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Sample records for plato confucius buber

  1. Buber from the Cartesian Perspective? A Critical Review of Reading Buber's Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jeong-Gil

    2012-01-01

    The positive reception of Buber's philosophy does not fully match Buber's intention in terms of overcoming the problem of the subject-object binary. In other words, a number of authors have remained within the traditional way of thinking by merely replacing the subject and object with Buber's I and You, establishing a more dogmatic normative…

  2. The Buber-Rogers Dialogue: Theory Confirmed in Experience

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    Seckinger, Donald S.

    1976-01-01

    Considers a dialogue between Carl Rogers and Martin Buber and its use both in distinguishing the concept teaching from the concept therapy as a general case and specifically in differentiating existential psychotherapy from Buber's theory of instruction. (Author/RK)

  3. Bakhtin and Buber: Problems of Dialogic Imagination

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    Nina Perlina

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications of biographical materials on Mikhail Bakhtin demonstrate that he was familiar with the writings of Martin Buber. The philosophical and aesthetic verbal expression of Buber's ideas within the time-spatial universe of Bakhtin's own awareness allows us to discuss this obvious biographical evidence in a wider cultural context. The central opposition of Buber's and Bakhtin's systems is the dialogic dichotomous pair: "Ich und Du" (I and Thou, or "myself and another." Bakhtin's dialogic imagination is rooted in the binaries of the subject-object relations which he initially formulated as "responsibility" and "addressivity," that is to say, as individual awareness and its responsiveness of life. The basic words of Bakhtin's philosophical aesthetics can be understood as the "relation to the other," and their semantics and terminological meaning are directly related to Martin Buber (his work, Ich und Du , 1923. In the 1930s-60s Bakhtin developed the concepts of responsibility and addressivity into his universal dialogic theory of speech-genres. His hierarchy of speech-genres was built in order to establish relations between different sub-genres of the novel (various types of poetic utterances and different species of individual discourse. However, the entire edifice of this dialogic system remained unfinished, and several types of dialogic relations between individual pronouncements of the characters and individual novelistic genres were not discussed by him. Buber's ideas on the dialogue can be used as a clue to one possible interpretation of the function of authoritative and internally persuasive discourses in different sub-genres of the novel (the novel of confession, the Bildungsroman , the autobiographical novel. In this article, Buber's philosophical cycle is used as an aid in reconstructing the integral whole of Bakhtin's "dialogic imagination," as this dialogic mode of thinking goes through his unfinished works: "Author and

  4. THEOLOGYOF DIALOGUE. MARTIN BUBER AND CHRISTIANITY

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    G. ZAVERSHINSKY

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Martin Buber is one of pioneers of the dialog method, which is to complete the standard subject-object approach in the humanities. It was he, who had shaped the classic form to this method and attempted to use it when developing relationship patterns between Judaism and Christianity. In the author’s view, Buber failed in this attempt, as it shows the study of his work «Zwei Glaubensweisen». It had happened because of Buber’s not quite «dialogical» views on person of Christ and lack of good acquaintance with all the complexity and diversity of the Christian thought. Buber could not interpret properly the St. Paul’s thought without considering hypostatic communication with God as it is presented in the orthodox theology. In spite of this the author believes that fruits of Buber’s labor in the dialogue philosophy still can be in many ways useful for Christian theology and practice

  5. Constructing Confucius in the Low Countries

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    Trude Dijkstra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The first translation of Confucius’s Analects into a European language was a Dutch book by Pieter van Hoorn. Printed in Batavia in 1675, it predated the better-known Latin translation, Confucius Sinarum Philosophus (1687. Whereas the introduction of Confucius in the West has often been regarded as a project of the Jesuit mission, an exploration of the Netherlandish situation points out that the ‘manufacturing’ of Confucianism was a variegated and multi-confessional affair. The process of transmitting, translating, publishing, explaining, and judging Confucius presented a challenge to Europeans from different backgrounds and allegiances, integrating not only Latin and vernacular scholarship but also Asian expertise.

  6. The Singing Sage: rhymes in Confucius dialogues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weingarten, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 3 (2016), s. 1-27 ISSN 0041-977X Institutional support: RVO:68378009 Keywords : Early Chinese literature * Confucius * rhetoric * memory * songs Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  7. Finding Ernst Mayr's Plato.

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    Powers, Jack

    2013-12-01

    Many biologists have accepted Ernst Mayr's claim that evolutionary biology undermined an essentialist or typological view of species that had its roots in Platonic philosophy. However, Mayr has been accused of failing to support with textual evidence his attributions to Plato of these sorts of views about biology. Contemporary work in history and philosophy of biology often seems to take onboard Mayr's account of Plato's view of species. This paper seeks to provide a critical account of putative inconsistencies between an evolutionary view of species and Platonic philosophy with renewed attention to the Platonic texts in light of recent Plato scholarship; I argue that claims that Plato held an essentialist view of species inconsistent with evolutionary biology are inadequately supported by textual evidence. If Mayr's essentialist thesis fails, one might think that the intuition that Platonic philosophy is in tension with Darwinian evolution could nonetheless be accounted for by Plato's apparent privileging of a certain sort of teleological explanation, a thesis that Mayr suggests in his 1959 paper on Louis Agassiz. However, this thesis also faces difficulties. Ernst Mayr's Plato is more likely to be found in the writings of anti-evolutionary 19th century biologists like Mayr's frequent target, Agassiz, than in a cautious reading of the Platonic dialogues themselves. Interlocutors in discussions of the history of biological thought and classificatory methods in biology should be cautious in ascribing views about biology to Plato and using terms like "Platonic essentialism." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Plato psychiatrist, Foucault platonic].

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    Mathov, Nicolás

    2016-05-01

    This work explores the links between the concepts of "soul", "law" and "word" in Plato's work, in order to highlight the importance and the centrality of the philosophical-therapeutic dimension in the Greek philosopher's thought. In that way, this work pretends to show that "contemporary" problems usually discussed within "Human Sciences" in general, and Psychiatry in particular, should confront their knowledge with Plato's work, mainly due to the profound influence his ideas have had in our Greco-Christian culture. In that sense, and with that objective, this work also explores Michel Foucault's lucid and controversial interpretation of Plato.

  9. Hippocrates, cardiology, Confucius and the Yellow Emperor.

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    Cheng, T O

    2001-12-01

    Although Hippocrates (460-c.375 BC) has been traditionally recognized as the Father of Medicine, the fact that he was seminal in the development of cardiology is much less well known. Evidence is presented to support the notion that Hippocrates could also be considered the Father of Cardiology. Hippocrates also had many of the teachings and practices in common with Confucius (c.551-c.479 BC) and the Yellow Emperor of China (2695-2589 BC). Whereas Confucius was not a physician, the Yellow Emperor was an ancient Chinese physician whose Huang Di Neijing, the Yellow Emperor's Canon of Internal Medicine, is the oldest known treatise of medicine in existence.

  10. PLATO Esperanto Materials.

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    Sherwood, Judith

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of types of Esperanto materials available on PLATO--a general overview section, a picture introduction, lessons that accompany a textbook, vocabulary drills, crossword puzzles, dictation drills, reading practice, and a concentration game. The general overview lesson gives a comprehensive summary of the history and…

  11. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

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    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  12. The Similarities of the Mean between Confucius and Aristotle

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    苗亚男; 庄梦琪

    2017-01-01

    The doctrine of the Mean is praised by Aristotle and Confucius. It has an important academic position in ethics theories both in the Western and Eastern philosophical fields. Having a better understanding of the doctrine of the Mean will benefit us in further study of virtuous ethical theories. By comparison, we can discover that the thoughts of Confucius and Aristotle have many similar places.

  13. From Pericles to Plato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Øjvind

    2012-01-01

    Plato is normally taken as one of the founders of Western political philosophy, not at least with his Republic. Here, he constructs a hierarchy of forms of governments, beginning with aristocracy at the top as a critical standard for the other forms of governments, and proceeding through timocracy......’ funeral oration is used to show that Pericles presented a democratic political philosophy that can serve as a counterpoint to Plato’s political philosophy in the Republic....

  14. Peers on Socrates and Plato

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    Mackenzie, Jim

    2014-01-01

    There is more to be said about two of the topics Chris Peers addresses in his article "Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A morpho-logic of teaching and learning" (2012, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 44, 760-774), namely the Socratic method of teaching and Plato's stance with regard to women and feminism. My purpose in this article is…

  15. Martin Buber: eclipse de Deus e o Holocausto

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    Renato Somberg Pfeffer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este artigo analisa a questão da eclipse de Deus em Martin Buber. A experiência religiosa israelita parte de duas compreensões convergentes de Deus: Ele é o senhor da história e criador do mundo e do homem. Tudo que existe não se explica por si mesmo, tudo se remete ao criador. A partir desse ponto de vista, serão enfocados Deus e o Holocausto.

  16. Healing relationships and the existential philosophy of Martin Buber

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    Scott, John G; Scott, Rebecca G; Miller, William L; Stange, Kurt C; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2009-01-01

    The dominant unspoken philosophical basis of medical care in the United States is a form of Cartesian reductionism that views the body as a machine and medical professionals as technicians whose job is to repair that machine. The purpose of this paper is to advocate for an alternative philosophy of medicine based on the concept of healing relationships between clinicians and patients. This is accomplished first by exploring the ethical and philosophical work of Pellegrino and Thomasma and then by connecting Martin Buber's philosophical work on the nature of relationships to an empirically derived model of the medical healing relationship. The Healing Relationship Model was developed by the authors through qualitative analysis of interviews of physicians and patients. Clinician-patient healing relationships are a special form of what Buber calls I-Thou relationships, characterized by dialog and mutuality, but a mutuality limited by the inherent asymmetry of the clinician-patient relationship. The Healing Relationship Model identifies three processes necessary for such relationships to develop and be sustained: Valuing, Appreciating Power and Abiding. We explore in detail how these processes, as well as other components of the model resonate with Buber's concepts of I-Thou and I-It relationships. The resulting combined conceptual model illuminates the wholeness underlying the dual roles of clinicians as healers and providers of technical biomedicine. On the basis of our analysis, we argue that health care should be focused on healing, with I-Thou relationships at its core. PMID:19678950

  17. Healing relationships and the existential philosophy of Martin Buber

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    Stange Kurt C

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The dominant unspoken philosophical basis of medical care in the United States is a form of Cartesian reductionism that views the body as a machine and medical professionals as technicians whose job is to repair that machine. The purpose of this paper is to advocate for an alternative philosophy of medicine based on the concept of healing relationships between clinicians and patients. This is accomplished first by exploring the ethical and philosophical work of Pellegrino and Thomasma and then by connecting Martin Buber's philosophical work on the nature of relationships to an empirically derived model of the medical healing relationship. The Healing Relationship Model was developed by the authors through qualitative analysis of interviews of physicians and patients. Clinician-patient healing relationships are a special form of what Buber calls I-Thou relationships, characterized by dialog and mutuality, but a mutuality limited by the inherent asymmetry of the clinician-patient relationship. The Healing Relationship Model identifies three processes necessary for such relationships to develop and be sustained: Valuing, Appreciating Power and Abiding. We explore in detail how these processes, as well as other components of the model resonate with Buber's concepts of I-Thou and I-It relationships. The resulting combined conceptual model illuminates the wholeness underlying the dual roles of clinicians as healers and providers of technical biomedicine. On the basis of our analysis, we argue that health care should be focused on healing, with I-Thou relationships at its core.

  18. Plato's patricide in the sophist

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    Deretić Irina J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author attempts to elucidate validity of Plato's criticism of Parmenides' simplified monistic ontology, as well as his concept of non-being. In contrast to Parmenides, Plato introduces a more complex ontology of the megista gene and redefines Parmenides' concept of non-being as something absolutely different from being. According to Plato, not all things are in the same sense, i. e. they have the different ontological status. Additionally, he redefines Parmenides' concept of absolute non-being as 'difference' or 'otherness.' .

  19. Phusis and Nomos in Plato

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    Zahra Nouri Sanghdehi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest problems in Plato that appears in different forms in his works is the relation of nomos and phusis. This thesis has been in fifth century B.C as the contradiction of phusis and nomos among big thinkers. In this essay, we tried to investigate the relation of phusis and nomos in Plato’s thoughts according to current theories of the contradiction of these in dialogues Gorgias, Republic and Protagoras. Plato tries to minimize consequences of belief to contradiction of phusis and nomos in social and political life by assertion large scale relation between phusis and nomos. Plato depicts the ultimate solution of this problem in Law. There he accounts nomos as raised from phusis that is sub sovereignty of divine. Indeed union of phusis and gods in Plato’s thought is sanction for the identity of phusis and nomos.

  20. Four Educators in Plato's "Theaetetus"

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    Mintz, Avi I.

    2011-01-01

    Scholars who have taken interest in "Theaetetus'" educational theme argue that Plato contrasts an inferior, even dangerous, sophistic education to a superior, philosophical, Socratic education. I explore the contrasting exhortations, methods, ideals and epistemological foundations of Socratic and Protagorean education and suggest that Socrates'…

  1. Confucius Say: Naming as Social Code in Ancient China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Julie Ann

    Confucius (551-479 B.C.) believed in the power of language to regulate society. Concerned about civil war and the moral and social decay of his time, he advocated a peaceful society with a mild and moderate form of law and order and with an emphasis on the well-being of individuals through compassion, kindness, and justice. This form of law…

  2. The Confucius Institute at the University of Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter; Hampwaye, Godfrey

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, China has intensified its engagement in the internationalisation of higher education in Africa via the establishment of Confucius Institutes. The aim of this chapter is to shed light on the differences between Chinese support for higher education and ‘traditional’ partnerships...

  3. Confucius Institutes and China's Soft Power: Practices and Paradoxes

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    Lo, Joe Tin-yau; Pan, Suyan

    2016-01-01

    Since China's implementation of the Confucius Institute (CI) project in 2004, most academic works have been written on its objectives, nature, features, development, problems and challenges, especially in terms of soft power projection. Though some of them could unravel the tensions and paradoxes in the CI project, there is a paucity of in-depth…

  4. Two Key Theories in Education: Confucius and John Dewey

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    Bonnie, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The following describes the philosophies of Confucius (Confucianism) and John Dewey (pragmatism/instrumentalism/experimentalism) and their views toward vocational, technical, general academic instruction, and the development of morals and values as espoused throughout Asia and America during a span of history from 551 BCE to 1949 CE. This is not…

  5. Chinese Language Education in Europe: The Confucius Institutes

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    Starr, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the background to the Chinese government's decision to embark on a programme of promoting the study of Chinese language and culture overseas. This includes the impact of Joseph Nye's concept of "soft power" in China, ownership of the national language, the Confucius connection, and how these factors interact with…

  6. Confucius' Analysis of the Human Nature of Irrationality and His Quest for Moral Education

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    Jiawei, Xing

    2015-01-01

    This study uses mainly Confucian classic Lunyu to explore Confucius' insightful thinking about humans' strong innate nature of irrationality out of their physical needs. Irrationality causes interpersonal disturbances and chaos, and as such moral education is indispensable. Confucius advocated humanity, the principles of conscientiousness and…

  7. Beyond "Either-Or" Thinking: John Dewey and Confucius on Subject Matter and the Learner

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    Tan, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    This article compares the educational thought of John Dewey and Confucius on the nature of and relationship between subject matter and the learner. There is a common perception in the existing literature and discourse that Dewey advocates child- or learner-centred education whereas Confucius privileges subject matter via textual transmission.…

  8. Review of the Confucius Institutes' Strategy for the Dissemination of Chinese Culture

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    Ying, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Following four years of continuous expansion in scale, the Confucius Institutes have begun entering the stage of implicit development: the most pressing question that needs answering is whether the Confucius Institutes, which are devoted to the dissemination of Chinese culture, can achieve the spread of Chinese culture overseas through day-to-day…

  9. Cultural Artefact, Ideology Export or Soft Power? Confucius Institute in Peru

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    Park, Jae

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a critical analysis of the transnational interplay of cultural, educational and economic forces that culminated with the establishment of a Chinese language and cultural centre in Peru, the Confucius Institute. Confucius Institutes are government-sponsored cultural centres devoted mainly to Chinese language education around the…

  10. Rhetorical Inventions and Cultural Diversity--A Historical Approach: Aristotle and Confucius.

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    Wang, Haixia

    While Aristotle treats the nature of rhetoric as philosophical, political/practical, and artistic/technical, Confucius views language use as philosophical and political/practical but not as artistic/technical, with the result that Confucius does not seem to offer as much as Aristotle does. In their essay "Refiguring Rhetoric as an Art:…

  11. The call and the response. Martin Heidegger and Martin Buber on responsibility

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    Artur JEWUŁA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The philosophy of subjectivity reached its limits at the beginning of the 20th century. Various attempts at new thinking appears as a reaction to these limits. Such attempts involve, among others, the philosophy of dialogue that was represented in the works of Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, and Eberhard Grisebach. Another approach includes Martin Heidegger’s demand for returning to the question of Being. In this article I intend to present that both attempts are similar in many ways, although their representatives tended to be critical of one another. However, the thought of Martin Buber as well as Martin Heidegger proves to understand a man as a dynamic being, who faces “the calling”. First, I will analyse the thought of Martin Heidegger as presented in Being and Time, then I describe the thought of Martin Buber mainly based on his treaty I and Thou. Finally, I compare the similarities and differences in the thinking of both philosophers.

  12. Martin Buber's Philosophy of Education and Its Implications for Adult Non-Formal Education

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    Guilherme, Alex; Morgan, W. John

    2009-01-01

    The Jewish philosopher and educator Martin Buber (1878-1965) is considered one of the twentieth century's greatest contributors to the philosophy of religion and is also recognized as the pre-eminent scholar of "Hasidism." He has also attracted considerable attention as a philosopher of education. However, most commentaries on this aspect of his…

  13. The Apocalyptic War Against Gog Of Magog. Martin Buber versus Meir Kahane

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    Sneller, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article a confrontation on the classic Gog/Magog motive (end time battle between God and evil) is enacted between two opposite Jewish thinkers: Martin Buber and Meir Kahane. It shows how and on what conditions the biblical text can be interpreted so differently. The article also tries to

  14. Relations as Plural-Predications in Plato

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    Scaltsas, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Plato was the first philosopher to discover the metaphysical phenomenon of plural-subjects and plural-predication; e.g. you and I are two, but neither you, nor I are two. I argue that Plato devised an ontology for plural-predication through his Theory of Forms, namely, plural-partaking in a Form. Furthermore, I argue that Plato used plural-partaking to offer an ontology of related individuals without reifying relations. My contention is that Plato’s theory of plural-relatives has evaded detec...

  15. The Method of Hypothesis in Plato's Philosophy

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    Malihe Aboie Mehrizi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the examination of method of hypothesis in Plato's philosophy. This method, respectively, will be examined in three dialogues of Meno, Phaedon and Republic in which it is explicitly indicated. It will be shown the process of change of Plato’s attitude towards the position and usage of the method of hypothesis in his realm of philosophy. In Meno, considering the geometry, Plato attempts to introduce a method that can be used in the realm of philosophy. But, ultimately in Republic, Plato’s special attention to the method and its importance in the philosophical investigations, leads him to revise it. Here, finally Plato introduces the particular method of philosophy, i.e., the dialectic

  16. Deus e o Diabo nos detalhes: a ética em Buber e Adorno God and the devil in details: ethics Buber and Adorno

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    Kátia Mendonça

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A autora aborda a Violência a partir de uma perspectiva ''personalista e fenomenológica'', para que não fique restrita ao seu sentido usual, de violação da integridade física. O artigo toma as filosofias de M. Buber e T. Adorno como plataforma da reflexão, ambas preocupadas em estabelecer uma ''fenomenologia dos sentidos'', e compara suas conseqüências éticas, mostrando como um compreensão ampliada da Violência emerge desse ponto de vista.The author approaches Violence from a ''personalist and phenomenological'' perspective, so that the issue do not remain exclusevily referred to its usual sense, the violation of physical integrity. The article takes M. Buber and T. Adorno philosophies - both concerned with the construction of a ''phenomenology of sensibilities'' - as a support for its own elaboration, and compares their ethical implications, showing how a enlarged understanding of Violence rises from that point of view.

  17. Plato's Anti-Kohlbergian Program for Moral Education

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    Jonas, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Following Lawrence Kohlberg it has been commonplace to regard Plato's moral theory as "intellectualist", where Plato supposedly believes that becoming virtuous requires nothing other than "philosophical knowledge or intuition of the ideal form of the good". This is a radical misunderstanding of Plato's educational programme,…

  18. Examining Culture's Impact on the Learning Behaviors of International Students from Confucius Culture Studying in Western Online Learning Context

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    Kang, Haijun; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of shared understanding of how culture impacts learning in online environment. Utilizing document analysis, the authors in this research study culture's impact on the learning behaviors of student sojourners from Confucius culture studying in Western online learning context. The shared understandings of Confucius culture and…

  19. Confucius Institute at Universitas Al Azhar, Jakarta The unseen power of China

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    Thung Ju Lan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available China’s soft power is a difficult concept to measure if the Confucius Institute is the only source relied on. Joseph Nye’s concept of soft power puts a strong emphasis on “the power of attraction” as a tool to persuade or “to shape the preferences of others” in the worlds of business and politics. To understand how this soft power - or the Confucius Institute - works, we have to determine the “observable” power of the “intangible” attraction embedded in it. This observable but intangible attraction is assumed to be “embedded”in the language and culture offered by the Institute, namely so-called “shared values”. However, without having attended its classes, it is difficult to see which values are being shared with the local students. Despite this handicap, it is very apparent that the image of China itself has acted as an attraction. An attraction to China was visible already, even before the Confucius Institute was established. For Indonesians, China is a big country which has exerted its power there for a long time through its diaspora and/or exports. Therefore, the Confucius Institute is just one of the many forms of Chinese-ness within their purview. Certainly, the Confucius Institute might have assisted in adjusting negative impressions and expelling some of the reservations the Indonesians have about China. Nevertheless, its influence extends to only a limited number of people who are closely engaged with the Institute.

  20. Plato's problem an introduction to mathematical platonism

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    Panza, M

    2013-01-01

    What is mathematics about? And how can we have access to the reality it is supposed to describe? The book tells the story of this problem, first raised by Plato, through the views of Aristotle, Proclus, Kant, Frege, Gödel, Benacerraf, up to the most recent debate on mathematical platonism.

  1. The PLATO 2.0 mission

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    Rauer, H.; et al., [Unknown; Hekker, S.

    2014-01-01

    PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets

  2. Quoting Plato in Porphyrius' Cuestiones homericas

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    Lucía Rodríguez‑Noriega Guillén

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the quotations of Plato in Porphyry’s Homeric Questions,including their typology (literal quotation, allusion, paraphrase, etc., their beingor not direct citations, their function in the work, and their possible parallels inother authors.

  3. Martin buber: uma alternativa para se pensar as inter-relações no cotidiano escolar

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    Márcia R. M.Ferraz Arruda

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nesta comunicação procuramos mostrar a propriedade das idéias de Martin Buber, na obra Eu e Tu (2001, para se pensar as inter-relações na escola. Em termos antropológicos, no cotidiano escolar se configuram, simultaneamente, cultura organizacional e a cultura de grupos, segundo Edgar Morin (1984 e Michel Maffesoli (1998. Buscamos na “filosofia do encontro” uma reflexão sobre as relações inter-subjetivas produzidas pelos sujeitos no cotidiano escolar. São relações que efetivam a comunicação, definida por Buber como um encontro, no qual se dá a complementaridade e reciprocidade das ações entre o Eu-Tu, o dialógico, em detrimento à experiência de contato proporcionada no Eu-Isso, o monológico. A questão a ser iluminada diz respeito ao fato de que, por meio da “filosofia do encontro”, talvez possamos encontrar suportes teóricos consistentes para repensarmos as relações produzidas pelos sujeitos no âmbito escolar, o que evidencia o caráter “ontológico” de uma questão crucial na escola: ensino-aprendizagem. Abstract: This paper will attempt to point out relevance of the ideas of Martin Buber, in the work “I and Thou” (2001, to think the interrelations in school. In anthropological terms, in the school daily life both organizational culture and the culture of groups are established, according Edgar Morin (1984 and Michel Maffesoli (1998. We searched on the “Philosophy of the Meeting" a reflection on the inter-subjective relations produced by the subjects in the everyday life school. They are relations that implement the communication, defined by Buber as an encounter, which gave the complementarity and reciprocity of actions between the “I-Thou”, the dialogical, to the detriment of the experience of contact provided in the “I-That”, the monological. The issue to be enlightened relates to the fact that, through the "philosophy of the meeting," perhaps we can find consistent theoretical support in

  4. Confucius and unnamed boy”: intertextuality and adaptation

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    Márcia Schmaltz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, Sergio Capparelli met Marcia Schmaltz in a Beijing subway and invited her to co-translate Chinese tales for children and youngsters. This meeting resulted in a collection of over two hundred short stories, which were partially published in 50 Fables of Fabulous China (Capparelli; Schmaltz, 2007 and in Chinese Supernatural Tales (Schmaltz; Capparelli, 2010. In this paper, I present some reflections originated from the bibliographical research about the preparation of those source texts. The first reflection focuses on the influence of the philosophical doctrines of the traditional culture for the Chinese literary production, which has on education one of its main roles. The second one combines literary concepts such as prose fiction, children’s literature and intertextuality in the different cultural systems involved, which must be taken into consideration by the translator. The third one refers to the reconstitution process of the tale “Confucius and unnamed boy”, and to the texts referring to this tale. Finally, the forth reflection is about the translation process. In this part, we discuss the decisions which were made, taking into account the intrinsic aspects of the source texts in the Chinese cultural system for its transposition in the target culture system.

  5. Confucius and unnamed boy”: intertextuality and adaptation

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    Márcia Schmaltz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2016v36n1p114 In 2005, Sergio Capparelli met Marcia Schmaltz in a Beijing subway and invited her to co-translate Chinese tales for children and youngsters. This meeting resulted in a collection of over two hundred short stories, which were partially published in 50 Fables of Fabulous China (Capparelli; Schmaltz, 2007 and in Chinese Supernatural Tales (Schmaltz; Capparelli, 2010. In this paper, I present some reflections originated from the bibliographical research about the preparation of those source texts. The first reflection focuses on the influence of the philosophical doctrines of the traditional culture for the Chinese literary production, which has on education one of its main roles. The second one combines literary concepts such as prose fiction, children’s literature and intertextuality in the different cultural systems involved, which must be taken into consideration by the translator. The third one refers to the reconstitution process of the tale “Confucius and unnamed boy”, and to the texts referring to this tale. Finally, the forth reflection is about the translation process. In this part, we discuss the decisions which were made, taking into account the intrinsic aspects of the source texts in the Chinese cultural system for its transposition in the target culture system.

  6. Socrates the Pythagorean: an Invention of Plato?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Shichalin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the image of Socrates as found in the Works of Plato and Aristophanes. The author discovers Pythagorean traits in the image of Socrates as portrayed by these two ancient authors. The author also discusses the Pythagoreans and their role in the creation of stable schools of Philosophy. He likewise shows that the sophists were not the only ones contributing to the creation of centres of education and learning in the ancient world

  7. Pemikiran Epistemologi Barat: dari Plato Sampai Gonseth

    OpenAIRE

    Nunu Burhanuddin

    2015-01-01

    This paper riviewing the Western epistemology thought. The theme focuses on Plato to Gonseth. The Epistemology that referred in this article, is to think about "how humans acquire knowledge?". From this then appear four types of sect modern western epistemology thought, namely: sect of empiricism, rationalism sect, kantinian sect, sect of positivism. Furthermore, the social positivism sciences developed by Comte leaves serious problems associated with the loss of the role of the subject. This...

  8. Ancient Doctrines of Passions: Plato and Aristotle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskra-Paczkowska Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this essay is a discussion of the doctrines of emotions of Plato and Aristotle. According to both them it is impossible to oust the passions from the good, i.e. happy life. On the contrary, emotions are an important component of human excellence. We investigate this question with reference to Plato’s doctrine of the soul and his concept of a perfect life, and Aristotle’s ethics, poetics and rhetoric.

  9. Evaluating PLATO: postgraduate teaching and learning online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Menna; Bullock, Alison

    2014-02-01

      The use of the Internet as a teaching medium has increased rapidly over the last decade. PLATO (postgraduate learning and teaching online) was launched in 2008 by the e-learning unit (ELU) of Wales Deanery. Located within Learning@NHSWales, a Moodle virtual learning environment (VLE), it hosts a wide range of freely available courses and resources tailored to support the education, training and continuing professional development (CPD) needs of health care professionals working across the National Health Service (NHS) Wales. The evaluation aimed to identify the costs and benefits of PLATO, report its value as attributed by users, identify potential cost savings and make recommendations.   Five courses (case studies) were selected, representing the range of available e-learning resources: e-induction; fetal heart monitoring; cervical screening; GP prospective trainers; and tools for trainers. Mixed methods were used: one-to-one qualitative interviews, focus group discussions and surveys explored user views, and identified individual and organisational value.   Qualitative findings identified six key areas of value for users: ELU support and guidance; avoidance of duplication and standardisation; central reference; local control; flexibility for learners; and specific features. Survey results (n=72) indicated 72 per cent of consultants reported that PLATO was easy to access and user friendly. E-learning was rated as 'very/important' for CPD by 79 per cent of respondents. Key challenges were: access, navigation, user concerns, awareness and support.   PLATO supports education and helps deliver UK General Medical Council standards. Future plans should address the suggested recommendations to realise cost savings for NHS Wales and the Wales Deanery. The findings have wider applicability to others developing or using VLEs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. From the Teachings of Confucius to Western Influences: How Adult Education Is Shaped in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor C. X.; Farmer, Lesley S. J

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study designed to determine whether the teachings of Confucius (liberal and behavioral teaching approaches) or Western teaching approaches (humanistic, progressive, radical and analytic teaching approaches) shaped adult education in Taiwan. Thirty-nine randomly selected adult educators from three premium…

  11. Can Virtue Be Taught and How? Confucius on the Paradox of Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I shall first examine an apparent paradox in Confucius' view on whether everyone is perfectible through education: on the one hand, he states that education should be provided to all, on the other hand, he says that common people cannot be made to know things. To understand this apparent paradox, I shall argue that education for…

  12. Implications in the Era of Building Confucius Institutes from a Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheyuan, Tang

    2016-01-01

    Confucius Institutes characterized by the outstanding culture of the Chinese nation have been built in a way that sends them abroad, which has been a cultural revival and self-conscious choice of "sending Eastern learning Westward" in the 21st century. This has helped turn back the declining cultural trade deficit and upheld the…

  13. Pemikiran Epistemologi Barat: dari Plato Sampai Gonseth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunu Burhanuddin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper riviewing the Western epistemology thought. The theme focuses on Plato to Gonseth. The Epistemology that referred in this article, is to think about "how humans acquire knowledge?". From this then appear four types of sect modern western epistemology thought, namely: sect of empiricism, rationalism sect, kantinian sect, sect of positivism. Furthermore, the social positivism sciences developed by Comte leaves serious problems associated with the loss of the role of the subject. This problem being the background of epistemology philosophy appears that by Emund Husserl developed through the phenomenology, Habermas through hermeneutics, and Ferdinand Gonseth through critical theory.

  14. Plato's ghost the modernist transformation of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Plato's Ghost is the first book to examine the development of mathematics from 1880 to 1920 as a modernist transformation similar to those in art, literature, and music. Jeremy Gray traces the growth of mathematical modernism from its roots in problem solving and theory to its interactions with physics, philosophy, theology, psychology, and ideas about real and artificial languages. He shows how mathematics was popularized, and explains how mathematical modernism not only gave expression to the work of mathematicians and the professional image they sought to create for themselves, but how modernism also introduced deeper and ultimately unanswerable questions

  15. Plato the Pederast: Rhetoric and Cultural Procreation in the Dialogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    Examines Plato's Dialogues by reading them through two cultural lenses: the role of eros in classical Greece and its analogous relationship to language and rhetoric; and the educational function of eros within the ancient institution of pederasty. Shows how the cultural values of ancient Greece manifested themselves in Plato's erotic educational…

  16. Plato's Theories of Knowledge and Education: an Examination of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plato's Theories of Knowledge and Education: an Examination of the Interpretations of Cloete and Agyemang. ... UJAH: Unizik Journal of Arts and Humanities ... views, this article reveals some serious logical and factual errors in Cloete's interpretations, and thereby clarifies Plato's epistemology and theories of education.

  17. Plato and the teaching of entrepreneurship studies as general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondly to use Plato's model of education to stress the importance of the practical aspect of entrepreneurial studies so as to avoid the old syndrome of breeding certificate Laden, theory filled entrepreneurial studies. For Plato, education should be tailored to suit the learner specialization; that is a carpenter should be taught ...

  18. Plato: from Socrates to Pre-Socratics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU. SHICHALIN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view on the chronology of the Corpus Platonicum (CP texts turns out to be anachronistic from several, especially formal and historical, points of view. From the formal point of view all the CP texts can be divided into speeches, framed dialogues and dialogues in dramatic form; there are serious reasons for correlating these groups of dialogues with different chronological periods. Historically, to view Plato’s works as modern philosophical and scholarly literature is incorrect; instead, it would seem expedient to correlate the three groups of dialogues mentioned with their changing audiences for which Plato wrote before the establishment of the Academy, during the first stage of its existence (before the second trip to Sicily and in the later period. The evolution of Plato’s philosophy is to be correlated with the evolution of the school created by him. Lack of attention to these methods can lead to incorrect assumptions concerning Plato’s evolution which found their way, among others, into the book “Plato and the Post-Socratic Dialogue” by Prof. Ch. Kahn where he speaks of a transition from Socratic to Pre-Socratic problems in Plato’s works; the book is critically examined by the author of the present article.

  19. Education and the doctrine of the Mean in Aristotle and in Confucius

    OpenAIRE

    Panos ELIOPOULOS

    2014-01-01

    Aristotle and Confucius elaborate their theories on the basis of a complex apprehen - sion of the ethical and political problem as one. The Greek and the Chinese philosopher focus on the importance of virtue, which signifies a passage from an initial understanding of communal life to a life with others that becomes self-fulfilling and facilitates self improvement and excellence. The individual goal is the same as the collective goal; this becomes the foundation o...

  20. A scientific approach to Plato's Atlantis

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    Massimo Rapisarda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The myth of Atlantis is hard to die. This attempt to use scientific evidence to give it the final smash ends up with the doubt that it might not be totally unsubstantiated. The time of the supposed existence of Atlantis (around twelve thousand years ago was, in fact, characterized by technological revolutions, acknowledged by archaeology, and abrupt climate changes, documented by geology. In principle, it cannot therefore be ruled out that some of those dramatic events left a memory, later used by Plato as a basis for its tale. The climate changes involved the majority of the northern hemisphere, thus all the ancient civilizations (Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Indian and Chinese could have preserved reminiscence, but it is clear that the events occurring closer to Greece would have been more accessible to Plato. Among the Mediterranean sites that experienced the cataclysms of the beginning of the Holocene, a good candidate to host a primordial civilization might have been the archipelago then existing in the Strait of Sicily, a natural maritime link between Tunisia and Italy, prized by the presence of an obsidian source at Pantelleria. Eleven thousand five hundred years ago, a sudden sea level rise erased the archipelago, submerging the possible settlements, but Pantelleria obsidian ores are still there and could provide a significant clue. In fact, the potential discovery of artefacts, originating from a source now submerged by the sea level rise, would imply that the collection of the mineral took place when it was still emerged, namely at the time of Atlantis. Even if such discovery would not be sufficient to prove the existence of the mythical island, it would be enough to shake up the timeline of the human occupation in the region.

  1. What Plato and Murdoch Think About Love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Shakouri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are many interpretations of love and lots of scholars write and talk on love; however, what exactly is the meaning of love? Iris Murdoch’s works are an accumulation of emotional relationships and feelings of love. Her great subject is love, both sexual and non-sexual, and her characters are the portrayal of a small group of people caught up in convoluted ties of love and hate, with Eros ruling over them (Cohen 22. Murdoch was one of the most respected British writers and philosophers of the second half of the twentieth century and, of course, the postwar period. In Murdoch’s novels, love is one of the central themes—marriage, as the institution of love, more often binds than frees. Her characters are mainly ego-centric people who struggle to love and are often overwhelmed by the factor of self-obsession, jealousy, ambition, fascination with suffering and charismatic power. They are absolutely ordinary people with a consuming demand for love, and mental and physical exile. Murdoch was inspired by Plato’s ideas in many ways. Like art, here again Plato’s idea of love is more skeptical than Murdoch’s, whereas Murdoch kept it only as a way to the Good, creation, and happiness. Murdoch and Plato saw love more as a Freudian concept, the Eros, the word that comes from the name of the first Greek god of love. Both the philosophers, Plato and Murdoch, believed that this erotic longing and desires revived by Eros can led to a new direction, a way toward virtue and truth. Her protagonist or marginalized characters are usually tackling it with either vulgarity or the heavenly, which results in creation, art or salvation. Murdoch, as a major moral philosopher, usually grasps the chances to encapsulate her moral visions in her works, and created novels that should be counted as meditations on human love and goodness.

  2. Anamnesis and the Silent Narrator in Plato and John

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L. Parsenios

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Gospel of John is often compared to the dialogues of Plato by those who connect Johannine theology and Platonic philosophy. The comparison operates on the level of ideas. The present paper does not ignore issues of theology and philosophy but grounds a comparison of John and Plato first and foremost on the literary level. In several key places in John 1, 3, and 14, the Johannine narrator recedes from view and is unexpectedly silent where one would expect a narrator’s comment to organize the conversations and interactions between characters in John. Plato also renders the voice of the narrator silent in a dialogue like the Theaetetus. This paper argues that John and Plato both suppress the narrator’s voice in order to further their anamnetic efforts and to make later generations not only readers but participants in their original conversations.

