magnetic field intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging conftrms the enrichment of ferrofluids in a desired body tissue of Sprague-Dawley rats. The simulation results coincide with those animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide the important information and can suggest strategies for improving delivery in favor of the clinical application.

  6. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, David

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins\\/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and\\/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i) homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii) targets of known drugs, but are (iii) not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under \\'change-of-application\\' patents.

  7. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Toomey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii targets of known drugs, but are (iii not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under 'change-of-application' patents.

  8. Large-scale prediction of drug-target interactions using protein sequences and drug topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Dongsheng [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu Shao [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Xu Qingsong [School of Mathematical Sciences and Computing Technology, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Lu Hongmei; Huang Jianhua [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu Qiannan [Key Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Wuhan University), Ministry of Education, and Wuhan University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liang Yizeng, E-mail: yizeng_liang@263.net [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2012-11-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Drug-target interactions are predicted using an extended SAR methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A drug-target interaction is regarded as an event triggered by many factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular fingerprint and CTD descriptors are used to represent drugs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our approach shows compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR methodology. - Abstract: The identification of interactions between drugs and target proteins plays a key role in the process of genomic drug discovery. It is both consuming and costly to determine drug-target interactions by experiments alone. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new in silico prediction approaches capable of identifying these potential drug-target interactions in a timely manner. In this article, we aim at extending current structure-activity relationship (SAR) methodology to fulfill such requirements. In some sense, a drug-target interaction can be regarded as an event or property triggered by many influence factors from drugs and target proteins. Thus, each interaction pair can be represented theoretically by using these factors which are based on the structural and physicochemical properties simultaneously from drugs and proteins. To realize this, drug molecules are encoded with MACCS substructure fingerings representing existence of certain functional groups or fragments; and proteins are encoded with some biochemical and physicochemical properties. Four classes of drug-target interaction networks in humans involving enzymes, ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM models gave prediction accuracy of 90.31%, 88.91%, 84.68% and 83.74% for four datasets, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to predict the drug-target

  9. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  10. [The new era of epithelium-targeted drug development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshimi; Nagase, Shotaro; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2014-01-01

    Epithelium plays pivotal roles in biological barrier separating the inside of body and the outside environment. Ninety percent of malignant tumors are derived from epithelium. Most pathological microorganisms invade into the body from mucosal epithelium. Thus, epithelium is potential targets for drug development. Claudins (CLs), a family of tetra-transmembrane protein consisting of over 20 members, are structural and functional components of tight junction-seals in epithelium. Modulation of CL-seals enhanced mucosal absorption of drugs. CLs are often over-expressed in malignant tumors. CL-4 expression is increased in the epithelial cells covering the mucosal immune tissues. Very recently, CLs are also expected to be targets for traumatic brain injury and regenerative therapy. In this review, we overview the past, the present and the future of CLs-targeted drug development.

  11. Targeted drug delivery by ultrasound-triggered margination of microbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Guckenberger, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The ideal agent for targeted drug delivery should stay away from the biochemically active walls of the blood vessels during circulation. However, upon reaching its target it should attain a near-wall position. Though seemingly contradictory, we show that coated microbubbles (ultrasound contrast agents) possess precisely these two properties. Using numerical simulations we find that application of a localized ultrasound pulse at the target organ triggers their rapid migration from the vessel center toward the endothelial wall. This ultrasound-triggered margination is due to hydrodynamic interactions between the red blood cells and the oscillating bubbles. Importantly, we find that the effect is very robust, existing even if the duration in the stiff state is five times lower than the opposing time in the soft state. Our results might also explain why recent in-vivo studies found strongly enhanced drug uptake by co-administration of microbubbles with classical drug delivery agents.

  12. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS. The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  13. Nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery in brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinda, Subas C; Pattnaik, Gurudutta

    2013-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) found to act as rate limiting factor in drug delivery to brain in combating the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Such limiting physiological factors include the reticuloendothelial system and protein opsonization, which present across BBB, play major role in reducing the passage of drug. Several approaches employed to improve the drug delivery across the BBB. Nanoparticles (NP) are the solid colloidal particle ranges from 1 to 1000 nm in size utilized as career for drug delivery. At present NPs are found to play a significant advantage over the other methods of available drug delivery systems to deliver the drug across the BBB. Nanoparticles may be because of its size and functionalization characteristics able to penetrate and facilitate the drug delivery through the barrier. There are number of mechanisms and strategies found to be involved in this process, which are based on the type of nanomaterials used and its combination with therapeutic agents, such materials include liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and non-viral vectors of nano-sizes for CNS gene therapy, etc. Nanotechnology is expected to reduce the need for invasive procedures for delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Some devices such as implanted catheters and reservoirs however will still be needed to overcome the problems in effective drug delivery to the CNS. Nanomaterials are found to improve the safety and efficacy level of drug delivery devices in brain targeting. Nanoegineered devices are found to be delivering the drugs at cellular levels through nono-fluidic channels. Different drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nonogels and nonobiocapsules have been used to improve the bioavailability of the drug in the brain, but microchips and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticulate careers are found to be more effective therapeutically in treating brain tumor. The physiological approaches also utilized to improve the transcytosis capacity

  14. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book clearly demonstrates the progression of nanoparticle therapeutics from basic research to applications. Unlike other books covering nanoparticles used in medical applications, Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications presents the medical challenges that can be reduced or even overcome by recent advances in nanoscale drug delivery. Each chapter highlights recent progress in the design and engineering of select multifunctional nanoparticles with topics covering targeting, imaging, delivery, diagnostics, and therapy.

  15. Identifying problematic drugs based on the characteristics of their targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Jose eDa Silva Lopes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Identifying promising compounds during the early stages of drug development is a major challenge for both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. The difficulties are even more pronounced when we consider multi-target pharmacology, where the compounds often target more than one protein, or multiple compounds are used together. Here, we address this problem by using machine learning and network analysis to process sequence and interaction data from human proteins to identify promising compounds. We used this strategy to identify properties that make certain proteins more likely to cause harmful effects when targeted; such proteins usually have domains commonly found throughout the human proteome. Additionally, since currently marketed drugs hit multiple targets simultaneously, we combined the information from individual proteins to devise a score that quantifies the likelihood of a compound being harmful to humans. This approach enabled us to distinguish between approved and problematic drugs with an accuracy of 60%¬–70%. Moreover, our approach can be applied as soon as candidate drugs are available, as demonstrated with predictions for more than 5000 experimental drugs. These resources are available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/psin/.

  16. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  17. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers....... This demonstrates that the cell model can be a useful tool for the design of effective lysosome-targeting drugs with minimal off-target interactions....

  18. Polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery and targeting: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Jawahar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many modern technologies have been established in the pharmaceutical research and development area. The field of nanotechnology has been revolutionary as substantial and technical, and scientific growth, in basic sciences plus manipulation by physical or chemical process of individual atoms and molecules have widened its horizon. Polymeric nanoparticles with a size in the nanometer range protect drugs against in vitro and in vivo degradation; it releases the drug in a controlled manner and also offers the possibility of drug targeting. The use of polymeric drug nanoparticles is a universal approach to increase the therapeutic performance of poorly soluble drugs in any route of administration. The present review discusses the physico-chemical properties of polymeric nanoparticles, production methods, routes of administration and potential therapeutic applications.

  19. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchè MM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Martino Maria Zacchè, Sushma Srikrishna, Linda Cardozo Department of Urogynaecology, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD. Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin, nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. Keywords: drug targeting, drug-delivery system, bladder disorders

  20. [Development of drug delivery systems for targeting to macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio

    2007-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) using liposomes as drug carriers for targeting to macrophages have been developed for the treatment of diseases that macrophages are related to their progress. Initially, DDS for the treatment of atherosclerosis are described. The influence of particle size on the drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions that macrophages are richly present and antiatherosclerotic effects following intravenous administration of liposomes containing dexamethasone (DXM-liposomes) was investigated in atherogenic mice. Both the drug delivery efficacy of DXM-liposomes (particle size, 200 nm) to atherosclerotic lesions and their antiatherosclerotic effects were greater than those of 70 and 500 nm. These results indicate that there is an optimal particle size for drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions. DDS for the treatment of respiratory infections are then described. The influence of particle size and surface mannosylation on the drug delivery to alveolar macrophages (AMs) and antibacterial effects following pulmonary administration of liposomes containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX-liposomes) was investigated in rats. The drug delivery efficacy of CPFX-liposomes to AMs was particle size-dependent over the range 100-1000 nm and then became constant at over 1000 nm. These results indicate that the most effective size is 1000 nm. Both the drug delivery efficacy of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes (particle size, 1000 nm) to AMs and their antibacterial effects were significantly greater than those of unmodified CPFX-liposomes. These results indicate that the surface mannosylation is useful method for drug delivery to AMs. This review provides useful information to help in the development of novel pharmaceutical formulations aimed at drug targeting to macrophages.

  1. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang HW

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hung-Wei Yang,1,2 Mu-Yi Hua,1 Hao-Li Liu,3 Chiung-Yin Huang,2 Kuo-Chen Wei21Molecular Medicine Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, 3Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, TaiwanAbstract: Nanoparticles (NPs play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some

  2. A conceptual framework for the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, T T; Borup, R; Willer, A

    2010-01-01

    regulation, and (ii) the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets for therapeutic interventions. Significantly, our study provides a conceptual framework that can be applied to any subtype of AML and cancer in general to uncover novel information from published microarray data sets at low cost...

  3. Drug loading, dispersion stability, and therapeutic efficacy in targeted drug delivery with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Heister, E; Neves, V.; Lamprecht, C.; Silva, SRP; Coley, HM; Mcfadden, J.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed a drug delivery system for the anti-cancer drugs doxorubicin and mitoxantrone based on carbon nanotubes, which is stable under biological conditions, allows for sustained release, and promotes selectivity through an active targeting scheme. Carbon nanotubes are particularly promising for this area of application due to their high surface area, allowing for high drug loading, and their unique interaction with cellular membranes. We have taken a systematic approach to PEG conju...

  4. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  5. Nanofabricated biomimetic structures for smart targeting and drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudia, Alma; Kanger, Johannes S.; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2005-01-01

    We present a new approach to hybrid artificial cells (AC) designed for specific targeting and active drug delivery by combining an impermeable non-biological scaffold with an artificial bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) that supports the functioning bio-molecules required to provide AC functionality. We

  6. Spherons as a drug target in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averback, P

    1998-10-01

    Spherons are unique brain entities that are causally linked to the amyloid plaques (SPs [senile plaques]) of Alzheimer's disease (AD). SPs are the quantitatively major tissue abnormality of AD. Spherons increase in size (but not in number) gradually throughout life until they reach a size range where they burst and form SPs. Drugs targeted at attenuating the process of spheron transformation into SPs are a logical approach to AD therapy. There are 20 criteria of validity for an SP causal entity that are satisfied by spherons-and no more than a few of these 20 criteria are satisfied by any other known hypothesis. These criteria of validity are reviewed, in addition to common difficulties in understanding spheron theory and a number of common-sense considerations in AD therapeutic research. Spheron-based drug therapy in AD potentially can retard the process of spheron bursting and subsequent plaque formation by: 1) blocking the formation of SPs; 2) reducing the size of SPs; 3) delaying spheron breakdown; and 4) retarding spheron growth. Isolated spherons from human brain are intact human drug targets and can be used as human in vitro or in vivo screening targets. The paramount importance of spherons as a target for drug therapy in AD is emphasized by considering that regardless of any other type of real or potential therapy, there still already exists in every middle-aged adult a full population of spherons in the brain, filled with more than enough amyloid to bring about full-blown AD.

  7. Current and future drug targets in weight management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkamp, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity will continue to be one of the leading causes of chronic disease unless the ongoing rise in the prevalence of this condition is reversed. Accumulating morbidity figures and a shortage of effective drugs have generated substantial research activity with several molecular targets being investi

  8. Glial cells as drug targets : What does it take?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development time

  9. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  10. Folate receptor targeted liposomes encapsulating anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Anumita; Das, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Among all available lipid based nanoparticulate systems, the success of liposomal drug delivery system is evident by the number of liposomal products available in the market or under advanced stages of preclinical and clinical trials. Liposome has the ability to deliver chemotherapeutic agents to the targeted tissues or even inside the cancerous cells by enhanced intracellular penetration or improved tumour targeting. In the last decade, folate receptor mediated tumour targeting has emerged as an attractive alternative method of active targeting of cancer cells through liposomes due to its numerous advantages over other targeting methods. Folate receptors, also known as folate binding proteins, allow the binding and internalization of folate or folic acid into the cells by a method called folate receptor mediated endocytosis. They have restricted presence in normal cells and are mostly expressed during malignant transformation. In this review article, folate receptor targeting capability of liposomes has been described. This review article has focussed on the different cancer drugs which have been encapsulated in folate receptor targeted liposomes and their in vitro as well as in vivo efficacies in several tumour models.

  11. Wzy-dependent bacterial capsules as potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Daniel J; Standish, Alistair; Kobe, Bostjan; Morona, Renato

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial capsule is a recognized virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria. It likely works as an antiphagocytic barrier by minimizing complement deposition on the bacterial surface. With the continual rise of bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics, there is an increasing need for novel drugs. In the Wzy-dependent pathway, the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is regulated by a phosphoregulatory system, whose main components consist of bacterial-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) and their cognate phosphatases. The ability to regulate capsule biosynthesis has been shown to be vital for pathogenicity, because different stages of infection require a shift in capsule thickness, making the phosphoregulatory proteins suitable as drug targets. Here, we review the role of regulatory proteins focusing on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli and discuss their suitability as targets in structure-based drug design.

  12. Biomimetic and bioinspired nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina

    2017-03-01

    In drug targeting, the urgent need for more effective and less iatrogenic therapies is pushing toward a complete revision of carrier setup. After the era of 'articles used as homing systems', novel prototypes are now emerging. Newly conceived carriers are endowed with better biocompatibility, biodistribution and targeting properties. The biomimetic approach bestows such improved functional properties. Exploiting biological molecules, organisms and cells, or taking inspiration from them, drug vector performances are now rapidly progressing toward the perfect carrier. Following this direction, researchers have refined carrier properties, achieving significant results. The present review summarizes recent advances in biomimetic and bioinspired drug vectors, derived from biologicals or obtained by processing synthetic materials with a biomimetic approach.

  13. Leishmaniasis:Current status of available drugs and new potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nisha Singh; Manish Kumar; Rakesh Kumar Singh

    2012-01-01

    The control ofLeishmania infection relies primarily on chemotherapy till date. Resistance to pentavalent antimonials, which have been the recommended drugs to treat cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, is now widespread in Indian subcontinents. New drug formulations like amphotericinB, its lipid formulations, and miltefosine have shown great efficacy to treat leishmaniasis but their high cost and therapeutic complications limit their usefulness. In addition, irregular and inappropriate uses of these second line drugs in endemic regions like state of Bihar, India threaten resistance development in the parasite. In context to the limited drug options and unavailability of either preventive or prophylactic candidates, there is a pressing need to develop true antileishmanial drugs to reduce the disease burden of this debilitating endemic disease. Notwithstanding significant progress of leishmanial research during last few decades, identification and characterization of novel drugs and drug targets are far from satisfactory. This review will initially describe current drug regimens and later will provide an overview on few important biochemical and enzymatic machineries that could be utilized as putative drug targets for generation of true antileishmanial drugs.

  14. Leveraging human genetics to guide drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-07-01

    Identifying appropriate molecular targets is a critical step in drug development. Despite many advantages, the traditional tools of observational epidemiology and cellular or animal models of disease can be misleading in identifying causal pathways likely to lead to successful therapeutics. Here, we review some favorable aspects of human genetics studies that have the potential to accelerate drug target discovery. These include using genetic studies to identify pathways relevant to human disease, leveraging human genetics to discern causal relationships between biomarkers and disease, and studying genetic variation in humans to predict the potential efficacy and safety of inhibitory compounds aimed at molecular targets. We present some examples taken from studies of plasma lipids and coronary artery disease to highlight how human genetics can accelerate therapeutics development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  16. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-01-29

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal.

  17. Review of therapeutic drug monitoring of anticancer drugs part two--targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Nicolas; Bardin, Christophe; Chatelut, Etienne; Paci, Angelo; Beijnen, Jos; Levêque, Dominique; Veal, Gareth; Astier, Alain

    2014-08-01

    Most of oral targeted therapies are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Oral administration generates a complex step in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of these drugs. Inter-individual PK variability is often large and variability observed in response is influenced not only by the genetic heterogeneity of drug targets, but also by the pharmacogenetic background of the patient (e.g. cytochome P450 and ABC transporter polymorphisms), patient characteristics such as adherence to treatment and environmental factors (drug-drug interactions). Retrospective studies have shown that targeted drug exposure, reflected in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) correlates with treatment response (efficacy/toxicity) in various cancers. Nevertheless levels of evidence for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) are however heterogeneous among these agents and TDM is still uncommon for the majority of them. Evidence for imatinib currently exists, others are emerging for compounds including nilotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, sorafenib and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Applications for TDM during oral targeted therapies may best be reserved for particular situations including lack of therapeutic response, severe or unexpected toxicities, anticipated drug-drug interactions and/or concerns over adherence treatment. Interpatient PK variability observed with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is comparable or slightly lower to that observed with TKIs. There are still few data with these agents in favour of TDM approaches, even if data showed encouraging results with rituximab, cetuximab and bevacizumab. At this time, TDM of mAbs is not yet supported by scientific evidence. Considerable effort should be made for targeted therapies to better define concentration-effect relationships and to perform comparative randomised trials of classic dosing versus pharmacokinetically-guided adaptive dosing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A review on target drug delivery: magnetic microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Chandna

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic microsphere is newer approach in pharmaceutical field. Magnetic microspheres as an alternative to traditional radiation methods which use highly penetrating radiation that is absorbed throughout the body. Its use is limited by toxicity and side effects. The aim of the specific targeting is to enhance the efficiency of drug delivery & at the same time to reduce the toxicity & side effects. This kind of delivery system is very much important which localises the drug to the disease site. In this larger amount of freely circulating drug can be replaced by smaller amount of magnetically targeted drug. Magnetic carriers receive magnetic responses to a magnetic field from incorporated materials that are used for magnetic microspheres are chitosan, dextran etc. magnetic microspheres can be prepared from a variety of carrier material. One of the most utilized is serum albumin from human or other appropriate species. Drug release from albumin microspheres can be sustained or controlled by various stabilization procedures generally involving heat or chemical cross-linking of the protein carrier matrix.

  19. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Eunah Kang,1 Jong Wook Shin2 1School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, 2Division of Allergic and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. Keywords: pericytes, pericyte-targeting drug delivery, tissue engineering, platelet-derived growth factor, angiogenesis, vascular remodeling

  20. Combinatorial approaches for the identification of brain drug delivery targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Charles C; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB.

  1. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  2. Mechanistic models enable the rational use of in vitro drug-target binding kinetics for better drug effects in patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, W.E.; Wong, Y.C.; Nederpelt, I.; Heitman, L.H.; Danhof, M.; Graaf, van der P.H.; Gilissen, R.A.; de, Lange E.C.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug-target binding kinetics are major determinants of the time course of drug action for several drugs, as clearly described for the irreversible binders omeprazole and aspirin. This supports the increasing interest to incorporate newly developed high-throughput assays for drug-target

  3. Drugs and drug delivery systems targeting amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no cure and limited treatment solutions that are unable to target any of the suspected causes. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the causes of neurodegeneration is the overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ and the inability of Aβ peptides to be cleared from the brain, resulting in self-aggregation to form toxic oligomers, fibrils and plaques. One of the potential treatment options is to target Aβ and prevent self-aggregation to allow for a natural clearing of the brain. In this paper, we review the drugs and drug delivery systems that target Aβ in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Many attempts have been made to use anti-Aβ targeting molecules capable of targeting Aβ (with much success in vitro and in vivo animal models, but the major obstacle to this technique is the challenge posed by the blood brain barrier (BBB. This highly selective barrier protects the brain from toxic molecules and pathogens and prevents the delivery of most drugs. Therefore novel Aβ aggregation inhibitor drugs will require well thought-out drug delivery systems to deliver sufficient concentrations to the brain.

  4. Rhamnogalacturonan-I based microcapsules for targeted drug release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svagan, Anna J.; Kusic, Anja; De Gobba, Cristian;

    2016-01-01

    Drug targeting to the colon via the oral administration route for local treatment of e.g. inflammatory bowel disease and colonic cancer has several advantages such as needle-free administration and low infection risk. A new source for delivery is plant-polysaccharide based delivery platforms...... such as Rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I). In the gastro-intestinal tract the RG-I is only degraded by the action of the colonic microflora. For assessment of potential drug delivery properties, RG-I based microcapsules (~1 μm in diameter) were prepared by an interfacial poly-addition reaction. The cross-linked capsules were...

  5. Promises and challenges of anticancer drugs that target the epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Inge; Johnstone, Ricky W; Bots, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of epigenetic aberrations in cancer and their role in promoting tumorigenesis has led to the development of various small molecule inhibitors that target epigenetic enzymes. In preclinical settings, many epigenetic inhibitors demonstrate promising activity against a variety of both hematological and solid tumors. The therapeutic efficacy of those inhibitors that have entered the clinic however, is restricted predominantly to hematological malignancies. Here we outline the observed epigenetic aberrations in various types of cancer and the clinical responses to epigenetic drugs. We furthermore discuss strategies to improve the responsiveness of both hematological and solid malignancies to epigenetic drugs.

  6. NIOSOMES: A ROLE IN TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles inclosing an aqueous phase and a wide range of molecules could be encapsulated within aqueous spaces of lipid membrane vesicles. They are microscopic lamellar structures formed on the admixture of a non-ionic surfactant, cholesterol and phosphate with subsequent hydration in aqueous media. Niosomes belongs to novel drug delivery system which offers a large number of advantages over other conventional and vesicular delivery systems. Namely they are the targeted drug delivery system which showing reduction of dose, stability and compatibility of non-ionic surfactants, easy modification, delayed clearance, suitability for a wide range of Active Pharmaceutical Agents.

  7. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design.

  8. Drugs that target pathogen public goods are robust against evolved drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, John W

    2012-11-01

    Pathogen drug resistance is a central problem in medicine and public health. It arises through somatic evolution, by mutation and selection among pathogen cells within a host. Here, we examine the hypothesis that evolution of drug resistance could be reduced by developing drugs that target the secreted metabolites produced by pathogen cells instead of directly targeting the cells themselves. Using an agent-based computational model of an evolving population of pathogen cells, we test this hypothesis and find support for it. We also use our model to explain this effect within the framework of standard evolutionary theory. We find that in our model, the drugs most robust against evolved drug resistance are those that target the most widely shared external products, or 'public goods', of pathogen cells. We also show that these drugs exert a weak selective pressure for resistance because they create only a weak correlation between drug resistance and cell fitness. The same principles apply to design of vaccines that are robust against vaccine escape. Because our theoretical results have crucial practical implications, they should be tested by empirical experiments.

  9. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  10. New Insight into the Molecular Drug Target of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Soetikno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN lowered quality of life and shortened life expectancy amongst those affected. Evidence indicates interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGEs, activated protein kinase C (PKC and angiotensin II exacerbate the progression of DN. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACEIs, renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS, AGEs, and PKC have been tested for slowing down the progression of DN. The exact molecular drug targets that lead to the amelioration of renal injury in DN are not well understood. This review summarizes the potential therapeutic targets, based on putative mechanism in the progression of the disease.

  11. Updates on drug-target network; facilitating polypharmacology and data integration by growth of DrugBank database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barneh, Farnaz; Jafari, Mohieddin; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Network pharmacology elucidates the relationship between drugs and targets. As the identified targets for each drug increases, the corresponding drug-target network (DTN) evolves from solely reflection of the pharmaceutical industry trend to a portrait of polypharmacology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potentials of DrugBank database in advancing systems pharmacology. We constructed and analyzed DTN from drugs and targets associations in the DrugBank 4.0 database. Our results showed that in bipartite DTN, increased ratio of identified targets for drugs augmented density and connectivity of drugs and targets and decreased modular structure. To clear up the details in the network structure, the DTNs were projected into two networks namely, drug similarity network (DSN) and target similarity network (TSN). In DSN, various classes of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with distinct therapeutic categories were linked together based on shared targets. Projected TSN also showed complexity because of promiscuity of the drugs. By including investigational drugs that are currently being tested in clinical trials, the networks manifested more connectivity and pictured the upcoming pharmacological space in the future years. Diverse biological processes and protein-protein interactions were manipulated by new drugs, which can extend possible target combinations. We conclude that network-based organization of DrugBank 4.0 data not only reveals the potential for repurposing of existing drugs, also allows generating novel predictions about drugs off-targets, drug-drug interactions and their side effects. Our results also encourage further effort for high-throughput identification of targets to build networks that can be integrated into disease networks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Ion channels as drug targets in central nervous system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkielewicz, A M; Gunia, A; Szkaradek, N; Słoczyńska, K; Krupińska, S; Marona, H

    2013-01-01

    Ion channel targeted drugs have always been related with either the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, or the cardiovascular system. Within the CNS, basic indications of drugs are: sleep disorders, anxiety, epilepsy, pain, etc. However, traditional channel blockers have multiple adverse events, mainly due to low specificity of mechanism of action. Lately, novel ion channel subtypes have been discovered, which gives premises to drug discovery process led towards specific channel subtypes. An example is Na(+) channels, whose subtypes 1.3 and 1.7-1.9 are responsible for pain, and 1.1 and 1.2 - for epilepsy. Moreover, new drug candidates have been recognized. This review is focusing on ion channels subtypes, which play a significant role in current drug discovery and development process. The knowledge on channel subtypes has developed rapidly, giving new nomenclatures of ion channels. For example, Ca(2+)s channels are not any more divided to T, L, N, P/Q, and R, but they are described as Ca(v)1.1-Ca(v)3.3, with even newer nomenclature α1A-α1I and α1S. Moreover, new channels such as P2X1-P2X7, as well as TRPA1-TRPV1 have been discovered, giving premises for new types of analgesic drugs.

  13. Targeted Protein Degradation: from Chemical Biology to Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromm, Philipp M; Crews, Craig M

    2017-09-21

    Traditional pharmaceutical drug discovery is almost exclusively focused on directly controlling protein activity to cure diseases. Modulators of protein activity, especially inhibitors, are developed and applied at high concentration to achieve maximal effects. Thereby, reduced bioavailability and off-target effects can hamper compound efficacy. Nucleic acid-based strategies that control protein function by affecting expression have emerged as an alternative. However, metabolic stability and broad bioavailability represent development hurdles that remain to be overcome for these approaches. More recently, utilizing the cell's own protein destruction machinery for selective degradation of essential drivers of human disorders has opened up a new and exciting area of drug discovery. Small-molecule-induced proteolysis of selected substrates offers the potential of reaching beyond the limitations of the current pharmaceutical paradigm to expand the druggable target space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug delivery application of extracellular vesicles; insight into production, drug loading, targeting, and pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Somiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are secreted from any types of cells and shuttle between donor cells and recipient cells. Since EVs deliver their cargos such as proteins, nucleic acids, and other molecules for intercellular communication, they are considered as novel mode of drug delivery vesicles. EVs possess advantages such as inherent targeting ability and non-toxicity over conventional nanocarriers. Much efforts have so far been made for the application of EVs as a drug delivery carrier, however, basic techniques, such as mass-scale production, drug loading, and engineering of EVs are still limited. In this review, we summarize following four points. First, recent progress on the production method for EVs is described. Second, current techniques of drug loading methods are summarized. Third, targeting approach to specifically deliver cargo molecules for diseased sites by engineered EVs is discussed. Lastly, strategies to control pharmacokinetics and improve biodistribution are discussed.

  15. Decorating Nanoparticle Surface for Targeted Drug Delivery: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape, stiffness (composition and surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs have been recognized as key design parameters for NP-mediated drug delivery platforms. Among them, the surface functionalization of NPs is of great significance for targeted drug delivery. For instance, targeting moieties are covalently coated on the surface of NPs to improve their selectively and affinity to cancer cells. However, due to a broad range of possible choices of surface decorating molecules, it is difficult to choose the proper one for targeted functions. In this work, we will review several representative experimental and computational studies in selecting the proper surface functional groups. Experimental studies reveal that: (1 the NPs with surface decorated amphiphilic polymers can enter the cell interior through penetrating pathway; (2 the NPs with tunable stiffness and identical surface chemistry can be selectively accepted by the diseased cells according to their stiffness; and (3 the NPs grafted with pH-responsive polymers can be accepted or rejected by the cells due to the local pH environment. In addition, we show that computer simulations could be useful to understand the detailed physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and guide the design of next-generation NP-based drug carriers with high selectivity, affinity, and low toxicity. For example, the detailed free energy analysis and molecular dynamics simulation reveals that amphiphilic polymer-decorated NPs can penetrate into the cell membrane through the “snorkeling” mechanism, by maximizing the interaction energy between the hydrophobic ligands and lipid tails. We anticipate that this work will inspire future studies in the design of environment-responsive NPs for targeted drug delivery.

  16. New alginic acid–atenolol microparticles for inhalatory drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceschan, Nazareth Eliana; Bucalá, Verónica [Planta Piloto de Ingeniería Química (PLAPIQUI), CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Camino La Carrindanga Km 7, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Departamento de Ingeniería Química, UNS, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ramírez-Rigo, María Verónica, E-mail: vrrigo@plapiqui.edu.ar [Planta Piloto de Ingeniería Química (PLAPIQUI), CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Camino La Carrindanga Km 7, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Departamento de Biología, Bioquímica y Farmacia, UNS, San Juan 670, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2014-08-01

    The inhalatory route allows drug delivery for local or systemic treatments in a noninvasively way. The current tendency of inhalable systems is oriented to dry powder inhalers due to their advantages in terms of stability and efficiency. In this work, microparticles of atenolol (AT, basic antihypertensive drug) and alginic acid (AA, acid biocompatible polyelectrolyte) were obtained by spray drying. Several formulations, varying the relative composition AT/AA and the total solid content of the atomized dispersions, were tested. The powders were characterized by: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Powder X-ray Diffraction, while also the following properties were measured: drug load efficiency, flow properties, particles size and density, moisture content, hygroscopicity and morphology. The ionic interaction between AA and AT was demonstrated, then the new chemical entity could improve the drug targeting to the respiratory membrane and increase its time residence due to the mucoadhesive properties of the AA polymeric chains. Powders exhibited high load efficiencies, low moisture contents, adequate mean aerodynamic diameters and high cumulative fraction of respirable particles (lower than 10 μm). - Highlights: • Novel particulate material to target atenolol to the respiratory membrane was developed. • Crumbled microparticles were obtained by spray drying of alginic–atenolol dispersions. • Ionic interaction between alginic acid and atenolol was demonstrated in the product. • Amorphous solids with low moisture content and high load efficiency were produced. • Relationships between the feed formulation and the product characteristics were found.

  17. Integral membrane pyrophosphatases: a novel drug target for human pathogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Xhaard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-integral pyrophosphatases (mPPases are found in several human pathogens, including Plasmodium species, the protozoan parasites that cause malaria. These enzymes hydrolyze pyrophosphate and couple this to the pumping of ions (H+ and/or Na+ across a membrane to generate an electrochemical gradient. mPPases play an important role in stress tolerance in plants, protozoan parasites, and bacteria. The solved structures of mPPases from Vigna radiata and Thermotoga maritima open the possibility of using structure-based drug design to generate novel molecules or repurpose known molecules against this enzyme. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding mPPases, focusing on their structure, the proposed mechanism of action, and their role in human pathogens. We also summarize different methodologies in structure-based drug design and propose an example region on the mPPase structure that can be exploited by these structure-based methods for drug targeting. Since mPPases are not found in animals and humans, this enzyme is a promising potential drug target against livestock and human pathogens.

  18. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  19. Prediction of off-target drug effects through data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yera, Emmanuel R; Cleves, Ann E; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-01-01

    We present a probabilistic data fusion framework that combines multiple computational approaches for drawing relationships between drugs and targets. The approach has special relevance to identifying surprising unintended biological targets of drugs. Comparisons between molecules are made based on 2D topological structural considerations, based on 3D surface characteristics, and based on English descriptions of clinical effects. Similarity computations within each modality were transformed into probability scores. Given a new molecule along with a set of molecules sharing some biological effect, a single score based on comparison to the known set is produced, reflecting either 2D similarity, 3D similarity, clinical effects similarity or their combination. The methods were validated within acurated structural pharmacology database (SPDB) and further tested by blind application to data derived from the ChEMBL database. For prediction of off-target effects, 3D-similarity performed best as a single modality, but combining all methods produced performance gains. Striking examples of structurally surprising off-target predictions are presented.

  20. Reprofiled drug targets ancient protozoans: drug discovery for parasitic diarrheal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anjan; Ndao, Momar; Reed, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel automated, high throughput screening (HTS) methodology for the anaerobic intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We validated this HTS platform by screening a chemical library containing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and bioactive compounds. We identified an FDA-approved drug, auranofin, as most active against E. histolytica both in vitro and in vivo. Our cell culture and animal studies indicated that thioredoxin reductase, an enzyme involved in reactive oxygen species detoxification, was the target for auranofin in E. histolytica. Here, we discuss the rationale for drug development for three parasites which are major causes of diarrhea worldwide, E. histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum and extend our current finding of antiparasitic activity of auranofin to Entamoeba cysts, G. lamblia and C. parvum. These studies support the use of HTS assays and reprofiling FDA-approved drugs for new therapy for neglected tropical diseases.

