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Sample records for plato computer-based instructional

  1. The Tenth Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The University of Delaware's work with computer-based instruction since 1974 is summarized with attention to the history and development of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, university applications, outside user applications, and research and evaluation. PLATO was the system that met the university's criteria, which included support for…

  2. The Ninth Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The University of Delaware's work with computer-based instruction since 1974 is summarized, with attention to the history and development of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, university applications, outside user applications, and research and evaluation. PLATO was the system that met the university's criteria, which included: supporting…

  3. The Eleventh Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The University of Delaware's work with computer-based instruction since 1974 is summarized with attention to the history and development of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, university applications, outside user applications, and research and evaluation. PLATO was the system that met the university's criteria, which included support for…

  4. From Teaching Machines to Microcomputers: Some Milestones in the History of Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Richard P.; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the history of computer-based education within the context of psychological theorists of instruction, including Pressey, Thorndike, Skinner, and Crowder. Topics discussed include computer-managed instruction; computer-assisted instruction; the Computer Curriculum Corporation; PLATO; TICCIT; microcomputers; effects on students; and cost…

  5. Evaluation of a Three Year Health Sciences PLATO IV Computer-Based Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlie, William E.; Essex, Diane L.

    Significant findings of the comprehensive evaluation of a computer-based curriculum in the basic medical sciences using the PLATO IV computer system are presented. The study was conducted by the Office of Curriculum and Evaluation (OCE) of the School of Basic Medical Sciences (SBMS) at the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign (UC). It was…

  6. Computer-Based Instruction in Elementary Hindi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachru, Yamuna; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction for Hindi courses at the University of Illinois is described in relation to the technical aspects of programming Hindi on the PLATO system and the curriculum components. The program focuses on review of the materials already covered in class and building understanding of a number of grammatical constructions by using…

  7. Synopsis of the University of Delaware's Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    This brief paper presents background information and a description of the organizational structure and educational objectives of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction, formerly the Delaware PLATO project, whose name was changed to reflect the University's ongoing commitment to providing leadership in educational computing following the…

  8. Computer-Based Instruction in Basic Medical Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Roger; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Literature on computer-based instruction shows student performance improves with this method, although students spend less time studying. It is recommended that future research be designed to better detect the influence of computer-based instruction and that greater attention be given to methodological issues like test construction and research…

  9. A Comparative Evaluation of Computer Based and Non-Computer Based Instructional Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Ian

    1988-01-01

    Compares the computer assisted instruction (CAI) tutorial with its non-computerized pedagogical roots: the Socratic Dialog with Skinner's Programmed Instruction. Tests the effectiveness of a CAI tutorial on diffusion and osmosis against four other interactive and non-interactive instructional strategies. Notes computer based strategies were…

  10. Cost of Initial Development of PLATO Instruction in Veterinary Medicine. CERL Report X-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, George M.

    An academic program instituting the PLATO system of computer-assisted instruction at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine is discussed. Procedures involved setting up an organization, establishing an administrative system, studying capabilities of the system, studying factors making a lesson suitable for programming, and…

  11. Educator Beliefs Regarding Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, D. LaDon; Branson, Floyd, Jr.; Talbert, B. Allen

    2003-01-01

    Extension educators (n=17) completed two of five technical sections from an aquaculture CD-ROM tutorial. Evidence from pre/post-training questionnaires, content assessments, and follow-up interviews reveals favorable attitudes toward computer-based inservice training. The ability to spend less time out of their county and to review materials after…

  12. A Summary of Plato Curriculum and Research Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Elisabeth R.

    PLATO (programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations) is a computer-based teaching system which was developed in the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois to explore the possibilities of automation in individual instruction. The history of the PLATO program is summarized here, along with a list of courses which used…

  13. Effects of Instructional Events in Computer-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Klein, James; Sullivan, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Forty years ago, Robert Gagne published the first edition of his book The Conditions of Learning (1965) in which he proposed nine events of instruction that provide a sequence for organizing a lesson. These events remain the foundation of current instructional design practice (Reiser, 2002; Richey, 2000). They represent desirable conditions in an…

  14. Computer-Based Grammar Instruction in an EFL Context: Improving the Effectiveness of Teaching Adverbial Clauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to find out whether there are any statistically significant differences in participants' achievements on three different types of instruction: computer-based instruction, teacher-driven instruction, and teacher-driven grammar supported by computer-based instruction. Each type of instruction follows the deductive approach. The…

  15. Computer-Based Grammar Instruction in an EFL Context: Improving the Effectiveness of Teaching Adverbial Clauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to find out whether there are any statistically significant differences in participants' achievements on three different types of instruction: computer-based instruction, teacher-driven instruction, and teacher-driven grammar supported by computer-based instruction. Each type of instruction follows the deductive approach. The…

  16. An Evaluation of Computer-Based Instruction in Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a tremendous increase in the availability of computer-based instructional (CBI materials. Some studies have shown an improvement in learning when CBI is used. However, many researchers believe the current studies are inadequate. While CBI software should be thoroughly tested by developers, as educators, we should be concerned about whether or not the CBI materials we use are improving learning in our classrooms with our students. We present an evaluation of a computer-based hypermedia tutorial that was delivered over our General Microbiology website. We found that CBI was at least as effective as text-based material. However, of all students who used CBI, only those who explored most of the site benefited from using the site. Tracking each student's use of the CBI was critical for understanding who was learning and why.

  17. An Evaluation of Computer-Based Instruction in Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry S. Leventhal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a tremendous increase in the availability of computer-based instructional (CBI materials. Some studies have shown an improvement in learning when CBI is used. However, many researchers believe the current studies are inadequate. While CBI software should be thoroughly tested by developers, as educators, we should be concerned about whether or not the CBI materials we use are improving learning in our classrooms with our students. We present an evaluation of a computer-based hypermedia tutorial that was delivered over our General Microbiology website. We found that CBI was at least as effective as text-based material. However, of all students who used CBI, only those who explored most of the site benefited from using the site. Tracking each student's use of the CBI was critical for understanding who was learning and why.

  18. Naval Computer-Based Instruction: Cost, Implementation and Effectiveness Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    that precipitated change in the way we do computer-based instruction will be pointed out. Perhaps the most well known of all the CBI projects...Electric (GE) has been showing a newer technology than CD-I called Digital Video Interactive ( DVI ). It uses custom chips to compress high quality...been used to great advantage. The Navy will need to look 70 at CD-I and DVI , interactive extensions of the CD-ROM technology, and decide how we can

  19. Image Interpretation Instruction Via A Computer-Based-Training System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Melanie

    1988-02-01

    As newer and more sophisticated imagery collection systems rapidly increase the volume of imagery requiring thorough exploitation, the need for imagery analysts to acquire and maintain expertise increases accordingly. In response, Loral Systems Group (Arizona) has produced a computer-based-training (CBT) system that presents a series of lessons on radar imaging principles and their application to the various orders of battle. The training system is composed of two host computers, four student/instructor workstations, a printer, and lesson material. The computers control the imagery presentation, deliver twenty-eight interactive lessons of computer-assisted instruction, and generate reports. Each dual-screen workstation presents lessons consisting of instructional text coupled with representative imagery annotated with color graphics. Although the system is designed for the unique characteristics of radar interpretation, alternative courseware could instruct interpretation techniques for other imagery (photographic, electro-optical, infrared). Regardless of the sensor type and amount of available imagery, both commercial and military segments of the interpretation community will benefit only if the interpreter/analyst is successfully trained to translate image information into useful terms.

  20. Using Postfeedback Delays to Improve Retention of Computer-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Douglas A.; Dickinson, Alyce M.

    2012-01-01

    Self-pacing, although often seen as one of the primary benefits of computer-based instruction (CBI), can also result in an important problem, namely, computer-based racing. Computer-based racing is when learners respond so quickly within CBI that mistakes are made, even on well-known material. This study compared traditional CBI with two forms of…

  1. Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Views about Using Computer-Based Instructional Materials in Constructing Mathematical Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukova-Guzel, Esra; Canturk-Gunhan, Berna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine prospective mathematics teachers' views about using computer-based instructional materials in constructing mathematical concepts and to reveal how the sample computer-based instructional materials for different mathematical concepts altered their views. This is a qualitative study involving twelve…

  2. Control Data's Education Offering: "Plato Would Have Enjoyed PLATO"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datamation, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Programmed Learning and Teaching Operation (PLATO) distributes instructional materials in the form of text, numbers, animated drawings and other graphics for individualized, self-paced learning. (Author)

  3. Computer-Based Self-Instructional Modules. Final Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Harold

    Reported is a project involving seven chemists, six mathematicians, and six physicists in the production of computer-based, self-study modules for use in introductory college courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. These modules were designed to be used by students and instructors with little or no computer backgrounds, in institutions…

  4. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Attitudes toward Computer-Based Instruction of Postsecondary Hospitality Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Carl; Greenan, James P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between postsecondary students' emotional-social intelligence and attitudes toward computer-based instructional materials. Research indicated that emotions and emotional intelligence directly impact motivation, while instructional design has been shown to impact student attitudes and subsequent engagement with…

  5. Computer-Based Instruction: A Background Paper on its Status, Cost/Effectiveness and Telecommunications Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jai P.; Morgan, Robert P.

    In the slightly over twelve years since its inception, computer-based instruction (CBI) has shown the promise of being more cost-effective than traditional instruction for certain educational applications. Pilot experiments are underway to evaluate various CBI systems. Should these tests prove successful, a major problem confronting advocates of…

  6. Impact of Computer-Based Instruction on Attitudes of Students and Instructors: A Review. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anne Truscott

    To determine whether contact with computer-assisted instruction (CAI) leads to feelings of "depersonalization" and "dehumanization" a review was conducted of investigations to explore attitudes toward various modes of computer-based instruction before, during, or after exposure. Evaluation of pertinent factors which influenced attitudes was made…

  7. Computer-Based Instruction: Roots, Origins, Applications, Benefits, Features, Systems, Trends and Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    Dealing exclusively with instructional computing, this paper describes how computers are delivering instruction in a wide variety of subjects to students of all ages and explains why computer-based education is currently having a profound impact on education. After a discussion of roots and origins, computer applications are described for…

  8. Computer-based learning: games as an instructional strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J; Goodman, J

    1999-01-01

    Games are a creative teaching strategy that enhances learning and problem solving. Gaming strategies are being used by the authors to make learning interesting, stimulating and fun. This article focuses on the development and implementation of computer games as an instructional strategy. Positive outcomes have resulted from the use of games in the classroom.

  9. The impact of computer-based versus "traditional" textbook science instruction on selected student learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan H.

    This study reports the results of research designed to examine the impact of computer-based science instruction on elementary school level students' science content achievement, their attitude about science learning, their level of critical thinking-inquiry skills, and their level of cognitive and English language development. The study compared these learning outcomes resulting from a computer-based approach compared to the learning outcomes from a traditional, textbook-based approach to science instruction. The computer-based approach was inherent in a curriculum titled The Voyage of the Mimi , published by The Bank Street College Project in Science and Mathematics (1984). The study sample included 209 fifth-grade students enrolled in three schools in a suburban school district. This sample was divided into three groups, each receiving one of the following instructional treatments: (a) Mixed-instruction primarily based on the use of a hardcopy textbook in conjunction with computer-based instructional materials as one component of the science course; (b) Non-Traditional, Technology-Based -instruction fully utilizing computer-based material; and (c) Traditional, Textbook-Based-instruction utilizing only the textbook as the basis for instruction. Pre-test, or pre-treatment, data related to each of the student learning outcomes was collected at the beginning of the school year and post-test data was collected at the end of the school year. Statistical analyses of pre-test data were used as a covariate to account for possible pre-existing differences with regard to the variables examined among the three student groups. This study concluded that non-traditional, computer-based instruction in science significantly improved students' attitudes toward science learning and their level of English language development. Non-significant, positive trends were found for the following student learning outcomes: overall science achievement and development of critical thinking

  10. Computer-Based Mathematics Instructions for Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mustaq A.; Wall, Curtiss E.

    1996-01-01

    Almost every engineering course involves mathematics in one form or another. The analytical process of developing mathematical models is very important for engineering students. However, the computational process involved in the solution of some mathematical problems may be very tedious and time consuming. There is a significant amount of mathematical software such as Mathematica, Mathcad, and Maple designed to aid in the solution of these instructional problems. The use of these packages in classroom teaching can greatly enhance understanding, and save time. Integration of computer technology in mathematics classes, without de-emphasizing the traditional analytical aspects of teaching, has proven very successful and is becoming almost essential. Sample computer laboratory modules are developed for presentation in the classroom setting. This is accomplished through the use of overhead projectors linked to graphing calculators and computers. Model problems are carefully selected from different areas.

  11. Plato's Embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilberding, James

    2015-01-01

    Embryology was a subject that inspired great cross-disciplinary discussion in antiquity, and Plato's Timaeus made an important contribution to this discussion, though Plato's precise views have remained a matter of controversy, especially regarding three key questions pertaining to the generation and nature of the seed: whether there is a female seed; what the nature of seed is; and whether the seed contains a preformed human being. In this paper I argue that Plato's positions on these three issues can be adequately determined, even if some other aspects of his theory cannot. In particular, it is argued that (i) Plato subscribes to the encephalo-myelogenic theory of seed, though he places particular emphasis on the soul being the true seed; (ii) Plato is a two-seed theorist, yet the female seed appears to make no contribution to reproduction; and (iii) Plato cannot be an advocate of preformationism.

  12. Training troubleshooting skills with an anchored instruction module in an authentic computer based simulation environment

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    To improve the application and transfer of troubleshooting skills when diagnosing faults in complex automated production units, we developed and implemented an “anchored instruction” learning module in the context of a computer based simulation environment. The effects of the instructional module were evaluated in a quasi-experimental evaluation study. During the study 42 mechatronic apprentices were trained in two parallel experimental groups with and without the anchored instruction module....

  13. Acquisition and Generalization of Chained Tasks Taught with Computer Based Video Instruction to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kevin M.; Maguire, Amy; McClimon, Desiree

    2009-01-01

    Three elementary aged students with autism participated in an evaluation of computer based video instruction that targeted functional life skills. The effects of the software were analyzed in the context of a multiple probe design across and replicated across participants. This study represents a departure from more traditional video based…

  14. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Use Public Bus Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda; O'Brien, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to push a "request to stop bus signal" and exit a city bus in response to target landmarks. A multiple probe design across three students and one bus route was used to evaluate effectiveness of…

  15. Instruction of Statistics via Computer-Based Tools: Effects on Statistics' Anxiety, Attitude, and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, S. Koza; Karadag, Engin; Akdal, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of statistics instruction using computer-based tools, on statistics anxiety, attitude, and achievement. This study was designed as quasi-experimental research and the pattern used was a matched pre-test/post-test with control group design. Data was collected using three scales: a Statistics…

  16. Instruction of Statistics via Computer-Based Tools: Effects on Statistics' Anxiety, Attitude, and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, S. Koza; Karadag, Engin; Akdal, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of statistics instruction using computer-based tools, on statistics anxiety, attitude, and achievement. This study was designed as quasi-experimental research and the pattern used was a matched pre-test/post-test with control group design. Data was collected using three scales: a Statistics…

  17. Interactive Computer Based Assessment Tasks: How Problem-Solving Process Data Can Inform Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoanetti, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents key steps in the design and analysis of a computer based problem-solving assessment featuring interactive tasks. The purpose of the assessment is to support targeted instruction for students by diagnosing strengths and weaknesses at different stages of problem-solving. The first focus of this article is the task piloting…

  18. Sixth Summative Report of the Office of Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    This summary of developments and activities at the University of Delaware Office of Computer-Based Instruction (OCBI) during 1980-1981 includes: (1) a detailed account of the history and development of OCBI which covers background information, utilization rates, the organization of OCBI, the OCBI courseware development process, OCBI publications,…

  19. Guidelines for the Development of Computer-based Instruction Modules for Science and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry D. Davidson

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of a prototype computer-based instruction (CBI module is described. The module covers introductory structural analysis techniques and demonstrates the practicality of CBI for undergraduate engineering education. The module’s generic learning objectives are used to develop a set of guiding principles for CBI development. Choice of authoring software and the module architecture are presented, followed by the details of the user interface, logic, and screen layout. The module design and software development process outlined here are easily extended to computer-based tutorials that present problem solving methods for engineering, mathematics, and the natural sciences.