  3. 1 Plato's Theories of Knowledge and Education: an Examination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngozi Ezenwa-Ohaeto

    doing introduced some of the most insightful theories of knowledge that ..... major deductions he makes from that quotation (but does not explain), are: (i). That Plato 'assumes' that there is 'a pre- linguistic realm whose representation either.

  4. Isocrates and Plato on Rhetoric and Rhetorical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, William L.

    1991-01-01

    Compares the views of Isocrates and Plato on rhetoric and rhetorical education. Elucidates their criticisms of the sophists, their general assumptions about the nature and function of rhetoric, and their views on rhetorical education. (PRA)

  5. Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues

    OpenAIRE

    Neiders, Ivars

    2011-01-01

    "Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues" Annotation The dissertation "Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues" is a philosophical study of Socratic views in moral psychology. Particular attention is paid to what the author calls (1) Doxastic competence and (2) Orectic competence. It is argued that according to Socrates these two different epistemic relations are important aspects of our self-understanding. The doxast...

  6. Plato, Nightingale, and Nursing: Can You Hear Me Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Jacqueline Michele; Fitzsimons, Virginia

    2015-10-01

    A historical perspective on how the writings of Plato influenced Florence Nightingale in the formation of nursing as a respected profession for women. Comparing Nightingale's life and legacy to Platonic philosophy demonstrates how philosophy continues to speak to the profession of nursing practice as guardians of society in the 21st century. A review of the literature using EBSCO, SAGEpub, MEDLINE, and CINAHL databases and hand searches of literature were initiated for the years 1990-2014 using the terms "Plato," "Nightingale," and "nursing" restricted to English. Florence Nightingale, known as the mother of modern-day nursing, embodied her life and work after the philosophic tenets of Plato. Plato's Allegory of the Cave influenced Nightingale's attitudes with regard to the value of education, knowledge of the good, and the importance of imparting learned knowledge to others. Plato's work spoke of educating both men and women to seek the truth, affording both sexes to become competent as future leaders in the role of guardians to society. Nightingale's emphasis of education for women as a conduit for their usefulness to society mirrored Plato's philosophy. Over 100 years after her death, the impact Florence Nightingale still has on professional nursing practice remains. Scholarship in nursing education today is infused with a liberal arts background in philosophy, ethics, and the sciences. Nightingale's holistic concepts of person, health, and environment in the practice of nursing coalesced with her statistical analyses in validating nursing actions foreshadowed the development of universal nursing knowledge and language base and meta-paradigm concepts in nursing. Further classification and categorization of Nightingale's concepts of assessing, implementing, and evaluating delivery of care became the linguistic precursors for the identification of nursing process, nursing actions, and nursing diagnoses. Plato's and Nightingale's holistic, scientific, and

  7. Towards a New Framework for Soft Power: An Observation of China’s Confucius Institute

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, Kyoungtaek

    2010-01-01

    There are many controversial and differing opinions concerning Nye’s concept of soft power which have lead to some confusion in our understanding of what soft power actually is. By analyzing a given governmental agency, i.e. China’s Confucius Institute, I will show the problem inherent in Nye’s term soft power. I will analyze the concept of soft power as a combination of two meanings: ‘soft’ and ‘power’. I believe this research could offer a new perspective on the concept of soft power and co...

  8. Eugenics concept: from Plato to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvercin, C H; Arda, B

    2008-01-01

    All prospective studies and purposes to improve cure and create a race that would be exempt of various diseases and disabilities are generally defined as eugenic procedures. They aim to create the "perfect" and "higher" human being by eliminating the "unhealthy" prospective persons. All of the supporting actions taken in order to enable the desired properties are called positive eugenic actions; the elimination of undesired properties are defined as negative eugenics. In addition, if such applications and approaches target the public as a whole, they are defined as macro-eugenics. On the other hand, if they only aim at individuals and/or families, they are called micro-eugenics. As generally acknowledged, Galton re-introduced eugenic proposals, but their roots stretch as far back as Plato. Eugenic thoughts and developments were widely accepted in many different countries beginning with the end of the 19th to the first half of the 20th centuries. Initially, the view of negative eugenics that included compulsory sterilizations of handicapped, diseased and "lower" classes, resulted in tens of thousands being exterminated especially in the period of Nazi Germany. In the 1930s, the type of micro positive eugenics movement found a place within the pro-natalist policies of a number of countries. However, it was unsuccessful since the policy was not able to become effective enough and totally disappeared in the 1960s. It was no longer a fashionable movement and left a deep impression on public opinion after the long years of war. However, developments in genetics and its related fields have now enabled eugenic thoughts to reappear under the spotlight and this is creating new moral dilemmas from an ethical perspective.

  9. Outsourced to China: Confucius Institutes and Soft Power in American Higher Education. A Report by the National Association of Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rachelle

    2017-01-01

    Since 2004, the Chinese government has planted Confucius Institutes that offer Chinese language and culture courses at colleges and universities around the world--including more than 100 in the United States. These Institutes avoid Chinese political history and human rights abuses, portray Taiwan and Tibet as undisputed territories of China, and…

  10. Confucius Institute Programming in the United States: Language Ideology, Hegemony, and the Making of Chinese Culture in University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambach, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how Confucius Institute teachers and U.S. students use language to index qualities of Chinese people and culture. The study draws on the model of "linguistic fact" to argue that students' and teachers' contextualized use of language occurs in relation to their different yet naturalized assumptions about a commonly…

  11. Plato, Aristotle and the phytagorean influence on Plutarch's De Musica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roosevelt Rocha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In his treatise On Music, Plutarch cites and discusses excerpts from works of Plato and Aristotle in which these authors deal with issues relevant to the harmonic theory. In these passages, we see that the sources used by Plutarch have a strong influence of the Pythagorean school, under which the study of musical scales was developed focusing on the mathematical relationships that exist between the notes and intervals. This indicates that Plutarch or not directly read the texts of Plato and Aristotle, or read, but using some other source, a commentator of Pythagorean extraction, who we can not identify.

  12. Plato's Cosmic Theology: A Rationale for a Polytheistic Astrology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, André

    2015-05-01

    Plato's cosmology influenced classical astronomy and religion, but was in turn influenced by the polytheistic context of its time. Throughout his texts, including the cosmological treatise Timaeus, and the discussions on the soul in the Phaedrus, Plato (c.428-c.348 BC) established what can be generalised as Platonic cosmological thought. An understanding of the philosophical and mythical levels of Platonic thought can provide a rationale for polytheistic and astrological worldviews, pointing to some cosmological continuity, alongside major shifts, from ancient Greek religion to the astrological thought of ancient astronomers such as Claudius Ptolemy.

  13. Expected asteroseismic performances with the space project PLATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goupil Mariejo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The PLATO (PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of star space project will observe about fifty percents of the sky with the main purpose of detecting, confirming and characterizing transiting exoplanets of (superEarth sizes in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. Determining masses, radii and ages of exoplanets require the knowledge the masses, radii and ages of the host stars. We give a brief presentation of the main features of the mission. We then discuss some expected seismic performances of PLATO for characterizing bright solar-like stars, focusing on the challenging determination of accurate/precise stellar ages.

  14. FORMAÇÃO HUMANA, VISÃO DE MUNDO, DIÁLOGO E EDUCAÇÃO: A ATUALIDADE DE PAULO FREIRE E MARTIN BUBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Coelho Pena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Este artigo discute questões contemporâneas da educação no que se refere às relações entre professores e alunos e à formação, a partir das teorias de Paulo Freire e de Martin Buber. Inicialmente, o texto explicita a aproximação entre a teoria de Freire e Buber. Em seguida, destaca aspectos fundantes da obra dos dois pensadores por favorecerem uma formação que se situe e que atue para o diálogo, contra a desumanização e qualquer tipo de humilhação, discriminação ou exclusão. Ao final, sintetiza contribuições de Paulo Freire e Martin Buber para uma educação voltada para a formação de comunidade e que seja crítica, criativa, dialógica. Nas considerações finais, fica evidenciada a atualidade de Freire e Buber, seu legado teórico para ações práticas e políticas.

  15. The necessity of dialectics according to Plato and Adorno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne-Marie Eggert

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the notion of philosophy as, on the one hand, an academic or scientific discipline and, on the other, something perhaps superior to the disciplines and in any case dealing with what is not a 'disciplinary' matter. Through an interpretation of Plato's concept of dialectics and...

  16. Plato and Play: Taking Education Seriously in Ancient Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angour, Armand

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines Plato's notions of play in ancient Greek culture and shows how the philosopher's views on play can be best appreciated against the background of shifting meanings and evaluations of play in classical Greece. Play--in various forms such as word play, ritual, and music--proved central to the development of…

  17. Plato, Freud and Marx on Human Nature: A Comparative Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the conceptions of human nature by Plato, Sigmund Freud and Karl Marx, with a view to revealing and explaining the convergence and divergence between these conceptions. It shows that agreement or disagreement on the distinguishing characteristics of human individuals can be situated on ...

  18. Three Misunderstandings of Plato's Theory of Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Mark Jonas argues that there are three broadly held misconceptions of Plato's philosophy that work against his relevance for contemporary moral education. The first is that he is an intellectualist who is concerned only with the cognitive aspect of moral development and does not sufficiently emphasize the affective and conative…

  19. PLATO[R] Achieve Now. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "PLATO[R] Achieve Now" is a software-based curriculum for the elementary and middle school grades. Instructional content is delivered via the PlayStation Portable (PSP[R]) system, allowing students to access learning materials in various settings. Software-based assessments are used to customize individual instruction, allowing students…

  20. Go Tell Alcibiades: Tragedy, Comedy, and Rhetoric in Plato's "Symposium"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Nathan; Poulakos, John

    2008-01-01

    Plato's "Symposium" is a significant but neglected part of his elaborate and complex attitude toward rhetoric. Unlike the intellectual discussion of the "Gorgias" or the unscripted conversation of the "Phaedrus," the "Symposium" stages a feast celebrating and driven by the forces of "Eros." A luxuriously stylish performance rather than a rational…

  1. Future development of the PLATO Observatory for Antarctic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Michael C. B.; Bonner, Colin S.; Everett, Jon R.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; McDaid, Scott; McLaren, Campbell; Storey, John W. V.

    2010-07-01

    PLATO is a self-contained robotic observatory built into two 10-foot shipping containers. It has been successfully deployed at Dome A on the Antarctic plateau since January 2008, and has accumulated over 730 days of uptime at the time of writing. PLATO provides 0.5{1kW of continuous electrical power for a year from diesel engines running on Jet-A1, supplemented during the summertime with solar panels. One of the 10-foot shipping containers houses the power system and fuel, the other provides a warm environment for instruments. Two Iridium satellite modems allow 45 MB/day of data to be transferred across the internet. Future enhancements to PLATO, currently in development, include a more modular design, using lithium iron-phosphate batteries, higher power output, and a light-weight low-power version for eld deployment from a Twin Otter aircraft. Technologies used in PLATO include a CAN (Controller Area Network) bus, high-reliability PC/104 com- puters, ultracapacitors for starting the engines, and fault-tolerant redundant design.

  2. [I-THOU Eternal relationship in the life of caregivers of children with AIDS: study based on Martin Buber philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaurich, Diego

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study aimed at understanding, in the light of Martin Buber's philosophy, what is to be a caregiver of children with AIDS. The phenomenological interview guided the meeting with seven caregivers of children with AIDS, selected in a teaching hospital of Porto Alegre-RS, southern of Brazil. The data were interpreted in the light of hermeneutics, emerging the unit of meaning Dialogues 'between' the familiar I and the Eternal THOU. The dialogues take place in the search for answers that allow the understanding of the significance of the impact and challenges they face while living with AIDS. As well, they reveal hope in changes, in the cure and in a vaccine development. We believe that knowing the importance of dialogue in the context of HIV/AIDS epidemic provide the development of a nursing care that brings together the technical-scientific and humanistic aspects.

  3. THE JOURNEY OF TRUTH: FROM PLATO TO ZOLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribut Basuki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Western theater theory and criticism is generally considered to be set forth by the Greeks. Plato was "the first theater critic" with his negative comments about theater owing to his idealistic views about "the truth." Then came Aristotle who used a different viewpoint from that of Plato, saying that there is "truth" in theater. However, hostile criticism on theater came back in the Middle Ages, championed by Tertulian before Aristotelian theory was revived by the neo-classicists such as Scaliger and Castelvetro. Theater theory and criticism discourse was then made more alive by the romanticists who disagreed with the neo-classicists' rigid rules on theater. As the influence of science became dominant in the theater world, naturalism and realism emerged and became the mainstream of theater theory and criticism until well into the twentieth century.

  4. Approach to the problem of motion in Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio García Peña

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the first philosophers began to reflect about the idea of nature, the problem of motion became a crucial topic in their discussions. The entire pre-Socratic tradition was gathered by Plato, whose reflections are often triggered by fragments of Parmenides and Heraclitus. The Athenian philosopher analyzed motion in relation to the visible and intelligible regions that he distinguishes in the sphere of reality, as well as the fine line that links it to the soul

  5. Plato and Aristotle on the Problem of Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Santa Cruz, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    This paper purports toshow that it is not necessary to read the early Platonic dialogues starting from the "classic" theory of Forms. It argues, instead, that it is possibleto analyze them and, above all, to explain the use of the vocabulary of "presence" starting from the more general and prior possibility of distinguishing a subject from its accidental predicates, especially quality. The relation of "present in" or "being in" to which Plato recurs. is inherited by Aristotle. The distinction...

  6. Discourse, Dialectic and Intrapersonal Rhetoric: A Reinterpretation of Plato's Rhetorical Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikins, James W.

    The idea that rhetoric might operate in epistemologically significant ways was first presented by Plato. This paper argues that the heart of Plato's conception of epistemic discourse is a recognition of the centrality of intrapersonal rhetoric. Through a careful study of Platonic writing, particularly the "Phaedrus," three principal…

  7. Worldly and Otherworldly Virtue: Likeness to God as Educational Ideal in Plato, Plotinus, and Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovko, Marie-Élise

    2018-01-01

    In Plato, 'Becoming like God' constitutes the "telos" of the philosophical life. Our 'likeness to God' is rooted in the relationship of the divine paradeigma to its image established in the generation of the Cosmos. This relationship makes knowledge and virtue possible, and informs Plato's theory of education. Related concepts preexist…

  8. Plato and the Modern American "Right": Agendas, Assumptions, and the Culture of Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interpretation of Plato's "Republic" that has many striking similarities to the social agenda of modern educational conservatives in the United States, which is particularly timely because George W. Bush's administration is, at this writing, coming to an end. Plato's ideal city is best seen as one that promoted an…

  9. Reversing Plato’s Anti-Democratism: Castoriadis’ “Quirky” Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamblet, Wendy C.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the conflicting "loves" of Cornelius Castoriadis--his love for the ancients, and especially Plato, and for the common person of the demos. A detailed study of Castoriadis' analysis of Plato's Statesman exposes that Castoriadis attempts to resolve the paradox by rereading Plato as a radical democrat. I argue that this unorthodox reading is at best "quirky, " (a charge Castoriadis levels at Plato at worst a groundless sophism. However, I conjecture that Castoriadis' reading may not constitute a serious attempt to describe a Platonic politics, so much as a prescriptive reading of what otherwise might have been, given certain strands of political generosity evident elsewhere in Plato's corpus.

  10. 孔子父子互隐与孟子论舜的再思考%Reflection on Confucius' Fuzihuyin and Mencius' (Shun) Qiefuertao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万光军

    2009-01-01

    从内容上说,"父子互隐"与"窃负而逃"都涉及亲情与礼法的关系.从对象上说,父子互隐和窃负而逃都涉及儒学群己关系,其中父子互隐主要涉及父与子、自己家与他人家,窃负而逃主要涉及自己家与他人家、家与国.从孔孟角度看,孟子希望舜窃负而逃、而孔子则未必赞成鲁国直者父子互隐,孔孟在此有所不同,孔子的态度有利于群体和谐.%On content, "Fuzihuyin" (father and son concealing for each other) and "Qiefuertao"(stealing and fleeing away) are all concerning about emotion and law. On target, "Fuzihuyin" and "Qiefuertao" are all concerning about relation between Qun and Ji (group and individual) of Confucianism. On difference between Confucius and Mencius, Confucius cannot agree with the way of Luguozhizhe( a man of Lu doing things frankly), Confucius maybe Luguolizhe(a man of Lu doing thing by law). The attitude of Confucius' is different from that of Mencius', which is contribute to the group harmony.

  11. Prospects for detecting decreasing exoplanet frequency with main-sequence age using PLATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, D.; Brown, D. J. A.; Mustill, A. J.; Pollacco, D.

    2017-09-01

    The space mission PLATO will usher in a new era of exoplanetary science by expanding our current inventory of transiting systems and constraining host star ages, which are currently highly uncertain. This capability might allow PLATO to detect changes in planetary system architecture with time, particularly because planetary scattering due to Lagrange instability may be triggered long after the system was formed. Here, we utilize previously published instability time-scale prescriptions to determine PLATO's capability to detect a trend of decreasing planet frequency with age for systems with equal- mass planets. For two-planet systems, our results demonstrate that PLATO may detect a trend for planet masses which are at least as massive as super-Earths. For systems with three or more planets, we link their initial compactness to potentially detectable frequency trends in order to aid future investigations when these populations will be better characterized.

  12. Democratic institutions: the spell of Plato and the return to the classics

    OpenAIRE

    Colen, José

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper, that reflects an ongoing research, is to suggest the usefulness of an analysis of the readings of Karl Popper and Leo Strauss on Plato's political philosophy. Very different as they are, both thinkers saw in the Republic one of the most powerful critics of democracy and built interpretations and polemic arguments by contrast with Plato's arguments. There are currently two arguments questioning liberal or constitutional democracy. The first originates in the social s...

  13. The role of the poet in Plato's ideal cities of Callipolis and Magnesia

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard Naddaf

    2008-01-01

    Plato's attitude toward the poets and poetry has always been a flashpoint of debate, controversy and notoriety, but most scholars have failed to see their central role in the ideal cities of the Republic and the Laws, that is, Callipolis and Magnesia. In this paper, I argue that in neither dialogue does Plato "exile" the poets, but, instead, believes they must, like all citizens, exercise the expertise proper to their profession, allowing them the right to become full-fledged participants in ...

  14. Plato: A localised orbital based density functional theory code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, S. D.; Horsfield, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Plato package allows both orthogonal and non-orthogonal tight-binding as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations to be performed within a single framework. The package also provides extensive tools for analysing the results of simulations as well as a number of tools for creating input files. The code is based upon the ideas first discussed in Sankey and Niklewski (1989) [1] with extensions to allow high-quality DFT calculations to be performed. DFT calculations can utilise either the local density approximation or the generalised gradient approximation. Basis sets from minimal basis through to ones containing multiple radial functions per angular momenta and polarisation functions can be used. Illustrations of how the package has been employed are given along with instructions for its utilisation. Program summaryProgram title: Plato Catalogue identifier: AEFC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 219 974 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 821 493 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C/MPI and PERL Computer: Apple Macintosh, PC, Unix machines Operating system: Unix, Linux and Mac OS X Has the code been vectorised or parallelised?: Yes, up to 256 processors tested RAM: Up to 2 Gbytes per processor Classification: 7.3 External routines: LAPACK, BLAS and optionally ScaLAPACK, BLACS, PBLAS, FFTW Nature of problem: Density functional theory study of electronic structure and total energies of molecules, crystals and surfaces. Solution method: Localised orbital based density functional theory. Restrictions: Tight-binding and density functional theory only, no exact exchange. Unusual features: Both atom centred and uniform meshes available

  15. FORMATION OF ANTIQUE RHETORIC: CHRONOLOGY OF RHETORICAL METHODS AND STYLES (PLATO, ARISTOTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Pantelyeyeva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: to analyze the basic points of philosophical concepts of rhetoric of Plato and Aristotle, to prove that from Plato the rhetoric in the true sense starts being approved, and Aristotle is an ancestor of real theory of speech of the new genre, the new form, the new purposes and tasks of the description of verbal art. Problem statement: development of the ancient principles of rhetorical style’s creating is reached by efforts of outstanding speakers, each of them were differed not only by the ideological sympathies or antipathies, but also by nature of works, the concepts put in their basis. Two Ancient Greek philosophers: Plato and Aristotle are considered as founders of ancient rhetorical science. Methodology. Author has used system method, methods of content and comparative analysis. Scientific novelty is displayed in the received results from the comparative analysis of two concepts of public speech of Plato and Aristotle from a position of philosophical justification of rhetoric’s rules with orientation on ancient "popular" declamation practices. Practical value of article consists in development of insufficiently studied object "Antique declamation discourse" where Plato and Aristotle's two central rhetorical concepts appear as the intermediate stage in development of a declamation discourse of Ancient Greece and, subsequently, and Ancient Rome. Conclusions. The conclusions can be given by the following facts: from Plato the rhetoric in the true sense is approved: true rhetorical art isn’t based only on argument technique, the true rhethor appears as the philosopher. Plato raises the problem of an ambiguity of two opposite rhetorics presented in "Gorgias" and "Phaedrus ". Rhetoric as scientific discipline, as the present theory of speech is first considered by Aristotle. The rhetoric is presented as the science "about speech and about thoughts", about the relation of thinking to the word.

  16. The PLATO Dome A site-testing observatory: Power generation and control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. S.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Hengst, S.; Luong-van, D. M.; Storey, J. W. V.; Yang, H.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The atmospheric conditions above Dome A, a currently unmanned location at the highest point on the Antarctic plateau, are uniquely suited to astronomy. For certain types of astronomy Dome A is likely to be the best location on the planet, and this has motivated the development of the Plateau Observatory (PLATO). PLATO was deployed to Dome A in early 2008. It houses a suite of purpose-built site-testing instruments designed to quantify the benefits of Dome A site for astronomy, and science instruments designed to take advantage of the observing conditions. The PLATO power generation and control system is designed to provide continuous power and heat, and a high-reliability command and communications platform for these instruments. PLATO has run and collected data throughout the winter 2008 season completely unattended. Here we present a detailed description of the power generation, power control, thermal management, instrument interface, and communications systems for PLATO, and an overview of the system performance for 2008.

  17. The role of the poet in Plato's ideal cities of Callipolis and Magnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Naddaf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Plato's attitude toward the poets and poetry has always been a flashpoint of debate, controversy and notoriety, but most scholars have failed to see their central role in the ideal cities of the Republic and the Laws, that is, Callipolis and Magnesia. In this paper, I argue that in neither dialogue does Plato "exile" the poets, but, instead, believes they must, like all citizens, exercise the expertise proper to their profession, allowing them the right to become full-fledged participants in the productive class. Moreover, attention to certain details reveals that Plato harnesses both positive and negative factors in poetry to bring his ideal cities closer to a practical realization. The status of the poet and his craft in this context has rarely to my knowledge been addressed.

  18. Plato's Critique of Rhetoric in the "Gorgias" (447a-466a): Epistemology, Methodology, and the Lyotardian Differend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComiskey, Bruce

    The uncritical acceptance of Plato's treatment of sophistic doctrines (specifically in Plato's dialogue the "Gorgias") in the university has resulted in an impoverished contemporary view of sophistic rhetoric. Since Socrates' foundational epistemology allows for the knowledge of immutable truth and Gorgias' relativistic epistemology does…

  19. Purification through Emotions: The Role of Shame in Plato's "Sophist" 230B4-E5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candiotto, Laura

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes an analysis of Plato's "Sophist" (230b4--e5) that underlines the bond between the logical and the emotional components of the Socratic "elenchus", with the aim of depicting the social valence of this philosophical practice. The use of emotions characterizing the 'elenctic' method described by Plato is…

  20. ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes in the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, Paul W; Siha, Hany; Fu, Yuling

    2012-01-01

    Ticagrelor, when compared with clopidogrel, reduced the 12-month risk of vascular death/myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes intended to undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO...

  1. Genesis 2–3 and Alcibiades's speech in Plato's Symposium : A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genesis 2–3 and Alcibiades's speech in Plato's Symposium : A cultural critical reading. ... Abstract. The purpose of this article is to discuss some basic problems and methodological steps concerning the encounter between Hebrews and Greeks in the Classical period and its impact on the Hellenistic era. The relationship ...

  2. Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho-Logic of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses two well-known texts that respectively describe learning and teaching, drawn from the work of Freud and Plato. These texts are considered in psychoanalytic terms using a methodology drawn from the philosophy of Luce Irigaray. In particular the article addresses Irigaray's approach to the analysis of speech and utterance as a…

  3. From Plato to Erikson: How the War on "Bad Play" Has Impoverished Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, the titans of educational reform--Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, Piaget, Erikson, Csikszentmihalyi and others--have championed the educational benefits of play. Yet many professors and administrators are boggled by the idea of playing academic games in college. They instantly dismiss faculty initiatives like "Reacting to the…

  4. Can Prior Knowledge Hurt Text Comprehension? An Answer Borrowed from Plato, Aristotle, and Descartes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lawrence B.

    Taking a philosophical approach based on what Plato, Aristotle, and Descartes said about knowledge, this paper addresses some of the murkiness in the conceptual space surrounding the issue of whether prior knowledge does or does not facilitate text comprehension. Specifically, the paper first develops a non-exhaustive typology of cases in which…

  5. The PLATO System: A Study in the Diffusion of an Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Francis D.; Wolf, W. C., Jr.

    This study was designed to ascertain the relationships between the steps of a tool designed to link knowledge production and the needs of knowledge users (the Wolf-Welsh Linkage Methodology or WWLM) with milestones in the evolution of an innovative computer-assisted instructional system called PLATO (Programming Logic for Advanced Teaching…

  6. God as Intellect in the philosophical Theology of Plato, Aristotle and Plotinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Volkova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of the main stages in the development of philosophical theology in Plato, Aristotle and Plotinus, as well as its central concept - Active Intellect or God. It is shown, firstly, that Plato was the first who formulated the concept of a One omnibenevolent God. Plato opposed this doctrine to the gods of traditional mythology. In the "Timaeus" talking about the creation of the world, Plato represents God as an artisan, i. e. Demiurge, who arranges the World soul and matter with the help of the numbers. Therefore, God is introduced as an Intellect, because looking at an intelligible paradigm, he created the cosmos as its likeness. Secondly, it was shown that Aristotle made theology demonstrative theoretical knowledge. God as a subject of such knowledge is the pure actuality of thinking. Third, it is shown that Plotinus, continuing the line of Plato and Aristotle, gave philosophical theology a new, much more personal character. Theology for Plotinus is not only an demonstrative knowledge of the omnibenevolent God, but also a personal experience of reunion with him. A special attention in the article is paid for Plotinus' interpretation of the Platonic Demiurge. It is shown that Plotinus first connected the two aspects of the divine, namely the Demiurge-creator and the intelligible paradigm that are described in the "Timaeus," into the single hypostasis of Intellect. The main reason for this assertion was the necessity to postulate the unity of the intellect and the intelligible object as a necessary condition for the possibility of all cognitions. As a result, instead of the traditional idea of the two gods, Plotinus elaborates the doctrine of a single divine Intellect, combining both these aspects.

  7. Plato crater, first observative session: not any "hook" but a shark fin? (Italian Title: La 1° Campagna Osservativa del cratere Plato: non un "uncino" ma una "pinna di squalo"?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercatali, A.

    2018-01-01

    On 1st March 2012 an observative session of Moon's Plato crater was made. The purpose of these observations was to check the presence of one shadow with "hook" form at the inner of Plato crater already reported by H. Percy Wilkins, 3th April 21:30 UT, 1952. The results obtained by us have not shown any shadow with an hook form, but a shadow like a shark fin.

  8. Good and Bad: Love and Intimacy From Plato to Melanie Klein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, David

    2018-06-01

    Melanie Klein's theories on love outline a complex system of relations-an oscillating dynamic of psychical and emotional tendencies following from both actual experience and fantasies produced by the mind. Her insights are often discussed and applied in psychoanalytical contexts, but the philosophical implications of her theory-especially in relation to Platonic thought-have rarely been discussed. In this article, I will attempt to address this gap by setting out some preliminary yet core considerations shared by both Plato and Klein. First, I will describe some structural parallels between Kleinian and Platonic thought, especially in dialectical terms. Second, I will outline Plato's covert influence on Freud as passing through the teachings of philosopher Franz Brentano. And last, I will discuss intimacy as a struggle between the forces of good and bad, creativity and destruction, and love and hate-suggesting that Klein's conception of love emerges as a moral exigency.

  9. One aspect of the methodology of cognition in Plato and Dionysius the Areopagite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiseev, Petr

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Petr Moiseev (Perm State Institute of Arts and Cultureshows how the concept of ascension to truth, first formulated by Plato, was later reworked and reevaluated in new cognitive context by such later thinkers, as Plutarch, Iamblichus and, finally, Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite. Special attention is given to the concept of knowledge beyond human cognition and the role symbolism played in the process of its development.

  10. Los platos de los peces y el más allá

    OpenAIRE

    Aranegui Gascó, Carmen

    1996-01-01

    - Interpretación de la decoración de los platos de peces ibéticos como expresión de una determinada concepción del orden del universo y del tránsito a la otra vida. Flores, estrellas y espirales son la expresion de los tres elementos, mientras que el pez muestra el camino hacia el más allá.

  11. [History and reception of the translations of Plato's Dialogues by Antoni Bronikowski].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the history of translations of Plato's dialogues as made by A. Bronikowski (1817-1884), their assessment formulated by the contemporary for the translator recipients and today's opinions on them. Bronikowski began his translation work on the legacy of Plato in the '50s of the 19th century and carried them out systematically, despite the many adversities, until his death. The article presents the most important criticisms of the reviewers of Bronikowski's translations, which focused on the flaws of his style. The critics pointed out numerous shortcomings, archaisms, which hindered and prevented smooth reading of the text by readers unfamiliar with the language of the original. Most of the criticisms came from the Warsaw environment, especially from K. Kozłowski, the son of the first Polish translator of Plato, FA. Kozłowski. Among the defenders of Bronikowski there were K. Libelt and J.I. Kraszewski. They raised the subject of difficulty which the translator had to deal with and the lack of literary taste of the audience. It seems that both parties were partially right. Bronikowski's text was indeed not suitable for smooth reading in many places, however, it could serve as a useful tool for students who acquainted themselves with the Greek originals of the dialogues.

  12. The role of the poet in Plato's ideal cities of Callipolis and Magnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Naddaf

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plato's attitude toward the poets and poetry has always been a flashpoint of debate, controversy and notoriety, but most scholars have failed to see their central role in the ideal cities of the Republic and the Laws, that is, Callipolis and Magnesia. In this paper, I argue that in neither dialogue does Plato "exile" the poets, but, instead, believes they must, like all citizens, exercise the expertise proper to their profession, allowing them the right to become full-fledged participants in the productive class. Moreover, attention to certain details reveals that Plato harnesses both positive and negative factors in poetry to bring his ideal cities closer to a practical realization. The status of the poet and his craft in this context has rarely to my knowledge been addressed.A atitude de Platão com relação aos poetas e à poesia tem sempre sido um ponto de debate, controvérsia e notoriedade, mas a maioria dos estudiosos não consegue ver seu papel central nas cidades ideais da República e das Leis, ou seja, Callipolis e Magnésia. Neste artigo, defendo que em nenhum dos dois diálogos Platão exila os poetas, mas, ao contrário, acredita que eles devem, como todos os cidadãos, exercitar a competência própria à sua profissão, permitindo-lhes o direito de se tornarem participantes com todos os direitos da classe produtora. Principalmente, se prestarmos a atenção devida em certos detalhes, veremos que Platão controla tanto os fatores positivos, como os negativos na poesia, para aproximar mais suas cidades ideais da realização prática. A meu ver, o estatuto do poeta e de sua habilidade, nesse contexto, foram raramente estudados.

  13. On-ground and in-orbit characterisation plan for the PLATO CCD normal cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Walton, D.; Smith, A.; Hailey, M.; Curry, P.; Kennedy, T.

    2017-11-01

    PLAnetary Transits and Ocillations (PLATO) is the third European Space Agency (ESA) medium class mission in ESA's cosmic vision programme due for launch in 2026. PLATO will carry out high precision un-interrupted photometric monitoring in the visible band of large samples of bright solar-type stars. The primary mission goal is to detect and characterise terrestrial exoplanets and their systems with emphasis on planets orbiting in the habitable zone, this will be achieved using light curves to detect planetary transits. PLATO uses a novel multi- instrument concept consisting of 26 small wide field cameras The 26 cameras are made up of a telescope optical unit, four Teledyne e2v CCD270s mounted on a focal plane array and connected to a set of Front End Electronics (FEE) which provide CCD control and readout. There are 2 fast cameras with high read-out cadence (2.5 s) for magnitude ~ 4-8 stars, being developed by the German Aerospace Centre and 24 normal (N) cameras with a cadence of 25 s to monitor stars with a magnitude greater than 8. The N-FEEs are being developed at University College London's Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) and will be characterised along with the associated CCDs. The CCDs and N-FEEs will undergo rigorous on-ground characterisation and the performance of the CCDs will continue to be monitored in-orbit. This paper discusses the initial development of the experimental arrangement, test procedures and current status of the N-FEE. The parameters explored will include gain, quantum efficiency, pixel response non-uniformity, dark current and Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI). The current in-orbit characterisation plan is also discussed which will enable the performance of the CCDs and their associated N-FEE to be monitored during the mission, this will include measurements of CTI giving an indication of the impact of radiation damage in the CCDs.

  14. Dialectic of Eros and Myth of the Soul in Plato's Phaedrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jens Kristian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I question a widespread reading of a passage in the last part of the Phaedrus dealing with the science of dialectic. According to this reading, the passage announces a new method peculiar to the later Plato aiming at defining natural kinds. I show that the Phaedrus itself does not ...... not support such a reading. As an alternative reading, I suggest that the science of dialectic, as discussed in the passage, must be seen as dealing primarily with philosophical rhetoric and knowledge of human souls....

  15. Numbers Rule The Vexing Mathematics of Democracy, from Plato to the Present

    CERN Document Server

    Szpiro, George G

    2010-01-01

    Since the very birth of democracy in ancient Greece, the simple act of voting has given rise to mathematical paradoxes that have puzzled some of the greatest philosophers, statesmen, and mathematicians. Numbers Rule traces the epic quest by these thinkers to create a more perfect democracy and adapt to the ever-changing demands that each new generation places on our democratic institutions. In a sweeping narrative that combines history, biography, and mathematics, George Szpiro details the fascinating lives and big ideas of great minds such as Plato, Pliny the Younger, Ramon Llull, Pierre Simo

  16. [Plato's philosophy and the bioethical debate on the end of life: intersections in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Schramm, Fermin Roland

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses bioethical aspects of medical futility, focusing on some of its intersections in public health. Starting from a demarcation of finitude in the core of the philosophical and bioethical debate on the end of life, we confront the contemporary criticism regarding medical futility with the ideas of Plato (427-347 B.C.), a philosopher who proposed significant considerations on numerous features of the medicine of his time. We thus explore novel theoretic references to guide the disputes related to this essential problem, the implications of which are decisive to health and life.

  17. Slovenian test case Vrbanski Plato aquifer in the EU HORIZON 2020 FREEWAT project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Kopač

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Slovenian case study in the EU HORIZON 2020 FREEWAT project was Vrbanski Plato aquifer. Slovenia is divided into two river basin districts: the Danube and the North Adriatic. The Vrbanski Plato aquifer, which he presents both natural and artificial bank filtration from the river Drava, is a part of the Danube river basin district and is the most important water source for 14 municipalities in the northeastern part of Slovenia. We investigated the groundwatersurface water interaction between river Drava and the porous aquifer in the geological old riverbed and possible reduction of city impact. This site is the oldest managed artificial groundwater recharge with riverbank filtration and has more than thirty years of successful operation. It is something special, very abundant in a small space, independent of drought and climate changes, but vulnerable due to the impact of the city. Under the city there is watershed dividing, which is shifting with different water management condition and we would like to have the least possible impact of the city. For optimal water management we decided to use FREEWAT plug-in within QGIS platform. With new developed FREEWAT plug-in in project FREEWAT, we made steady-state and transient groundwater model for presenting this shift of the watershed dividing under the city and optimal water management for this area. The model was designed in a way that it identifies and describes all major aspects of the physical hydrogeological system and water management. During the running of a project, there was an accident with heating oil spillage in city area, right on the watershed dividing. So we oriented with the transient groundwater model as well on heating oil spillage and pumping with additional wells at the place of the accident to present successful rehabilitation and the importance of the managed groundwater recharge. Our experience with FREEWAT platform during the Vrbanski Plato aquifer case study was very

  18. Social developmnet of ecologically sensitive rural areas: Case studies of the Moravian Karst (Czech Republic) and the Devetashko Plato (Bulgaria)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletalová, Jana; Stefanová, D.; Vaishar, Antonín; Stefanov, P.; Dvořák, Petr; Tcherkezova, E.

    3-4, 3-4 (2016), s. 65-84 ISSN 0204-7209 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : social development * rural sensitive areas * Devetashko Plato * Bulgaria * Moravian karst - Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Cultural and economic geography http://geoproblems.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2016_34/4_zapletalova.pdf

  19. Three Aspects of PLATO Use at Chanute AFB: CBE Production Techniques, Computer-Aided Management, Formative Development of CBE Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecka, Joseph A.

    This report describes various aspects of lesson production and use of the PLATO system at Chanute Air Force Base. The first chapter considers four major factors influencing lesson production: (1) implementation of the "lean approach," (2) the Instructional Systems Development (ISD) role in lesson production, (3) the transfer of…

  20. Synergies Between the Kepler, K2 and TESS Missions with the PLATO Mission (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.