  1. Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy: New Drugs and Emerging Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gilbert W.; Lin, Jieru E.; Blomain, Erik S.; Waldman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing pandemic and related health and economic costs are staggering. Pharmacotherapy partnered with lifestyle modifications form the core of current strategies to reduce the burden of this disease and its sequelae. However, therapies targeting weight loss have a significant history of safety risks, including cardiovascular and psychiatric events. Here, evolving strategies for developing anti-obesity therapies, including targets, mechanisms, and developmental status are highlighted. Progress in this field is underscored by Belviq® (lorcaserin) and Qsymia® (phentermine/topiramate), the first agents in more than 10 years to achieve regulatory approval for chronic management weight in obese patients. On the horizon, novel insights in metabolism and energy homeostasis reveal cGMP signaling circuits as emerging targets for anti-obesity pharmacotherapy. These innovations in molecular discovery may elegantly align with practical off-the-shelf approaches leveraging existing approved drugs that modulate cGMP levels for the management of obesity. PMID:24105257

  2. p21-activated kinase family: promising new drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynh N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nhi Huynh, Hong He Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: The p21-activated kinase (PAK family of serine/threonine protein kinases are downstream effectors of the Rho family of GTPases. PAKs are frequently upregulated in human diseases, including various cancers, and their overexpression correlates with disease progression. Current research findings have validated important roles for PAKs in cell proliferation, survival, gene transcription, transformation, and cytoskeletal remodeling. PAKs are shown to act as a converging node for many signaling pathways that regulate these cellular processes. Therefore, PAKs have emerged as attractive targets for treatment of disease. This review discusses the physiological and pathological roles of PAKs, validation of PAKs as new promising drug targets, and current challenges and advances in the development of PAK-targeted anticancer therapy, with a focus on PAKs and human cancers. Keywords: p21-activated kinase, cancer, inhibitor

  3. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  4. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  5. Iron Acquisition Pathways as Targets for Antitubercular Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghetti, Fiorella; Villa, Stefania; Gelain, Arianna; Barlocco, Daniela; Chiarelli, Laurent Roberto; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Costantino, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis nowadays ranks as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. In the last twenty years, this disease has again started to spread mainly for the appearance of multi-drug resistant forms. Therefore, new targets are needed to address the growing emergence of bacterial resistance and for antitubercular drug development. Efficient iron acquisition is crucial for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, because it serves as cofactor in many essential biological processes, including DNA biosynthesis and cellular respiration. Bacteria acquire iron chelating non-heme iron from the host using the siderophore mycobactins and carboxymycobactins and by the uptake of heme iron released by damaged red blood cells, through several acquisition systems. Drug discovery focused its efforts on the inhibition of MbtI and MbtA, which are are two enzymes involved in the mycobactin biosynthetic pathway. In particular, MbtI inhibitors have been studied in vitro, while MbtA inhibitors showed activity also in infected mice. Another class of compounds, MmpL3 inhibitors, showed antitubercular activity in vitro and in vivo, but their mechanism of action seems to be off-target. Some compounds inhibiting 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase were discovered but not tested on in vivo assays. The available data reported in this study based on inhibitors and gene deletion studies, suggest that targeting iron acquisition systems could be considered a promising antitubercular strategy. Due to their redundancy, the relative importance of each pathway for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival has still to be determined. Thus, in vivo studies with new, potent and specific inhibitors are needed to highlight target selection.

  6. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakkarapani, Prabu [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Subbiah, Latha, E-mail: lathasuba2010@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Palanisamy, Selvamani; Bibiana, Arputha [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO{sub 3}-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO{sub 3}-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 µm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. - Highlights: • Development of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) by layer-by-layer method. • Characterization of physicochemical, pharmaceutical and magnetic properties of MMC. • Multiple layers of alternative polyelectrolytes prolongs methotrexate release time. • MMC is capable for targeted and sustained release rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  7. Application of RNAi to Genomic Drug Target Validation in Schistosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Guidi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Concerns over the possibility of resistance developing to praziquantel (PZQ, has stimulated efforts to develop new drugs for schistosomiasis. In addition to the development of improved whole organism screens, the success of RNA interference (RNAi in schistosomes offers great promise for the identification of potential drug targets to initiate drug discovery. In this study we set out to contribute to RNAi based validation of putative drug targets. Initially a list of 24 target candidates was compiled based on the identification of putative essential genes in schistosomes orthologous of C. elegans essential genes. Knockdown of Calmodulin (Smp_026560.2 (Sm-Calm, that topped this list, produced a phenotype characterised by waves of contraction in adult worms but no phenotype in schistosomula. Knockdown of the atypical Protein Kinase C (Smp_096310 (Sm-aPKC resulted in loss of viability in both schistosomula and adults and led us to focus our attention on other kinase genes that were identified in the above list and through whole organism screening of known kinase inhibitor sets followed by chemogenomic evaluation. RNAi knockdown of these kinase genes failed to affect adult worm viability but, like Sm-aPKC, knockdown of Polo-like kinase 1, Sm-PLK1 (Smp_009600 and p38-MAPK, Sm-MAPK p38 (Smp_133020 resulted in an increased mortality of schistosomula after 2-3 weeks, an effect more marked in the presence of human red blood cells (hRBC. For Sm-PLK-1 the same effects were seen with the specific inhibitor, BI2536, which also affected viable egg production in adult worms. For Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-aPKC the in vitro effects were reflected in lower recoveries in vivo. We conclude that the use of RNAi combined with culture with hRBC is a reliable method for evaluating genes important for larval development. However, in view of the slow manifestation of the effects of Sm-aPKC knockdown in adults and the lack of effects of Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-MAPK p38 on adult viability

  8. Current idea of an algorithm for drug treatment and optimal succession of using targeted drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Nosov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of targeted and pathogenetically sound medicational approaches could considerably improve the results of therapy in patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC. To date, VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors continue to remain a basic and most effective drug treatment in patients with mRCC and the choice of a drug for first-line therapy is based on the following factors: disease prognosis, a patient’s general somatic state, and the understanding of immediate therapy goals, anticipated toxicity and tolerability.Most patients develop resistance to VEGFR inhibitors within 6–11 months after treatment initiation. The basis for resistance development may be the following mechanisms: activation of alternative proangiogenic signaling pathways, that of angiogenesis-independent progression pathways, a microenvironment-induced phenotypic change of tumor cells to form their resistance to targeted drugs, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes in the drug itself during therapy. To overcome resistance to VEGFR inhibitors, there are 2 possible options: 1 switching to a drug having another mechanism of action (the mTOR inhibitor everolimus; 2 that to a more selective and potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor (axitinib that selectively affects and suppresses the activityof the same targets – VEGFR (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1–3. As before, there is scanty convincing evidence for unique benefits in a particular succession of targeted drugs: a VEGFR inhibitor – a VEGFR inhibitor or a VEGFR inhibitor – an mТOR inhibitor. In a number of cases, the succession of prescribing of targeted drugs may be practically determined by clinical criteria, specifically by the possibility of controlling toxic complications that may be typical for VEFGR inhibitors and may accumulate in case of their successive use. It must be also remembered that VEGFR inhibitors may be successfully reused in patients who have received second- or

  9. Current idea of an algorithm for drug treatment and optimal succession of using targeted drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Nosov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of targeted and pathogenetically sound medicational approaches could considerably improve the results of therapy in patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC. To date, VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors continue to remain a basic and most effective drug treatment in patients with mRCC and the choice of a drug for first-line therapy is based on the following factors: disease prognosis, a patient’s general somatic state, and the understanding of immediate therapy goals, anticipated toxicity and tolerability.Most patients develop resistance to VEGFR inhibitors within 6–11 months after treatment initiation. The basis for resistance development may be the following mechanisms: activation of alternative proangiogenic signaling pathways, that of angiogenesis-independent progression pathways, a microenvironment-induced phenotypic change of tumor cells to form their resistance to targeted drugs, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes in the drug itself during therapy. To overcome resistance to VEGFR inhibitors, there are 2 possible options: 1 switching to a drug having another mechanism of action (the mTOR inhibitor everolimus; 2 that to a more selective and potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor (axitinib that selectively affects and suppresses the activityof the same targets – VEGFR (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1–3. As before, there is scanty convincing evidence for unique benefits in a particular succession of targeted drugs: a VEGFR inhibitor – a VEGFR inhibitor or a VEGFR inhibitor – an mТOR inhibitor. In a number of cases, the succession of prescribing of targeted drugs may be practically determined by clinical criteria, specifically by the possibility of controlling toxic complications that may be typical for VEFGR inhibitors and may accumulate in case of their successive use. It must be also remembered that VEGFR inhibitors may be successfully reused in patients who have received second- or

  10. Physics considerations in targeted anticancer drug delivery by magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimphil, Emmanuel; Nagesetti, Abhignyan; Guduru, Rakesh; Stewart, Tiffanie; Rodzinski, Alexandra; Liang, Ping; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2017-06-01

    In regard to cancer therapy, magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) have proven to be in a class of its own when compared to any other nanoparticle type. Like conventional magnetic nanoparticles, they can be used for externally controlled drug delivery via application of a magnetic field gradient and image-guided delivery. However, unlike conventional nanoparticles, due to the presence of a non-zero magnetoelectric effect, MENs provide a unique mix of important properties to address key challenges in modern cancer therapy: (i) a targeting mechanism driven by a physical force rather than antibody matching, (ii) a high-specificity delivery to enhance the cellular uptake of therapeutic drugs across the cancer cell membranes only, while sparing normal cells, (iii) an externally controlled mechanism to release drugs on demand, and (iv) a capability for image guided precision medicine. These properties separate MEN-based targeted delivery from traditional biotechnology approaches and lay a foundation for the complementary approach of technobiology. The biotechnology approach stems from the underlying biology and exploits bioinformatics to find the right therapy. In contrast, the technobiology approach is geared towards using the physics of molecular-level interactions between cells and nanoparticles to treat cancer at the most fundamental level and thus can be extended to all the cancers. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art and presents an ab initio model to describe the underlying mechanisms of cancer treatment with MENs from the perspective of basic physics.

  11. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  12. Drug targeting to myofibroblasts: Implications for fibrosis and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Saleh; Bansal, Ruchi; Prakash, Jai

    2017-07-16

    Myofibroblasts are the key players in extracellular matrix remodeling, a core phenomenon in numerous devastating fibrotic diseases. Not only in organ fibrosis, but also the pivotal role of myofibroblasts in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis has recently been highlighted. Myofibroblast targeting has gained tremendous attention in order to inhibit the progression of incurable fibrotic diseases, or to limit the myofibroblast-induced tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we outline the origin of myofibroblasts, their general characteristics and functions during fibrosis progression in three major organs: liver, kidneys and lungs as well as in cancer. We will then discuss the state-of-the art drug targeting technologies to myofibroblasts in context of the above-mentioned organs and tumor microenvironment. The overall objective of this review is therefore to advance our understanding in drug targeting to myofibroblasts, and concurrently identify opportunities and challenges for designing new strategies to develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics against fibrosis and cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins.

  14. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram, E-mail: tejabhiram@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Ramasamy, Shivaraman [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy [Department of Pharmacy practice, SRM College of Pharmacy, Chennai 603203 (India)

    2015-04-15

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex.

  15. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  16. Quantification of biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles for drug targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadira Ibrišimović

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this work was the development of appropriate analytical methods and assays for determining and monitoring composition and degradation of nanoparticles built from PLGA (poly D, L-lactid-co-glycolid, which can be reloaded with different drugs. A sensitive and precise method for monitoring of nanoparticle degradation in vitro was developed and optimized. Nanoparticles allow a selective enrichment of different drugs and knowledge of the nature and type of their degradation is essential for characterization and control of drug release and dosage. Materials and methods. The first method developed during this work to quantify the PLGA polymer matrix use advantage of the chemical reaction of aliphatic carboxylic acids with ferric chloride (FeCl3 thus quantifying both degradation products of PLGA, lactic and glycol acids, at the same time. A second assay method of choice was to react to the polymer hydrolysate with lactate dehydrogenase, thus assaying selectively the lactic acid part. Results. During development of both of described methods was possible to determine dynamic range for PLGA matrix and nanoparticles, as well as to characterize impact of Pluronic F-68 and glycolic acid on lactate dehydrogenase activity. Conclusion. During our work we were able to develop two sensitive methods for monitoring of biodegradation of polymers which are consecutively used as a nanoparticle matrix in drug targeting.

  17. Magnetically responsive microparticles for targeted drug and radionuclide delivery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Ghebremeskel, A. N.; Nunez, L.; Kasza, K. E.; Chang, F.; Chien, T.-H.; Fisher, P. F.; Eastman, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; McDonald, L.; Xie, Y.; Johns, L.; Pytel, P.; Hafeli, U. O.

    2004-02-16

    We are currently investigating the use of magnetic particles--polymeric-based spheres containing dispersed magnetic nanocrystalline phases--for the precise delivery of drugs via the human vasculature. According to this review, meticulously prepared magnetic drug targeting holds promise as a safe and effective method of delivering drugs to specific organ, tissue or cellular targets. We have critically examined the wide range of approaches in the design and implementation of magnetic-particle-based drug delivery systems to date, including magnetic particle preparation, drug encapsulation, biostability, biocompatibility, toxicity, magnetic field designs, and clinical trials. However, we strongly believe that there are several limitations with past developments that need to be addressed to enable significant strides in the field. First, particle size has to be carefully chosen. Micrometer-sized magnetic particles are better attracted over a distance than nanometer sized magnetic particles by a constant magnetic field gradient, and particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m show a much better accumulation with no apparent side effects in small animal models, since the smallest blood vessels have an inner diameter of 5-7 {micro}m. Nanometer-sized particles <70 nm will accumulate in organ fenestrations despite an effective surface stabilizer. To be suitable for future human applications, our experimental approach synthesizes the magnetic drug carrier according to specific predefined outcome metrics: monodisperse population in a size range of 100 nm to 1.0 {micro}m, non-toxic, with appropriate magnetic properties, and demonstrating successful in vitro and in vivo tests. Another important variable offering possible improvement is surface polarity, which is expected to prolong particle half-life in circulation and modify biodistribution and stability of drugs in the body. The molecules in the blood that are responsible for enhancing the uptake of particles by the reticuloendothelial

  18. Brain targeted transcranial route of drug delivery of diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathirana W

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The term transcranial route means the brain targeted transfer of drug molecules across the cranium through the layers of the skin and skin appendages of the head, arteries and veins of the skin of the head, the cranial bones along with the diploe, the cranial bone sutures, the meninges and specifically through the emissary veins. The administration of drugs through the scalp in ayurvedic system for the diseases associated with the brain was evaluated with a view to develop a novel targeted route for central nervous system drugs. It is expected to circumvent the systemic side effects of oral route. Diazepam was dissolved in an oil medium and applied on scalp as practiced in the ayurvedic system. Thirty rats were tested on the rotating rotarod for muscle relaxant effect of diazepam. Five groups of rats tested were the control, diazepam i.v. injected (280 µg/0.1 ml group, two groups treated with transcranial diazepam oil solution (1.5 mg/0.2 ml and the transcranial blank vehicle treated groups. Holding time in triplicate for each rat on the rotating rotarod was measured. The holding times following each treatment was statistically compared (one-way ANOVA. The pooled average times for the control, diazepam i.v. injected, diazepam oil solution transcranial treated two groups and the blank vehicle treated groups were 35.45, 4.73, 16.5, 15.39 and 33.23 seconds respectively. The two groups subjected to the brain targeted transcranial route showed a statistically significant decrease (50% drop in the holding time against the control group indicating the centrally acting muscle relaxant effect due to absorption of diazepam into the brain through the proposed route.

  19. Drug-target and disease networks: polypharmacology in the post-genomic era

    OpenAIRE

    Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Mousavian, Zaynab; Bozorgmehr, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    With the growing understanding of complex diseases, the focus of drug discovery has shifted away from the well-accepted “one target, one drug” model, to a new “multi-target, multi-drug” model, aimed at systemically modulating multiple targets. Identification of the interaction between drugs and target proteins plays an important role in genomic drug discovery, in order to discover new drugs or novel targets for existing drugs. Due to the laborious and costly experimental process of drug-targe...

  20. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Carnevale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 is a non-selective, Ca2+ permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX. Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures.

  1. Discovering the first microRNA-targeted drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of nearly every biological process in the cell and play key roles in the pathogenesis of human disease. As a result, there are many drug discovery programs that focus on developing miRNA-based therapeutics. The most advanced...... of these programs targets the liver-expressed miRNA-122 using the locked nucleic acid (LNA)–modified antisense oligonucleotide miravirsen. Here, we describe the discovery of miravirsen, which is currently in phase 2 clinical trials for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection....

  2. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  3. Development of modified pulsincap drug delivery system of metronidazole for drug targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Sindhu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified Pulsincap dosage form of metronidazole was developed to target drug release in the colon. Bodies of hard gelatin capsules were treated with formaldehyde keeping the caps as such. Metronidazole pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization method were incorporated into these specialized capsule shells and plugged with polymers guar gum, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 10K, carboxymethylcellulose sodium and sodium alginate separately at concentrations 20 mg, 30 mg and 40 mg. The filled capsules were completely coated with 5% cellulose acetate phthalate to prevent variable gastric emptying. All the formulations were assayed to determine drug content and the ability of the modified Pulsincap to provide colon-specific drug delivery was assessed by in vitro drug release studies in buffer pH 1.2 for 2 h, pH 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid for 3 h and pH 6.8 (stimulated colonic fluid for 7 h. The results indicated that significant drug release occurred only after 5 h from the start of experiment. Thus, metronidazole could be successfully colon targeted by the use of the modified Pulsincap, thereby reducing systemic side effects.

  4. Pharmaceutical technology at the service of targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allémann, Eric; Delie, Florence; Lange, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Research in pharmaceutical technology has drifted from formulation of systems with improved drug absorption and bioavailability to systems targeting molecular sites of diseases. The research unit of Pharmaceutical Technology from the University of Geneva focuses on the development of systems for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Three types of constructs for targeting are reviewed. With a fine-tuning of size and surface composition, polymeric nanoparticles are developed to improve detection of micrometastasis by fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, surface coating with specific antibodies increase the therapeutic efficiency of the encapsulated chemotherapeutic agent for tumor treatment in animal models. Constructs that are activated by remote sources of energy are investigated in the unit. For instance, microbubbles bearing specific antibody fragments at their surface are useful contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. Microbubbles, if combined with a thrombolytic drug and ultrasound, improve clot lysis, which is promising for stroke treatments. Enzymatically activated prodrug scaffolds are also under development. With this approach, intrinsic enzymatic activity of a diseased tissue activates the formulations. This concept led to the development of theranostic agents that can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  5. Nanomaterials for the Local and Targeted Delivery of Osteoarthritis Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Chinnagounder Periyasamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has found its potential in every possible field of science and engineering. It offers a plethora of options to design tools at the nanometer scale, which can be expected to function more effectively than micro- and macrosystems for specific applications. Although the debate regarding the safety of synthetic nanomaterials for clinical applications endures, it is a promising technology due to its potential to augment current treatments. Various materials such as synthetic polymer, biopolymers, or naturally occurring materials such as proteins and peptides can serve as building blocks for adaptive nanoscale formulations. The choice of materials depends highly on the application. We focus on the use of nanoparticles for the treatment of degenerative cartilage diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA. Current therapies for OA focus on treating the symptoms rather than modifying the disease. The usefulness of OA disease modifying drugs is hampered by side effects and lack of suitable drug delivery systems that target, deliver, and retain drugs locally. This challenge can be overcome by using nanotechnological formulations. We describe the different nanodrug delivery systems and their potential for cartilage repair. This paper provides the reader basal understanding of nanomaterials and aims at drawing new perspectives on the use of existing nanotechnological formulations for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  6. The Possible Potential Therapeutic Targets for Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamilselvan Subramani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival overgrowth is a side effect of certain medications. The most fibrotic drug-induced lesions develop in response to therapy with phenytoin, the least fibrotic lesions are caused by cyclosporin A, and the intermediate fibrosis occurs in nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth. Fibrosis is one of the largest groups of diseases for which there is no therapy but is believed to occur because of a persistent tissue repair program. During connective tissue repair, activated gingival fibroblasts synthesize and remodel newly created extracellular matrix. Proteins such as transforming growth factor (TGF, endothelin-1 (ET-1, angiotensin II (Ang II, connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF, insulin-like growth factor (IGF, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF appear to act in a network that contributes to the development of gingival fibrosis. Since inflammation is the prerequisite for gingival overgrowth, mast cells and its protease enzymes also play a vital role in the pathogenesis of gingival fibrosis. Drugs targeting these proteins are currently under consideration as antifibrotic treatments. This review summarizes recent observations concerning the contribution of TGF-β, CTGF, IGF, PDGF, ET-1, Ang II, and mast cell chymase and tryptase enzymes to fibroblast activation in gingival fibrosis and the potential utility of agents blocking these proteins in affecting the outcome of drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

  7. Sigma-1 receptor: The novel intracellular target of neuropsychotherapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sigma-1 receptor ligands have been long expected to serve as drugs for treatment of human diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, depression, idiopathic pain, drug abuse, and cancer. Recent research exploring the molecular function of the sigma-1 receptor started unveiling underlying mechanisms of the therapeutic activity of those ligands. Via the molecular chaperone activity, the sigma-1 receptor regulates protein folding/degradation, ER/oxidative stress, and cell survival. The chaperone activity is activated or inhibited by synthetic sigma-1 receptor ligands in an agonist-antagonist manner. Sigma-1 receptors are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes that are physically associated with the mitochondria (MAM: mitochondria-associated ER membrane. In specific types of neurons (e.g., those at the spinal cord, sigma-1 receptors are also clustered at ER membranes that juxtapose postsynaptic plasma membranes. Recent studies indicate that sigma-1 receptors, partly in sake of its unique subcellular localization, regulate the mitochondria function that involves bioenergetics and free radical generation. The sigma-1 receptor may thus provide an intracellular drug target that enables controlling ER stress and free radical generation under pathological conditions.

  8. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria.

  9. Molecular drug targets and structure based drug design: A holistic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shailza; Malik, Balwant Kumar; Sharma, Durlabh Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Access to the complete human genome sequence as well as to the complete sequences of pathogenic organisms provides information that can result in an avalanche of therapeutic targets. Structure-based design is one of the first techniques to be used in drug design. Structure based design refers specifically to finding and complementing the 3D structure (binding and/or active site) of a target molecule such as a receptor protein. The aim of this review is to give an outline of studies in the fie...

  10. Drug-target interaction prediction by random walk on the heterogeneous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Ming-Xi; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Predicting potential drug-target interactions from heterogeneous biological data is critical not only for better understanding of the various interactions and biological processes, but also for the development of novel drugs and the improvement of human medicines. In this paper, the method of Network-based Random Walk with Restart on the Heterogeneous network (NRWRH) is developed to predict potential drug-target interactions on a large scale under the hypothesis that similar drugs often target similar target proteins and the framework of Random Walk. Compared with traditional supervised or semi-supervised methods, NRWRH makes full use of the tool of the network for data integration to predict drug-target associations. It integrates three different networks (protein-protein similarity network, drug-drug similarity network, and known drug-target interaction networks) into a heterogeneous network by known drug-target interactions and implements the random walk on this heterogeneous network. When applied to four classes of important drug-target interactions including enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors, NRWRH significantly improves previous methods in terms of cross-validation and potential drug-target interaction prediction. Excellent performance enables us to suggest a number of new potential drug-target interactions for drug development.

  11. Enhanced molecular dynamics sampling of drug target conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Bussey, Isela G; Doshi, Urmi; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Computational docking and virtual screening are two main important methods employed in structure-based drug design. Unlike the traditional approach that allows docking of a flexible ligand against a handful of receptor structures, receptor flexibility has now been appreciated and increasingly incorporated in computer-aided docking. Using a diverse set of receptor conformations increases the chances of finding potential drugs and inhibitors. Molecular dynamics (MD) is greatly useful to generate various receptor conformations. However, the diversity of the structures of the receptor, which is usually much larger than the ligand, depends on the sampling efficiency of MD. Enhanced sampling methods based on accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) can alleviate the sampling limitation of conventional MD and aid in representation of the phase space to a much greater extent. RaMD-db, a variant of aMD that applies boost potential to the rotatable dihedrals and non-bonded diffusive degrees of freedom has been proven to reproduce the equilibrium properties more accurately and efficiently than aMD. Here, we discuss recent advances in the aMD methodology and review the applicability of RaMD-db as an enhanced sampling method. RaMD-db is shown to be able to generate a broad distribution of structures of a drug target, Cyclophilin A. These structures that have never been observed previously in very long conventional MD can be further used for structure-based computer-aided drug discovery, and docking, and thus, in the identification and design of potential novel inhibitors.

  12. Micro RNA, A Review: Pharmacogenomic drug targets for complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Bajaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro RNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can regulate gene expression to target several mRNAs in a gene regulatory network. MiRNA related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (S.N.P.s represent a newly identified type of genetic variability that can be of influence to the risk of certain human diseases and also affect how drugs can be activated and metabolized by patients. This will help in personalized medicines which are used for adminis-trating the correct dosage of drug and drug efficacy. miRNA deregulated expression has been extensively de-scribed in a variety of diseases such as Cancer, Obesity , Diabetes, Schizophrenia and control and self renewal of stem cells. MiRNA can function as oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors. MiRNAs may act as key regulators of processes as diverse as early development, cell proliferation and cell death, apoptosis and fat metabolism and cell differentiation .miRNA expression have shown their role in brain development chronic lymphocytic leukemia, colonic adeno carcinoma, Burkiff′s lymphoma and viral infection. These show their links with viral disease, neu-rodevelopment and cancer. It has been shown that they play a key role in melanoma metastasis. These may be differentially expressed in malignant cells compared to normal cells altering the regulation of expression of many important genes. MiRNA expression has been used for prognosis and early diagnosis of these complex diseases. The present paper focuses on the role of miRNAs in various complex diseases, which will help in improving the drug discovery process and personalized medicines.

  13. Schizophrenia drug discovery and development in an evolving era: are new drug targets fulfilling expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, John; Brandon, Nicholas J

    2015-02-01

    Current therapeutics for schizophrenia, the typical and atypical antipsychotic class of drugs, derive their therapeutic benefit predominantly by antagonism of the dopamine D2 receptor subtype and have robust clinical benefit on positive symptoms of the disease with limited to no impact on negative symptoms and cognitive impairment. Driven by these therapeutic limitations of current treatments and the recognition that transmitter systems beyond the dopaminergic system in particular glutamatergic transmission contribute to the etiology of schizophrenia significant recent efforts have focused on the discovery and development of novel treatments for schizophrenia with mechanisms of action that are distinct from current drugs. Specifically, compounds selectively targeting the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 subtype, phosphodiesterase subtype 10, glycine transporter subtype 1 and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor have been the subject of intense drug discovery and development efforts. Here we review recent clinical experience with the most advanced drug candidates targeting each of these novel mechanisms and discuss whether these new agents are living up to expectations.

  14. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal SA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mubashir Hassan, Sajid Rashid National Center for Bioinformatics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18. Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. Keywords: migraine, bioinformatics, modeling and docking, KCNK18, TRESK, virtual screening, pharmacoinformatics

  15. New approaches for the identification of drug targets in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Antiparasitic chemotherapy is an important issue for drug development. Traditionally, novel compounds with antiprotozoan activities have been identified by screening of compound libraries in high-throughput systems. More recently developed approaches employ target-based drug design supported by genomics and proteomics of protozoan parasites. In this chapter, the drug targets in protozoan parasites are reviewed. The gene-expression machinery has been among the first targets for antiparasitic drugs and is still under investigation as a target for novel compounds. Other targets include cytoskeletal proteins, proteins involved in intracellular signaling, membranes, and enzymes participating in intermediary metabolism. In apicomplexan parasites, the apicoplast is a suitable target for established and novel drugs. Some drugs act on multiple subcellular targets. Drugs with nitro groups generate free radicals under anaerobic growth conditions, and drugs with peroxide groups generate radicals under aerobic growth conditions, both affecting multiple cellular pathways. Mefloquine and thiazolides are presented as examples for antiprotozoan compounds with multiple (side) effects. The classic approach of drug discovery employing high-throughput physiological screenings followed by identification of drug targets has yielded the mainstream of current antiprotozoal drugs. Target-based drug design supported by genomics and proteomics of protozoan parasites has not produced any antiparasitic drug so far. The reason for this is discussed and a synthesis of both methods is proposed.

  16. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  17. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  18. Candidiasis drug discovery and development: new approaches targeting virulence for discovering and identifying new drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Targeting pathogenetic mechanisms rather than essential processes represents a very attractive alternative for the development of new antibiotics. This may be particularly important in the case of antimycotics, due to the urgent need for novel antifungal drugs and the paucity of selective fungal targets. The opportunistic pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the main etiological agent of candidiasis, the most common human fungal infection. These infections carry unacceptably high mortality rates, a clear reflection of the many shortcomings of current antifungal therapy, including the limited armamentarium of antifungal agents, their toxicity, and the emergence of resistance. Moreover the antifungal pipeline is mostly dry. Areas covered This review covers some of the most recent progress towards understanding C. albicans pathogenetic processes and how to harness this information for the development of anti-virulence agents. The two principal areas covered are filamentation and biofilm formation, as C. albicans pathogenicity is intimately linked to its ability to undergo morphogenetic conversions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and to its ability to form biofilms. Expert opinion We argue that filamentation and biofilm formation represent high value targets, yet clinically unexploited, for the development of novel anti-virulence approaches against candidiasis. Although this has proved a difficult task despite increasing understanding at the molecular level of C. albicans virulence, we highlight new opportunities and prospects for antifungal drug development targeting these two important biological processes. PMID:23738751

  19. Nanoscale Quantifying the Effects of Targeted Drug on Chemotherapy in Lymphoma Treatment Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-10-01

    The applications of targeted drugs in treating cancers have significantly improved the survival rates of patients. However, in the clinical practice, targeted drugs are commonly combined with chemotherapy drugs, causing that the exact contribution of targeted drugs to the clinical outcome is difficult to evaluate. Quantitatively investigating the effects of targeted drugs on chemotherapy drugs on cancer cells is useful for us to understand drug actions and design better drugs. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for probing the nanoscale physiological activities of single live cells. In this paper, the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties were quantified on single lymphoma cells during the actions of rituximab (a monoclonal antibody targeted drug) and two chemotherapy drugs (cisplatin and cytarabine) by AFM. AFM imaging revealed the distinct changes of cellular ultramicrostructures induced by the drugs. The changes of cellular mechanical properties after the drug stimulations were measured by AFM indenting. The statistical histograms of cellular surface roughness and mechanical properties quantitatively showed that rituximab could remarkably strengthen the killing effects of chemotherapy drugs. The study offers a new way to quantify the synergistic interactions between targeted drugs and chemotherapy drugs at the nanoscale, which will have potential impacts on predicting the efficacies of drug combinations before clinical treatments.

  20. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery.

  1. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Huai-long XU; Yong-xi LIU; Na AN; Si ZHAO; Jin-ku BAO

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins,is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells.This highly regulated,multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer.Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer,which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target.Herein,we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer.We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy.Additionally,some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery.In summary,these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements.

  2. Current drug treatments targeting dopamine D3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggio, Gian Marco; Bucolo, Claudio; Platania, Chiara Bianca Maria; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine receptors (DR) have been extensively studied, but only in recent years they became object of investigation to elucidate the specific role of different subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, D5R) in neural transmission and circuitry. D1-like receptors (D1R and D5R) and D2-like receptors (D2R, D2R and D4R) differ in signal transduction, binding profile, localization in the central nervous system and physiological effects. D3R is involved in a number of pathological conditions, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, addiction, anxiety, depression and glaucoma. Development of selective D3R ligands has been so far challenging, due to the high sequence identity and homology shared by D2R and D3R. As a consequence, despite a rational design of selective DR ligands has been carried out, none of currently available medicines selectively target a given D2-like receptor subtype. The availability of the D3R ligand [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO for positron emission tomography studies in animal models as well as in humans, allows researchers to estimate the expression of D3R in vivo; displacement of [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO binding by concurrent drug treatments is used to estimate the in vivo occupancy of D3R. Here we provide an overview of studies indicating D3R as a target for pharmacological therapy, and a review of market approved drugs endowed with significant affinity at D3R that are used to treat disorders where D3R plays a relevant role.

  3. Tyrosine aminotransferase from Leishmania infantum: A new drug target candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin. The disease is fatal without treatment, which has been based on antimonial pentavalents for more than 60 years. Due to resistances, relapses and toxicity to current treatment, the development of new drugs is required. The structure of the L. infantum tyrosine aminotransferase (LiTAT has been recently solved showing important differences with the mammalian orthologue. The characterization of LiTAT is reported herein. This enzyme is cytoplasmic and is over-expressed in the more infective stages and nitric oxide resistant parasites. Unlike the mammalian TAT, LiTAT is able to use ketomethiobutyrate as co-substrate. The pharmacophore model of LiTAT with this specific co-substrate is described herein. This may allow the identification of new inhibitors present in the databases. All the data obtained support that LiTAT is a good target candidate for the development of new anti-leishmanial drugs.

  4. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Brito

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically.

  5. Adipokines as drug targets in diabetes and underlying disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Câmara, Niels O S; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are worldwide health problems. White fat dynamically participates in hormonal and inflammatory regulation. White adipose tissue is recognized as a multifactorial organ that secretes several adipose-derived factors that have been collectively termed "adipokines." Adipokines are pleiotropic molecules that gather factors such as leptin, adiponectin, visfatin, apelin, vaspin, hepcidin, RBP4, and inflammatory cytokines, including TNF and IL-1β, among others. Multiple roles in metabolic and inflammatory responses have been assigned to these molecules. Several adipokines contribute to the self-styled "low-grade inflammatory state" of obese and insulin-resistant subjects, inducing the accumulation of metabolic anomalies within these individuals, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Thus, adipokines are an interesting drug target to treat autoimmune diseases, obesity, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue inflammation. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the roles of adipokines in different immune and nonimmune cells, which will contribute to diabetes as well as to adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance development. We describe how adipokines regulate inflammation in these diseases and their therapeutic implications. We also survey current attempts to exploit adipokines for clinical applications, which hold potential as novel approaches to drug development in several immune-mediated diseases.