  20. Rethinking Strategy Instruction: Direct Reading Strategy Instruction versus Computer-Based Guided Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, Wolfgang; Baier, Herbert; Endlich, Darius; Schneider, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    There are many established reading strategy training programmes, which explicitly teach strategic and meta-cognitive knowledge to improve reading comprehension. Although instruction in strategy knowledge leads to improvements in meta-cognitive skills, the effects do not always transfer to reading comprehension. Therefore, to investigate…

  1. An evaluation of computer-based programmed instruction for promoting teachers' greetings of parents by name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvarsson, Einar T; Hanley, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Although greeting parents by name facilitates subsequent parent-teacher communication, baseline measures revealed that 4 preschool teachers never or rarely greeted parents by name during morning check-in. To promote frequent and accurate use of parents' names by teachers, the effects of a fully automated computerized assessment and programmed instruction (CAPI) intervention were evaluated in a multiple baseline design. The CAPI intervention involved assessment and training of relations among parents' and children's pictures and names, and produced rapid learning of parent names. The CAPI intervention also resulted in substantial improvements in the classroom use of parents' names for 3 of the 4 teachers; however, a supervisor-mediated feedback package (consisting of instructions, differential reinforcement, and error correction) was necessary to maintain name use for 2 of those teachers. The practical strengths and limitations of computer-based teacher training are discussed.

  2. Eighth Annual Peter Dean Lecture: Perspectives on a Decade of Computer-Based Instruction, 1974-84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    1985-01-01

    This analysis of trends in computer-based instruction (CBI) during the past decade briefly describes evaluation criteria from 1974 and discusses changes in attitudes toward CBI (costs, instructional effectiveness); system selection criteria (graphics, input devices, quantity and quality of software); the CBI marketplace (including transportability…

  3. Eighth Annual Peter Dean Lecture: Perspectives on a Decade of Computer-Based Instruction, 1974-84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    1985-01-01

    This analysis of trends in computer-based instruction (CBI) during the past decade briefly describes evaluation criteria from 1974 and discusses changes in attitudes toward CBI (costs, instructional effectiveness); system selection criteria (graphics, input devices, quantity and quality of software); the CBI marketplace (including transportability…

  4. Evaluation of cognitive loads imposed by traditional paper-based and innovative computer-based instructional strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Mansour, Mahmoud M; Wilhite, Dewey R

    2010-01-01

    Strategies of presenting instructional information affect the type of cognitive load imposed on the learner's working memory. Effective instruction reduces extraneous (ineffective) cognitive load and promotes germane (effective) cognitive load. Eighty first-year students from two veterinary schools completed a two-section questionnaire that evaluated their perspectives on the educational value of a computer-based instructional program. They compared the difference between cognitive loads imposed by paper-based and computer-based instructional strategies used to teach the anatomy of the canine skeleton. Section I included 17 closed-ended items, rated on a five-point Likert scale, that assessed the use of graphics, content, and the learning process. Section II included a nine-point mental effort rating scale to measure the level of difficulty of instruction; students were asked to indicate the amount of mental effort invested in the learning task using both paper-based and computer-based presentation formats. The closed-ended data were expressed as means and standard deviations. A paired t test with an alpha level of 0.05 was used to determine the overall mean difference between the two presentation formats. Students positively evaluated their experience with the computer-based instructional program with a mean score of 4.69 (SD=0.53) for use of graphics, 4.70 (SD=0.56) for instructional content, and 4.45 (SD=0.67) for the learning process. The mean difference of mental effort (1.50) between the two presentation formats was significant, t=8.26, p≤.0001, df=76, for two-tailed distribution. Consistent with cognitive load theory, innovative computer-based instructional strategies decrease extraneous cognitive load compared with traditional paper-based instructional strategies.

  5. Symposium by NATO Defense Research Group Panel VIII on Computer-Based Instruction in Military Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Weddle, Peter

    1987-01-01

    This collection of papers is the result of a symposium sponsored by NATO's Defense Research Group Panel VIII in the Spring of 1985. The symposium came into being when it became obvious to the NATO countries that research, development and utilization of advanced technologies for training was the best means of increasing both training effectiveness and efficiency. This symposium was the second in a series of three devoted to training. The series was structured to cover all aspects of training. The first series addressed the value of training, the second one dealt with the application of training technologies and the third and last of the series focused on academic issues concerned with the effect of prior learning on subsequent learning. The fact that a major American publisher has determined that computer based instruction is the technology of greatest interest to the NATO community is not surprising. Advances in microprocessor technology have revolutionized both how and where we train. During this symposium t...

  6. Comparison of computer based instruction to behavior skills training for teaching staff implementation of discrete-trial instruction with an adult with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, Melissa R; Williams, W Larry; Garrido, Natalia; Lee, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, behavior skills training (BST) is compared to a computer based training package for teaching discrete trial instruction to staff, teaching an adult with autism. The computer based training package consisted of instructions, video modeling and feedback. BST consisted of instructions, modeling, rehearsal and feedback. Following training, participants were evaluated in terms of their accuracy on completing critical skills for running a discrete trial program. Six participants completed training; three received behavior skills training and three received the computer based training. Participants in the BST group performed better overall after training and during six week probes than those in the computer based training group. There were differences across both groups between research assistant and natural environment competency levels.

  7. Awareness of Accessibility Barriers in Computer-Based Instructional Materials and Faculty Demographics at South Dakota Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology and course delivery methods have enabled persons with disabilities to enroll in higher education at an increasing rate. Federal regulations state persons with disabilities must be granted equal access to the information contained in computer-based instructional materials, but faculty at the six public universities in South…

  8. The Effects of Computer-Based Instruction on the Transition Planning Process Knowledge of Parents of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Dawn A.; Test, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing parents' ability to make informed choices is important to successful transition planning for youth with disabilities. This study used a multiple probe design across content areas replicated across participants to examine the effects of a computer-based instructional program on acquisition of parents' knowledge of the transition planning…

  9. A Survey of Exemplar Teachers' Perceptions, Use, and Access of Computer-Based Games and Technology for Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Michael D.; Marks, Yaela

    2013-01-01

    This research reports and analyzes for archival purposes surveyed perceptions, use, and access by 259 United States based exemplar Primary and Secondary educators of computer-based games and technology for classroom instruction. Participating respondents were considered exemplary as they each won the Milken Educator Award during the 1996-2009…

  10. Social Skills Instruction for Urban Learners with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Culturally Responsive and Computer-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Ervin, Porsha; Cartledge, Gwendolyn; Musti-Rao, Shobana; Gibson, Lenwood, Jr.; Keyes, Starr E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of culturally relevant/responsive, computer-based social skills instruction on the social skill acquisition and generalization of 6 urban African American sixth graders with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A multiple-probe across participants design was used to evaluate the effects of the social skills…

  11. The Effects of Computer-Based Instruction on the Transition Planning Process Knowledge of Parents of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Dawn A.; Test, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing parents' ability to make informed choices is important to successful transition planning for youth with disabilities. This study used a multiple probe design across content areas replicated across participants to examine the effects of a computer-based instructional program on acquisition of parents' knowledge of the transition planning…

  12. A Self-Instructional Approach To the Teaching of Enzymology Involving Computer-Based Sequence Analysis and Molecular Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Paul V.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a self-instructional assignment approach to the teaching of advanced enzymology. Presents an assignment that offers a means of teaching enzymology to students that exposes them to modern computer-based techniques of analyzing protein structure and relates structure to enzyme function. (JRH)

  13. The Goal Specificity Effect on Strategy Use and Instructional Efficiency during Computer-Based Scientific Discovery Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunsting, Josef; Wirth, Joachim; Paas, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Using a computer-based scientific discovery learning environment on buoyancy in fluids we investigated the "effects of goal specificity" (nonspecific goals vs. specific goals) for two goal types (problem solving goals vs. learning goals) on "strategy use" and "instructional efficiency". Our empirical findings close an important research gap,…

  14. Teaching Grocery Store Purchasing Skills to Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using a Computer-Based Instruction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David L.; Morgan, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    This research evaluated effects of a multi-media computer-based instruction (CBI) program designed to teach grocery store purchasing skills to three high-school students with intellectual disabilities. A multiple baseline design across participants used measures of computer performance mastery and grocery store probes to evaluate the CBI. All…

  15. Improving Cognitive Skills in Mentally Handicapped Pre-Schoolers through the Use of Computer-Based Instruction and Manipulatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Maria T.

    This practicum project involved working with four preschool children with mental disabilities to increase their cognitive abilities through the use of computer-based instruction and use of manipulative materials. It also sought to improve the children's social-emotional development and self-esteem. The developmental levels of the four students…

  16. Comparison of expert instruction and computer-based video training in teaching fundamental surgical skills to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, Markku; Brydges, Ryan; Backstein, David; Dubrowski, Adam

    2008-04-01

    Practice using computer-based video instruction (CBVI) leads to improvements in surgical skills proficiency. This study investigated the benefits of the introduction of (a) learner-directed, interactive video training and (b) the addition of expert instruction on the learning and retention of the basic surgical skills of suturing and knot-tying in medical students. Using bench models, students were pre-tested on a suturing and knot-tying skill after viewing an instructional video. The students were then randomly assigned to three practice conditions: self-study with video; self-study with interactive video; or the combination of self-study with interactive video with the addition of subsequent expert instruction. All participants underwent 18 trials of practice in their assigned training condition. The effectiveness of training was assessed by an immediate post-test and a retention test one month later. Performance was evaluated using expert- and computer-based assessments. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. There were no differences in expert- and computer-based assessments between groups at pre-test. Although all three groups demonstrated significant improvements on both measures between the pre- and post-tests as well as between pre-tests and retention-tests (P instruction nor the addition of self-directed interaction with video leads to further improvements in skill development or retention. These findings further support the possible implementation of CBVI within surgical skills curricula.

  17. A Project to Develop and Evaluate a Computerized System for Instructional Response Analysis; Project SIRA. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, J.A., Jr.

    Project SIRA (System for Instructional Response Analysis) used a systems approach to develop a complete range of programs and techniques both for evaluation of student performance and for evaluation and revision of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) lesson material. By use of the PLATO computer-based instructional hardware system at the…

  18. Computer-Based Science Education. CERL Report X-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Donald L.; And Others

    The PLATO IV system of computer-based education developed at the University of Illinois is discussed. A brief description of the PLATO system operation is given, and lesson examples are provided for the areas of biology, geometry, chemistry, and physics. Basic problems in the field of computer-based education are discussed, along with possible…

  19. Learner Control over Full and Lean Computer-based Instruction under Differing Ability Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Howard J.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effects of type of instructional control (learner control versus program control) and program mode (full versus lean) on the achievement, option use, time in the program, and attitudes of higher-ability and lower-ability university students using a computer-delivered instructional program. Discusses implications for instructional…

  20. Foundation, Organization, and Purpose of the National Consortium for Computer-Based Musical Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper begins with a look at the present state of computer applications to music education. Instructional systems for instrumental music, music fundamentals, ear-training, set theory, composition, analysis, information retrieval, automated music printing and computer-managed instruction are discussed. The functions of the NCCBMI are described.…

  1. Classroom versus Computer-Based CPR Training: A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Instructional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Robb S.; Gazzillo Diaz, Linda; Middlemas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether computer-based CPR training is comparable to traditional classroom training. Design and Setting: This study was quantitative in design. Data was gathered from a standardized examination and skill performance evaluation which yielded numerical scores. Subjects: The subjects were 64…

  2. Item Difficulty in the Evaluation of Computer-Based Instruction: An Example from Neuroanatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah; Pani, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports large item effects in a study of computer-based learning of neuroanatomy. Outcome measures of the efficiency of learning, transfer of learning, and generalization of knowledge diverged by a wide margin across test items, with certain sets of items emerging as particularly difficult to master. In addition, the outcomes of…

  3. Evaluation of Manual Spelling, Observational and Incidental Learning Using Computer-Based Instruction with a Tablet PC, Large Screen Projection, and a Forward Chaining Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrazzella, Kimberly; Mechling, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    The study employed a multiple probe design to investigate the effects of computer-based instruction (CBI) and a forward chaining procedure to teach manual spelling of words to three young adults with moderate intellectual disability in a small group arrangement. The computer-based program included a tablet PC whereby students wrote words directly…

  4. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Chinese: An Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching-Hsiang Chen; Chin-Chuan Cheng

    1976-01-01

    A report is made of a computer based instructional project in Chinese using the system known as PLATO conducted at the University of Illinois that has resulted in the creation of a file of three thousand Chinese characters and a set of Chinese lessons for first year students. (RM)

  5. A Computer-Based Instructional Support Network: Design, Development, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    earth context. Paper presented at the Fifteenth Annual Symposium of the Jean Piaget Society, Philadelphia, PA. Levin, J. A., Riel, M. M., Miyake, N...electronic communication network linking students to instructional resources such as instructors and instructional materials. A key element of the ISN...concept was to provide very simple, easy to use workstations for instructor and students , enabling effective system use with minimal training and

  6. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Verbally Respond to Questions and Make Purchases in Fast Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Pridgen, Leslie S.; Cronin, Beth A.

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based video instruction (CBVI) was used to teach verbal responses to questions presented by cashiers and purchasing skills in fast food restaurants. A multiple probe design across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of CBVI. Instruction occurred through simulations of three fast food restaurants on the computer using video…

  7. Unifying Computer-Based Assessment across Conceptual Instruction, Problem-Solving, and Digital Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William L.; Baker, Ryan S.; Rossi, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    As students work through online learning systems such as the Reasoning Mind blended learning system, they often are not confined to working within a single educational activity; instead, they work through various different activities such as conceptual instruction, problem-solving items, and fluency-building games. However, most work on assessing…

  8. The Reverse Modality Effect: Examining Student Learning from Interactive Computer-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Fethi A.; Crooks, Steven M.; Cheon, Jongpil; Ari, Fatih; Flores, Raymond; Kurucay, Murat; Paniukov, Dmitrii

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of modality on learning from multimedia instruction. This study utilized a factorial between-subject design to examine the effects of modality on student learning outcomes, study patterns and mental effort. An interactive computer-presented diagram was developed to teach the places of…

  9. Computer Based Instruction in the U.S. Army’s Entry Level Enlisted Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-13

    1982, December). Canadian Library Journal , 39, 357-364. Kimberlin, D. (1983). The U.S. Army air defense school distributed instructional system project...School Library Journal , p. 39. - .. .’... 130 The Army needs to improve individual soldier training in its units. (1981). Report to Congress by the

  10. Filsafat Ketuhanan Menurut Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Th.J Weismann

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Plato adalah filsuf pertama yang menulis secara filosofis dan secara sistematik teologis mengenai konsep Ketuhanan sehingga dapatlah dikatakan bahwa ia adalah peletqk dasar bagi ilmu teologia dan memberikan pengaruh besar bagi perkembanganfilsafat Barat khususnya tentangkonsep Ketuhanan. Pemikiran Plato tentang Ketuhanan adalah upayanya untuk mereformasi konsep Ketuhanan yang terdapat pada masyarakat Yunani kuno. Tulisan ini berupaya menganalisis dan memahami Ketuhanan menurut Plato agar pembaca masa kini dapat mengerti lebih dalam lagi tentong konsep Ketuhanan yang dipahami masyarakat Yunani kuno dan khususnya menurut Plato, dan juga dapat dijadikan sebagai bahan perbandingan bagifilsafat Ketuhanan pada masa kini. Filsafat Ketuhanan menurut Plato ini penulis jelaskan dengan memperhatikandimensi metafisika, epistemologi, dan etika.