    2017-01-01

    Two transit survey missions will have been flown by NASA prior to the launch of ESA's PLATO Mission in 2026, laying the groundwork for exoplanet discovery via the transit method. The Kepler Mission, which launched in 2009, collected data on its 100+ square degree field of view for four years before failure of a reaction wheel ended its primary mission. The results from Kepler include 2300+ confirmed or validated exoplanets, 2200+ planetary candidates, 2100+ eclipsing binaries. Kepler also revolutionized the field of asteroseismology by measuring the pressure mode oscillations of over 15000 solar-like stars spanning the lifecycle of such stars from hydrogen-burning dwarfs to helium-burning red giants. The re-purposed Kepler Mission, dubbed K2, continues to observe fields of view in and near the ecliptic plane for 80 days each, significantly broadening the scope of the astrophysical investigations as well as discovering an additional 156 exoplanets to date. The TESS mission will launch in 2017 to conduct an all-sky survey for small exoplanets orbiting stars 10X closer and 100X brighter than Kepler exoplanet host stars, allowing for far greater follow-up and characterization of their masses as well as their sizes for at least 50 small planets. Future assets such as James Webb Space Telescope, and ground-based assets such as ESOs Very Large Telescope (VLT) array, the Exremely Large Telescope (ELT), and the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be able to characterize the atmospheric composition and properties of these small planets. TESS will observe each 24 X 96 field of view for 30 days and thereby cover first the southern and then the northern hemisphere over 13 pointings during each year of the primary mission. The pole-most camera will observe the James Webb continuous viewing zone for one year in each hemisphere, permitting much longer period planets to be detected in this region. The PLATO mission will seek to detect habitable Earth-like planets with an instrument

  1. PLATO: a computer code for the analysis of fission product plateout in HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuo; Morimoto, Toshio.

    1981-01-01

    The computer code PLATO for estimating plateout activities on surfaces of primary cooling system of HTGRs has been developed, and in this report, analytical model and digital calculation method incorporated in the code are described. The code utilizes the mass transfer model analogous to heat transfer coupled with an expression for adsorption-desorption phenomenon, and is able to analyze plateout behaviours in a closed circuit, like a reactor cooling system, which is constructed from a various kind of components, as well as in an open-ended tube. With the code, fission product concentration in the coolant and plateout amount on the surfaces are calculated along the coolant stream, and total removal rate by the plateout process is also obtained. Comparison of the analytical results with the experimental results, including checks of the effects of some calculation conditions on the results, and preliminary analysis on the VHTR plant have been made. (author)

  2. Efficient methods for solving discrete topology design problems in the PLATO-N project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canh, Nam Nguyen; Stolpe, Mathias

    This paper considers the general multiple load structural topology design problems in the framework of the PLATO-N project. The problems involve a large number of discrete design variables and were modeled as a non-convex mixed 0–1 program. For the class of problems considered, a global...... optimization method based on the branch-and-cut concept was developed and implemented. In the method a large number of continuous relaxations were solved. We also present an algorithm for generating cuts to strengthen the quality of the relaxations. Several heuristics were also investigated to obtain efficient...... algorithms. The branch and cut method is used to solve benchmark examples which can be used to validate other methods and heuristics....

  3. Rosenzweig. Buber, Levinas, Wittgenstein Publishe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    upon a philosophy of the person; and 3) human interrelationships (communities) .... are not unrelated to the famous claim of Levinas that “ethics is first philosophy. ... rejects attempts to ground ethical behavior toward other persons on the idea ...

  4. On social justice: Comparing Paul with Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Strijdom

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available n “In search of Paul” (2004 Crossan and Reed argue that Paul’s vision and program were essentially in continuity with Jesus’: both opposed, be it in Galilean villages or Roman cities, an unjust imperial system by means of an alternative project of egalitarian, distributive justice. Although Crossan elsewhere demonstrates the deep roots of this concern in the Jewish tradition, he tends to downplay the importance of Greek contributions in this regard. The purpose of this essay will be to offer, in constant dialogue with Crossan (and Reed, a more refined comparison of social justice in Paul on the one hand and Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics on the other. If Paul tried to establish egalitarian and sharing Christian communities under the Roman empire, how do this vision and program compare and contrast with Plato's hierarchical but communal concept of justice, Aristotle’s distributive notion according to merit, and most importantly the Stoics’ argument of “oikeiosis” (i.e., other-concern by concentrical familiarization with the other? Imagine, say Crossan and Reed (CR hereafter in their recent book on Paul, the following dialogue between ourselves and Paul: Do you think, Paul, that all men are created equal and endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights? I am not speaking about all men, but about all Christians. But do you think, Paul, that all people should be Christians? Yes, of course,. And do you think, Paul, that all Christians should be equal with one another?Yes, of course. Then do you think, Paul, that it is God’s will for all people to be equal with one another? Well, let me think about that one for a while and, in the meantime, you think about equality in Christ. (CR 2004:234

  5. Systematic Contradiction Between Heritage Conservation and Tourism Development: Cleaning the Temple and Cemetery of Confucius and the Kong Family Mansion in Qufu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Degang; Sun Wanzhen

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the tourist industry, world heritage sites become more and more popular among tourists from home and abroad. Therefore, heritage tourism has become a new hotspot. However, while world heritage sites are making obvious economic benefit from tourism,they also bring various problems and contradictions, of which the most troublesome one is the contradiction between heritage conservation and tourism development. To discuss and analyze the root and the essence of the above contradiction and find a way to bring about harmony between them is an important program faced by our national heritage management practice and academic research. Based on the case of cleaning the Temple and Cemetery of Confucius and the Kong Family Mansion in Qufu, this paper analyzes the reasons why our national world cultural heritage sites bring about the above contradiction in the process of tourism development and points out that the improper system and stakeholders' benefit imbroglio are respectively the root and the essence of the contraction. Then, it also puts forward corresponding solutions.

  6. Simulation results for PLATO: a prototype hybrid X-ray photon counting detector with a low energy threshold for fusion plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, A.; Menouni, M.; Pangaud, P.; Morel, C.; Fenzi, C.; Colledani, G.; Moureau, G.; Escarguel, A.

    2017-01-01

    PLATO is a prototype hybrid X-ray photon counting detector that has been designed to meet the specifications for plasma diagnostics for the WEST tokamak platform (Tungsten (W) Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) in southern France, with potential perspectives for ITER. PLATO represents a customized solution that fulfills high sensitivity, low dispersion and high photon counting rate. The PLATO prototype matrix is composed of 16 × 18 pixels with a 70 μm pixel pitch. New techniques have been used in analog sensitive blocks to minimize noise coupling through supply rails and substrate, and to suppress threshold dispersion across the matrix. The PLATO ASIC is designed in CMOS 0.13 μm technology and was submitted for a fabrication run in June 2016. The chip is designed to be bump-bonded to a silicon sensor. This paper presents pixel architecture as well as simulation results while highlighting novel solutions.

  7. Viewpoint: Central adjudication of myocardial infarction in outcome-driven clinical trials--common patterns in TRITON, RECORD, and PLATO?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebruany, Victor L; Atar, Dan

    2012-09-01

    Central adjudication in randomised controlled outcome-driven trials represents a traditional approach to maintain data integrity by applying uniformed rules for assessment of clinical events. It was the purpose of this investigation to determine the patterns of myocardial infarction (MI) adjudication in the TRITON, RECORD, and PLATO trials. We were matching centrally-adjudicated MI's (CAMI's) from the official trial publication with the site-reported MI (SRMI's) count from the Food and Drug Administration's secondary analyses for the investigational compounds prasugrel (TRITON), rosiglitazone (RECORD), and ticagrelor (PLATO). CAMI numbers showed a remarkable discrepancy to SRMI's by more than a doubling of the difference: from 72 to 145 events in TRITON favoring prasugrel (from a hazard ratio [HR]=0.76, p=0.08; to a HR=0.76, p<0.001), and from 44 to 89 events in favour of ticagrelor in PLATO (from a HR=0.94, p=0.095; to a HR=0.84, p<0.001). In contrast, in the RECORD trial, the CAMI count was less than the SRMI count (from 24 to 8 events, from a HR=1.42, p=0.93; to a HR=1.14, p=0.96), in this case diminishing cardiovascular hazards in favour of rosiglitazone. In conclusion, central adjudication in the TRITON, the RECORD, and the PLATO trial turned out to have a critical impact on study outcomes. Trial publications should in the future include site-reported major efficacy and safety endpoints to preserve data integrity. The regulatory authorities should consider independent audits when there is a major disagreement between centrally adjudicated and site reported events influencing the results of a major clinical trial.

  8. Plato (power load analysis tool) - a module of west wall monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, Sutapa; Travere, Jean-marcel; Moreau, P.

    2015-01-01

    The mandate of the WEST (W Environment for Steady-state Tokamak) project, is to upgrade the medium- sized superconducting Tokamak, Tore Supra in a major scale. One of it's objectives, is to also act as a test-bed for ITER divertor components, to be procured and used in ITER. WEST would be installing actively cooled Tungsten divertor elements, like the ones to be used in ITER. These components would be tested under two experimental scenarios: high power (Ip = 0.8MA, lasting 30s with 15MW injected power) and high fluence (Ip = 0.6 MA, lasting 1000s with 12 MW injected power). Heat load on the divertor target will range from a few MW/m 2 up to 20 MW/m 2 depending on the X point location and the heat flux decay length. The tungsten Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) are less tolerant to overheating than their Carbon counterparts and prevention of their burnout is a major concern. It is in this context that the Wall Monitoring System (WMS) - a software framework aimed at monitoring the health of the Wall components, was conceived. WMS has been divided into three parts: a) a pre-discharge power load analysis tool to check compatibility between plasma scenario and PFC's operational limits in terms of heat flux b) a real-time system during discharge, to take into account all necessary measurements involved in the PFCs protection c) a set of analysis tools that would be used post-discharge, that would access WEST database and compare predicted and experimental results. This paper presents an overview of PLATo - the pre-pulse module of WMS that has been recently developed under IPR-IRFM research collaboration. PLAto has two major components - one that produces heat flux information of the PFCS and the other that produces energy graphs depending on shot profile defined by time variant magnetic equilibrium and injected power profiles. Preliminary results will be presented based on foreseen WEST plasma reference scenarios. (author)

  9. From Pericles to Plato – from democratic political praxis to totalitarian political philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øjvind Larsen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Plato is normally taken as one of the founders of Western political philosophy, not at least with his Republic. Here, he constructs a hierarchy of forms of governments, beginning with aristocracy at the top as a critical standard for the other forms of governments, and proceeding through timocracy and oligarchy to democracy and tyranny at the bottom. Following Karl Popper, the paper argues that Plato’s is a totalitarian philosophy that emphasizes the similarities between democracy and tyranny, which it considers to be the two worst forms of government. Plato’s denigration of democracy has dominated the tradition of political philosophy until recent times. This paper, however, shows that political philosophy in fact originates in democracy, especially as developed by the sophists and that philosophy is only a form of sophism with a similar origin in ancient Greek democracy. A discussion of Pericles’ funeral oration is used to show that Pericles presented a democratic political philosophy that can serve as a counterpoint to Plato’s political philosophy in the Republic.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  11. Love and/in psychoanalysis: a commentary on Lacan's reading of Plato's Symposium in Seminar VIII: Transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    What is love and what part does it play in psychoanalysis? Where are the analyst and the analysand situated in relation to the roles defined as those of the "lover" and the "beloved"? Jacques Lacan explores these and other questions in his soon-to-be-published Seminar VIII: Transference by providing an extensive commentary on Plato's most famous dialogue on love, the Symposium. This paper outlines some of the major points about love that grow out of Lacan's reading of the dialogue and examines their relevance to the analytic setting. Can the analyst be characterized as a sort of modern-day Socrates?

  12. Ancient philosophical ideas of the soul (Plato-Aristotelian tradition and Stoicism as a source of Patristic Thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitsev Cornelius

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the ancient idea of the soul that in the patristic era has been enriched by the perception of the methodology of ancient philosophy. Greek and Roman thinkers considered some properties of the soul, its immortality, revealed its “levels and strata” (Plato, Aristotle, expressed first guesses about the nature of sinful passions (the Stoics. But some aspects still remained unresolved so far. This is the issue of materiality or immateriality, of the soul, which "raised" in the Russian Empire in the 19th century (the dispute saints Theophan the Recluse and Ignatius Brianchaninov and remains relevant today.

  13. [Plato's conceptions of disorders of the soul (Ta peri psuchên nosêmata). Timaeus as the beginning of a dynamic and ethic psychopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godderis, J

    1998-01-01

    This contribution to the study of the evolution of fundamental concepts in psychiatry, and in particular of the interpretative models of mental disease, focuses on Plato's conceptions concerning the "disorders of the soul". Plato's "psychopathological" work suggests the decline of an hereditary conglomeration of interpretative arrangements of the irrational phenomena related to mental disease which, corresponding to the social needs of that time, had been united by the belief in myth and its therapeutic value. These archaic religious conceptions have most certainly been reversed by Plato, especially in his Timaeus, one of the three most influential of his dialogues. In a notable passage in this cosmological dialogue (86b ff.) Plato treats of those diseases of the soul which are caused by things physical, whether this be a "defective bodily constitution" or "faulty education". The diseases of the soul are thus no longer considered having a divine origin. Mental diseases to which man is unwittingly subject by defects in birth or education concern himself and his inner life and they cannot be dismissed with simplistic allegories. According to Plato they originate from a conflict, supported by a secret, hidden, irrational "self" that has its roots in the sôma, the rational "self" being only able to recuperate its total integrity if it manages, through self-discipline and knowledge, to check the somatic impulses, the folly of the body. Also, Plato offers a series of remedies to correct the undue influence of body on soul and soul on body, with a view to instituting a right balance and proportion between them. This, together with a stress on "care of the soul", particularly of the divine and immortal element, implicitly assumes that it is in man's power to apply the necessary remedies to himself and effect some sort of readjustment.

  14. The micro-fascism of Plato's good citizen: producing (dis)order through the construction of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Holmes, Dave

    2007-04-01

    The human body has come to be seen as forever susceptible to both external and internal hazards, which in many circumstances require immediate, heroic, and expensive intervention. In response to this, there has been a shift from a treatment-based healthcare model to one of prevention wherein nurses play an integral role by identifying and assessing risks for individuals, communities, and populations. This paper uses Deborah Lupton's outline of the spectrum of risk and applies the theoretical works of Foucault and Plato to demonstrate the means by which nurses maintain social order by identifying and counselling risk takers. It also utilizes the work of Deleuze and Guattari to illustrate how Plato's framework for creating social order through the creation of the good citizen can be viewed as a micro-fascist system, which has been adopted wholeheartedly by preventative health professionals. The goal of this paper is to present an alternate understanding of risk to provide nurses and other healthcare professionals with a non-traditional appreciation of certain aspects of their practice as researchers and clinicians.

  15. Why Did Socrates Deny That He Was a Teacher? Locating Socrates among the New Educators and the Traditional Education in Plato's "Apology of Socrates"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Avi I.

    2014-01-01

    Plato's "Apology of Socrates" contains a spirited account of Socrates' relationship with the city of Athens and its citizens. As Socrates stands on trial for corrupting the youth, surprisingly, he does not defend the substance and the methods of his teaching. Instead, he simply denies that he is a teacher. Many scholars have…

  16. The Case against the Arts from Plato to Tolstoy and Its Implications for Why and How the Arts Should Be Taught in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    From Plato onwards many of the great Western thinkers have explored the nature of the arts, their contribution to society and their role in education. This has often involved a discussion of the potentially negative impact of the arts. The recurring message has been that the arts can warp judgment, elevate emotion at the expense of reason,…

  17. A hipotética linguagem ideal de Platão Plato's hypothetical ideal language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Alves dos Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Para que um discurso sobre o espetáculo do mundo transcendente seja acolhido como totalidade inteligível e coerente, urge desvencilhar-se da arbitrariedade do domínio de trêmulos contornos do sensível, esfera de opiniões apenas. É o que propõe Platão, na esteira das reflexões dos primeiros pensadores: para suprir deficiências que causam a elisão da realidade e transformar a linguagem num veículo de intelecção autêntica dos conceitos essenciais de um pensar filosófico, ele a coloca no centro de uma especulação rigorosa. Tal como seus antecessores Heráclito e Parmênides, Platão revela logofilia ao empenhar-se na construção de uma nova estrutura discursiva, diferente daquela do homem comum, desencadeando no campo da Filosofia uma revolução que se tornara indispensável: elabora um modelo fundador - princípio de uma ordem permanente propedêutica à construção de uma linguagem formal e abstrata - referente a entes que os homens, na maioria, por si mesmos não conseguem visualizar. Somente nela poderá reverberar a verdade universal das Formas que, ao emprestarem seus nomes à infindável série dos particulares sensíveis, os clarifica e lhes confere significação. Com as teorias que a partir das Formas desenvolve e expõe nos Diálogos, o filósofo visa induzir o leitor a preparar-se para operar, metodicamente, a conversão de sua alma ao plano desses seres ideais, supra-sensíveis, e apreender, assim, a realidade que tudo fundamenta e torna cognoscível.For a discourse on the spectacle of the transcendental world to be received in its comprehensible and coherent totality, its needs to get rid of the arbitrariness of the dominion of tremulous shapes of the sensitive, which is merely the sphere of opinions. This is what Plato suggests, following the course of reflection of the first thinkers: in order to compensate the deficiencies that entail elision of reality and to transform language into a vehicle of authentic

  18. Clockwise rotation of the Santa Marta massif and simultaneous Paleogene to Neogene deformation of the Plato-San Jorge and Cesar-Ranchería basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Camilo; Guzman, Georgina; Bayona, German; Cardona, Agustin; Valencia, Victor; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    A moderate amount of vertical-axis clockwise rotation of the Santa Marta massif (30°) explains as much as 115 km of extension (stretching of 1.75) along its trailing edge (Plato-San Jorge basin) and up to 56 km of simultaneous shortening with an angular shear of 0.57 along its leading edge (Perijá range). Extensional deformation is recorded in the 260 km-wide, fan-shaped Plato-San Jorge basin by a 2-8 km thick, shallowing-upward and almost entirely fine-grained, upper Eocene and younger sedimentary sequence. The simultaneous initiation of shortening in the Cesar-Ranchería basin is documented by Mesozoic strata placed on to lower Eocene syntectonic strata (Tabaco Formation and equivalents) along the northwest-verging, shallow dipping (9-12° to the southeast) and discrete Cerrejón thrust. First-order subsidence analysis in the Plato-San Jorge basin is consistent with crustal stretching values between 1.5 and 2, also predicted by the rigid-body rotation of the Santa Marta massif. The model predicts about 100 km of right-lateral displacement along the Oca fault and 45 km of left-lateral displacement along the Santa Marta-Bucaramanga fault. Clockwise rotation of a rigid Santa Marta massif, and simultaneous Paleogene opening of the Plato-San Jorge basin and emplacement of the Cerrejón thrust sheet would have resulted in the fragmentation of the Cordillera Central-Santa Marta massif province. New U/Pb ages (241 ± 3 Ma) on granitoid rocks from industry boreholes in the Plato-San Jorge basin confirm the presence of fragments of a now segmented, Late Permian to Early Triassic age, two-mica, granitic province that once spanned the Santa Marta massif to the northernmost Cordillera Central.

  19. Protecting the pipeline of science: openness, scientific methods and the lessons from ticagrelor and the PLATO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Andrew J Stewart; Nijjer, Sukhjinder S; Francis, Darrel P

    2014-10-20

    Ticagrelor, a potent antiplatelet, has been shown to be beneficial in patients with acute coronary syndromes in a randomised controlled trial published in a highly ranked peer reviewed journal. Accordingly it has entered guidelines and has been approved for clinical use by authorities. However, there remains a controversy regarding aspects of the PLATO trial, which are not immediately apparent from the peer-reviewed publications. A number of publications have sought to highlight potential discrepancies, using data available in publicly published documents from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) leading to disagreement regarding the value of open science and data sharing. We reflect upon potential sources of bias present in even rigorously performed randomised controlled trials, on whether peer review can establish the presence of bias and the need to constantly challenge and question even accepted data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Infância e educação em Platão Childhood and education in Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Omar Kohan

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho estuda, desde uma perspectiva filosófica, o conceito de infância em Platão, com ênfase nos seguintes diálogos: Alcibíades I, Górgias, A República e As Leis. Num primeiro momento, situamos a questão da infância no marco mais ampliado do projeto filosófico e político de Platão. A seguir, propomos quatro traços principais do conceito de infância em Platão: a como possibilidade (as crianças podem ser qualquer coisa no futuro; b como inferioridade (as crianças - como as mulheres, estrangeiros e escravos - são inferiores em relação ao homem adulto cidadão; c como superfluidade (a infância não é necessária à pólis; d como material da política (a utopia se constrói a partir da educação das crianças. Não há a pretensão de levar Platão a algum tribunal. Busca-se apenas delimitar um problema e uma forma específica de enfrentá-lo, com vistas a contribuir para a análise da produtividade dessa perspectiva na história da filosofia da infância e da educação ocidental, bem como nas atuais teorias e práticas educacionais. Ao mesmo tempo, de forma implícita, procura-se oferecer elementos para problematizar uma visão já consolidada entre os historiadores da infância - particularmente desde o já clássico História social da infância e da família de Philippe Ariès -, segundo a qual a infância seria uma invenção moderna e ela não teria sido "pensada" pelos antigos enquanto tal.This work investigates from a philosophical perspective the concept of childhood in Plato, with an emphasis on the following dialogues: Alcibiades I, Gorgias, The Republic, and The Laws. Initially, we situate the issue of childhood within the wider scenario of Plato's political and philosophical project. We then propose four main features of the concept of childhood in Plato: a as possibility (children can become anything in future; b as inferiority (children - like women, foreigners and slaves - are inferior to the male

  1. A dialogical exploration of the grey zone of health and illness: medical science, anthropology, and Plato on alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Kieran

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes a phenomenological hermeneutic orientation to explicate and explore the notion of the grey zone of health and illness and seeks to develop the concept through an examination of the case of alcohol consumption. The grey zone is an interpretive area referring to the irremediable zone of ambiguity that haunts even the most apparently resolute discourse. This idea points to an ontological indeterminacy, in the face of which decisions have to be made with regard to the health of a person (e.g., an alcoholic), a system (e.g., the health system), or a society. The fundamental character of this notion will be developed in relation to the discourse on health and the limitations of different disciplinary practices. The case of alcohol consumption will be used to tease out the grey zone embedded in the different kinds of knowledge made available through the disciplinary traditions of medical science, with its emphasis on somatic well-being, and anthropology, with its focus on communal well-being. This tension or grey zone embedded in different knowledge outcomes will be shown to have a discursive parallel with the dialogue between the Athenian, the Spartan, and the Cretan in Plato's Laws. Making use of the dialogical approach as described by Gadamer, the Athenian's particular resolution of the tension will be explored as a case study to demonstrate the necessarily particular analysis involved in a grey zone resolution.

  2. What is good sport: Plato's view Co je to dobrý sport: Platónův pohled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Pisk

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available One of Plato's most common questions found in his dialogues is "What is something?" By asking this question Plato usually brought his co-speakers to the recognition that in fact they do not have a full comprehension of what something is, although they have a partial comprehension of it. The awareness of one's incomplete cognition is the first step to be made on the philosophic way to truth. As in ancient times also today Plato asks us – the modern philosophers of sport – "What is sport?" or more precisely "What is good sport?" Probably the best of Plato's answers to this question can be found in the basic concepts of his philosophy regarding his hierarchical division of the state and human soul into three parts. Since sport is derived from human being also the goodness of sport can be divided into three stages. The lowest stage of sport corresponds to the first part of the soul – the appetite soul. On this stage sport is based on the gaining of material goods through prizes won at competitions. In the philosophic view, this is the lowest possible stage of goodness of sport. The second stage of sport corresponds to the second part of the soul – the emotional soul. Sport at this stage is based on the elementary ancient agon, which seeks fulfilment in the winning of honour and glory. The greatest and the most superior is the third part of the soul – the reasonable soul. According to this, also the sport corresponding to the third part of the soul is the best. For this kind of sport it is no longer necessary to compete with other contestants, since it can achieve it's fulfilment in perfect execution of movement or exercise, in which the perfect cooperation between reason (soul and body is attained. At this stage of sport it is the most important to compete and win over one's self, and this can be achieved by everyone, without regard to his/her physical abilities in comparison with others. In Plato's view, good sport is the sport directed

  3. Refractory Abundances of Terrestrial Planets and Their Stars: Testing [Si/Fe] Correlations with TESS and PLATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Fortney, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    In standard models for planet formation, solid material in protoplanetary disks coagulate and collide to form rocky bodies. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that their chemical composition will follow the abundances of refractory elements, such as Si and Fe, in the host star, which has also accreted material from the disk. Backed by planet formation simulations which validate this assumption, planetary internal structure models have begun to use stellar abundances to break degeneracies in low-mass planet compositions inferred only from mass and radius. Inconveniently, our own Solar System contradicts this approach, as its terrestrial bodies exhibit a range of rock/iron ratios and the Sun's [Si/Fe] ratio is offset from the mean planetary [Si/Fe]. In this work, we explore what number and quality of observations we need to empirically measure the exoplanet-star [Si/Fe] correlation, given future transit missions, RV follow-up, and stellar characterization. Specifically, we generate synthetic datasets of terrestrial planet masses and radii and host star abundances assuming that the planets’ bulk [Si/Fe] ratio exactly tracks that of their host stars. We assign measurement uncertainties corresponding to expected precisions for TESS, PLATO, Gaia, and future RV instrumentation, and then invert the problem to infer the planet-star [Si/Fe] correlation given these observational constraints. Comparing the result to the generated truth, we find that 1% precision on the planet radii is needed to test whether [Si/Fe] ratios are correlated between exoplanet and host star. On the other hand, lower precisions can test for systematic offsets between planet and star [Si/Fe], which can constrain the importance of giant impacts for extrasolar terrestrial planet formation.

  4. Accuracy evaluation of fusion of CT, MR, and SPECT images using commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongioj, Valeria; Brusa, Anna; Loi, Gianfranco; Pignoli, Emanuele; Gramaglia, Alberto; Scorsetti, Marta; Bombardieri, Emilio; Marchesini, Renato

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A problem for clinicians is to mentally integrate information from multiple diagnostic sources, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), whose images give anatomic and metabolic information. Methods and Materials: To combine this different imaging procedure information, and to overlay correspondent slices, we used commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS). The algorithms utilize a fiducial-based coordinate system (or frame) with 3 N-shaped markers, which allows coordinate transformation of a clinical examination data set (9 spots for each transaxial section) to a stereotactic coordinate system. The N-shaped markers were filled with fluids visible in each modality (gadolinium for MR, calcium chloride for CT, and 99m Tc for SPECT). The frame is relocatable, in the different acquisition modalities, by means of a head holder to which a face mask is fixed so as to immobilize the patient. Position errors due to the algorithms were obtained by evaluating the stereotactic coordinates of five sources detectable in each modality. Results: SPECT and MR position errors due to the algorithms were evaluated with respect to CT: Δx was ≤ 0.9 mm for MR and ≤ 1.4 mm for SPECT, Δy was ≤ 1 mm and ≤ 3 mm for MR and SPECT, respectively. Maximal differences in distance between estimated and actual fiducial centers (geometric mismatch) were in the order of the pixel size (0.8 mm for CT, 1.4 mm for MR, and 1.8 mm for SPECT). In an attempt to distinguish necrosis from residual disease, the image fusion protocol was studied in 35 primary or metastatic brain tumor patients. Conclusions: The image fusion technique has a good degree of accuracy as well as the potential to improve the specificity of tissue identification and the precision of the subsequent treatment planning

  5. Cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome patients with peripheral arterial disease treated with ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel: Data from the PLATO trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.

    Abstract 14299: Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease Treated With Ticagrelor Compared to Clopidogrel: Data From the PLATO Trial Manesh R Patel1; Richard C Becker1; Daniel M Wojdyla2; Håkan Emanuelsson3; William Hiatt4; Jay Horrow5; Steen Husted6...... Uppsala, Sweden 10 Cardiology, Uppsala Clinical Rsch center, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden Background: Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at high risk for clinical events and are often difficult to manage. We evaluated cardiovascular outcomes of ACS patients...

  6. A display model for the TOU of PLATO: just a cool toy or a benchmark of opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Greggio, D.; Bergomi, M.; Biondi, F.; Farinato, J.; Farisato, G.; Magrin, D.; Lessio, L.; Marafatto, L.; Munari, M.; Pagano, I.; Ragazzoni, R.; Viotto, V.; Piazza, D.

    2016-07-01

    We produced a "toy-model" of one Telescope Optical Unit of PLATO, the Medium sized mission selected by ESA to fly in 2024. This is a six lenses dioptric very wide field camera with a window in front to take care of radiation impact on the first lens whose optical glass cannot be replaced with a radiation hardened one. The main aim of this project is just to produce a "cool" model for display purposes, in which one can "explore" the details of the inside through some openings in the tube, in order to visually inspect some of the fine details of the opto-mechanics. While its didactic and advertising role is out of doubt, during its construction we realized that some interesting outcome can be of some relevance for the project itself and that some findings could be useful, in order to assess the ability of producing with the same technology some (of course of much more modest quality) optical systems. In this context, we immediately dropped the option of producing the lenses with opaque material painted with a color resembling a refractive material (like blue for instance) and decided to actually produce them with transparent plastic. Furthermore the surfaces are then finely polished in order to give them basic optical properties. Such an optical system has only very coarsely the converging properties of the original nominal design for a number of reasons: the refractive indexes are not the nominal ones, the quality of the surfaces and their nominal values are only roughly, within a few percent, the targeted one, and the way the surfaces are built up makes them prone to some diffraction effects. However, the bulk of the lens and the surface roughness will give a large magnification of the scattering effects that will be experienced, at a much lower level, on the actual flight model. We investigated through propagation of a laser beam and by digital camera the main stray light modes that this toymodel offers. In other words, the model amplifies, to a large extent, the

  7. Object recognition and concept learning with Confucius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B; Sammut, C

    1982-01-01

    A learning program produces, as its output, a Boolean function which describes a concept. The function returns true if and only if the argument is an object which satisfies the logical expression in the body of the function. The learning program's input is a set of objects which are instances of the concept to be learnt. The paper describes an algorithm devised to learn concept descriptions in this form. 15 references.

  8. Gifted Sixth-Graders and Primary Source Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A.; Schlaggar, Sheila

    1993-01-01

    A sixth-grade gifted class studied the history of philosophy, including selections from such philosophers as Plato, Confucius, Buddha, Marcus Aurelius, and Moses Maimonides. Readings drew on fundamental features of child experience, such as their sense of justice, concern for moral values, and questions about reality. The paper describes classroom…

  9. Androgynes et gynandres : la relecture péladanienne du Banquet de Platon // Androgynes and gynandres : The Péladan’s reinterpretation of the Symposium by Plato

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Voldřichová Beránková

    2015-01-01

    The Symposium alias The Banquet belongs to those hypotexts by Plato which have been constantly reread and reinterpreted by the authors of French decadence. This article is focused on the Péladan’s reinterpretation of one of its parts, the famous Aristophanes’s speech about love. It implies on one hand the masculine notion of “androgyne”, heavily valorised in the fin de siècle novels, and, on the other hand, the feminine concept of “gynandre”, perceived negatively, feared and mocke...

  10. A psicoterapia dialógica de Martin Buber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón, Saturnino Pesquero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A doutrina buberiana sobre os efeitos humanizadores do seu principio dialógico, que define o genuíno diálogo, estabelece a base para se alcançar tanto uma realização pessoal plena quanto uma sociedade construída sobre as relações interpessoais. Num primeiro momento, sua elaboração teórica e aplicação prática estiveram mais voltadas para o campo da sociologia e da educação. A partir da década dos anos 50, no entanto, privilegia seu viés psicológico e psicoterápico. O presente artigo objetiva expor os principais conceitos e postulados de seu modelo psicoterápico assim como a convergência do mesmo com o da Psicoterapia Centrada na Pessoa de C. Rogers

  11. Direct healthcare costs and cost-effectiveness of acute coronary syndrome secondary prevention with ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel: economic evaluation from the public payer's perspective in Poland based on the PLATO trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawęska, Justyna; Macioch, Tomasz; Perkowski, Piotr; Budaj, Andrzej; Niewada, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ticagrelor is the first reversibly binding oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist designed to reduce clinical thrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Compared to clopidogrel, ticagrelor has been proven to significantly reduce the rate of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke without an increase in the rate of overall major bleeding in patients who have an ACS with or without ST-segment elevation (STEMI and NSTEMI) or unstable angina (UA). To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and healthcare costs associated with secondary prevention of ACS using ticagrelor or clopidogrel in patients after STEMI, NSTEMI and UA. An economic model based on results from the PLATO trial was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of one-year therapy with ticagrelor or clopidogrel. The structure of the model consisted of two parts, i.e. the decision tree with one-year PLATO results and the Markov model with lifelong estimations, which exceeded PLATO follow-up data. The model was adjusted to Polish settings with country-specific data on death rates in the general population and direct medical costs calculated from the public payer's perspective. Costs were derived from the National Health Fund (NHF) and the Ministry of Health and presented in PLN 2013 values. Annual mean costs of second and subsequent years after stroke or MI were obtained from the literature. Uncertainty of assumed parameters was tested in scenarios and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The adopted model allowed the estimation of an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for life years gained (LYG) and an incremental cost-utility ratio for quality adjusted life years (QALY). Total direct medical costs to the public payer at a one year horizon were 2,905 PLN higher with ticagrelor than with clopidogrel. However, mean healthcare costs at a one year horizon (excluding drug costs and concomitant drugs) were 690 PLN higher for patients treated with clopidogrel. In a lifetime horizon

  12. LAS CRÍTICAS DE ARISTÓTELES A PLATÓN EN METAFÍSICA I, 9 ARISTOTLE’S CRITICISMS OF PLATO IN METAPHYSICS I, 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Gabriela Di Camillo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    O recurso à exposição crítica das doutrinas anteriores é um procedimento metodológico usual em Aristóteles. Mas a característica distintiva do Livro I da Metafísica é que, ao invés de estabelecer uma nova doutrina, o exame dos predecessores serve para confirmar os próprios conceitos aristotélicos, os quais ele usa para avaliar os êxitos e os erros das doutrinas analisadas. Essa imposição de conceitos próprios lhe valeu a acusação de ter uma compreensão histórica distorcida. Com a análise detalhada das críticas da teoria platônica das Idéias na Metafísica I, 9, pretendemos mostrar: a que as críticas de manipulação e distorção das opiniões dos seus antecessores ofuscam o grau em que as suas próprias posições emergem de uma análise crítica do pensamento anterior; e b que a imposição de conceitos próprios não é uma distorção, mas uma proposta de solução para os problemas que as teorias anteriores deixaram sem solução.

    The use of critical exposition of previous doctrines is a methodological procedure usual in Aristotle. But the distinctive characteristic of Book I of the Metaphysics is that, rather than to establish a new doctrine, a review of  predecessors serves to confirm the own concepts to be used in the evaluation of the doctrines examined. This imposition of own terms has cost him the charge of distorting historical understanding. With the detailed analysis of the criticisms of Plato's theory of Ideas in Metaphysics I, 9, we intend to show a that the criticism of manipulation and distortion of his predecessors' views overshadow the degree to which Aristotle's own positions emerge from a critical review of previous thought and b that the

  13. Androgynes et gynandres : la relecture péladanienne du Banquet de Platon // Androgynes and gynandres : The Péladan’s reinterpretation of the Symposium by Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Voldřichová Beránková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Symposium alias The Banquet belongs to those hypotexts by Plato which have been constantly reread and reinterpreted by the authors of French decadence. This article is focused on the Péladan’s reinterpretation of one of its parts, the famous Aristophanes’s speech about love. It implies on one hand the masculine notion of “androgyne”, heavily valorised in the fin de siècle novels, and, on the other hand, the feminine concept of “gynandre”, perceived negatively, feared and mocked. Why in Péladan’s (1858–1918 eyes and according to many others decadent authors man is gorgeous and intelligent enough to realize on his own the platonic ideal of the union of the two sexes? And what about the woman, henceforth outmoded and “useless”? The decadent misogyny ties itself in knots over its fanciful theories which are reflective of the spirit of this historical period.