  6. Discovery of the target for immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Half a century ago, the sedative thalidomide caused a serious drug disaster because of its teratogenicity and was withdrawn from the market. However, thalidomide, which has returned to the market, is now used for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma (MM) under strict control. The mechanism of thalidomide action had been a long-standing question. We developed a new affinity bead technology and identified cereblon (CRBN) as a thalidomide-binding protein. We found that CRBN functions as a substrate receptor of an E3 cullin-Ring ligase complex 4 (CRL4) and is a primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Recently, new thalidomide derivatives, called immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), have been developed by Celgene. Among them, lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide (Pom) were shown to exert strong therapeutic effects against MM. It was found that Len and Pom both bind CRBN-CRL4 and recruit neomorphic substrates (Ikaros and Aiolos). More recently it was reported that casein kinase 1a (Ck1a) was identified as a substrate for CRBN-CRL4 in the presence of Len, but not Pom. Ck1a breakdown explains why Len is specifically effective for myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion. It is now proposed that binding of IMiDs to CRBN appears to alter the substrate specificity of CRBN-CRL4. In this review, we introduce recent findings on IMiDs.

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptors and interacting proteins: evolving drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The correct targeting, localization, regulation and signaling of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) represent major mechanisms underlying the complex function of neuronal networks. These tasks are accomplished by the formation of synaptic signal complexes that integrate functionally related proteins such as neurotransmitter receptors, enzymes and scaffold proteins. By these means, proteins interacting with mGluRs are important regulators of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Most described mGluR interaction partners bind to the intracellular C-termini of the receptors. These domains are extensively spliced and phosphorylated, resulting in a high variability of binding surfaces offered to interacting proteins. Malfunction of mGluRs and associated proteins are linked to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction, depression, epilepsy, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's disease. MGluR associated signal complexes are dynamic structures that assemble and disassemble in response to the neuronal fate. This, in principle, allows therapeutic intervention, defining mGluRs and interacting proteins as promising drug targets. In the last years, several studies elucidated the geometry of mGluRs in contact with regulatory proteins, providing a solid fundament for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, I will give an overview of human disorders directly associated with mGluR malfunction, provide an up-to-date summary of mGluR interacting proteins and highlight recently described structures of mGluR domains in contact with binding partners.

  8. Targeting memory processes with drugs to prevent or cure PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Christopher K; Maynard, George D; Kehne, John H

    2012-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic debilitating psychiatric disorder resulting from exposure to a severe traumatic stressor and an area of great unmet medical need. Advances in pharmacological treatments beyond the currently approved SSRIs are needed. Background on PTSD, as well as the neurobiology of stress responding and fear conditioning, is provided. Clinical and preclinical data for investigational agents with diverse pharmacological mechanisms are summarized. Advances in the understanding of stress biology and mechanisms of fear conditioning plasticity provide a rationale for treatment approaches that may reduce hyperarousal and dysfunctional aversive memories in PTSD. One challenge is to determine if these components are independent or reflect a common underlying neurobiological alteration. Numerous agents reviewed have potential for reducing PTSD core symptoms or targeted symptoms in chronic PTSD. Promising early data support drug approaches that seek to disrupt dysfunctional aversive memories by interfering with consolidation soon after trauma exposure, or in chronic PTSD, by blocking reconsolidation and/or enhancing extinction. Challenges remain for achieving selectivity when attempting to alter aversive memories. Targeting the underlying traumatic memory with a combination of pharmacological therapies applied with appropriate chronicity, and in combination with psychotherapy, is expected to substantially improve PTSD treatment.

  9. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s-1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  10. Leptin signaling molecular actions and drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang N

    2014-11-01

    leptin and Ob-R in cancer cells compared to normal cells, makes leptin an ideal drug target for the prevention and treatment of HCC, especially in obese patients. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, leptin, leptin antagonist, leptin signaling, tumor angiogenesis, drug target

  11. Retention of ferrofluid aggregates at the target site during magnetic drug targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfer, Mohammed; Saroj, Sunil Kumar; Panigrahi, Pradipta Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The present study reports the retention dynamics of a ferrofluid aggregate localized at the target site inside a glass capillary (500 × 500 μm2 square cross section) against a bulk flow of DI water (Re = 0.16 and 0.016) during the process of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The dispersion dynamics of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) into bulk flow for different initial size of aggregate at the target site is reported using the brightfield visualization technique. The flow field around the aggregate during the retention is evaluated using the μPIV technique. IONPs at the outer boundary experience a higher shear force as compared to the magnetic force, resulting in dispersion of IONPs into the bulk flow downstream to the aggregate. The blockage effect and the roughness of the outer boundary of the aggregate resulting from chain like clustering of IONPs contribute to the flow recirculation at the downstream region of the aggregate. The entrapment of seeding particles inside the chain like clusters of IONPs at the outer boundary of the aggregate reduces the degree of roughness resulting in a streamlined aggregate at the target site at later time. The effect of blockage, structure of the aggregate, and disturbed flow such as recirculation around the aggregate are the primary factors, which must be investigated for the effectiveness of the MDT process for in vivo applications.

  12. PBIT: pipeline builder for identification of drug targets for infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Gauri; Haldankar, Harshala; Barai, Ram Shankar; Bharmal, Mohammed Husain; Shetty, Vinit; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-12-30

    PBIT (Pipeline Builder for Identification of drug Targets) is an online webserver that has been developed for screening of microbial proteomes for critical features of human drug targets such as being non-homologous to human proteome as well as the human gut microbiota, essential for the pathogen's survival, participation in pathogen-specific pathways etc. The tool has been validated by analyzing 57 putative targets of Candida albicans documented in literature. PBIT integrates various in silico approaches known for drug target identification and will facilitate high-throughput prediction of drug targets for infectious diseases, including multi-pathogenic infections.

  13. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Madaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity.

  14. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    See, Ronald E.; Luyi Zhou; Wei-Lun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of rel...

  15. From laptop to benchtop to bedside: Structure-based Drug Design on Protein Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lu; Morrow, John K.; Tran, Hoang T.; Phatak, Sharangdhar S.; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhang, Shuxing

    2012-01-01

    As an important aspect of computer-aided drug design, structure-based drug design brought a new horizon to pharmaceutical development. This in silico method permeates all aspects of drug discovery today, including lead identification, lead optimization, ADMET prediction and drug repurposing. Structure-based drug design has resulted in fruitful successes drug discovery targeting protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Meanwhile, challenges, noted by low accuracy and combinatoric issue...

  16. What can we learn from Plausible Values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Maarten; Maris, Gunter; Bechger, Timo; Glas, Cees

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that the marginal distribution of plausible values is a consistent estimator of the true latent variable distribution, and, furthermore, that convergence is monotone in an embedding in which the number of items tends to infinity. We use this result to clarify some of the misconceptions that exist about plausible values, and also show how they can be used in the analyses of educational surveys.

  17. Drugging the Undruggable: Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2017-01-17

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are essential signaling enzymes that, together with protein tyrosine kinases, regulate tyrosine phosphorylation inside the cell. Proper level of tyrosine phosphorylation is important for a diverse array of cellular processes, such as proliferation, metabolism, motility, and survival. Aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting from alteration of PTP expression, misregulation, and mutation, has been linked to the etiology of many human ailments including cancer, diabetes/obesity, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases. However, despite the fact that PTPs have been garnering attention as compelling drug targets, they remain a largely underexploited resource for therapeutic intervention. Indeed, PTPs have been widely dismissed as "undruggable", due to concerns that (1) the highly conserved active site (i.e., pTyr-binding pocket) makes it difficult to achieve inhibitor selectivity among closely related family members, and (2) the positive-charged active site prefers negatively charged molecules, which usually lack cell permeability. To address the issue of selectivity, we advanced a novel paradigm for the acquisition of highly potent and selective PTP inhibitors through generation of bivalent ligands that interact with both PTP active site and adjacent unique peripheral pockets. To overcome the bioavailability issue, we have identified nonhydrolyzable pTyr mimetics that are sufficiently polar to bind the PTP active site, yet still capable of efficiently penetrating cell membranes. We show that these pTyr mimetics interact in the desired inhibitory fashion with the PTP active site and tethering them to appropriate molecular fragments to engage less conserved interactions outside of PTP active site can increase PTP inhibitor potency and selectivity. We demonstrate through three pTyr mimetics fragment-based approaches that it is completely feasible to obtain highly potent and selective PTP inhibitors with robust in vivo

  18. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu T. Supuran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3 × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5 × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM. The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM. Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Leishmania Pathogenesis: The Potential for Drug Target Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and characterizing Leishmania donovani genes and the proteins they encode for their role in pathogenesis can reveal the value of this approach for finding new drug targets. Effective drug targets are likely to be proteins differentially expressed or required in the amastigote life cycle stage found in the patient. Several examples and their potential for chemotherapeutic disruption are presented. A pathway nearly ubiquitous in living cells targeted by anticancer drugs, the ubiquitin system, is examined. New findings in ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers in Leishmania show how disruption of those pathways could point to additional drug targets. The programmed cell death pathway, now recognized among protozoan parasites, is reviewed for some of its components and evidence that suggests they could be targeted for antiparasitic drug therapy. Finally, the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system is involved in secretion of many virulence factors. How disruptions in this pathway reduce virulence as evidence for potential drug targets is presented.

  20. A series of case studies: practical methodology for identifying antinociceptive multi-target drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Min-Hee; Kim, Yuntae; Jung, Kyung Woon; Cho, Sunyoung; Lee, Doo H

    2012-05-01

    Since the introduction of drug discovery based on single targets, the number of newly developed drugs has steadily declined, and the reliablility of the current drug-discovery paradigm has been unceasingly questioned. As an alternative, an emerging approach pursuing multi-targeting drugs has arisen to reflect multifactorial diseases caused by the complex networks of various mechanisms. The purpose of this paper is to review multi-target drugs and introduce our progress in establishing a practical methodology for identifying antinociceptive multi-target drugs. We have adopted a system of ex vivo efficacy screening using long-term potentiation in rat spinal cord as a surrogate biomarker for neuropathic pain. A bait-target approach is also adopted to lure an unknown target combination that induces synergistic mechanisms.

  1. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... a-dozen pharmaceutical companies are now racing to develop drugs that lower cholesterol by blocking PCSK9. Are ...

  2. RFDT: A Rotation Forest-based Predictor for Predicting Drug-Target Interactions using Drug Structure and Protein Sequence Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Yan, Xin; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-14

    Identification of interaction between drugs and target proteins plays an important role in discovering new drug candidates. However, through the experimental method to identify the drug-target interactions remain to be extremely time-consuming, expensive and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, it is urgent to develop new computational methods to predict potential drug-target interactions (DTI). In this article, a novel computational model is developed for predicting potential drug-target interactions under the theory that each drug-target interaction pair can be represented by the structural properties from drugs and evolutionary information derived from proteins. Specifically, the protein sequences are encoded as Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) descriptor which contains information of biological evolutionary and the drug molecules are encoded as fingerprint feature vector which represents the existence of certain functional groups or fragments. Four benchmark datasets involving enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with Rotation Forest (RF) model. The proposed method achieved the prediction accuracy of 91.3%, 89.1%, 84.1% and 71.1% for four datasets respectively. In order to make our method more persuasive, we compared our classifier with the state-of-the-art Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. We also compared the proposed method with other excellent methods. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in the prediction of DTI, and can provide assistance for new drug research and development.

  3. In silico re-identification of properties of drug target proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Baeksoo; Jo, Jihoon; Han, Jonghyun; Park, Chungoo; Lee, Hyunju

    2017-05-31

    Computational approaches in the identification of drug targets are expected to reduce time and effort in drug development. Advances in genomics and proteomics provide the opportunity to uncover properties of druggable genomes. Although several studies have been conducted for distinguishing drug targets from non-drug targets, they mainly focus on the sequences and functional roles of proteins. Many other properties of proteins have not been fully investigated. Using the DrugBank (version 3.0) database containing nearly 6,816 drug entries including 760 FDA-approved drugs and 1822 of their targets and human UniProt/Swiss-Prot databases, we defined 1578 non-redundant drug target and 17,575 non-drug target proteins. To select these non-redundant protein datasets, we built four datasets (A, B, C, and D) by considering clustering of paralogous proteins. We first reassessed the widely used properties of drug target proteins. We confirmed and extended that drug target proteins (1) are likely to have more hydrophobic, less polar, less PEST sequences, and more signal peptide sequences higher and (2) are more involved in enzyme catalysis, oxidation and reduction in cellular respiration, and operational genes. In this study, we proposed new properties (essentiality, expression pattern, PTMs, and solvent accessibility) for effectively identifying drug target proteins. We found that (1) drug targetability and protein essentiality are decoupled, (2) druggability of proteins has high expression level and tissue specificity, and (3) functional post-translational modification residues are enriched in drug target proteins. In addition, to predict the drug targetability of proteins, we exploited two machine learning methods (Support Vector Machine and Random Forest). When we predicted drug targets by combining previously known protein properties and proposed new properties, an F-score of 0.8307 was obtained. When the newly proposed properties are integrated, the prediction performance

  4. Prediction of intracellular exposure bridges the gap between target- and cell-based drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laurie J.; Wayne, Gareth J.; Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Treyer, Andrea; Lundbäck, Thomas; West, Andy; Hann, Michael M.; Artursson, Per

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate target exposure is a major cause of high attrition in drug discovery. Here, we show that a label-free method for quantifying the intracellular bioavailability (Fic) of drug molecules predicts drug access to intracellular targets and hence, pharmacological effect. We determined Fic in multiple cellular assays and cell types representing different targets from a number of therapeutic areas, including cancer, inflammation, and dementia. Both cytosolic targets and targets localized in subcellular compartments were investigated. Fic gives insights on membrane-permeable compounds in terms of cellular potency and intracellular target engagement, compared with biochemical potency measurements alone. Knowledge of the amount of drug that is locally available to bind intracellular targets provides a powerful tool for compound selection in early drug discovery. PMID:28701380

  5. Platelets as Contractile Nanomachines for Targeting Drug Delivery in Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0495 TITLE: Platelets as Contractile Nanomachines for Targeting Drug Delivery in Hemostasis and Thrombosis PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Platelets as Contractile Nanomachines for Targeting Drug Delivery in Hemostasis and Thrombosis 5b. GRANT...controlled nanocarriers as a novel and potentially paradigm-shifting strategy for targeted drug delivery to achieve hemostasis during bleeding. We have

  6. Off-Target Effects of Psychoactive Drugs Revealed by Genome-Wide Assays in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 comp...

  7. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes...

  8. Neuropeptides as targets for the development of anticonvulsant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynen, Elke; Swijsen, Ann; Raijmakers, Marjolein; Hoogland, Govert; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. These seizures are due to abnormal excessive and synchronous neuronal activity in the brain caused by a disruption of the delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Neuropeptides can contribute to such misbalance by modulating the effect of classical excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. In this review, we discuss 21 different neuropeptides that have been linked to seizure disorders. These neuropeptides show an aberrant expression and/or release in animal seizure models and/or epilepsy patients. Many of these endogenous peptides, like adrenocorticotropic hormone, angiotensin, cholecystokinin, cortistatin, dynorphin, galanin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin, somatostatin, and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, are able to suppress seizures in the brain. Other neuropeptides, such as arginine-vasopressine peptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone, enkephalin, β-endorphin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and tachykinins have proconvulsive properties. For oxytocin and melanin-concentrating hormone both pro- and anticonvulsive effects have been reported, and this seems to be dose or time dependent. All these neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs. Other neuropeptides such as nesfatin-1 and vasoactive intestinal peptide have been less studied in this field; however, as nesfatin-1 levels change over the course of epilepsy, this can be considered as an interesting marker to diagnose patients who have suffered a recent epileptic seizure.

  9. Targeted lipid based drug conjugates: a novel strategy for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Kwatra, Deep; Earla, Ravinder; Samanta, Swapan K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-09-15

    A majority of studies involving prodrugs are directed to overcome low bioavailability of the parent drug. The aim of this study is to increase the bioavailability of acyclovir (ACV) by designing a novel prodrug delivery system which is more lipophilic, and at the same time site specific. In this study, a lipid raft has been conjugated to the parent drug molecule to impart lipophilicity. Simultaneously a targeting moiety that can be recognized by a specific transporter/receptor in the cell membrane has also been tethered to the other terminal of lipid raft. Targeted lipid prodrugs i.e., biotin-ricinoleicacid-acyclovir (B-R-ACV) and biotin-12hydroxystearicacid-acyclovir (B-12HS-ACV) were synthesized with ricinoleicacid and 12hydroxystearicacid as the lipophilic rafts and biotin as the targeting moiety. Biotin-ACV (B-ACV), ricinoleicacid-ACV (R-ACV) and 12hydroxystearicacid-ACV (12HS-ACV) were also synthesized to delineate the individual effects of the targeting and the lipid moieties. Cellular accumulation studies were performed in confluent MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cells. The targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV exhibited much higher cellular accumulation than B-ACV, R-ACV and 12HS-ACV in both cell lines. This result indicates that both the targeting and the lipid moiety act synergistically toward cellular uptake. The biotin conjugated prodrugs caused a decrease in the uptake of [(3)H] biotin suggesting the role of sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in uptake. The affinity of these targeted lipid prodrugs toward SMVT was studied in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Both the targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV (20.25 ± 1.74 μM) and B-12HS-ACV (23.99 ± 3.20 μM) demonstrated higher affinity towards SMVT than B-ACV (30.90 ± 4.19 μM). Further, dose dependent studies revealed a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on [(3)H] biotin uptake in the presence of biotinylated prodrugs. Transepithelial transport studies showed lowering of [(3)H] biotin permeability in

  10. tcTKB: an integrated cardiovascular toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-01-01

    Targeted cancer drugs are often associated with unexpectedly high cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Systematic approaches to studying CV events associated with targeted anticancer drugs have high potential for elucidating the complex pathways underlying targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we built tcTKB, a comprehensive CV toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs, by extracting drug-CV pairs from five large-scale and complementary data sources. The data sources include FDA drug labels (44,979 labels), the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) (4,285,097 records), the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online Database (CVAROD) (1,107,752 records), published biomedical literature (21,354,075 records), and published full-text articles from the Journal of Oncology (JCO) (13,855 articles). tcTKB contains 14,351 drug-CV pairs for 45 targeted anticancer drugs and 1,842 CV events. We demonstrate that CV events positively correlate with drug target genes and drug metabolism genes, demonstrating that tcTKB in combination with other data resources, could facilitate our understanding of targeted anticancer drugs and their associated CV toxicities. PMID:26958275

  11. Drug-target interaction prediction: databases, web servers and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Feng; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Yongdong

    2016-07-01

    Identification of drug-target interactions is an important process in drug discovery. Although high-throughput screening and other biological assays are becoming available, experimental methods for drug-target interaction identification remain to be extremely costly, time-consuming and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, various computational models have been developed to predict potential drug-target associations on a large scale. In this review, databases and web servers involved in drug-target identification and drug discovery are summarized. In addition, we mainly introduced some state-of-the-art computational models for drug-target interactions prediction, including network-based method, machine learning-based method and so on. Specially, for the machine learning-based method, much attention was paid to supervised and semi-supervised models, which have essential difference in the adoption of negative samples. Although significant improvements for drug-target interaction prediction have been obtained by many effective computational models, both network-based and machine learning-based methods have their disadvantages, respectively. Furthermore, we discuss the future directions of the network-based drug discovery and network approach for personalized drug discovery based on personalized medicine, genome sequencing, tumor clone-based network and cancer hallmark-based network. Finally, we discussed the new evaluation validation framework and the formulation of drug-target interactions prediction problem by more realistic regression formulation based on quantitative bioactivity data.

  12. The drug-target residence time model: a 10-year retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    The drug-target residence time model was first introduced in 2006 and has been broadly adopted across the chemical biology, biotechnology and pharmaceutical communities. While traditional in vitro methods view drug-target interactions exclusively in terms of equilibrium affinity, the residence time model takes into account the conformational dynamics of target macromolecules that affect drug binding and dissociation. The key tenet of this model is that the lifetime (or residence time) of the binary drug-target complex, and not the binding affinity per se, dictates much of the in vivo pharmacological activity. Here, this model is revisited and key applications of it over the past 10 years are highlighted.

  13. Micro RNA, A Review: Pharmacogenomic drug targets for complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Bawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can regulate gene expression to target several mRNAs in a gene regulatory network. MiRNA related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (S.N.P.s represent a newly identified type of genetic variability that can be of influence to the risk of certain human diseases and also affect how drugs can be activated and metabolized by patients. This will help in personalized medicines which are used for administrating the correct dosage of drug and drug efficacy. miRNA deregulated expression has been extensively described in a variety of diseases such as Cancer, Obesity , Diabetes, Schizophrenia and control and self renewal of stem cells. MiRNA can function as oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors. MiRNAs may act as key regulators of processes as diverse as early development, cell proliferation and cell death, apoptosis and fat metabolism and cell differentiation .miRNA expression have shown their role in brain development chronic lymphocytic leukemia, colonic adeno carcinoma, Burkiff’s lymphoma and viral infection. These show their links with viral disease, neurodevelopment and cancer. It has been shown that they play a key role in melanoma metastasis. These may be

  14. Drug target mining and analysis of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    Full Text Available The discovery of new drugs requires the development of improved animal models for drug testing. The Chinese tree shrew is considered to be a realistic candidate model. To assess the potential of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing, we performed drug target prediction and analysis on genomic and transcriptomic scales. Using our pipeline, 3,482 proteins were predicted to be drug targets. Of these predicted targets, 446 and 1,049 proteins with the highest rank and total scores, respectively, included homologs of targets for cancer chemotherapy, depression, age-related decline and cardiovascular disease. Based on comparative analyses, more than half of drug target proteins identified from the tree shrew genome were shown to be higher similarity to human targets than in the mouse. Target validation also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of the proteinase-activated receptors of tree shrew platelets is similar to that of human platelets but differs from that of mouse platelets. We developed an effective pipeline and search strategy for drug target prediction and the evaluation of model-based target identification for drug testing. This work provides useful information for future studies of the Chinese tree shrew as a source of novel targets for drug discovery research.

  15. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food and Drug Administration approved a drug called vismodegib (Erivedge™) for treating advanced cases of basal cell ... the trial that led to the approval of vismodegib appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine ...

  16. iDrug-Target: predicting the interactions between drug compounds and target proteins in cellular networking via benchmark dataset optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Lin, Wei-Zhong; Liu, Zi; Cheng, Xiang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Information about the interactions of drug compounds with proteins in cellular networking is very important for drug development. Unfortunately, all the existing predictors for identifying drug-protein interactions were trained by a skewed benchmark data-set where the number of non-interactive drug-protein pairs is overwhelmingly larger than that of the interactive ones. Using this kind of highly unbalanced benchmark data-set to train predictors would lead to the outcome that many interactive drug-protein pairs might be mispredicted as non-interactive. Since the minority interactive pairs often contain the most important information for drug design, it is necessary to minimize this kind of misprediction. In this study, we adopted the neighborhood cleaning rule and synthetic minority over-sampling technique to treat the skewed benchmark datasets and balance the positive and negative subsets. The new benchmark datasets thus obtained are called the optimized benchmark datasets, based on which a new predictor called iDrug-Target was developed that contains four sub-predictors: iDrug-GPCR, iDrug-Chl, iDrug-Ezy, and iDrug-NR, specialized for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), ion channels, enzymes, and NR (nuclear receptors), respectively. Rigorous cross-validations on a set of experiment-confirmed datasets have indicated that these new predictors remarkably outperformed the existing ones for the same purpose. To maximize users' convenience, a public accessible Web server for iDrug-Target has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iDrug-Target/ , by which users can easily get their desired results. It has not escaped our notice that the aforementioned strategy can be widely used in many other areas as well.

  17. Thiamin (Vitamin B1 Biosynthesis and Regulation: A Rich Source of Antimicrobial Drug Targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Du, Honghai Wang, Jianping Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1 is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP. Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics.

  18. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS, which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25-sterol methyltransferase (SMT. Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures, and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take

  19. Structural systems pharmacology: a new frontier in discovering novel drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hepan; Ge, Xiaoxia; Xie, Lei

    2013-08-01

    The modern target-based drug discovery process, characterized by the one-drug-one-gene paradigm, has been of limited success. In contrast, phenotype-based screening produces thousands of active compounds but gives no hint as to what their molecular targets are or which ones merit further research. This presents a question: What is a suitable target for an efficient and safe drug? In this paper, we argue that target selection should take into account the proteome-wide energetic and kinetic landscape of drug-target interactions, as well as their cellular and organismal consequences. We propose a new paradigm of structural systems pharmacology to deconvolute the molecular targets of successful drugs as well as to identify druggable targets and their drug-like binders. Here we face two major challenges in structural systems pharmacology: How do we characterize and analyze the structural and energetic origins of drug-target interactions on a proteome scale? How do we correlate the dynamic molecular interactions to their in vivo activity? We will review recent advances in developing new computational tools for biophysics, bioinformatics, chemoinformatics, and systems biology related to the identification of genome-wide target profiles. We believe that the integration of these tools will realize structural systems pharmacology, enabling us to both efficiently develop effective therapeutics for complex diseases and combat drug resistance.

  20. Are Pharmaceuticals with Evolutionary Conserved Molecular Drug Targets More Potent to Cause Toxic Effects in Non-Target Organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhagen, Sara; Fuchs, Anne; Lundström Belleza, Elin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine) and without (levonorgestrel) identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development), biochemical (RNA and DNA content) and molecular (gene expression) levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L−1, respectively) followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L−1, respectively). At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L−1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals. PMID:25140792

    1. Are pharmaceuticals with evolutionary conserved molecular drug targets more potent to cause toxic effects in non-target organisms?

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Sara Furuhagen

      Full Text Available The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine and without (levonorgestrel identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development, biochemical (RNA and DNA content and molecular (gene expression levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L-1, respectively followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L-1, respectively. At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L-1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals.

    2. Are pharmaceuticals with evolutionary conserved molecular drug targets more potent to cause toxic effects in non-target organisms?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Furuhagen, Sara; Fuchs, Anne; Lundström Belleza, Elin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

      2014-01-01

      The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine) and without (levonorgestrel) identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development), biochemical (RNA and DNA content) and molecular (gene expression) levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L-1, respectively) followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L-1, respectively). At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L-1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals.

    3. Plausibility functions and exact frequentist inference

      CERN Document Server

      Martin, Ryan

      2012-01-01

      In the frequentist program, inferential methods with exact control on error rates are a primary focus. Methods based on asymptotic distribution theory may not be suitable in a particular problem, in which case, a numerical method is needed. This paper presents a general, Monte Carlo-driven framework for the construction of frequentist procedures based on plausibility functions. It is proved that the suitably defined plausibility function-based tests and confidence regions have desired frequentist properties. Moreover, in an important special case involving likelihood ratios, conditions are given such that the plausibility function behaves asymptotically like a consistent Bayesian posterior distribution. An extension of the proposed method is also given for the case where nuisance parameters are present. A number of examples are given which illustrate the method and demonstrate its strong performance compared to other popular existing methods.

    4. Bisimulation for Single-Agent Plausibility Models

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Andersen, Mikkel Birkegaard; Bolander, Thomas; van Ditmarsch, H.;

      2013-01-01

      Epistemic plausibility models are Kripke models agents use to reason about the knowledge and beliefs of themselves and each other. Restricting ourselves to the single-agent case, we determine when such models are indistinguishable in the logical language containing conditional belief, i.e., we...... define a proper notion of bisimulation, and prove that bisimulation corresponds to logical equivalence on image-finite models. We relate our results to other epistemic notions, such as safe belief and degrees of belief. Our results imply that there are only finitely many non-bisimilar single......-agent epistemic plausibility models on a finite set of propositions. This gives decidability for single-agent epistemic plausibility planning....

    5. Computer Aided Drug Design for Multi-Target Drug Design: SAR /QSAR, Molecular Docking and Pharmacophore Methods.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Abdolmaleki, Azizeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B; Ghasemi, Fatemeh

      2017-01-01

      Multi-target drugs against particular multiple targets get better protection, resistance profiles and curative influence by cooperative rules of a key beneficial target with resistance behavior and compensatory elements. Computational techniques can assist us in the efforts to design novel drugs (ligands) with a preferred bioactivity outline and alternative bioactive molecules at an early stage. A number of in silico methods have been explored extensively in order to facilitate the investigation of individual target agents and to propose a selective drug. A different, progressively more significant field which is used to predict the bioactivity of chemical compounds is the data mining method. Some of the previously mentioned methods have been investigated for multi-target drug design (MTDD) to find drug leads interact simultaneously with multiple targets. Several cheminformatics methods and structure-based approaches try to extract information from units working cooperatively in a biomolecular system to fulfill their task. To dominate the difficulties of the experimental specification of ligand-target structures, rational methods, namely molecular docking, SAR and QSAR are vital substitutes to obtain knowledge for each structure in atomic insight. These procedures are logically successful for the prediction of binding affinity and have shown promising potential in facilitating MTDD. Here, we review some of the important features of the multi-target therapeutics discoveries using the computational approach, highlighting the SAR, QSAR, docking and pharmacophore methods to discover interactions between drug-target that could be leveraged for curative benefits. A summary of each, followed by examples of its applications in drug design has been provided. Computational efficiency of each method has been represented according to its main strengths and limitations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

    6. ORAL COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW ON CURRENT AND NOVEL PERSPECTIVES

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Asija Rajesh

      2012-10-01

      Full Text Available Small intestine is mostly the site for drug absorption but in some cases the drug needs to be targeted to colon due to some factors like local colonic disease, degradation related conditions, delayed release of drugs, systemic delivery of protein and peptide drugs etc. Colon targeted drug delivery is important and relatively new concept for the absorption of drugs because it offers almost neutral pH and long residence time, thereby increasing the drug absorption. Colon has proved to be a site for the absorption of poorly soluble drugs. For the successful targeting of drugs to colon the dosage form should be designed such that it prevents the drug release in upper GIT and releasing it in the colonic region. This review article discusses in brief about introduction of colon along with the novel and emerging technologies for colon targeting of drug molecule. Treatment of these diseases with colon-specific drug delivery system provides an interesting alternative over systemic drug administration because of lower dosing and fewer systemic side effects.

    7. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Oprea, Tudor; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg

      2011-01-01

      benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based...

    8. Hierarchical pulmonary target nanoparticles via inhaled administration for anticancer drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chen, Rui; Xu, Liu; Fan, Qin; Li, Man; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Li; Li, Weidong; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Zhipeng

      2017-11-01

      Inhalation administration, compared with intravenous administration, significantly enhances chemotherapeutic drug exposure to the lung tissue and may increase the therapeutic effect for pulmonary anticancer. However, further identification of cancer cells after lung deposition of inhaled drugs is necessary to avoid side effects on normal lung tissue and to maximize drug efficacy. Moreover, as the action site of the major drug was intracellular organelles, drug target to the specific organelle is the final key for accurate drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) for pulmonary antitumor and the material was well-designed for hierarchical target involved lung tissue target, cancer cell target, and mitochondrial target. The biodistribution in vivo determined by UHPLC-MS/MS method was employed to verify the drug concentration overwhelmingly increasing in lung tissue through inhaled administration compared with intravenous administration. Cellular uptake assay using A549 cells proved the efficient receptor-mediated cell endocytosis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation showed the location of MNPs in cells was mitochondria. All results confirmed the intelligent material can progressively play hierarchical target functions, which could induce more cell apoptosis related to mitochondrial damage. It provides a smart and efficient nanocarrier platform for hierarchical targeting of pulmonary anticancer drug. So far, this kind of material for pulmonary mitochondrial-target has not been seen in other reports.

    9. On the possibility of the unification of drug targeting systems. Studies with liposome transport to the mixtures of target antigens.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Trubetskoy, V S; Berdichevsky, V R; Efremov, E E; Torchilin, V P

      1987-03-15

      In order to make the drug targeting system more effective, simple and technological, we suggest creation of drug-bearing conjugates capable of simultaneous binding with different antigenic components of the target via specific antibodies. It is supposed that the targeted therapy should include sequential administration of the mixture of modified antibodies (or other specific vectors) against different components of affected tissue and, upon antibody accumulation in the desired region, administration of modified drugs or drug carrying systems which can recognize and bind with the target via accumulated antibodies due to the interaction between vector modifier and carrier modifier. Using as a model system monolayers consisting of the mixture of extracellular antigens and appropriated antibodies, it was shown that the treatment of the target with the mixture of biotinylated antibodies against all target components and subsequent binding with the target of biotinylated liposomes via avidin permits high liposome accumulation on the monolayer. The binding achieved is always higher than in the case of the utilization of single antibody-bearing liposomes. Besides, the system suggested is very simple and its components can be easily obtained on technological scale in standardized conditions.

    10. Identification and Validation of Novel Drug Targets for the Treatment of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria : New Insights

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Lunev, Sergey; de Assis Batista, Fernando; Bosch, Soraya; Wrenger, Carsten; Groves, Matthew; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso

      2016-01-01

      In order to counter the malarial parasite’s striking ability to rapidly develop drug resistance, a constant supply of novel antimalarial drugs and potential drug targets must be available. The so-called Harlow-Knapp effect, or “searching under the lamp post,” in which scientists tend to further

    11. Current Status of Targets and Assays for Anti-HIV Drug Screening

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      2007-01-01

      HIV/AIDS is one of the most serious public health challenges globally. Despite the great efforts that are being devoted to prevent, treat and to better understand the disease, it is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, there are 30 drugs or combinations of drugs approved by FDA. Because of the side-effects, price and drug resistance, it is essential to discover new targets, to develop new technology and to find new anti-HIV drugs. This review summarizes the major targets and assays currently used in anti-HIV drug screening.