  11. [Plato psychiatrist, Foucault platonic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathov, Nicolás

    2016-05-01

    This work explores the links between the concepts of "soul", "law" and "word" in Plato's work, in order to highlight the importance and the centrality of the philosophical-therapeutic dimension in the Greek philosopher's thought. In that way, this work pretends to show that "contemporary" problems usually discussed within "Human Sciences" in general, and Psychiatry in particular, should confront their knowledge with Plato's work, mainly due to the profound influence his ideas have had in our Greco-Christian culture. In that sense, and with that objective, this work also explores Michel Foucault's lucid and controversial interpretation of Plato.

  12. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach the Use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices for Ordering at Fast-Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Cronin, Beth

    2006-01-01

    In the study reported on here, the authors used computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach 3 high school students with moderate or severe intellectual disabilities how to order in fast-food restaurants by using an augmentative, alternative communication device. The study employed a multiple probe design to institute CBVI as the only…

  13. The Effects of the Computer-Based Instruction on the Achievement and Problem Solving Skills of the Science and Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serin, Oguz

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of the computer-based instruction on the achievements and problem solving skills of the science and technology students. This is a study based on the pre-test/post-test control group design. The participants of the study consist of 52 students; 26 in the experimental group, 26 in the control group. The…

  14. Effects of Computer-Based Video Instruction on the Acquisition and Generalization of Grocery Purchasing Skills for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Minkowan; Therrien, William J.; Hua, Youjia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) on teaching grocery purchasing skills to students with moderate intellectual disability (ID). Four high school students with mild to moderate ID participated in the study. A multiple-probe design across students was used to examine the effects. Results…

  15. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities to Perform Multiple Step, Job Tasks in a Generalized Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ortega-Hurndon, Fanny

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to perform complex, multiple step, job tasks in a generalized setting. A multiple probe design across three job tasks and replicated across three students was used to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  16. Effects of Computer-Based Video Instruction on the Acquisition and Generalization of Grocery Purchasing Skills for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Minkowan; Therrien, William J.; Hua, Youjia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) on teaching grocery purchasing skills to students with moderate intellectual disability (ID). Four high school students with mild to moderate ID participated in the study. A multiple-probe design across students was used to examine the effects. Results…

  17. A Computer-based Course in Classical Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D.; Sherwood, B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes and illustrates the tutorial and homework exercise lessons, student routing, course organization, administration, and evaluation of a PLATO computer-based course in classical mechanics. An appendix lists 41 lessons developed for the course. (CMV)

  18. Teaching Early Mathematics with PLATO[R] Software: An Overview of the New PLATO Elementary Mathematics Curricula and How To Use Them. Technical Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Bill; Foshay, Rob; Morris, Barbara

    The "PLATO[R] Math Expeditions" and "PLATO[R] Projects for the Real World" curricula are designed to implement effective, research-based instructional practices. "Math Expeditions" is designed to give elementary grade users the mathematics skills and practice needed to solve real-life problems. Across the eight…

  19. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  20. The Effect of Computer Based Instructional Technique for the Learning of Elementary Level Mathematics among High, Average and Low Achievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad Tanveer; Gondal, Bashir; Fatima, Nuzhat

    2014-01-01

    The major objective of the study was to elicit the effect of three instructional methods for teaching of mathematics on low, average and high achiever elementary school students. Three methods: traditional instructional method, computer assisted instruction (CAI) and teacher facilitated mathematics learning software were employed for the teaching…

  1. From Pericles to Plato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Øjvind

    2012-01-01

    Plato is normally taken as one of the founders of Western political philosophy, not at least with his Republic. Here, he constructs a hierarchy of forms of governments, beginning with aristocracy at the top as a critical standard for the other forms of governments, and proceeding through timocrac......’ funeral oration is used to show that Pericles presented a democratic political philosophy that can serve as a counterpoint to Plato’s political philosophy in the Republic....

  2. Improving Students' Understanding and Perception of Cell Theory in School Biology Using a Computer-Based Instruction Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiboss, Joel; Wekesa, Eric; Ndirangu, Mwangi

    2006-01-01

    A survey by the Kenya National Examination Council (KNEC) revealed that students' academic performance and interest in secondary school biology has been generally poor. This has been attributed to the current methods of instruction and the lack of instructional resources amenable to the study and proper understanding of such complex areas as cell…

  3. Peers on Socrates and Plato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2014-01-01

    There is more to be said about two of the topics Chris Peers addresses in his article "Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A morpho-logic of teaching and learning" (2012, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 44, 760-774), namely the Socratic method of teaching and Plato's stance with regard to women and feminism. My purpose in this article is…

  4. PLATO Sitcom Dialogs for Russian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Clayton; Provenzano, Nolen

    1981-01-01

    Situation comedy (sitcom) dialogs that are included in PLATO lessons for first year Russian students are described. These comprehension exercises make use of both the touch panel and the audio capabilities of PLATO. The sitcom dialogs were written by a native speaker of Russian and are based on the vocabulary in the textbook plus a small number of…

  5. Peers on Socrates and Plato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2014-01-01

    There is more to be said about two of the topics Chris Peers addresses in his article "Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A morpho-logic of teaching and learning" (2012, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 44, 760-774), namely the Socratic method of teaching and Plato's stance with regard to women and feminism. My purpose in this article is…

  6. Teaching suturing and knot-tying skills to medical students: a randomized controlled study comparing computer-based video instruction and (concurrent and summary) expert feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xeroulis, George J; Park, Jason; Moulton, Carol-Anne; Reznick, Richard K; Leblanc, Vicki; Dubrowski, Adam

    2007-04-01

    We carried out a prospective, randomized, 4-arm study including control arm, blinding of examiners to determine effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) and different types of expert feedback (concurrent and summary) on learning of a basic technical skill. Using bench models, participants were pre-tested on a suturing and instrument knot-tying skill after viewing an instructional video. The students were subsequently assigned randomly to 4 practice conditions: no additional intervention (control), self study with CBVI, expert feedback during practice trials (concurrent feedback), and expert feedback after practice trials (summary feedback). All participants underwent 19 trials of practice, over 1 hour, in their assigned training condition. The effectiveness of training was assessed both at an immediate post-test and 1 month later at a retention test. Performance was evaluated using both expert-based (Global Rating Scores) and computer-based assessment (Hand Motion Analysis). Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. There were no differences in GRS between groups at pre-test. The CBVI, concurrent feedback and summary feedback methods were equally effective initially for the instruction of this basic technical skill to naive medical students and displayed better performance than control (control, 12.71 [10.79 to 14.62]; CBVI, 16.39 [14.38 to 18.40]; concurrent, 16.97 [15.79 to 18.15]; summary, 16.09 [13.57 to 18.62]; P .05). Our study showed that CBVI can be as effective as summary expert feedback in the instruction of basic technical skills to medical students. Thoughtfully incorporated into technical curricula, CBVI can make efficient use of faculty time and serve as a useful pedagogic adjunct for basic skills training. Additionally, our study provides evidence supporting an increased role of summary feedback to effectively train novices in technical skills.

  7. The Cost of PLATO in a University Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    1983-01-01

    This analysis of the cost-effectiveness of the University of Delaware's own PLATO system discusses the initial expense of acquiring the system, decreases in unit cost as number of users increased, capital investment in hardware, expenditures and funding sources, comparisons of actual and projected costs, and benefits of individualized instruction.…

  8. Teacher Conceptions and Approaches Associated with an Immersive Instructional Implementation of Computer-Based Models and Assessment in a Secondary Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waight, Noemi; Liu, Xiufeng; Gregorius, Roberto Ma.; Smith, Erica; Park, Mihwa

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports on a case study of an immersive and integrated multi-instructional approach (namely computer-based model introduction and connection with content; facilitation of individual student exploration guided by exploratory worksheet; use of associated differentiated labs and use of model-based assessments) in the implementation of coupled computer-based models and assessment in a high-school chemistry classroom. Data collection included in-depth teacher interviews, classroom observations, student interviews and researcher notes. Teacher conceptions highlighted the role of models as tools; the benefits of abstract portrayal via visualizations; appropriate enactment of model implementation; concerns with student learning and issues with time. The case study revealed numerous challenges reconciling macro, submicro and symbolic phenomena with the NetLogo model. Nonetheless, the effort exhibited by the teacher provided a platform to support the evolution of practice over time. Students' reactions reflected a continuum of confusion and benefits which were directly related to their background knowledge and experiences with instructional modes. The findings have implications for the role of teacher knowledge of models, the modeling process and pedagogical content knowledge; the continuum of student knowledge as novice users and the role of visual literacy in model decoding, comprehension and translation.

  9. Conceptual model of health information ethics as a basis for computer-based instructions for electronic patient record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Mihoko; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Watanabe, Kayo

    2007-01-01

    A computer-based learning system called Electronic Patient Record (EPR) Laboratory has been developed for students to acquire knowledge and practical skills of EPR systems. The Laboratory is basically for self-learning. Among the subjects dealt with in the system is health information ethics. We consider this to be of the utmost importance for personnel involved in patient information handling. The variety of material on the subject has led to a problem in dealing with it in a methodical manner. In this paper, we present a conceptual model of health information ethics developed using UML to represent the semantics and the knowledge of the domain. Based on the model, we could represent the scope of health information ethics, give structure to the learning materials, and build a control mechanism for a test, fail and review cycle. We consider that the approach is applicable to other domains.

  10. Phusis and Nomos in Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Nouri Sanghdehi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest problems in Plato that appears in different forms in his works is the relation of nomos and phusis. This thesis has been in fifth century B.C as the contradiction of phusis and nomos among big thinkers. In this essay, we tried to investigate the relation of phusis and nomos in Plato’s thoughts according to current theories of the contradiction of these in dialogues Gorgias, Republic and Protagoras. Plato tries to minimize consequences of belief to contradiction of phusis and nomos in social and political life by assertion large scale relation between phusis and nomos. Plato depicts the ultimate solution of this problem in Law. There he accounts nomos as raised from phusis that is sub sovereignty of divine. Indeed union of phusis and gods in Plato’s thought is sanction for the identity of phusis and nomos.

  11. What is Plato? Inference and Allusion in Plato's "Sophist."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandahl, Ellen

    1989-01-01

    Discusses inference and allusion in the dialogue in Plato's Sophist. Examines the sense in which a locution is used, distinguishing among senses of the verb to be, and sets the ball rolling for the development of logic and the whole metaphysics of categories of being. (RAE)

  12. An Experiment in Architectural Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the application of the PLATO IV computer-based educational system to a one-semester basic drawing course for freshman architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design students and relates student reactions to the experience. (RAO)

  13. Grades 1-8, Apache Junction Unified School District 43, Apache Junction, Arizona. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, David W.; Quinn, Nancy W.

    Apache Junction Unified School District, Arizona, has embarked on a 5-year program of instructional improvement using technology. PLATO Elementary reading and mathematics products were installed in the district's elementary and middle schools at the beginning of the 1999-2000 school year. This evaluation studied the use and preliminary student…

  14. Computer-Based Training for the U.S. Coast Guard Standard Terminal Microcomputer: A Basis for Implementation Utilizing the Elaboration Theory of Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    73 BIBLIOGRAPHY----------------------------------------------- 76 INITIAL DISTRIBUTION LIST...provide " sonnet " as an example concept. A procedure is "a set of actions that are intended to achieve an end...a skill, technique, or method." A...of Instructional Design, 2nd edition, New York: Holt, Rinehart and W nston, 1979. 73 12. Convergent Technologies, Inc., Technical Documentation

  15. An Exploratory Investigation of the Effect of Individualized Computer-Based Instruction on Rifle Marksmanship Performance and Skill. CRESST Report 754

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gregory K. W. K.; Nagashima, Sam O.; Espinosa, Paul D.; Berka, Chris; Baker, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    In this report, researchers examined whether individualized multimedia-based instruction would influence the development of rifle marksmanship skills in novice shooters with little or no prior rifle marksmanship experience. Forty-eight novice shooters used an M4 rifle training simulator system to shoot at an 8-inch target at a simulated distance…

  16. The Impact of a Computer Based Math Instruction Program on Fifth Grade Student Academic Performance on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills in One School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Brian B.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the differences between two groups of fifth grade students' performance on the 2010 fifth grade Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) math test. The sample consisted of a group of fifth grade students receiving the traditional instruction from their classroom teacher and a group of fifth grade…

  17. The Method of Hypothesis in Plato's Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Aboie Mehrizi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the examination of method of hypothesis in Plato's philosophy. This method, respectively, will be examined in three dialogues of Meno, Phaedon and Republic in which it is explicitly indicated. It will be shown the process of change of Plato’s attitude towards the position and usage of the method of hypothesis in his realm of philosophy. In Meno, considering the geometry, Plato attempts to introduce a method that can be used in the realm of philosophy. But, ultimately in Republic, Plato’s special attention to the method and its importance in the philosophical investigations, leads him to revise it. Here, finally Plato introduces the particular method of philosophy, i.e., the dialectic

  18. Plato's Anti-Kohlbergian Program for Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Following Lawrence Kohlberg it has been commonplace to regard Plato's moral theory as "intellectualist", where Plato supposedly believes that becoming virtuous requires nothing other than "philosophical knowledge or intuition of the ideal form of the good". This is a radical misunderstanding of Plato's educational programme,…

  19. THEORY OF LOVE IN PLATO'S PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOHREH MOZAFARI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a philosophical analysis of the phenomenon of Plato’s love. It is noted that a large number of works are devoted to the philosophy of Plato’s love, but not all aspects of his philosophy are studied, for example the problems of erotosophy of Plato. Phenomenon of love interested philosophers since ancient times. The first attempts to explain the phenomenon of love appeared in ancient times. These attempts were made by ancient philosophers Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Platonism is a multifaceted teaching; identification of all possibilities of Plato’s erotic philosophy which can supplement other fields of philosophy is important and topical. 

  20. Three Aspects of PLATO Use at Chanute AFB: CBE Production Techniques, Computer-Aided Management, Formative Development of CBE Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecka, Joseph A.

    This report describes various aspects of lesson production and use of the PLATO system at Chanute Air Force Base. The first chapter considers four major factors influencing lesson production: (1) implementation of the "lean approach," (2) the Instructional Systems Development (ISD) role in lesson production, (3) the transfer of…

  1. A Plan for the Evaluation of a Project to Develop Basic Medical Sciences Lessons on PLATO IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Les A.; And Others

    A project to introduce PLATO IV computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in medical sciences education for health professionals was implemented at the School of Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Illinois. This paper describes the plan for evaluation of the project. Using a student questionnaire and additional general questions, the…

  2. An Evaluation of the Teaching Effectiveness of PLATO in a First Level Biology Course. CERL Report X-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenty, Richard P.; Kieffer, George H.