  14. Paramenide e Platone (e Aristotele nel Contre Colote de Plutarque Parménide et Platon (et Aristote dans le Contre Colotès de Plutarque Parmenides and Plato (and Aristote in Plutarch'sAgainst Colotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bonazzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The chapters dedicated to Parmenides and Plato play a decisive role in the composition strategy of the Adversus Colotem, since this is where Plutarch most clearly defines the background dualist thesis that will help demonstrate that Platonism is superior to Epicurism. By showing Parmenides too as a dualist engaged in distinguishing between the sensible and the intelligible world, Plutarch structures a history of ancient philosophy entirely focused on Plato. These chapters also bear witness of another centre of interest, namely Aristoteles (§ 14, who, despite the criticism he aimed at the theory of ideas, is not completely refuted, but rather used as a possible ally against epicurean materialists, Plutarch’s true bête noire.Les chapitres consacrés à Parménide et Platon jouent un rôle décisif dans la stratégie de composition de l’Adversus Colotem : c’est là en effet que Plutarque définit de la manière la plus claire la thèse dualiste de fond qui va servir à démontrer la supériorité du platonisme sur l’épicurisme. En présentant Parménide lui aussi comme un dualiste occupé à distinguer entre monde sensible et monde intelligible, Plutarque articule une histoire de la philosophie antique entièrement centrée sur Platon. Les chapitres témoignent ensuite d’un autre centre d’intérêt, avec la mention d’Aristote (§ 14, lequel, malgré les critiques qu’il adresse à la théorie des idées, n’est pas complètement réfuté, mais plutôt utilisé comme un allié possible contre les matérialistes épicuriens, la véritable « bête noire » de Plutarque.I capitoli dedicati a Parmenide e Platone giocano un ruolo decisivo nella strategia compositiva dell’Adversus Colotem: è qui infatti che Plutarco delinea nel modo più chiaro la tesi dualistica di fondo che servirà a dimostrare la superiorità del platonismo sull’epicureismo. Presentando anche Parmenide come un dualista, impegnato a distinguere tra mondo

  15. Alternativa de protección contra la corrosión del acero AISI 310S mediante recubrimiento de aluminio bajo condiciones de platos separadores en celdas de combustible de carbonatos fundidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Orozco-Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La celda de combustible de carbonatos fundidos (MCFC, por sus siglas en inglés convencional opera a 650°C. Consiste de un cátodo de NiO poroso y litiado, una mezcla eutéctica de carbonato de litio (Li2CO3 y carbonato de potasio (K2CO3 fundido en una matriz electrolitica de óxido de aluminio litiado (LiAlO2 y un ánodo poroso de Ni. Los platos separadores entre cada celda presentan problemas de corrosión. Ante eso, un acero inoxidable AISI 310S con recubrimiento fue estudiado en condiciones de un plato separador en una MCFC. Método: Se utilizó un acero inoxidable AISI 310S como sustrato (muestra A, aplicándole un recubrimiento de Al con (B y sin tratamiento térmico (C. Fueron expuestos en carbonatos fundidos (62 mol% Li2CO3 -38 mol% K2CO3 a 650 °C en crisoles de alúmina. El comportamiento electroquímico fue estudiado mediante la técnica de Espectroscopía de Impedancia Electroquimica (EIS. Para el análisis de los diagramas de impedancia, se utilizó el software de simulación “Boukamp Equivalent Circuit”. La sección transversal de las muestras corroídas fue caracterizada mediante Microscopía Electrónica de Barrido (SEM, por sus siglas en inglés y los productos formados por Difracción de rayos X (XRD, por sus siglas en inglés. Resultados: Los diagramas de EIS presentan aumentos y disminuciones en los semicírculos formados a altas frecuencias indicativo de disolución de la capa externa, aumento y disminución de la resistencia de esta última así como el posible rompimiento de ella. La técnica de XRD presentó fases LiFeO2, LiCrO2, -LiAlO2 y -LiAlO2 así como fases intermetálicas para las distintas condiciones de la muestra. De la misma manera, los análisis de SEM presentaron los espesores de cada una de las capas formadas. Discusión o Conclusión: En la muestra A, se formaron capas de LiFeO2 y LiCrO2 después de 200 horas de exposición. La capa de LiCrO2 aumenta por la difusión de Li hacia el

  16. Interpreting and Expanding Confucius' Golden Mean through Neutrosophic Tetrad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuhua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophy is a new branch of philosophy that studies the origin, nature, and scope of neutralities, as well as their interactions with different ideational spectra. There are many similarities between The Golden Mean and Neutrosophy. Chinese and international scholars need to toil towards expanding and developing The Golden Mean, towards its "modernization" and "globalization".

  17. Interpreting and Expanding Confucius' Golden Mean through Neutrosophic Tetrad

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Neutrosophy is a new branch of philosophy that studies the origin, nature, and scope of neutralities, as well as their interactions with different ideational spectra. There are many similarities between The Golden Mean and Neutrosophy. Chinese and international schol-ars need to toil towards expanding and developing The Golden Mean, towards its "modernization" and "globalization". Not only Chinese contemporary popular ideas and methods, but also international contemporary popular ideas and me...

  18. China’s Grand Strategy: From Confucius to Contemporary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    period of ‘national humiliation’.14 “The victimization narrative fostered an acute sensitivity to coercion by foreign powers and especially...rigidity and uninventiveness, dualism of defensiveness and superiority, narrowness and condescension for the non-Chinese world, and the legacy of

  19. Confucius's New Clothes: Contemporary Chinese Ideologies and the Confucian Revival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana S. Rošker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces the ideological background of the new Confucian revival, which appeared in the P.R. China during the last two decades. Through the analysis of classical Confucianism and through the presentation of essential differences between Confucianism as a socio-ethical philosophy, which is based upon communitarian principles on the one hand, and Confucianism in the function of the official state doctrine on the other, the author clearly shows that the Confucian revival in the P.R. China is to a high degree ideologically conditioned. The article introduces two different currents within the so-called Modern Confucianism, which represents the theoretical background of this revival that has been shaped in China at the threshold of the 20th century. Whereas this stream of thought has been silenced in China already in the early 1950s, its representatives in Hong Kong and Taiwan have been further developing and upgrading the philosophical bases of this system, which is based upon various attempts to synthesize Western and traditional Chinese ideas. Only during the last two decades we could also witness a revitalization of this philosophy in the P.R. China. This revitalization, however, rests upon different foundations.

  20. La Traditio Legis de Cristo a Pedro y Pablo en un plato de vidrio de Cástulo, Linares (Jaén = Traditio Legis of Christ to Peter and Paul in a glass bowl from Cástulo, Linares (Jaén

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mª Blázquez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo analizamos la iconografía de un plato de vidrio encontrado en Cástulo con la representación de la Tradicio legis o transmisión de la ley de Cristo a los apóstoles Pedro y Pablo.In this paper we analyze the iconography of a glass bowl found in Cástulo showing the representation of the Traditio legis, or «transmission of the law» of Christ to apostles Peter and Paul.

  1. Breads, loaves and portable stoves. Two ceramic forms intended for the baking of bread in Al-Andalus: the stove (tannur and the dish (tabag | Panes, hogazas y fogones portátiles. Dos formas cerámicas destinadas a la cocción del pan en Al-Andalus: el hornillo (tannur y el plato (tabag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gutiérrez Lloret

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available With this work we want to identify several pottery's series found in rural archaeological sequences of the Middle Ages beginning from the Eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula with two portable methode for bread-baking —the portable furnace or tannur and the baking-plate or tabaq— cited in the literary Arabian sources, contrasting with similar objects quoted by Latin and visigothics sources. This study includes also their origin and perdurance but, whereas these baking-plate appear in the Late Roman baking technology, the portable furnace was, apparently, introduced in al-Andalus with the Islamic conquest. | En este trabajo pretendemos identificar diversos repertorios cerámicos aparecidos en contextos arqueológicos altomedievales rurales del levante peninsular, con dos sistemas portátiles de coción del pan —el hornillo o tannur y el plato o tabaq— mencionados en las fuentes literarias árabes, relacionándolos, en algunos casos, con objetos similares mencionados en las fuentes latinas y visigodas. Estudiamos también sus orígenes y perduraciones, pero mientras que el plato figura en las tradiciones tardorromanas de panificación, el hornillo, de tradición semita, parece ser introducido en al-Andalus con la conquista islámica.

  2. Plato: White and Non-white Love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amo Sulaiman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Plato’s dialogues, the Symposium, and Phaedrus, provide a reasonableexplanation of love. G. Vlastos and M. Nussbaum do not share such anopinion. The former contends that Plato’s view of love is about lovingonly a person’s beauty, but not the entire person; thus, it falls short of anappropriate explanation of love. The latter holds that a theory of love should be complete, and that Plato’s one is incomplete on the grounds that it does not account for personal love. These criticisms will be re-evaluated in light of the duality of love (the white and non-white horses—in Phaedrus as well as participants’ views in the Symposium; a re-assessment will weaken the mentioned objections. This paper contends that from the Symposium and Phaedrus, one can have a fruitful understanding of being in love, being out of love, falling inlove, loving for its own sake and being erotically in love. In order to account for these related issues of love it is important to consider Plato’s works in terms of his “official” and “unofficial” views. The former is construed as the doctrine of the lover or loving for its own sake: this is associates with Diotima’s views which are repeated by Socrates. With reference to the latter, it is possible to explain what personal love or being in love, being out of love, falling in love, and being erotically in love involve. Erotic love will be interpreted as an extension of our philosophical conception of love, related to views of love that are mentioned in the Symposium other than Socrates’ report of Diotima’s conceptions. This paper is divided into two parts: the first one will show views of love in the Symposium. That is, being in love, being out of love, falling in love and loving for its own sake will be discussed. In addition, the forementioned criticisms will be re-evaluated. In the second section, we will show that Aristophanes’ speech expresses erotic love, and then Kant’s objections will be explained and discussed.

  3. Aristotle vs. Plato: The Balkans' Paradoxical Enlightenment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Michalopoulos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available As it occurred in West, Aristotle’s thought was in Byzantium the main organon of philosophical meditation within the frame of the Christian Faith. Nonetheless, from the ninth century on it was a revival of Platonism that took place – of Neo-Platonism at the beginning and of Platonism itself at the end. The Church, initially indifferent, became suspicious only when, at the turning of the fourteenth to the fifteenth century, the Platonism seemed to engender somewhat a latent paganism; but the Patriarchate was not then able to fight that tendency. So only after the 1453 capture of Constantinople by the Ottomans, Gennadius Scholarius managed to root out from the Greek lands Platonism and its crypto-pagan extension. Be that as it may; the main paradox of the Balkan history is that in the early seventeenth century some leading Greek scholars endorsed the materialist interpretation of Aristotle’s thought – as it was taught in the University of Padua by Cesare Cremonini; and as a corollary this materialistic philosophical system began being taught in both Constantinople and Athens. It was that very way that the Enlightenment took birth in the Balkans – and somehow became a State ideology - long before its prevalence in France. And of course all this had as a result a turn toward Physics and Chemistry with far-reaching consequences

  4. Platón ako Pseudo-Sókratés? Niekoľko poznámok k problematike autorstva filozofického textu v antike ( “Plato as Pseudo-Socrates? Some Remarks on the Problems Related to the Autorship of a Philosophical Text in Antiquity“

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Škvrnda ml.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper deals with the problematic category of authorship in ancient philosophical literature. Philosophers are divided into two groups: the first consist of non-writing protagonists (e. g. Socrates, Ammonius of Saccas, while the second category includes writing authors (e. g. Plato, Aristotle. Paper argues that with regard to their „historicity“, between these two groups of philosophers is no substantial difference. Philosophical texts were often written in co-authorship. Many students and later adherents passed their own doctrines off as teacherʼs originals. Moreover, due to the fact that the very texts were transcribed countless times, there is no certainty about original phrasing of the documents that came down to our modern or renaissance era. The „historicity“ of philosophersʼ attitudes and ideas therefore can not be deduced from the existence of authorized text, written by some particular author.

  5. plato and the teaching of entrepreneurship studies as general

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    2016-08-22

    Aug 22, 2016 ... curriculum and teaching of entrepreneurial studies in Universities? .... EMPLOYMENT: the public sector is still is still the largest employer of ..... This care of the body in the case of those who are to be guardians of the .... sponsors for such program. In ... Oguejiofor (eds) African Philosophy and Public Affairs.

  6. PPI, paradoxes and Plato: who's sailing the ship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Jonathan; Damery, Sarah; Redwod, Sabi

    2013-03-01

    Over the last decade, patient and public involvement (PPI) has become a requisite in applied health research. Some funding bodies demand explicit evidence of PPI, while others have made a commitment to developing PPI in the projects they fund. Despite being commonplace, there remains a dearth of engagement with the ethical and theoretical underpinnings of PPI processes and practices. More specifically, while there is a small (but growing) body of literature examining the effectiveness and impact of PPI, there has been relatively little reflection on whether the concept/practice of PPI is internally coherent. Here, the authors unpick a 'paradox' within PPI, which highlights a tension between its moral and pragmatic motivations and its implementation. The authors argue that this 'professionalisation paradox' means we need to rethink the practice, and purpose, of PPI in research.

  7. Pragmatic Critique of Plato's Theory of Education | Umezurike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of education which involves rigorous process and which he believed could help determine the class where each individual citizen could be grouped. This theory though very fantastic when examined theoretically, is not without some flaws. It is because of these flaws that some philosophers describe his theory as utopian.

  8. Rekindling the Dialogue: Education According to Plato and Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Luchene, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    Since passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, thinking about America's schools has been taken over by something like philosopher Rene Descartes's malignant demon of doubt. The act's exclusive focus on assessing student achievement and faculty accountability in terms that can be "proved" mathematically has cast into doubt a…

  9. Plato and the art of leadership citizenship | Nwankwor | Sophia: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  10. "From Plato to Pareto": The Western Civilization Course Reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Marie Marmo

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of historical study within general education. Reviews the rise and fall of the Western Civilization course as the core of general education in the humanities. Suggests ways a revised version of this course can be restored to a central place in the curriculum. (AYC)

  11. Citizenship and Social Order: Reflections on Plato | Ogo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citoyenneté et ordre social: réflexions sur Platon Cet article traite de la relation entre ordre social citoyenneté et en s\\'inspirant de Platon. L\\'ordre social renvoie à des questions fondamentales de justice, de coopération entre les hommes et de recherche du bien commun. Il s\\'agit donc de savoir comment les responsabilités ...

  12. Plato, Socrates, Hunt, and Rotfeld: Eigenforms of Academic Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Louise Ripley

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of academic institutions profess to offer Interdisciplinary Studies but few truly achieve it, and not without a great deal of effort over and above the normal workload of a professor and a level of patience and perseverance not found in many university students. This paper will report on a successful academic collaboration between two very different disciplines: philosophy and business. It will examine a course taught jointly by the two disciplines in a strategy of imbrication attempted by a college of York University in Toronto, Atkinson College, housing both liberal arts and professional school.

  13. Foucault, Confucius and the In-Service Learning of Experienced Teachers in an Era of Managerialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hua

    2018-01-01

    By drawing on Foucault's theory of subjectification, this study presents a case study of two experienced teachers' in-service learning in the managerialist climate of Macau. The results indicate that the prevailing policies and administrative strategies on in-service learning served as the apparatus of managerialism working on teachers and…

  14. Would Confucius benefit from psychotherapy? The compatibility of cognitive behaviour therapy and Chinese values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Julie; Oei, Tian P S

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to explore the conceptual compatibility between cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and the common values of Chinese Culture. In order to address such a question, the distinctive processes attributed to CBT (e.g., teaching of skills, emphasis on homework, cognitive processes, present/future focus), as summarized in the meta-analysis by Blagys and Hilsenroth [(2002). Distinctive activities of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A review of the comparative psychotherapy process literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 22, 671-706], and the core values of Chinese Culture, determined through an integration of The Hofstede Project, [Hofstede, G.H. (1980). Culture's consequences: International differences in work related values. Beverly Hills: Sage]. The Chinese Value Survey [Chinese Culture Connection (1987). Chinese values and the search for culture-free dimensions of culture. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 18, 143-164]. The Schwartz Value Survey [Schwartz, S.H. (1994). Cultural dimensions of values: Towards an understanding of national differences. In Kim, U., Trandis, H.C., Katiticibasi, C., Choi, S.C., & Yoon, G. (eds.), Individualism and collectivism: Theory, method and application (pp. 85-119). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage] were used. A strong degree of compatibility between the two was found and it is argued that rather than developing new indigenized therapies, with some structural changes to the processes of CBT, this therapy can be effective for Chinese clients. It is further proposed that Chinese clients may benefit from challenging their irrational cognitions that are bound up in their strict adherence to social norms. Future recommendations for increasing the compatibility of CBT to Chinese culture are discussed.

  15. Soft Power and Higher Education: An Examination of China's Confucius Institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui

    2010-01-01

    China's global presence has become a significant subject. However, little attention has been directed to the role of higher education in projecting China's soft power, and little academic work has been done directly on it, despite the fact that there has been some work on related topics. Borrowing the theories of soft power and higher education…

  16. Confucius meets Weber or "Managerialism takes all"? Comparing civil servant values in China and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Z.; Yang, L.

    2015-01-01

    This article assesses the validity of normative claims on how civil servant values in East Asian and Western European administrations differ. By triangulating quantitative and qualitative survey data from a sample of Chinese (n = 508) and Dutch (n = 238) civil servants, we aim to answer two main

  17. A Transcultural Theory of Thinking for Instrumental Music Education: Philosophical Insights from Confucius and Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    In music education, thinking is often construed in terms of acquiring conceptual knowledge of musical elements. Research has found, however, that instrumental music educators have largely neglected conceptual teaching and learning. This begs the following questions: What is the nature of thinking in instrumental music education? How should…

  18. 'n Dialogiese kommunikasieteorie vanuit 'n Prakties-Teologiese perspektief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. C. Pieterse

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available A dialogical theory of communication from a practical theological perspective For our practical theological reflection on the communication of the gospel in ministry, we need a sound theory of communication. We choose for a dialogical theory of communication which suits the nature of Christian communication. This theory is developed with insights from theology and philosophy. The roots of a dialogical theory of communication are found in the thoughts of Socrates, Plato en Augustine. Kierkegaard is seen as the founder of the modern dialogical theory of communication, whilst the contributions of Buber, Jaspers, Gadamer and Habermas are traced. In an era of mass communication and propaganda, Christians need a communicative context where dialogue, freedom and an existential experience of God's love and grace can develop.

  19. . MODERN EDUCATION: FROM RATIONALITY TO REASONABLENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Anisimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of modern education development and criticizes a pragmatic attitude to education. Based on the retrospective historical analysis, the author maintains that educational systems are generally focused on fostering the pragmatic intellect rather than reasoning, which leads to a superficial world perception, and undermines personal analytical potential and capability of strategic problem solving. Concentration on rationality is unlikely to provide a way out of the world crisis. In the author’s view, education demands both the deep and solid comprehension of existential concepts and the reference to the “absolute spirit” of Confucius, Plato, Kant and Hegel. The research is aimed at justifying the civilizational paradigm of education on the basis of Hegelian fundamental ideas of intellectual perception with the emphasis on reasonability instead of rationality. As the most adequate implementation instrument, the author suggests a game simulating technique that combines the benefits of philosophical, scientific and methodological thinking.

  20. Michel Serres' "Le Parasite" and Martin Buber's "I and Thou: Noise" in Informal Education Affecting "Dialogue" between Communities in Conflict in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Alex

    2015-01-01

    One issue that is often ignored in political theory is the problem of means and modes of communication affecting "dialogue" between parties. In this age of hyper communication, this is something particularly relevant. The point here is that, despite the ease with which we have access to both means and modes of communication, there…

  1. On social justice: Comparing Paul with Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · FAQ's · News · AJOL jobs · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Contact AJOL · Terms and Conditions of Use.

  2. On social justice: Comparing Paul with Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  3. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  4. On social justice: Comparing Paul with Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    If Paul tried to establish egalitarian and sharing Christian communities under ... study on Paul for the debate on universal human values – except to suggest ... challenge until, at least for many, Caesar's apotheosis meant not ... just the promise, but the start of the world's salvation, redemption, ..... All will be on a par together.

  5. The idea in John Duns Scotus’ turn-about Between Plato and Descartes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fiorentino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical distance between the Cartesian concept, on the one hand, and the Platonic concept and Medieval tradition, on the other, would be incomprehensible unless one were to take into account the fundamental link, that lies in the thought of John Duns Scotus. The scope of this contribution is to illustrate the theoretical bearing of the turnabout in theology operated by Scotus as regards the concept of ideas. In fact, for Scotus, as we shall see, the concept of the idea is profoundly transformed, loses its exemplary value and takes on a new semblance that is nearer to the Cartesian concept, all this starting from a theological framework.

  6. PLATO IN V. S. SOLOVYEV’SPHILOSOPHY IN THE 1870-S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU. TIKHEEV

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to critically explore conceptual and historical backgrounds of the assessment of Plato’s intellectual heritage given by V. S. Solovyov during the fi rst decade of his activity as philosopher and university lecturer. Within the scope of investigation are included lectures on the history of ancient philosophy delivered by him in the 1870s, as well as some of his theoretical works of the same period. Author shows that Solovyov’s platonic studies were inspired partly by ideas of European romanticism, but mainly by philosophical program of German idealism. On the other hand platonic doctrine of ideas was used by Solovyov to support his own project of the new metaphysics and early version of the philosophy of unitotality

  7. Delivering on the promise of Plato's academy: educational accessibility for the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatly, Michele G; Flach, John; Shingledecker, Clark; Golshani, Forouzan

    2010-01-01

    This special volume is dedicated to eight updated and expanded communications selected from 33 refereed papers presented at the inaugural international conference on Technology-based Learning with Disability (LWD-07) which took place on July 19-20, 2007 at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Approximately 140 researchers and practitioners attended LWD-07 representing a cross-section of K-12 and higher education, pure and applied research, disability-related industry and rehabilitation agencies with common interests in facilitating educational attainment for people with all types of disabilities through use of technology. The communications selected for publication are representative of the breadth of interest at the nexus of disability, assistive technology, and the pedagogy of individualized learning. Access to education is a key component for quality of life and rehabilitation of any individual with a disability.

  8. Nietzsche, Plato and the Power of the Duende: the shamanic roots of poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel de Lima

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo lida com as raízes xamânicas da poesia através da análise das antigas deidades artísticas gregas, a saber, Apolo e Dionísio, em suas marcadas dicotomias de tendências artísticas tal como são apresentadas por Friedrich Nietzsche em sua reavaliação das considerações platônicas sobre a criação artística. Esta primeira análise é então seguida por um interessante paralelo à força nietzscheana do dionisíaco que pode ser encontrada no igualmente misterioso poder do “Duende,” presente em Federico García Lorca quando da fusão de seus conceitos surrealistas com o senso de sua cultura nativa da Andaluzia, a fim de se mostrar as raízes xamânicas da representação poética.

  9. Friendship and War: True Political Art as the Alliance of Philosophy and Rhetoric in Plato's Gorgias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Parra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo explora la relación entre filosofía y retórica desde una nueva perspectiva al enfatizar la naturaleza dramática del diálogo y, por tanto, poniéndole atención no sólo a lo que se dice sobre filosofía y retórica, sino también a lo que se muestra, especialmente por las intervenciones de Gorgias a lo largo del diálogo con el fin de salvar a la comunidad de diálogo que investiga lo bueno y lo justo. Esta reconcepción de la relación entre filosofía y retórica implica una reconcepción de la práctica de la política misma, fundada en una filosofía que busca girar las almas individuales hacia el bien y una retórica que motiva a los individuos a ser girados en esa misma dirección por las palabras de los otros.

  10. The Peloponnesian War, the Spanish Requirement and the Clash of Civilizations: An Application of Plato's Theaetetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy C. Hamblet

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper challenges the notion of “civilization” as focal to, and originative of, the problem of suffering in the world, a legacy that continues to betray its heritage in the third millennium of the Common Era. The current global crisis of terrorism is, on both sides of this confrontation, being posed as a war of “civilizations.” Both sides, the terrorists and the current American administration and its allies, argue for the righteous, divinely-ordained nature of their cause and the demonic nature of their infidel enemy. Both legitimate their violences by claims of superior “civilization” and both cite the god as in their “civilizational” court.

  11. About Being a Friend: Friendship and Metaphysics by Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Albert the Great

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Quero Sánchez

    2014-11-01

    of friendship in his commentaries on the Nicomachian Ethics (both Super Ethica and Ethica and we show how his metaphysics should be considered as Christian Aristotelism, according to the traditional interpretation, which has, as is known, been questioned for decades

  12. Plato and the Police: Dogs, Guardians, and Why Accountability Is the Wrong Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Samantha; Shuffelton, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Attention to significant commonalities between the position of teachers and police officers, we suggest, illuminates problematic aspects of their position within a democracy. Demographically, both the teaching force and the police force are disproportionately white, yet the commonalities extend beyond race. We suspect too little attention has been…

  13. The Problem of Intelligence or the Two Sorts of a priori Knowledge in Plato's Dialogue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chvatík, Ivan

    -, č. 1 (2011), s. 79-93 ISSN 1934-1474. [Razón y Vida. La responsabilidad de la filosofía. Segovia, 19.09.2011-23.09.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : reason * mathema * phronesis * the idea of the Good Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  14. Two Hundred Years of the Psychology of Attitude - 2000 Years of Contributions, From Plato to Allport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodwin, Martin G.

    Developments that laid the groundwork for the modern psychology of attitude began with early Greek philosophy. Conceptions of the cosmologists during the Golden Age of Greek Civilization and the Sophist movement served as a link between mythology and science. Contributions of British Empiricism and German Experimentalism were instrumental to the…

  15. Standard Chronology in Plato’s Dialogues and Stylometric Evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Ghomi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract What are to be discussed in this article include two main points: i some kind of a fixed structure can be found in all the chronologies that have been proposed from the last quarter of 19th century onward; a structure that is called here “standard” chronology, and ii in spite of the fact that the appearance of this structure owes too much to the stylistic evidences, these evidences themselves do not confirm anything in the structure but the place of the so-called late dialogues. The standard chronology of Plato’s dialogues is inclined to consider Meno and Republic as dialogues that have been composed after so-called Socratic dialogues and before Parmenides and Theaetetus. This chronology also insists that the latter two dialogues must be dated after so-called middle dialogues and before dialogues like Sophist, Timaeus, Philebus and Laws. This papper is to illuminate the fact that except the similarities between the late dialogues and their probable lateness, the place of other dialogues, more importantly among them the so-called middle period dialogues, Theaetetus and Parmenides, cannot be approved by stylistic evidences.

  16. The Quest for a Poetics of Goodness in Plato and Aristotle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dairo Orozco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo compara las concepciones de actividad artística en Platón y Aristóteles y se divide en tres partes. En la primera, se discuten la mimesis y la technē en el Ion de Platón, así como el papel de la poesía en la República. En la segunda, se hace un recuento de la idea de felicidad de Aristóteles como fin de la acción. En la última se discute el intento de reconciliación de las posiciones de Platón y Aristóteles realizado por el pensador neoplatónico renacentista, Torquato Tasso.

  17. On social justice: Comparing Paul with Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although Crossan elsewhere demonstrates the deep roots of this concern in the Jewish tradition, he tends to downplay the importance of Greek contributions in this regard. The purpose of this essay will be to offer, in constant dialogue with. Crossan (and Reed), a more refined comparison of social justice in Paul on the one ...

  18. The Figure of Yan Zhuoju 顏涿聚 in Ancient Chinese Literature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weingarten, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2015), s. 229-261 ISSN 0254-9948 Institutional support: RVO:68378009 Keywords : Confucius * Confucius's Disciples * Yan Zhuoju * Anecdotes * Early Chinese History * Philology * Historiography * Rhetoric Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  19. Introduction to the Four Principles of Biomedical Ethics in Confucius%简论儒家生命医学伦理学“四原则”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国利

    2017-01-01

    原则主义与情境主义之间如何平衡与妥协不仅是现实生活的难题,更是生命伦理学永恒的挑战.与西方文化中政治化的公平概念不同的是,儒学的公平思想不仅具有外在的自然基础,而且是标准的、充满内容的道德伦理原则.儒学思想的基础与主体是原则主义的,且不拒绝情境主义.在儒学四原则中,公平和尊重自主这两个道德伦理原则都属于原则主义的范畴,而“知止”与功利主义的不伤害或有利原则两者是情境主义的基础.“知止”原则是儒学道德美德与伦理原则的内在核心精神所在,而在儒学诸外在的道德伦理原则中公平是第一原则.%It is not only the problem of the real life,but also the challenge of the biomedical ethics for how to get the balance and compromise between the principlism and situationism.The fairness in Confucian is constructed on the basis of the external nature,and also is a standard and content-full ethical principle,which is different from the political one in the western culture.The Confucian basis is the principlism but does not refuse the situationism.In the four principles of Confucian,both fairness and respect for autonomy belong to the principlism,while the other two of "knowing where to stop" and no harm or the principle of benefit of utilitarianism are the basis of the situationism.The principle of "knowing where to stop" is the internal core spirit of the Confucian moral virtue and ethical principles,but fairness is the first principle of its all external principles.

  20. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO); Programa de verificacion del calculo para un sistema de planificacion de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (PLATO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  1. Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas: plots must obey the laws they refer to and models shall describe biophysical reality!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkov, Igor I

    2011-06-01

    In the companion paper, we discussed in details proper linearization, calculation of the inactive osmotic volume, and analysis of the results on the Boyle-vant' Hoff plots. In this Letter, we briefly address some common errors and misconceptions in osmotic modeling and propose some approaches, namely: (1) inapplicability of the Kedem-Katchalsky formalism model in regards to the cryobiophysical reality, (2) calculation of the membrane hydraulic conductivity L(p) in the presence of permeable solutes, (3) proper linearization of the Arrhenius plots for the solute membrane permeability, (4) erroneous use of the term "toxicity" for the cryoprotective agents, and (5) advantages of the relativistic permeability approach (RP) developed by us vs. traditional ("classic") 2-parameter model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Gospel of Thomas and Plato : A Study of the Impact of Platonism on the Fifth Gospel

    OpenAIRE

    Miroshnikov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    It is no secret that Christian dogmatic theology adopted a generous number of its concepts from Platonist philosophy; by the time of the Cappadocian fathers, it was customary to talk about divine matters in Platonist terms. It is, however, much more difficult to track the Platonist influence during the formative centuries of Christianity. In the last decades, the academic community has gradually come to realize that research into the Platonizing tendencies of early Christian texts may shed ne...

  3. How Poets Should Speak of the Gods. Plato, Republic II 377e6–378a1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jera Marušič

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In Plato’s Republic, Socrates and his interlocutors assign to poetry an important educational task in the envisioned just state, but then find the existing poetry mostly unsuitable for it. Examining how poets speak about the gods, Socrates directs at Hesiod the criticism that he »did not speak falsely well« (377e7 when narrating the actions of Uranus and Cronus. We may find this criticism surprising: the poet is not reproached for speaking falsely about the actions of these two gods, but for not speaking falsely well about them. It seems, therefore, that Socrates would not disapprove of Hesiod’s false speaking, provided that the poet spoke falsely well. In order to clarify Socrates’ criticism, it is first examined what it means, in the case of Hesiod, »to speak falsely« (as opposed to »speaking truly«, and then what it means »not to speak falsely well« (as opposed to »speaking falsely well«. Relying on some further arguments by Socrates, a distinction is made between two kinds of claims that can be made about the gods: claims about what the gods are like and claims about what they did. As this paper tries to show, it is acceptable to Socrates if poets speak falsely about what the gods did (for, because there is no knowing about the divine actions, it is not possible to speak truly about this, as is suggested at 382c10–d3, but not about what they are like (for what we do know about the divine nature is that it is good and therefore cannot cause evil, and so it must be spoken of, as is argued at 379b1–16. It turns out, therefore, that poets speak falsely well about what the gods did when they attribute good actions to them, i.e. such actions as they could in fact have done: doing so, the poets speak falsely about what the gods did, but implicitly speak truly about what they are like. As Hesiod attributed bad actions to Uranus and Cronus, he implicitly spoke of the gods as capable of evil. Therefore he did not speak falsely only about the divine actions, but, implicitly, also about the nature of the divine. That is why he did not speak falsely well.

  4. Baseline Q waves as a prognostic modulator in patients with ST-segment elevation: insights from the PLATO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siha, Hany; Das, Debraj; Fu, Yuling; Zheng, Yinggan; Westerhout, Cynthia M; Storey, Robert F; James, Stefan; Wallentin, Lars; Armstrong, Paul W

    2012-07-10

    Baseline Q waves may provide additional value compared with time from the onset of symptoms in predicting outcomes for patients with ST-segment elevation. We evaluated whether baseline Q waves superseded time from symptom onset as a prognostic marker of one-year mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Our study was derived from data from patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention within 24 hours in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes trial Q waves on the baseline electrocardiogram were evaluated by a blinded core laboratory. We assessed the associations between baseline Q waves and time from symptom onset to percutaneous coronary intervention with peak biomarkers, ST-segment resolution on the discharge electrocardiogram, and one-year all-cause and vascular mortality. Of 4341 patients with ST-segment elevation, 46% had baseline Q waves. Compared to those without Q waves, those with baseline Q waves were older, more frequently male, had higher heart rates, more advanced Killip class and had a longer time between the onset of symptoms and percutaneous coronary intervention. They also had higher one-year all-cause mortality than patients without baseline Q waves (baseline Q waves: 4.9%; no baseline Q waves: 2.8%; hazard ratio [HR] 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-2.45, p waves. After multivariable adjustment, baseline Q waves, but not time from symptom onset, were associated with a significant increase in all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.10-2.01, p = 0.046) and vascular mortality (adjusted HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.09-2.28, p = 0.02). The presence of baseline Q waves provides useful additional prognostic insight into the clinical outcome of patients with ST-segment elevation. Clinical Trials.gov registration no. NCT00391872.

  5. Gastronomía, turismo y potencialidades territoriales: el plato minero y la salazón, bases para el turismo alimentario en Nemocón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Andrés Llano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available La promoción turística de un municipio como Nemocón pasa por el reconocimiento de su gastronomía, asociada a la cultura alimentaria andina. Esta aceptación del patrimonio culinario de un lugar como Nemocón, sirve como referente para la construcción de la ruta de la sal a partir de las bases del turismo alimentario. Desde el marco conceptual de la geografía humana, el estudio utilizó un enfoque metodológico que involucró como estrategia de investigación la historia oral, privilegiando la narración en el rescate de elementos culturales.

  6. Avance al estudio de las pinturas rupestres esquemáticas de la Cueva del Plato. Panel "A" (Otiñar, Jaén

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier CARRASCO RUS

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available En estos últimos años se han descubierto una serie de abrigos y cuevas con pinturas rupestres de tipo «esquemático» en la provincia de Jaén. En muchos de los casos han sido dadas a conocer de forma muy sucinta a modo de pequeño informe, llamando la atención de los especialistas e interesándoles por ellas. Otras veces las noticias de los hallazgos no han pasado de las páginas del periódico local, con el consiguiente detrimento para el conocimiento de las manifestaciones artísticas de las primitivas poblaciones del Alto Guadalquivir.

  7. Dose distribution around Ir192 brachytherapy source in non-full scattering conditions: comparison of in-phantom measurements and Nucletron-Oldelft plato system calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jastrzembski, Michal; Kabacinska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Comparing the values of doses measured in vivo during gynaecological brachytherapy with those computed with the use of Nucletron-Oldelft brachytherapy treatment planning system a high level of uncertainty appears. In case of points located close to the media border this is also due to the lack of scattering in this region. The influence of the lack of scattering on dose distribution has been investigated. Measured data has been compared to those given by Nucletron-Oldelft BPS. Materials and methods: Profiles in a large water phantom (PTW MP3 system) has been measured in directions perpendicular to the long axis of the fixed source at varied water level and at varied source-to-detector distances. Normalization values for the curves has been acquired by absolute dose measurements. Obtained data has been compared to profiles calculated in the same axes by Nucletron-Oldelft BPS. Results: The lack of scattering in the region close to water surface (up to 8cm) results in significant drop in measured dose. The decrease depends both on the distance from the medium border and on the distance from the source. For source-to-detector distance of 6.5cm the difference between calculated and measured dose is 8% for 3cm and 21% for 1cm of water above the source. Profiles in this region become flattened and asymmetric according to the drop in dose level. Conclusions: The lack of scattering in the region close to the patient skin results in significant drop in dose which is not taken into account by Nucletron-Oldelft BPS. This means that dose distribution calculated in this region by the System is not correct

  8. Gastronomía, turismo y potencialidades territoriales: el plato minero y la salazón, bases para el turismo alimentario en Nemocón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Andrés Llano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available La promoción turística de un municipio como Nemocón pasa por el reconocimiento de su gastronomía, asociada a la cultura alimentaria andina. Esta aceptación del patrimonio culinario de un lugar como Nemocón, sirve como referente para la construcción de la ruta de la sal a partir de las bases del turismo alimentario. Desde el marco conceptual de la geografía humana, el estudio utilizó un enfoque metodológico que involucró como estrategia de investigación la historia oral, privilegiando la narración en el rescate de elementos culturales.

  9. Seria a moqueca apenas uma peixada? ¿La moqueca seria unicamente un plato de pescado? Alimentacion e identidad en Salvador, Bahia (Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Fajans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Comidas regionais no Brasil incorporam a história, geografia, cultura, “raça”, classe social e identidade de uma região. Um exemplo claro destes fatores se encontra na competição entre os Estados da Bahia e do Espírito Santo acerca de quem faz a melhor moqueca. A competição não está apenas associada ao gosto desta especialidade, mas também aos valores religiosos, culturais, raciais e de classe a ela associados. São incorporadas as qualidades de quem prepara e o contexto no qual é preparada e servida a moqueca.Las comidas regionales del Brasil revelan la historia, la geografía, la cultura, la “raza”, las clases sociales y la identidad de cada región. Un ejemplo claro de esos factores se encuentra en la competencia entre los Estados de Bahia y Espírito Santo acerca que quién hace la mejor moqueca. En esta competencia, finalmente, el sabor de esta especialidad culinaria no tiene tanta importancia como los valores religiosos, culturales, raciales y de clase a los cuales está asociada. Este platillo incorpora las cualidades de las personas que lo cocinan y el contexto en el cual está elaborado y servido.

  10. Philosophy and Politics: The anti-political character of Socrates’ philosophy and Plato ’s project of making philosophy political

    OpenAIRE

    Hrvoje Cvijanović

    2016-01-01

    The intention of this research is to elaborate on Socrates’ philosophy and its serious consequences for the relationship between philosophy and politics, hence making them hostile to each other, and Socrates an enemy of the people. The author explores the tension between philosophy and public life by comparing and contrasting two opposing philosophical projects – Socrates and Plato’s – while illuminating different methods and paths they follow in their understanding of philosophy and politics...

  11. Dialogical Existence seen as a Social Relation and its Impact to the Life with Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article compares the philosophical concept of dialogical existence of Martin Buber with the sociological one from Pierpaolo Donati, which put its focus on the phenomena of social relationship.