    12. The application of antitumor drug-targeting models on liver cancer.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yan, Yan; Chen, Ningbo; Wang, Yunbing; Wang, Ke

      2016-06-01

      Hepatocarcinoma animal models, such as the induced tumor model, transplanted tumor model, gene animal model, are significant experimental tools for the evaluation of targeting drug delivery system as well as the pre-clinical studies of liver cancer. The application of antitumor drug-targeting models not only furnishes similar biological characteristics to human liver cancer but also offers guarantee of pharmacokinetic indicators of the liver-targeting preparations. In this article, we have reviewed some kinds of antitumor drug-targeting models of hepatoma and speculated that the research on this field would be capable of attaining a deeper level and expecting a superior achievement in the future.

    13. [Metabotropic glutamate receptors as targets for new drug development].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Arkhipov, V I; Kapralova, M V

      2011-01-01

      The review is devoted to experimental investigations of metabotropic glutamate receptors and the properties of drugs (ligands) belonging to agonists, antagonists, and modulators of the activity of these receptors. Possibilities of the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia patients, and narcotic dependency by using drugs of this class are considered.

    14. Target Nanoparticles for Therapy - SANS and DLS of Drug Carrier Liposomes and Polymer Nanoparticles

      Science.gov (United States)

      Nawroth, T.; Johnson, R.; Krebs, L.; Khoshakhlagh, P.; Langguth, P.; Hellmann, N.; Goerigk, G.; Boesecke, P.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Szekely, N.; Schweins, R.

      2016-09-01

      T arget Nano-Pharmaceutics shall improve therapy and diagnosis of severe diseases, e.g. cancer, by individual targeting of drug-loaded nano-pharmaceuticals towards cancer cells, and drug uptake receptors in other diseases. Specific ligands, proteins or cofactors, which are recognized by the diseased cells or cells of food and drug uptake, are bound to the nanoparticle surface, and thus capable of directing the drug carriers. The strategy has two branches: a) for parenteral cancer medicine a ligand set (2-5 different, surface-linked) are selected according to the biopsy analysis of the patient tissue e.g. from tumor.; b) in the oral drug delivery part the drug transport is enforced by excipients/ detergents in combination with targeting materials for cellular receptors resulting in an induced drug uptake. Both targeting nanomaterials are characterized by a combination of SANS + DLS and SAXS or ASAXS in a feedback process during development by synthesis, nanoparticle assembly and formulation.

    15. Finding potential drug targets against Shigella flexneri through druggable proteome exploration.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Mohammad Uzzal Hossain

      2016-11-01

      Full Text Available Abstract:Background: Shigella flexneri is a gram negative bacteria that causes the infectious disease ‘shigellosis’. Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri is responsible for developing diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps in human. Antibiotics are mostly given to patients infected with shigella. Resistance to antibiotics can hinder its treatment significantly. Upon identification of essential therapeutic targets, vaccine and drug could be effective therapy for the treatment of shigellosis. Methods: The study was designed for the identification and qualitative characterization for potential drug targets from S. flexneri by using the subtractive genome analysis. A set of computational tools were used to identify essential proteins those are required for the survival of S. flexneri. Total proteome (13503 proteins of S. flexneri was retrieved from NCBI and further analyzed by subtractive channel analysis. After identification of the metabolic proteins we have also performed its qualitative characterization to pave the way for the identification of promising drug targets. Results: Subtractive analysis revealed that a list of 53 targets of S. flexneri were human non-homologous essential metabolic proteins that might be used for potential drug targets. We have also found that 11 drug targets are involved in unique pathway. Most of these proteins are cytoplasmic, can be used as broad spectrum drug targets, can interact with other proteins and show the druggable properties. The functionality and drug binding site analysis suggest a promising effective way to design the new drugs against S. flexneri. Conclusion: We have identified 13 potential novel drug and one vaccine target(s against S. flexneri. The outcome might also be used as module as well as circuit design in systems biology. Keywords: S. flexneri, drug target, therapeutics, metabolic proteins, proteome

    16. Preparation and Optimization of Nanoemulsions for targeting Drug Delivery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Navneet Sharma

      2013-12-01

      Full Text Available Nanoemulsions have appeared as a novel drug delivery system which allows sustained or controlled release of drug, biological active ingredient and genetic material. Nanoemulsion is a dispersion consisting of oil, surfactant and an aqueous phase, which is a isotropically clear and thermo-dynamically or kinetically stable liquid solution, usually with droplet diameter within the range of 10-500nm. Although interest in nano-emulsions was developed for more than two decades now, mainly for nanoparticle preparation, it is in the last few years that direct applications of nano-emulsions in consumer products are being developed, mainly in pharmacy and cosmetics. These recent applications have made that studies on optimization methods for nano-emulsion preparation be a requirement. The design of effective formulations for drugs has long been a major task, because drug efficacy can severely limited by instability or poor solubility in the vehicle. Nanoemulsion is being applied to enhance the solubility and bioavailability of water insoluble drugs. The nanosized droplets leading to an enormous increase in interfacial areas associated with nanoemulsion would influence the transport properties of the drug [1, 2]. Recently, there has been a considerable attraction for this formulation, for the delivery of hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drug as drug carriers because of its improved drug solubilization capacity, long shelf life, ease of preparation and improvement of bioavailability of drugs. This review is focused on the most recent literature on developments of nano-emulsions as final application products and on the optimization of their preparation.

    17. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Oprea, Tudor I; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg; Yang, Jeremy J; Taboureau, Olivier; Mathias, Stephen L; Kouskoumvekaki, Lrene; Sklar, Larry A; Bologa, Cristian G

      2011-03-14

      Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply bio- and cheminformatics tools using the DRUGS database, containing 3,837 unique small molecules annotated on 1,750 proteins. These are likely to serve as drug targets and antitargets (i.e., associated with side effects, SE). The academic community, the pharmaceutical sector and clinicians alike could benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based on 7,684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the "adverse reactions" section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5x5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE-D-T-CO. This type of data can be used to streamline drug repurposing and may result in novel insights that can lead to the identification of novel drug actions.

    18. Biologically Plausible, Human-scale Knowledge Representation

      Science.gov (United States)

      Crawford, Eric; Gingerich, Matthew; Eliasmith, Chris

      2016-01-01

      Several approaches to implementing symbol-like representations in neurally plausible models have been proposed. These approaches include binding through synchrony (Shastri & Ajjanagadde, 1993), "mesh" binding (van der Velde & de Kamps, 2006), and conjunctive binding (Smolensky, 1990). Recent theoretical work has suggested that…

    19. A Modular Probe Strategy for Drug Localization, Target Identification and Target Occupancy Measurement on Single Cell Level.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rutkowska, Anna; Thomson, Douglas W; Vappiani, Johanna; Werner, Thilo; Mueller, Katrin M; Dittus, Lars; Krause, Jana; Muelbaier, Marcel; Bergamini, Giovanna; Bantscheff, Marcus

      2016-09-16

      Late stage failures of candidate drug molecules are frequently caused by off-target effects or inefficient target engagement in vivo. In order to address these fundamental challenges in drug discovery, we developed a modular probe strategy based on bioorthogonal chemistry that enables the attachment of multiple reporters to the same probe in cell extracts and live cells. In a systematic evaluation, we identified the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between trans-cyclooctene labeled probe molecules and tetrazine-tagged reporters to be the most efficient bioorthogonal reaction for this strategy. Bioorthogonal biotinylation of the probe allows the identification of drug targets in a chemoproteomics competition binding assay using quantitative mass spectrometry. Attachment of a fluorescent reporter enables monitoring of spatial localization of probes as well as drug-target colocalization studies. Finally, direct target occupancy of unlabeled drugs can be determined at single cell resolution by competitive binding with fluorescently labeled probe molecules. The feasibility of the modular probe strategy is demonstrated with noncovalent PARP inhibitors.

    20. AS1411 aptamer tagged PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles for tumor cell targeting and drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Aravind, Athulya; Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Nair, Remya; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

      2012-11-01

      Liposomes and polymers are widely used drug carriers for controlled release since they offer many advantages like increased treatment effectiveness, reduced toxicity and are of biodegradable nature. In this work, anticancer drug-loaded PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and were functionalized with AS1411 anti-nucleolin aptamers for site-specific targeting against tumor cells which over expresses nucleolin receptors. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were conducted using UV spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out in two different cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and GI-1 cells and two different normal cells, L929 cells and HMEC cells. Confocal microscopy and flowcytometry confirmed the cellular uptake of particles and targeted drug delivery. The morphology analysis of the NPs proved that the particles were smooth and spherical in shape with a size ranging from 60 to 110 nm. Drug-loading studies indicated that under the same drug loading, the aptamer-targeted NPs show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted NPs. In addition, the PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency and superior sustained drug release than the drug loaded in plain PLGA NPs. The results confirmed that AS1411 aptamer-PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs are potential carrier candidates for differential targeted drug delivery.

    1. [Multimorbidity and multi-target-therapy with herbal drugs].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Saller, R; Rostock, M

      2012-12-12

      The active components of herbal drugs and substances are pleiotropic multi-ingredient compounds with multitarget properties including antiinflammatory effects. A pleiotropic inhibition of inflammation could play an important role in mutlimorbide patients as an attempt of prevention or retardation of metastasis. A large number of experimental data for European and non-European herbal drugs as well as various herbal drug combinations suggest such a possibility. Despite the so far small number of clinical studies, such an experimental herbal treatment could appear to be reasonable and acceptable, provided that there are data available on quality and safety of these herbal drugs by treatments of patients with various diseases. Besides, herbal drugs and substances play a growing role the treatment of patients with multimorbidity. Many of these herbal drugs have antiinflammatory effects beside their proved symptomatic efficacy in a lot of other diseases. The specific selection of herbal drugs that are efficacious in specific indications and additionally showed antiinflammatory effects offers the possibility of simultaneous antiinflammatory and specific efficacy. St. John's Wort and milk thistle belong to the oldest and to the best experimentally and clinically examined herbal remedies. The spectrum of internal and external uses of Hypercum perforatum as a multicompound herbal drug includes functional gastro-intestinal complaint and illness, skin disease, mucosal lesion, superficial injury, depressive upset and depression, somatoform disorders, restlessness, nervosity, convalescence, exhaustion and sleep disturbances respectively. The plurivalent character of the multicompound even enables a broad spectrum of activity. This might justify to prefer St. John's Wort to other drugs in a wide range of treatments: In multimorbide patients with depression or in depressive patients with coronary heart disease the anti-inflammatory effects could mean an additional advantage

    2. SimBoost: A Read-Across Approach for Drug-Target Interaction Prediction Using Gradient Boosting Machines

      OpenAIRE

      He, Tong

      2016-01-01

      Computational prediction of the interaction between drugs and targets is a standing challenge in drug discovery. High performance on binary drug-target benchmark datasets was reported for a number of methods. A possible drawback of binary data is that missing values and non-interacting drug-target pairs are not differentiated. In this paper, we present a method called SimBoost that predicts the continuous binding affinities of drugs and targets and thus incorporates the whole interaction spec...

    3. Targeting Receptors, Transporters and Site of Absorption to Improve Oral Drug Delivery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      J.H. Hamman

      2007-01-01

      Full Text Available Although the oral route of drug administration is the most acceptable way of self-medication with a high degree of patient compliance, the intestinal absorption of many drugs is severely hampered by different biological barriers. These barriers comprise of biochemical and physical components. The biochemical barrier includes enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal lumen, brush border and in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells as well as efflux transporters that pump drug molecules from inside the epithelial cell back to the gastrointestinal lumen. The physical barrier consists of the epithelial cell membranes, tight junctions and mucus layer. Different strategies have been applied to improve the absorption of drugs after oral administration, which range from chemical modification of drug molecules and formulation technologies to the targeting of receptors, transporters and specialized cells such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. This review focuses specifically on the targeting of receptor-mediated endocytosis, transporters and the absorption-site as methods of optimizing intestinal drug absorption. Intestinal epithelial cells express several nutrient transporters that can be targeted by modifying the drug molecule in such a way that it is recognized as a substrate. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a transport mechanism that can be targeted for instance by linking a receptor substrate to the drug molecule of interest. Many formulation strategies exist for enhancing drug absorption of which one is to deliver drugs at a specific site in the gastrointestinal tract where optimum drug absorption takes place.

    4. Targeting receptors, transporters and site of absorption to improve oral drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hamman, J H; Demana, P H; Olivier, E I

      2007-01-01

      Although the oral route of drug administration is the most acceptable way of self-medication with a high degree of patient compliance, the intestinal absorption of many drugs is severely hampered by different biological barriers. These barriers comprise of biochemical and physical components. The biochemical barrier includes enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal lumen, brush border and in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells as well as efflux transporters that pump drug molecules from inside the epithelial cell back to the gastrointestinal lumen. The physical barrier consists of the epithelial cell membranes, tight junctions and mucus layer. Different strategies have been applied to improve the absorption of drugs after oral administration, which range from chemical modification of drug molecules and formulation technologies to the targeting of receptors, transporters and specialized cells such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. This review focuses specifically on the targeting of receptor-mediated endocytosis, transporters and the absorption-site as methods of optimizing intestinal drug absorption. Intestinal epithelial cells express several nutrient transporters that can be targeted by modifying the drug molecule in such a way that it is recognized as a substrate. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a transport mechanism that can be targeted for instance by linking a receptor substrate to the drug molecule of interest. Many formulation strategies exist for enhancing drug absorption of which one is to deliver drugs at a specific site in the gastrointestinal tract where optimum drug absorption takes place.

    5. The use of microbubbles to target drug delivery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Porter Richard

      2004-11-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Ultrasound-mediated microbubbles destruction has been proposed as an innovative method for noninvasive delivering of drugs and genes to different tissues. Microbubbles are used to carry a drug or gene until a specific area of interest is reached, and then ultrasound is used to burst the microbubbles, causing site-specific delivery of the bioactive materials. Furthermore, the ability of albumin-coated microbubbles to adhere to vascular regions with glycocalix damage or endothelial dysfunction is another possible mechanism to deliver drugs even in the absence of ultrasound. This review focuses on the characteristics of microbubbles that give them therapeutic properties and some important aspects of ultrasound parameters that are known to influence microbubble-mediated drug delivery. In addition, current studies involving this novel therapeutical application of microbubbles will be discussed.

    6. Secretases as targets for drug design in Alzheimer's disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Hendriksen, JVRB; Nottet, HSLM; Smits, HA; Smits, H.J.

      Alzheimer's disease accounts for the majority of dementia in the elderly. Worldwide, approximately 20 million people are suffering from this devastating disease, with no effective treatment currently available. For efficient drug design, it is important to identify the molecular mechanisms

    7. Nanoparticles laden in situ gelling system for ocular drug targeting

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Divya Kumar

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available Designing an ophthalmic drug delivery system is one of the most difficult challenges for the researchers. The anatomy and physiology of eye create barriers like blinking which leads to the poor retention time and penetration of drug moiety. Some conventional ocular drug delivery systems show shortcomings such as enhanced pre-corneal elimination, high variability in efficiency, and blurred vision. To overcome these problems, several novel drug delivery systems such as liposomes, nanoparticles, hydrogels, and in situ gels have been developed. In situ-forming hydrogels are liquid upon instillation and undergo phase transition in the ocular cul-de-sac to form viscoelastic gel and this provides a response to environmental changes. In the past few years, an impressive number of novel temperature, pH, and ion-induced in situ-forming systems have been reported for sustain ophthalmic drug delivery. Each system has its own advantages and drawbacks. Thus, a combination of two drug delivery systems, i.e., nanoparticles and in situ gel, has been developed which is known as nanoparticle laden in situ gel. This review describes every aspects of this novel formulation, which present the readers an exhaustive detail and might contribute to research and development.

    8. Targeting DDX3 in cancer: personalized drug development and delivery

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Bol, G.M.

      2013-01-01

      Cancer begins when a cell in an organ of our body starts to grow uncontrollably. Only recently has it become clear that targeting the cancer cells’ dependency on specific proteins, rather than their origin, has greater therapeutic potential. The vast majority of potential targets for cancer therapy

    9. Identification of drug targets by chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast

      KAUST Repository

      Wu, Manhong

      2012-12-01

      OBJECTIVE: To advance our understanding of disease biology, the characterization of the molecular target for clinically proven or new drugs is very important. Because of its simplicity and the availability of strains with individual deletions in all of its genes, chemogenomic profiling in yeast has been used to identify drug targets. As measurement of drug-induced changes in cellular metabolites can yield considerable information about the effects of a drug, we investigated whether combining chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast could improve the characterization of drug targets. BASIC METHODS: We used chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast to characterize the target for five drugs acting on two biologically important pathways. A novel computational method that uses a curated metabolic network was also developed, and it was used to identify the genes that are likely to be responsible for the metabolomic differences found. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The combination of metabolomic and chemogenomic profiling, along with data analyses carried out using a novel computational method, could robustly identify the enzymes targeted by five drugs. Moreover, this novel computational method has the potential to identify genes that are causative of metabolomic differences or drug targets. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    10. Prediction of Drugs Target Groups Based on ChEBI Ontology

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Yu-Fei Gao

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available Most drugs have beneficial as well as adverse effects and exert their biological functions by adjusting and altering the functions of their target proteins. Thus, knowledge of drugs target proteins is essential for the improvement of therapeutic effects and mitigation of undesirable side effects. In the study, we proposed a novel prediction method based on drug/compound ontology information extracted from ChEBI to identify drugs target groups from which the kind of functions of a drug may be deduced. By collecting data in KEGG, a benchmark dataset consisting of 876 drugs, categorized into four target groups, was constructed. To evaluate the method more thoroughly, the benchmark dataset was divided into a training dataset and an independent test dataset. It is observed by jackknife test that the overall prediction accuracy on the training dataset was 83.12%, while it was 87.50% on the test dataset—the predictor exhibited an excellent generalization. The good performance of the method indicates that the ontology information of the drugs contains rich information about their target groups, and the study may become an inspiration to solve the problems of this sort and bridge the gap between ChEBI ontology and drugs target groups.

    11. Systems biology-embedded target validation: improving efficacy in drug discovery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Vandamme, Drieke; Minke, Benedikt A; Fitzmaurice, William; Kholodenko, Boris N; Kolch, Walter

      2014-01-01

      The pharmaceutical industry is faced with a range of challenges with the ever-escalating costs of drug development and a drying out of drug pipelines. By harnessing advances in -omics technologies and moving away from the standard, reductionist model of drug discovery, there is significant potential to reduce costs and improve efficacy. Embedding systems biology approaches in drug discovery, which seek to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of potential drug targets in a network context, will reduce attrition rates by earlier target validation and the introduction of novel targets into the currently stagnant market. Systems biology approaches also have the potential to assist in the design of multidrug treatments and repositioning of existing drugs, while stratifying patients to give a greater personalization of medical treatment.

    12. Structure-based DNA-targeting strategies with small molecule ligands for drug discovery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

      2013-09-01

      Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics.

    13. Delineation on Therapeutic Significance of Transporters as Molecular Targets of Drugs

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      KANAI Yoshikat; HE Xin; LIU Chang-xiao

      2011-01-01

      Transporters are membrane proteins mediating permeation of organic and inorganic solutes through the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organella.They play essential roles in the epithelial absorption and cellular uptake of nutrients as well as absorption,distribution,metabolism,and excretion of drugs.Because transporters contribute to determining the distribution of compounds in the body in concert with metabolic/synthetic enzymes,the drugs that affect the functions of transporters are expected to alter the distribution of compounds in the body and to ameliorate disrupted homeostasis.In this context,drugs targeting transporters have been used clinically.Such drugs include antidepressants targeting monoamine transporters,diuretics targeting inorganic ion transporters of renal tubules,and uricosuric agents targeting renal urate transporters.Now new transporter-targeting drugs designed based on post-genome drug development strategy have been in the process of clinical trials or basic/clinical researches.For example,the inhibitors of renal Na/glucose cotransporter SGLT2 have been proved for their efficacy in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.The cancer L-type amino acid transporter 1(LAT1)has been considered as a target of cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.The transporter-targeting drugs are expected to provide new rationale in the therapeutics of various diseases.

    14. Predicted essential proteins ofPlasmodium falciparum for potential drug targets

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      Qing-Feng He; Li Deng; Qin-Ying Xu; Zheng Shao

      2012-01-01

      ABSTRACT Objective:To identify novel drug targets for treatment ofPlasmodium falciparum.Methods:LocalBLASTP were used to find the proteins non-homologous to human essential proteins as novel drug targets. Functional domains of novel drug targets were identified by InterPro and Pfam,3D structures of potential drug targets were predicated by theSWISS-MODELworkspace. Ligands and ligand-binding sites of the proteins were searched byEf-seek.Results:Three essential proteins were identified that might be considered as potential drug targets.AAN37254.1 belonged to1-deoxy-D-xylulose5-phosphate reductoisomerase,CAD50499.1 belonged to chorismate synthase,CAD51220.1 belonged toFAD binging3 family, but the function of CAD51220.1 was unknown. The3D structures, ligands and ligand-binding sites ofAAN37254.1 andCAD50499.1 were successfully predicated.Conclusions:Two of these potential drug targets are key enzymes in2-C-methyl-d-erythritol4-phosphate pathway and shikimate pathway, which are absent in humans, so these two essential proteins are good potential drug targets. The function and3D structures ofCAD50499.1 is still unknown, it still need further study.

    15. Using compound similarity and functional domain composition for prediction of drug-target interaction networks.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chen, Lei; He, Zhi-Song; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

      2010-11-01

      Study of interactions between drugs and target proteins is an essential step in genomic drug discovery. It is very hard to determine the compound-protein interactions or drug-target interactions by experiment alone. As supplementary, effective prediction model using machine learning or data mining methods can provide much help. In this study, a prediction method based on Nearest Neighbor Algorithm and a novel metric, which was obtained by combining compound similarity and functional domain composition, was proposed. The target proteins were divided into the following groups: enzymes, ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors. As a result, four predictors with the optimal parameters were established. The overall prediction accuracies, evaluated by jackknife cross-validation test, for four groups of target proteins are 90.23%, 94.74%, 97.80%, and 97.51%, respectively, indicating that compound similarity and functional domain composition are very effective to predict drug-target interaction networks.

    16. PCR-based ordered genomic libraries: a new approach to drug target identification for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Belanger, Aimee E; Lai, Angel; Brackman, Marcia A; LeBlanc, Donald J

      2002-08-01

      Described here are the development and validation of a novel approach to identify genes encoding drug targets in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The method relies on the use of an ordered genomic library composed of PCR amplicons that were generated under error-prone conditions so as to introduce random mutations into the DNA. Since some of the mutations occur in drug target-encoding genes and subsequently affect the binding of the drug to its respective cellular target, amplicons containing drug targets can be identified as those producing drug-resistant colonies when transformed into S. pneumoniae. Examination of the genetic content of the amplicon giving resistance coupled with bioinformatics and additional genetic approaches could be used to rapidly identify candidate drug target genes. The utility of this approach was verified by using a number of known antibiotics. For drugs with single protein targets, amplicons were identified that rendered S. pneumoniae drug resistant. Assessment of amplicon composition revealed that each of the relevant amplicons contained the gene encoding the known target for the particular drug tested. Fusidic acid-resistant mutants that resulted from the transformation of S. pneumoniae with amplicons containing fusA were further characterized by sequence analysis. A single mutation was found to occur in a region of the S. pneumoniae elongation factor G protein that is analogous to that already implicated in other bacteria as being associated with fusidic acid resistance. Thus, in addition to facilitating the identification of genes encoding drug targets, this method could provide strains that aid future mechanistic studies.

    17. Delivery of drugs to intracellular organelles using drug delivery systems: Analysis of research trends and targeting efficiencies.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

      2015-12-30

      Targeting of drug delivery systems (DDSs) to specific intracellular organelles (i.e., subcellular targeting) has been investigated in numerous publications, but targeting efficiency of these systems is seldom reported. We searched scientific publications in the subcellular DDS targeting field and analyzed targeting efficiency and major formulation parameters that affect it. We identified 77 scientific publications that matched the search criteria. In the majority of these studies nanoparticle-based DDSs were applied, while liposomes, quantum dots and conjugates were used less frequently. The nucleus was the most common intracellular target, followed by mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In 65% of the publications, DDSs surface was decorated with specific targeting residues, but the efficiency of this surface decoration was not analyzed in predominant majority of the studies. Moreover, only 23% of the analyzed publications contained quantitative data on DDSs subcellular targeting efficiency, while the majority of publications reported qualitative results only. From the analysis of publications in the subcellular targeting field, it appears that insufficient efforts are devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters and of the DDSs' intracellular fate. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for future studies in the field of organelle-specific drug delivery and targeting.

    18. A systematic prediction of multiple drug-target interactions from chemical, genomic, and pharmacological data.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Hua Yu

      Full Text Available In silico prediction of drug-target interactions from heterogeneous biological data can advance our system-level search for drug molecules and therapeutic targets, which efforts have not yet reached full fruition. In this work, we report a systematic approach that efficiently integrates the chemical, genomic, and pharmacological information for drug targeting and discovery on a large scale, based on two powerful methods of Random Forest (RF and Support Vector Machine (SVM. The performance of the derived models was evaluated and verified with internally five-fold cross-validation and four external independent validations. The optimal models show impressive performance of prediction for drug-target interactions, with a concordance of 82.83%, a sensitivity of 81.33%, and a specificity of 93.62%, respectively. The consistence of the performances of the RF and SVM models demonstrates the reliability and robustness of the obtained models. In addition, the validated models were employed to systematically predict known/unknown drugs and targets involving the enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs, and nuclear receptors, which can be further mapped to functional ontologies such as target-disease associations and target-target interaction networks. This approach is expected to help fill the existing gap between chemical genomics and network pharmacology and thus accelerate the drug discovery processes.

    19. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

      2015-01-01

      Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

    20. Bacterial Histidine Kinases as Novel Antibacterial Drug Targets

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Bem, A.E.; Velikova, N.R.; Pellicer, M.T.; Baarlen, van P.; Marina, A.; Wells, J.M.

      2015-01-01

      Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) are promising targets for novel antibacterials. Bacterial HKs are part of bacterial two-component systems (TCSs), the main signal transduction pathways in bacteria, regulating various processes including virulence, secretion systems and antibiotic resistance. In thi

    1. Bacterial Histidine Kinases as Novel Antibacterial Drug Targets

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Bem, A.E.; Velikova, N.R.; Pellicer, M.T.; Baarlen, van P.; Marina, A.; Wells, J.M.

      2015-01-01

      Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) are promising targets for novel antibacterials. Bacterial HKs are part of bacterial two-component systems (TCSs), the main signal transduction pathways in bacteria, regulating various processes including virulence, secretion systems and antibiotic resistance. In

    2. Smart linkers in polymer-drug conjugates for tumor-targeted delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chang, Minglu; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Ting; Zuo, Tiantian; Guan, Yuanyuan; Lin, Guimei; Shao, Wei

      2016-01-01

      To achieve effective chemotherapy, many types of drug delivery systems have been developed for the specific environments in tumor tissues. Polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly used in tumor therapy due to several significant advantages over traditional delivery systems. In the fabrication of polymer-drug conjugates, a smart linker is an important component that joins two fragments or molecules together and can be cleared by a specific stimulus, which results in targeted drug delivery and controlled release. By regulating the conjugation between the drug and the nanocarriers, stimulus-sensitive systems based on smart linkers can offer high payloads, certified stability, controlled release and targeted delivery. In this review, we summarize the current state of smart linkers (e.g. disulfide, hydrazone, peptide, azo) used recently in various polymer-drug conjugate-based delivery systems with a primary focus on their sophisticated design principles and drug delivery mechanisms as well as in vivo processes.

    3. Nanoparticle-Enabled Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Dose Control and Tissue Targeting

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Brian C. Palmer

      2016-12-01

      Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g., patches, ointments, and creams enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases.

    4. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zhou, Luyi; Sun, Wei-Lun; See, Ronald E

      2011-06-14

      Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of relapse. Here, we review the evidence for the role of orexins in modulating reward and drug-seeking in animal models of addiction and the potential for orexin receptors as specific targets for anti-relapse medication approaches.

    5. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ronald E. See

      2011-06-01

      Full Text Available Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of relapse. Here, we review the evidence for the role of orexins in modulating reward and drug-seeking in animal models of addiction and the potential for orexin receptors as specific targets for anti-relapse medication approaches.

    6. Advances in Bone-targeted Drug Delivery Systems for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Osteosarcoma.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Li, Cheng-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Long-Bang; Shi, Xin; Wu, Su-Jia; Zhao, Jian-Ning

      2016-05-01

      Targeted therapy for osteosarcoma includes organ, cell and molecular biological targeting; of these, organ targeting is the most mature. Bone-targeted drug delivery systems are used to concentrate chemotherapeutic drugs in bone tissues, thus potentially resolving the problem of reaching the desired foci and minimizing the toxicity and adverse effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Some progress has been made in bone-targeted drug delivery systems for treatment of osteosarcoma; however, most are still at an experimental stage and there is a long transitional period to clinical application. Therefore, determining how to combine new, polymolecular and multi-pathway targets is an important research aspect of designing new bone-targeted drug delivery systems in future studies. The purpose of this article was to review the status of research on targeted therapy for osteosarcoma and to summarize the progress made thus far in developing bone-targeted drug delivery systems for neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma with the aim of providing new ideas for highly effective therapeutic protocols with low toxicity for patients with osteosarcoma. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

    7. Emerging drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: A review of well-characterized drug targets for novel antimalarial chemotherapy

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Arnish Chakraborty

      2016-07-01

      Full Text Available Malaria is a life-threatening, highly infectious parasitic disease caused by the intracellular, protozoan parasites of Plasmodium species. The most severe form of the disease is caused by Plasmodium falciparum, an Apicomplexa parasite with a remarkable ability to acquire resistance to antimalarial medications. Drug resistant malaria is a serious public health concern in the tropical and sub-tropical nations of the world, rendering conventional antimalarial medication ineffective in several regions. Since an effective malaria vaccine is not yet available to the masses, novel antimalarial drugs need to be developed to control the disease on the face of ever increasing reports of drug resistance. The review acquaints the readers to the current situation of chemotherapy and drug resistance in malaria across the globe, the existing antimalarial medications in use, their mechanism of action and how the malaria parasite evolves resistance to them. The review also focuses on the identification, characterization and validation of a plethora of novel drug targets in Plasmodium falciparum from the oxidoreductase, hydrolase and protein kinase groups of enzymes. The work highlights the importance of these drug targets in Plasmodium biology and shines a spotlight on novel inhibitors which have the potential to be developed as future antimalarial drugs. The review ends with a detailed discussion on the prospects and challenges in antimalarial drug discovery.

    8. Comparative genomics study for identification of putative drug targets in Salmonella typhi Ty2.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Batool, Nisha; Waqar, Maleeha; Batool, Sidra

      2016-01-15

      Typhoid presents a major health concern in developing countries with an estimated annual infection rate of 21 million. The disease is caused by Salmonella typhi, a pathogenic bacterium acquiring multiple drug resistance. We aim to identify proteins that could prove to be putative drug targets in the genome of S. typhi str. Ty2. We employed comparative and subtractive genomics to identify targets that are absent in humans and are essential to S. typhi Ty2. We concluded that 46 proteins essential to pathogen are absent in the host genome. Filtration on the basis of drug target prioritization singled out 20 potentially therapeutic targets. Their absence in the host and specificity to S. typhi Ty2 makes them ideal targets for treating typhoid in Homo sapiens. 3D structures of two of the final target enzymes, MurA and MurB have been predicted via homology modeling which are then used for a docking study.

    9. Sensation Seeking and Targeting of Televised Anti-Drug PSAs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Donohew, Lewis; And Others

      A study was conducted to determine how to reach out in an effective manner via televised public service announcements (PSAs) to particular at-risk audiences to motivate participation in drug abuse prevention programs. The subjects (207 young adults in Fayette County, Kentucky) responded to the M. Zuckerman sensation-seeking questionnaire. They…

    10. Personalized medicine of targeted anti-cancer drugs

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Klümpen, H.J.

      2012-01-01

      Medicine is becoming more and more tailored and that certainly applies to therapies for cancer. The researcher has looked at the genetic profile of the individual and the individual variation in exposure to the drug to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. His field of interest

    11. Discovering the first microRNA-targeted drug

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

      2012-01-01

      MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of nearly every biological process in the cell and play key roles in the pathogenesis of human disease. As a result, there are many drug discovery programs that focus on developing miRNA-based therapeutics. The most advanced...

    12. One for All? Hitting Multiple Alzheimer's Disease Targets with One Drug.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hughes, Rebecca E; Nikolic, Katarina; Ramsay, Rona R

      2016-01-01

      HIGHLIGHTS Many AD target combinations are being explored for multi-target drug design.New databases and models increase the potential of computational drug designLiraglutide and other antidiabetics are strong candidates for repurposing to AD.Donecopride a dual 5-HT/AChE inhibitor shows promise in pre-clinical studies Alzheimer's Disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs (MTDs). Intended as an introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key MTD design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch, and the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer's Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic.

    13. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Zhang Zhenzhong

      2011-01-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1 they themselves have target effects; (2 they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3 they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

    14. In vivo characteristics of targeted drug-carrying filamentous bacteriophage nanomedicines

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Vaks Lilach

      2011-12-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines are a new class of nanomedicines that combines biological and chemical components into a modular nanometric drug delivery system. The core of the system is a filamentous phage particle that is produced in the bacterial host Escherichia coli. Target specificity is provided by a targeting moiety, usually an antibody that is displayed on the tip of the phage particle. A large drug payload is chemically conjugated to the protein coat of the phage via a chemically or genetically engineered linker that provides for controlled release of the drug after the particle homed to the target cell. Recently we have shown that targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines can be used to eradicate pathogenic bacteria and cultured tumor cells with great potentiation over the activity of the free untargeted drug. We have also shown that poorly water soluble drugs can be efficiently conjugated to the phage coat by applying hydrophilic aminoglycosides as branched solubility-enhancing linkers. Results With an intention to move to animal experimentation of efficacy, we tested anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines for toxicity and immunogenicity and blood pharmacokinetics upon injection into mice. Here we show that anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines that carry the antibiotic chloramphenicol conjugated via an aminoglycoside linker are non-toxic to mice and are greatly reduced in immunogenicity in comparison to native phage particles or particles to which the drug is conjugated directly and are cleared from the blood more slowly in comparison to native phage particles. Conclusion Our results suggest that aminoglycosides may serve as branched solubility enhancing linkers for drug conjugation that also provide for a better safety profile of the targeted nanomedicine.