    This paper describes a study of the teaching effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction using the PLATO system at the University of Illinois in a first level biology course. College enrollment, class rank, final grade, and time study data of the control and experimental groups were obtained from master rosters. A questionnaire administered to…

  3. Quoting Plato in Porphyrius' Cuestiones homericas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Rodríguez‑Noriega Guillén

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the quotations of Plato in Porphyry’s Homeric Questions,including their typology (literal quotation, allusion, paraphrase, etc., their beingor not direct citations, their function in the work, and their possible parallels inother authors.

  4. Plato's problem an introduction to mathematical platonism

    CERN Document Server

    Panza, M

    2013-01-01

    What is mathematics about? And how can we have access to the reality it is supposed to describe? The book tells the story of this problem, first raised by Plato, through the views of Aristotle, Proclus, Kant, Frege, Gödel, Benacerraf, up to the most recent debate on mathematical platonism.

  5. The PLATO 2.0 mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauer, H.; et al., [Unknown; Hekker, S.

    2014-01-01

    PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets

  6. Results of the 1975 Delaware PLATO Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    During the Spring semester of 1975, the University of Delaware initiated a PLATO project with the dual purpose of demonstrating how a computer system might function in a university and of evaluating what part such a system might play in the future of the university and its supporting community. The demonstration phase of the project, which…

  7. Socrates, Plato, "Eros" and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherran, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the educational method--the "elenchos"--of Plato's Socrates, arguing, against some prominent interpretations, that it is love, both "eros" and "philia", that is the key that links Socrates' philosophy with his education. This analysis, of course, raises some difficult questions regarding the relationship between teacher and…

  8. Plato's Protagoras: Professional Models, Ethical Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Marshall W.

    1983-01-01

    In Plato's model his clear criticism of Protagorean careerism and his negotiation with Socratic radicalism shows he is a centrist cultivating criticism and open discourse. In an age when academe seems to have lost a sense of its identify and function in society, its most enduring contributions are criticism and discourse. (MLW)

  9. What scientists can learn from Plato's Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Conferences and scientific meetings are as old as science itself. The ancient Greeks where (in)famous for organizing so-called symposiums. During a symposium (from Greek, drinking together), attendees followed a program that contained both social and scientific aspects, focused around a certain topic. Whilst drinking and eating, all participants were expected to share their vision on the topic of interest by giving an oral presentation. The goal of these meetings was to arrive at a new common understanding and to come closer to the truth. Plato et al. knew very well how to organize an effective scientific conference, which should make use overthink the way we are organizing present-day conferences. Scientific meetings aim to connect researchers, share research and unravel the truth. The question is now: how do we get this done effectively? Plato knew that discussing science with strangers is difficult and he believed that talking about heavy matter could be done best when combined with social events. What if we try to go back to the times of Plato and model our conferences after the ancient symposiums? We might drop laying on couches and covering ourselves in ivy and flowers. However, a mix of social and scientific events will contribute to achieving the ultimate goal of why scientists go to conferences: to connect, to share and to unravel the truth.

  10. MTA Computer Based Evaluation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lisa P.; And Others

    The MTA PLATO-based evaluation system, which has been implemented by a consortium of schools of medical technology, is designed to be general-purpose, modular, data-driven, and interactive, and to accommodate other national and local item banks. The system provides a comprehensive interactive item-banking system in conjunction with online student…

  11. MTA Computer Based Evaluation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lisa P.; And Others

    The MTA PLATO-based evaluation system, which has been implemented by a consortium of schools of medical technology, is designed to be general-purpose, modular, data-driven, and interactive, and to accommodate other national and local item banks. The system provides a comprehensive interactive item-banking system in conjunction with online student…

  12. From Plato to Orwell: Utopian Rhetoric in a Dystopian World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatherage, Scott

    Plato's "Republic" and George Orwell's "1984" both posit visionary worlds, one where humans are virtuous and understand what Plato refers to as "the Good," and the other where citizens are pawns of a government which uses language as a form of tyranny and control. Despite these overarching differences in philosophical…

  13. From Plato to Orwell: Utopian Rhetoric in a Dystopian World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatherage, Scott

    Plato's "Republic" and George Orwell's "1984" both posit visionary worlds, one where humans are virtuous and understand what Plato refers to as "the Good," and the other where citizens are pawns of a government which uses language as a form of tyranny and control. Despite these overarching differences in philosophical…

  14. Plato the Pederast: Rhetoric and Cultural Procreation in the Dialogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    Examines Plato's Dialogues by reading them through two cultural lenses: the role of eros in classical Greece and its analogous relationship to language and rhetoric; and the educational function of eros within the ancient institution of pederasty. Shows how the cultural values of ancient Greece manifested themselves in Plato's erotic educational…

  15. Plato's Philosophy of Education and the Common Core Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Madonna M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines Plato's Philosophy of Education asking what he would say about the current Common Core initiative which is to better help students to become college and career ready. Plato would be in favor of the common core in as much as the standards are tied to specific skills needed in various career jobs as he was a proponent of…

  16. Fourth Summative Report of the Delaware PLATO Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    A brief history of the Delaware PLATO project and descriptions of new developments in facilities, applications, user services, research, evaluation, and courseware produced since the Third Summative Report (1978) are provided, as well as an overview of PLATO applications at the University of Delaware. Sample lessons, illustrations, and activity…

  17. Fifth Summative Report of the Delaware PLATO Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    A brief history of the Delaware PLATO project and descriptions of the new developments in facilities, applications, user services, research, evaluation, and courseware produced since the Fourth Summative Report (1979) are provided, as well as an overview of PLATO applications at the University of Delaware. Sample lessons, illustrations, and…

  18. Third Summative Report of the Delaware PLATO Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    Descriptions of new developments in the areas of facilities, applications, user services, support staff, research, evaluation, and courseware production since the Second Summative Report (1977) are provided, as well as a summative overview of PLATO applications at the University of Delaware. Through the purchase of its own PLATO system, this…

  19. Plato's ghost the modernist transformation of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Plato's Ghost is the first book to examine the development of mathematics from 1880 to 1920 as a modernist transformation similar to those in art, literature, and music. Jeremy Gray traces the growth of mathematical modernism from its roots in problem solving and theory to its interactions with physics, philosophy, theology, psychology, and ideas about real and artificial languages. He shows how mathematics was popularized, and explains how mathematical modernism not only gave expression to the work of mathematicians and the professional image they sought to create for themselves, but how modernism also introduced deeper and ultimately unanswerable questions

  20. Pemikiran Epistemologi Barat: dari Plato Sampai Gonseth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunu Burhanuddin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper riviewing the Western epistemology thought. The theme focuses on Plato to Gonseth. The Epistemology that referred in this article, is to think about "how humans acquire knowledge?". From this then appear four types of sect modern western epistemology thought, namely: sect of empiricism, rationalism sect, kantinian sect, sect of positivism. Furthermore, the social positivism sciences developed by Comte leaves serious problems associated with the loss of the role of the subject. This problem being the background of epistemology philosophy appears that by Emund Husserl developed through the phenomenology, Habermas through hermeneutics, and Ferdinand Gonseth through critical theory.

  1. The PLATO 2.0 Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Rauer, H; Aerts, C; Appourchaux, T; Benz, W; Brandeker, A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Deleuil, M; Gizon, L; Güdel, M; Janot-Pacheco, E; Mas-Hesse, M; Pagano, I; Piotto, G; Pollacco, D; Santos, N C; Smith, A; -C., J; Suárez,; Szabó, R; Udry, S; Adibekyan, V; Alibert, Y; Almenara, J -M; Amaro-Seoane, P; Eiff, M Ammler-von; Antonello, E; Ball, W; Barnes, S; Baudin, F; Belkacem, K; Bergemann, M; Birch, A; Boisse, I; Bonomo, A S; Borsa, F; Brandão, I M; Brocato, E; Brun, S; Burleigh, M; Burston, R; Cabrera, J; Cassisi, S; Chaplin, W; Charpinet, S; Chiappini, C; Csizmadia, Sz; Cunha, M; Damasso, M; Davies, M B; Deeg, H J; Fialho, F de Oliveira; DÍaz, R F; Dreizler, S; Dreyer, C; Eggenberger, P; Ehrenreich, D; Eigmüller, P; Erikson, A; Farmer, R; Feltzing, S; Figueira, P; Forveille, T; Fridlund, M; García, R; Giuffrida, G; Godolt, M; da Silva, J Gomes; Goupil, M -J; Granzer, T; Grenfell, J L; Grotsch-Noels, A; Günther, E; Haswell, C A; Hatzes, A P; Hébrard, G; Hekker, S; Helled, R; Heng, K; Jenkins, J M; Khodachenko, M L; Kislyakova, K G; Kley, W; Kolb, U; Krivova, N; Kupka, F; Lammer, H; Lanza, A F; Lebreton, Y; Magrin, D; Marcos-Arenal, P; Marrese, P M; Marques, J P; Martins, J; Mathis, S; Mathur, S; Messina, S; Miglio, A; Montalban, J; Montalto, M; Monteiro, M J P F G; Moradi, H; Moravveji, E; Mordasini, C; Morel, T; Mortier, A; Nascimbeni, V; Nielsen, M B; Noack, L; Norton, A J; Ofir, A; Oshagh, M; Ouazzani, R -M; Pápics, P; Parro, V C; Petit, P; Plez, B; Poretti, E; Quirrenbach, A; Ragazzoni, R; Raimondo, G; Rainer, M; Reese, D R; Redmer, R; Reffert, S; Rojas-Ayala, B; Roxburgh, I W; Solanki, S K; Salmon, S; Santerne, A; Schneider, J; Schou, J; Schuh, S; Schunker, H; Silva-Valio, A; Silvotti, R; Skillen, I; Snellen, I; Sohl, F; Sousa, A S; Sozzetti, A; Stello, D; Strassmeier, K G; Švanda, M; Szabó, G M; Tkachenko, A; Valencia, D; van Grootel, V; Vauclair, S D; Ventura, P; Wagner, F W; Walton, N A; Weingrill, J; Werner, S C; Wheatley, P J; Zwintz, K

    2013-01-01

    PLATO 2.0 is a mission candidate for ESA's M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). It addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets like ours, able to develop life? The PLATO 2.0 instrument consists of 34 small aperture telescopes providing a wide field-of-view and a large photometric magnitude range. It targets bright stars in wide fields to detect and characterize planets down to Earth-size by photometric transits, whose masses can then be determined by ground-based radial-velocity follow-up measurements. Asteroseismology will be performed for stars <=11mag to obtain highly accurate stellar parameters, including masses and ages. The combination of bright targets and asteroseismology results in high accuracy for the bulk planet parameters: 2%, 4-10% and 10% for planet radii, masses and ages, respectively. The foreseen baseline observing strategy includes two long pointings (2-3 years) to detect and bulk characterize planets reaching into t...

  2. Effectiveness of Computer-Based Education in Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, James A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This metaanalysis of 32 comparative studies shows that computer-based education has generally had positive effects on the achievement of elementary school pupils. However, these effects are different for off-line computer managed instruction and interactive computer assisted instruction (CAI); interactive CAI produces greater increases in student…

  3. Plato on Metaphysical Explanation: Does 'Participating' Mean Nothing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine J. Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to Aristotle, Plato's efforts at metaphysical explanation not only fail, they are nonsensical. In particular, Plato's appeals to Forms as metaphysically explanatory of the sensibles that participate in them is "empty talk" since "'participating' means nothing" (Met. 992a28-9. I defend Plato against Aristotle's charge by identifying a particular, substantive model of metaphysical predication as the favored model of Plato's late ontology. The model posits two basic metaphysical predication relations: self-predication and participation. In order to understand the participation relation, it is important first to understand how Plato's Forms are self-predicative paradigms. According to the favored model, Forms are self-predicative paradigms insofar as they are ideal, abstract encoders of structural essences. Sensibles participate in Forms by exemplifying the structures encoded in the Forms. Given plausible conditions on metaphysical explanation, Plato's appeals to abstract Forms as metaphysically explanatory of sensibles is a reasonable competitor for Aristotle's appeals to natural, substantial forms. At the very least, Plato's appeals to a participation relation are not empty.

  4. Technology validation of the PLATO CCD at ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prod'homme, Thibaut; Verhoeve, Peter; Beaufort, Thierry; Duvet, Ludovic; Lemmel, Frederic; Smit, Hans; Blommaert, Sander; Oosterbroek, Tim; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Visser, Ivo; Heijnen, Jerko; Butler, Bart

    2016-07-01

    PLATO { PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars { is the third medium-class mission to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. Due for launch in 2025, the payload makes use of a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) the e2v CCD270 operated at 4 MHz. The manufacture of such large device in large quantity constitutes an unprecedented effort. To de-risk the PLATO CCD procurement and aid the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation team is characterizing the electro-optical performance of a number of PLATO devices before and after proton irradiation.

  5. A scientific approach to Plato's Atlantis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Rapisarda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The myth of Atlantis is hard to die. This attempt to use scientific evidence to give it the final smash ends up with the doubt that it might not be totally unsubstantiated. The time of the supposed existence of Atlantis (around twelve thousand years ago was, in fact, characterized by technological revolutions, acknowledged by archaeology, and abrupt climate changes, documented by geology. In principle, it cannot therefore be ruled out that some of those dramatic events left a memory, later used by Plato as a basis for its tale. The climate changes involved the majority of the northern hemisphere, thus all the ancient civilizations (Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Indian and Chinese could have preserved reminiscence, but it is clear that the events occurring closer to Greece would have been more accessible to Plato. Among the Mediterranean sites that experienced the cataclysms of the beginning of the Holocene, a good candidate to host a primordial civilization might have been the archipelago then existing in the Strait of Sicily, a natural maritime link between Tunisia and Italy, prized by the presence of an obsidian source at Pantelleria. Eleven thousand five hundred years ago, a sudden sea level rise erased the archipelago, submerging the possible settlements, but Pantelleria obsidian ores are still there and could provide a significant clue. In fact, the potential discovery of artefacts, originating from a source now submerged by the sea level rise, would imply that the collection of the mineral took place when it was still emerged, namely at the time of Atlantis. Even if such discovery would not be sufficient to prove the existence of the mythical island, it would be enough to shake up the timeline of the human occupation in the region.

  6. Intra-Socratic Polemics: The Symposia of Plato and Xenophon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Danzig

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Textual relationships between the two Symposia suggest that Xenophon wrote first, prompting Plato to write Socrates' critique of Phaedrus, to which Xenophon responded by appending his ch. 8.

  7. Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues

    OpenAIRE

    Ivars Neiders

    2011-01-01

    "Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues" Annotation The dissertation "Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues" is a philosophical study of Socratic views in moral psychology. Particular attention is paid to what the author calls (1) Doxastic competence and (2) Orectic competence. It is argued that according to Socrates these two different epistemic relations are important aspects of our self-understanding. The doxast...