  12. Philosophy and Literature; Philosophy as Literature: Call for Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plato wrote both stories and argument as a way of investigating philosophical problems. For Plato, the choice of literary form was essential to the quest for philosophical truth. Ever since, philosophical reflection has found expression in numerous literary forms, both creative and conventional. And so, we have Platonic and Humean dialogues, Cartesian meditations, Enlightenment fables, Kierkegaardian narratives, Nietzchean parables and aphorisms, Russellian mathematics, Wittgensteinian tractatuses and investigations, as well as all the standard literary forms of novels, novellas, poems, plays, and songs. Transnational Literature is seeking papers for a special edition of the journal which will be dedicated to the literary expression of philosophy. Rather than readings of philosophy in literature (of mapping particular philosophical frameworks onto works of literature, we invite explorations of philosophy as literature and we invite these explorations to also address the journal’s transnational focus by exploring the crossing of cultural, national and temporal boundaries. The following ideas are of particular interest: •\tPhilosophy and literature as ‘embattled adversaries’ (Calvino and the breaking down of boundaries between philosophy and literature. •\tPhilosophical fiction as an alternative mode of philosophical reflection and investigation and/or experimental method. (George Eliot’s novels, for example, as ‘a set of experiments in life… endeavour[s] to see what our thought and emotion may be capable of.’ •\tThe use of literary devices in philosophical writing to express philosophical facts / metaphysical truths. (Locke’s metaphorical ‘candle within us’ becomes the factual ‘intuition.’ •\tThe use of literary devices in creative fiction to do the work of philosophy. (Exposition as a way of interrupting narrative to keep reader attentive to the task of enquiry. Point-of-view as ethical device. Ellipsis as getting

  13. Význam čísel mezi Platónem a Aristotelem

    OpenAIRE

    Šíma, Antonín

    2016-01-01

    1 Abstract Meaning of numbers between Plato and Aristotle Antonín Šíma The dissertation titled "The Transformation of the Concept of Number between Plato and the Early Academy" deals with the problem of numbers in early Platonism between Aristotle and Plato. In Plato's dialogues, within professional mathematical disciplines of knowledge, numbers fulfil a function of propaedeutic procedure to the method of thinking − dialectic. Dialectic engages in the most general structures of thinking whose...

  14. Srovnání Platónova a Aristotelova pojetí etiky ctnosti

    OpenAIRE

    TISCHLEROVÁ, Monika

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the comparison of Plato and Aristotle's conception of virtue ethics. The first part describes Plato's view of this area of philosophy. Plato puts his ethics based on the analogy between the municipality and the soul. Plato also operates with good ideas. In the second part, Aristotle view. First, I discuss the objectives of its philosophy, which is good, and then bliss. Then there is the division of the moral virtues and intellectual. Then describe each of Aristotle's virt...

  15. Fuzzyics =CATEGORYICS =PRAGMATYICS (``Son of ``TRIZ''')/CATEGORY-SEMANTICS Cognition (fcp/csc) of Plato-Aristotle ``SQUARE-of-OPPOSITION''(SoO): Linguistics: Antonyms VS ``SYNONYMS'' VS Analogy/ Metaphor: Coarsest-Possible Topology: Shocks/High-Pressures Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward Plato Aristotle Archimedes Carl-Ludwig; Young, Frederic; Lewis, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Siegel[MRS Fall-Mtgs,:Symp.Fractals(89)-5-papers!!!;Symp.Scaling(90)] FCP/CSC {aka SPD}(Tic-Tac-Toe-Matrix/Tabular List-Format) ``COMMON-FUNCTIONING-PRINCIPLE'' DI/TRI-CHOTOMY GENERIC ``INEVITABILITY_-WEB'' PURPOSEFUL PARSIMONY-of-DI/TRI-CHOTOMY STRATEGY REdiscovery of SoO automatically/optimality is in NON-list-format/matrix: DIMENSIONALITY-DOMINATION -INEVIT-ABILITY ROOT-CAUSE(RC) ULTIMATE-ORIGIN(UO): (level-0.-logic) DIMENSIONALITY (level-0. logic): [dst = ODD-Z] {Dst=FRACTAL-UNcertainty FLUCTUATIONS} (dst = EVEN-Z): CAUSES: (level- I.-logic): EXTENT/SCALE/RADIUS: (relative)-[LOCALITY] (relative)-(...GLOBALITY...) & (level-II.-logic): POWER-SPECTRUM{noise ≅generalized-susceptibility}: [``l''/ω0-White] (...-``l''/ω 1 . 000 . . . - HYPERBOLICITY...) & (level-III.-logic) CRITICAL-EXPONENT:n =0 n = 1.000... ; BUT ALL 3 ALSO CAUSED BY ANOTHER INdependent RCUO (level-IV.-logic):

  16. Krása a nesmrteľnosť. O plodení u Platóna a Shakespeara (Beauty and Immortality. On Procreation in Plato and Shakespeare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Vydra

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available There are two moments referred in this essay: (1 A human being, which desires for immortality, desires for to be alive in his child or in an artwork. (2 Full human being’s desire is related for beauty. Is a beauty the same thing as immortality? How looks the relation between them? Shakespeare’s Sonnets begin with the challenge to his friend to procreate the offspring, because this is a way for immortality of the friend’s beauty. And if it is not a child, than verse refused him before the death or the Lethe. Similarly, Plato’s Socrates says in Symposium about his meeting with Diotima of Mantineia. She told him the oration on real Beauty without accidents. To see real Beauty means to be immortal, likewise the gods. Thus, could be a human being immortal?

  17. Krása a nesmrteľnosť. O plodení u Platóna a Shakespeara (Beauty and Immortality. On Procreation in Plato and Shakespeare)

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Vydra

    2007-01-01

    There are two moments referred in this essay: (1) A human being, which desires for immortality, desires for to be alive in his child or in an artwork. (2) Full human being’s desire is related for beauty. Is a beauty the same thing as immortality? How looks the relation between them? Shakespeare’s Sonnets begin with the challenge to his friend to procreate the offspring, because this is a way for immortality of the friend’s beauty. And if it is not a child, than verse refused him before the de...

  18. P ≠NP Millenium-Problem(MP) TRIVIAL Physics Proof Via NATURAL TRUMPS Artificial-``Intelligence'' Via: Euclid Geometry, Plato Forms, Aristotle Square-of-Opposition, Menger Dimension-Theory Connections!!! NO Computational-Complexity(CC)/ANYthing!!!: Geometry!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, London; Menger, Karl; Rota, Gian-Carlo; Euclid, Alexandria; Siegel, Edward

    P ≠NP MP proof is by computer-''science''/SEANCE(!!!)(CS) computational-''intelligence'' lingo jargonial-obfuscation(JO) NATURAL-Intelligence(NI) DISambiguation! CS P =(?) =NP MEANS (Deterministic)(PC) = (?) =(Non-D)(PC) i.e. D(P) =(?) = N(P). For inclusion(equality) vs. exclusion (inequality) irrelevant (P) simply cancels!!! (Equally any/all other CCs IF both sides identical). Crucial question left: (D) =(?) =(ND), i.e. D =(?) = N. Algorithmics[Sipser[Intro. Thy.Comp.(`97)-p.49Fig.1.15!!!

  19. Plato, Symposium 212a6–7 : The Most Immortal of Men, with an Appendix on Phrases of the Type εἴπερ (τις) ἄλλος

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boter, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents two hitherto neglected arguments in favour of the thesis that the philosopher’s immortality described by Diotima in Plato’s Symposium refers exclusively to immortality by means of posterity and not to some sort of personal immortality after death. Both arguments are contained

  20. Mass transport in a PEMFC fuel battery using combinations of monopolar plates and reaction-diffusion medium; Transporte de masa en una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC utilizando combinaciones de platos monopolares y medios de difusion de reactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas Paleta, M. G. Araceli [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Bautista Rodriguez, C. Moises [Alter-Energias Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)] email: celso.bautista@thyssenkrupp.com; Rivera Marquez, J. Antonio; Tepale Ochoa, Nancy [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The efficiency of a PEMFC fuel battery is limited due to a variety of mass transport-related phenomena that take place while it is operating. The electromotive force of the PEM fuel battery is related to the generation of concentration gradients resulting from the distribution of the reactants on the active sites of the electrode. The reactant gases supplied to the PEMFC are distributed over the diffusion layer of the electrodes through the channels of the polar plates. They then spread toward the active layer where the semi-reactions take place. Another important aspect is the presence of water molecules, a product of the reaction. When they accumulate, they cover the porosity of the electrodes, involving the reduction in the flow of reactants, even at high current density values and, combined with the diffusion phenomena involved, cause the PEMFC to complete cease functioning. The critical parameters for the transport phenomena are porosity, the diameter of the pore in the diffusion layer and the characteristics of the distribution of the reactants. The present works includes an experimental design of two distribution media and two diffusion media of the reactant gases in a PEMFC, involving three case studies. The results show significantly notable interactions between the diameter of the pore, the type of diffusion layer applied and the type of distributor applied. The combination in the second case significantly reduces the ohmic resistance and moderately reduces the diffusion resistances. While the combination in case three notably increases the ohmic resistance, diffusion resistance is significantly reduced. [Spanish] La eficiencia de una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC es limitada por diversos fenomenos de transporte de masa presentes durante su funcionamiento. La fuerza electromotriz de la pila a combustible tipo PEM esta relacionada con la generacion de gradientes de concentracion los cuales se dan como resultado de la distribucion de los reactivos sobre los sitios activos del electrodo. Los gases reactivos suministrados a una PEMFC se distribuyen sobre la capa de difusion de los electrodos por medio de los canales de las placas polares, posteriormente difunden hacia la capa activa donde se llevan a cabo las semi-reacciones. Otro aspecto importante es la presencia de las moleculas de agua, producto de la reaccion, que al acumularse cubren la porosidad de los electrodos implicando la reduccion del flujo de los reactivos, incluso a altos valores de densidad de corriente se combina con los fenomenos de difusion involucrados, ocasionando; el cese total en el funcionamiento de la PEMFC. Los parametros criticos para los fenomenos de transporte son la porosidad, el diametro del poro en la capa de difusion y las caracteristicas de distribucion de reactivos. El presente trabajo comprende un diseno experimental entre dos medios de distribucion y dos medios de difusion de gases reactivos en una PEMFC, implicando tres casos de estudio. Los resultados obtenidos muestran interacciones notablemente significativas entre el diametro de poro, el tipo de capa de difusion aplicada y el tipo de distribuidor aplicado. La combinacion en el segundo caso reduce significativamente las resistencias ohmicas y moderadamente las resistencias por difusion mientras la combinacion del caso tres incrementa notablemente las resistencias ohmicas sin embargo reducen las resistencias por difusion de forma importante.

  1. A human factors data bank for French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villemeur, A.; Mosneron-Dupin, F.; Bouissou, M.; Meslin, T.

    1986-01-01

    CONFUCIUS is a computerized data bank developed by Electricite de France to study human factors in nuclear power plants. A detailed and homogeneous grouping of described operation and maintenance errors as well as of performance times is possible with CONFUCIUS. It also incorporates a selection of statistical treatment softwares. Readily usable and modifiable, the system can easily evolve. It allows a wide range of applications (safety analysis, event analysis, training, human factors engineering, probabilistic analysis). Data derived from the analysis of significant events reported in power plants and from the analysis of simulator tests are used as inputs into this data bank

  2. Views of orality and the translation of the Bible.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an overview of constructions of orality that played an important role in the theory and practice of modern Bible translation. Three distinct perspectives can be distinguished. First we have the constructions of orality as articulated by Buber and Rosenzweig in the Interbellum

  3. Enhancing Autonomy-Supportive I-Thou Dialogue in Schools: Conceptualization and Socio-Emotional Effects of an Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Haya; Assor, Avi

    2012-01-01

    We present a conceptualization and a 2 year program of autonomy-supportive I-Thou dialogue among teachers and students that is based on self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan in "Psychol Inq" 11(4):227-268, 2000) and Buber's (1960) philosophy. The program was applied in 18 seventh grade classes (420 students). Findings showed: (a) increases in…

  4. Toward a Communication Theory Focused on Humankind's Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, William A.; Ternent, Janet A.

    This speech presents a model of human communication which integrates the existential philosophy of Martin Buber with the communication views of Jonas Salk. In his book, "The Survival of the Wisest," Salk characterizes an "Epoch A" to describe the values and behaviors of the past and an "Epoch B" to describe the necessary values and behaviors for…

  5. Visual Literacy: Implications for the Production of Children's Television Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, L. J.

    Visual literacy, the integration of seeing with other cognitive processes, is an essential tool of learning. To explain the relationship between the perceiver and the perceived, three types of theories can be brought to bear: introverted; extroverted; and transactional. Franklin Fearing, George Herbert Mead, Martin Buber, and other theorists have…

  6. Dehumanization and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarsky, Daniel

    1982-01-01

    Two types of dehumanization are defined, and modern instances of dehumanization--failure to regard a person as if s/he were the human being that s/he is--are analyzed. Philosophical insights of Immanuel Kant and Martin Buber concerning human dignity are given, and examples of dehumanization in education are cited. (PP)

  7. Precision in the Global War on Terror: Inciting Muslims Through the War of Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Lebanese Christian musi- cian Marcel Khalifa was put on trial for including lyrics about the Prophet Yusuf (Joseph) in his songs. Westerners will...then concludes his essay by noting Ambassador Hume Horan’s comment that there are no Arab “Christofer Dawsons . . . and Martin Bubers

  8. Retrospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Anthony

    1971-01-01

    A collection of essays on education printed in The New Era during the 1920-1930 era and written by: Beatrice Ensor, A. S. Neill, G. Bernard Shaw, Adolphe Ferriere, C. G. Jung, Martin Buber, Alfred Adler, Harold Rugg, Ovide Decroly, and Paul Langevin. (SE)

  9. A Primer of Existentialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Gordon E.

    1961-01-01

    Although no set of principles can apply uniformly to all existentialists, certain basic characteristics of existentialism are central to both the nonreligious writers like Sartre and Camus and the theistic existentialists like Kierkegaard, Maritain, Marcel, Tillich, Berdyaev, and Buber. These characteristics are (1) an insistence that human life…

  10. How Can We Overcome the Dichotomy That Western Culture Has Created between the Concepts of Independence and Dependence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Zehavit

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article, inspired by the works of Martin Buber, is to propose an alternative to the inherent dichotomy of Western culture. It may allow Western culture to transcend its fixed nature towards new directions and to suggest challenging solutions for reshaping the questions--what is the role of man in the world, and what is the…

  11. Ethics Responsibility Dialogue the Meaning of Dialogue in Lévinas's Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Pazi, Hanoch

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the concept of dialogue in the philosophy of Emmanuel Lévinas, with a focus on the context of education. Its aim is to create a conversation between the Lévinasian theory and the theories of other philosophers, especially Martin Buber, in an effort to highlight the ethical significance that Lévinas assigns to the act of…

  12. BEG IN SE LSVANBYBE LV ERTA LIN G * „Vertaal beteken twee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    RoSENZWEtG, wat tesame met MARTIN BuBER 'n uiters merkwaardige. *Lesing gehou ... Dit het ook LuTHER, die Bybelvertaler vir die Duitse volk, wel goed ...... king en die kleur van die oorspronklike behou word selfs al sou daar mee aan ...

  13. Beyond Relation: A Critical Exploration of "Relational Consciousness" for Spiritual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This paper takes a philosophical view of the spiritual concept "relational consciousness" first proposed by Rebecca Nye in 1998. I will consider the "relational" aspect of spirituality through the ontology of Heidegger and the dialogical relationship "I and Thou" of Martin Buber, examining the problems that contingency and mediation within…

  14. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-08

    May 8, 2009 ... Bakhtin and Buber,2 but more contemporary views are also considered. These four .... not meant to be purely a matter of crisis management. Life is contingent and this should also be reflected in worship services. But worship ...

  15. The Impacts of Corruption on Economic Development in Afghanistan: A Study of the Effects of Nepotism and Bribery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    corruption as it changes over time. He references philosophers such as Plato , Aristotle and Machiavelli.2 Plato introduces the initial analyses of...corruption as human flaw introduced into governments that distorts and perverts them. Aristotle takes Plato further by identifying the transformation...reemphasizes that while corrupt practices are condoned and rationalized , more damaging forms of corruption will become acceptable. Corruption can co-exist with

  16. Rozdíly v chápání ctnosti u Platóna, Aristotela a Aurelia Augustina

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanová, Blanka

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor's Thesis: Difference in Plato's, Aristotle's and Aurelius Augustinus' Understanding to Virtue Name: Blanka Kavanová Faculty: Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy Year: 2011 ABSTRACT The bachelor's thesis is concerned with the development and differences in Plato's, Aristotle's and Aurelius Augustinus' concept of virtue. The first part is focused on Plato's concept of four basic virtues, i.e. moderation/reasonableness, justice...

  17. Global China Insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Rien; Fischer, Ingrid

    Journal in which the Groningen Confucius Institute (GCI) shares different perspectives on China and provides insights into China from as many different aspects as possible. GCI aims to provide a full view of real China to the readers as well as featuring international and comprehensive perspectives,

  18. 新羅・花郎徒衆の忠と薩摩武士の忠の比較検討 : 古代中国思想に見る四つの忠を媒介として

    OpenAIRE

    西中, 研二||ニシナカ, ケンジ||Nishinaka, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the loyalty that is the foundation of the Bushido spirit of Japan and Chinaand Korea. It is important to make a basis for comparing the loyalty of each country. At first I found the origin of the concept of the loyalty in the Analects of Confucius. And It was named

  19. Neoliberalistliku ego õitseng või agoonia? / Mart Ojasalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojasalu, Mart

    2008-01-01

    Järg 27. veebr. lk. 6-7. Autori arvates ei hävita ultraliberalism ainult eetilisi inimsuhteid, vaid mässib eestlased pangalaenude ja liisingutega pangaorjusesse, mille tasateenimisele kulub kogu elu. 21. sajand on loodusvarasid raiskava vabaturumajanduse lõpp, selle vahetab välja ökoloogiline "meie"-tunnetusel põhinev Confuciuse elustiil

  20. 〈研究ノート〉異文化と「勘違い」─いま、中国を講ずることについて─

    OpenAIRE

    好並, 晶

    2016-01-01

    Teaching cross-culture should be started with the idea that learning about foreign culture is not the same as learning domestic culture. We have to realize it from what happens in our daily lives around us. This article illustrates misunderstanding about China and Chinese in terms of Confucius' words, the habit of gift giving, the importance of eating, and Chinese poetry.

  1. Moral is political Notions of ideal citizenship in Lie Kim Hok’s Hikajat Khonghoetjoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Sutrisno

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the Hikajat Khonghoetjoe (The life story of Confucius, written by Lie Kim Hok in 1897, is a medium to propose modern ideas of flexible subjectivity, cosmopolitanism, active citizenship and the concepts of good governance to the Chinese Peranakans who experienced political and racial discrimination under Dutch colonization. Using the figure of Confucius, Lie aimed to cultivate virtuous subjects who apply their faith and morality in political sphere. He intended to raise political awareness and rights among the Chinese as colonial subjects and to valorize their bargaining power with the Dutch colonial government. By introducing Confucianism, Lie proposed that the Chinese reconnect themselves with China as an alternative patronage which could subvert White supremacy. Instead of using sources in Chinese, Lie translated the biography of Confucius from the European texts. In crafting his story, Lie applied conglomerate authorship, a technique commonly practised by Malay authors. It allowed him to select, combine and appropriate the source texts. To justify that Confucius' virtue and his teaching were superb and are applicable to contemporary life, Lie borrowed and emphasized European writers’ high appraisal of Confucianism, instead of using his own arguments and opinions. I call this writing technique “indirect agency”.

  2. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy - Vol 7, No 1 (2004)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primacy of the family in the philosophies of Confucius and Aristotle, and in African philosophy: A comparative analysis · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AF Uduigwomen, MI Edet, 83-89. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sophia.v7i1.38686 ...

  3. Cooperative Learning in a Hong Kong Primary School: Perceptions, Problems and Accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kam Wing

    2014-01-01

    Some educators may see cooperative learning as a Western pedagogy that is difficult to use in Eastern countries with a Confucian Heritage, while others argue that the philosophy of Confucius parallels the elements of cooperative learning. This article reports the key findings of a 2-year longitudinal study that investigated the perceptions of…

  4. Confucianism on the Comeback: Current Trends in Culture, Values, Politics, and Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    There is ample evidence that Confucianism is undergoing a multi-faceted revival in contemporary China. This can be seen in government slogans, in a runaway best seller on the "Analects" (the compendium of Confucius's teachings), in educational experiments, and in academic activities. The twentieth century was a bad century for…

  5. Global China Insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Rien; Havinga, Marieke; Fischer, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Journal in which the Groningen Confucius Institute (GCI) shares different perspectives on China and provides insights into China from as many different aspects as possible. GCI aims to provide a full view of real China to the readers as well as featuring international and comprehensive perspectives,

  6. Investigating Morals and Values in Today's Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Paul D.

    This responsibility education activity book for grades 5-10 offers a set of materials that reflect students' interests and motivation for values education. The book is built around three moral principles: (1) "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you" (Confucius, 513 B.C.); (2) "The end does not justify the means" (Immanuel Kant, "The…

  7. Older Adult Education: New Public Pedagogy in 21st Century Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-hui

    2015-01-01

    The lifelong learning concept of "never too late to learn" advocated by Confucius has gradually become rooted in the lives of Taiwanese adults and seniors. In response to the impact of population ageing and low fertility rates, numerous elementary schools, junior high schools, and universities have allocated resources and space to…

  8. Effects of Cognitive Styles on an MSN Virtual Learning Companion System as an Adjunct to Classroom Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Wen

    2011-01-01

    This study designed a chatbot system, Confucius, as a MSN virtual learning companion to examine how specific application design variables within educational software affect the learning process of subjects as defined by the cognitive continuum of field-dependent and field-independent learners. 104 college students participated in a 12 week…

  9. Can Tasks Be Used to Teach Chinese Culture at the Beginner Level?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruan, Youjin

    2012-01-01

    In the autumn term of 2011, the Confucius Institute for Learning and Innovation (CI) at Aalborg University (AAU) offered a Chinese course as part of an international program at Gug School. The course introduced Chinese culture and information about modern China as well as limited Chinese language...

  10. The search for virtue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitović Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the combat for virtue, waged between Plato and the Sophists, Plato was striving to keep the contents of old Hellenic ethics, but not their mythical form, where Sophism discovered significant shortcomings and thanks to that challenged the whole contents of old Hellenic ethics. On the other hand, Plato accepted the new form of rational thinking, but not the dismantling unilateralism of Sohpism rationality. In other words, Plato embarked on theoreticizing the contents of old Hellenic ethics, aspiring to reconcile the fundamental principle of traditional view of the world with the new ruling form of thinking.

  11. Will and Wille | Wright | Shakespeare in Southern Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Ronald Gray. Shakespeare on Love: The Sonnets and Plays in Relation to Plato's Symposium, Alchemy, Christianity and Renaissance Neo-Platonism. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011.

  12. Ética e educação: caminhos buberianos Ethics and education: buberian ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Röhr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A relação entre ética e Educação está sendo abordada em três aspectos: a educação ética, compreendida como iniciativa educacional, que visa ajudar o educando a se tornar ser ético; a ética pedagógica, que trata da ética do agir do educador; e a ética da comunidade dos educadores, que se volta para questões éticas envolvidas na colaboração dos educadores em projetos pedagógicos. Escolheu-se, como objeto de análise, o pensamento filosófico e pedagógico de Martin Buber enquanto proposta que se distingue tanto do dogmatismo quanto do relativismo ético. Não encontramos em Buber imperativos do agir ético, mas uma descrição de atitudes que nos auxiliam a identificar o caminho para uma vida ética. Em seu livro "O Caminho do Homem segundo a Doutrina Hassídica", utiliza-se de lendas que expressam o caminho ético-existencial a ser tomado pelo homem. O intento da nossa interpretação é abstrair o conteúdo religioso-místico das lendas e apresentar os fundamentos antropológicos e filosóficos do seu pensamento sobre a ética.The relationship between ethics and education is approached in three aspects: the ethical education, understood as the educational initiative that tries to help the learner become ethical; the pedagogical ethics, that deals with the educator's ethics of action; and the ethics of the community of educators, that looks into the ethical questions involved in the collaboration of educators in similar pedagogical projects. The philosophic and pedagogical thoughts of Martin Buber were chosen as a proposal that differs from both ethical dogmatism and ethical relativism. Instead of imperatives of ethical action, a description of attitudes that helps to identify the way to an ethical life can be found in Buber. In the book, "The way of man according to the teachings of Hasidism", Buber uses legends that express the ethical-existential road that a man should take. The intention of our interpretation of this

  13. Computer-Based Legal Education at the University of Illinois: A Report of Two Years' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, Peter B.; Morgan, Thomas D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes experimentation with the Plato IV computer-assisted method of teaching law at the University of Illinois College of Law: development and testing of programs for teaching Future Interests and Offer and Acceptance, and law-related work currently being done on Plato. Potential, limitations, and student enthusiasm are summarized. (JT)

  14. The Test Matters: The Relationship between Classroom Observation Scores and Teacher Value Added on Multiple Types of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Pam; Cohen, Julie; Ronfeldt, Matthew; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined how the relationships between one observation protocol, the Protocol for Language Arts Teaching Observation (PLATO), and value-added measures shift when different tests are used to assess student achievement. Using data from the Measures of Effective Teaching Project, we found that PLATO was more strongly related to the…

  15. A Rather Intelligent Language Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Stefano; Breuker, Joost

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of DART (Didactic Augmented Recursive Transition), an ATN-based system for writing intelligent computer assisted instruction (ICAI) programs that is available on the PLATO system are described. DART allows writing programs in an ATN dialect, compiling them in machine code for the PLATO system, and executing them as if the original…

  16. Response to Mackenzie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Chris Peers begins his response to Jim Mackenzie's article, "Peers on Socrates and Plato" by asking "What is the 'masculine imaginary?'" Peers defines the term "imaginary" as it is applied in his article, "Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho-Logic of Teaching and Learning" (2012) and draws…

  17. Monologue à plusiers voix : Montaigne et le dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftgaard, Anders

    2010-01-01

    dissatisfaction with Plato's dialogues, he aspired to match Plato's style, not least in achieving a conversational tone. Three different elements of dialogue are analysed : the “Dialogue of One“ between the different parts of Montaigne's mind, the dialogue between the author and the writers quoted and paraphrased...

  18. Rotaryst lahkunud Valev Platot ümbritsevad segased rahaasjad / Nils Niitra

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Niitra, Nils, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Endine kaitseministri nõunik Valev Plato lahkus Rotary klubi liikmete ridadest. 2003. aastal kõrvaldati ta Tartu Ülikooli Kääriku spordibaasi direktori ametikohalt segaduste tõttu rahaasjades. Tartu Rotary klubi presidendi Andrus Ansipi arvamus Plato klubist lahkumise kohta

  19. The Legitimization of Dialectic: Socratic Strategy in the "Gorgias."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerton, Patricia

    In the "Gorgias," Plato focuses attention upon the value of dialectic as opposed to rhetoric, as well as the status of orators as opposed to philosophers. Through his agent, Socrates, Plato confirms dialectic as a legitimate endeavor while calling into question the place of rhetoric. Socrates is portrayed as a director who enacts a…

  20. The Inner (and Unavoidable?) Violence of Reason: Re-Reading Heidegger via Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agnese, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Since Plato, Western thought has framed knowing as a method within "some realm of what is" and a predetermined "sphere of objects". The roots and the consequences of this stance towards reason and truth were noted by Heidegger, who equates the history of Western thought with the history of metaphysics. Since Plato, truth has…

  1. The Possibility of Phenomenology in Heidegger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    “democracy to come has always been suicidal” (read: not “life-assured”) .... Plato and Aristotle: “Phenomenology radicalized in ... of Plato and Aristotle brought back to life: the repetition, the ..... notwithstanding, simply to fight the fight is to lose it.

  2. Platonic Dialogue, Maieutic Method and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I offer a reading of one of Plato's later works, the "Sophist", that reveals it to be informed by principles comparable on the face of it with those that have emerged recently in the field of critical thinking. As a development of the famous Socratic method of his teacher, I argue, Plato deployed his own pedagogical method, a…

  3. Perfect and imperfect states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitović Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early Greek ethics embodied in Cretan and Spartan mores, served as a model for Plato`s political theory. Plato theorized the contents of early Greek ethics, aspiring to justify and revitalize the fundamental principles of a traditional view of the world. However, according to Plato`s new insight, deed is further from the truth than a thought i.e. theory. The dorian model had to renounce its position to the perfect prototype of a righteous state, which is a result of the inner logic of philosophical theorizing in early Greek ethics. Prototype and model of philosophical reflection, in comparison to philosophical theory, becomes minor and deficient. Philosophical theorizing of early Greek ethics philosophically formatted Greek heritage, initiating substantial changes to the content of traditional ethics. Replacement of the myth with ontology, as a new foundation of politics, transformed early Greek ethics in various relevant ways. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179049

  4. Religious existentialists about the phenomenon of the crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Karpova

    2014-04-01

    M. Buber distinguishes sociological nature of the crisis and the crisis of the spirit. It focuses attention on the relationship «loneliness – a crisis». Analyzing contemporary anthropological crisis, he associates it with the theme of technological progress and decline of spirituality. So the philosopher comes to clarify three areas of human life, which manifests itself through the crisis of the human soul. There is such area of life: technology, economy and political practice. They, said M. Buber, formed in the human soul loneliness and emptiness. Marcel and Jaspers also drew attention to the problem of the relationship of «man – machinery». They noted the influence of the existence of such a relationship crisis and decline in spirituality.

  5. The management of interaction networks. The ???in-between??? concept within social work and counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Hern??ndez-Aristu, Jes??s

    2015-01-01

    We are familiar with the field of group interaction through the traditional work of Kurt Lewin and also systemic thinking talks about network interaction that builds up the system. Martin Buber also discusses the ???in-between??? concept as the third element.The therapist or counselor, social worker and clients are part of an interaction network, representing therapeutic and social working situations. Success in treatment and reflective processes, depends on the perception and managemen...

  6. Midwifery and dialogue in organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Marianne; Block Poulsen, Jørgen

    is a dialogue between theory and praxis, too. It integrates research, action, and training as well as theories of interpersonal and organizational communication, Roger's humanistic psychology, Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, and Buber's philosophy of dialogue. The empirical material consists...... transcripts and analyses of these live conversations. We hope to have a dialogue with graduate students and colleagues doing similar research and training. As well as with reflective practitioners working as organizational and process consultants, coaches, trainers, mediators, facilitators, etc....

  7. Ética como sociabilidad. Bubber, Marcel y Levinas

    OpenAIRE

    Riva, F. (Franco)

    2005-01-01

    Levinas considers Buber and Marcel “two great minds”. Their philosophy of dialogue is not exhortation, because it expresses the new ethic of proximity of man to man. No more experience of others, but original and irreducible sociality, beyond any theory. The incarnation and the metaproblematic in Marcel, in particular, mean to Levinas the overcoming of the self towards the others. Thus the being in Marcel is not the same as the traditional ontology (the totality), but it ...

  8. Biomedicine or Holistic Medicine for Treating Mentally Ill Patients? A Philosophical and Economical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2007-01-01

    Today we have two scientific medical traditions, two schools or treatment systems: holistic medicine and biomedicine. The two traditions are based on two very different philosophical positions: subjectivistic and objectivistic. The philosopher Buber taught us that you can say I-Thou or I-It, holding the other person as a subject or an object. These two fundamentally different attitudes seem to characterize the difference in world view and patient approach in the two schools, one coming from p...

  9. I and Thou: learning the 'human' side of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Atara; Chin-Yee, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    This essay is a reflection on the doctor-patient relationship from the perspective of two medical students, which draws on the ideas of 20th-century philosopher Martin Buber. Although Buber never wrote about medicine directly, his 'philosophy of dialogue' raises fundamental questions about how human beings relate to one another, and can thus offer valuable insights into the nature of the clinical encounter. We argue that Buber's basic word pairs, 'I-You' and 'I-It', provide a useful heuristic for understanding different modes of caring for patients, which we illustrate using examples of illness narratives from two literary works: Tolstoy's Ivan Ilych and Margaret Edson's Wit Our essay demonstrates how the humanities in general and philosophy in particular can inform a more humanistic practice for healthcare trainees and practicing clinicians alike. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Evaluación de las condiciones higiénico-sanitarias y seguridad microbiológica de establecimientos de restauración colectiva y de platos de ensalada y cárnicos cocidos destinados a poblaciones de riesgo en Andalucía

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Caturla, Magdevis Janet

    2012-01-01

    Los vegetales de IV Gama y productos cárnicos cocidos listos para el consumo son alimentos básicos en los hogares y en los establecimientos de restauración colectiva; y a menudo se incluyen en la dieta destinada a niños, ancianos, enfermos, etc., por su facilidad de preparación y valor nutricional. Sin embargo, son alimentos que no requieren de tratamiento térmico para su consumo, por lo que son muy vulnerables a las contaminaciones microbianas originadas fundamentalmente por p...

  11. New construction and implementation of conveyor equipment for the Jaenschwalde opencast mine; Neubau und Umsetzung von Bandanlagenausruestungen fuer den Tagebau Jaenschwalde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magoltz, Lothar; Reinsch, Rolf [Ecosoil Ost GmbH, Senftenberg (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    A saying: ''The path is the goal''. - This saying is attributed historically and philosophically to Confucius (around 551-479 BC). This saying was experienced in the truest meaning of the word on the Jacob's Path in Spanish Santiago de Compostela. In the case of the coal stream from the Jaenschwalde opencast mine to the Jaenschwalde power station the path is the economic goal. (orig.)

  12. Operational Ethics in Coalition Warfare: Whose Ethics Will Prevail? A Philosophical/Theological Conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-13

    34choices freely made and the rational principle employed." 25 There are three "fathers" of Utilitarianism , Jeremy Bentham, James Mill , and his son John ... Stuart Mill who refined and expanded upon his father’s work. This ethical position states that the...Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and the indigenous religions of Africa; Western and Eastern philosophers, Aristotle, Mill , Confucius, Storer, and Rand to

  13. West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Osuagwwu

    If P then Q. P is the ... (p.32). About 177 AD Celsus, in his book 'The True. Word', expressed what appears to have been the consensus ... h(ic) s(itus) e(st). Tiberius .... account of John 6:42, the Jews stated that they are sure of .... illegitimate son like Confucius as Collins (2016) stated? .... writings of the Greek Scriptures (new.

  14. Inimkäsitlusi filosoofias / Peeter Pints

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pints, Peeter

    1997-01-01

    Käsitlemist leiavad Confucius, Sokrates, Augustinus, M. Luther, B. Pascal, N. Macchiavelli, Erasmus Rotterdamist, T. Hobbes, J. Locke, Ch.L. Montesqieu, J.J. Rousseau, Cl. Helvetius, I. Kant, J. Condorcet, F.W. Hegel, L. Feuerbach, K. Marx, H. Maine de Biran, F.W. Schelling, M. Stirner, A. Schopenhauer, L. Morgan, E. Taylor, L. Levy-Bruhl, W. McDougall, H. Spencer, O. Spengler, Cl. Levy-Strauss, S. Kierkegaard, M. Weber

  15. 数字解读(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Beijing Olympics Facts Opening Ceremony On August 8,2008,the opening ceremony of the 29th Olympic Games was held in the Beijing National Stadium,also known as the"Bird's Nest."At the beginning of the ceremony,2008 actors chanted The Analects of Confucius,and each struck a fou(a clay pot played as percussion instrument)to welcome friends from around the world.

  16. The Coast Artillery Journal. Volume 69, Number 2, August 1928

    Science.gov (United States)

    1928-08-01

    hour law, the immediate availability of funds for the purchase of supplies, creation of a food administration, and perhaps wage limitation and price...Confucius exercises ~ Pfofoun~ influence over the people. Buddhism and Taoism people the universe with numerous spirits, making the people snperstitious... food stuff for her need and so can subsist with- out outside aid. The raw materials produced are silk, camel, goat and sheep wool, cotton, vegetable

  17. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. VNAF Improvement and Modernization Program, July 1971 - December 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Thus it’s not too difficult to understand that Vietnamese who follow Confucius, Mencius and Mo Tzu or who subscribe to Taoism , Buddhism or other...Bombing System, improving the Air Liaison Officer (ALO)/FAC system, improving the airlift control system, improving the food distribution system, and...to have to sustain many, many places that are surrounded and cannot get food and supplies other than by airlift, then they don’t have the capability

  18. Ezra Pound and Du Fu: Gazing at Mt. Tai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Su

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Confined to a six-by-six-foot outdoor steel cage, Ezra Pound saw a series of mountain hills from a few miles to the east of Pisa. The poet compared one of these small 800-metre hills to the sacred Chinese Mt. Tai, which becomes the most common geographical name in The Pisan Cantos. Pound’s poetic summoning of this particular mountain is related to the fact that Mt. Tai is historically and culturally connected to the philosophy of Confucius, who personally ascended the mountain several times. Pound, as a devout Confucian disciple, closely follows the philosophical doctrines and attempts to mentally trace the footsteps of Confucius. This paper will argue how Pound’s poetic evocation of the mountain shares a striking similarity to an eighth-century Chinese poem called “Gazing at Mt. Tai,” which was written by the famous literatus - Du Fu 杜甫(712 – 770 . In spite of living in two completely different eras and countries, Pound’s and Du Fu’s reference to Mt. Tai demonstrates the confluence of their poetic spirits. Neither of them ascended mountain personally. They instead made use of their poetic imagination to follow the paths of Confucius and perceived the mountain as an earthly paradise, one which represents tranquillity and serenity away from the moral and physical corruption of the external world.