    15. PDTD: a web-accessible protein database for drug target identification

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Gao Zhenting

      2008-02-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background Target identification is important for modern drug discovery. With the advances in the development of molecular docking, potential binding proteins may be discovered by docking a small molecule to a repository of proteins with three-dimensional (3D structures. To complete this task, a reverse docking program and a drug target database with 3D structures are necessary. To this end, we have developed a web server tool, TarFisDock (Target Fishing Docking http://www.dddc.ac.cn/tarfisdock, which has been used widely by others. Recently, we have constructed a protein target database, Potential Drug Target Database (PDTD, and have integrated PDTD with TarFisDock. This combination aims to assist target identification and validation. Description PDTD is a web-accessible protein database for in silico target identification. It currently contains >1100 protein entries with 3D structures presented in the Protein Data Bank. The data are extracted from the literatures and several online databases such as TTD, DrugBank and Thomson Pharma. The database covers diverse information of >830 known or potential drug targets, including protein and active sites structures in both PDB and mol2 formats, related diseases, biological functions as well as associated regulating (signaling pathways. Each target is categorized by both nosology and biochemical function. PDTD supports keyword search function, such as PDB ID, target name, and disease name. Data set generated by PDTD can be viewed with the plug-in of molecular visualization tools and also can be downloaded freely. Remarkably, PDTD is specially designed for target identification. In conjunction with TarFisDock, PDTD can be used to identify binding proteins for small molecules. The results can be downloaded in the form of mol2 file with the binding pose of the probe compound and a list of potential binding targets according to their ranking scores. Conclusion PDTD serves as a comprehensive and

    16. Optimal drug cocktail design: methods for targeting molecular ensembles and insights from theoretical model systems.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Tidor, Bruce

      2008-05-01

      Drug resistance is a significant obstacle in the effective treatment of diseases with rapidly mutating targets, such as AIDS, malaria, and certain forms of cancer. Such targets are remarkably efficient at exploring the space of functional mutants and at evolving to evade drug binding while still maintaining their biological role. To overcome this challenge, drug regimens must be active against potential target variants. Such a goal may be accomplished by one drug molecule that recognizes multiple variants or by a drug "cocktail"--a small collection of drug molecules that collectively binds all desired variants. Ideally, one wants the smallest cocktail possible due to the potential for increased toxicity with each additional drug. Therefore, the task of designing a regimen for multiple target variants can be framed as an optimization problem--find the smallest collection of molecules that together "covers" the relevant target variants. In this work, we formulate and apply this optimization framework to theoretical model target ensembles. These results are analyzed to develop an understanding of how the physical properties of a target ensemble relate to the properties of the optimal cocktail. We focus on electrostatic variation within target ensembles, as it is one important mechanism by which drug resistance is achieved. Using integer programming, we systematically designed optimal cocktails to cover model target ensembles. We found that certain drug molecules covered much larger regions of target space than others, a phenomenon explained by theory grounded in continuum electrostatics. Molecules within optimal cocktails were often dissimilar, such that each drug was responsible for binding variants with a certain electrostatic property in common. On average, the number of molecules in the optimal cocktails correlated with the number of variants, the differences in the variants' electrostatic properties at the binding interface, and the level of binding affinity

    17. Polymeric micelles with stimuli-triggering systems for advanced cancer drug targeting.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Nakayama, Masamichi; Akimoto, Jun; Okano, Teruo

      2014-08-01

      Since the 1990s, nanoscale drug carriers have played a pivotal role in cancer chemotherapy, acting through passive drug delivery mechanisms and subsequent pharmaceutical action at tumor tissues with reduction of adverse effects. Polymeric micelles, as supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic polymers, have been considerably developed as promising drug carrier candidates, and a number of clinical studies of anticancer drug-loaded polymeric micelle carriers for cancer chemotherapy applications are now in progress. However, these systems still face several issues; at present, the simultaneous control of target-selective delivery and release of incorporated drugs remains difficult. To resolve these points, the introduction of stimuli-responsive mechanisms to drug carrier systems is believed to be a promising approach to provide better solutions for future tumor drug targeting strategies. As possible trigger signals, biological acidic pH, light, heating/cooling and ultrasound actively play significant roles in signal-triggering drug release and carrier interaction with target cells. This review article summarizes several molecular designs for stimuli-responsive polymeric micelles in response to variation of pH, light and temperature and discusses their potentials as next-generation tumor drug targeting systems.

    18. Large-scale detection of drug off-targets: hypotheses for drug repurposing and understanding side-effects.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chartier, Matthieu; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Zylber, María Inés; Najmanovich, Rafael J

      2017-04-28

      Promiscuity in molecular interactions between small-molecules, including drugs, and proteins is widespread. Such unintended interactions can be exploited to suggest drug repurposing possibilities as well as to identify potential molecular mechanisms responsible for observed side-effects. We perform a large-scale analysis to detect binding-site molecular interaction field similarities between the binding-sites of the primary target of 400 drugs against a dataset of 14082 cavities within 7895 different proteins representing a non-redundant dataset of all proteins with known structure. Statistically-significant cases with high levels of similarities represent potential cases where the drugs that bind the original target may in principle bind the suggested off-target. Such cases are further analysed with docking simulations to verify if indeed the drug could, in principle, bind the off-target. Diverse sources of data are integrated to associated potential cross-reactivity targets with side-effects. We observe that promiscuous binding-sites tend to display higher levels of hydrophobic and aromatic similarities. Focusing on the most statistically significant similarities (Z-score ≥ 3.0) and corroborating docking results (RMSD < 2.0 Å), we find 2923 cases involving 140 unique drugs and 1216 unique potential cross-reactivity protein targets. We highlight a few cases with a potential for drug repurposing (acetazolamide as a chorismate pyruvate lyase inhibitor, raloxifene as a bacterial quorum sensing inhibitor) as well as to explain the side-effects of zanamivir and captopril. A web-interface permits to explore the detected similarities for each of the 400 binding-sites of the primary drug targets and visualise them for the most statistically significant cases. The detection of molecular interaction field similarities provide the opportunity to suggest drug repurposing opportunities as well as to identify potential molecular mechanisms responsible for side

    19. Predict potential drug targets from the ion channel proteins based on SVM.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Huang, Chen; Zhang, Ruijie; Chen, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Yongshuai; Shang, Zhenwei; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xuehong; Li, Xia

      2010-02-21

      The identification of molecular targets is a critical step in the drug discovery and development process. Ion channel proteins represent highly attractive drug targets implicated in a diverse range of disorders, in particular in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Due to the limits of experimental technique and low-throughput nature of patch-clamp electrophysiology, they remain a target class waiting to be exploited. In our study, we combined three types of protein features, primary sequence, secondary structure and subcellular localization to predict potential drug targets from ion channel proteins applying classical support vector machine (SVM) method. In addition, our prediction comprised two stages. In stage 1, we predicted ion channel target proteins based on whole-genome target protein characteristics. Firstly, we performed feature selection by Mann-Whitney U test, then made predictions to identify potential ion channel targets by SVM and designed a new evaluating indicator Q to prioritize results. In stage 2, we made a prediction based on known ion channel target protein characteristics. Genetic algorithm was used to select features and SVM was used to predict ion channel targets. Then, we integrated results of two stages, and found that five ion channel proteins appeared in both prediction results including CGMP-gated cation channel beta subunit and Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit alpha-5, etc., and four of which were relative to some nerve diseases. It suggests that these five proteins are potential targets for drug discovery and our prediction strategies are effective.

    20. Targeting iron metabolism in drug discovery and delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Crielaard, Bart J; Lammers, Twan; Rivella, Stefano

      2017-02-03

      Iron fulfils a central role in many essential biochemical processes in human physiology; thus, proper processing of iron is crucial. Although iron metabolism is subject to relatively strict physiological control, numerous disorders, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, have recently been linked to deregulated iron homeostasis. Consequently, iron metabolism constitutes a promising and largely unexploited therapeutic target for the development of new pharmacological treatments for these diseases. Several iron metabolism-targeted therapies are already under clinical evaluation for haematological disorders, and these and newly developed therapeutic agents are likely to have substantial benefit in the clinical management of iron metabolism-associated diseases, for which few efficacious treatments are currently available.

    1. Nanoparticle functionalization for brain targeting drug delivery and diagnostic

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Gomes, Maria João; Mendes, Bárbara; Martins, Susana

      2016-01-01

      Nanobiotechnology has been demonstrated to be an efficient tool for targeted therapy as well as diagnosis, with particular emphasis on brain tumor and neurodegenerative diseases. On this regard, the aim of this chapter is focused on engineered nanoparticles targeted to the brain, so that they have...... the ability to overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the brain tissue. Firstly, it highlighted the difficulty of physically active molecules and colloidal carriers to overcome BBB, which is an impediment for the treatment of several brain diseases; then, the use of nanoparticles as advantageous...

    2. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Oula Penate Medina

      2011-01-01

      Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

    3. Targeted Drug Delivery in Covalent Organic Nanosheets (CONs) via Sequential Postsynthesis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Mitra, Shouvik; Sasmal, Himadri Sekhar; Kundu, Tanay; Kandambeth, Sharath; Illath, Kavya S; Díaz Díaz, David; Banerjee, Rahul

      2017-03-03

      Covalent organic nanosheets (CONs) have emerged as a new class of functional two-dimensional (2D) porous organic polymeric materials with a high accessible surface, diverse functionality and chemical stability. They could become a versa-tile candidate for targeted drug delivery. Despite their many advantages, there are limitations to use them for target specific drug delivery. We anticipated that these drawbacks could be overturned by judicious postsynthetic modification steps to use CONs for targeted drug delivery. The postsynthetic modification would not only produce the desired functionality, it would also help in exfoliation to CONs as well. In order to meet this requirement, we have developed a facile, salt-mediated synthesis of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) in presence of p-toluenesulphonic acid (PTSA). The COFs were subjected to sequential postsynthetic modifications to yield functionalized targeted CONs for targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to the breast cancer cells. This postsynthetic modification resulted in simultaneous chemical delamination and functionalization to targeted CONs. Targeted CONs showed sustained release of the drug to the cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, which led to cancer cell death via apoptosis. Considering easy and facile COF synthesis, functionality based postsynthetic modifications and chemical delamination to CONs for potential advantageous targeted drug delivery, this process can have a significant impact in biomedical applications.

    4. Molecular Communication Model for Targeted Drug Delivery in Multiple Disease Sites With Diversely Expressed Enzymes.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A K; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B T Sunil

      2016-04-01

      Targeted drug delivery (TDD) for disease therapy using liposomes as nanocarriers has received extensive attention in the literature. The liposome's ability to incorporate capabilities such as long circulation, stimuli responsiveness, and targeting characteristics, makes it a versatile nanocarrier. Timely drug release at the targeted site requires that trigger stimuli such as pH, light, and enzymes be uniquely overexpressed at the targeted site. However, in some cases, the targeted sites may not express trigger stimuli significantly, hence, achieving effective TDD at those sites is challenging. In this paper, we present a molecular communication-based TDD model for the delivery of therapeutic drugs to multiple sites that may or may not express trigger stimuli. The nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver models for the molecular communication system are presented. Here, the nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver are injected into the targeted body system's blood network. The compartmental pharmacokinetics model is employed to model the transportation of these therapeutic nanocarriers to the targeted sites where they are meant to anchor before the delivery process commences. We also provide analytical expressions for the delivered drug concentration. The effectiveness of the proposed model is investigated for drug delivery on tissue surfaces. Results show that the effectiveness of the proposed molecular communication-based TDD depends on parameters such as the total transmitter volume capacity, the receiver radius, the diffusion characteristic of the microenvironment of the targeted sites, and the concentration of the enzymes associated with the nanotransmitter and the nanoreceiver designs.

    5. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Asrar Alam

      2014-01-01

      Full Text Available Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets.

    6. [Drug delivery systems to target the anterior segment of the eye: fundamental bases and clinical applications].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Behar-Cohen, F

      2002-05-01

      The development of new drug delivery systems to target the anterior segment of the eye may offer many advantages: to increase the biodisponibility of the drug, to allow the penetration of drug that cannot be formulated as solutions, to obtain constant and sustained drug release, to achieve higher local concentrations without systemic effects, to target more specifically one tissue or cell type, to reduce the frequency of instillation and therefore increase the observance and comfort of the patient while reducing side effects of frequent instillation. Several approaches are developed, aiming to increase the corneal contact time by modified formulation or reservoir systems, or by increasing the tissue permeability using iontophoresis. To date, no ocular drug delivery system is ideal for all purposes. To maximize treatment efficacy, careful evaluation of the specific pathological condition, the targeted Intraocular tissue and the location of the most severe pathology must be made before selecting the method of delivery most suitable for each individual patient.

    7. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

      2016-02-01

      Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

    8. Target-mediated drug disposition model for drugs with two binding sites that bind to a target with one binding site.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

      2017-07-19

      The paper extended the TMDD model to drugs with two identical binding sites (2-1 TMDD). The quasi-steady-state (2-1 QSS), quasi-equilibrium (2-1 QE), irreversible binding (2-1 IB), and Michaelis-Menten (2-1 MM) approximations of the model were derived. Using simulations, the 2-1 QSS approximation was compared with the full 2-1 TMDD model. As expected and similarly to the standard TMDD for monoclonal antibodies (mAb), 2-1 QSS predictions were nearly identical to 2-1 TMDD predictions, except for times of fast changes following initiation of dosing, when equilibrium has not yet been reached. To illustrate properties of new equations and approximations, several variations of population PK data for mAbs with soluble (slow elimination of the complex) or membrane-bound (fast elimination of the complex) targets were simulated from a full 2-1 TMDD model and fitted to 2-1 TMDD models, to its approximations, and to the standard (1-1) QSS model. For a mAb with a soluble target, it was demonstrated that the 2-1 QSS model provided nearly identical description of the observed (simulated) free drug and total target concentrations, although there was some minor bias in predictions of unobserved free target concentrations. The standard QSS approximation also provided a good description of the observed data, but was not able to distinguish between free drug concentrations (with no target attached and both binding site free) and partially bound drug concentrations (with one of the binding sites occupied by the target). For a mAb with a membrane-bound target, the 2-1 MM approximation adequately described the data. The 2-1 QSS approximation converged 10 times faster than the full 2-1 TMDD, and its run time was comparable with the standard QSS model.

    9. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellularcarcinoma - a drug development crisis?

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      2016-01-01

      Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing causeof cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multitargetedkinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven toimprove outcomes in patients with advanced diseaseoffering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensivegenomic mapping has improved understanding of thegenetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), thisknowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The lastfew years have seen the failure of several first and secondline phase Ⅲ clinical trials of novel molecularly targetedtherapies, warranting a change in the way new therapiesare investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for thesefailures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trialdesign and a lack of biomarkers. This review discussesthe current crisis in HCC drug development and how weshould learn from recent trial failures to develop a moreeffective personalised treatment paradigm for patientswith HCC.

    10. Bioreducible carboxymethyl dextran nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Thambi, Thavasyappan; You, Dong Gil; Han, Hwa Seung; Deepagan, V G; Jeon, Sang Min; Suh, Yung Doug; Choi, Ki Young; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Doo Sung; Park, Jae Hyung

      2014-11-01

      Bioreducible carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) derivatives are synthesized by the chemical modification of CMD with lithocholic acid (LCA) through a disulfide linkage. The hydrophobic nature of LCA allows the conjugates (CMD-SS-LCAs) to form self-assembled nanoparticles in aqueous conditions. Depending on the degree of LCA substitution, the particle diameters range from 163 to 242 nm. Doxorubicin (DOX), chosen as a model anticancer drug, is effectively encapsulated into the nanoparticles with high loading efficiency (>70%). In vitro optical imaging tests reveal that the fluorescence signal of DOX quenched in the bioreducible nanoparticles is highly recovered in the presence of glutathione (GSH), a tripeptide capable of reducing disulfide bonds in the intracellular compartments. Bioreducible nanoparticles rapidly release DOX when they are incubated with 10 mm GSH, whereas the drug release is greatly retarded in physiological buffer (pH 7.4). DOX-loaded bioreducible nanoparticles exhibit higher toxicity to SCC7 cancer cells than DOX-loaded nanoparticles without the disulfide bond. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation demonstrate that bioreducible nanoparticles can effectively deliver DOX into the nuclei of SCC7 cells. In vivo biodistribution study indicates that Cy5.5-labeled CMD-SS-LCAs selectively accumulate at tumor sites after systemic administration into tumor-bearing mice. Notably, DOX-loaded bioreducible nanoparticles exhibit higher antitumor efficacy than reduction-insensitive control nanoparticles. Overall, it is evident that bioreducible CMD-SS-LCA nanoparticles are useful as a drug carrier for cancer therapy.

    11. Is PDE4 too difficult a drug target?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Higgs, Gerry

      2010-05-01

      The search for selective inhibitors of PDE4 as novel anti-inflammatory drugs has continued for more than 30 years. Although several compounds have demonstrated therapeutic effects in diseases such as asthma, COPD, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, none have reached the market. A persistent challenge in the development of PDE4 inhibitors has been drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as nausea. However, extensive clinical trials with well-tolerated doses of roflumilast (Daxas; Nycomed/Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corp/Forest Laboratories Inc) in COPD, a disease that is generally unresponsive to existing therapies, have demonstrated significant therapeutic improvements. In addition, GlaxoSmithKline plc is developing 256066, an inhaled formulation of a PDE4 inhibitor that has demonstrated efficacy in trials in asthma, and apremilast from Celgene Corp has been reported to be effective for the treatment of psoriasis. Despite the challenges and complications that have been encountered during the development of PDE4 inhibitors, these drugs may provide a genuinely novel class of anti-inflammatory agents, and there are several compounds in development that could fulfill that promise.

    12. Tau-Centric Targets and Drugs in Clinical Development for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

      OpenAIRE

      Francesco Panza; Vincenzo Solfrizzi; Davide Seripa; Imbimbo, Bruno P.; Madia Lozupone; Andrea Santamato; Chiara Zecca; Maria Rosaria Barulli; Antonello Bellomo; Alberto Pilotto; Antonio Daniele; Antonio Greco; Giancarlo Logroscino

      2016-01-01

      The failure of several Phase II/III clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with drugs targeting β-amyloid accumulation in the brain fuelled an increasing interest in alternative treatments against tau pathology, including approaches targeting tau phosphatases/kinases, active and passive immunization, and anti-tau aggregation. The most advanced tau aggregation inhibitor (TAI) is methylthioninium (MT), a drug existing in equilibrium between a reduced (leuco-methylthioninium) and oxidized f...

    13. Drug-loading capacity and nuclear targeting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grafted with anionic amphiphilic copolymers

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Tsai HC

      2013-11-01

      Full Text Available Hsieh-Chih Tsai,1,* Jeng-Yee Lin,2,* Faiza Maryani,1 Chun-Chiang Huang,1 Toyoko Imae1,31Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, 2Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, 3Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In this study, three types of hybrid nanotubes (NTs, ie, oxidized multiwalled carbon NTs (COOH MWCNTs, heparin (Hep-conjugated MWCNTs (Hep MWCNTs, and diblock copolymer polyglycolic acid (PGA-co-heparin conjugated to MWCNTs (PGA MWCNTs, were synthesized with improved biocompatibility and drug-loading capacity. Hydrophilic Hep substituents on MWCNTs improved biocompatibility and acted as nucleus-sensitive segments on the CNT carrier, whereas the addition of PGA enhanced drug-loading capacity. In the PGA MWCNT system, the amphiphilic copolymer (PGA-Hep formed micelles on the side walls of CNTs, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The PGA system encapsulated the hydrophobic drug with high efficiency compared to the COOH MWCNT and Hep MWCNT systems. This is because the drug was loaded onto the PGA MWCNTs through hydrophobic forces and onto the CNTs by ∏–∏ stacking interactions. Additionally, most of the current drug-carrier designs that target cancer cells release the drug in the lysosome or cytoplasm. However, nuclear-targeted drug release is expected to kill cancer cells more directly and efficiently. In our study, PGA MWCNT carriers effectively delivered the active anticancer drug doxorubicin into targeted nuclei. This study may provide an effective strategy for the development of carbon-based drug carriers for nuclear-targeted drug delivery. Keywords: carbon nanotube, amphiphilic copolymer, drug loading, nucleus targeting, cancer therapy

    14. New development and application of ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction in gene therapy and drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Qiu, Ri-Xiang; Jiang, Lan; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Yu, Jiang-Xiu

      2013-08-01

      Ultrasound is a common used technique for clinical imaging. In recent years, with the advances in preparation technology of microbubbles and the innovations in ultrasound imaging, ultrasound is no longer confined to detection of tissue perfusion, but extends to specific ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy gradually. With the development of research, ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy have made great progresses. Targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging are achieved by binding target molecules, specific antibody or ligand to the surface of microbubbles to obtain specific imaging by attaching to target tissues. Meanwhile, it can also achieve targeting gene therapy or drug delivery by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) mediating genes or drugs to specific target sites. UTMD has a number of advantages, such as target-specific, highly effective, non-invasivity, relatively low-cost and no radiation, and has broad application prospects, which is regarded as one hot spot in medical studies. We reviewed the new development and application of UTMD in gene therapy and drug delivery in this paper. With further development of technology and research, the gene or drug delivery system and related methods will be widely used in application and researches.

    15. A new targeted delivery approach by functionalizing drug nanocrystals through polydopamine coating.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zhan, Honglei; Jagtiani, Tina; Liang, Jun F

      2017-05-01

      Tumor target specificity via chemotherapy is widely considered to be very effective on tumor treatment. For an ideal chemotherapeutic agent like Camptothecin (CPT) (CPT is the abbreviation for Camptothecin), improved therapeutic efficacy and high selectivity are equally important. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we developed a novel tumor targeting peptide XQ1 grafted CPT nanocrystals with polydopamine coating as a spacer. In this study, CPT nanocrystals were coated by polymerization of dopamine that was induced by plasma-activated water under an acidic environment, and then the tumor targeting peptide was grafted onto polydopamine (PDA) (PDA is the abbreviation for polydopamine) coated CPT nanocrystals through catechol chemistry. The PDA layer had negligible effects on drug crystallinity and structure but resulted in drug nanocrystals with excellent dispersion properties, improved dissolution rate and drug stability by preventing water hydrolysis. More importantly, tumor targeting peptide XQ1 facilitated a rapid cross-membrane translocation of drug nanocrystals via receptor-mediated endocytosis, leading to efficient intracellular drug delivery. Moreover, this novel drug formulation demonstrated more potent anti-cancer activity against tumor cells in comparison with free CPT and naked CPT nanocrystals and exhibited high selectivity, all of which are attributed to the tumor target specificity property and inherent pH-dependent drug release behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    16. Targeted blood-to-brain drug delivery --10 key development criteria.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gaillard, Pieter J; Visser, Corine C; Appeldoorn, Chantal C M; Rip, Jaap

      2012-09-01

      Drug delivery to the brain remains challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier. In this review, 10 key development criteria are presented that are important for successful drug development to treat CNS diseases by targeted drug delivery systems. Although several routes of delivery are being investigated, such as intranasal delivery, direct injections into the brain or CSF, and transient opening of the blood-brain barrier, the focus of this review is on physiological strategies aiming to target endogenous transport mechanisms. Examples from literature, focusing on targeted drug delivery systems that are being commercially developed, will be discussed to illustrate the 10 key development criteria. The first four criteria apply to the targeting of the blood-brain barrier: (1) a proven inherently safe receptor biology, (2) a safe and human applicable ligand, (3) receptor specific binding, and (4) applicable for acute and chronic indications. Next to an efficient and safe targeting strategy, as captured in key criteria 1 to 4, a favorable pharmacokinetic profile is also important (key criterion 5). With regard to the drug carriers, two criteria are important: (6) no modification of active ingredient and (7) able to carry various classes of molecules. The final three criteria apply to the development of a drug from lab to clinic: (8) low costs and straightforward manufacturing, (9) activity in all animal models, and (10) strong intellectual property (IP) protection. Adhering to these 10 key development criteria will allow for a successful brain drug development.

    17. Two-component signal transduction as potential drug targets in pathogenic bacteria.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Eguchi, Yoko; Watanabe, Takafumi; Okamoto, Sho; Doi, Akihiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

      2010-04-01

      Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    18. Investigation on a Potential Targeting Drug Delivery System Consisting of Folate, Mitoxantrone and Human Serum Albumin

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      ZHOU Qiu-Jua; BI Ya-Jing; XIANG Jun-Feng; TANG Ya-Lin; YANG Qian-Fan; XU Guang-Zhi

      2008-01-01

      A potential targeting drug delivery system consisting of folate (FA), the targeting molecule, human serum al- bumin (HSA), the carrier, and mitoxantrone (MTO), the medicine, has been designed. Data obtained by UV absorp-tion, fluorescence, and NMR techniques indicated the formation of ternary complexes and possible application to building a targeting drug delivery system by using FA, MTO and HSA. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay indicated that the toxicity of the FA-HSA-MTO against PC-3 cell line was 79.95%, which was much higher than that of free MTO tested in totally the same conditions. About 30% increase of the toxicity should be owed to the targeting ef-fect of FA. Thus, the feasibility and validity of a novel targeting drug delivery system, FA-HSA-MTO, was con-firmed.

    19. Grants4Targets - an innovative approach to translate ideas from basic research into novel drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lessl, Monika; Schoepe, Stefanie; Sommer, Anette; Schneider, Martin; Asadullah, Khusru

      2011-04-01

      Collaborations between industry and academia are steadily gaining importance. To combine expertises Bayer Healthcare has set up a novel open innovation approach called Grants4Targets. Ideas on novel drug targets can easily be submitted to http://www.grants4targets.com. After a review process, grants are provided to perform focused experiments to further validate the proposed targets. In addition to financial support specific know-how on target validation and drug discovery is provided. Experienced scientists are nominated as project partners and, depending on the project, tools or specific models are provided. Around 280 applications have been received and 41 projects granted. According to our experience, this type of bridging fund combined with joint efforts provides a valuable tool to foster drug discovery collaborations.

    20. Elucidating antimalarial drug targets/mode-of-action by application of system biology technologies

      CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

      Becker, J

      2008-11-01

      Full Text Available . In this regard, the researchers chose the polymine metabolic pathway in P. falciparum as a proof of concept project, to validate the pathway as a drug target and elucidate the (MoA) of cyclohexylamine in P. falciparum 3D7. Drug effects were examined through...

    1. Multifunctional magnetic silica nanotubes for MR imaging and targeted drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Su, Wu

      2015-03-04

      A multifunctional drug delivery vehicle consisting of a tubular shaped silica host, a compact superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layer and a hyaluronic acid surface coating was developed as a theranostic platform, for in vivo MR imaging and magnetically guided/cancer targeted drug delivery.

    2. ROCK1 is a potential combinatorial drug target for BRAF mutant melanoma

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Smit, Marjon A; Maddalo, Gianluca; Greig, Kylie; Raaijmakers, Linsey M; Possik, Patricia A; van Breukelen, Bas; Cappadona, Salvatore; Heck, Albert Jr; Altelaar, Adrianus; Peeper, Daniel S

      2014-01-01

      Treatment of BRAF mutant melanomas with specific BRAF inhibitors leads to tumor remission. However, most patients eventually relapse due to drug resistance. Therefore, we designed an integrated strategy using (phospho)proteomic and functional genomic platforms to identify drug targets whose inhibiti

    3. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

      2012-01-01

      The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

    4. The Research and Applications of Quantum Dots as Nano-Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cancer Therapy

      OpenAIRE

      Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Bing-Jie

      2016-01-01

      Quantum dots (QDs), nano-carriers for drugs, can help realize the targeting of drugs, and improve the bioavailability of drugs in biological fields. And, a QD nano-carrier system for drugs has the potential to realize early detection, monitoring, and localized treatments of specific disease sites. In addition, QD nano-carrier systems for drugs can improve stability of drugs, lengthen circulation time in vivo, enhance targeted absorption, and improve the distribution and metabolism process of ...

    5. Host pharmacokinetics and drug accumulation of anthelmintics within target helminth parasites of ruminants.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lifschitz, A; Lanusse, C; Alvarez, L

      2017-07-01

      Anthelmintic drugs require effective concentrations to be attained at the site of parasite location for a certain period to assure their efficacy. The processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (pharmacokinetic phase) directly influence drug concentrations attained at the site of action and the resultant pharmacological effect. The aim of the current review article was to provide an overview of the relationship between the pharmacokinetic features of different anthelmintic drugs, their availability in host tissues, accumulation within target helminths and resulting therapeutic efficacy. It focuses on the anthelmintics used in cattle and sheep for which published information on the overall topic is available; benzimidazoles, macrocyclic lactones and monepantel. Physicochemical properties, such as water solubility and dissolution rate, determine the ability of anthelmintic compounds to accumulate in the target parasites and consequently final clinical efficacy. The transcuticular absorption process is the main route of penetration for different drugs in nematodes and cestodes. However, oral ingestion is a main route of drug entry into adult liver flukes. Among other factors, the route of administration may substantially affect the pharmacokinetic behaviour of anthelmintic molecules and modify their efficacy. Oral administration improves drug efficacy against nematodes located in the gastroinestinal tract especially if parasites have a reduced susceptibility. Partitioning of the drug between gastrointestinal contents, mucosal tissue and the target parasite is important to enhance the drug exposure of the nematodes located in the lumen of the abomasum and/or small intestine. On the other hand, large inter-animal variability in drug exposure and subsequent high variability in efficacy is observed after topical administration of anthelmintic compounds. As it has been extensively demonstrated under experimental and field conditions, understanding

    6. Microfluidics for drug discovery and development: from target selection to product lifecycle management.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kang, Lifeng; Chung, Bong Geun; Langer, Robert; Khademhosseini, Ali

      2008-01-01

      Microfluidic technologies' ability to miniaturize assays and increase experimental throughput have generated significant interest in the drug discovery and development domain. These characteristics make microfluidic systems a potentially valuable tool for many drug discovery and development applications. Here, we review the recent advances of microfluidic devices for drug discovery and development and highlight their applications in different stages of the process, including target selection, lead identification, preclinical tests, clinical trials, chemical synthesis, formulations studies and product management.

    7. Protein target discovery of drug and its reactive intermediate metabolite by using proteomic strategy

      OpenAIRE

      Lianghai Hu; John Paul Fawcett; Jingkai Gu

      2012-01-01

      Identifying protein targets of bioactive compounds is an effective approach to discover unknown protein functions, identify molecular mechanisms of drug action, and obtain information for optimization of lead compounds. At the same time, metabolic activation of a drug can lead to cytotoxicities. Therefore, it is very important to systemically characterize the drug and its reactive intermediate. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach has emerged as the most efficient to study protein funct...

    8. Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Kuldeep Hemraj Ramteke

      2014-03-01

      Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A, and concentration of cross linking agent (B on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system.

    9. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

      2012-02-01

      The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings.

    10. [New targets and new drugs in thoracic oncology].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rouviere, D; Bousquet, E; Pons, E; Milia, J-D; Guibert, N; Mazieres, J

      2015-10-01

      A number of mechanisms that drive oncogenesis have been deciphered over the last 20 years. The main oncogenic factors in the field of thoracic oncology are mutations of EGFR, KRAS, and EML4-ALK translocation, which are most often reported in adenocarcinomas. However, new molecular targets have been highlighted recently including BRAF mutations, HER2 or PI3K, new translocations such as ROS1 or KIF5B-RET. Molecular abnormalities have also been identified in tumors other than adenocarcinoma (squamous and small cell carcinoma). Therapeutic strategies have been designed to inhibit these signaling pathways including monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Some of these molecules are now approved as therapies, others are currently undergoing testing in clinical trials. We here present a review of novel targeted agents for lung cancer.

    11. Notch signaling in glioblastoma: a developmental drug target?

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Boulay Jean-Louis

      2010-11-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Malignant gliomas are among the most devastating tumors for which conventional therapies have not significantly improved patient outcome. Despite advances in imaging, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, survival is still less than 2 years from diagnosis and more targeted therapies are urgently needed. Notch signaling is central to the normal and neoplastic development of the central nervous system, playing important roles in proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and cancer stem cell regulation. Notch is also involved in the regulation response to hypoxia and angiogenesis, which are typical tumor and more specifically glioblastoma multiforme (GBM features. Targeting Notch signaling is therefore a promising strategy for developing future therapies for the treatment of GBM. In this review we give an overview of the mechanisms of Notch signaling, its networking pathways in gliomas, and discuss its potential for designing novel therapeutic approaches.

    12. Finding new drug targets for the treatment of migraine attacks

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Olesen, J; Olesen, Jes; Tfelt-Hansen, P

      2009-01-01

      No new preventive drugs specific to migraine have appeared for the last 20 years and existing acute therapies need improvement. Unfortunately, no animal models can predict the efficacy of new therapies for migraine. Because migraine attacks are fully reversible and can be aborted by therapy......, the headache- or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signalling molecules can be tested in a human model. This model has predicted efficacy of nitric oxide synthase inhibition and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor blockade. The pharmaceutical industry should pay more attention to human...