  8. Evaluation of E-Rat, a Computer-based Rat Dissection in Terms of Student Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predavec, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Presents a study that used computer-based rat anatomy to compare student learning outcomes from computer-based instruction with a conventional dissection. Indicates that there was a significant relationship between the time spent on both classes and the marks gained. Shows that computer-based instruction can be a viable alternative to the use of…

  9. What Plato and Murdoch Think About Love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Shakouri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are many interpretations of love and lots of scholars write and talk on love; however, what exactly is the meaning of love? Iris Murdoch’s works are an accumulation of emotional relationships and feelings of love. Her great subject is love, both sexual and non-sexual, and her characters are the portrayal of a small group of people caught up in convoluted ties of love and hate, with Eros ruling over them (Cohen 22. Murdoch was one of the most respected British writers and philosophers of the second half of the twentieth century and, of course, the postwar period. In Murdoch’s novels, love is one of the central themes—marriage, as the institution of love, more often binds than frees. Her characters are mainly ego-centric people who struggle to love and are often overwhelmed by the factor of self-obsession, jealousy, ambition, fascination with suffering and charismatic power. They are absolutely ordinary people with a consuming demand for love, and mental and physical exile. Murdoch was inspired by Plato’s ideas in many ways. Like art, here again Plato’s idea of love is more skeptical than Murdoch’s, whereas Murdoch kept it only as a way to the Good, creation, and happiness. Murdoch and Plato saw love more as a Freudian concept, the Eros, the word that comes from the name of the first Greek god of love. Both the philosophers, Plato and Murdoch, believed that this erotic longing and desires revived by Eros can led to a new direction, a way toward virtue and truth. Her protagonist or marginalized characters are usually tackling it with either vulgarity or the heavenly, which results in creation, art or salvation. Murdoch, as a major moral philosopher, usually grasps the chances to encapsulate her moral visions in her works, and created novels that should be counted as meditations on human love and goodness. Keywords: Eros, erotic love and real artwork, moral philosopher, The Black Prince

  10. Reversing Plato’s Anti-Democratism: Castoriadis’ “Quirky” Plato

    OpenAIRE

    Wendy C. Hamblet

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the conflicting "loves" of Cornelius Castoriadis--his love for the ancients, and especially Plato, and for the common person of the demos. A detailed study of Castoriadis' analysis of Plato's Statesman exposes that Castoriadis attempts to resolve the paradox by rereading Plato as a radical democrat. I argue that this unorthodox reading is at best "quirky, " (a charge Castoriadis levels at Plato) at worst a groundless sophism. However, I conjecture that Castoriadis' readin...

  11. Eugenics concept: from Plato to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvercin, C H; Arda, B

    2008-01-01

    All prospective studies and purposes to improve cure and create a race that would be exempt of various diseases and disabilities are generally defined as eugenic procedures. They aim to create the "perfect" and "higher" human being by eliminating the "unhealthy" prospective persons. All of the supporting actions taken in order to enable the desired properties are called positive eugenic actions; the elimination of undesired properties are defined as negative eugenics. In addition, if such applications and approaches target the public as a whole, they are defined as macro-eugenics. On the other hand, if they only aim at individuals and/or families, they are called micro-eugenics. As generally acknowledged, Galton re-introduced eugenic proposals, but their roots stretch as far back as Plato. Eugenic thoughts and developments were widely accepted in many different countries beginning with the end of the 19th to the first half of the 20th centuries. Initially, the view of negative eugenics that included compulsory sterilizations of handicapped, diseased and "lower" classes, resulted in tens of thousands being exterminated especially in the period of Nazi Germany. In the 1930s, the type of micro positive eugenics movement found a place within the pro-natalist policies of a number of countries. However, it was unsuccessful since the policy was not able to become effective enough and totally disappeared in the 1960s. It was no longer a fashionable movement and left a deep impression on public opinion after the long years of war. However, developments in genetics and its related fields have now enabled eugenic thoughts to reappear under the spotlight and this is creating new moral dilemmas from an ethical perspective.

  12. Positure in Plato's Laws: An Introduction to Figuration on Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the research was to determine the benefits of applying the new Figuration philosophy of dance, based in part on Plato, to civic education. Design/methodology: A close phenomenological reading of Plato's "The Laws," with a strategic focus on its account of the concept of posture. Findings: Plato considers posture to be…

  13. Plato's Cosmic Theology: A Rationale for a Polytheistic Astrology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, André

    2015-05-01

    Plato's cosmology influenced classical astronomy and religion, but was in turn influenced by the polytheistic context of its time. Throughout his texts, including the cosmological treatise Timaeus, and the discussions on the soul in the Phaedrus, Plato (c.428-c.348 BC) established what can be generalised as Platonic cosmological thought. An understanding of the philosophical and mythical levels of Platonic thought can provide a rationale for polytheistic and astrological worldviews, pointing to some cosmological continuity, alongside major shifts, from ancient Greek religion to the astrological thought of ancient astronomers such as Claudius Ptolemy.

  14. ESA's CCD test bench for the PLATO mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, Thierry; Duvet, Ludovic; Bloemmaert, Sander; Lemmel, Frederic; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Verhoeve, Peter; Smit, Hans; Butler, Bart; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Heijnen, Jerko; Visser, Ivo

    2016-08-01

    PLATO { PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars { is the third medium-class mission to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. Due for launch in 2025, the payload makes use of a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), the e2v CCD270 operated at 4 MHz and at -70 C. To de-risk the PLATO CCD qualification programme initiated in 2014 and support the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation section from the Future Missions Office has developed a dedicated test bench.

  15. Computer-Based Dynamic Assessment of Multidigit Multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Design details, operation, and initial field test results are reported for DynaMath, a computer-based dynamic assessment system that provides individually tailored, instructionally useful assessment of students with disabilities. DynaMath organizes and outputs student performance data, graphically shows the "zone of proximal…

  16. Alternative communication network designs for an operational Plato 4 CAI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, R. E., Jr.; Eastwood, L. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The cost of alternative communications networks for the dissemination of PLATO IV computer-aided instruction (CAI) was studied. Four communication techniques are compared: leased telephone lines, satellite communication, UHF TV, and low-power microwave radio. For each network design, costs per student contact hour are computed. These costs are derived as functions of student population density, a parameter which can be calculated from census data for one potential market for CAI, the public primary and secondary schools. Calculating costs in this way allows one to determine which of the four communications alternatives can serve this market least expensively for any given area in the U.S. The analysis indicates that radio distribution techniques are cost optimum over a wide range of conditions.

  17. The Learning Disabled and Computer Based Education: Program Design Strategies. CREATE Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David; And Others

    Third in a series of six monographs on the use of new technologies in the instruction of learning disabled students, the paper explores program design strategies for computer-based instructional materials. Section 1 summarizes ideas related to models of perception and cognition, theories of instruction, and key characteristics of intelligent…

  18. A Data Bank Experience on the PLATO System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Wallace; St-Denis, Richard

    1980-01-01

    Current theories on terminology and lexicography which underlie the logical components of the terminology bank set up on the PLATO system and established standards are briefly presented. The units that were essential to developing the bank are discussed. References are listed. (Author)

  19. Plato and Play: Taking Education Seriously in Ancient Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angour, Armand

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines Plato's notions of play in ancient Greek culture and shows how the philosopher's views on play can be best appreciated against the background of shifting meanings and evaluations of play in classical Greece. Play--in various forms such as word play, ritual, and music--proved central to the development of…

  20. Stonecutter Mills, Inc., Isothermal Community College. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Greg

    Stonecutter Mills, Inc., is a textile manufacturing company with a major production facility in Spindale, North Carolina. In the past few years, Stonecutter Mills employees have been given an opportunity to spend up to 2 hours a week on company time to participate in PLATO-supported learning at Isothermal Community College. Employees could choose…

  1. Future development of the PLATO Observatory for Antarctic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Michael C. B.; Bonner, Colin S.; Everett, Jon R.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; McDaid, Scott; McLaren, Campbell; Storey, John W. V.

    2010-07-01

    PLATO is a self-contained robotic observatory built into two 10-foot shipping containers. It has been successfully deployed at Dome A on the Antarctic plateau since January 2008, and has accumulated over 730 days of uptime at the time of writing. PLATO provides 0.5{1kW of continuous electrical power for a year from diesel engines running on Jet-A1, supplemented during the summertime with solar panels. One of the 10-foot shipping containers houses the power system and fuel, the other provides a warm environment for instruments. Two Iridium satellite modems allow 45 MB/day of data to be transferred across the internet. Future enhancements to PLATO, currently in development, include a more modular design, using lithium iron-phosphate batteries, higher power output, and a light-weight low-power version for eld deployment from a Twin Otter aircraft. Technologies used in PLATO include a CAN (Controller Area Network) bus, high-reliability PC/104 com- puters, ultracapacitors for starting the engines, and fault-tolerant redundant design.

  2. The CGE-PLATO Electronic Laboratory Station Structure and Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, J. P.

    An electronic laboratory station was designed for student use in learning electronic instrumentation and measurement by means of the computer-guided experimentation (CGE) system. The station features rack-mounted electronic laboratory equipment on a laboratory table adjacent to a PLATO IV terminal. An integrated logic system behind the laboratory…

  3. Pursuing the Good, Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato s Republic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Douglas; Cairns; Fritz-Gregor; Herrmann; Terry; Penner

    2008-01-01

    ‘Pursuing the good’ is an old subject in both social history of ancient Greece and Greek philosophy studies. There is hardly anything new when we talk about virtue or morality in the time of Plato and Aristotle. In the area of Greek history, many books and articles on or relevant to that

  4. Eschatological narrative in Plato: between logos and myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Casadesús Bordoy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In his dialogues, Plato frequently resorted to alternate and intertwine his dialectic expositions with images and allegories, aiming to illustrate his arguments. This paper analyses in detail his use of the opposition between logos and myth tointroduce his descriptions of Hades

  5. Go Tell Alcibiades: Tragedy, Comedy, and Rhetoric in Plato's "Symposium"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Nathan; Poulakos, John

    2008-01-01

    Plato's "Symposium" is a significant but neglected part of his elaborate and complex attitude toward rhetoric. Unlike the intellectual discussion of the "Gorgias" or the unscripted conversation of the "Phaedrus," the "Symposium" stages a feast celebrating and driven by the forces of "Eros." A luxuriously stylish performance rather than a rational…

  6. Second Summative Report of the Delaware PLATO Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    Begun on an experimental basis in March 1975, the ongoing PLATO project at the University of Delaware has become an established part of the University's academic program. This descriptive report is divided into three sections: (1) project history and development, including organization, utilization, instructor and author training, and projections…

  7. Dodecahedrane—The chemical transliteration of Plato's universe (A Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Leo A.

    1982-07-01

    The development of chemical interest in three of Plato's five convex polyhedra is described from an historical perspective. The successful synthesis of 1,16-dimethyldodecahedrane and its structural characteristics are outlined. Finally, an account of recent work leading to the still more aesthetically appealing and ultrasymmetric parent dodecahedrane is given.

  8. Arete and physics: The lesson of Plato's "Timaeus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, John R.

    Plato's Timaeus is traditionally read as a work dedicated to the sole purpose of describing the origin and nature of the cosmos, as a straightforward attempt by Plato to produce a peri phuseos treatise. In accord with this reading, the body of Timaeus' monologue is then seen as nothing more than an attempt by Plato to convey his own cosmological doctrines. I propose an alternative to the view that the Timaeus is nothing more than a textbook of Platonic physics. The Timaeus is rather squarely focused on the human being, in her moral and political dimensions, and on her relation to the natural world as a whole. Ultimately, this account of the human being is intended to provide part of the answer to the question of how society can produce good citizens and leaders, and thus serves to provide a theoretical basis for the practices of paideia. When viewed in this light many of the curious features of the Timaeus appear less strange. The various parts of the dialogue: the dramatic introduction, Critias' tale of the Ancient Athenians, and Timaeus' monologue can be seen as each contributing to an investigation of a single topic. It further allows us to understand why Plato chooses to employ Timaeus the Locrian as the principle speaker of the dialogue rather than Socrates. Finally, when read in this way, the Timaeus no longer appears as an outlier in the Platonic corpus, as a work devoted to a radically different subject matter than the rest of his writings. It can be seen as dedicated to the same issues which preoccupied Plato throughout his entire life, as about the determination of the best life and providing the tools with which to realize it.

  9. THE JOURNEY OF TRUTH: FROM PLATO TO ZOLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribut Basuki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Western theater theory and criticism is generally considered to be set forth by the Greeks. Plato was "the first theater critic" with his negative comments about theater owing to his idealistic views about "the truth." Then came Aristotle who used a different viewpoint from that of Plato, saying that there is "truth" in theater. However, hostile criticism on theater came back in the Middle Ages, championed by Tertulian before Aristotelian theory was revived by the neo-classicists such as Scaliger and Castelvetro. Theater theory and criticism discourse was then made more alive by the romanticists who disagreed with the neo-classicists' rigid rules on theater. As the influence of science became dominant in the theater world, naturalism and realism emerged and became the mainstream of theater theory and criticism until well into the twentieth century.

  10. The necessity of dialectics according to Plato and Adorno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne-Marie Eggert

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the notion of philosophy as, on the one hand, an academic or scientific discipline and, on the other, something perhaps superior to the disciplines and in any case dealing with what is not a 'disciplinary' matter. Through an interpretation of Plato's concept of dialectics and...... and Adorno's understanding of philosophy as expression (Ausdruck) it is proposed that this two-fold nature of philosophy is what makes dialectics necessary....

  11. Optical and dark characterization of the PLATO CCD at ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeve, Peter; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Oosterbroek, Tim; Duvet, Ludovic; Beaufort, Thierry; Blommaert, Sander; Butler, Bart; Heijnen, Jerko; Lemmel, Frederic; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Smit, Hans; Visser, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    PLATO - PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars - is the third medium-class mission (M3) to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. It is due for launch in 2025 with the main objective to find and study terrestrial planets in the habitable zone around solar-like stars. The payload consists of >20 cameras; with each camera comprising 4 Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), a large number of flight model devices procured by ESA shall ultimately be integrated on the spacecraft. The CCD270 - specially designed and manufactured by e2v for the PLATO mission - is a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) back-illuminated device operating at 4 MHz pixel rate and coming in two variants: full frame and frame transfer. In order to de-risk the PLATO CCD procurement and aid the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation section is currently validating the PLATO CCD270. This validation consists in demonstrating that the device achieves its specified electrooptical performance in the relevant environment: operated at 4 MHz, at cold and before and after proton irradiation. As part of this validation, CCD270 devices have been characterized in the dark as well as optically with respect to performance parameters directly relevant for the photometric application of the CCDs. Dark tests comprise the measurement of gain sensitivity to bias voltages, charge injection tests, and measurement of hot and variable pixels after irradiation. In addition, the results of measurements of Quantum Efficiency for a range of angles of incidence, intra- pixel response (non-)uniformity, and response to spot illumination, before and after proton irradiation. In particular, the effect of radiation induced degradation of the charge transfer efficiency on the measured charge in a star-like spot has been studied as a function of signal level and of position on the pixel grid, Also, the effect of various levels of background light on the

  12. Dynamic tracking of elementary preservice teachers' experiences with computer-based mathematics learning environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephen R.

    2003-05-01

    A challenging task in educational research today is to understand the implications of recent developments in computer-based learning environments. On the other hand, questions regarding learning and mathematical cognition have long been a central focus of research in mathematics education. Adding technology compounds an already complex problematic. Fortunately, computer-based technology also provides researchers with new ways of studying cognition and instruction. This paper introduces a new method for dynamically tracking learners' experiences in computer-based learning environments. Dynamic tracking is illustrated in both a classroom and a clinical setting by drawing on two studies with elementary preservice teachers working in computer-based mathematics learning environments.

  13. Designing for learner engagement with computer-based testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Walker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The issues influencing student engagement with high-stakes computer-based exams were investigated, drawing on feedback from two cohorts of international MA Education students encountering this assessment method for the first time. Qualitative data from surveys and focus groups on the students’ examination experience were analysed, leading to the identification of engagement issues in the delivery of high-stakes computer-based assessments.The exam combined short-answer open-response questions with multiple-choice-style items to assess knowledge and understanding of research methods. The findings suggest that engagement with computer-based testing depends, to a lesser extent, on students’ general levels of digital literacy and, to a greater extent, on their information technology (IT proficiency for assessment and their ability to adapt their test-taking strategies, including organisational and cognitive strategies, to the online assessment environment. The socialisation and preparation of students for computer-based testing therefore emerge as key responsibilities for instructors to address, with students requesting increased opportunities for practice and training to develop the IT skills and test-taking strategies necessary to succeed in computer-based examinations. These findings and their implications in terms of instructional responsibilities form the basis of a proposal for a framework for Learner Engagement with e-Assessment Practices.