  19. Book of Abstracts, Logic Colloquium 󈨦, the ASL European Summer Meeting, August 9-15, 1998, Prague, Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-23

    the First Hypothesis of Plato’s Parmenides and the Undecidable Sentence of Kurt Godel 155 D. Drai Concepts of validity 156 M. L Zelbert, Logical...account of mathematics in the "Tractatus". -154- LC 󈨦 Book of Abstracts A Comparison Between the First Hypothesis of Plato’s Parmenides and the...42)(05)43129386 svandova@jumbo.ped.muni.cz in the second half of the twentieth century there has been a revival of interest in Plato’s Parmenides

  20. Editorial. Dialogue, Communication and Collaboration: Aspects of Philosophy and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovilė Barevičiūtė

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acting as a usual means of everyday communication and collaboration, dialogue is also a fundamental mode of human presence in the world. It is innate and, therefore, feels organic to people. Nothing but a dialogue determines and defines the inborn human potential of reflexivity, empathy and communitivity. Naturally, it is hardly surprising that as a phenomenon, a dialogue constantly fell within the purview of most prominent European thinkers and throughout different historical epochs, in the spaces of philosophy and communication, it unfolded in a diverse and multidimensional manner. Ancient Greek philosopher Plato wrote in the form of dialogue, this way opening the possibility to a reader to learn about the world and the order of things as well as defining a certain relationship between the perceiving subject and the perceivable object. In the early Middle Ages, writings of Saint Augustine encouraged people to immerse into themselves and start a conversation with God, which established a certain living relationship between spaces empirical and transcendental. Much later, towards the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, German phenomenologist Edmund Husserl, who developed the theory of the intentionality of the consciousness, perceived that no living relationship between people is feasible without intersubjectivity. In this case, the communication is conditioned on the focus of at least two subjects on a certain object. This object, in particular, ensures the potential of the meaning, content and the purpose of communication. Another German author Martin Buber treated the dialogue as a phenomenon, in which an individual establishes a personal relationship with the Christian God, and this gives rise to a certain immediacy: a confrontation with the Ruler of the Kingdom of Heaven gives meaning to all the other interpersonal relationships. These are but few different philosophical interpretations of dialogue as a phenomenon. The

  1. Hermes Frank Chidam'modzi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    specifically analyse or discuss Plato's theories of education or justice. 93 .... the world, the unemployment capital of the world, the poverty continent, the Aids .... the masses would be empowered with the necessary civic and political rights.

  2. Energeetiliselt autonoomse maakonna projekti toetab ka Briti saatkond / Raivo Sihver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sihver, Raivo

    2006-01-01

    Briti saatkonna esindaja Liis Plato ja Põlva maavanem Urmas Klaas allkirjastasid pilootprojekti "Energeetiliselt autonoomne maakond". Teise etapi käigus läbiviidavat uurimistööd toetab Eesti Briti saatkond 150 000 krooniga

  3. Anton Marty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rollinger, Robin

    -, Spring (2014), s. 1-18 ISSN 1095-5054 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Anton Marty * Franz Brentano * philosophy of language * theory of meaning * inner form Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/marty/

  4. MILITARY LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: THE FIVE POINT STAR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erasmus

    Frederik Uys, School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch. University .... (also not included in this article) included classical descriptions of leadership (Plato, ..... manual on the SA Army's leadership, command and management principles to be.

  5. Can virtue be taught?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitović Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The teachability of virtue is an issue on which were crossed swords during the struggle for supremacy between two basic principles of ancient Greek spirit - sophistry and ancient Greek ethics. Two great representatives of these opposite principles, Plato and Protagoras, confronted their arguments in Plato's dialog named after the great sophist. Paradoxically, during this philosophical struggle, Protagoras, who at the beginning supposed that virtue is teachable, later, on the contrary, states that virtue is not knowledge and this would make it least likely to be teachable. On the other hand Plato, who is trying to preserve the ancient Greek principle that virtue is innate, claims that virtue is knowledge. The solution of this great dispute between two principles of antiquity Plato sees in philosophical theoretization of ancient Greek mythical worldview.

  6. Christian von Ehrenfels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rollinger, Robin; Ierna, C.

    -, May 28 (2015), s. 1-36 ISSN 1095-5054 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Ehrenfels * Gestalt * values * sexual ethics * philosophy of mathematics * cosmology Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ehrenfels/

  7. Přítel Aristotelés

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháček, Kryštof

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 13 (2015), s. 34-45 ISSN 1803-7860 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Aristotle's philosophy of friendship * Plato's philosophy of friendship * medieval philosophy of friendship Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  8. Did the Timaeus Create a Textual Community?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren R. Niehoff

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Plato's Timaeus, in the beginning widely invoked, became with Philo and Plutarch a privileged source of authority for the Middle Platonists, and with Celsus and Porphyry a marker of pagan identity.

  9. Plato’s Atlantis Story: A Prose Hymn to Athena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Garvey

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available By introducing the Atlantis narrative as praise of Athena, stressing the ritual occasion, and altering elements of Athenian myth, Plato seeks to demonstrate the justice and beneficence of the gods.

  10. Lessons Learned from Developing and Operating the Kepler Science Pipeline and Building the TESS Science Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.

    2017-01-01

    The experience acquired through development, implementation and operation of the KeplerK2 science pipelines can provide lessons learned for the development of science pipelines for other missions such as NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, and ESA's PLATO mission.

  11. Improving The Prototyping Process In Department Of Defense Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    assessing program feasibility is to objectively and rationally determine the strengths and weakness of a technology. This functional requirement also...prototypes created for the purpose of maturing technology will not be ready for fielding and cannot be deployed ( Plato 1995). Second, there is a risk...pressure to reduce cost and schedule estimates (Weinberg 1991; Plato 1995). The first few iterations of a prototype typically result in immediate high

  12. Real Leadership and the U.S. Army: Overcoming a Failure of Imagination to Conduct Adaptive Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Picasso In the Republic, Plato presents an allegory to de- scribe man’s resistance to imagining beyond the boundaries of his experiences...Courage to Create, London, UK: Norton, 1975), p. 60. 2. Plato , The Republic, New York: Oxford University Press, 1945, pp. 232-233. 3. Martin E. Dempsey...enemy will be networked and not always rational . The host nation and the enemy will be news-media savvy and will use information operations to

  13. Fighting Tomorrows Fire Today: Leveraging Intelligence for Scenario-Based Exercise Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    of Martin Fishbein and Icek Ajzenand and the theory of reasoned action.55 The theory states that “behavior is rational and is dependent on the...that may only be conscious of the current practices. The Allegory of Plato’s Cave illustrates this well:112 Plato imagines a cave, in which several...never seen the real objects before, the prisoners believe that the shadows of objects were “real.” Plato suggests that the prisoners would begin a

  14. Determinants of Conflict in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    1965), 13. 137 Tedd Gurr, Why Men Rebel (1965), 13. 138 Jonathan Wolff, " Karl Marx ," The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2011 Edition...490961276. Wolff, Jonathan. “ Karl Marx .” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Spring 2011 Edition (n.d.). http://plato.stanford.edu/archives...accessed March 10, 2011, http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2011/entries/ marx /. 139 Tedd Gurr, Why Men Rebel, (Princeton: Princeton University

  15. The Holy Versus the Sacred: Offering a Little Trouble for a Multiple Religious Belonging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidenbaum Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this essay is to illustrate a difficulty which may arise in the attempt to simultaneously identify with more than one religious tradition. Drawing upon the philosophical insights of Martin Buber and Emmanuel Levinas, I demonstrate how some of the most cardinal themes in one faith or theological perspective may set itself against the central notions of another. Along the way, Kierkegaard, the perennial philosophy, process theology, and even Frank Herbert’s science fiction classic Dune are woven into the discussion.

  16. 6. Languaging as sharing

    OpenAIRE

    McHenry, Henry Davis

    2017-01-01

    When will the action of thinking endure, include, and refer to the presence of the living man facing us? When will the dialectic of thought become dialogic, an unsentimental, unrelaxed dialogue in the strict terms of thought with the man present at the moment?—M. BuberA living human being cannot be turned into the voiceless object of some secondhand, finalizing cognitive process.—M. Bakhtin We have now re-invented language as languaging, and we have begun to investigate how languaging and Bei...

  17. Nos tempos da bioética, a presença dos vitimados questões sobre o outro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Pretel Pereira Job

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta algumas considerações sobre a bioética, estabelecendo conexões com as necessidades de adotar um ponto de vista que inclua a participação do Outro. Argumenta e enfatiza a necessidade de respeitar a dignidade do ser humano conforme lições ensinadas pelos filósofos Martin Buber, Emmanuel Lévinas, Franz Rosenzweig e Viktor Frankl. Conclui, apontando para a necessidade de incluir o conceito de Alteridade, a fim de pesquisar sobre o relacionamento entre homem e homem.

  18. Dialog i kommunen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gitte; Sidenius, Annemette; Bønnelykke, Rebeka

    2015-01-01

    is to investigate if and how the dialogue is utilized, articulated and practiced in a public organisation. From the research question: How is the discourse about dialogue, participation and empowerment articulated in the context of the “Dialogforum” in the school of X-købing? We examine the practice in a specific...... are mainly Phillips and her presentations of Mikhail Bakhtin, Martin Buber and Michel Foucault (Phillips 2011b), since it provides adequate concepts to be able to analyse available discourses within the concept of “Dialogforum”. Our findings reveal the following themes of participation and empowerment...

  19. Why worship? Revisiting a fundamental liturgical question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Cilliers

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article the fundamental liturgical question as to the motive and intention of worship is addressed within the framework of four related liturgical tensions, namely between being and becoming, between time and space, between awe and expression, and between laughter and lament. In order to do this, some classical voices from the past are listened to, for instance, Schleiermacher, Kierkegaard, Moltmann, Tillich, Otto, Bakhtin and Buber, but more contemporary views are also considered. These four tensions are described in the light of the key terms: ‘already’ and ‘not yet’, and some implications for present-day liturgical practices are drawn.

  20. Forms of concern: toward an intersubjective perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmacz, Rami

    2013-09-01

    The growing interest in the issue of concern, which appeared relatively late in psychoanalytical literature, resulted in several distinctions. Winnicott distinguished between concern as an expression of guilt and concern as a manifestation of joy, Brenman Pick distinguished between real concern and spurious concern, and Bowlby distinguished between sensitive and compulsive caregiving. The basic concepts of Buber's dialogical philosophy and intersubjective approaches in psychoanalysis have created fertile ground for the study of concern, and enabled us to conceptualize these distinctions in a way that has heretofore been lacking in psychoanalytical thought.

  1. Ethik der Verantwortung: Begründungsprobleme aus diskursethischer Sicht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Burckhart

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available - Ethic of responsibility. Foundation problems from the point of view of discourse ethics - This paper discusses the problem of the foundation of the ethics of responsibility in Hans Jonas by the point of view of the Karl-Otto Apel’s discourse ethics. In difference to a unilateral reciprocal ethics – like christians charity, ethics of the bond in the kantian sense, ethics of the face according to Levinas, ethics I-You according to Buber – the approach proposed in this paper can be defined as universal reciprocal. This means that it need to consider the interests of all participants in the “life”.

  2. Public Diplomacy: An Alternative Diplomacy in Foreign Affairs’ Issues. Greek Public Diplomacy: Capabilities and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    146 Abdullah Bozkurt, “Democratic Deficit in Turkey,” Today’s Zaman, April 19, 2011, http://www.todayszaman.com/ columnist -241412-democratic-deficit...2010/04/09/confucius-to-their-enemies-china%E2%80%99s-investment-in- public-diplomacy/. 250 J. Nye, “The New Public Diplomacy,” Project Syndicate , Feb...255 J. Nye, “The New Public Diplomacy,” Project Syndicate , Feb 10, 2010, http://www.project- syndicate.org

  3. JPRS Report, China, Qiushi (Seeking Truth), No. 7, 1 April 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-24

    Buddhism and Taoism , we will have only to look at the following process—from the teaching of Six Arts by Confucius, to which Dong Zhongshu added the...impressed by this line of his: "I refused bribes of food and such things, and I can sleep with a clear conscience." It is not easy for a person to...34refuse bribes of food and such things, and sleep with a clear conscience" in today’s society. As I read this line, I think of the person and realize

  4. El Quijote: nutrición y salud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Begoña Carretero Gómez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemos trabajado el tema basado en la nutrición con los alumnos de tercero de la ESO. Para ello se ha desarrollado la siguiente experiencia tomando como referencia la obra del Quijote. Se han utilizado diferentes fragmentos de dicha obra en los cuales se hace referencia a diferentes platos castellano-manchegos. Se recopilaron recetas correspondientes a éstos y otros platos para, posteriormente, realizar un estudio nutricional de los mismos. De la misma manera los alumnos elaboraron diferentes menús utilizando dichos platos, procurando siempre mantener el equilibrio nutricional. Durante el desarrollo de la actividad se ha procurado un enfoque interdisciplinar relacionando el tema principalmente con las áreas de ciencias sociales, educación física, matemáticas y lengua. Finalmente se han cocinado algunas de estas recetas.

  5. Number in Plato’s Philebus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetnikov, Andrey

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns the concept of number (arithmos, important for dialectical method of later Plato. It becomes clear that the arithmos in Plato’s dialectics should be understood as a concrete operation, a sort of tekhne, such as counting, enumeration, compilation of a comprehensive and systematic list, etc., rather then the theoretical number of abstract arithmetic. The author analyses a series of grammatical, musical and rhetorical examples, supplied by Plato in the Philebus and other dialogues, and traces the usage of arithmos and similar words in the earlier tradition, particularly, in Homer, Hesiod, the classical tragedy, and Herodotus.

  6. Advancing Military Professionalism in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    professional military. It simultaneously undermines a military’s commitment to protect the country and its citizens. Plato noted some 2,400 years ago...stepping down from his post as Senior Advisor to the President on Defence and Security.42 He procured not only spoiled food rations for the Ugandan... Plato , The Republic, tr. G.M.A. Grube (Hacket, 1992), 417b and 434a-b. 17 “Above the State: The Officers’ Republic in Egypt,” Carnegie Middle East Center

  7. Kant and zeno of elea: historical precedents of the "sceptical method"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micheli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For Kant's interpretation of Zeno in KrV A502-507/B530-535, scholars have usually referred to Plato's Phaedrus (261d; in reality the sources Kant uses are, on one hand, Brucker (who depends in turn on the pseudo-Aristotelian De Melisso, Xenophane, et Gorgia, 977 b 2-21, and, on the other, Plato's Parmenides (135e6-136b1 and Proclus' commentary on it, as quoted by Gassendi in a popular textbook he wrote on the history of logic.

  8. De tumba a útero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia González Suárez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we rehearsed dialogue between two chronologically distant contexts: Plato and the present time. The issue to confront is the difference between the sexes in terms of reproduction. Plato considered irrelevant the difference in the dialogue Republic and then became one of the centers of their legislation, in a real matter of state. Currently, the increasing use of surrogacy, which makes pregnancy in a process that can be dispensed by contracting with another woman, it demands a reflection on the political significance that we attach to this practice and thus the legislative framework in which we frame it.

  9. Panorámica de la cocina colombiana

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Alzate

    2003-01-01

    El territorio colombiano, dotado de selvas, cordilleras, valles, mares y ríos, conjugado con las tradiciones culturales propias de cada región, le ha dado a la cocina colombiana variedad y exquisitez. Al recorrer el país encontramos diversidad de platos, ricos en ingredientes naturales y con el sello inconfundible de los pueblos y su arte culinario. Las costas sobre los dos mares hacen uso de su abundancia de mariscos y pescados: la Atlántica, enriqueciendo los platos con tubérculos y carnes ...

  10. Platón, Aristóteles y la narrativa histórica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Picón Casas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most showy questions about the works of Plato and Aristotle rests on them silence brings over of the history. They read and criticized physicists, philosophers, mathematicians, biologists, poets, rhetorical, political, etc. Nevertheless, their appointments about the historians of that moment would fit in a sheet of paper. In this brief article we try to offer an explanation about such an omission. Likewise, we are useful to offer a reason of the Menexenus and to contribute a confirmation of the reasons that L. Edelstein led to questioning the genuineness of seventh and eighth letters attributed to Plato.

  11. Similitudes entre as filosofias de Rousseau e Platão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldo Becker

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with some similitudes that may be perceived between the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and those of Plato. We intend to examine mainly the existent resemblances concerning eloquence and the power of discourse, as much as they have political actions as their ends. We aim at demonstrating that both authors attribute both positive and negative traits to discourse and eloquence. In order to achieve these goals, we shall use mainly the works Essay on the origin of languages and Discourse on the origin of inequality, by Rousseau, and Phaedrus and Gorgias, by Plato.

  12. Estudio del efecto del procesado e ingredientes funcionales en la textura de purés de patata frescos y congelados

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Sánchez, María José

    2015-01-01

    En los últimos años el contexto económico, social y cultural ha generado que en los países desarrollados se dedique menos tiempo a la preparación de platos tradicionales. El ritmo de vida incesante en las grandes urbes ha generado un aumento del consumo de platos precocinados y congelados. Simultáneamente, los últimos datos sobre obesidad y enfermedades cardiovasculares han provocado un aumento de la concienciación social por la necesidad de disminuir la ingesta total calórica aumentando...

  13. Another Kind of Love in Education: "Whatever" Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Igor; Lewis, Tyson E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational theorists ranging from Plato, to Freire, to bell hooks, to Peter McLaren have theorized love as an essential factor in education. Whereas, typically, a particular kind of love (erotic love, caring love, etc.) is argued to be especially relevant for educational practice, what we do in this paper is to look at kinds of love that are…

  14. Philosophy and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Philosophical thinking which has stood the test of time is summarized in this document. The rationale is that all students benefit from studies of philosophical thinking emphasizing moral standards. Thinkers included are: Plato, Aristotle, Peter Abelard, Francis Bacon, Sir Thomas More, Thomas Campanella, Thomas Hobbes, Benedict Spinoza, John…

  15. The Virtues of New Water Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwarteveen, M.Z.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores some of the implications of post-positivism for water knowledge by answering the question: what is good water knowledge? I use Plato's four cardinal virtues, i.e. Fortitude, Temperance, Prudence and Justice, to answer the question. Fortitude means acknowledging that there are

  16. Chôra : Creation and Pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2009-01-01

    Plato's dialogue the Timaeus describes not only the making of the cosmos (order), but also the condition of what is not order, neither for the human body nor for the universe. What is disorder in cosmogonic terms it is disease for the human body. Timaeus applies to the concept chôra in discussing...

  17. Effective communication. A Platonic case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, Gerry C.; Wieling, Martijn; Kroon, Martin; Van Noord, Gertjan

    As a contribution to the valedictory volume for John Nerbonne I present a case study of two thematically similar passages in Plato where I will make use of an analysis based on discourse cohesion and above all on the rhetorical and manipulative use of particles to show how a single (leading)

  18. Mimesis in Bible Didactics – an outline in the context of religious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Mimesis' is a concept explored in Antiquity as well as in cultural history. It also plays an important role in the Bible. In this article we argue for 'mimesis' as a role model for Bible teaching in religious education. In the first part we give some insights into the concept of mimesis, drawing on ancient philosophers (Aristotle, Plato) ...

  19. Walter Pater's "Winckelmann"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, David

    2001-01-01

    In his recent book, "The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections from Plato to Foucault," Alexander Nehamas presents two conceptions of philosophy--philosophy as a theorethical discipline concerned to offer arguments; and the interest of Socrates, Montaigne, and also Nietzsche and Foucault in the art of living. Building on his "Nietzsche: Life as…

  20. Impudent Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article explores aspects of eros in education in relation to ideas of indirectness associated with the French concept of "pudeur," sometimes translated as "modesty". It explores lines of thought extending through Emerson and Nietzsche but reaching back to Plato's "Symposium." This is a means of exposing the…

  1. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    through and yet strong enough to bear wind and snow. The geometry is in turn based on the solid with twelve identical regular pentagons as faces – the dodecahedron, which goes back to the times of Plato. Each of the pentagons can further be divided into five triangles, making 60 triangles in all. Mathematicians have ...

  2. Mimesis in Bible Didactics – an outline in the context of religious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-23

    Oct 23, 2015 ... How to cite this article: Zimmermann, M. ... are central to the third book of Plato's Res Publica and reveals the .... type of depiction and reference brings it into the present ..... W.H. Fyfe, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA/.

  3. Quantum Beauty: Real and Ideal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, F.

    2011-01-01

    Does the world embody beautiful ideas? Pythagoras and Plato intuited that it should; Newton and Maxwell demonstrated how it could. But modern physics, and especially the quantum physics at its foundation, answers with a much more resounding and definitive 'Yes' I'll bring in history and art, as well as science, to make the case.(author)

  4. THE BEAUTY OF THE WORLD IN PLATO’S TIMAEUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Meara, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Timaeus Plato describes the world as the ‘most beautiful’ (kallistos, 29a5 of generated things. Perhaps indeed this is the first systematic description of the beauty of the world. It is, at any rate, one of the most influential statements of the theme. The Stoics were deeply convinced by it and later, in the third century A.D., at a time when contempt and hate for the world were propagated by Gnostic movements, Plotinus, interpreting the Timaeus, would write magnificent passages on the beauty and value of the world. But what does Plato mean by the ‘beauty’ of the world? What makes the world beautiful? In this paper these questions are approached first (1 by a brief discussion of the distinction which Plato appears to make in the Timaeus between beauty and the good. In one passage (Tim. 87c ‘measure’ seems to relate to this distinction. It is suitable then (2 to look at a section of another late work of Plato, the Philebus, where the themes of beauty, goodness and measure may be compared in more detail. The theme of measure then takes us back (3 to the Timaeus, in order to examine the role played by measure, in particular mathematical measure, in constituting the beauty of the world. I discuss in detail the way in which mathematical structures make for the beauty of soul and body in the living whole that is the world.

  5. Pedagogy, Philosophy, and the Question of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsung Juang; Huang, Kuo Hung

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the prominence of rationalism in the major Western pedagogical theories of Plato, Rousseau, and Dewey, all of whom conceptualize formal teaching, as the inculcation of rationality in individual learners. After each of their theories has been described, the argument turns against the tradition of pedagogical rationalism to…

  6. Operational Social Influence in the Vietnam War: An Analysis of Influence Tactics Used by the U.S. Marine’s Combined Action Program and the Viet Cong in South Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    LITERATURE REVIEW A. THE SCIENCE OF SOCIAL INFLUENCE Sociology, the study of society, can be traced back to the time of Plato (428–327 BC). Sociology looks...produces a drive to reduce that tension and may result in a rationalization trap.”120 One of the most studied theories in Social Psychology is

  7. Legitimacy: First Principles and Efficacy in R2P Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    offender. At its core, natural law is then focused on one overriding telos or end, which is to 21 Plato and Aristotle are considered the first scholars...related to some a priori notion in natural law; it is the result of the rational choice of various rulers. Krasner’s argument is persuasive, but he does

  8. Latent Scope Bias in Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    to the way we perceive the world, and it has permeated intellectual debate since Plato (Statesman, 261e et seq.). The mechanisms by which we...Social Psychology, 13(2), 141–154. Hilton, D. J. (1995). The social context of reasoning: Conversational inference and rational judgment. Psychological

  9. Implementing a Modern Warfighting Supply-Chain for Information Technology Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    enforcing information standards that help regulate inf01mation definitions; emphasizing compliance; and rationalizing performance requirements. 52...developed a prototype PISR PLAto coinmence realizing that CCE in the context of the first MCISR-E objective: "The synergistic integration of all

  10. A Comparison Study of Second-Order Screening Designs and Their Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    H2 97 V. Nonlinear Screening Designs for Defense Testing: An Overview and Case Study 5.1 Introduction “Necessity is the Mother of Invention.” Plato is...involved concepts like design resolution, minimum aber- ration , power, the number of clear (non-confounded) effects, concepts like rotatability

  11. Identity Dilemmas: The Consequence of Identity in Protracted Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    prescribe method, or promote thought, the contributions of Thucydides, Plato , Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Kant and others offer penetrating insight into...Lebow, A Cultural Theory, 180. 28 Ibid., 180. For an exceptional examination of ontological security-seeking behavior and how rational security

  12. Reawaken the American Spirit of Innovation in Your Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Necessity is the mother of invention. — Plato Many people could argue that American national security and the development of airpower in particular...directive manner whereas the catalyst’s peer approach exercises trust in a collaborative manner. The CEO is “ rational , powerful, in the spotlight

  13. The Meaning of Time. An Introduction into Philosophical, Biological and Physical Aspects of Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-15

    mentioned already Plato (428-347BC) as the originator of the essential quasistatic view of time and history. He was preceded by Parmenides (540BC and Zeno...after. * Being and Entities: Being is the most universal concept. It was 31 discovered by Parmenides (- 500 B.C.), who saw that of all the diversity of

  14. Aristarchus of Samos the ancient Copernicus

    CERN Document Server

    Heath, Sir Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This classic work traces Aristarchus of Samos's anticipation by two millennia of Copernicus's revolutionary theory of the orbital motion of the earth. Heath's history of astronomy ranges from Homer and Hesiod to Aristarchus and includes quotes from numerous thinkers, compilers, and scholasticists from Thales and Anaximander through Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle, and Heraclides. 34 figures.

  15. The Readability of an Unreadable Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert M.

    1980-01-01

    The Dale-Chall Readability Formula and the Fry Readability Graph were used to analyze passages of Plato's "Parmenides," a notoriously difficult literary piece. The readability levels of the text ranged from fourth to eighth grade (Dale-Chall) and from sixth to tenth grade (Fry), indicating the limitations of the readability tests. (DF)

  16. the rhetorical analysis of the letter to the galatians: 1995-2005

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002a:11) points out that sophistic rhetoric was not aimed at reflecting truth or even at achieving logical consistency, but rather at winning the ar- gument at all costs. Furthermore, Vos (2002a:14ff.) describes the attempts by. Plato and Aristotle to ...

  17. Creative Minds: The Search for the Reconciling Principles of Science, the Humanities, Arts and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Since before the time of writers such as Plato in his "Republic" and "Timaeus"; Martianus Capella in "The Marriage of Mercury and Philology"; Boethius in "De institutione musica"; Kepler in "The Harmony of the Universe"; and many others, there have been attempts to reconcile the various disciplines in the sciences, arts, humanities, and religion…

  18. An integrativist attempt to dissolve and reconstruct Richard Rorty's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    He calls those who engage in the former activity ''ironists,'' people like Proust, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Hegel and Derrida, and calls those who engage in the latter activity ''metaphysicians,'' people like Plato, Descartes and Kant (RORTYa 1989, 96—97). The ironists, he says, have radical and continuing doubts about their ...

  19. Husserl's Evidence Problem | Oktem | Indo-Pacific Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of evidence, with specific focus on the problem of evidence in Husserl's phenomenology. How this problem was dealt with and resolved by philosophers such as Plato, Descartes and Kant is compared and contrasted with Husserl's approach, and the implications of the solution offered by ...

  20. Perfect Worlds : Utopian Fiction in China and the West

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Douwe

    2011-01-01

    Perfect Worlds biedt een uitgebreide historische analyse van utopische verhalen in de Chinese en Euro-Amerikaanse traditie. Aan bod komen onder meer de kritiek van Thomas More op Plato, de Europese oriëntalistische speurtocht naar utopieën in China en Chinese schrijvers die hun confucianistische

  1. Perfect Worlds : Utopian Fiction in China and the West

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Douwe

    2011-01-01

    Perfect Worlds biedt een uitgebreide historische analyse van utopische verhalen in de Chinese en Euro-Amerikaanse traditie. Verschillende hoofdstukken gaan onder meer in op de kritiek van Thomas More op Plato, de Europese oriëntalistische speurtocht naar utopieën in China, Dostoevsky’s reactie op

  2. Philosophy with Guts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Western philosophy, from Plato on, has had the tendency to separate feeling and thought, affect and cognition. This article argues that a strong philosophy (metaphorically, with "guts") utilizes both in its work. In fact, a "complete act of thought" also will include action. Feeling motivates thought, which formulates ideas,…

  3. Shadow art

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.; Pauly, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "To them, I said, the truth would be literally nothing but the shadows of the images." - Plato, The Republic Shadow art is a unique form of sculptural art where the 2D shadows cast by a 3D sculpture are essential for the artistic effect. We

  4. [Art-chance and art-experience in classical Greece].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Deokjin

    2011-06-30

    In Classical Greece, works defining the nature of art appeared in the various disciplines like medicine, rhetoric, dietetics, architecture and painting. Hippocratic authors tried to show that an art of medicine existed indeed. They contrasted the concept of art with that of chance, not experience that Plato and Aristotle distinguished from art. In fact there are similarities and discrepancies between Hippocratic epistemology and Platoic epistemology. Hippocratic authors maintained that the products of chance were not captured by art. They distinguished the domain of art charactered by explanatory knowledge and prediction from the domain of chance ruled by the unexplained and the unforeseeable. They minimized the role of luck and believed the role of art. Hippocratic authors thought that professional ability contained both knowledge and experience. In Hippocratic corpus, experience is a synonym of competence and usually has a positive meaning. But Plato gave empirical knowledge the disdainful sense and decided a ranking between two types of knowledge. Both Hippocratic authors and Plato held that a genuine art had connection with explanatory knowledge of the nature of its subject matter. A common theme that goes through arguments about art-chance and art-chance is the connection between art and nature. Hippocratic authors and Plato regarded art as a highly systematic process. Art provides us with general and explanatory knowledge of human nature. Art and nature is a mutual relationship. The systematic understanding of nature helps us gain the exactness of art and an exact art helps us understand nature well.

  5. Chomsky on MisEducation. Critical Perspectives Series: A Book Series Dedicated to Paulo Freire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2004-01-01

    Noam Chomsky's prolific writings have made him one of the most-quoted educators in history--the only living writer on a most-cited list that includes Plato, Shakespeare, and Freud. Yet until now, no book has systematically offered Chomsky's influential writings on education. In this book, Noam Chomsky encourages a larger understanding of…

  6. Excluding Women from the Educational Realm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jane Roland

    1982-01-01

    Martin examines the exclusion of women from philosophy of education both as subjects who have written about education and as objects of educational study and thought. She traces this exclusion from a misunderstanding of Plato, Rousseau, and Pestalozzi and builds a critique of the concepts of education, liberal education, and teaching. (Author/SK)

  7. Guía para la construcción de instalaciones deportivas: campo de tiro

    OpenAIRE

    Bañuls García, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Realización de proyectos de campos de tiro de pistola y escopeta tanto de aire comprimido como de fuego, arco, ballesta, tiro al plato y pista de air-soft. Escuela de Arquitectura e Ingeniería de Edificación Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena

  8. Celebrating the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Celebrating the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education Curriculum ... Accordingly the thesis defended in this paper is that; contrary to public opinion, it is a ... from documentary analysis with special focus on Plato's Theory of Forms and ... By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  9. Quantification of dichlorvos released from kill strips used in boll weevil eradication programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two types of kill strips, Hercon Vaportape II and Plato Insecticide Strip, are used by boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis (Boheman), eradication programs in the U.S. Both types utilize dichlorvos as the killing agent and are marketed to last up to a month in traps. Consequently, programs typically re...

  10. Can Movies Enhance Happiness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bergsma (Ad)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPlato called poetry a ‘false Siren’, the ‘ally of all that is low and weak in the soul against that which is high and strong.’ (Bywater 1920) The problem was that onlookers in the theatre would become emotionally involved in the psychic conflicts and suffering that was depicted, whereas

  11. MTA Computer Based Evaluation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lisa P.; And Others

    The MTA PLATO-based evaluation system, which has been implemented by a consortium of schools of medical technology, is designed to be general-purpose, modular, data-driven, and interactive, and to accommodate other national and local item banks. The system provides a comprehensive interactive item-banking system in conjunction with online student…

  12. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Opafola, SO. Vol 1, No 1 (2010) - Articles The Basis of The 'Social – Market' Economy Abstract · Vol 1, No 2 (2010) - Articles Human Nature and the Social Order Abstract · Vol 5, No 1 (2014) - Articles Plato, Freud and Marx on Human Nature: A Comparative Analysis Abstract · Vol 5, No 1 (2014) - Articles The Debates in ...

  13. Love will tear us apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramming, Pia; Johnsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    to their leaders, each others and their jobs in terms of love. To be able to encourage emotions of love in call centre workers can be seen as very successful transformational leadership, while challenging our basic assumptions about love as an authentic, higher order feeling. We use Plato's classic work on love...

  14. 141 Development as Obligation and the Obligation of Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    ground that; he had enjoyed the State's security and protection all his life and that it would be ... Plato built his whole architecture of the State on justice and was .... of the society and to the less privileged and vulnerable members of the society.

  15. The Development of a Distributive Interactive Computing Model in Consumer Economics, Utilizing Jerome S. Bruner's Theory of Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James L.

    A computerized delivery system in consumer economics developed at the University of Delaware uses the PLATO system to provide a basis for analyzing consumer behavior in the marketplace. The 16 sequential lessons, part of the Consumer in the Marketplace Series (CMS), demonstrate consumer economic theory in layman's terms and are structured to focus…

  16. De blinde vlek van de filosofie : Een leven leiden: Over nut en nadeel van de filosofie voor het leven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomkens, R.

    2016-01-01

    Age-old philosophical texts, from Plato to Montaigne or from Lao-tse to Rousseau, are still being read by many. What makes these texts so attractive and ‘contemporary’ today, other than scientific texts from long ago? Most of the time these texts do not address empirical or conceptual questions, but

  17. Los indios y los empedrados sotaquireños

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Giovanni Quesada-Cárdenas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo de investigación describe la preparación de los platos culinarios tradicionales del municipio de Sotaquirá (Boyacá, que hacen parte de los saberes ancestrales que han prevalecido generacionalmente en los habitantes del municipio; ya que caracterizan la identidad sotaquireña. También se exponen algunos elementos sobre la gestión de la administración municipal (2012-2015 para promover la permanencia y reconocimiento de estos saberes como patrimonio cultural. El contenido del artículo es el resultado de la investigación “Identidad campesina en torno a los oficios tradicionales en el municipio de Sotaquirá (2013-2015”; que tuvo como fin describir las costumbres culturales en torno a los oficios tradicionales, que configuran la identidad campesina de los habitantes del municipio de Sotaquirá. El enfoque metodológico fue cualitativo desde la corriente socio-critica; se usaron la entrevista y la observación participante para reconocer la importancia de los platos que se configuran como aspectos fundamentales de la identidad de los sotaquireños. Se destaca que este trabajo logró generar espacios de reflexión con los entrevistados respecto de los oficios tradicionales culinarios del municipio en torno al reconocimiento del valor de los platos como patrimonio cultural y las particularidades del plato de acuerdo con los contextos familiares.

  18. The Lure of Evil: Exploring Moral Formation on the Dark Side of Literature and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David; Davis, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The moral potential of works of art, for good or ill, has been recognised from philosophical antiquity: on the assumption that the moral effects of art are invariably negative, Plato advised the exclusion of artists from any rationally ordered state. Arguably, however, the problem of the moral status of art has become yet more acute in contexts of…

  19. Mysticism and/in the Old Testament: Methodological orientation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-17

    Nov 17, 2015 ... suppositions (most directly the concepts rendered by Plato and Aristotle) and rhetorical ... possibilities here would lie the ideals of the disappearance-of-being, when ... There is thus no problem with historically identifying the ... ways typical of the era in which we live under Western(ised) cultural hegemony.

  20. Computer Processing of Esperanto Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Bruce

    1981-01-01

    Basic aspects of computer processing of Esperanto are considered in relation to orthography and computer representation, phonetics, morphology, one-syllable and multisyllable words, lexicon, semantics, and syntax. There are 28 phonemes in Esperanto, each represented in orthography by a single letter. The PLATO system handles diacritics by using a…

  1. The World of Work between the Personal and the Collective: A Demand for Social Justice and Guidance for Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Julio Gonzalez; Chacón, Omaira

    2015-01-01

    The struggle for justice has been permanent for a very long period of time. In this sense, it could be said that since Plato conceived it as one of the fundamental virtues, justice has constituted a goal to achieve for any society. In the case of justice, related to social aspects, the situation has been overwhelming in Latin America. Based on a…

  2. Preconocimiento en Platón y Aristóteles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Andrés Mercado M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that Aristotle often criticizes Plato's theories -especially his conception of reminiscence- some of their explanations of human knowledge seem to present important similarities. Some texts of Meno and De memoria et reminiscentia show one of these interesting parallelisms.

  3. TODOS SOMOS AMNÉSICOS: MARCAS DO PENSAMENTO DE BERGSON E DA REMINISCÊNCIA PLATÔNICA EM NENHUM, NENHUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Teixeira Silva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to analyze the concepts of memory present in Guimarães Rosa’s short story Nenhum, Nenhuma. We start from the assumption that the writer used the ideas of Plato and Bergson in the construction of this story.

  4. Forest species in an agricultural landscape in The Netherlands: effects of habitat fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grashof-Bokdam, C.

    1997-01-01

    For 312 forest patches on sandy soils in the Netherlands, effects of fragmentation are studied of forest habitat in the past on the present occurrence of forest plato species. Using regression techniques, the numbers of forest edge, interior, zoochorous and anemochorous species, as well as

  5. 140 CIRCULAR INTERACTION BETWEEN LINGUISTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economy. Although a country or administrative district should have one or more official languages for obvious reasons, Nelde (1991) proposes that the ... circular interaction between linguistic departments and language departments. Finding an answer to' Plato's abovementioned problem entails that as many languages as ...