    13. Targeted CNx Nanowire-Drug Complexes for Enhanced Chemotherapeutic Efficacy

      Science.gov (United States)

      2009-09-01

      Zhongrui Li‡ and Alexandru S. Biris‡ (2008). Temperature Measurement of Carbon Nanotubes Using Infrared Thermography Chemistry of Materials 20, 4011...The relative efficiency of conversion of nIR irradiation into heat for DNA-encased MWNTs relative to non-DNA-encased MWNTs and other materials is...successful, the use of aptamers. Details of the successful approach to building N-MWNTs with targeting molecule: Raw, carbon vapor deposition (CVD) MWNTs

    14. Using Click Chemistry to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium

      Science.gov (United States)

      2016-06-01

      both enzymes are expressed cytoplasmically in sporozoites and liver stages. Using a specific and potent inhibitor of Plasmodium PKG and inhibitor... originally planned. Therefore, we modified our approach so that we could still fulfill the objective of identifying Tsp’s target in sporozoites. To fulfill...essential Ca(2)(+) signals at key decision points in the life cycle of malaria parasites. PLoS Biol 12: e1001806. 2. Falae A, Combe A, Amaladoss A

    15. Interactions of dendrimers with biological drug targets: reality or mystery - a gap in drug delivery and development research.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

      2016-07-21

      Dendrimers have emerged as novel and efficient materials that can be used as therapeutic agents/drugs or as drug delivery carriers to enhance therapeutic outcomes. Molecular dendrimer interactions are central to their applications and realising their potential. The molecular interactions of dendrimers with drugs or other materials in drug delivery systems or drug conjugates have been extensively reported in the literature. However, despite the growing application of dendrimers as biologically active materials, research focusing on the mechanistic analysis of dendrimer interactions with therapeutic biological targets is currently lacking in the literature. This comprehensive review on dendrimers over the last 15 years therefore attempts to identify the reasons behind the apparent lack of dendrimer-receptor research and proposes approaches to address this issue. The structure, hierarchy and applications of dendrimers are briefly highlighted, followed by a review of their various applications, specifically as biologically active materials, with a focus on their interactions at the target site. It concludes with a technical guide to assist researchers on how to employ various molecular modelling and computational approaches for research on dendrimer interactions with biological targets at a molecular level. This review highlights the impact of a mechanistic analysis of dendrimer interactions on a molecular level, serves to guide and optimise their discovery as medicinal agents, and hopes to stimulate multidisciplinary research between scientific, experimental and molecular modelling research teams.

    16. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Zuhorn, Inge; Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick

      2015-01-01

      The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics in

    17. Nitric oxide-related drug targets in headache

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Olesen, Jes

      2010-01-01

      SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so-called del......SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so......-called delayed headache that fulfils criteria for migraine without aura in migraine sufferers. Blockade of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) by L-nitromonomethylarginine effectively treats attacks of migraine without aura. Similar results have been obtained for chronic the tension-type headache and cluster headache....... Inhibition of the breakdown of cyclic guanylate phosphate (cGMP) also provokes migraine in sufferers, indicating that cGMP is the effector of NO-induced migraine. Similar evidence suggests an important role of NO in the tension-type headache and cluster headache. These very strong data from human...

    18. Mining predicted essential genes of Brugia malayi for nematode drug targets.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Sanjay Kumar

      Full Text Available We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression.

    19. Nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of saquinavir mesylate for brain targeting.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Mahajan, Hitendra S; Mahajan, Milind S; Nerkar, Pankaj P; Agrawal, Anshuman

      2014-03-01

      The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunological privileged sanctuary site-providing reservoir for HIV-1 virus. Current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. The low permeability of anti-HIV drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) leads to insufficient delivery. Therefore, developing a novel approaches enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required for the treatment of neuro-AIDS. The aim of this study was to develop intranasal nanoemulsion (NE) for enhanced bioavailability and CNS targeting of saquinavir mesylate (SQVM). SQVM is a protease inhibitor which is a poorly soluble drug widely used as antiretroviral drug, with oral bioavailability is about 4%. The spontaneous emulsification method was used to prepare drug-loaded o/w nanoemulsion, which was characterized by droplet size, zeta potential, pH, drug content. Moreover, ex-vivo permeation studies were performed using sheep nasal mucosa. The optimized NE showed a significant increase in drug permeation rate compared to the plain drug suspension (PDS). Cilia toxicity study on sheep nasal mucosa showed no significant adverse effect of SQVM-loaded NE. Results of in vivo biodistribution studies show higher drug concentration in brain after intranasal administration of NE than intravenous delivered PDS. The higher percentage of drug targeting efficiency (% DTE) and nose-to-brain drug direct transport percentage (% DTP) for optimized NE indicated effective CNS targeting of SQVM via intranasal route. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated transport of drug in the CNS at larger extent after intranasal administration as NE.

    20. A critical review of pro-cognitive drug targets in psychosis: Convergence on myelination and inflammation.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Rune A. eKroken

      2014-02-01

      Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs have thus far focused on dopaminergic antagonism at the D2 receptors, as counteracting the hyperdopaminergia in nigrostriatal and mesolimbic projections has been considered mandatory for the antipsychotic action of the drugs. Current drugs effectively target the positive symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations and delusions in the majority of patients, whereas effect sizes are smaller for negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions. With the understanding that neurocognitive dysfunction associated with schizophrenia have a greater impact on functional outcome than the positive symptoms, the focus in pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia has shifted to the potential effect of future drugs on cognitive enhancement. A major obstacle is, however, that the biological underpinnings of cognitive dysfunction remain largely unknown. With the availability of increasingly sophisticated techniques in molecular biology and brain imaging, this situation is about to change, with major advances being made in identifying the neuronal substrates underlying schizophrenia, and putative pro-cognitive drug targets may be revealed. In relation to cognitive effects, this review focuses on evidence from basic neuroscience and clinical studies, taking two separate perspectives. One perspective is the identification of previously under-recognized treatment targets for existing antipsychotic drugs, including myelination and mediators of inflammation. A second perspective is the development of new drugs or novel treatment targets for well-known drugs which act on recently discovered treatment targets for cognitive enhancement, and which may complement the existing drugs. This might pave the way for personalized treatment regimens for patients with schizophrenia aimed at improved functional outcome. The review also aims at identifying major current constraints for pro-cognitive drug development for patients with schizophrenia.

    1. Chemical Genomics and Emerging DNA Technologies in the Identification of Drug Mechanisms and Drug Targets

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

      2012-01-01

      critical roles in the genomic age of biological research and drug discovery. In the present review we discuss how simple biological model organisms can be used as screening platforms in combination with emerging genomic technologies to advance the identification of potential drugs and their molecular...

    2. Adaptation of targeted nanocarriers to changing requirements in antimalarial drug delivery

      OpenAIRE

      Marques, Joana; Valle-Delgado, Juan J.; Urbán, Patricia; Baró, Elisabet; Prohens, Rafel; Mayor, Alfredo; Cisteró, Pau; Delves, Michael; Robert E Sinden; Grandfils, Christian; de Paz, José L.; García-Salcedo, José A.; Fernández-Busquets, Xavier

      2016-01-01

      The adaptation of existing antimalarial nanocarriers to new Plasmodium stages, drugs, targeting molecules, or encapsulating structures is a strategy that can provide new nanotechnology-based, cost-efficient therapies against malaria. We have explored the modification of different liposome prototypes that had been developed in our group for the targeted delivery of antimalarial dru...

    3. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

      2010-09-01

      Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

    4. Endocrine function as a target of perinatal drug effects: methodologic issues.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kuhn, C; Ignar, D; Windh, R

      1991-01-01

      The goal of this chapter is to indicate potential endocrine targets of perinatal drug exposure, to describe the methodologic issues involved in detecting changes in hormone secretion, and to provide examples of several endocrine systems in which exposure to drugs during development significantly impaired normal endocrine development. Finally, we attempted to show that endocrine function is both a target and useful marker for detecting effects of drug of abuse on development that provides the advantages of accurate quantitation and relative response stability across ontogeny.

    5. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Fang, Ye

      2011-07-01

      We describe a label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) method to assess the pharmacology of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor. This method combines dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays using an array of probe molecule-hijacked cells with similarity analysis. The whole cell DMR assays track cell system-based, ligand-directed, and kinetics-dependent biased activities of the drugs, and translates their on-target pharmacology into numerical descriptors which are subject to similarity analysis. We demonstrate that the approach establishes an effective link between the label-free pharmacology and in vivo therapeutic indications of drugs.

    6. Visualization of network target crosstalk optimizes drug synergism in myocardial ischemia.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Xiaojing Wan

      Full Text Available Numerous drugs and compounds have been validated as protecting against myocardial ischemia (MI, a leading cause of heart failure; however, synergistic possibilities among them have not been systematically explored. Thus, there appears to be significant room for optimization in the field of drug combination therapy for MI. Here, we propose an easy approach for the identification and optimization of MI-related synergistic drug combinations via visualization of the crosstalk between networks of drug targets corresponding to different drugs (each drug has a unique network of targets. As an example, in the present study, 28 target crosstalk networks (TCNs of random pairwise combinations of 8 MI-related drugs (curcumin, capsaicin, celecoxib, raloxifene, silibinin, sulforaphane, tacrolimus, and tamoxifen were established to illustrate the proposed method. The TCNs revealed a high likelihood of synergy between curcumin and the other drugs, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments. Further drug combination optimization showed a synergistic protective effect of curcumin, celecoxib, and sililinin in combination against H₂O₂-induced ischemic injury of cardiomyocytes at a relatively low concentration of 500 nM. This result is in agreement with the earlier finding of a denser and modular functional crosstalk between their networks of targets in the regulation of cell apoptosis. Our study offers a simple approach to rapidly search for and optimize potent synergistic drug combinations, which can be used for identifying better MI therapeutic strategies. Some new light was also shed on the characteristic features of drug synergy, suggesting that it is possible to apply this method to other complex human diseases.

    7. Hedgehog pathway as a drug target: Smoothened inhibitors in development

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Lin TL

      2012-03-01

      Full Text Available Tara L Lin1, William Matsui21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Division of Hematologic Malignancies, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Emerging laboratory and clinical investigations demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling (Hh represents a novel therapeutic target in various human cancers. This conserved signaling pathway precisely regulates self-renewal and terminal differentiation in embryonic development, but is typically silenced in adult tissues, with reactivation usually only during tissue repair. Aberrant Hh pathway signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis, self-renewal, and chemotherapy resistance of a growing number of solid and hematologic malignancies. Major components of the Hh pathway include the Hh ligands (Sonic, Desert, and Indian, the transmembrane receptor Patched, the signal transducer Smoothened (Smo, and transcription factors Gli1–3 which regulate the transcription of Hh target genes. Mutations in Hh pathway genes, increased Hh signaling in tumor stroma, and Hh overexpression in self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells have been described, and these different modes of Hh signaling have implications for the design of Hh pathway inhibitors and their integration into conventional treatment regimens. Discovery of a naturally-occurring Smo inhibitor, cyclopamine, and the identification of Hh pathway mutations and over expression in cancer cells prompted the development of several cyclopamine derivatives. Encouraging laboratory and in vivo data has resulted in Phase I and II clinical trials of Smo inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of Hh pathway signaling in malignancy and Smo antagonists in development. Recent data with these agents shows that they are well-tolerated and may be effective for subsets of patients. Challenges remain

    8. Drug Targets in Infections With Ebola and Marburg Viruses

      Science.gov (United States)

      2009-01-01

      recombinant nematode anticoagulant protein c2 (rNAPc2), which inhibits the FVUalTF complex activation of factor X, were protected - 33% of the time when...human diseaees including anti-TNF-a and anti-IL-6 for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis select cancers . Targeting of the Host Immune Response...Tyburski, 1. G.; Warsow, K. M.; Kubinec, S. M. J. Trauma, 1996 40(3), 384-7. [58J Sato, N.; Fukuda, K.; Nariuchi, H.; Sagara, N. J. Natl. Cancer Inst

    9. E2F-1 as an anticancer drug target

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Joseph R. Bertino

      2011-12-01

      Full Text Available Mounting evidence indicates that the E2F transcription factors play an essential role in all aspects of cellular functions. Many human malignancies have been shown to overexpress one or more of the ‘‘activating’’ E2Fs. In some circumstances, down regulation as well as overexpression of E2F-1, leads to inhibition of cell growth. The emphasis in this review is placed on new data implicating microRNAs in the regulation of E2F activity and the efforts thus far to target this activity in order to cause tumor regression.

    10. Targeting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) to Overcome Drug Resistance in Cancer.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Du, Bowen; Shim, Joong Sup

      2016-07-22

      Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is known to play an important role in cancer progression, metastasis and drug resistance. Although there are controversies surrounding the causal relationship between EMT and cancer metastasis, the role of EMT in cancer drug resistance has been increasingly recognized. Numerous EMT-related signaling pathways are involved in drug resistance in cancer cells. Cells undergoing EMT show a feature similar to cancer stem cells (CSCs), such as an increase in drug efflux pumps and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, targeting EMT has been considered a novel opportunity to overcome cancer drug resistance. This review describes the mechanism by which EMT contributes to drug resistance in cancer cells and summarizes new advances in research in EMT-associated drug resistance.

    11. Nitric oxide-related drug targets in headache

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Olesen, Jes

      2010-01-01

      -called delayed headache that fulfils criteria for migraine without aura in migraine sufferers. Blockade of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) by L-nitromonomethylarginine effectively treats attacks of migraine without aura. Similar results have been obtained for chronic the tension-type headache and cluster headache....... Inhibition of the breakdown of cyclic guanylate phosphate (cGMP) also provokes migraine in sufferers, indicating that cGMP is the effector of NO-induced migraine. Similar evidence suggests an important role of NO in the tension-type headache and cluster headache. These very strong data from human......SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so...

    12. Optimizing drugs to reach treatment targets for children and adolescents living with HIV

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Martina Penazzato

      2015-12-01

      Full Text Available Introduction: As the global community makes progress towards the 90-90-90 targets by 2020, a key challenge is ensuring that antiretroviral drugs for children and adolescents are suitable to the context of resource-limited settings. Drug optimization aims to support the expanded use of more simplified, less toxic drug regimens with high barriers to drug resistance that require minimal clinical monitoring while maintaining therapeutic efficacy. This manuscript summarizes the progress made and outlines further critical steps required to ensure that the right drugs are available to start children and adolescents on treatment and to keep them virologically suppressed. Discussion: Building upon previous work in drug optimization, several important steps were taken in 2014 to ensure alignment between WHO dosing recommendations and the requirements of regulatory bodies, to accelerate drug development, to reduce intellectual property barriers to generic production of combined formulations and rationalize drug selection in countries. The priority for the future is to improve access to antiretroviral therapy (ART at the two ends of the paediatric age spectrum – infants and adolescents – where the treatment gap is greatest, and optimize drug sequencing with better use of available medicines for second- and third-line ART. Future efforts in this area will require continuous collaboration and coordination, and the promotion of innovative approaches to accelerate access to new drugs and formulations. Conclusions: While significant progress has been made, additional efforts are needed to ensure that treatment targets are reached by 2020.

    13. Potential chemotherapeutic targets for Japanese encephalitis: current status of antiviral drug development and future challenges.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji

      2015-01-01

      Japanese encephalitis (JE) remains a public health threat in Asia. Although several vaccines have been licensed, ∼ 67,900 cases of the disease are estimated to occur annually, probably because the vaccine coverage is low. Therefore, effective antiviral drugs are required to control JE. However, no licensed anti-JE drugs are available, despite extensive efforts to develop them. We provide a general overview of JE and JE virus, including its transmission cycle, distribution, structure, replication machinery, immune evasion mechanisms and vaccines. The current situation in antiviral drug development is then reviewed and future perspectives are discussed. Although the development of effective anti-JE drugs is an urgent issue, only supportive care is currently available. Recent progress in our understanding of the viral replication machinery and immune evasion strategies has identified new targets for anti-JE drug development. To date, most candidate drugs have only been evaluated in single-drug formulations, and efficient drug delivery to the CNS has virtually not been considered. However, an effective anti-JE treatment is expected to be achieved with multiple-drug formulations and a targeted drug delivery system in the near future.

    14. Targeting Energy Metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a New Paradigm in Antimycobacterial Drug Discovery

      Science.gov (United States)

      Villellas, Cristina; Lu, Ping

      2017-01-01

      ABSTRACT Drug-resistant mycobacterial infections are a serious global health challenge, leading to high mortality and socioeconomic burdens in developing countries worldwide. New innovative approaches, from identification of new targets to discovery of novel chemical scaffolds, are urgently needed. Recently, energy metabolism in mycobacteria, in particular the oxidative phosphorylation pathway, has emerged as an object of intense microbiological investigation and as a novel target pathway in drug discovery. New classes of antibacterials interfering with elements of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway are highly active in combating dormant or latent mycobacterial infections, with a promise of shortening tuberculosis chemotherapy. The regulatory approval of the ATP synthase inhibitor bedaquiline and the discovery of Q203, a candidate drug targeting the cytochrome bc1 complex, have highlighted the central importance of this new target pathway. In this review, we discuss key features and potential applications of inhibiting energy metabolism in our quest for discovering potent novel and sterilizing drug combinations for combating tuberculosis. We believe that the combination of drugs targeting elements of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway can lead to a completely new regimen for drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    15. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli, E-mail: ywang@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Bryant, Stephen H., E-mail: bryant@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

      2016-02-25

      Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision–recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets. - Graphical abstract: Flowchart of the proposed RLS-KF algorithm for drug-target interaction predictions. - Highlights: • A nonlinear kernel fusion algorithm is proposed to perform drug-target interaction predictions. • Performance can further be improved by using the recalculated kernel. • Top predictions can be validated by experimental data.

    16. Mitochondria-Targeting Polydopamine Nanoparticles To Deliver Doxorubicin for Overcoming Drug Resistance.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Li, Wen-Qing; Wang, Zhigang; Hao, Sijie; He, Hongzhang; Wan, Yuan; Zhu, Chuandong; Sun, Li-Ping; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

      2017-05-24

      Mitochondria play a critical role in diverse cellular processes, such as energy production and apoptosis regulation. The mitochondria-targeted drug delivery is becoming a potential novel strategy for overcoming drug resistance in cancer therapy. Herein, we synthesize nature-inspired dopamine-derived polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles. Using triphenylphosphonium (TPP) as the mitochondrial penetration molecule to improve the target efficiency, we synthesize poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified PDA (PDA-PEG) and TPP-functionalized PEG-modified PDA (PDA-PEG-TPP) nanoparticles. Then anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded on PDA-PEG and PDA-PEG-TPP (PDA-PEG-DOX and PDA-PEG-TPP-DOX) nanoparticles, which are apt to deliver DOX to cell nuclei and mitochondria, respectively. To mimic the repeated anticancer drug treatment in clinical cases, we repeatedly treated the MDA-MD-231 cancer cells for a long time using DOX-loaded nanoparticles and find that the mitochondria targeting PDA-PEG-TPP-DOX has higher potential to overcome the drug resistance than the regular delivery nanoparticles PDA-PEG-DOX. These results indicate the promising potential of applying PDA-PEG-TPP-DOX nanoparticles in mitochondria-targeted drug delivery to overcome the drug resistance in long-time anticancer chemotherapy.

    17. IAP proteins as targets for drug development in oncology

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Dubrez L

      2013-09-01

      Full Text Available Laurence Dubrez,1,2 Jean Berthelet,1,2 Valérie Glorian,1,21Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (Inserm, Dijon, France; 2Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, FranceAbstract: The inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs constitute a family of proteins involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell death, immune and inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell motility. There is accumulating evidence supporting IAP-targeting in tumors: IAPs regulate various cellular processes that contribute to tumor development, such as cell death, cell proliferation, and cell migration; their expression is increased in a number of human tumor samples, and IAP overexpression has been correlated with tumor growth, and poor prognosis or low response to treatment; and IAP expression can be rapidly induced in response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy because of the presence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES-dependent mechanism of translation initiation, which could contribute to resistance to antitumor therapy. The development of IAP antagonists is an important challenge and was subject to intense research over the past decade. Six molecules are currently in clinical trials. This review focuses on the role of IAPs in tumors and the development of IAP-targeting molecules for anticancer therapy.Keywords: Smac mimetics, apoptosis, antitumor therapy

    18. Targeting the subtypes of breast cancer: rethinking investigational drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Curigliano, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Marzia; Fumagalli, Luca; Brollo, Janaina; Munzone, Elisabetta; Nolé, Franco; Criscitiello, Carmen; Goldhirsch, Aron

      2012-02-01

      The choice of adjuvant treatments for women with breast cancer is based on several features that take into account the heterogeneity of the disease. Questions raised during the decision process include the following: i) What leads to the use of endocrine therapy? ii) What leads to the use of anti-HER2 therapy? iii) What justifies the use of chemotherapy? Choices of adjuvant treatment are based on parameters defined by molecular characterization of breast cancer subtypes or by approximations to this classification using traditional clinical-pathological features. Clinicians should consider cases within the various distinct subpopulation in order to properly select the most 'personalized' adjuvant therapeutic approach. Sensitivity to chemotherapy and/or targeted agents in subtypes of breast cancers are predictable based on gene pathway alterations and associated gene products. This review covers several clinical data on several investigational agents for early-stage breast cancer molecular subtypes. We selected from literature data prospective Phase I, II and III clinical trials of chemotherapy (weekly or daily schedules), including indicators of activity and toxicity and data on survival/mortality. The future of many investigational therapeutics in breast cancer is linked to our ability to identify the most druggable target in each subtype.

    19. Pharmacologically active metabolites, combination screening and target identification-driven drug repositioning in antituberculosis drug discovery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kigondu, Elizabeth M; Wasuna, Antonina; Warner, Digby F; Chibale, Kelly

      2014-08-15

      There has been renewed interest in alternative strategies to address bottlenecks in antibiotic development. These include the repurposing of approved drugs for use as novel anti-infective agents, or their exploitation as leads in drug repositioning. Such approaches are especially attractive for tuberculosis (TB), a disease which remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally and, increasingly, is associated with the emergence of drug-resistance. In this review article, we introduce a refinement of traditional drug repositioning and repurposing strategies involving the development of drugs that are based on the active metabolite(s) of parental compounds with demonstrated efficacy. In addition, we describe an approach to repositioning the natural product antibiotic, fusidic acid, for use against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Finally, we consider the potential to exploit the chemical matter arising from these activities in combination screens and permeation assays which are designed to confirm mechanism of action (MoA), elucidate potential synergies in polypharmacy, and to develop rules for drug permeability in an organism that poses a special challenge to new drug development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    20. Representation of target-bound drugs by computed conformers: implications for conformational libraries

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Goede Andrean

      2006-06-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of known protein structures provides valuable information about pharmaceutical targets. Drug binding sites are identifiable and suitable lead compounds can be proposed. The flexibility of ligands is a critical point for the selection of potential drugs. Since computed 3D structures of millions of compounds are available, the knowledge of their binding conformations would be a great benefit for the development of efficient screening methods. Results Integration of two public databases allowed superposition of conformers for 193 approved drugs with 5507 crystallised target-bound counterparts. The generation of 9600 drug conformers using an atomic force field was carried out to obtain an optimal coverage of the conformational space. Bioactive conformations are best described by a conformational ensemble: half of all drugs exhibit multiple active states, distributed over the entire range of the reachable energy and conformational space. A number of up to 100 conformers per drug enabled us to reproduce the bound states within a similarity threshold of 1.0 Å in 70% of all cases. This fraction rises to about 90% for smaller or average sized drugs. Conclusion Single drugs adopt multiple bioactive conformations if they interact with different target proteins. Due to the structural diversity of binding sites they adopt conformations that are distributed over a broad conformational space and wide energy range. Since the majority of drugs is well represented by a predefined low number of conformers (up to 100 this procedure is a valuable method to compare compounds by three-dimensional features or for fast similarity searches starting with pharmacophores. The underlying 9600 generated drug conformers are downloadable from the Super Drug Web site 1. All superpositions are visualised at the same source. Additional conformers (110,000 of 2400 classified WHO-drugs are also available.

    1. Prediction of drug-target interaction by label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous network.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Song-Yao

      2016-02-01

      The identification of potential drug-target interaction pairs is very important, which is useful not only for providing greater understanding of protein function, but also for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. Recently, numerous machine learning-based algorithms (e.g. kernel-based, matrix factorization-based and network-based inference methods) have been developed for predicting drug-target interactions. All these methods implicitly utilize the assumption that similar drugs tend to target similar proteins and yield better results for predicting interactions between drugs and target proteins. To further improve the accuracy of prediction, a new method of network-based label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous networks, namely LPMIHN, is proposed to infer the potential drug-target interactions. LPMIHN separately performs label propagation on drug and target similarity networks, but the initial label information of the target (or drug) network comes from the drug (or target) label network and the known drug-target interaction bipartite network. The independent label propagation on each similarity network explores the cluster structure in its network, and the label information from the other network is used to capture mutual interactions (bicluster structures) between the nodes in each pair of the similarity networks. As compared to other recent state-of-the-art methods on the four popular benchmark datasets of binary drug-target interactions and two quantitative kinase bioactivity datasets, LPMIHN achieves the best results in terms of AUC and AUPR. In addition, many of the promising drug-target pairs predicted from LPMIHN are also confirmed on the latest publicly available drug-target databases such as ChEMBL, KEGG, SuperTarget and Drugbank. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our LPMIHN method, indicating that LPMIHN has a great potential for predicting drug-target interactions.

    2. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

      2010-05-01

      An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

    3. Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase: A Potential Drug Target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Sherry L. Mowbray

      2014-08-01

      Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Globally, tuberculosis is second only to AIDS in mortality and the disease is responsible for over 1.3 million deaths each year. The impractically long treatment schedules (generally 6–9 months and unpleasant side effects of the current drugs often lead to poor patient compliance, which in turn has resulted in the emergence of multi-, extensively- and totally-drug resistant strains. The development of new classes of anti-tuberculosis drugs and new drug targets is of global importance, since attacking the bacterium using multiple strategies provides the best means to prevent resistance. This review presents an overview of the various strategies and compounds utilized to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a promising target for the development of drugs for TB therapy.

    4. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

      2016-04-01

      In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

    5. Discovery of novel drug targets and their functions using phenotypic screening of natural products.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chang, Junghwa; Kwon, Ho Jeong

      2016-03-01

      Natural products are valuable resources that provide a variety of bioactive compounds and natural pharmacophores in modern drug discovery. Discovery of biologically active natural products and unraveling their target proteins to understand their mode of action have always been critical hurdles for their development into clinical drugs. For effective discovery and development of bioactive natural products into novel therapeutic drugs, comprehensive screening and identification of target proteins are indispensable. In this review, a systematic approach to understanding the mode of action of natural products isolated using phenotypic screening involving chemical proteomics-based target identification is introduced. This review highlights three natural products recently discovered via phenotypic screening, namely glucopiericidin A, ecumicin, and terpestacin, as representative case studies to revisit the pivotal role of natural products as powerful tools in discovering the novel functions and druggability of targets in biological systems and pathological diseases of interest.

    6. Target engagement and drug residence time can be observed in living cells with BRET.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Robers, Matthew B; Dart, Melanie L; Woodroofe, Carolyn C; Zimprich, Chad A; Kirkland, Thomas A; Machleidt, Thomas; Kupcho, Kevin R; Levin, Sergiy; Hartnett, James R; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Niles, Andrew L; Ohana, Rachel Friedman; Daniels, Danette L; Slater, Michael; Wood, Monika G; Cong, Mei; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Wood, Keith V

      2015-12-03

      The therapeutic action of drugs is predicated on their physical engagement with cellular targets. Here we describe a broadly applicable method using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to reveal the binding characteristics of a drug with selected targets within intact cells. Cell-permeable fluorescent tracers are used in a competitive binding format to quantify drug engagement with the target proteins fused to Nanoluc luciferase. The approach enabled us to profile isozyme-specific engagement and binding kinetics for a panel of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Our analysis was directed particularly to the clinically approved prodrug FK228 (Istodax/Romidepsin) because of its unique and largely unexplained mechanism of sustained intracellular action. Analysis of the binding kinetics by BRET revealed remarkably long intracellular residence times for FK228 at HDAC1, explaining the protracted intracellular behaviour of this prodrug. Our results demonstrate a novel application of BRET for assessing target engagement within the complex milieu of the intracellular environment.

    7. A review of recent patents on the protozoan parasite HSP90 as a drug target.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Angel, Sergio O; Matrajt, Mariana; Echeverria, Pablo C

      2013-04-01

      Diseases caused by protozoan parasites are still an important health problem. These parasites can cause a wide spectrum of diseases, some of which are severe and have high morbidity or mortality if untreated. Since they are still uncontrolled, it is important to find novel drug targets and develop new therapies to decrease their remarkable social and economic impact on human societies. In the past years, human HSP90 has become an interesting drug target that has led to a large number of investigations both at state organizations and pharmaceutical companies, followed by clinical trials. The finding that HSP90 has important biological roles in some protozoan parasites like Plasmodium spp, Toxoplasma gondii and trypanosomatids has allowed the expansion of the results obtained in human cancer to these infections. This review summarizes the latest important findings showing protozoan HSP90 as a drug target and presents three patents targeting T. gondii, P. falciparum and trypanosomatids HSP90.

    8. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      John C. Leach

      2016-03-01

      Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

    9. Hepatitis B virus receptors and molecular drug targets.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Verrier, Eloi R; Colpitts, Che C; Sureau, Camille; Baumert, Thomas F

      2016-07-01

      Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Virus-induced diseases include cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current therapeutic strategies may at best control infection without reaching cure. Complementary antiviral strategies aimed at viral cure are therefore urgently needed. HBV entry is the first step of the infection cycle, which leads to the formation of cccDNA and the establishment of chronic infection. Viral entry may thus represent an attractive target for antiviral therapy. This review summarizes the molecular virology and cell biology of HBV entry, including the discovery and development of new HBV entry inhibitors, and discusses their potential in future treatment of HBV infection.

    10. New tuberculostatic agents targeting nucleic acid biosynthesis: drug design using QSAR approaches.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bueno, Renata V; Braga, Rodolpho C; Segretti, Natanael D; Ferreira, Elizabeth I; Trossini, Gustavo H G; Andrade, Carolina H

      2014-01-01

      Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death among curable infectious diseases. The emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) TB is a growing global health concern and there is an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Enzymes involved in DNA and ATP biosynthesis are potential targets for tuberculostatic drug design, since these enzymes are essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. This review presents the current progress and applications of structure-activity relationship analysis for the discovery of innovative tuberculostatic agents as inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, DNA gyrase, ATP synthase, and thymidylate kinase enzymes, highlighting present challenges and new opportunities in TB drug design.

    11. Identification of putative drug targets of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 by subtractive genomics approach

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Md. Musharaf Hossain

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available The prolonged and uncontrolled use of antibiotics in treatment against many pathogens causes the multiple drug resistance. The drug resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 has been evolved, which cause a major disease listeriosis. The drug dose limit against that pathogen was also increased for currently prescribed antibiotics and more often combinational therapy was preferred. Therefore, identification of an extensive novel drug target, unique and essential to the microorganism and subjected to its validation and drug development is imperative. Availability of the total proteome of L. monocytogenes F2365 enabled in silico identification of putative common drug targets and their subcellular localization by subtractive genomics approach. In the present work subtractive genomics approach is used to identify vaccine and drug targets of L. monocytogenes F2365 to speed up the rational drug and vaccine design. It has revealed that out of 2821 reference sequences of the pathogen, 744 represent essential proteins and among them 274 are human non-homolog proteins. Besides, all predicted human non-homologs were then analyzed by subcellular localization servers, in which 46 proteins were identified as surface exposed proteins and can be considered as potential drug and vaccine targets for the pathogen. The 3D structure of two human non-homolog putative drug targets, pantothenate kinase (LmPK and holliday junction resolvase-like protein (LmHJR of L. monocytogenes F2365 were generated by homology modeling program Easymodeller 4.0; a GUI version of modeller. Generated structures were also validated by several online servers. The overall stereochemical quality of the model was assessed by Ramachandran plot analysis that was provided by PROCHECK. ProQ, ERRAT, Pro-SA web and VERIFY 3D of SAVES programs were also used to compute several validation parameters during the evaluation of the model. This protein structure information is important in structure

    12. Oncogenic targets, magnitude of benefit, and market pricing of antineoplastic drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Amir, Eitan; Seruga, Bostjan; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Kwong, Ryan; Pandiella, Atanasio; Tannock, Ian F; Ocaña, Alberto

      2011-06-20

      The relationship between market pricing of new anticancer drugs and the magnitude of clinical benefit caused by them has not been reported. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated approved new agents for solid tumors by the U.S. Food and Drug administration since the year 2000 were assessed. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were extracted for time-to-event end points described for each RCT. HRs were pooled for three groups: agents directed against a specific molecular target, for which the target population is selected by a biomarker (group A); less specific biologic targeted agents (group B); and chemotherapeutic agents (group C). Monthly market prices of these different drugs were compared. For overall survival (OS), the pooled HR was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.59 to 0.81) for group A (six drugs, six trials); it was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) for group B (seven drugs, 14 trials); and it was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.90) for group C (eight drugs, 12 trials). For progression-free survival (PFS), the pooled HR was 0.42 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.49) for group A (six drugs, seven trials); it was 0.57 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.64) for group B (seven drugs, 14 trials); and it was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.85) for group C (six drugs, 10 trials). Tests for heterogeneity between subgroups were highly significant for PFS (P drugs were $5375 for group A, $5644 for group B, and $6584 for group C (P = .87). New agents with specific molecular targets are clinically the most beneficial, but their monthly market prices are not significantly different from those of other anticancer agents.

    13. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

      Science.gov (United States)

      Moynie, Lucille; Schnell, Robert; McMahon, Stephen A.; Sandalova, Tatyana; Boulkerou, Wassila Abdelli; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Alphey, Magnus; Cukier, Cyprian; Duthie, Fraser; Kopec, Jolanta; Liu, Huanting; Jacewicz, Agata; Hunter, William N.; Naismith, James H.; Schneider, Gunter

      2013-01-01

      Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns. PMID:23295481

    14. The RAS-Effector Interaction as a Drug Target.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Keeton, Adam B; Salter, E Alan; Piazza, Gary A

      2017-01-15

      About a third of all human cancers harbor mutations in one of the K-, N-, or HRAS genes that encode an abnormal RAS protein locked in a constitutively activated state to drive malignant transformation and tumor growth. Despite more than three decades of intensive research aimed at the discovery of RAS-directed therapeutics, there are no FDA-approved drugs that are broadly effective against RAS-driven cancers. Although RAS proteins are often said to be "undruggable," there is mounting evidence suggesting it may be feasible to develop direct inhibitors of RAS proteins. Here, we review this evidence with a focus on compounds capable of inhibiting the interaction of RAS proteins with their effectors that transduce the signals of RAS and that drive and sustain malignant transformation and tumor growth. These reports of direct-acting RAS inhibitors provide valuable insight for further discovery and development of clinical candidates for RAS-driven cancers involving mutations in RAS genes or otherwise activated RAS proteins. Cancer Res; 77(2); 221-6. ©2017 AACR.