  14. Cognitive processes in solving variants of computer-based problems used in logic teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysink, Tessa H.S.; Dijkstra, S.; Kuper, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The effect of two instructional variables, visualisation and manipulation of objects, in learning to use the logical connective, conditional, was investigated. Instructions for 66 first- year social science students were varied in the computer-based learning environment Tarski's World, designed for

  15. Effect of Computer-Based Video Games on Children: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tsung-Yen; Chen, Wei-Fan

    2009-01-01

    This experimental study investigated whether computer-based video games facilitate children's cognitive learning. In comparison to traditional computer-assisted instruction (CAI), this study explored the impact of the varied types of instructional delivery strategies on children's learning achievement. One major research null hypothesis was…

  16. Effect of Computer-Based Video Games on Children: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tsung-Yen; Chen, Wei-Fan

    2009-01-01

    This experimental study investigated whether computer-based video games facilitate children's cognitive learning. In comparison to traditional computer-assisted instruction (CAI), this study explored the impact of the varied types of instructional delivery strategies on children's learning achievement. One major research null hypothesis was…

  17. Cognitive processes in solving variants of computer-based problems used in logic teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysink, T.H.S.; Dijkstra, S.; Kuper, J.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of two instructional variables, visualisation and manipulation of objects, in learning to use the logical connective, conditional, was investigated. Instructions for 66 first-year social science students were varied in the computer-based learning environment Tarski's World, designed for t

  18. Computer-Based Learning: Interleaving Whole and Sectional Representation of Neuroanatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah

    2013-01-01

    The large volume of material to be learned in biomedical disciplines requires optimizing the efficiency of instruction. In prior work with computer-based instruction of neuroanatomy, it was relatively efficient for learners to master whole anatomy and then transfer to learning sectional anatomy. It may, however, be more efficient to continuously…

  19. Computer-based training for safety: comparing methods with older and younger workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Erik S; Mulloy, Karen B

    2006-01-01

    Computer-based safety training is becoming more common and is being delivered to an increasingly aging workforce. Aging results in a number of changes that make it more difficult to learn from certain types of computer-based training. Instructional designs derived from cognitive learning theories may overcome some of these difficulties. Three versions of computer-based respiratory safety training were shown to older and younger workers who then took a high and a low level learning test. Younger workers did better overall. Both older and younger workers did best with the version containing text with pictures and audio narration. Computer-based training with pictures and audio narration may be beneficial for workers over 45 years of age. Computer-based safety training has advantages but workers of different ages may benefit differently. Computer-based safety programs should be designed and selected based on their ability to effectively train older as well as younger learners.

  20. Computer Assisted Instruction in Economics: An Approach for Illustrating General Equilibrium Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Robert W.

    A market exchange simulation utilizing the PLATO computer-assisted instructional system at the University of Illinois has been designed to teach students the principles of a general equilibrium system. It serves a laboratory function which supplements traditional instruction by stimulating students' interests and providing them with illustrations…

  1. The Philosopher's Arete or theStructure of Plato's Parmenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Gutierrez

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The controversy conceming the unity of Plato's Parmenides and the meaning of its first part is stillongoing. The A. proposes a solution, pointing out its structural coincidence with the Republic's simile of the line. This leads him to confine young Socrates in the segment that corresponds to óuivoux and old Parmenides in the vór¡olc; segment. As the one who "possesses insight" of truth based on his apprehension of the One-Good. Parmenides is the actual representative of the philosopher's arete.

  2. Tibial plato leveling osteotomy / Osteotomia de nivelamento do plato da tíbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Maria Matera

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO is a relatively new and innovative surgical treatment for the cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the canine species. The real intent of the procedure is to provide functional stability to the stifle joint by eliminating or neutralizing the cranial tibial thrust during weight bearing instead to restore the cranial cruciate ligament function. The proposal of this study is to report a review of the TPLO procedure, emphasizing procedure, surgical technique, post operative care and complications. The TPLO procedure consists in a radial osteotomy in the tibial plato and rotation of the caudal plateau in order to obtain a desired angle. After the leveling of the tibial plateau, a bone plate and screws are used to stabilize the osteotomy until bone is healed up. The complications that have been associated with the procedure include tibial tuberosity fracture and patellar tendon tendinosis. This procedure has become increasingly more popular for surgical treatment of cranial cruciate ligament injuries in large breed dog. The long term clinical results have not been completely elucidated yet. It has been showed that this technique doesn’t halt the degenerative joint disease.A osteotomia do platô da tíbia (TPLO é um tratamento relativamente novo e inovador para a ruptura do ligamento cruzado cranial (RLCC na espécie canina. Ao invés de restaurar a função do ligamento, o procedimento promove estabilidade funcional para a articulação do joelho, por eliminar ou neutralizar a força tibial cranial durante a sustentação de peso. A proposta do presente estudo é revisar a técnica de TPLO, enfatizando o procedimento, técnica cirúrgica, cuidados pós-operatórios e complicações. A técnica da TPLO consiste na realização de uma osteotomia circular do platô da tíbia com rotação de sua porção caudal até a obtenção do ângulo desejado. Após o nivelamento do platô da tíbia, placa e parafusos

  3. Reversing Plato’s Anti-Democratism: Castoriadis’ “Quirky” Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamblet, Wendy C.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the conflicting "loves" of Cornelius Castoriadis--his love for the ancients, and especially Plato, and for the common person of the demos. A detailed study of Castoriadis' analysis of Plato's Statesman exposes that Castoriadis attempts to resolve the paradox by rereading Plato as a radical democrat. I argue that this unorthodox reading is at best "quirky, " (a charge Castoriadis levels at Plato at worst a groundless sophism. However, I conjecture that Castoriadis' reading may not constitute a serious attempt to describe a Platonic politics, so much as a prescriptive reading of what otherwise might have been, given certain strands of political generosity evident elsewhere in Plato's corpus.

  4. Radiation, Thermal Gradient and Weight: a threefold dilemma for PLATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, Demetrio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Bruno, Giordano; Piazza, Daniele; Borsa, Francesco; Ghigo, Mauro; Mogulsky, Valery; Bergomi, Maria; Biondi, Federico; Chinellato, Simonetta; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Greggio, Davide; Gullieuszik, Marco; Marafatto, Luca; Viotto, Valentina; Munari, Matteo; Pagano, Isabella; Sicilia, Daniela; Basso, Stefano; Spiga, Daniele; Bandy, Timothy; Brändli, Mathias; Benz, Willy; De Roche, Thierry; Rieder, Martin; Brandeker, Alexis; Klebor, Maximilian; Schweitzer, Mario; Wieser, Matthias; Erikson, Anders; Rauer, Heike

    2016-07-01

    The project PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO) is one of the selected medium class (M class) missions in the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The mean scientific goal of PLATO is the discovery and study of extrasolar planetary systems by means of planetary transits detection. The opto mechanical subsystem of the payload is made of 32 normal telescope optical units (N-TOUs) and 2 fast telescope optical units (FTOUs). The optical configuration of each TOU is an all refractive design based on six properly optimized lenses. In the current baseline, in front of each TOU a Suprasil window is foreseen. The main purposes of the entrance window are to shield the following lenses from possible damaging high energy radiation and to mitigate the thermal gradient that the first optical element will experience during the launch from ground to space environment. In contrast, the presence of the window increases the overall mass by a non-negligible quantity. We describe here the radiation and thermal analysis and their impact on the quality and risks assessment, summarizing the trade-off process with pro and cons on having or dropping the entrance window in the optical train.

  5. Manufacturing and alignment tolerance analysis through Montecarlo approach for PLATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, Demetrio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Bergomi, Maria; Biondi, Federico; Chinellato, Simonetta; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Greggio, Davide; Gullieuszik, Marco; Marafatto, Luca; Viotto, Valentina; Munari, Matteo; Pagano, Isabella; Sicilia, Daniela; Basso, Stefano; Borsa, Francesco; Ghigo, Mauro; Spiga, Daniele; Bandy, Timothy; Brändli, Mathias; Benz, Willy; Bruno, Giordano; De Roche, Thierry; Piazza, Daniele; Rieder, Martin; Brandeker, Alexis; Klebor, Maximilian; Mogulsky, Valery; Schweitzer, Mario; Wieser, Matthias; Erikson, Anders; Rauer, Heike

    2016-07-01

    The project PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO) is one of the selected medium class (M class) missions in the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The main scientific goal of PLATO is the discovery and study of extrasolar planetary systems by means of planetary transits detection. According to the current baseline, the scientific payload consists of 34 all refractive telescopes having small aperture (120mm) and wide field of view (diameter greater than 37 degrees) observing over 0.5-1 micron wavelength band. The telescopes are mounted on a common optical bench and are divided in four families of eight telescopes with an overlapping line-of-sight in order to maximize the science return. Remaining two telescopes will be dedicated to support on-board star-tracking system and will be specialized on two different photometric bands for science purposes. The performance requirement, adopted as merit function during the analysis, is specified as 90% enclosed energy contained in a square having size 2 pixels over the whole field of view with a depth of focus of +/-20 micron. Given the complexity of the system, we have followed a Montecarlo analysis approach for manufacturing and alignment tolerances. We will describe here the tolerance method and the preliminary results, speculating on the assumed risks and expected performances.

  6. Computer Based Instruction of Professional Psychological Skill Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ouwerkerk, R. J.; Hoebe, M. N.; Oldersma, F. L.; Meijman, T. F.; van Oudenhoven-van der Zee, K. I.

    The developments in information technology and multimedia give new opportunities to increase the efficiency and quality of skills education. This paper presents three applications developed in the Netherlands to enhance professional skills learning in different areas of psychology: (1) BioPsy, an application developed to teach and train the…

  7. Large Scale Development of Computer-Based Instructional Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, William P.; Scott, G.F.

    The Individualization Project at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) was organized on a cooperative basis with a federal agency and several community colleges to move smoothly from R&D to a production mode of operation, and finally to emphasize dissemination of computer courseware and systems. The key to the successful…

  8. Computer-based programs on acquisition of reading skills in schoolchildren (review of contemporary foreign investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prikhoda N.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a description of 17 computer-based programs, which were used over the last 5 years (2008—2013 in 15 studies of computer-assisted reading instruction and intervention of schoolchildren. The article includes a description of specificity of various terms used in the above-mentioned studies and the contents of training sessions. The article also carries out a brief analysis of main characteristics of computer-based techniques — language of instruction, age and basic characteristics of students, duration and frequency of training sessions, dependent variables of education. Special attention is paid to efficiency of acquisition of different reading skills through computer-based programs in comparison to traditional school instruction.

  9. Love as an Object of Initiation in Plato's Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euaggelia Maraggianou

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Initiation ( muvhsh was the first stage of the ancient mysteries celebrating Demeter, the earth-goddess, and her daughter Kore, soon identified with Persephone or Persephasa, a pre-Greek deity of the underworld. Next came the stage of contemplation ( ejpopteiva , at which worshippers were shown a vision of the goddess of Hades. This led them to identify themselves with her, thus reaching the highest form of happiness. The Eleusinian Mysteries were inseparably linked to the Orphic doctrine, which in its turn influenced the thought of Plato. Plato sees love as an object of initiation and as one of the greatest mysteries of human existence. Plato’s dialogues, Phaedrus and Symposium, contain expressions borrowed directly from the vocabulary of the Mysteries. Although neither Socrates in Phaedrus nor Diotima in Symposium make any explicit reference to the mystic ceremonies, it is certain that both allude to them in expounding the mysteries of spiritual life. The latter has to start at the stage of physical love in order to end up in the contemplation of Ideas. The mystery into which Socrates is initiated by Diotima is the following: there is a mystic stairway leading from the earth to the sky, from man to God. It is made visible by Love, and its steps are represented by different kinds of beauty. The ascent is a gradual one, with a long stop at each of the stages. In this way Love, disciplined by philosophy and spiritualised by increasing de-personalisation, ends up in the Intellectual, conceiving the latter with an intuitive insight. By this spiritual process, one is purified, led to the road of salvation and enabled to participate in the Divine.

  10. PLATO as it is : A legacy mission for Galactic archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglio, A.; Chiappini, C.; Mosser, B.; Davies, G. R.; Freeman, K.; Girardi, L.; Jofré, P.; Kawata, D.; Rendle, B. M.; Valentini, M.; Casagrande, L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Gilmore, G.; Hawkins, K.; Holl, B.; Appourchaux, T.; Belkacem, K.; Bossini, D.; Brogaard, K.; Goupil, M.-J.; Montalbán, J.; Noels, A.; Anders, F.; Rodrigues, T.; Piotto, G.; Pollacco, D.; Rauer, H.; Prieto, C. Allende; Avelino, P. P.; Babusiaux, C.; Barban, C.; Barbuy, B.; Basu, S.; Baudin, F.; Benomar, O.; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bressan, A.; Cacciari, C.; Campante, T. L.; Cassisi, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Combes, F.; Creevey, O.; Cunha, M. S.; Jong, R. S.; Laverny, P.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Deheuvels, S.; Depagne, É.; Ridder, J.; Matteo, P. Di; Mauro, M. P. Di; Dupret, M.-A.; Eggenberger, P.; Elsworth, Y.; Famaey, B.; Feltzing, S.; García, R. A.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Gizon, L.; Haywood, M.; Handberg, R.; Heiter, U.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Ibata, R.; Katz, D.; Kawaler, S. D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Kurtz, D. W.; Lagarde, N.; Lebreton, Y.; Lund, M. N.; Majewski, S. R.; Marigo, P.; Martig, M.; Mathur, S.; Minchev, I.; Morel, T.; Ortolani, S.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Plez, B.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Pricopi, D.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Reylé, C.; Robin, A.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Salaris, M.; Santiago, B. X.; Schiavon, R.; Serenelli, A.; Sharma, S.; Aguirre, V. Silva; Soubiran, C.; Steinmetz, M.; Stello, D.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Ventura, P.; Ventura, R.; Walton, N. A.; Worley, C. C.

    2017-07-01

    Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.

  11. Angiographic outcomes in the PLATO Trial (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunadian, Vijay; James, Stefan K; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Zorkun, Cafer; Wu, Jinhui; Storey, Robert F; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Katus, Hugo; Emanuelsson, Hakan; Horrow, Jay; Maya, Juan; Wallentin, Lars; Harrington, Robert A; Gibson, C Michael

    2013-01-01

    The PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes) angiographic substudy sought to compare the efficacy of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel with respect to angiographic outcomes before and after PCI in the setting of acute coronary syndrome...

  12. The Legacies of Literacy: From Plato to Freire through Harvey Graff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul

    1989-01-01

    Reviews "The Legacies of Literacy: Continuities and Contradictions in Western Culture and Society" (Harvey G. Graff). Discusses the historical role of literacy education as a tool for liberation, emphasizing the viewpoints of Plato and Freire. (FMW)

  13. Genesis 2–3 and Alcibiades's speech in Plato's Symposium : A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genesis 2–3 and Alcibiades's speech in Plato's Symposium : A cultural critical reading. ... interpretation can arise from the analysis of Alcibiades's speech compared to M- and LXX-Genesis ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  14. Prospects for detecting decreasing exoplanet frequency with main sequence age using PLATO

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Mustill, Alexander J; Pollacco, Don

    2015-01-01

    The space mission PLATO will usher in a new era of exoplanetary science by expanding our current inventory of transiting systems and constraining host star ages, which are currently highly uncertain. This capability might allow PLATO to detect changes in planetary system architecture with time, particularly because planetary scattering due to Lagrange instability may be triggered long after the system was formed. Here, we utilize previously published instability timescale prescriptions to determine PLATO's capability to detect a trend of decreasing planet frequency with age for systems with equal-mass planets. For two-planet systems, our results demonstrate that PLATO may detect a trend for planet masses which are at least as massive as super-Earths. For systems with three or more planets, we link their initial compactness to potentially detectable frequency trends in order to aid future investigations when these populations will be better characterized.