  6. Education and the Political Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Joseph R.

    This paper traces the ideology (assertions, theories, and aims) of public schooling from Plato through the first Prussian state school system under Bismarck, through Adam Smith and John Stuart Mill. It contends that public schooling contradicts and works to destroy the United States' libertarian traditions of freedom and self-rule. Though not…

  7. The Concept of Philosophical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyum, Steinar

    2010-01-01

    Strangely, the concept of philosophical education is not much in use, at least not as a "philosophical" concept. In this essay, Steinar Boyum attempts to outline such a philosophical concept of philosophical education. Boyum uses Plato's Allegory of the Cave, Rene Descartes's life of doubt, and Immanuel Kant's criticism of metaphysics as paradigms…

  8. Fysis v rétorice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháček, Kryštof

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 10 (2013), s. 7-31 ISSN 1803-7860 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Physis * rhetoric * Aristotle * Gorgias * Plato * necessity * nature * destiny * free action Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0239423

  9. It's Not as Simple as It Seems: Doing Honest Academic Work in an Age of Point and Click

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenbury, Leila

    2009-01-01

    There have been and always will be those who try to game the system. The academic system is no exception, and probably since the time Plato and Socrates gathered students around them to discuss the philosophical verities there were those in the group who calculated how they could creatively prune what the master teachers asked them to do and…

  10. Hippocrates and the mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukanelis, A S

    1998-03-01

    Hippocrates as a central figure of Greek Medicine of the Golden Age stands ipso jure first among equals with Pericles, Socrates, Plato, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Phidias, Praxiteles and all of the other great men who are to this very day considered by the true rulers, philosophers, writers, artists and generally all civilized men as Great Teachers.

  11. child sexual abuse in zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J MUGUMBATE

    This paper bemoans the current scourge of child- sexual abuse as well as the recent .... What we must bear in mind is that these are the. 'reported cases' ..... Plato was trying to advance a theory of motivation for human action and he explains ...

  12. Notions of "Rhetoric as Epistemic" in Ancient Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, William L.

    The notion that rhetoric (and to a lesser extent, argument) is epistemic is an increasingly popular one today, although it can be traced to ancient Greece. The notion holds that rhetoric, or the art of persuasion, creates and shapes knowledge. Two ancient authors--Aristophanes and Plato--provide evidence that others had notions of rhetoric as…

  13. Implantación de un sistema de gestión de la seguridad y salud en el trabajo según OHSAS 18001 en un planta de fabricación y envasado de pasta seca.

    OpenAIRE

    Marco-Famoux, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    El trabajo se basa en un caso real, un centro industrial donde se produce y envasa pasta seca, y que pertenece a un grupo empresarial de propiedad familiar dedicado a la venta y distribución de pastas alimentarias secas y platos preparados refrigerados a base de pasta fresca.

  14. The Classical Tradition of Dialectics and American Legal Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, William

    1981-01-01

    The case method is a modern discipline of mind, based on classical models of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and well suited to the education of lawyers, whether in scholarly work or advocacy. It produces sharpness and speed of tongue and mind and a facility for precision, clarity, and quality of expression. (MSE)

  15. Intelligent Computer-Assisted Instruction: A Review and Assessment of ICAI Research and Its Potential for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Christopher J.; And Others

    The first of five sections in this report places intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) in its historical context through discussions of traditional computer-assisted instruction (CAI) linear and branching programs; TICCIT and PLATO IV, two CAI demonstration projects funded by the National Science Foundation; generative programs, the…

  16. Philosophein as ergon: Plato’s Socrates in Herodotus’ Solon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Machado Ribeiro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to show how Plato did not have, at a glance, the poet as his main opponent: as Havelock wishes to prove, Plato’s problem is not only a quarrel about orality in poetry against the lettered intellectual. Thus, it is important to notice that in Apology of Socrates, Plato proposes to illustrate the difference between Socrates’ philosophein and the activity of the nominated sophistai, as seen that in The Clouds by Aristophanes the Socratic character is presented as a sophistes. However, we cannot forget that in the Fifth Century the words philosopher and sophist had a similar meaning. The aim of this study is, though, to discuss that in Herodotus, when Croesus and Solon meet, it is possible to differentiate the philosophical from certain sophistical activity and Plato probably used this distinction in certain passages in his work to highlight Solon as a singular wise man apart from the others. Hence, there would be a possible diversity of erga in the investigation in order to gain a knowledge. It would be, thus, less of a distinction between the poet of oral culture and the intellectual philosopher what Plato would aim to do immediately, but above all, through the theoretical knowledge, to justify rationally the most beautiful human actions.

  17. Literature as a Moral Thermometer: A Humanistic Approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the classical period till the present, questions have always been asked over what values that a course of study in any human society can be to the scholar. Plato started the debate on what value or contribution which literature can make to a well-ordered republic. Later scholars defended the view by asserting that ...

  18. Early Childhood Education: Its Historic Past and Promising Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Dorothy W.

    As the end of the century nears, it is important to reflect upon the history of early childhood education and what the future holds. Centuries before the Christian era began, Plato wrote that the welfare of children from birth onward was a responsibility of the entire community. In 1628, the first written guidance for out-of-home education of…

  19. Education in the Virtues: Tragic Emotions and the Artistic Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penwell, Derek L.

    2009-01-01

    The profoundly thoughtful--not to mention extensive--character of the scholarship historically applied to the nature of the difference between Plato and Aristotle on the issue of the tragic emotions raises the obvious question: What new is there left to say? In this article, the author seeks to hold together two separate issues that have occupied…

  20. Classical variables in the era of space photometric missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnár L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The space photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler transformed our view of pulsating stars, including the well-known RR Lyrae and Cepheid classes. The K2, TESS and PLATO missions will expand these investigations to larger sample sizes and to specific stellar populations.

  1. Literature and Truth : Imaginative Writing as a Medium for Ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansdown, Richard

    2017-01-01

    In Literature and Truth Richard Lansdown continues a discussion concerning the truth-bearing status of imaginative literature that pre-dates Plato. The book opens with a general survey of contemporary approaches in philosophical aesthetics, and a discussion of the contribution to the question made

  2. Greek Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Thomas L.

    2014-03-01

    Prefatory note; 1. Introduction; 2. Doxography; 3. Plato; 4. Eudoxus (and Callippus); 5. Aristotle; 6. Heraclides of Pontus; 7. Euclid; 8. Aristarchus of Samos; 9. Eratosthenes; 10. Aratus; 11. Posidonius; 12. Geminus; 13. Hipparchus; 14. Ptolemy; 15. Strabo; 16. Treatise 'De mundo'; 17. Cleomedes; 18. Plutarch; Appendix; Index.

  3. Plagiarism and Prosecution: A New Approach at Air University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Isocrates, Demosthenes, Aes- chines, Menander and Plutarch indulged in it at times. Aristotle lifted whole pages from Democritus. . . . And Plato...There are speeches in Antony and Cleopatra which * are pure Plutarch . Malone painstakingly analyzed Parts I, II, and III of Henry VI, and came to the

  4. The World of Instruction: Undertaking the Impossible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    Throughout history, philosophers have reflected on educational questions. Some of their ideas emerged in defense of, or opposition to, skepticism about the possibility of formal teaching and learning. These philosophers include Plato, Augustine, St Thomas Aquinas, Søren Kierkegaard, Martin Heidegger, and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Together, they…

  5. Democratizing Laughter

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    According to John Banas and colleagues, the research on laughter in the classroom indicates that a classroom full of laughter increases learning. In contrast, Plato argued that laughter is a vice and chastised those who would give in to it. Nonetheless, between the ancient concept of laughter as vice and the modern concept of laughter as learning…

  6. Rebirth of Paideia: Ultimacy and the Game of Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doner, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Plato's philosophy of paideia concerns the life-long growth toward areté, excellence, in body, mind, and spirit. Implementation of this philosophy in modern times is challenged by many societal conditions, especially relativism, plurality, and secularity. This paper discusses an approach that advocates individualized paideia. In its most simple…

  7. The Matrix and the Cave: Reconsidering the Ontological Dimension of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Morimichi

    2006-01-01

    The Western theory of education was in its Greek origin inseparably tied to the Greek concept of Being and truth. This is shown clearly by the metaphor of the Cave in the seventh book of Plato's Republic. This interdependence of education (paideia) with Being (which later was identified with Nature or God) has provided, since then, a firm…

  8. Affective technology, should it be our future or remain fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Coeckelbergh, M.; van Wynsberghe, A.L.; van Wynsberghe, Amy Louise

    2011-01-01

    In Book VII of The Republic, dated 360 B.C., Plato describes his allegory of the cave. He questions our reality, which could as easily be an illusion. This touches upon the foundations of philosophy but also on the foundations of mathematics. Both branches of science question axioms taken often for

  9. Nature, Human Nature, and Solutions to Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

    This paper promotes an undergraduate course that would discuss the great ideas of Plato, St. Paul, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean Paul Sartre, B. F. Skinner, and Konrad Lorenz. This course would help students understand human values and behaviors while focusing on historical, world, and national problems. Tentative solutions would then be…

  10. An Interdisciplinary Proposal for Employing Film to Release the Imaginations of Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Haroldo Abraam

    2010-01-01

    Questions regarding the proper role of the arts in education have occupied many thinkers throughout the ages, no less than the likes of Plato and Rousseau. Like them, several have argued that paintings, for example, are mere re-presentations of and certainly not, to borrow a term from Kant, the "thing-in-itself." From a Platonic and Rousseauian…

  11. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By that time, the coasts of southern. Italy and eastern Sicily ... The left one was known to the ancient Chinese; the right one was given by .... bothered to check it. (The fact that he was wrong is to have ... Technology, Doubleday, 1982. Plato and ...

  12. Between Truth and Beauty. Symposium 194e – 201c

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháček, Kryštof

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, International Issue 1 (2010), s. 173-195 ISSN 1803-7860 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Plato * Symposium * Gorgias * Agathon * tragic thought * rhetoric * philosophy of power Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0236437

  13. The Phaedrus Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Examines the possibility for a textually grounded inquiry of Plato's "Gorgias" and "Phaedrus" that would probe the psychic investments intrinsic to discursive phenomena. Examines the impact of the confrontation with rhetoric as the "Other" of philosophy, and explores the relations among rhetoric, philosophy, and…

  14. Bewildering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaza, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Theorists as diverse as Plato, Rousseau, Freire, Apple, and the New London Group have understood education as a practice that "makes" humans. Positing education as a practice of humanization has long been understood to be the highest, most lofty good. By drawing on feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies, the author of…

  15. CIÊNCIA E MATEMÁTICA, NA REPÚBLICA, DE PLATÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Filgueiras de Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze how the Republic of the Plato discusses the concepts of math and science, more specifically in books V, VI and VII of this dialogue. Were first raised some preliminary issues considered in relation to the peculiar way in which Plato developed his writing, if the dialogical style that asks a whole care in their reading, but also arose the problem of translations made from Greek to Portuguese that sometimes hinders its understanding. In a second moment was approached understanding of the term science in Greek, making a relationship with mathematics. As a starting point, was taken the assumption that for Plato the math does not fit the classification of science. This research seeks to understand these concepts in the Platonic philosophy, and there is no way to accomplish such a purpose without resorting to the issues that are most relevant in the Platonic philosophy (epistemology and ontology, considering the arguments of Reminiscence and the Theory of Forms. The paper ends by concluding that science is only considered in the Platonic philosophy that we can have knowledge of the reality, and that, according to the philosopher, is the dialectic; getting the math therefore framed within a framework of knowledge that Plato says in the Republic be among the opinion (doxa and science itself (epistême that is the understanding (dianoia.

  16. What It Is and that It Is

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannatella, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The title of this paper comes from Aristotle's "Metaphysics." It appropriately captures how he understood art education. In what follows, a considerable amount of the author's thinking is indebted to Plato's and Aristotle's understanding of art education as mimetic education. On first view, an art mimetic educational approach may appear worryingly…

  17. Iqbal--Education and Cultivation of Self: A Way Forward for Muslims of the Subcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauman, Sarwat

    2018-01-01

    Whether all educationists were philosophers or not, one thing is clear--that all philosophers were educationists--directly or indirectly. May it be Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau or Dewey, they all came up with the notion that to bring about any change at a greater level in a society, change in its educational system is fundamental. Dr. Mohammad…

  18. Thomas Taylor’s dissent from some 18th-century views on Platonic philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catana, Leo

    2013-01-01

    that Neoplatonic readings of Plato are erroneous by definition. In particular, it argues that the reviewer relied on, and tacitly accepted, ethical and theological premises going back to the historiography of philosophy developed by Jacob Brucker in his Historia critica philosophiae (1742-44). These premises were...

  19. Aristotle's "homo mimeticus" as an Educational Paradigm for Human Coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzo, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    In the "Poetics" of Aristotle there is a definition of the human being that perhaps has not yet been well considered in educational theory and practice. This definition calls into question a dynamism that according to Plato was unavoidable for an appropriate understanding of the educational process that turns a human being into a…

  20. On the (Im)potentiality of an African Philosophy of Education to Disrupt Inhumanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghid, Yusef

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances made in the liberal Western philosophical and educational tradition to counteract unethical, immoral and inhumane acts committed by the human species, these acts of inhumanity persist. It would be inapt to apportion blame only to Western thinking, which has its roots in Greek antiquity, as Plato and Aristotle, for instance,…

  1. Effects of visual control training on the shooting performance of elite female basketball players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, a method was tested to train visual control in basketball shooting. Using a sender/receiver system, Plato liquid-crystal goggles were wirelessly and manually controlled by the experimenter to manipulate vision of players while they were shooting. During the training the goggles

  2. The Art of Wondering: A Revisionist Return to the History of Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covino, William A.

    Reacting to the tradition which has reduced rhetorics to summaries of rules and principles, this book presupposes that Plato's "Phaedrus," Aristotle's "Rhetoric," and Cicero's "De Oratore" cannot be reduced to summary information or pedagogical advice. The book considers that these works, on the contrary, along with…

  3. Rhetoric. The Bobbs-Merrill Series in Composition and Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard L., Ed.

    Reflecting the opinions of both classical theorists and recent authors, 16 papers on rhetorical theory are collected in this publication. Selections in Part 1, concerned with the definition and objectives of rhetoric, are by Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Kenneth Burke, Donald C. Bryant, and Martin Steinmann, Jr. In Part 2, selections from the pedagogy…

  4. The Boundaries of Language and Rhetoric: Some Historical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Robert O.

    1968-01-01

    Important ideas and events in the history of rhetoric are examined in order to illumine the present situation, especially the problem of defining the concept of rhetoric. From Plato's hostility to rhetoric and Aristotle's epistomological rehabilitation of it to the later ethical emphasis of Cicero and the Medieval Christian rhetoriticians, the…

  5. "Techne" and Technical Communication: Toward a Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Offers background on how the term "techne" was used up through the fourth century BCE. Discusses how modern discourse on technical communication both converges with and departs from Plato's and Aristotle's statements on the relationship between "techne" and rhetoric. Points out areas for further discussion as teachers of…

  6. The Failure of Memory: Reflections on Rhetoric and Public Remembrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kendall R.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth of public memory studies in the field of rhetoric suggests the need to reflect upon the ways in which the practices of rhetoric and the notion of memory intersect. In this essay, I trace the intersection between memory and rhetoric back to the works of Plato and Aristotle. These early works suggest that one reason for attending to…

  7. The First Sophists and the Uses of History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarratt, Susan C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of intellectual views on the Greek sophists in three phases: (1) their disparagement by Plato and Aristotle as the morally disgraceful "other"; (2) nineteenth century British positivists' reappraisal of these relativists as ethically and scientifically superior; and (3) twentieth century versions of the sophists as…

  8. Exploring the Foundations of Philosophy of Natural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, David J.

    This paper explores the historical and philosophical basis of naturalistic education. The exploration focuses on prominent epistemological views of the relationship between sensation and thought. Three time periods of intellectual study were considered: (1) the classical period during which Plato established the model for philosophic inquiry and…

  9. "Listen Then, Or, Rather, Answer": Contemporary Challenges to Socratic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullam, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of Jacques Rancière in recent work in educational philosophy has rejuvenated discussion of the merits and weaknesses of Socratic education, both in Plato's dialogues and in invocations of Socrates in contemporary educational practice. In this essay Jordan Fullam explores the implications of this trend through comparing…

  10. Questioning the Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's "The Republic." Socrates used a series of strategic questions to help his student Glaucon come to understand the concept of justice. Socrates purposefully posed a series of…

  11. Socratic Dialogue, the Humanities and the Art of the Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Plato's depiction of Socrates' interrogations in his early dialogues provides an enduring example of the importance of asking questions as an educative method. This article considers the central educational elements of Socratic dialogue and the ways in which these were developed in the 20th century, particularly in "The Socratic Method"…

  12. The Metaphor of Therapy and Its Use in the Learning of a Workplace Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Paul; Maguire, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The idea that learning involves a kind of therapy goes back to ancient times: Socrates was, at least in part, concerned with a kind of care of the self, and Plato in his early dialogues presents learning as a cure for bad intellectual and moral habits. Our metaphoric use of therapy supposes that worthwhile learning might be considered as a…

  13. Why is there Philosophy of Mathematics AT ALL? | Hacking | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematics plays an inordinate role in the work of many of famous Western philosophers, from the time of Plato, through Husserl and Wittgenstein, and even to the present. Why? This paper points to the experience of learning or making mathematics, with an emphasis on proof. It distinguishes two sources of the perennial ...

  14. Gr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Blažek

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The-Greek word   (Archilochos, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristoteles, Dor. ní&anos: "ape", ní-&wv, -wvoi; "little ape" (Pindaros does not have any convincible Indo-European etymology. The old comparison with Lat. foedus "beastly, foul" etc. is obviously improbable and the word is rather bor­rowed from an unknown source.

  15. Humane Letters: Notes on the Concept of Integrity and the Meanings of Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Chris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author calls for an analysis of integrity and contends that attempting to describe wholeness precisely and incisively is not necessarily a contradiction in terms. The author makes some distinctions about integrity using two moves, one inspired by Plato, and one by Aristotle. The author uses the phrase "humane letters" to name…

  16. Inviting the Deprived to the Feast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    An urban community college routinely assigns Swift, Plato, Joyce, and other classic authors of the Western tradition to its immigrant and minority students. Bruce Gans, who founded and directs the program, tells of the value of Great Books to those who have the most to gain from rising above race, culture, and class.

  17. Belief in the Spirits of the Dead in Africa: A Philosophical Interpretation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... view that in this rapidly changing world, philosophy should inquire not only in to theoretical problems, but also into practical ones. Plato and Aristotle's theories of the soul being some of the most carefully discussed philosophical theories on immortality or lack of it, will provide the background of deliberation in this paper.

  18. A history of astronomy from Thales to Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, J L E

    1953-01-01

    A masterpiece of historical insight and scientific accuracy, this is the definitive work on Greek astronomy and the Copernican Revolution. Beginning with the ancient Egyptians, it ranges from the Pythagoreans and Plato to medieval European and Islamic cosmologies, concluding with detailed surveys of the works of Copernicus, Brahe, and Kepler.

  19. Philosophy as Pharmakon : Towards the hermeneutics of healing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of philosophy gives us an insight into what good life portends. Plato, Aristotle and other ancient classics developed guiding principles on the ethical basis for behavioural cognition and existential logic. Hence, the interest of philosophy in other disciplines such as medicine and psychology is well known.

  20. The Gestural Theory of Language Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David F.

    2008-01-01

    The idea that iconic visible gesture had something to do with the origin of language, particularly speech, is a frequent element in speculation about this phenomenon and appears early in its history. Socrates hypothesizes about the origins of Greek words in Plato's satirical dialogue, "Cratylus", and his speculation includes a possible…

  1. An Appraisal of Equal Educational Opportunities and its Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper appraised the concept of equal educational opportunities and its implications for peace and development in Nigeria. In the age of Plato, education was meant to make each person contribute his best in the stratum that he belonged. In consequence, all children were educated together at the nursery, kindergarten ...

  2. Aristotle on Deliberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Christian Erik J

    2014-01-01

    Aristotle differs from most later philosophers in distinguishing clearly between epistemic reasoning, which aims for truth, and practical reasoning, which does not. How can he posit this distinction and yet not dismiss practical reasoning as flattery and manipulation, as Plato did? The answer lies...

  3. Thomas Aquinas on the Soul: Old problems, New Solutions. Guiding Premises for a Thomistic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy Shilov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two main approaches to the doctrine of the soul: that of Plato and that of Aristotle. Each of these approaches had its own development and its own interpretations. Plato and his school was more important during the Middle Ages. Through the neo-platonic philosophers it reached Saint Augustine and became a part of the western cultural and religious heritage until finally it was taken up by member of the Franciscan order - Roger Bacon and Bonaventure. But this paradigm could not solve a host of problems connected with the soul and many of them remained unresolved. The end of the twelfth century brought the growth of the universities and the teaching of Aristotle - a new paradigm - transmitted by the Arabic philosophers which was rediscovered by the West. Two commentators on Aristotle - Averroes and Avicenna -were the most important for the West, especially since Avicenna exerted a great influence on Albert the Great. But both Plato and Aristotle, when taken separately, proved to be quite useless in resolving certain problems. But Thomas Aquinas was able to splice the Gordian knot concealing a solution to the problem of the soul. By combining the psychology of Plato with the metaphysics of Aristotle, Thomas succeeded in creating a new concept of the human person. The author of this article has tried to explain the difficulties which faced Thomas and the way in which Thomas was able to resolve a problem which had troubled philosophy through the ages - the problem of reconciling Plato with Aristotle and finding a way to make their conflicting philosophies agree with each other

  4. Closeness and distance in the nurse-patient relation. The relevance of Edith Stein's concept of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Sylvia M

    2006-01-01

    This paper emanates from the concept of empathy as understood by the German philosopher Edith Stein. It begins by highlighting different interpretations of empathy. According to the German philosopher Martin Buber, empathy cannot be achieved as an act of will. In contrast, the psychologist Carl Rogers believes that empathy is identical with dialogue and is the outcome of a cognitive act of active listening. The empathy concept of Edith Stein, philosopher and follower of Edmund Husserl's phenomenology, goes beyond these conflicting views and offers a more complex interpretation, with relevance for both healthcare and nursing education. When studying Stein's three-level model of empathy, a field of tension between perspectives of closeness and distance becomes apparent. The paper concludes by suggesting Stein's model of empathy as a strategy to overcome the tension and meet the demands of empathy.

  5. Interaksi Antarmanusia melalui Media Sosial Facebook Mengenai Topik Keagamaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedictus A Simangunsong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human interaction has shifted with the advent of new media, the internet, especially with the presence of social media. The keyword of social media is a medium intended to share among individuals in order to achieve a better quality of life. The resarch aims finding human interaction trend influenced by social media i.e. Facebook, by looking at the content of the message delivered in sensitive issues phenomena, such as religious belief. Data analysis has been done through descriptive qualitative based on Martin Buber. These result indicates that interaction model can be established if the content of the message delivered in accordance with the wishes of communication, often obtained a description of the interaction that can be done by users against other users so that the purpose of the use of social media can be achieved.

  6. Anxious Affinities: How Theatrical Performance Can Generate a Platform for Interpersonal Dialogue

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    Motal Jan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article combines both philosophical and psychological approaches to argue that art and theatre performance especially can be grasped as a revelation of the universal and basic human concern, which is existential anxiety. The author presents an opinion, that via performative acts on stage, spectators and performers/actors are interconnected in hermeneutic situation (Hans-Georg Gadamer, in which they play their existential experience. Therefore, the universal death anxiety (Irvin D. Yalom can be understood as a possible platform for interpersonal and intercultural dialogue (Martin Buber. The article concludes, that archetypes (Carl Gustav Jung are such a place for mutual understanding, representing both mental and physical answers to the basic existential experience of humankind.

  7. Playing the Ineffable: The Romance of Musical Pragmatism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.; Westney, William

    Part lecture, part dialog and part classical-music performance (both solo and two-piano), this presentation explores the dimensions of musical meaning on a variety of levels.  The presenters bring parallel and interlocking backgrounds to their shared inquiry: one as a professional performer...... with philosophical interests, the other as a professional academic philosopher who is also an active classical musician. Topics will include: the interplay between verbal and non-verbal narrative, the intersubjectivity of meaning generated through musical artistry and audience-performer dynamics, notions...... of authenticity in both music making and philosophy, the relationship between language systems and the "ineffable."  The discussion will invoke themes from the work of, among others, Langer, Buber, Dewey, and Wittgenstein. Piano works by Mozart and Rachmaninoff will be performed on concert Steinways....

  8. [In the beginning was a relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbelle, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Judgment and actions based on scientific evidence are modified by the unique caregiver-patient relationship. Caregivers relying exclusively upon "rational" decisions in line with evidence-based clinical recommendations avoid their relational responsibility. The "noble" purpose illustrates that decisions to treat can be at the same time pointless and valuable. Dia (through) - logue (knowledge) makes it possible to go beyond informed consent, which holds caregivers responsible for providing information and patients for the decision to treat. Finally, where healing is no longer achievable and autonomy dies away, compassion rather than therapeutic tenacity might be the answer. These examples are explained corresponding to the philosophical ideas of respectively Emmanuel Levinas en Roger Burgraeve (noble purpose), Martin Buber (dialogical thinking) and Daniel C. Dennett (autonomy loss).

  9. The positive dimension of the conflict in news interviews

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    Thales Vilela Lelo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects about a possible positive dimension of the conflict, starting with an exhibition that addresses the world of journalism interviews. Using the positivity attributed to the conflict in the theorizing of Georg Simmel as a complement to the dialogical movement developed in Martin Buber theorizations, will perform the analysis of an interview conducted in the Globo News guided by the discrepancy between the interviewer/interviewee. From this point, the concepts are articulated with an emphasis on a pragmatic framework, so that it discusses the conflict as an element with potential to promote destabilization on conventional frames of journalism, managing the public and inviting him to debate about a specific problematic field.

  10. Sacred Torrents in Modernity: German Jewish Philosophers and the Legacy of Secularization

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    Roemer Nils

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the ongoing interaction between the Jewish sacred past and its modern interpreters. Jewish thinkers from the eighteenth century reclaimed these ideals instead of dismissing them. Sacred traditions and modern secular thought existed in their mutual constitutive interdependence and not in opposition. When the optimism in historical progress and faith in reason unraveled in the fin de siècle, it engendered a new critical response by Jewish historians and philosophers of the twentieth century. These critical voices emerged within the fault lines of nineteenth and early twentieth century Jewish anti-historicist responses. What separated twentieth-century Jewish thinkers such as Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, and Gershom Scholem from their nineteenth-century forerunners was not their embrace of religion but their critical stance toward reason and their crumbling faith in historical progress.

  11. Lévinas as a perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Britta

    or pedagogy or both, and the examples are to be seen in a Danish context. On this background I will reflect on a modern understanding of being a professional in areas of care, pedagogy and education. Even if Lévinas seems utopian, his work can contribute to new reflections related to tendencies in a modern......Professional relations in the field of pedagogy, education and care are often described as symmetric or asymmetric having in mind that the professional has an advantage of being the professional. Using the perspective from the philosopher Emmanuel Lévinas this is not just a matter of course...... that the professional has the advantage. In Denmark we have a tradition of referring to the Danish philosopher K.E.Løgstrup or the German philosopher Martin Buber when investigating the professional encounter or meeting and often stating the asymmetry without any further considerations... Løgstrup makes us aware...

  12. [RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JUNIOR AND SENIOR DOCTORS: A BUBERIAN MODEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Pougnet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Doctors in training work in services under the supervision of senior doctors. These professional relationships may lead to frustrations, or ill-being at work. Indeed doctors are often very busy with care and can hardly communicate. The purpose of this article is to propose ways to think in its ethical dimension this relationship, by learning from Martin Buber's ideas. He thought a philosophy of relationship in two word pairs: I-Thou and I-It. This thought can be useful in the context of the médical relationship and mentorship. Indeed we can see our colleague as a person or only as a caregiver. We offer a relationship model according to buberian thought, between junior and senior doctor caring about the same patients.

  13. Education related to the field of (intellectual) disability - we have to do better!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Britta Kusk

    that this is the result. My findings show different perspectives in this field that are very rarely in focus of any research. Structural barriers are quite important. Among others educational gaps - in general - but also more specific on e.g. ethics and knowledge of legislation. Adults with intellectual disability...... to secure suitable education to ensure that the intentions in the conventions can be fulfilled and to raise a general awareness. Looking into educational orders in Denmark for professional bachelors in this area it seems not at all evident, that this is going to happen. For all programs it relates...... as Emmanuel Lévinas, Axel Honneth and Jürgen Habermas, but also Løgstrup, Buber and Foucault contribute. How can we – in spite of structural, governmental and economic barriers – work with ethical aspects and values as recognition and understanding. My main methodology has been a phenomenological approach...

  14. The space of togetherness--a caring encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Gunilla; Kasén, Anne; Nyström, Lisbet

    2014-03-01

    Encounters in relation to the nurse-patient relationship are often discussed within nursing and caring literature without a reflection on the actual meaning of the concept. Assuming that an encounter is essential for nursing care, this article seeks to create a deeper understanding of the concept through a hermeneutic approach to texts by the philosophers Buber and Marcel. Presence, recognition, availability and mutuality seem to be essential prerequisites for an encounter. As these prerequisites are fulfilled within and between human beings who encounter each other, it is possible to speak of a space of togetherness, a mutual existence, where life's mystery shines forth and caring is realized. The challenge lies in creating these encounters within nursing care. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Quelques conceptions juives de l’individu Some Jewish Conceptions of the Individual

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    Alessandro Guetta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Is there a Jewish conception of the individual subject? The issue is quite problematic, for several reasons: 1 it is difficult to speak of Judaism in a monolithic manner, because Judaism is a multifaceted reality, varying according to different epochs and places, to the point that we should speak of “Judaisms”, in the plural; 2 if the question of the individual subject is connected to the vision that the Western (meaning, European, essentially Christian culture has constructed, Judaism can hardly be defined as “Occidental” or “Oriental”. After a short analysis of these two points, we present the conceptions of the individual subject as developed by two major Jewish thinkers of the twentieth century: Martin Buber (1878-1965 and Erich Fromm (1900-1980. Both based their visions on traditional Jewish sources (Bible, Talmud but attributed them a universal value.

  16. China’s Higher Education Engagement with Africa: A Different Partnership and Cooperation Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth King

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available What is the nature of China’s educational partnerships with Africa? This chapter examines China’s investment in human resource development in Africa, especially in higher education, through several programmes including long- and short-term training of Africans in China, Confucius Institutes, stand-alone projects, and the 20+20 scheme for higher education cooperation between China and Africa. It investigates several apparent differences between China’s aid discourse and practice and those of traditional Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD donors. It asks how the enduring continuity of China’s discourse on mutual benefit and common good in educational aid can be explained. Can what looks like a one-way partnership in terms of financing really, in fact, be symmetrical?

  17. The needs of AIDS-infected individuals in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun Luke; Trout, Shirley K; Lu, Katarina; Creswell, John W

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this exploratory case study was to describe the needs and present the voices of 21 AIDS-infected individuals who contracted the disease through the selling of blood in rural China. Data sources included interviews, field notes, and letters. Three themes emerged: living in a vicious circle, awakening from the dead end, and escaping the vicious circle through education. Education emerged as an overarching theme and was identified as the catalyst that would either keep the families of those affected trapped in the vicious circle or rescue them from it. Findings are explained within the theoretical contexts of social capital, motivation theory, and Confucius's philosophy on education. The authors discuss implications for researchers, educators, relief workers, human service workers, policy makers, and human rights advocates. They conclude with suggestions for further study.

  18. Two Views of Liberty, Occidental and Oriental(?

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    Bruno Leoni

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper, by the late Bruno Leoni, was originally presented at a special meeting of the Mont Pèlerin Society (Tokyo, Sept. 5–10, 1966, and was originally published in the Italian journal Il Politico in 1966. The paper displays Leoni’s fondness for Chinese culture, and is essentially a defense of the unity of mankind. Westerners are often of the belief that the Occidental, or Western, individual freedom-based view of liberty is distinct from the Oriental (Eastern view of liberty. Leoni challenges this perspective. Mill believed that disregard for custom was what made the West both free and different from the rest of the world, while the Oriental approach is more backward and based on blind respect for customs. However, custom has often been invoked both in the East and in the West to oppose and limit the power of tyrants, and to defend or to secure civil or political liberty. Mill argued that disregard of custom accounts for novelty, novelty for diversity of character and culture, and the latter for freedom and progress, but there was an unsurpassed diversity of character and culture when Oriental and Occidental people were put together under the rule of the Roman emperors. Furthermore, the “Orient” was not monotonous, dull, and homogeneous, as Mill presumed; to the contrary, Europe cannot show in any period of its history a variety of races, languages, cultures, philosophies and religions even slightly comparable to those of India or China. In fact, Buddha and Confucius were both concerned mainly with individual freedom. Confucius’s theory of society, in particular, was very individualistic; he clearly formulated for the first time in recorded history that principle of “reciprocity,” the “golden rule” for any liberal society. He maintained that the very fundamental principle for a happy society is “Not doing to others what one does not wish them do to one’s self.” Confucius shared, along with the greatest masters of

  19. [The role of ancient astrology in preparation for a secular natural science and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Markham J

    2011-01-01

    The Persian period in the Near East (from c. 500 BCE) represented the first example of globalisation, during which advanced cultural centres from Egypt to Afghanistan were united under a single rule and common language. Paul Unschuld has drawn attention to a scientific revolution in the late first millennium BC, extending from Greece to China, from Thales to Confucius, which saw natural law replace the divine law in scientific thinking. This paper argues for new advances in astronomy as the specific motor which motivated changes in scientific thinking and influenced other branches of science, including medicine, just as the new science of astrology, which replaced divination, fundamentally changed the nature of medical prognoses. The secularisation of science was not universally accepted among ancient scholars, and the irony is that somewhat similar reservations accompanied the reception of modern quantum physics.

  20. In the Footsteps of the Master: Confucian Values in Anime and Manga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Born

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction to Japan in the Sixth Century, the teachings of Confucius have played an important role in the creation and sustenance of societal values and order. While Japanese society has changed much since the dawn of the postwar era, these same basic principles are still highly influential, but are seen in some surprising forms. Geared primarily at pre-teen and teen-age boys, recent 'shônen 'anime, especially 'Naruto 'and 'Bleach', evince Confucian values while encouraging the viewer to identify with and embrace them. While some critics of contemporary culture are quick to point out some of the societal breakdowns and subcultural variances common to the 'Otaku 'phenomenon, Confucianism is still alive and well, albeit in reinterpreted forms. Using 'shônen 'anime in the classroom to examine traditional values creates a useful device for understanding Japanese popular culture and its connection to larger anthropological and historical themes.

  1. The Analysis of Confucian Followers’ Understanding of Gods in Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism in Bangka Island - Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiato Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a multi-ethnic, multi-culture, and multi-faith country. This piece of land combines a lot of ethnic elements into one. For example, Confucianism in Indonesia is combination of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism characteristic in many ways. Aim of this paper is to find out the features of Confucianism as a religion or a belief for its followers in Bangka. In addition, this paper also focuses on finding out the followers view towards their Gods in their perspectives. In this article, classification of Gods in Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism is presented based on direct social observation. In this paper, analysis of Confucian followers understanding towards Gods in Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism in Bangka Island Indonesia is presented respectively. In conclusion, characteristics of these three religions have blended perfectly and there is no more distinction in Confucius, Buddhist or Taoism Gods in Confucian followers’ community in Bangka Island. 

  2. Introduction to Special Section: Paleoseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeats, Robert S.; Prentice, Carol S.

    1996-03-01

    A proverb of Confucius states "Study the past if you would divine the future." If we could learn about the past history of earthquakes on a specific fault, then we could serve society well by better forecasting the future earthquake behavior of that fault. For most of the world, the period of historical records is short: about 200 years in California and less than that in New Zealand, Oregon, and other parts of the world. And even where the historical record is thousands of years long, such as in north central China or the eastern Mediterranean region, it is commonly difficult to correlate a major historical earthquake with a specific active fault. Even if this correlation could be made without ambiguity, the recurrence intervals for many faults are longer than even a historical record of several thousand years. For these reasons, the history of large earthquakes on faults must, for the most part, be learned from the geological record.