    15. Imaging of a targeted PDT drug with fluorescence tomography

      Science.gov (United States)

      Muffoletto, Dan; Gupta, Anurag; Xu, Zhiqiang; Mahrer, Chris; Bauer, Gretchen; Galas, Scott; Pandey, Ravindra K.; Sunar, Ulas

      2009-02-01

      We constructed a whole-body fluorescence tomography instrument to monitor novel bifunctional phototherapeutic drugs (e.g., HPPH-Cyanine dye conjugate) in small animals. The instrument allows dense source and detector sampling with a fast galvo scanner and a CCD detector for improved resolution and sensitivity (Patwardhan et al., 2005). Here we report tissue phantom measurements to evaluate the imaging performance with a newly constructed tomography instrument. Phantom measurements showed that strong fluorescence generated by HPPH-Cyanine dye (HPPH-CD), having high fluorescence quantum yield and long wavelength fluorescence emission, allowed deep tissue imaging. We also report in vivo fluorescence measurements of the conjugate in Nude mice bearing A549 human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors at 24 hr post injection to evaluate tumor detection ability of the conjugate. Our results indicate that the HPPH-CD shows preferential uptake in tumors compared to surrounding normal tissue at 24 hr post injection. This study demonstrates a potential use of HPPH-CD in detection (fluorescence imaging) and treatment (PDT) of deeply seated tumors.

    16. Epigenetic Modifications, Alcoholic Brain and Potential Drug Targets

      Science.gov (United States)

      Jangra, Ashok; Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Pandey, Suryanarayan; Choubey, Priyansha; Rajput, Prabha; Saroha, Babita; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar; Lahkar, Mangala

      2016-01-01

      Acute and chronic alcohol exposure evidently influences epigenetic changes, both transiently and permanently, and these changes in turn influence a variety of cells and organ systems throughout the body. Many of the alcohol-induced epigenetic modifications can contribute to cellular adaptations that ultimately lead to behavioral tolerance and alcohol dependence. The persistence of behavioral changes demonstrates that long-lasting changes in gene expression, within particular regions of the brain, may contribute importantly to the addiction phenotype. The research activities over the past years have demonstrated a crucial role of epigenetic mechanisms in causing long lasting and transient changes in the expression of several genes in diverse tissues, including brain. This has stimulated recent research work that is aimed at characterizing the influence of epigenetic regulatory events in mediating the long lasting and transient effects of alcohol abuse on the brain in humans and animal models of alcohol addiction. In this study, we update our current understanding of the impact of alcohol exposure on epigenetic mechanisms in the brain and refurbish the knowledge of epigenetics in the direction of new drugs development. PMID:27780992

    17. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

      Science.gov (United States)

      Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

      2015-01-01

      African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

    18. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

      2015-06-01

      African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

    19. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Juan D Unciti-Broceta

      2015-06-01

      Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

    20. IPC synthase as a useful target for antifungal drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sugimoto, Yuichi; Sakoh, Hiroki; Yamada, Koji

      2004-12-01

      Inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase is a common and essential enzyme in fungi and plants, which catalyzes the transfer of phosphoinositol to the C-1 hydroxy of ceramide to produce IPC. This reaction is a key step in fungal sphingolipid biosynthesis, therefore the enzyme is a potential target for the development of nontoxic therapeutic antifungal agents. Natural products with a desired biological activity, aureobasidin A (AbA), khafrefungin, and galbonolide A, have been reported. AbA, a cyclic depsipeptide containing 8 amino acids and a hydroxyl acid, is a broad spectrum antifungal with strong activity against many pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans, and some Aspergillus spp. Khafrefungin, an aldonic acid ester with a C22 long alkyl chain, has antifungal activity against C. albicans, Cr. Neoformans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Galbonolide A is a 14-membered macrolide with fungicidal activity against clinically important strains, and is especially potent against Cr. neoformans. These classes of natural products are potent and specific antifungal agents. We review current progress in the development of IPC synthase inhibitors with antifungal activities, and present structure-activity relationships (SAR), physicochemical and structural properties, and synthetic methodology for chemical modification.

    1. Identification of the platelet ADP receptor targeted by antithrombotic drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hollopeter, G; Jantzen, H M; Vincent, D; Li, G; England, L; Ramakrishnan, V; Yang, R B; Nurden, P; Nurden, A; Julius, D; Conley, P B

      2001-01-11

      Platelets have a crucial role in the maintenance of normal haemostasis, and perturbations of this system can lead to pathological thrombus formation and vascular occlusion, resulting in stroke, myocardial infarction and unstable angina. ADP released from damaged vessels and red blood cells induces platelet aggregation through activation of the integrin GPIIb-IIIa and subsequent binding of fibrinogen. ADP is also secreted from platelets on activation, providing positive feedback that potentiates the actions of many platelet activators. ADP mediates platelet aggregation through its action on two G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes. The P2Y1 receptor couples to Gq and mobilizes intracellular calcium ions to mediate platelet shape change and aggregation. The second ADP receptor required for aggregation (variously called P2Y(ADP), P2Y(AC), P2Ycyc or P2T(AC)) is coupled to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase through Gi. The molecular identity of the Gi-linked receptor is still elusive, even though it is the target of efficacious antithrombotic agents, such as ticlopidine and clopidogrel and AR-C66096 (ref. 9). Here we describe the cloning of this receptor, designated P2Y12, and provide evidence that a patient with a bleeding disorder has a defect in this gene. Cloning of the P2Y12 receptor should facilitate the development of better antiplatelet agents to treat cardiovascular diseases.

    2. Discovery of cancer drug targets by CRISPR-Cas9 screening of protein domains.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Milazzo, Joseph P; Wang, Zihua; Kinney, Justin B; Vakoc, Christopher R

      2015-06-01

      CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology holds great promise for discovering therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. Current screening strategies target CRISPR-Cas9-induced mutations to the 5' exons of candidate genes, but this approach often produces in-frame variants that retain functionality, which can obscure even strong genetic dependencies. Here we overcome this limitation by targeting CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis to exons encoding functional protein domains. This generates a higher proportion of null mutations and substantially increases the potency of negative selection. We also show that the magnitude of negative selection can be used to infer the functional importance of individual protein domains of interest. A screen of 192 chromatin regulatory domains in murine acute myeloid leukemia cells identifies six known drug targets and 19 additional dependencies. A broader application of this approach may allow comprehensive identification of protein domains that sustain cancer cells and are suitable for drug targeting.

    3. 'One-pot' synthesis of multifunctional GSH-CdTe quantum dots for targeted drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chen, Xiaoqin; Tang, Yajun; Cai, Bing; Fan, Hongsong

      2014-06-13

      A novel quantum dots-based multifunctional nanovehicle (DOX-QD-PEG-FA) was designed for targeted drug delivery, fluorescent imaging, tracking, and cancer therapy, in which the GSH-CdTe quantum dots play a key role in imaging and drug delivery. To exert curative effects, the antineoplastic drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) was loaded on the GSH-CdTe quantum dots through a condensation reaction. Meanwhile, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell was introduced to wrap the DOX-QD, thus stabilizing the structure and preventing clearance and drug release during systemic circulation. To actively target cancer cells and prevent the nanovehicles from being absorbed by normal cells, the nanoparticles were further decorated with folic acid (FA), allowing them to target HeLa cells that express the FA receptor. The multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA conjugates were simply prepared using the 'one pot' method. In vitro study demonstrated that this simple, multifunctional nanovehicle can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles. After reaching the tumor cells, the FA on the DOX-QD-PEG surface allowed folate receptor recognition and increased the drug concentration to realize a higher curative effect. This novel, multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA system shows great potential for tumor imaging, targeting, and therapy.

    4. Predicting drug-target interactions through integrative analysis of chemogenetic assays in yeast.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Heiskanen, Marja A; Aittokallio, Tero

      2013-04-05

      Chemical-genomic and genetic interaction profiling approaches are widely used to study mechanisms of drug action and resistance. However, there exist a number of scoring algorithms customized to different experimental assays, the relative performance of which remains poorly understood, especially with respect to different types of chemogenetic assays. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a test bed, we carried out a systematic evaluation among the main drug target analysis approaches in terms of predicting global drug-target interaction networks. We found drastic differences in their performance across different chemical-genomic assay types, such as those based on heterozygous and homozygous diploid or haploid deletion mutant libraries. Moreover, a relatively small overlap in the predicted targets was observed between those approaches that use either chemical-genomic screening alone or combined with genetic interaction profiling. A rank-based integration of the complementary scoring approaches led to improved overall performance, demonstrating that genetic interaction profiling provides added information on drug target prediction. Optimal performance was achieved when focusing specifically on the negative tail of the genetic interactions, suggesting that combining synthetic lethal interactions with chemical-genetic interactions provides highest information on drug-target interactions. A network view of rapamycin-interacting genes, pathways and complexes was used as an example to demonstrate the benefits of such integrated and optimized analysis of chemogenetic assays in yeast.

    5. Predicting drug-target interactions by dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hao, Ming; Bryant, Stephen H.; Wang, Yanli

      2017-01-01

      In this work, we propose a dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization (DNILMF) algorithm to predict potential drug-target interactions (DTI). The prediction procedure consists of four steps: (1) inferring new drug/target profiles and constructing profile kernel matrix; (2) diffusing drug profile kernel matrix with drug structure kernel matrix; (3) diffusing target profile kernel matrix with target sequence kernel matrix; and (4) building DNILMF model and smoothing new drug/target predictions based on their neighbors. We compare our algorithm with the state-of-the-art method based on the benchmark dataset. Results indicate that the DNILMF algorithm outperforms the previously reported approaches in terms of AUPR (area under precision-recall curve) and AUC (area under curve of receiver operating characteristic) based on the 5 trials of 10-fold cross-validation. We conclude that the performance improvement depends on not only the proposed objective function, but also the used nonlinear diffusion technique which is important but under studied in the DTI prediction field. In addition, we also compile a new DTI dataset for increasing the diversity of currently available benchmark datasets. The top prediction results for the new dataset are confirmed by experimental studies or supported by other computational research.

    6. Smart Cancer Cell Targeting Imaging and Drug Delivery System by Systematically Engineering Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lu, Nan; Tian, Ying; Tian, Wei; Huang, Peng; Liu, Ying; Tang, Yuxia; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Shouju; Su, Yunyan; Zhang, Yunlei; Pan, Jing; Teng, Zhaogang; Lu, Guangming

      2016-02-10

      The integration of diagnosis and therapy into one nanoplatform, known as theranostics, has attracted increasing attention in the biomedical areas. Herein, we first present a cancer cell targeting imaging and drug delivery system based on engineered thioether-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMOs). The PMOs are stably and selectively conjugated with near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye Cyanine 5.5 (Cy5.5) and anti-Her2 affibody on the outer surfaces to endow them with excellent NIRF imaging and cancer targeting properties. Also, taking the advantage of the thioether-group-incorporated mesopores, the release of chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX) loaded in the PMOs is responsive to the tumor-related molecule glutathione (GSH). The drug release percentage reaches 84.8% in 10 mM of GSH solution within 24 h, which is more than 2-fold higher than that without GSH. In addition, the drug release also exhibits pH-responsive, which reaches 53.6% at pH 5 and 31.7% at pH 7.4 within 24 h. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis demonstrate that the PMOs-based theranostic platforms can efficiently target to and enter Her2 positive tumor cells. Thus, the smart imaging and drug delivery nanoplatforms induce high tumor cell growth inhibition. Meanwhile, the Cy5.5 conjugated PMOs perform great NIRF imaging ability, which could monitor the intracellular distribution, delivery and release of the chemotherapy drug. In addition, cell viability and histological assessments show the engineered PMOs have good biocompatibility, further encouraging the following biomedical applications. Over all, the systemically engineered PMOs can serve as a novel cancer cell targeting imaging and drug delivery platform with NIRF imaging, GSH and pH dual-responsive drug release, and high tumor cell targeting ability.

    7. Caenorhabditis elegans: A Model System for Anti-Cancer Drug Discovery and Therapeutic Target Identification

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kobet, Robert A.; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Baohong; Pak, Stephen C.; Asch, Adam S.; Lee, Myon-Hee

      2014-01-01

      The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique opportunity for biological and basic medical researches due to its genetic tractability and well-defined developmental lineage. It also provides an exceptional model for genetic, molecular, and cellular analysis of human disease-related genes. Recently, C. elegans has been used as an ideal model for the identification and functional analysis of drugs (or small-molecules) in vivo. In this review, we describe conserved oncogenic signaling pathways (Wnt, Notch, and Ras) and their potential roles in the development of cancer stem cells. During C. elegans germline development, these signaling pathways regulate multiple cellular processes such as germline stem cell niche specification, germline stem cell maintenance, and germ cell fate specification. Therefore, the aberrant regulations of these signaling pathways can cause either loss of germline stem cells or overproliferation of a specific cell type, resulting in sterility. This sterility phenotype allows us to identify drugs that can modulate the oncogenic signaling pathways directly or indirectly through a high-throughput screening. Current in vivo or in vitro screening methods are largely focused on the specific core signaling components. However, this phenotype-based screening will identify drugs that possibly target upstream or downstream of core signaling pathways as well as exclude toxic effects. Although phenotype-based drug screening is ideal, the identification of drug targets is a major challenge. We here introduce a new technique, called Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability (DARTS). This innovative method is able to identify the target of the identified drug. Importantly, signaling pathways and their regulators in C. elegans are highly conserved in most vertebrates, including humans. Therefore, C. elegans will provide a great opportunity to identify therapeutic drugs and their targets, as well as to understand mechanisms underlying the

    8. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

      Science.gov (United States)

      Huang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Ping

      2017-04-01

      A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which 60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and 10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, 90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and 70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy.

    9. Cancer in silico drug discovery: a systems biology tool for identifying candidate drugs to target specific molecular tumor subtypes.

      Science.gov (United States)

      San Lucas, F Anthony; Fowler, Jerry; Chang, Kyle; Kopetz, Scott; Vilar, Eduardo; Scheet, Paul

      2014-12-01

      Large-scale cancer datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) allow researchers to profile tumors based on a wide range of clinical and molecular characteristics. Subsequently, TCGA-derived gene expression profiles can be analyzed with the Connectivity Map (CMap) to find candidate drugs to target tumors with specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics. This represents a powerful computational approach for candidate drug identification, but due to the complexity of TCGA and technology differences between CMap and TCGA experiments, such analyses are challenging to conduct and reproduce. We present Cancer in silico Drug Discovery (CiDD; scheet.org/software), a computational drug discovery platform that addresses these challenges. CiDD integrates data from TCGA, CMap, and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) to perform computational drug discovery experiments, generating hypotheses for the following three general problems: (i) determining whether specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics are associated with unique gene expression signatures; (ii) finding candidate drugs to repress these expression signatures; and (iii) identifying cell lines that resemble the tumors being studied for subsequent in vitro experiments. The primary input to CiDD is a clinical or molecular characteristic. The output is a biologically annotated list of candidate drugs and a list of cell lines for in vitro experimentation. We applied CiDD to identify candidate drugs to treat colorectal cancers harboring mutations in BRAF. CiDD identified EGFR and proteasome inhibitors, while proposing five cell lines for in vitro testing. CiDD facilitates phenotype-driven, systematic drug discovery based on clinical and molecular data from TCGA.

    10. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

      2017-07-01

      The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

    11. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Accardo A

      2014-03-01

      Full Text Available Antonella Accardo,1 Luigi Aloj,2 Michela Aurilio,2 Giancarlo Morelli,1 Diego Tesauro11Centro interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi (CIRPeB, Department of Pharmacy and Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IBB CNR, University of Naples “Federico II”, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Fondazione “G. Pascale”, Napoli, ItalyAbstract: Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs; and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors.Keywords: receptors binding peptides, drug delivery

    12. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Bhagwan Yadav

      2015-10-01

      Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

    13. Anatomically Plausible Surface Alignment and Reconstruction

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Larsen, Rasmus

      2010-01-01

      With the increasing clinical use of 3D surface scanners, there is a need for accurate and reliable algorithms that can produce anatomically plausible surfaces. In this paper, a combined method for surface alignment and reconstruction is proposed. It is based on an implicit surface representation...... combined with a Markov Random Field regularisation method. Conceptually, the method maintains an implicit ideal description of the sought surface. This implicit surface is iteratively updated by realigning the input point sets and Markov Random Field regularisation. The regularisation is based on a prior...... energy that has earlier proved to be particularly well suited for human surface scans. The method has been tested on full cranial scans of ten test subjects and on several scans of the outer human ear....

    14. A systematic prediction of drug-target interactions using molecular fingerprints and protein sequences.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Huang, Yu-An; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing

      2016-11-21

      Drug-Target Interactions (DTI) play a crucial role in discovering new drug candidates and finding new proteins to target for drug development. Although the number of detected DTI obtained by high-throughput techniques has been increasing, the number of known DTI is still limited. On the other hand, the experimental methods for detecting the interactions among drugs and proteins are costly and inefficient. Therefore, computational approaches for predicting DTI are drawing increasing attention in recent years. In this paper, we report a novel computational model for predicting the DTI using extremely randomized trees model and protein amino acids information. More specifically, the protein sequence is represented as a Pseudo Substitution Matrix Representation (Pseudo-SMR) descriptor in which the influence of biological evolutionary information is retained. For the representation of drug molecules, a novel fingerprint feature vector is utilized to describe its substructure information. Then the DTI pair is characterized by concatenating the two vector spaces of protein sequence and drug substructure. Finally, the proposed method is explored for predicting the DTI on four benchmark datasets: Enzyme, Ion Channel, GPCRs and Nuclear Receptor. The experimental results demonstrate that this method achieves promising prediction accuracies of 89.85%, 87.87%, 82.99% and 81.67%, respectively. For further evaluation, we compared the performance of Extremely Randomized Trees model with that of the state-of-the-art Support Vector Machine classifier. And we also compared the proposed model with existing computational models, and confirmed 15 potential drug-target interactions by looking for existing databases. The experiment results show that the proposed method is feasible and promising for predicting drug-target interactions for new drug candidate screening based on sizeable features.

    15. The Role of Plausible Values in Large-Scale Surveys

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wu, Margaret

      2005-01-01

      In large-scale assessment programs such as NAEP, TIMSS and PISA, students' achievement data sets provided for secondary analysts contain so-called "plausible values." Plausible values are multiple imputations of the unobservable latent achievement for each student. In this article it has been shown how plausible values are used to: (1) address…

    16. Comprehending Conflicting Science-Related Texts: Graphs as Plausibility Cues

      Science.gov (United States)

      Isberner, Maj-Britt; Richter, Tobias; Maier, Johanna; Knuth-Herzig, Katja; Horz, Holger; Schnotz, Wolfgang

      2013-01-01

      When reading conflicting science-related texts, readers may attend to cues which allow them to assess plausibility. One such plausibility cue is the use of graphs in the texts, which are regarded as typical of "hard science." The goal of our study was to investigate the effects of the presence of graphs on the perceived plausibility and…

    17. Invariant visual object recognition: biologically plausible approaches.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Robinson, Leigh; Rolls, Edmund T

      2015-10-01

      Key properties of inferior temporal cortex neurons are described, and then, the biological plausibility of two leading approaches to invariant visual object recognition in the ventral visual system is assessed to investigate whether they account for these properties. Experiment 1 shows that VisNet performs object classification with random exemplars comparably to HMAX, except that the final layer C neurons of HMAX have a very non-sparse representation (unlike that in the brain) that provides little information in the single-neuron responses about the object class. Experiment 2 shows that VisNet forms invariant representations when trained with different views of each object, whereas HMAX performs poorly when assessed with a biologically plausible pattern association network, as HMAX has no mechanism to learn view invariance. Experiment 3 shows that VisNet neurons do not respond to scrambled images of faces, and thus encode shape information. HMAX neurons responded with similarly high rates to the unscrambled and scrambled faces, indicating that low-level features including texture may be relevant to HMAX performance. Experiment 4 shows that VisNet can learn to recognize objects even when the view provided by the object changes catastrophically as it transforms, whereas HMAX has no learning mechanism in its S-C hierarchy that provides for view-invariant learning. This highlights some requirements for the neurobiological mechanisms of high-level vision, and how some different approaches perform, in order to help understand the fundamental underlying principles of invariant visual object recognition in the ventral visual stream.

    18. [Two-component signal transduction as attractive drug targets in pathogenic bacteria].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Utsumi, Ryutaro; Igarashi, Masayuki

      2012-01-01

      Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). TCS consists of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). TCSs are attractive as drug targets for antimicrobials because many HK and RR genes are coded on the bacterial genome though few are found in lower eukaryotes. The HK/RR signal transduction system is distinct from serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation in higher eukaryotes. Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets.

    19. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

      2015-09-01

      Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

    20. Identifying co-targets to fight drug resistance based on a random walk model

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Chen Liang-Chun

      2012-01-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance has now posed more severe and emergent threats to human health and infectious disease treatment. However, wet-lab approaches alone to counter drug resistance have so far still achieved limited success due to less knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. Our approach apply a heuristic search algorithm in order to extract active network under drug treatment and use a random walk model to identify potential co-targets for effective antibacterial drugs. Results We use interactome network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gene expression data which are treated with two kinds of antibiotic, Isoniazid and Ethionamide as our test data. Our analysis shows that the active drug-treated networks are associated with the trigger of fatty acid metabolism and synthesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-related processes and those results are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Efflux pumps processes appear to be the major mechanisms of resistance but SOS response is significantly up-regulation under Isoniazid treatment. We also successfully identify the potential co-targets with literature confirmed evidences which are related to the glycine-rich membrane, adenosine triphosphate energy and cell wall processes. Conclusions With gene expression and interactome data supported, our study points out possible pathways leading to the emergence of drug resistance under drug treatment. We develop a computational workflow for giving new insights to bacterial drug resistance which can be gained by a systematic and global analysis of the bacterial regulation network. Our study also discovers the potential co-targets with good properties in biological and graph theory aspects to overcome the problem of drug resistance.

    1. ‘VIROSOMES’ A NOVEL STRATEGY FOR DELIVERY OF DRUGS AND TARGETING: AN OVERVIEW

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      M. Gowtham

      2012-10-01

      Full Text Available Over the years there has been a great revolution in drug delivery technologies. Virosomes drug delivery systems are an example of the various novel drug delivery systems available. A virosome is a drug or vaccine delivery mechanism consisting of unilamellar phospholipid bilayer vesicle incorporating virus derived proteins to allow the virosomes to fuse with target cells. Virosomes are not able to replicate but are pure fusion-active vesicle. These are reconstituted viral envelopes that can serve as vaccines and as vehicles for cellular delivery of macromolecules. The prospect of drug delivery and targeting using virosomes is an interesting field of research and development. Because virosomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, nontoxic, and non-autoimmunogenic, attempts have been made to use them as vaccines or adjuvants as well as delivery systems for drugs, nucleic acids, or genes for therapeutic purposes. The success of virosomal drug delivery depends on the methods used to prepare the encapsulated bioactive materials and incorporate them into the virosomes, as are characterization and formulation of the finished preparation. This article gives an insight of virosomes as a newer method of drug delivery. This article gives an insight of hydrogels and virosomes as a newer futuristic tool.

    2. A green approach to dual-drug nanoformulations with targeting and synergistic effects for cancer therapy.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Lu, Yue; Fan, Zhongxiong; Li, Yang; Jiang, Yuan; Hou, Zhenqing

      2017-11-01

      Exploration of efficient dual-drug nanohybrids, particularly those with high drug loading, specific targeting property, and long-termed stability, is of highly importance in cancer therapy. A pH-driven coprecipitation was performed in the aqueous phase to obtain a dual-drug nanoformulation, composed of 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) nanoneedles integrated with an exterior thin layer of the methotrexate (MTX)-chitosan conjugate. The high stability of nanohybrids in water and the targeting property provided by the MTX ingredient function synergistically to the prolonged and sustained drug release property in tumor tissues and the increased cellular uptake. The cytotoxicity test illustrates that dual-drug nanoneedles possess the remarkable killing ability to HeLa cells with the combination index at 0.33 ± 0.07. After cellular internalization, the release of both drug ingredients results in an excellent anticancer activity in vivo with the minimized adverse side effects. Design of a green approach to the carrier-free, dual-drug nanoformulations enables to develop emerging drug delivery systems for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    3. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Lei Chen

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1 chemical interaction between drugs, (2 protein interactions between drugs’ targets, and (3 target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations.

    4. Using an Old Drug to Target a New Drug Site: Application of Disulfiram to Target the Zn-Site in HCV NS5A Protein.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lee, Yu-Ming; Duh, Yulander; Wang, Shih-Ting; Lai, Michael M C; Yuan, Hanna S; Lim, Carmay

      2016-03-23

      In viral proteins, labile Zn-sites, where Zn(2+) is crucial for maintaining the native protein structure but the Zn-bound cysteines are reactive, are promising drug targets. Here, we aim to (i) identify labile Zn-sites in viral proteins using guidelines established from our previous work and (ii) assess if clinically safe Zn-ejecting agents could eject Zn(2+) from the predicted target site and thus inhibit viral replication. As proof-of-concept, we identified a labile Zn-site in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A protein and showed that the antialcoholism drug, disulfiram, could inhibit HCV replication to a similar extent as the clinically used antiviral agent, ribavirin. The discovery of a novel viral target and a new role for disulfiram in inhibiting HCV replication will enhance the therapeutic armamentarium against HCV. The strategy presented can also be applied to identify labile sites in other bacterial or viral proteins that can be targeted by disulfiram or other clinically safe Zn-ejectors.

    5. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Feng Jiang

      2015-10-01

      Full Text Available Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX, are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

    6. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

      2015-01-01

      Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

    7. EphB1 as a Novel Drug Target to Combat Pain and Addiction

      Science.gov (United States)

      2015-09-01

      EphB1  as  a  Novel  Drug  Target  to  Combat  Pain  and   Addiction   Principal  Investigator  Name:   Mark...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EphB1 as a Novel Drug Target to Combat Pain and Addiction 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EphB1 as a Novel Drug Target to...Combat Pain and Addiction 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0220 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Mark Henkemeyer, Ph.D. 5e

    8. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug deliver y system for tumor metastasis

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      Xiao-Yu Zhang; Wei-Yue Lu

      2014-01-01

      Te lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. hTe metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors;the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the speciifcity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers.

    9. Multi-target drug design approaches for multifactorial diseases: from neurodegenerative to cardiovascular applications.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Katselou, M G; Matralis, A N; Kourounakis, A P

      2014-01-01

      In multi-target drug design (MTD) medicinal chemistry aims to integrate multiple pharmacophores into a single drug molecule in order to make it active on several molecular biological mechanisms simultaneously. Given the fact that most diseases are multifactorial in nature, MTD is being pursued with increasing intensity, which has resulted in improved outcomes in disease models and several compounds have entered clinical trials. In a wide range of examples we illustrate how various functionalities have been combined within single structures and how this has affected their (pre)clinical outcome. This review describes the successful application of MTD for disorders such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, diabetes, metabolic and inflammatory diseases, especially focusing on the field of atherosclerosis where multi-target strategies are a promising alternative to the classical "one target-one drug" design approach.

    10. A targeted drug delivery system based on dopamine functionalized nano graphene oxide

      Science.gov (United States)

      Masoudipour, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Maleki, Nasim

      2017-01-01

      The cellular targeting property of a biocompatible drug delivery system can widely increase the therapeutic effect against various diseases. Here, we report a dopamine conjugated nano graphene oxide (DA-nGO) carrier for cellular delivery of the anticancer drug, Methotrexate (MTX) into DA receptor positive human breast adenocarcinoma cell line. The material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, the antineoplastic action of MTX loaded DA-nGO against DA receptor positive and negative cell lines were explored. The results presented in this article demonstrated that the application of DA functionalized GO as a targeting drug carrier can improve the drug delivery efficacy for DA receptor positive cancer cell lines and promise future designing of carrier conjugates based on it.

    11. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Md. Mirazul Islam

      2015-01-01

      Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery.

    12. Iontophoresis of minoxidil sulphate loaded microparticles, a strategy for follicular drug targeting?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Barros, M Angélica de Oliveira; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Lopez, Renata F V

      2015-10-01

      The feasibility of targeting drugs to hair follicles by a combination of microencapsulation and iontophoresis has been evaluated. Minoxidil sulphate (MXS), which is used in the treatment of alopecia, was selected as a relevant drug with respect to follicular penetration. The skin permeation and disposition of MXS encapsulated in chitosan microparticles (MXS-MP) was evaluated in vitro after passive and iontophoretic delivery. Uptake of MXS was quantified at different exposure times in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles. Microencapsulation resulted in increased (6-fold) drug accumulation in the hair follicles relative to delivery from a simple MXS solution. Application of iontophoresis enhanced follicular delivery for both the solution and the microparticle formulations. It appears, therefore, that microencapsulation and iontophoresis can act synergistically to enhance topical drug targeting to hair follicles.

    13. Gold nanoparticles: the importance of physiological principles to devise strategies for targeted drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Papasani, Madhusudhan R; Wang, Guankui; Hill, Rodney A

      2012-08-01

      Nanotechnology and its promise for clinical translation to targeted drug delivery with limited accompanying toxicity provide exciting research opportunities that demand multidisciplinary approaches. To make rapid progress in the design of nano-platforms for drug delivery and toward their use in the clinic, basic and mechanistic studies must first be tested in vitro and then progress to in vivo studies in animal models, incorporating an understanding of body functioning. Recently, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have gained much attention as model drug delivery platforms because of their advantageous surface characteristics that allow easy functionalization with chemical and biological molecules and also due to their apparently low toxicity. In this study we review recent in vitro and in vivo research progress with Au NPs as drug delivery platforms and suggest experimental strategies for future studies for efficacious, targeted delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    14. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lin, Tai-Chi; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Chien

      2015-11-01

      Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

    15. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Tai-Chi Lin

      2015-11-01

      Full Text Available Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

    16. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Islam, Md Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

      2015-01-01

      The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery.

    17. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

      2010-01-01

      Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

    18. Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality for targeted drug delivery

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Li, Yong-Yong; Li, Lan; Dong, Hai-Qing, E-mail: inano_donghq@tongji.edu.cn; Cai, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Tian-Bin, E-mail: rentianbin@yeah.net

      2013-07-01

      PKKKRKV (Pro-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Lys-Val, PV7), a seven amino acid peptide, has emerged as one of the primary nuclear localization signals that can be targeted into cell nucleus via the nuclear import machinery. Taking advantage of chemical diversity and biological activities of this short peptide sequence, in this study, Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality were successfully developed for intracellular drug delivery. These nanomicelles with the size ∼ 100 nm were self-assembled from F127 polymer that was flanked with two PV7 sequences at its both terminal ends. Hydrophobic anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with inherent fluorescence was chosen as the model drug, which was found to be efficiently encapsulated into nanomicelles with the encapsulation efficiency at 72.68%. In comparison with the non-functionalized namomicelles, the microscopic observation reveals that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles display a higher cellular uptake, especially into the nucleus of HepG2 cells, due to the nuclear localization signal effects. Both cytotoxicity and apoptosis studies show that the DOX-loaded nanomicelles were more potent than drug nanomicelles without nuclear targeting functionality. It was thus concluded that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles could be a potentially alternative vehicle for nuclear targeting drug delivery. - Highlights: ► A new nuclear targeted drug delivery system based on micelles is developed. ► This micellar system features a core-shell structure with the size peaked at 100 nm. ► PV7, a short peptide sequence, is adopted as a nuclear targeting ligand. ► PV7 functionalized drug loaded micelles are more potent in killing tumor cells.

    19. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

      Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

    20. Identification of new drug targets and resistance mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Thomas R Ioerger

      Full Text Available Identification of new drug targets is vital for the advancement of drug discovery against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, especially given the increase of resistance worldwide to first- and second-line drugs. Because traditional target-based screening has largely proven unsuccessful for antibiotic discovery, we have developed a scalable platform for target identification in M. tuberculosis that is based on whole-cell screening, coupled with whole-genome sequencing of resistant mutants and recombineering to confirm. The method yields targets paired with whole-cell active compounds, which can serve as novel scaffolds for drug development, molecular tools for validation, and/or as ligands for co-crystallization. It may also reveal other information about mechanisms of action, such as activation or efflux. Using this method, we identified resistance-linked genes for eight compounds with anti-tubercular activity. Four of the genes have previously been shown to be essential: AspS, aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, Pks13, a polyketide synthase involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis, MmpL3, a membrane transporter, and EccB3, a component of the ESX-3 type VII secretion system. AspS and Pks13 represent novel targets in protein translation and cell-wall biosynthesis. Both MmpL3 and EccB3 are involved in membrane transport. Pks13, AspS, and EccB3 represent novel candidates not targeted by existing TB drugs, and the availability of whole-cell active inhibitors greatly increases their potential for drug discovery.

    1. Polymeric particulate technologies for oral drug delivery and targeting: A pathophysiological perspective

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Hunter, A. Christy; Elsom, Jacqueline; Wibroe, Peter Popp;

      2012-01-01

      to optimize drug targeting and bioavailability. Frequently the carrier systems used are either constructed from or contain polymeric materials. Examples of these nanocarriers include polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanocarriers, self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems and nanocrystals......Publication year: 2012 Source:Maturitas, Volume 73, Issue 1 A. Christy Hunter, Jacqueline Elsom, Peter P. Wibroe, S. Moein Moghimi The oral route for delivery of pharmaceuticals is the most widely used and accepted. Nanoparticles and microparticles are increasingly being applied within this arena...