  15. Plato's Charmides as a Political Act: Apologetics and the Promotion of Ideology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danzig, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

      By showing that Critias and Socrates understood the same matters differently, Plato was able to treat seriously ideas that came to be associated with the Thirty and with Socrates while shielding himself from criticism...

  16. Platerm: la banque de terminologie du systeme Platon (PLATERM: The Terminology Bank of the PLATO System).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Wallace; St-Denis, Richard

    1980-01-01

    Describes the elements and functioning of the terminology bank of the PLATO (Programmed Loqic for Automated Teaching Operation) system. Discusses contemporary terminology and lexicography notions on which the bank is based and outlines the tasks performed through PLATERM. (MES)

  17. Platerm: la banque de terminologie du systeme Platon (PLATERM: The Terminology Bank of the PLATO System).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Wallace; St-Denis, Richard

    1980-01-01

    Describes the elements and functioning of the terminology bank of the PLATO (Programmed Loqic for Automated Teaching Operation) system. Discusses contemporary terminology and lexicography notions on which the bank is based and outlines the tasks performed through PLATERM. (MES)

  18. To Compare the Effects of Computer Based Learning and the Laboratory Based Learning on Students' Achievement Regarding Electric Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Bekir; Kanli, Uygar; Ingec, Sebnem Kandil

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the research problem was: "Is the computer based physics instruction as effective as laboratory intensive physics instruction with regards to academic success on electric circuits 9th grade students?" For this research of experimental quality the design of pre-test and post-test are applied with an experiment and a control…

  19. "Rappin' Reader" and "Say Say Oh Playmate": Using Children's Childhood Songs as Literacy Scaffolds in Computer-based Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, Nichole

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the benefits of using culturally responsive reading material and a computer-based learning environment in literacy instruction. Describes a study of low socioeconomic status first through fourth grade African American children that tested two computer programs that use prior knowledge as scaffolds for early literacy instruction.…

  20. A novel algorithm for computer based assessment

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Student learning outcomes have been evaluated through graded assignments and tests by most paper-based assessment systems. But computer based assessments has the opportunity to improve the efficiency of assessments process. The use of internet is also made possible

  1. On computer-based assessment of mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Pead, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This work explores some issues arising from the widespread use of computer based assessment of Mathematics in primary and secondary education. In particular, it considers the potential of computer based assessment for testing “process skills” and “problem solving”. This is discussed through a case study of the World Class Tests project which set out to test problem solving skills. The study also considers how on-screen “eAssessment” differs from conventional paper tests and how transferri...

  2. Encountering the Expertise Reversal Effect with a Computer-Based Environment on Electrical Circuit Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisslein, Jana; Atkinson, Robert K.; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a computer-based environment employing three example-based instructional procedures (example-problem, problem-example, and fading) to teach series and parallel electrical circuit analysis to learners classified by two levels of prior knowledge (low and high). Although no differences between the…

  3. Comparative Effects of Computer-Based Concept Maps, Refutational Texts, and Expository Texts on Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesope, Olusola O.; Cavagnetto, Andy; Hunsu, Nathaniel J.; Anguiano, Carlos; Lloyd, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This study used a between-subjects experimental design to examine the effects of three different computer-based instructional strategies (concept map, refutation text, and expository scientific text) on science learning. Concept maps are node-link diagrams that show concepts as nodes and relationships among the concepts as labeled links.…

  4. Cognitive Support for Learning Computer-Based Tasks Using Animated Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cognitive support for learning computer-based tasks using animated demonstration (AD) on instructional efficiency. Cognitive support included (1) segmentation and learner control introducing interactive devices that allow content sequencing through a navigational menu, and content pacing through stop and…

  5. Students' Mathematics Word Problem-Solving Achievement in a Computer-Based Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunbas, N.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a computer-based story, which was designed in anchored instruction framework, on sixth-grade students' mathematics word problem-solving achievement. Problems were embedded in a story presented on a computer as computer story, and then compared with the paper-based version of the same story…

  6. Comparative Effects of Computer-Based Concept Maps, Refutational Texts, and Expository Texts on Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesope, Olusola O.; Cavagnetto, Andy; Hunsu, Nathaniel J.; Anguiano, Carlos; Lloyd, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This study used a between-subjects experimental design to examine the effects of three different computer-based instructional strategies (concept map, refutation text, and expository scientific text) on science learning. Concept maps are node-link diagrams that show concepts as nodes and relationships among the concepts as labeled links.…

  7. The Effects of Integrating Computer-Based Concept Mapping for Physics Learning in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Shih, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    It generally is accepted that concept mapping has a noticeable impact on learning. But literatures show the use of concept mapping is not benefit all learners. The present study explored the effects of incorporating computer-based concept mapping in physics instruction. A total of 61 9th-grade students participated in this study. By using a…

  8. Inventing Motivates and Prepares Student Teachers for Computer-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogger-Frey, I.; Kappich, J.; Schwonke, R.; Holzäpfel, L.; Nückles, M.; Renkl, A.

    2015-01-01

    A brief, problem-oriented phase such as an inventing activity is one potential instructional method for preparing learners not only cognitively but also motivationally for learning. Student teachers often need to overcome motivational barriers in order to use computer-based learning opportunities. In a preliminary experiment, we found that student…

  9. Computer-Based Learning of Neuroanatomy: A Longitudinal Study of Learning, Transfer, and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah; Pani, John R.

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal experiment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of new methods for learning neuroanatomy with computer-based instruction. Using a three-dimensional graphical model of the human brain and sections derived from the model, tools for exploring neuroanatomy were developed to encourage "adaptive exploration". This is an…

  10. Trends and techniques in computer-based educational simulation: Applications to MBL design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Stanchev, I.S.; Tinker, Robert F.

    1996-01-01

    Computer-based educational simulations are seen as a subset of the larger set of instructional approaches whose goal is to help learners come to a better understanding of real, complex systems. In this paper, a conceptualization is developed for the domain “understanding complex systems” and within

  11. An Evaluation of the Instructional Effectiveness of a Computer Lesson in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, John P.; Francis, Peter R.

    1982-01-01

    One group of undergraduate students were taught a one-hour computerized lesson on free body diagram analysis, developed at Iowa State University for use with the PLATO system. Other students studied the same material using worksheets. Both methods appeared to be equally effective although the computer system offered some instructional advantages.…

  12. The PLATO Dome A site-testing observatory: Power generation and control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. S.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Hengst, S.; Luong-van, D. M.; Storey, J. W. V.; Yang, H.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The atmospheric conditions above Dome A, a currently unmanned location at the highest point on the Antarctic plateau, are uniquely suited to astronomy. For certain types of astronomy Dome A is likely to be the best location on the planet, and this has motivated the development of the Plateau Observatory (PLATO). PLATO was deployed to Dome A in early 2008. It houses a suite of purpose-built site-testing instruments designed to quantify the benefits of Dome A site for astronomy, and science instruments designed to take advantage of the observing conditions. The PLATO power generation and control system is designed to provide continuous power and heat, and a high-reliability command and communications platform for these instruments. PLATO has run and collected data throughout the winter 2008 season completely unattended. Here we present a detailed description of the power generation, power control, thermal management, instrument interface, and communications systems for PLATO, and an overview of the system performance for 2008.

  13. Gaia and WEAVE/WxES: Supporting the PLATO Exoplanet Hunter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper briefly describes the powerful linkages between the Gaia and PLATO missions and the potential for WEAVE in the study of exoplanet populations, for instance through the proposed WxES survey. Gaia successfully launched in December 2013, and over the course of its nominal five year mission will discover, via their astrometric signatures, upwards of 20 000 massive Jupiter sized long period planets at distances out to several hundred parsecs around all star types. In addition Gaia will discover up to a thousand short period hot Jupiters around M stars. PLATO, to launch in 2024, will through precision photometry, observe in detail some million host stars, and will detect, via the transit technique, planets down to Earth masses. PLATO will observe two fields of over 2 000 square degrees for 2-3 years each. At least one of these will be in the northern hemisphere. WEAVE has the potential to provide detailed chemical characterization of the host stars of the Gaia and PLATO exoplanet systems. This will enable insights into, for instance, metallicity of the host star correlations against both massive exoplanets (perhaps confirming current relationships), and lower mass exoplanets. We note how the rapid exploitation of such a potential WEAVE survey could be achieved, utilizing the WEAVE processing systems being developed at the IoA, Cambridge, coupled with efficient interfaces to both Gaia and PLATO data products, that are also being generated at the IoA.

  14. The role of the poet in Plato's ideal cities of Callipolis and Magnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Naddaf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Plato's attitude toward the poets and poetry has always been a flashpoint of debate, controversy and notoriety, but most scholars have failed to see their central role in the ideal cities of the Republic and the Laws, that is, Callipolis and Magnesia. In this paper, I argue that in neither dialogue does Plato "exile" the poets, but, instead, believes they must, like all citizens, exercise the expertise proper to their profession, allowing them the right to become full-fledged participants in the productive class. Moreover, attention to certain details reveals that Plato harnesses both positive and negative factors in poetry to bring his ideal cities closer to a practical realization. The status of the poet and his craft in this context has rarely to my knowledge been addressed.

  15. PLATO - the next-generation AASTINO for robotic site-testing on the Antarctic plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengst, S.; Lawrence, J.; Luong-van, D.; Everett, J.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Storey, J. W. V.; Hall, S.

    2006-08-01

    A new site-testing facility, PLATO (Plateau Observatory), is under development at UNSW for deployment to remote sites on the Antarctic Plateau including Dome A. The new facility will adopt many of the features of the AASTINO (Automated Astrophysical Site Testing InterNational Observatory) facility at Dome C. PLATO will autonomously control a flexible site testing and observing instrument suite, monitored via the Iridium satellite network. A challenging aspect of PLATO is to maximise the reliability of the power source while minimising fuel consumption. We are building a low pressure, low temperature environmental chamber to simulate operation at the highest altitudes (4,100 m at Dome A). Two types of engines will be tested: a single-cylinder diesel engine and a Stirling engine.

  16. A Compute Environment of ABC95 Array Computer Based on Multi-FPGA Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    ABC95 array computer is a multi-function network's computer based on FPGA technology, The multi-function network supports processors conflict-free access data from memory and supports processors access data from processors based on enhanced MESH network.ABC95 instruction's system includes control instructions, scalar instructions, vectors instructions.Mostly net-work instructions are introduced.A programming environment of ABC95 array computer assemble language is designed.A programming environment of ABC95 array computer for VC++ is advanced.It includes load function of ABC95 array computer program and data, store function, run function and so on.Specially, The data type of ABC95 array computer conflict-free access is defined.The results show that these technologies can develop programmer of ABC95 array computer effectively.

  17. Computer-Based Technologies in Dentistry: Types and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa Mahdi Musawi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During dental education, dental students learn how to examine patients, make diagnosis, plan treatment and perform dental procedures perfectly and efficiently. However, progresses in computer-based technologies including virtual reality (VR simulators, augmented reality (AR and computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM systems have resulted in new modalities for instruction and practice of dentistry. Virtual reality dental simulators enable repeated, objective and assessable practice in various controlled situations. Superimposition of three-dimensional (3D virtual images on actual images in AR allows surgeons to simultaneously visualize the surgical site and superimpose informative 3D images of invisible regions on the surgical site to serve as a guide. The use of CAD/CAM systems for designing and manufacturing of dental appliances and prostheses has been well established.This article reviews computer-based technologies, their application in dentistry and their potentials and limitations in promoting dental education, training and practice. Practitioners will be able to choose from a broader spectrum of options in their field of practice by becoming familiar with new modalities of training and practice.Keywords: Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy; Immersion; Computer-Aided Design; Dentistry; Education

  18. Efficient methods for solving discrete topology design problems in the PLATO-N project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canh, Nam Nguyen; Stolpe, Mathias

    This paper considers the general multiple load structural topology design problems in the framework of the PLATO-N project. The problems involve a large number of discrete design variables and were modeled as a non-convex mixed 0–1 program. For the class of problems considered, a global optimizat......This paper considers the general multiple load structural topology design problems in the framework of the PLATO-N project. The problems involve a large number of discrete design variables and were modeled as a non-convex mixed 0–1 program. For the class of problems considered, a global...

  19. The quest for a poetics of goodness in plato and aristotle

    OpenAIRE

    Dairo Orozco

    2012-01-01

    The paper, which compares Plato and Aristotle’s different approaches towards artistic activity, is divided into three parts. The first part discusses Plato’s Ion on mimesis and technē, as well as the role that poetry plays in the Republic. The second section offers an account of Aristotle’s idea of happiness as the end of action. Thelast section of this study deals with an attempt to reconcile Plato and Aristotle’s attitude towards mimetic art in a treatise by a Neoplatonic renaissance thinke...

  20. A Similar Comparison between the Thought of Plato and Confucius on Social Hierarchy and Elitism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨馥遥

    2014-01-01

    The spring-autumn period and warring state period of Chinese thoughts coincide strikingly with the thoughts of the Hel enic Age in the west. Plato and Confucius, the two outstanding seminal thinkers have shaped the philosophy of their respective cultures through some similar means and thoughts which definitely meet at a series of significant points. The highlight of the academic thesis lies in the comparison of the general similarities be-tween Plato and Confucius especial y in terms of social hierarchy and elitism.

  1. Understanding Computer-Based Digital Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Trey

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of new educational media and technology focuses on producing and delivering computer-based digital video. Highlights include video standards, including international standards and aspect ratio; camera formats and features, including costs; shooting digital video; editing software; compression; and a list of informative Web sites. (LRW)

  2. Evaluation of a Computer-Based Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Richard S.

    1978-01-01

    A computer-based narrative report integrating results from the Strong Vocational Interest Blank, the Opinion Attitude and Interest Survey, and the Cooperative English Test was compared with a standard profile format. No differences were found between the two methods for male and female. (Author)

  3. Implementation and Operation of Computer-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    wedding of their subject matter expertise and newly acquired PLATO programming competence would produce a vigorous, new generation of lesson...differences are only cosmetic, involving little more than facility with the jargon and the mythology of the medium. In other cases the differences are

  4. The PLATO End-to-End CCD Simulator -- Modelling space-based ultra-high precision CCD photometry for the assessment study of the PLATO Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Zima, W; De Ridder, J; Salmon, S; Catala, C; Kjeldsen, H; Aerts, C

    2010-01-01

    The PLATO satellite mission project is a next generation ESA Cosmic Vision satellite project dedicated to the detection of exo-planets and to asteroseismology of their host-stars using ultra-high precision photometry. The main goal of the PLATO mission is to provide a full statistical analysis of exo-planetary systems around stars that are bright and close enough for detailed follow-up studies. Many aspects concerning the design trade-off of a space-based instrument and its performance can best be tackled through realistic simulations of the expected observations. The complex interplay of various noise sources in the course of the observations made such simulations an indispensable part of the assessment study of the PLATO Payload Consortium. We created an end-to-end CCD simulation software-tool, dubbed PLATOSim, which simulates photometric time-series of CCD images by including realistic models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the pointing uncertainty of the satellite ...