  3. Konsep Ketuhanan (T’ien dan Relevansinya dengan Pembentukan Etos Kerja dalam Ajaran Kong Hu Cu (Konfusius

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    Nazwar Nazwar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Artikel ini membahas konsep Ketuhanan Konfusius yang berkaitan dengan etika kerja para penganutnya. Konsep ketuhanan yang dianalisa berdasar pada perspektif Filsafat, kemudian ditarik kepada realita tindakan sosial penganut ajaran Konfusius, dengan menggunakan data yang diperoleh berupa semangat kerja dan pemenuhan kebutuhan hidup para penganut pandangan hidup ini. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, ditemukan bahwa konsep ketuhanan yang terdapat dalam ajaran Konfusius adalah paradigma fungsional. Dalam keyakinan tersebut, relasi antara Tuhan dan manusia didasarkan pada nilai fungsi. Tuhan diyakini berdasar pada peranannya terhadap kehidupan manusia. Begitupun sebaliknya, manusia diyakini berperan dalam pemenuhan keinginan Tuhan. Sehingga dalam ibadahnya yang paling menonjol adalah ritual korban. Semakin banyak korban yang dipersembahkan, maka kehidupanpun akan semakin subur dan makmur. Berdasarkan paradigma demikian, para penganut Konfusius kemudian mempunyai semangat kerja tinggi. Dengan tujuan selain  pemenuhan kebutuhan hidup, juga merupakan usaha pemenuhan kebutuhan spiritual dalam rangka ibadah kepada T’ien (Tuhan. This article discusses the concept of God Confucius relating to the work ethic of its adherents. The concept of God that is analyzed based on the perspective of philosophy, then pulled to the reality of social action adherents of Confucianism, using the data obtained in the form of morale and subsistence adherents of this view of life. Based on this research, it was found that the concept of God contained in the teachings of Confucius is the functional paradigm. In that belief, the relationship between God and man is based on the value of the function. God is believed, based on its role in human life. Vice versa, humans are believed to play a role in the fulfillment of God's will. Thus, in the worship of the most prominent is the ritual sacrifice. The more sacrifices be offered, the more fertile and prosperous life will be. Based

  4. ROLE OF ANCIENT HERITAGE IN FORMING CHRISTIAN WORLD PICTURE

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    Vadim Vadimovich Kortunov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article compares the views of Plato and Aristotle in terms of their relation to the problem of rationality. In fact, Plato and Aristotle have absolutely opposite positions on the question of the essence of philosophy, its subject, its methods; they call for a completely incompatible with each other interpretations of the basis of the life. For Plato, true being is spiritual, transcendental that does not fit into any rational-logical framework. For Aristotle true being is subject-sensual, quite rationally knowable within the boundaries of logical thinking. For Plato, the subject-sensual - is illusory "shadow" of the spirit; for Aristotle absolute spirit is a theoretical assumption, assumption forced, as a kind of methodological assumption to justify the reality of the subject-sensual, "flesh" world. Aristotle most clearly formulated the idea of the rational-logical totality, as a whole it is quite popular for the ancient metaphysics, with which the natural philosophers, and Eleatics, and sophists were largely agreed. Plato, "Opened" transcendence, outlined ways to super-rational, and in many respects to the irrational and mystical understanding of the philosophical problems. And in this sense, as well as Orphics and the Pythagoreans, he left some opposition to the rational-logical tradition of ancient Greece. Plato argued that the truth - it is itself a spiritual reality, which is originally opened to man: it is beyond controversy, representing the true being. From this he concluded that the forms of life and forms of logical thinking differ from each other. For Aristotle, on the contrary, the truth is the correspondence of the forms of thinking to the forms of being; it is not a reality, but it is a reflection of the reality in the structures of human consciousness. And we need to dad that just such interpretation of truth firmly established in Western philosophy and science.These two tendencies, aimed at forming rational and irrational

  5. The Hero-Heroine as Image and Representation of the Androgyne

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    Carmen Dominte

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting as a fabulous bisexual human being, the Androgyne was soon punished by the gods when trying to place itself above them. Plato describes the Androgyne as a perfect roundness: a single body having four arms, four legs and one head with two opposed faces. Because of its pride, the Androgyne was cut in the middle and the face was turned backwards. Considering this definition, the myth of the Androgyne was used by Plato to sustain his thesis upon love: the two halves left alone in the world are trying desperately to find each other in order to recreate the initial form. The same myth was also found in the early religions, reflecting the unity between the Earth and the Sky. This study follows the Plato’s tradition and identifies the modern Androgyne in different literary characters in few of the very well known literary masterpieces.

  6. 'Teraz' u Parminidesa: B 8.5 ('NOW' ACCORDING TO PARMENIDES: B 8.5

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    Jerzy Pawliszcze

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the concept of time in Parmenides' poem. The author begins with comparison between Parmenides and the concept of eternity in Plato's Timaeus. Some historian agree, that concept of eternity was alien for Parmenides and argue from fragm. 8, 5-6, where Parmenides uses the term 'now' - nyn in non-eternal sense. The author reads the conceptions of Schofield, Kahn, Gallop and Groarke (and many other writers and observe some difficulties with their interpretations. He makes entrance with strictly philological analysis of nyn (Plato, Sophocles, Aristotle and compares their use of 'now' with poems of Pindar. The author introduces the concept of 'cyclical' time, where order of moments is irrelevant and men can achieve salvation relatively easy to access.

  7. Obecność śmierci w życiu (The Presence of Death In Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Theunissen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Theunissen places his philosophy of death between two traditions, the modern German philosophy represented by Feuerbach, Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Scheler and Simmel and the metaphysics of death, championed especially by Plato. At first sight these two points of view seems completely different. The modern philosophy construes death as something present in life (death dissolves in life and Plato describes death as a separation of body and soul. In his analysis of the notion of ‘presence’ the author defends the thesis that the philosophy of death is the philosophy of life, provided life is construed as a movement which transcends itself. This transcendence is described as a continuous distance toward world and ourselves. In the end he comes to conclusion that the metaphysical interpretation of death is consistent with the postmetaphysical one, the former is like a theory and the latter is like a practice.

  8. Which kind of mathematics was known by and referred to by those who wanted to integrate mathematics in «Wisdom» - Neopythagoreans and others?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Jens

    Plato, so the story goes, held mathematics in high esteem, and those philosopher-kings that ought to rule his republic should have a thorough foundation in mathematics. This may well be true - but an observation made by Aristotle suggests that the mathematics which Plato intends is not the one...... based on theorems and proofs which we normally identify with "Greek mathematics". Most other ancient writers who speak of mathematics as a road towardWisdom also appear to be blissfully ignorant of the mathematics of Euclid, Archimedes, Apollonios, etc. The aim of the paper is to identify the kinds...... of mathematics which were available as external sources for this current (on the whole leaving out of consideration Liberal-Arts mathematics as not properly external). A number of borrowings can be traced to various practitioners' traditions - but always as bits borrowed out of context....

  9. Which kind of mathematics was known and referred to by those who wanted to integrate mathematics in «Wisdom»

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Plato, so the story goes, held mathematics in high esteem, and those philosopher-kings that ought to rule his republic should have a thorough foundation in mathematics. This may well be true – but an observation made by Aristotle suggests that the mathematics which Plato intends is not the one...... based on theorems and proofs which we normally identify with “Greek mathematics”. Most other ancient writers who speak of mathematics as a road toward Wisdom also appear to be blissfully ignorant of the mathematics of Euclid, Archimedes, Apollonios, etc. – though not necessarily of their names. The aim...... of the paper is to identify the kinds of mathematics which were available as external sources for this current (on the whole leaving out of consideration Liberal-Arts mathematics as not properly external). A number of borrowings can be traced to various practitioners' traditions – but always as bits borrowed...

  10. [The epiglottis in antiquity in medicine and philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repici, L

    1990-01-01

    In Antiquity, the epiglottis and the related question whether drink enters the lung is a problem embracing both differently organized philosophical strategies and differently developed medical competences. Over the centuries, the history of a physiological question gradually turns into a debate where we find philosophers disagreeing with philosophers and physicians with physicians. A peculiar feature of this debate is that from a certain time on it involves a division between those who defend Plato's view on the subject and those who (philosophers as well as physicians) criticize it. Plato, Aristotle and Chrysippus, the Hippocratic authors and Erasistratus in the testimony of Aulus Gellius, Plutarch and indirectly also of Cicero, and then Galen and Macrobius have a special place in the development of this topic.

  11. Investigation of the memorization process

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    Simona-Mariana Cretu

    Full Text Available Memorizing involves many processes that are not fully known. This research area is just as exciting for contemporary scientists as well as it was for the ones in antiquity, considering the crucial importance of memory in human life and personality. In the last decades important steps in the knowledge of the memorization process were made by cognitive neuroscience. The paper focuses on the analysis of this process with references to its early known beginning. The study first analyses this topic in Plato's work and continues with opinions of other scientists/philosophers. Analogies between earlier and current theories, including dynamic aspects of the store, retain and recall of information, drive us to a personal point of view referring to the interpretation of Plato's book, The Republic; therefore, new directions of investigation referring to the entities and processes from human body can occur in the next future.

  12. Northern Command: A Relevant and Necessary Partner to Increase Security in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    month.19 Drug cartels leverage low pay and offer “ plato o plomo” or “silver or lead” which forces policemen to choose between taking a bribe or a...Scott Stewart, Hezbollah, Radical but Rational , Stratfor Security Weekly, (12 August 2010), http://www.stratfor.com/weekly...34Hezbollah, Radical but Rational ." Stratfor.com. August 12, 2010. http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/20100811_hezbollah_radical_rational (accessed 28

  13. What is New in New Wars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    it is appropriate to briefly summarize classical war theory. Many theorists and practitioners have studied war. Plato , Thucydides, Sun Tzu, Jomini and... rational purpose, where pride reigns, where emotions are paramount and where instinct is king.13 War is also a place where we are prevented from...be associated with the existence of societies or states, of state interests and of rational and irrational calculation on how they may be achieved

  14. A Tale of Two Army Doctrines: Which Way Forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    nature, and to describe human conflict (war). Plato would offer in the Republic that it is the balancing of justice through his tripartite soul of...conflict.15 The conflict inspired by identity preservation is primarily ideologically based and is not prone to secular rationality . This is not to say...that there is no rationality , but that it is based on an ideology or canon. In addition, economic globalization has fostered a fertile ground for

  15. Plato’s Visible God: The Cosmic Soul Reflected in the Heavens

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    George Latura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Although Plato states that the perceptible god that he describes in Timaeus is visible to the human eye, the reflection of the Cosmic Soul in the heavens has largely been explained away or forgotten in the Western mind. But Roman texts, early Christian testimony, and Imperial coins illustrate that Plato’s intersection in the heavens played a major role in Hellenistic cosmology and soteriology.

  16. Investigating Constraint-Based Approaches for the Development of Agile Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Company Cbt Tm will have to clear two routes, namely DIAM along A log team Plato Route know 4.2. The f synch are p tasks interv availa links...tactical sp ration estim (a) (b) sks that are relat ission end is delay , which  is deemed t occurrence.  In  t ilitary and ts to check, a

  17. Logic, Probability, and Human Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    accordingly suggest a way to integrate probability and deduction. The nature of deductive reasoning To be rational is to be able to make deductions...3–6] and they underlie mathematics, science, and tech- nology [7–10]. Plato claimed that emotions upset reason- ing. However, individuals in the grip...fundamental to human rationality . So, if counterexamples to its principal predictions occur, the theory will at least explain its own refutation

  18. Knowledge as an Inhibitor to Competition in Defence Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    epistemology, or the theory of knowledge, has been struggling with this area for several millennia. Approximately 2500 years ago Plato provided a...true, and how, has profound implications for how different sorts of knowledge are viewed. While positivism lays claims to knowledge as rational ...power, self-regulating free markets, and “ rational choice” models that internalise, and thus normalise, markets. The concern for postmodernists is that

  19. A Brief Prehistory of Philosophical Paraconsistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H. F. Altman

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In celebration of Newton da Costa’s place in the history of paraconsistency, this paper considers the use and abuse of deliberate self-contradiction. Beginning with Parmenides, developed by Plato, and continued by Cicero, an ancient philosophical tradition used deliberately paraconsistent discourses to reveal the truth. In modern times, decisionism has used deliberate self-contradiction against Judeo-Christian revelation.

  20. Optimization of an algorithm for 3D calculation of radiation dose distribution in heterogeneous media for use in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perles, L.A.; Chinellato, C.D.; Rocha, J.R.O.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper has been presented a modification of a algorithm for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dose distribution in heterogeneous media by convolutions. This modification has maintained good accordance between calculated and simulated data in EGS4 code. The results of algorithm have been compared with commercial program PLATO, where have been noticed inconsistency for equivalent density regions in a muscle-lung-muscle interface system

  1. Aplicación del método de punto de burbuja en el diseño de columnas de destilación

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Sánchez Mares

    2006-01-01

    El presente trabajo muestra la aplicación del método riguroso de punto de burbuja en el diseño de una columna de destilación de diez etapas. Como resultado se obtienen los perfiles de temperatura, composición, carga térmica y de constantes de equilibrio a través de cada plato que integra la columna

  2. An Evaluation of the Feasibility of Using Hand-Held Computers for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-30

    approved. I FRANK E. GIUNTI F. A. NERONE Chief, Instructuinal Colonel, Infantry Development Division Director, Training Developments Institute...on electronic networks (PLATO) were initiated, and HHCs were borrowed and programmed. A number of Battelle experts were also consulted. Devices Noted...of a network . as an book. aide-memoire, a calculator, a word For outdoor use there is no processor, a financial planner and comparable product. From on

  3. Simulation scenarios in the Star Trek universe reject solipsism

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.

    2016-01-01

    WE RARELY THINK to question the true nature of reality, which seems unambiguous and clear to our senses – a Materialist viewpoint. However, since that which we sense and come to know comes about through a potentially fallible sensory interface, it may well be that the nature of reality is different to that which we perceive, experience, and take as given. Many thinkers have attempted to come to grips with this contentious issue, and a short list includes Plato, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Mil...

  4. A Software Technology Transition Entropy Based Engineering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Systems Basics, p273). (Prigogine 1997 p81). It is not the place of this research to provide a mathematical formalism with theorems and lemmas. Rather...science). The ancient philosophers, 27 Pythagoras , Protagoras, Socrates, and Plato start the first discourse (the message) that has continued...unpacking of the technology "message" from Pythagoras . This process is characterized by accumulation learning, modeled by learning curves in

  5. Přátelství jako hodnota v klasické řecké filosofii a etice

    OpenAIRE

    Grospičová, Simona

    2012-01-01

    TITLE: Friendship as a Virtue in Classical Greek Philosophy and Ethics AUTHOR: Simona Grospičová DEPARTMENT: Social Sciences and Philosophy Department SUPERVISOR: PhDr. Miloslava Blažková, CSc. ABSTRACT: This work analyses friendship, in Greek philia, as a virtue in Classical Greek philosophy and ethics. The study concentrates on works concerning friendship of two most significant authors of the stated period Plato and Aristotle. Friendship is examined not only as a separated theme but also a...

  6. Saving Private Socrates « Il faut sauver le soldat Socrate » : Entretien sur le discours d'Alcibiade du Banquet de Platon.

    OpenAIRE

    Périllié, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Texte + notes + références bibliographiques d'un entretien filmé accessible sur la plateforme Youtube; The speech of Alcibiades in Plato's Symposium is often neglected or altered, falsified. So Nietzsche, Lacan, and even Vlastos (to a lesser extent), in turn, overlooked one or several crucial aspects of Socrates' portrait, drawn by Alcibiades. But these repeated misunderstandings are only the recurrent symptoms of the non-acceptance of who Socrates truly was in all his uniqueness and idiosync...

  7. Rui Chafes : a escultura como sopro

    OpenAIRE

    Lino, João, 1987

    2014-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Escultura Pública, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Belas Artes, 2014 The sculpture of Rui Chafes has the largest references in medieval art, german Romanticism, a subtle intersection of philosophical and literary references (Plato, Nietzsche, Rilke, among others), but also the post-minimal art. The sculptures of this artist, when is possible and sufficient the assumption of that status, are presented as discrete and subtle catalysts that recall a Beauty that is befor...

  8. Newton's Metaphysics of Space as God's Emanative Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquette, Dale

    2014-09-01

    In several of his writings, Isaac Newton proposed that physical space is God's "emanative effect" or "sensorium," revealing something interesting about the metaphysics underlying his mathematical physics. Newton's conjectures depart from Plato and Aristotle's metaphysics of space and from classical and Cambridge Neoplatonism. Present-day philosophical concepts of supervenience clarify Newton's ideas about space and offer a portrait of Newton not only as a mathematical physicist but an independent-minded rationalist philosopher.

  9. Tracing the roots of European bioethics back to the Ancient Greek philosophersphysicians

    OpenAIRE

    Kalokairinou, Eleni M.

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to the usual claim that Bioethics is a contemporary discipline, I argue that its origins can be traced back to the Ancient Greek philosophers-healers. In classical antiquity philosophy was almost inseparable from medicine not only in the sense that philosophers like Empedocles, Plato and Aristotle contributed to its development, but also in that later philosophers conceived of moral principles and rules in order to prevent the physicians’ malpractice and the patients’ harassment. Fro...

  10. Between coaching and social counselling

    OpenAIRE

    Toni Vrana

    2012-01-01

    Coaching appears to be another modern counselling approach, practiced initially in the business world. It can to be analyzed through a comparison with social counselling. The roots of coaching go back to Ancient Greece.. Plato used to propagate the art of aksing questions by recording the Socratic dialogue. Today coaching is in substance related to mentoring, tutoring and coaching in sport. The core of the activity - according to different coaching definitions - is discovering the hidden pote...

  11. Undoing forgetfulness: Chiasmus of Poetical Mind - a Cultural Paradigm of Archetypal Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2005-01-01

    into some old cosmologies and visions in which chiasmus constantly emerged as an enduring cultural paradigm with ontological relevance. Spanning from Plato to Christian theology, up to the contemporary Neo-Platonism of archetypal psychology, this paper hopes to put forth, if not a theory, at least a vision...... about man and cosmos, cosmos and man, a chiastic epiphany in which the body and the material world partake both of the sacred. Key words: memory; chiasmus; image; imagination; archetypal psychology; DNA....

  12. An operational framework for equity in the 2015 agreement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngwadla, Xolisa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available others, with wrongfulness dependent on the wrongdoer being morally to blame (Coleman, et al. 2013). The perception of equity in the negotiations finds expression in both the form and magnitude of commitments. Differential treatment in the scope... to the perspectives of others. Page | 12 References Lamont, Julian and Favor, Christi, "Distributive Justice", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2013 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.) forthcoming URL = plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2013...

  13. Urban Morphometrics: Towards a Science of Urban Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Dibble, Jacob; Prelorendjos, Alexios; Romice, Ombretta; Zanella, Mattia; Strano, Emanuele; Pagel, Mark; Porta, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Urban theorists, social reformists and philosophers have considered the city as a living organism since Plato. However, despite extraordinary advancements in evolutionary biology, now being used to explain social and cultural phenomena, a proper science of evolution in cities has never been established since Geddes' work at the dawn of the Town Planning discipline. Commencing in the tradition of Urban Morphology, this research develops and validates a statistically reliable and universally ap...

  14. asentamientos del área protegida. Parque Nacional Alejandro de Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emérita Moreno Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La investigación tiene como objetivo aportar elementos para el rescate del acervo cultural - natural de los pobladores, acerca de la utilización de la flora circundante vinculadas a la cocina tradicional de la región. Se reportaron 258 formas de aprovechamiento, de un total de 75 especies, de las cuales 69 se emplean de forma independiente y 28 se unen constituyendo las recetas de los platos tradicionales de la región.

  15. The Limits of Moral Principle: An Ends, Means, and Role Spheres Model of the Ethical Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Stuart Mill (1806-1873) and Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) are readily identified with utilitarianism , while Plato, Aris- totle, Immanual Kant (1724-1804), and...Pennsylvania: Chandler Publishing Company, 1970. 11. Mill , John Stewart. Utilitarianism . Edited by Oskar Piest. New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1957. 12. Muller... John Locke (1632-1704) are identified with formalism (1:365). Utilitarian thought can be further broken down into such categories as act

  16. Sacred Sky and Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, F.

    2011-06-01

    The concept of the sacred world beyond the stars found expression in the works of Plato, into Gnosticism and was incorporated into Christianity where medieval images of the cosmos pictured the heavenly domain as beyond the stars. Today cyberspace literature abounds with descriptions of a transmundane space, a great Beyond. This talk looks at current views of cyberspace and asks if they are a re-packaging of the age-old concept of a sacred sky in a secular and technological format?

  17. Medieval Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    During the early Middle Ages (ca 500 to ca 1130) scholars with an interest in cosmology had little useful and dependable literature. They relied heavily on a partial Latin translation of PLATO's Timaeus by Chalcidius (4th century AD), and on a series of encyclopedic treatises associated with the names of Pliny the Elder (ca AD 23-79), Seneca (4 BC-AD 65), Macrobius (fl 5th century AD), Martianus ...

  18. The Problem of the Object of Mathematics as Intelligible Substance in Aristotle's Metaphysics

    OpenAIRE

    Cattanei, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The A. examines the problem of intermediat emathematical entities by analyzing Metaphysics l017a9-l4, since, according to Aristotle. this passage is both a source and a critique of Plato's theory. The goal is to identify four cardinal points that may ground a dialogue between two contesting positions regarding this problem. Through them, it becomes evident that Aristotle severs the question of the intelligible nature of mathematical entities by using the conceptual scalpel of his own ousiolog...

  19. Inflamed with Study: Eighteenth-Century Higher Education and the Formation of the American Constitutional Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-30

    the Constitution makers included among the Greeks Plato, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Polybius, Strabo, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plutarch and Dionysius of...condition of the weaker members of the Amphyctionic Confederacy. Plutarch (life of Themistocles) will inform us that it happened but too often that the...in the same essay, in describing the deficiencies of the system, he reiterates, "It happened but too often, according to Plutarch , that the deputies

  20. 'Astronomy' or 'astrology': a brief history of an apparent confusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    The modern usage of the words 'astronomy' and 'astrology' is traced back to distinctions that are largely ignored in recent scholarship. Three interpretations of celestial phenomena (in a geometrical, a substantialist and a prognostic form) co-existed during the Hellenistic Period. From Plato to Isidore of Seville, the semiotic contrast is evidenced, and its later developments are sketched. The concept of astronomy is found to be rather constant and distinct from changing views about astrology.

  1. Philosophy under the Sign of Crisis Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bobica

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available According to Plato, philosophy was born out of the amazement, out of the impact the contemplation of the grandiose and harmonious nature show and its regular cycles had upon the human mind. However amazement is only one of the impulses that determine one to search forintelligible answers to the questions of a reflexive mind when coming into contact with a reality that causes amazement.

  2. Femme Fatale: An Examination of the Role of Women in Combat and the Policy Implications for Future American Military Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Amazons . The mention of the word evokes images of tall, strong combative women who abandoned femininity and the protection of male companions to...live as their own tribe . Most assume that these are merely mythical tales about female warriors yet greater writers such as Homer and Plato described a... tribe of these women living in the southern areas of the former Soviet Union.2 Archeological evidence supports the idea that women participated in

  3. Systems Thinking for Strategic Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    needed to man weapons systems and equipment to fight according to Army doctrine. There are series of interactions that have second and third order...otherwise go. The indirect approach to diplomacy is especially difficult for democracies because the approach may appear to be leading the state in a...military operations must be approached from a systems perspective. In the ancient world, Xenophon, a contemporary of Plato , described just such a

  4. Oferta y composición nutricional de ensaladas en patios de comida de centros comerciales de Lima Metropolitana, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marifé Bustamante-García

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Evaluar la oferta y composición nutricional de las ensaladas ofrecidas como plato principal en los patios de comida de los centros comerciales de Lima, Perú. Materiales y métodos. Se revisó las cartas de comida de todas las franquicias presentes en los patios de comida de los once centro comerciales de Lima, luego se evaluó la composición nutricional de las ensaladas ofertadas como plato principal calculando su contenido calórico, proteico, carbohidratos, grasas, colesterol, fibra y sodio, y la adecuación de ingesta para una cena (30% de una dieta de 2000 kcal. Resultados. Las ensaladas como plato principal representaron el 4,7% de la oferta, solo 7/17 franquicias ofrecían al menos una ensalada. El costo promedio de las ensaladas fue superior a los otros platos ($5,3 vs 4,7; p<0,001. El contenido calórico promedio fue de 329 kcal y de 2,7 g de fibra; con relación a una cena, se encontró un alto porcentaje de adecuación proteica (172,9%, de colesterol (121,0%, y bajo para calorías (54,8%, carbohidratos (23,1% y fibra (36,4%. Conclusiones. Las ensaladas que se ofertan en patios de centros comerciales de Lima son escasas y más costosas, presentan poco aporte de fibra y altos contenidos de colesterol. Se deben revisar estrategias para mejorar la accesibilidad de ensaladas de calidad en escenarios donde solo ofertan comidas rápidas

  5. Aristotelés a Nová rétorika

    OpenAIRE

    Boháček, K. (Kryštof)

    2014-01-01

    The author shows how important was the rhetorical alternative for Plato's constitution of theoretical philosophy. The second part describes the decline of classical rhetoric from the Greek most influential discourse to the 'zero point' around 1900. Third part is dedicated to Perelman and the 'Rhetorical Turn', treated as return to Aristotle. The last part confronts Aristotle with Perelman's understanding of Aristotelian rhetoric, and asks, if the New Rhetoric really returned to Aristotle?

  6. Aristotle on Deliberation:Its Place in Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric

    OpenAIRE

    Kock, Christian Erik J

    2014-01-01

    Aristotle differs from most later philosophers in distinguishing clearly between epistemic reasoning, which aims for truth, and practical reasoning, which does not. How can he posit this distinction and yet not dismiss practical reasoning as flattery and manipulation, as Plato did? The answer lies in the concepts of deliberation (boulē, bouleusis) and deliberate choice (proairesis). They link Aristotle's rhetoric, ethics, and politics together and help provide definitions of all three: Ethics...

  7. INSPIRACJE GRECKO-RZYMSKIE W IDEOLOGII NAZISTOWSKIEJ

    OpenAIRE

    Chiżyńska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on ancient ideas, myths and texts, which has been adapted by Third Reich in order to build Nazi ideology. Hitler’s followers passionately read works of Plato, Plutarch and Tacitus, however, their intention was not to learn about antiquity, but to fit ancient thoughts to National Socialism. The same thing NSDAP tried to do with ancient art, architecture, gestures (Roman salute) and symbols (swastika). Führer’s attitude towards Greek and Roman antiquity was very...

  8. The Dependence of Value on Humanity

    OpenAIRE

    Korsgaard, Christine M.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discusses socially dependent attributes by providing an example of appreciating two different buildings. It comments on the idea of philosophising about value as it can perhaps be applied to a number of terms including valuable objects like operas and flowers, and the properties of virtue such as inventiveness and symmetry in architecture can be deemed as different values. It also considers object existence and its correlation to pluralist views with reference from Plato and Aris...

  9. [The endeavours by Wincentego Lutosławskiego (1863-1954) to obtain a chair of philosophy at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    When applying for a chair of philosophy at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow in 1891, Wincentego Lutosławskiego had already published a number of important articles as well as a doctoral dissertation, which he defended at Dorpat University. While working at the University of Kazan, Lutosławskiego had been engaged in several research sojourns abroad, including one in London. He had also made contact with another Polish specialist on Plato's philosophy, Stanisław Pawlicki, who gave a positive referral on the publication of Lutosławskiego's work On Plato's logic, part I by Akademia Umiejtno [ci (Academy of Science) in Cracow (1891); the subsequent conflict between the two scholars stemmed from differences in world-view and differences in scholarly views relating to methodology and interpretation. The application by Lutosławskiego, despite being supported by the dean of Faculty of Philosophy, Maurycy Staszewski, the only philosophy sitting on the faculty council, was rejected, and the majority of faculty council opted for Pawlicki, a renowned professor of the Faculty of Theology. Lutosławskiego continued to pursue his scholarly career abroad, publishing in several European languages, until the publication in 1897 of his famous work on Plato (The Origin and Growth of Plato's Logic). Meanwhile Pawlicki, burdened both by his teaching responsibilities and the results of the research by Lutosławskiego, was not able to complete (before his death in 1916) his History of ancient philosophy, the intention of doing which he had declared in the first volume, published in 1890. While Lutosławskiego was prevented from working in Crackow, he became - thanks to his works - a historian of ancient philosophy whose world renown has persisted until the present day. Pawlicki obtained the Chair, but his works on the history of philosophy are rarely cited today.

  10. The music of reason experience the beauty of mathematics through quotations

    CERN Document Server

    Pappas, Theoni

    2015-01-01

    Learn what Alice in Wonderland, Albert Einstein, William Shakespeare, Mae West, Plato and others have to say about mathematics. In this collection of quotations about mathematics and its connections to the imagination, humor, arts, history, nature, etc. comes from a wide variety of mathematicians, writers, scientists, artists and celebrities. With each chapter of quotations, Pappas has written a short insightful essay about mathematics, and has created graphics which enhance the thoughts and quotations.

  11. CUTTING BACK THE STEM: CULTIVATING LIBERAL ARTS IN OFFICER ACCESSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    another. Ancient polymaths like Plato and Aristotle did not separate mathematics and astronomy from the logic and aesthetics of philosophy...know and what you don’t. - Anatole France No way of thinking or doing, however ancient , can be trusted without proof. - Henry David Thoreau...particular focus on diversity and technical degrees.”16 What diversity means is not explicit, but the given rationale includes historic references to

  12. [Feelings as considered by preplatonic and contemporary philosophers--coincidence or influence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborowski, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Feelings' role in ancient Greek conceptions up till now has not become clear. As far as the researchers of antiquity are interested in Aristotle's and Hellenistic philosophers, Plato's and his predecessors has not been analysed from this point of view yet. It is often connected with a fact that Preplatonic philosophy is so-called philosophy of physis, and/or its nature is exclusively rationalistic. Thanks to the analysis of three passages (Heraclitus fr. B 85, Parmenides fr. B 3 and Democritus fr. B 31), and multilevel interpretation of Plato's conception one can indicate--if focus one's attention on the elements concerning the affectivity--the similarities to contemporary philosophers' outlooks. Among others, they concern 1) Heraclitus (and Parmenides fr. B 1, 1) versus Hume, Pascal, Ribot, Brentano, Bergson, 2) Parmenides versus Descartes, 3) Democritus versus Ribot, 4) Plato versus Scheler and Hartmann. Such analyses and interpretations let conquer conventional thinking of the Greek emotionality issue, because on the one hand they reveal a kind of deformations and misconstructions in searches, and on the other show a current importance of ancient conceptions. In support of the statement it is worth reminding of the formulation emotional intelligence that recently has enjoyed great popularity. His origins can be found already in Greek philosophers' thought.

  13. FORM AND LANGUAGE: THE LANDSCAPE OF THE ARCHITECTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hooper

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of my doctoral research I have constructed a play using Platonic dialectic to explore the concept construct of “form.” I am borrowing from the origins of western philosophy to explore the acquisition of knowledge, as well as the landscape of language to articulate the architectural. Ultimately I am asking a question that all students should ask: What is the shape of an idea, that is--what constitutes “form”? The play’s protagonist is Plato. Using his own voice is very much intentional as Plato wrote dialogues never having himself as the interlocutor in any. Early Greek philosophers Heraclitus and Parmenides appear as herms, and the poet Homer appears as a ghost. The dialogues are purely hypothetical and the “voices” of these characters, as well as Plato’s, are based on their own words and writings. However, the voice of Pan, an interloper between the characters in the play and the readers of it, is purely fictional. Finally, every protagonist needs an antagonist, so I have introduced a gardener. My thesis question is “what is the shape of an idea, that is--what constitutes “form”?” The gardener challenges Plato’s theory of The Forms to promote an alternative theory of form, that of the shape-idea. I have replaced exemplars that Plato uses to explain his theory in his own texts with paradigms that are subsequently explored in the play.

  14. Panorámica de la cocina colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alzate

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available El territorio colombiano, dotado de selvas, cordilleras, valles, mares y ríos, conjugado con las tradiciones culturales propias de cada región, le ha dado a la cocina colombiana variedad y exquisitez. Al recorrer el país encontramos diversidad de platos, ricos en ingredientes naturales y con el sello inconfundible de los pueblos y su arte culinario. Las costas sobre los dos mares hacen uso de su abundancia de mariscos y pescados: la Atlántica, enriqueciendo los platos con tubérculos y carnes de origen silvestre; la Pacífica, haciendo uso de los frutos exóticos que provee la espesa selva virgen; la Amazonía y los Llanos Orientales aprovechan la variedad de peces de las numerosas corrientes fluviales para nutrir sus menús; la amplia región andina brinda múltiples posibilidades con el uso de cereales, tubérculos, granos, carnes (de res, cerdo, aves, chivo y pescado y condimentos a base de plantas; y al sur del Pacífico tres departamentos, diferenciados por su etnia, cultura y economía, tienen en el maíz y el trigo la base de buena parte de sus platos. Un gran país y una gama de opciones culinarias para deleitar a propios y foráneos.

  15. Analysis of 100-Year-Old Beer Originated from the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olšovská, Jana; Matoulková, Dagmar; Dušek, Martin; Felsberg, Jürgen; Jelínková, Markéta; Čejka, Pavel; Štěrba, Karel

    2017-04-26

    Three bottles of different beers were found in 2015 during a reconstruction of the brewery of the Raven Trading s.r.o. company in Záhlinice, Czech Republic. Thanks to good storage conditions, it was possible to analyze their original characteristics. All three bottles contained most probably lager type beer. One beer had sulfuric and fecal off-flavors; it was bright with the original extract of 10.3° Plato. The second beer, with an original extract of 7.6° Plato, was dark and very acidic, resembling Lambic. DNA analysis proved the presence of Dekkera bruxellensis, which corresponded to its chemical profile (total acidity, FAN, ethyl acetate, total esters). The third beer contained traces of carbon dioxide bubbles, was light brown and slightly bitter, with an original extract 10.4° Plato. Because it obviously underwent a natural aging process, sweetness, honey, and fruity off-flavors were detected and transformation products of iso-α-acids were found.

  16. [Essentialism and typological thinking in biological systematics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, L N

    2003-01-01

    In biological literature, essentialism and typological thinking are believed to be incompatible with evolutionary ideas. At present, the same considerations underlay the claims to abandon the Linnaean hierarchy, or the fundamental classificatory structure rooted in essentialism. This paper suggests to reconsider the negative views of Plato's typology and Aristotle's essentialism following the narrow interpretations that have nothing to do with the classification of living beings. Plato's theory of 'ideas' (or 'forms') is the basis of classificatory theory; it provided such concepts as 'species', 'genus', 'essence', 'dichotomous division' but the development of this theory in the framework of moral and esthetic values could not be beneficial to biology. Aristotle's essentialism is more complicated and exists in two forms; one of these, or classificatory essentialism, is a modification of Plato's typology; another one, or organismal essentialism, represents the shift of 'essence' from the world of relations between objects to the realm of particular things, where the concept of essence lost its basic meaning. It is senseless to look for unreal 'type of an organism' ('essence of a thing') but precisely this kind of essentialism is attractive for biologists and philosophers. Organismal essentialism is the underlying basis of so-called 'individuality thesis' that is used as a weapon against classificatory essentialism. The same thesis is associated with an extensional vision of taxa that also explains the criticism of Linnaean hierarchy, while the latter is the intentional structure and the first tool suggested for the rank coordination of many unequal taxa.

  17. Monist and Dualist Tendencies in Platonism before Plotinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon, John

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The author argues that the Platonism that Plotinus inherits – setting aside Ammonius Saccas, of whom we know all too little – is by the later second century distinctly dualist in tendency, and is able, especially in the case of Plutarch, to quote Plato to its purpose. Plato himself, though, as the author maintains, is, despite appearances to the contrary, what one might term a ‘modified monist’. That is to say, he fully recognizes the degree of imperfection and evil in the world, and holds it to be ineradicable, but he does not in the last resort believe in a positive countervailing force to the Good or the One. What we have is simply a negative force, whether Indefinite Dyad, disorderly World-Soul, or Receptacle, which is an inevitable condition of their being a world at all, but which, as a side-effect of introducing diversity, generates various sorts of imperfection. It is this scenario that justifies his follower Hermodorus in declaring that Plato recognizes only a single first principle, and it to this sort of monism – if anything, in a more pronounced form – that Plotinus returns. The article is published in a Russian translation in Vol. II, issue 1

  18. Monist and Dualist Tendencies in Platonism before Plotinus (in Russian

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    Dillon, John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The author argues that the Platonism that Plotinus inherits – setting aside Ammonius Saccas, of whom we know all too little – is by the later second century distinctly dualist in tendency, and is able, especially in the case of Plutarch, to quote Plato to its purpose. Plato himself, though, as the author maintains, is, despite appearances to the contrary, what one might term a ‘modified monist’. That is to say, he fully recognizes the degree of imperfection and evil in the world, and holds it to be ineradicable, but he does not in the last resort believe in a positive countervailing force to the Good or the One. What we have is simply a negative force, whether Indefinite Dyad, disorderly World-Soul, or Receptacle, which is an inevitable condition of their being a world at all, but which, as a side-effect of introducing diversity, generates various sorts of imperfection. It is this scenario that justifies his follower Hermodorus in declaring that Plato recognizes only a single first principle, and it to this sort of monism – if anything, in a more pronounced form – that Plotinus returns. The article is published in its English version in Vol. I, issue 1

  19. Imitating the Myth in the Gorgias

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    Efren A. Alverio II

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of logical positivism contributed to the sharp definitional demarcation between what we consider mythical (mythos and what we take to be a true account (logos. This essay attempts to go back to one of the sources of such a supposed distinction. By analyzing the Gorgias, I will show that even Plato did not make such a distinction. In fact, Plato even constructed a theory of justice that made use of myth as its medium. The Platonic Myth in the Gorgias was used as true logos in order to justify Socrates' use of the myth as the paradigm of a life that is philosophical in contrast to that of his accusers who espoused mere sophistry. By using the concept of historia in relation with the concept of mythos, Plato regarded the futuristic afterlife in the myth as a sufficient condition to live a just life. This sufficient condition exemplified by the Myth in the Gorgias is a measuring rod by which we can compare our present system of justice.

  20. The Methodological Analysis of the Plato’s Doctrine About Space and the Person in Dialogue “Timaeus”

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    Viacheslav Meshkov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focus is on the main methodological sets of Plato which substantially influenced his philosophic and scientific thinking, expressed in the dialogue ‘Timaeus’, as well as defined the specific of his doctrine in relation to the cosmos and human being: the principle of substantial perfection, deterministic approach, a tendency to analyze the empiric material with the means of mathematical objects. Plato’s understanding of the cosmos and human body as lively, holistic constructions enabled their fruitful systematic studies. Shaping his teaching on the soul and the body of human being, Plato endeavored to solve one of the most complicated tasks: to establish the first theoretical, mathematised system, and under such conditions to fill the pure language of observations with ideal constructs. The author shows that one of the most important scientific achievements of the Athenian philosopher was the use of the thinking constructions of geometrical triangles, which made possible creating of the theoretical models of living organisms, with explaining their nature and functioning that was one among the first in the history of science. Moreover Plato was the first in the history of science who filled with the theoretical contents not the first elements only, but all the examined material objects.