    2. The Proteomics Big Challenge for Biomarkers and New Drug-Targets Discovery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Rosa Terracciano

      2012-10-01

      Full Text Available In the modern process of drug discovery, clinical, functional and chemical proteomics can converge and integrate synergies. Functional proteomics explores and elucidates the components of pathways and their interactions which, when deregulated, lead to a disease condition. This knowledge allows the design of strategies to target multiple pathways with combinations of pathway-specific drugs, which might increase chances of success and reduce the occurrence of drug resistance. Chemical proteomics, by analyzing the drug interactome, strongly contributes to accelerate the process of new druggable targets discovery. In the research area of clinical proteomics, proteome and peptidome mass spectrometry-profiling of human bodily fluid (plasma, serum, urine and so on, as well as of tissue and of cells, represents a promising tool for novel biomarker and eventually new druggable targets discovery. In the present review we provide a survey of current strategies of functional, chemical and clinical proteomics. Major issues will be presented for proteomic technologies used for the discovery of biomarkers for early disease diagnosis and identification of new drug targets.

    3. Drug Target Identification and Elucidation of Natural Inhibitors for Bordetella petrii: An In Silico Study

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ray, Manisha; Pattnaik, Animesh; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar

      2016-01-01

      Environmental microbes like Bordetella petrii has been established as a causative agent for various infectious diseases in human. Again, development of drug resistance in B. petrii challenged to combat against the infection. Identification of potential drug target and proposing a novel lead compound against the pathogen has a great aid and value. In this study, bioinformatics tools and technology have been applied to suggest a potential drug target by screening the proteome information of B. petrii DSM 12804 (accession No. PRJNA28135) from genome database of National Centre for Biotechnology information. In this regards, the inhibitory effect of nine natural compounds like ajoene (Allium sativum), allicin (A. sativum), cinnamaldehyde (Cinnamomum cassia), curcumin (Curcuma longa), gallotannin (active component of green tea and red wine), isoorientin (Anthopterus wardii), isovitexin (A. wardii), neral (Melissa officinalis), and vitexin (A. wardii) have been acknowledged with anti-bacterial properties and hence tested against identified drug target of B. petrii by implicating computational approach. The in silico studies revealed the hypothesis that lpxD could be a potential drug target and with recommendation of a strong inhibitory effect of selected natural compounds against infection caused due to B. petrii, would be further validated through in vitro experiments. PMID:28154518

    4. Malarial kinases: novel targets for in silico approaches to drug discovery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bullard, Kristen M; DeLisle, Robert Kirk; Keenan, Susan M

      2013-01-01

      Malaria, the disease caused by infection with protozoan parasites from the genus Plasmodium, claims the lives of nearly 1 million people annually. Developing nations, particularly in the African Region, bear the brunt of this malaria burden. Alarmingly, the most dangerous etiologic agent of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, is becoming increasingly resistant to current first-line antimalarials. In light of the widespread devastation caused by malaria, the emergence of drug-resistant P. falciparum strains, and the projected decrease in funding for malaria eradication that may occur over the next decade, the identification of promising new targets for antimalarial drug design is imperative. P. falciparum kinases have been proposed as ideal drug targets for antimalarial drug design because they mediate critical cellular processes within the parasite and are, in many cases, structurally and mechanistically divergent when compared with kinases from humans. Identifying a molecule capable of inhibiting the activity of a target enzyme is generally an arduous and expensive process that can be greatly aided by utilizing in silico drug design techniques. Such methods have been extensively applied to human kinases, but as yet have not been fully exploited for the exploration and characterization of antimalarial kinase targets. This review focuses on in silico methods that have been used for the evaluation of potential antimalarials and the Plasmodium kinases that could be explored using these techniques.

    5. The Validation of Nematode-Specific Acetylcholine-Gated Chloride Channels as Potential Anthelmintic Drug Targets.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wever, Claudia M; Farrington, Danielle; Dent, Joseph A

      2015-01-01

      New compounds are needed to treat parasitic nematode infections in humans, livestock and plants. Small molecule anthelmintics are the primary means of nematode parasite control in animals; however, widespread resistance to the currently available drug classes means control will be impossible without the introduction of new compounds. Adverse environmental effects associated with nematocides used to control plant parasitic species are also motivating the search for safer, more effective compounds. Discovery of new anthelmintic drugs in particular has been a serious challenge due to the difficulty of obtaining and culturing target parasites for high-throughput screens and the lack of functional genomic techniques to validate potential drug targets in these pathogens. We present here a novel strategy for target validation that employs the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to demonstrate the value of new ligand-gated ion channels as targets for anthelmintic discovery. Many successful anthelmintics, including ivermectin, levamisole and monepantel, are agonists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, suggesting that the unexploited pentameric ion channels encoded in parasite genomes may be suitable drug targets. We validated five members of the nematode-specific family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channels as targets of agonists with anthelmintic properties by ectopically expressing an ivermectin-gated chloride channel, AVR-15, in tissues that endogenously express the acetylcholine-gated chloride channels and using the effects of ivermectin to predict the effects of an acetylcholine-gated chloride channel agonist. In principle, our strategy can be applied to validate any ion channel as a putative anti-parasitic drug target.

    6. The Validation of Nematode-Specific Acetylcholine-Gated Chloride Channels as Potential Anthelmintic Drug Targets.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Claudia M Wever

      Full Text Available New compounds are needed to treat parasitic nematode infections in humans, livestock and plants. Small molecule anthelmintics are the primary means of nematode parasite control in animals; however, widespread resistance to the currently available drug classes means control will be impossible without the introduction of new compounds. Adverse environmental effects associated with nematocides used to control plant parasitic species are also motivating the search for safer, more effective compounds. Discovery of new anthelmintic drugs in particular has been a serious challenge due to the difficulty of obtaining and culturing target parasites for high-throughput screens and the lack of functional genomic techniques to validate potential drug targets in these pathogens. We present here a novel strategy for target validation that employs the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to demonstrate the value of new ligand-gated ion channels as targets for anthelmintic discovery. Many successful anthelmintics, including ivermectin, levamisole and monepantel, are agonists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, suggesting that the unexploited pentameric ion channels encoded in parasite genomes may be suitable drug targets. We validated five members of the nematode-specific family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channels as targets of agonists with anthelmintic properties by ectopically expressing an ivermectin-gated chloride channel, AVR-15, in tissues that endogenously express the acetylcholine-gated chloride channels and using the effects of ivermectin to predict the effects of an acetylcholine-gated chloride channel agonist. In principle, our strategy can be applied to validate any ion channel as a putative anti-parasitic drug target.

    7. Crowd sourcing a new paradigm for interactome driven drug target identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Vashisht, Rohit; Mondal, Anupam Kumar; Jain, Akanksha; Shah, Anup; Vishnoi, Priti; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Rohira, Harsha; Bhat, Ashwini G; Passi, Anurag; Mukherjee, Keya; Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Kumar, Vikas; Arora, Anshula; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Subramanian, Ahalyaa; Venkatachalam, Aparna; Gayathri, S; Raj, Sweety; Chitra, Vijaya; Verma, Kaveri; Zaheer, Salman; Balaganesh, J; Gurusamy, Malarvizhi; Razeeth, Mohammed; Raja, Ilamathi; Thandapani, Madhumohan; Mevada, Vishal; Soni, Raviraj; Rana, Shruti; Ramanna, Girish Muthagadhalli; Raghavan, Swetha; Subramanya, Sunil N; Kholia, Trupti; Patel, Rajesh; Bhavnani, Varsha; Chiranjeevi, Lakavath; Sengupta, Soumi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Atray, Naresh; Gandhi, Swati; Avasthi, Tiruvayipati Suma; Nisthar, Shefin; Anurag, Meenakshi; Sharma, Pratibha; Hasija, Yasha; Dash, Debasis; Sharma, Arun; Scaria, Vinod; Thomas, Zakir; Chandra, Nagasuma; Brahmachari, Samir K; Bhardwaj, Anshu

      2012-01-01

      A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative 'Connect to Decode' (C2D) to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed 'interactome pathway' (IPW), encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach.

    8. Crowd sourcing a new paradigm for interactome driven drug target identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Rohit Vashisht

      Full Text Available A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative 'Connect to Decode' (C2D to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed 'interactome pathway' (IPW, encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach.

    9. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

      2015-08-12

      There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD.

    10. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

      2015-08-01

      Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS.

    11. Surface Modified Multifunctional and Stimuli Responsive Nanoparticles for Drug Targeting: Current Status and Uses

      Science.gov (United States)

      Siafaka, Panoraia I.; Üstündağ Okur, Neslihan; Karavas, Evangelos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.

      2016-01-01

      Nanocarriers, due to their unique features, are of increased interest among researchers working with pharmaceutical formulations. Polymeric nanoparticles and nanocapsules, involving non-toxic biodegradable polymers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and inorganic–organic nanomaterials, are among the most used carriers for drugs for a broad spectrum of targeted diseases. In fact, oral, injectable, transdermal-dermal and ocular formulations mainly consist of the aforementioned nanomaterials demonstrating promising characteristics such as long circulation, specific targeting, high drug loading capacity, enhanced intracellular penetration, and so on. Over the last decade, huge advances in the development of novel, safer and less toxic nanocarriers with amended properties have been made. In addition, multifunctional nanocarriers combining chemical substances, vitamins and peptides via coupling chemistry, inorganic particles coated by biocompatible materials seem to play a key role considering that functionalization can enhance characteristics such as biocompatibility, targetability, environmental friendliness, and intracellular penetration while also have limited side effects. This review aims to summarize the “state of the art” of drug delivery carriers in nanosize, paying attention to their surface functionalization with ligands and other small or polymeric compounds so as to upgrade active and passive targeting, different release patterns as well as cell targeting and stimuli responsibility. Lastly, future aspects and potential uses of nanoparticulated drug systems are outlined. PMID:27589733

    12. Methodologies and Application of New Target Identification, Drug Action Mechanism Investigation and New Molecular Entity Discovery

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      2011-01-01

      @@ The group, headed by Prof.JIANG Hualiang with the CAS Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, has been centering on the basic research of pharmaceutical science, including identifying new targets, studying new drug action mechanisms and discovering new drug candidates.On the basis of new methodology development, an effective multi-disciplinary research platform for drug research and discovery has been established through the integration of different disciplines of computational chemistry, organic synthesis, molecular and cellular biology.A bunch of creative results have been achieved in these areas.

    13. Guidelines to PET measurements of the target occupancy in the brain for drug development

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Takano, Akihiro; Varrone, Andrea; Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Salvadori, Piero [CNR Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica, Pisa (Italy); Gee, Antony [Kings College London, Department of Chemistry and Biology, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Windhorst, Albert; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vercouillie, Johnny [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, UMR Inserm U930, Tours (France); Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium)

      2016-11-15

      This guideline summarizes the current view of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine Drug Development Committee. The purpose of this guideline is to guarantee a high standard of PET studies that are aimed at measuring target occupancy in the brain within the framework of development programs of drugs that act within the central nervous system (CNS drugs). This guideline is intended to present information specifically adapted to European practice. The information provided should be applied within the context of local conditions and regulations. (orig.)

    14. The HA-incorporated nanostructure of a peptide-drug amphiphile for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Choi, Huyeon; Jeena, M T; Palanikumar, L; Jeong, Yoojeong; Park, Sooham; Lee, Eunji; Ryu, Ja-Hyoung

      2016-04-25

      A simple peptide based prodrug of camptothecin (CPT) has been synthesised in which the CPT is conjugated to a tripeptide (KCK) via a disulfide linkage (KCK-CPT) and self-assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water depending on the concentration. The hyaluronic acid (HA) complex of KCK-CPT exhibited target specific toxicity with excellent antitumour efficiency.

    15. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF ENZYMATICALY TRIGGERED MULTIPARTICULATE COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Mohapatra Santosh K

      2011-02-01

      Full Text Available The most critical challenge in oral colon specific drug delivery approach is to preserve the formulation during its passage through the stomach and about first six meters of the small intestine. Microbial enzyme-triggering mechanisms seem to be promising to provide more reliable colonic delivery .The objective of the present study was to develop biodegradable colon targeted multiparticulate system by using guar gum. In this study drug (Budesonide loaded pellets were coated with aqueous guar gum solution and subjected to In-vitro drug release studies simulating GIT with and without enzyme as well as coating properties were evaluated by SEM. In-vitro release studies indicates that drug release after 4.5 h lag time in presence of enzyme and lag time increase in absence of enzyme which indicated the enzyme triggered system for colonic release. This Multiparticulate system can be effectively used for colonic drug delivery for effective treatment of colonic diseases.

    16. [Economic Loss of Remaining Contents in Molecular Target Drug Preparation and the Simulation for Cost Saving].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Usami, Eiseki; Kimura, Michio; Fukuoka, Tomohiro; Okada, Kazutomo; Yoshimura, Tomoaki

      2016-06-01

      While preparing an anticancer drug, even if it is an expensive molecular target drug, the remainder is not divided and saved for use in other patients; instead, it is discarded, resulting in waste of medical resources. In this study, we examined the economic loss in terms of medical costs by calculating the discarded amounts of 12 commonly used molecular target drugs at Ogaki Municipal Hospital, Japan between January 2012 and December 2014. We found, on average, that drugs valued at ¥ 52,593,182 were discarded annually. In particular, the discarded amounts of relatively expensive drugs, such as bevacizumab, bortezomib, and rituximab, were valued at ¥ 16,646,300, ¥ 15,866,289, and ¥ 8,401,324, respectively. Among these, the average amount of waste per administration of bortezomib was particularly expensive, at a cost of ¥ 67,325. Bortezomib is a commonly used treatment, resulting in excessive cumulative discarded cost. In an effort to save cost, we should consider using small capacity standard injections. Development of a simulation that used the remaining drug contents from only 1 day showed that bevacizumab alone accounts for an average cost saving of ¥1 2,542,191(75.3%) per year. This study suggests that effectively utilizing the remaining drug contents would ensure efficient use of medical resources, thereby reducing economic losses.

    17. Layered Double Hydroxide Modified by PEGylated Hyaluronic Acid as a Hybrid Nanocarrier for Targeted Drug Delivery

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      董岸杰; 李雪; 王伟伟; 韩尚聪; 刘鉴锋; 刘金剑; 赵军强; 许舒欣; 邓联东

      2016-01-01

      In recent years, organic-inorganic hybrid nanocarriers are explored for effective drug delivery and pref-erable disease treatments. In this study, using 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)as electronegative model drug, a new type of organic-inorganic hybrid drug delivery system(LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU)was conceived and manufactured by the ad-sorption of PEGylated hyaluronic acid(HA-PEG)on the surface of layered double hydroxide(LDH, prepared via hydrothermal method)and the intercalation of 5-FU in the interlamination of LDH via ion exchange strategy. The drug loading amount of LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU achieved as high as 34.2%. LDH, LDH/5-FU and LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TGA, laser particle size analyzer and SEM. With the benefit of pH-degradable feature of LDH and enzyme-degradable feature of HA, LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU showed pH-degradable and enzyme-degradable capacity inin vitro drug release. Moreover, the drug carrier LDH/HA-PEG contained biocom-patible PEG and tumor-targeted HA, resulting in lower cytotoxicity and better endocytosis compared with LDHin vitro. It was suggested that the organic-inorganic hybrid drug delivery system, which was endowed with the proper-ties of controlled release, low toxicity and tumor-targeting delivery for ameliorative cancer therapy, was advisable and might be applied further to fulfill other treatments.

    18. Doxorubicin loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Kayal, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ramanujan, R.V., E-mail: ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

      2010-04-06

      Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery system that can be used in locoregional cancer treatment. Coated magnetic particles, called carriers, are very useful for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs. Magnetic carriers were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron oxide followed by coating with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, TEM, TGA, FTIR and VSM techniques. The magnetic core of the carriers was magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), with average size of 10 nm. The room temperature VSM measurements showed that magnetic particles were superparamagnetic. The amount of PVA bound to the iron oxide nanoparticles were estimated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the attachment of PVA to the iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Doxorubicin (DOX) drug loading and release profiles of PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed that up to 45% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h, the drug release followed the Fickian diffusion-controlled process. The binding of DOX to the PVA was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The present findings show that DOX loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

    19. NASAL ROUTE: A NOVELISTIC APPROACH FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY TO CNS

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Choudhary Rakhi

      2013-03-01

      Full Text Available Drug delivery through nasal route has attracted the interest of scientific community as it has been potentially explored as an alternative route for the administration of vaccines and biomolecules such as proteins, peptides and non-peptide drugs that are susceptible to enzymatic or acidic degradation and first-pass hepatic metabolism. The nasal mucosa is one of the most permeable and highly vascularised sites for drug administration ensuring rapid absorption and onset of therapeutic action. Intranasal administration is a non-invasive route for drug delivery, which is widely used for the local treatment of rhinitis or nasal polyposis. Since drugs can be absorbed into the systemic circulation through the nasal mucosa, this route may also be used in a range of acute or chronic conditions requiring considerable systemic exposure. In addition it minimizes the lag time associated with oral drug delivery and offers non-invasiveness, self medication, patient comfort and patient compliance which are hurdled in intravenous drug therapy. The objective of this review is to provide an anatomical, histological and physiological overview of nose, absorption enhancers, barriers related to nasal drug delivery, physicochemical, biological and formulation related factors affecting nasal drug delivery system and its advantages. It also highlights research approaches on brain targeting through nasal cavity.

    20. Fluorescence assays for monitoring RNA-ligand interactions and riboswitch-targeted drug discovery screening.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Liu, J; Zeng, C; Zhou, S; Means, J A; Hines, J V

      2015-01-01

      Riboswitches and other noncoding regulatory RNA are intriguing targets for the development of therapeutic agents. A significant challenge in the drug discovery process, however, is the identification of potent compounds that bind the target RNA specifically and disrupt its function. Essential to this process is an effectively designed cascade of screening assays. A screening cascade for identifying compounds that target the T box riboswitch antiterminator element is described. In the primary assays, moderate to higher throughput screening of compound libraries is achieved by combining the sensitivity of fluorescence techniques with functionally relevant assays. Active compounds are then validated and the binding to target RNA further characterized in secondary assays. The cascade of assays monitor ligand-induced changes in the steady-state fluorescence of an attached dye or internally incorporated 2-aminopurine; the fluorescence anisotropy of an RNA complex; and, the thermal denaturation fluorescence profile of a fluorophore-quencher labeled RNA. While the assays described have been developed for T box riboswitch-targeted drug discovery, the fluorescence methods and screening cascade design principles can be applied to drug discovery efforts targeted toward other medicinally relevant noncoding RNA.

    1. Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves

      Science.gov (United States)

      Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

      2011-02-01

      Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

    2. Plausibility and evidence: the case of homeopathy.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rutten, Lex; Mathie, Robert T; Fisher, Peter; Goossens, Maria; van Wassenhoven, Michel

      2013-08-01

      Homeopathy is controversial and hotly debated. The conclusions of systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials of homeopathy vary from 'comparable to conventional medicine' to 'no evidence of effects beyond placebo'. It is claimed that homeopathy conflicts with scientific laws and that homoeopaths reject the naturalistic outlook, but no evidence has been cited. We are homeopathic physicians and researchers who do not reject the scientific outlook; we believe that examination of the prior beliefs underlying this enduring stand-off can advance the debate. We show that interpretations of the same set of evidence--for homeopathy and for conventional medicine--can diverge. Prior disbelief in homeopathy is rooted in the perceived implausibility of any conceivable mechanism of action. Using the 'crossword analogy', we demonstrate that plausibility bias impedes assessment of the clinical evidence. Sweeping statements about the scientific impossibility of homeopathy are themselves unscientific: scientific statements must be precise and testable. There is growing evidence that homeopathic preparations can exert biological effects; due consideration of such research would reduce the influence of prior beliefs on the assessment of systematic review evidence.

    3. Temporal and Qualitative Decomposition of Plausible Reasoning

      Science.gov (United States)

      1993-12-15

      be priming for ’Philip’ at the * position in this discourse is compatible with assuming that the process of binding the anaphoric pronoun does not...suggestion that contextually based binding of implicit anaphors is delayed until triggers are encountered (rather than occurring on line), the aspect of...displayed; one subject group received the target ’him’, and the comparison group received the target ’her’. The targets were always anaphoric pronouns. The

    4. In Silico Identification of Proteins Associated with Drug-induced Liver Injury Based on the Prediction of Drug-target Interactions.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ivanov, Sergey; Semin, Maxim; Lagunin, Alexey; Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

      2017-07-01

      Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure as well as one of the major reasons for drug withdrawal from clinical trials and the market. Elucidation of molecular interactions associated with DILI may help to detect potentially hazardous pharmacological agents at the early stages of drug development. The purpose of our study is to investigate which interactions with specific human protein targets may cause DILI. Prediction of interactions with 1534 human proteins was performed for the dataset with information about 699 drugs, which were divided into three categories of DILI: severe (178 drugs), moderate (310 drugs) and without DILI (211 drugs). Based on the comparison of drug-target interactions predicted for different drugs' categories and interpretation of those results using clustering, Gene Ontology, pathway and gene expression analysis, we identified 61 protein targets associated with DILI. Most of the revealed proteins were linked with hepatocytes' death caused by disruption of vital cellular processes, as well as the emergence of inflammation in the liver. It was found that interaction of a drug with the identified targets is the essential molecular mechanism of the severe DILI for the most of the considered pharmaceuticals. Thus, pharmaceutical agents interacting with many of the identified targets may be considered as candidates for filtering out at the early stages of drug research. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

    5. Identification of attractive drug targets in neglected-disease pathogens using an in silico approach.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Gregory J Crowther

      Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased sequencing of pathogen genomes and the subsequent availability of genome-scale functional datasets are expected to guide the experimental work necessary for target-based drug discovery. However, a major bottleneck in this has been the difficulty of capturing and integrating relevant information in an easily accessible format for identifying and prioritizing potential targets. The open-access resource TDRtargets.org facilitates drug target prioritization for major tropical disease pathogens such as the mycobacteria Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the kinetoplastid protozoans Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi; the apicomplexan protozoans Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, and Toxoplasma gondii; and the helminths Brugia malayi and Schistosoma mansoni. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present strategies to prioritize pathogen proteins based on whether their properties meet criteria considered desirable in a drug target. These criteria are based upon both sequence-derived information (e.g., molecular mass and functional data on expression, essentiality, phenotypes, metabolic pathways, assayability, and druggability. This approach also highlights the fact that data for many relevant criteria are lacking in less-studied pathogens (e.g., helminths, and we demonstrate how this can be partially overcome by mapping data from homologous genes in well-studied organisms. We also show how individual users can easily upload external datasets and integrate them with existing data in TDRtargets.org to generate highly customized ranked lists of potential targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the datasets and the tools available in TDRtargets.org, we have generated illustrative lists of potential drug targets in seven tropical disease pathogens. While these lists are broadly consistent with the research community's current interest in certain specific proteins, and suggest

    6. SELF-BLM: Prediction of drug-target interactions via self-training SVM

      Science.gov (United States)

      Keum, Jongsoo; Nam, Hojung

      2017-01-01

      Predicting drug-target interactions is important for the development of novel drugs and the repositioning of drugs. To predict such interactions, there are a number of methods based on drug and target protein similarity. Although these methods, such as the bipartite local model (BLM), show promise, they often categorize unknown interactions as negative interaction. Therefore, these methods are not ideal for finding potential drug-target interactions that have not yet been validated as positive interactions. Thus, here we propose a method that integrates machine learning techniques, such as self-training support vector machine (SVM) and BLM, to develop a self-training bipartite local model (SELF-BLM) that facilitates the identification of potential interactions. The method first categorizes unlabeled interactions and negative interactions among unknown interactions using a clustering method. Then, using the BLM method and self-training SVM, the unlabeled interactions are self-trained and final local classification models are constructed. When applied to four classes of proteins that include enzymes, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, and nuclear receptors, SELF-BLM showed the best performance for predicting not only known interactions but also potential interactions in three protein classes compare to other related studies. The implemented software and supporting data are available at https://github.com/GIST-CSBL/SELF-BLM. PMID:28192537

    7. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Intraocular Drug Delivery System to Target Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Martina Giannaccini

      2014-01-01

      Full Text Available One of the most challenging efforts in drug delivery is the targeting of the eye. The eye structure and barriers render this organ poorly permeable to drugs. Quite recently the entrance of nanoscience in ocular drug delivery has improved the penetration and half-life of drugs, especially in the anterior eye chamber, while targeting the posterior chamber is still an open issue. The retina and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid tissues, located in the posterior eye chamber, are responsible for the majority of blindness both in childhood and adulthood. In the present study, we used magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs as a nanotool for ocular drug delivery that is capable of specific localization in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE layer. We demonstrate that, following intraocular injection in Xenopus embryos, MNPs localize specifically in RPE where they are retained for several days. The specificity of the localization did not depend on particle size and surface properties of the MNPs used in this work. Moreover, through similar experiments in zebrafish, we demonstrated that the targeting of RPE by the nanoparticles is not specific for the Xenopus species.

    8. Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality for targeted drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Li, Yong-Yong; Li, Lan; Dong, Hai-Qing; Cai, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Tian-Bin

      2013-07-01

      PKKKRKV (Pro-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Lys-Val, PV7), a seven amino acid peptide, has emerged as one of the primary nuclear localization signals that can be targeted into cell nucleus via the nuclear import machinery. Taking advantage of chemical diversity and biological activities of this short peptide sequence, in this study, Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality were successfully developed for intracellular drug delivery. These nanomicelles with the size ~100 nm were self-assembled from F127 polymer that was flanked with two PV7 sequences at its both terminal ends. Hydrophobic anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with inherent fluorescence was chosen as the model drug, which was found to be efficiently encapsulated into nanomicelles with the encapsulation efficiency at 72.68%. In comparison with the non-functionalized namomicelles, the microscopic observation reveals that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles display a higher cellular uptake, especially into the nucleus of HepG2 cells, due to the nuclear localization signal effects. Both cytotoxicity and apoptosis studies show that the DOX-loaded nanomicelles were more potent than drug nanomicelles without nuclear targeting functionality. It was thus concluded that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles could be a potentially alternative vehicle for nuclear targeting drug delivery.

    9. Genome evolution predicts genetic interactions in protein complexes and reveals cancer drug targets

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Lu, X.; Kensche, P.R.; Huynen, M.A.; Notebaart, R.A.

      2013-01-01

      Genetic interactions reveal insights into cellular function and can be used to identify drug targets. Here we construct a new model to predict negative genetic interactions in protein complexes by exploiting the evolutionary history of genes in parallel converging pathways in metabolism. We evaluate

    10. Medicinal chemistry based approaches and nanotechnology-based systems to improve CNS drug targeting and delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Vlieghe, Patrick; Khrestchatisky, Michel

      2013-05-01

      The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by various barriers, which regulate nervous tissue homeostasis and control the selective and specific uptake, efflux, and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous molecules. Among these barriers is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a physical and physiological barrier that filters very efficiently and selectively the entry of compounds from the blood to the brain and protects nervous tissue from harmful substances and infectious agents present in the bloodstream. The BBB also prevents the entry of potential drugs. As a result, various drug targeting and delivery strategies are currently being developed to enhance the transport of drugs from the blood to the brain. Following a general introduction, we briefly overview in this review article the fundamental physiological properties of the BBB. Then, we describe current strategies to bypass the BBB (i.e., invasive methods, alternative approaches, and temporary opening) and to cross it (i.e., noninvasive approaches). This section is followed by a chapter addressing the chemical and technological solutions developed to cross the BBB. A special emphasis is given to prodrug-targeting approaches and targeted nanotechnology-based systems, two promising strategies for BBB targeting and delivery of drugs to the brain.

    11. Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Yadollah Omidi

      2012-02-01

      Full Text Available Introduction: Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively controlled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB, whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods: Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics. Conclusion: The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent.

    12. Proteins with complex architecture as potential targets for drug design: a case study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Bálint Mészáros

      2011-07-01

      Full Text Available Lengthy co-evolution of Homo sapiens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis, resulted in a dramatically successful pathogen species that presents considerable challenge for modern medicine. The continuous and ever increasing appearance of multi-drug resistant mycobacteria necessitates the identification of novel drug targets and drugs with new mechanisms of action. However, further insights are needed to establish automated protocols for target selection based on the available complete genome sequences. In the present study, we perform complete proteome level comparisons between M. tuberculosis, mycobacteria, other prokaryotes and available eukaryotes based on protein domains, local sequence similarities and protein disorder. We show that the enrichment of certain domains in the genome can indicate an important function specific to M. tuberculosis. We identified two families, termed pkn and PE/PPE that stand out in this respect. The common property of these two protein families is a complex domain organization that combines species-specific regions, commonly occurring domains and disordered segments. Besides highlighting promising novel drug target candidates in M. tuberculosis, the presented analysis can also be viewed as a general protocol to identify proteins involved in species-specific functions in a given organism. We conclude that target selection protocols should be extended to include proteins with complex domain architectures instead of focusing on sequentially unique and essential proteins only.

    13. Network-based approaches for drug response prediction and targeted therapy development in cancer.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dorel, Mathurin; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei; Kuperstein, Inna

      2015-08-21

      Signaling pathways implicated in cancer create a complex network with numerous regulatory loops and redundant pathways. This complexity explains frequent failure of one-drug-one-target paradigm of treatment, resulting in drug resistance in patients. To overcome the robustness of cell signaling network, cancer treatment should be extended to a combination therapy approach. Integrating and analyzing patient high-throughput data together with the information about biological signaling machinery may help deciphering molecular patterns specific to each patient and finding the best combinations of candidates for therapeutic targeting. We review state of the art in the field of targeted cancer medicine from the computational systems biology perspective. We summarize major signaling network resources and describe their characteristics with respect to applicability for drug response prediction and intervention targets suggestion. Thus discuss methods for prediction of drug sensitivity and intervention combinations using signaling networks together with high-throughput data. Gradual integration of these approaches into clinical routine will improve prediction of response to standard treatments and adjustment of intervention schemes.

    14. Rho-kinase as a drug target for the treatment of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Gosens, R; Schaafsma, D; Nelemans, SA; Halayko, AJ

      2006-01-01

      In asthma, inflammatory and structural cells contribute to increased bronchoconstriction acutely and more chronically to airway remodelling. Current asthma therapy doesn't inhibit these features satisfactorily. This review discusses Rho-kinase as a potential drug target, since increasing evidence su

    15. (Glyco)-protein drug carriers with an intrinsic therapeutic activity : The concept of dual targeting

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Meijer, DKF; Molema, G; Moolenaar, F; deZeeuw, D; Swart, PJ

      1996-01-01

      Dual targeting can in principle be achieved by using intrinsically active carriers that not only deliver the conjugated drug but also otherwise influence the pathological process. Potential carriers of this kind are monoclonal antibodies, certain interferons and interleukins, as well as certain enzy

    16. Pathways Targeted by Antidiabetes Drugs Are Enriched for Multiple Genes Associated With Type 2 Diabetes Risk

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Segre, Ayellet V.; Wei, Nancy; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C.; Wijmenga, T. N.; Ostaptchouk, J. V.

      2015-01-01

      Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered >65 common variants associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, their relevance for drug development is not yet clear. Of note, the first two T2D-associated loci (PPARG and KCNJ11/ABCC8) encode known targets of antidiabetes medications. We th

    17. Ionic Channels as Targets for Drug Design: A Review on Computational Methods

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      José Manuel González-Ros

      2011-12-01

      Full Text Available Ion channels are involved in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The implications of ion channels in a variety of diseases, including diabetes, epilepsy, hypertension, cancer and even chronic pain, have signaled them as pivotal drug targets. Thus far, drugs targeting ion channels were developed without detailed knowledge of the molecular interactions between the lead compounds and the target channels. In recent years, however, the emergence of high-resolution structures for a plethora of ion channels paves the way for computer-assisted drug design. Currently, available functional and structural data provide an attractive platform to generate models that combine substrate-based and protein-based approaches. In silico approaches include homology modeling, quantitative structure-activity relationships, virtual ligand screening, similarity and pharmacophore searching, data mining, and data analysis tools. These strategies have been frequently used in the discovery and optimization of novel molecules with enhanced affinity and specificity for the selected therapeutic targets. In this review we summarize recent applications of in silico methods that are being used for the development of ion channel drugs.

    18. Targeting of Drugs to ICAM for Treatment of Acute Lung Injury

      Science.gov (United States)

      2005-04-01

      vessels and potential utility as targets for drug delivery is not clear, interstitial milieu, endocytosis has a prime role in the However, caveoli...Harshaw DW, transmigration. Am J Pathol 2002; 160(3): 1155-69. Alder S, et al. Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-]- [61] Erdos EG. Angiotensin I

    19. Therapy of Chronic Hepatitis C in the Era of Nanotechnology: Drug Delivery Systems and Liver Targeting.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Cuestas, Maria Lujan

      2017-01-01

      Since the British scientist Michael Houghton along with George Kuo, Qui-Lim Choo (Chiron Corporation Emeryville), and Daniel W. Bradley (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) codiscovered the causative agent of hepatitis C in 1989, so much progress has been made for the screening of blood donors and management of this chronic liver disease. In this regard, direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have emerged as the potential "cure" of this slowly progressing and devastating disease. However, improvements are still clearly required since the anti-hepatitis C drugs currently available in the market are so extremely expensive (i.e. $94,500 for a 12-week course of treatment), that many patients will have a denied access to such drugs by their insurers. In the last few years, nanotechnology has emerged as a new platform for drug development, contributing significantly to the improvement of the administration and delivery of many drugs. Additionally, nanotechnologies can provide unique solutions even in poorer societies. This manuscript reviews the current knowledges on the available anti-hepatitis C drugs and the new drug candidates being investigated as well, and introduces the recent advances in nanocarrier-based delivery systems. Finally, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver are also discussed.

    20. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.