  5. Computer Based Collaborative Problem Solving for Introductory Courses in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Carolina; Lee, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    We discuss collaborative problem solving computer-based recitation style. The course is designed by Lee [1], and the idea was proposed before by Christian, Belloni and Titus [2,3]. The students find the problems on a web-page containing simulations (physlets) and they write the solutions on an accompanying worksheet after discussing it with a classmate. Physlets have the advantage of being much more like real-world problems than textbook problems. We also compare two protocols for web-based instruction using simulations in an introductory physics class [1]. The inquiry protocol allowed students to control input parameters while the worked example protocol did not. We will discuss which of the two methods is more efficient in relation to Scientific Discovery Learning and Cognitive Load Theory. 1. Lee, Kevin M., Nicoll, Gayle and Brooks, Dave W. (2004). ``A Comparison of Inquiry and Worked Example Web-Based Instruction Using Physlets'', Journal of Science Education and Technology 13, No. 1: 81-88. 2. Christian, W., and Belloni, M. (2001). Physlets: Teaching Physics With Interactive Curricular Material, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 3. Christian,W., and Titus,A. (1998). ``Developing web-based curricula using Java Physlets.'' Computers in Physics 12: 227--232.

  6. ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes in the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, Paul W; Siha, Hany; Fu, Yuling;

    2012-01-01

    Ticagrelor, when compared with clopidogrel, reduced the 12-month risk of vascular death/myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes intended to undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) tr...

  7. Democratic Freedom and the Concept of Freedom in Plato and Aristotle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogens Herman Hansen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the several meanings of eleutheria used by Greeks in the classical period, democratic freedom is rejected by both Plato and Aristotle, who do not articulate a theory of political freedom but rather confine eleutheria to a social context.

  8. Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho-Logic of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses two well-known texts that respectively describe learning and teaching, drawn from the work of Freud and Plato. These texts are considered in psychoanalytic terms using a methodology drawn from the philosophy of Luce Irigaray. In particular the article addresses Irigaray's approach to the analysis of speech and utterance as a…

  9. Dialectic of Eros and Myth of the Soul in Plato's Phaedrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jens Kristian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I question a widespread reading of a passage in the last part of the Phaedrus dealing with the science of dialectic. According to this reading, the passage announces a new method peculiar to the later Plato aiming at defining natural kinds. I show that the Phaedrus itself does not ...

  10. From Dialogos to Dialogue: The Use of the Term from Plato to the Second Century CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jazdzewska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Plato the verb διαλέγεσθαι is far more common than the noun, and both denote question-and-answer discussions; it was only in the Hellenistic period that διάλογος became a genre term, though its other meanings survived.

  11. Two examples of the relation between the contemporary science and Plato

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, Elio

    2016-01-01

    The philosopher Plato is remembered even today by scientists, and his writings are still inspiring the scientific research. In the present short note (intended essentially for public outreach) two examples are briefly illustrated: 1) the European space project that bears his name, dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets; 2) the discussion about platonism in contemporary physics.

  12. Can Prior Knowledge Hurt Text Comprehension? An Answer Borrowed from Plato, Aristotle, and Descartes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lawrence B.

    Taking a philosophical approach based on what Plato, Aristotle, and Descartes said about knowledge, this paper addresses some of the murkiness in the conceptual space surrounding the issue of whether prior knowledge does or does not facilitate text comprehension. Specifically, the paper first develops a non-exhaustive typology of cases in which…

  13. A Philosophical Investigation of the Role of Teachers: A Synthesis of Plato, Confucius, Buber, and Freire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Seung Hwan

    2008-01-01

    This study proposes the ideal role of teachers through the examination of Plato, Confucius, Buber, and Freire on the subject. Teachers not only contribute to the development of individuals and societies but also attain self-realization through teaching. As such, the role of teachers is important as a goal as well as a means. To examine such role,…

  14. Genesis 2–3 and Alcibiades's speech in Plato's Symposium: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-26

    Aug 26, 2015 ... Friedländer 1975:26f; Gauss 1958:111–117) is the last speech in Plato's ... leader (450–404/3 BCE), appears to be in a great state of intoxication .... command (Gn 2:18: 'You are free to eat of all the trees in the garden.

  15. Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho-Logic of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses two well-known texts that respectively describe learning and teaching, drawn from the work of Freud and Plato. These texts are considered in psychoanalytic terms using a methodology drawn from the philosophy of Luce Irigaray. In particular the article addresses Irigaray's approach to the analysis of speech and utterance as a…

  16. From Plato to Erikson: How the War on "Bad Play" Has Impoverished Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, the titans of educational reform--Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, Piaget, Erikson, Csikszentmihalyi and others--have championed the educational benefits of play. Yet many professors and administrators are boggled by the idea of playing academic games in college. They instantly dismiss faculty initiatives like "Reacting to the…

  17. Computer-based Training (CBT in der Humanmedizin [Computer-based training (CBT in an undergraduate medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolle, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Computer based training (CBT is based on chunking of the learning content and follows a highly structured instructional design. The question is addressed whether verbally expressible knowledge can be acquired by CBT in a learning content example in human medicine. Methods: 43 students of human medicine (31 females, 12 males studied a CBT learning object on general tumour pathology comprising 32 frames for three times and wrote short essays on the topic. The main goal was to assess the increase of the frequency of terms and concepts of general tumour pathology between the essays as determined by content analysis.Results: Frequency analysis showed 28 +- 25 hits in the first, 40 +- 19 hits in the second and – after two weeks intermission – 35 +- 17 hits in the third essay, with the increase being highly significant (p < 0.01 The hits in the essay correlated significantly with the performance in the CBT learning object. In the qualitative feedback, positive remarks prevailed (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Computer based training does not simply drill the performance in predefined frames, but facilitates the achievement of knowledge which can be verbally expressed. Performance of the individual student in the CBT learning objects is significantly correlated to the quality of the short essay on the same topic.[german] Zielsetzung: Computer-based Training (CBT als tutorielles e-Learning-Konzept beruht auf einer Zerlegung des Lernstoffs in kleine Einheiten (Chunking und einem stark strukturierten instruktionalen Prozess. Die Studie befasst sich mit der Frage, ob auf diese Art aktiv explizites (sprachlich ausdrückbares Wissen zu einem humanmedizinischen Thema erworben werden kann. Methodik: 43 Studierende der Humanmedizin (31 Frauen, 12 Männer machten ein CBT-Lernobjekt zur Allgemeinen Tumorpathologie mit 32 Frames 3 mal durch und erstellten Kurzessays. Hauptzielgröße war die Differenz der inhaltlichen Frequenzanalyse

  18. ICOHR: intelligent computer based oral health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, L C; Cobb, D S; Reynolds, D C

    1995-01-01

    The majority of work on computer use in the dental field has focused on non-clinical practice management information needs. Very few computer-based dental information systems provide management support of the clinical care process, particularly with respect to quality management. Traditional quality assurance methods rely on the paper record and provide only retrospective analysis. Today, proactive quality management initiatives are on the rise. Computer-based dental information systems are being integrated into the care environment, actively providing decision support as patient care is being delivered. These new systems emphasize assessment and improvement of patient care at the time of treatment, thus building internal quality management into the caregiving process. The integration of real time quality management and patient care will be expedited by the introduction of an information system architecture that emulates the gathering and storage of clinical care data currently provided by the paper record. As a proposed solution to the problems associated with existing dental record systems, the computer-based patient record has emerged as a possible alternative to the paper dental record. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently conducted a study on improving the efficiency and accuracy of patient record keeping. As a result of this study, the IOM advocates the development and implementation of computer-based patient records as the standard for all patient care records. This project represents the ongoing efforts of The University of Iowa College of Dentistry's collaboration with the University of Uppsala Data Center, Uppsala, Sweden, on a computer-based patient dental record model. ICOHR (Intelligent Computer Based Oral Health Record) is an information system which brings together five important parts of the patient's dental record: medical and dental history; oral status; treatment planning; progress notes; and a Patient Care Database, generated from their

  19. Prestandardisation Activities for Computer Based Safety Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, J. R.; Bologna, S.; Ehrenberger, W.

    1981-01-01

    Questions of technical safety become more and more important. Due to the higher complexity of their functions computer based safety systems have special problems. Researchers, producers, licensing personnel and customers have met on a European basis to exchange knowledge and formulate positions....... The Commission of the european Community supports the work. Major topics comprise hardware configuration and self supervision, software design, verification and testing, documentation, system specification and concurrent processing. Preliminary results have been used for the draft of an IEC standard and for some...

  20. Computer-Based Reading Programs: A Preliminary Investigation of Two Parent Implemented Programs with Students At-Risk for Reading Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindiprolu, Sekhar S.; Forbush, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2000, National Reading Panelists (NRP) reported that computer delivered reading instruction has potential for promoting the reading skills of students at-risk for reading failure. However, panelists also noted a scarcity of data present in the literature on the effects of computer-based reading instruction. This preliminary investigation…

  1. Computer-Based Legal Education at the University of Illinois: A Report of Two Years' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, Peter B.; Morgan, Thomas D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes experimentation with the Plato IV computer-assisted method of teaching law at the University of Illinois College of Law: development and testing of programs for teaching Future Interests and Offer and Acceptance, and law-related work currently being done on Plato. Potential, limitations, and student enthusiasm are summarized. (JT)

  2. An Automated Approach to Instructional Design Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael; And Others

    This paper describes the Guided Approach to Instructional Design Advising (GAIDA), an automated instructional design tool that incorporates techniques of artificial intelligence. GAIDA was developed by the U.S. Air Force Armstrong Laboratory to facilitate the planning and production of interactive courseware and computer-based training materials.…

  3. Scaffolding Cognitive and Metacognitive Processes in Low Verbal Ability Learners: Use of Diagrams in Computer-Based Training Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Haydee M.; Fiore, Stephen M.; Oser, Randall L.

    2002-01-01

    This study of undergraduates investigated how scaffolding instructional strategies can support learners' knowledge acquisition and metacomprehension of complex systems in a computer-based training environment. Results showed that incorporating diagrams facilitated performance on measures of integrative knowledge and facilitated the development of…

  4. Paper-Based and Computer-Based Concept Mappings: The Effects on Computer Achievement, Computer Anxiety and Computer Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Yavuz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the effects of paper-based and computer-based concept mappings on computer hardware achievement, computer anxiety and computer attitude of the eight grade secondary school students. The students were randomly allocated to three groups and were given instruction on computer hardware. The teaching methods used…

  5. A Computer-Based, Interactive Videodisc Job Aid and Expert System for Electron Beam Lithography Integration and Diagnostic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kimberly

    This master's thesis describes the development of an expert system and interactive videodisc computer-based instructional job aid used for assisting in the integration of electron beam lithography devices. Comparable to all comprehensive training, expert system and job aid development require a criterion-referenced systems approach treatment to…

  6. Computer Based Information Systems and the Middle Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why do some computer based information systems succeed while others fail. It concludes with eleven recommended areas that middle management must...understand in order to effectively use computer based information systems . (Modified author abstract)

  7. Plato, Wilde, and Woolf: the poetics of homoerotic "intercourse" in A Room of One's Own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanita, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This article places Woolf in the context of homoerotic literary ancestry. It suggests that the overall argument in A Room of One's Own owes a debt to Wilde's 1891 pamphlet The Soul of Man under Socialism. It also examines Woolf's controversial meditation on male-female collaboration and intercourse in A Room, and suggests a homoerotic reading of this meditation, drawing on images and ideas of literary transmission and creation from Plato's Symposium.

  8. The philosopher Socrates had exophthalmos (a term coined by Plato) and probably Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetrou, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    According to a previously published theory, Socrates was afflicted with temporal lobe epilepsy since his childhood. Plato, Xenophon, and Aristoxenus described Socrates as having exophthalmos, probably diplopia, and some symptoms compatible with hyperthyroidism. Using these data, we theorize that Socrates had Graves' disease. In order to determine a cause of his temporal lobe epilepsy, we speculate that the philosopher also had autoimmune thyroiditis and Hashimoto encephalopathy during his childhood and his epilepsy may have been a sequel to this hypothesized encephalopathy.

  9. The instrument control unit of the ESA-PLATO 2.0 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focardi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Cosentino, R.; Giusi, G.; Pancrazzi, M.; Noce, V.; Ottensamer, R.; Steller, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pace, E.; Plasson, P.; Peter, G.; Pagano, I.

    2016-07-01

    PLATO 2.0 has been selected by ESA as the third medium-class Mission (M3) of the Cosmic Vision Program. Its Payload is conceived for the discovery of new transiting exoplanets on the disk of their parent stars and for the study of planetary system formation and evolution as well as to answer fundamental questions concerning the existence of other planetary systems like our own, including the presence of potentially habitable new worlds. The PLATO Payload design is based on the adoption of four sets of short focal length telescopes having a large field of view in order to exploit a large sky coverage and to reach, at the same time, the needed photometry accuracy and signalto- noise ratio (S/N) within a few tens of seconds of exposure time. The large amount of data produced by the telescope is collected and processed by means of the Payload's Data Processing System (DPS) composed by many processing electronics units. This paper gives an overview of the PLATO 2.0 DPS, mainly focusing on the architecture and processing capabilities of its Instrument Control Unit (ICU), the electronic subsystem acting as the main interface between the Payload (P/L) and the Spacecraft (S/C).

  10. COMPUTER-BASED REASONING SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CIPRIAN CUCU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Argumentation is nowadays seen both as skill that people use in various aspects of their lives, as well as an educational technique that can support the transfer or creation of knowledge thus aiding in the development of other skills (e.g. Communication, critical thinking or attitudes. However, teaching argumentation and teaching with argumentation is still a rare practice, mostly due to the lack of available resources such as time or expert human tutors that are specialized in argumentation. Intelligent Computer Systems (i.e. Systems that implement an inner representation of particular knowledge and try to emulate the behavior of humans could allow more people to understand the purpose, techniques and benefits of argumentation. The proposed paper investigates the state of the art concepts of computer-based argumentation used in education and tries to develop a conceptual map, showing benefits, limitation and relations between various concepts focusing on the duality “learning to argue – arguing to learn”.

  11. Bridging Theory and Practice: Developing Guidelines to Facilitate the Design of Computer-based Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa D. Young

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The design of computer-based learning environments has undergone a paradigm shift; moving students away from instruction that was considered to promote technical rationality grounded in objectivism, to the application of computers to create cognitive tools utilized in constructivist environments. The goal of the resulting computer-based learning environment design principles is to have students learn with technology, rather than from technology. This paper reviews the general constructivist theory that has guided the development of these environments, and offers suggestions for the adaptation of modest, generic guidelines, not mandated principles, that can be flexibly applied and allow for the expression of true constructivist ideals in online learning environments.

  12. Computer Based Training Authors' and Designers' training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric GODET

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This communication, through couple of studies driven since 10 years, tries to show how important is the training of authors in Computer Based Training (CBT. We submit here an approach to prepare designers mastering Interactive Multimedia modules in this domain. Which institutions are really dedicating their efforts in training authors and designers in this area of CBTs? Television devices and broadcast organisations offered since year 60s' a first support for Distance Learning. New media, New Information and Communication Technologies (NICT allowed several public and private organisations to start Distance Learning projects. As usual some of them met their training objectives, other of them failed. Did their really failed? Currently, nobody has the right answer. Today, we do not have enough efficient tools allowing us to evaluate trainees' acquisition in a short term view. Training evaluation needs more than 10 to 20 years of elapsed time to bring reliable measures. Nevertheless, given the high investments already done in this area, we cannot wait until the final results of the pedagogical evaluation. A lot of analyses showed relevant issues which can be used as directions for CBTs authors and designers training. Warning - Our studies and the derived conclusions are mainly based on projects driven in the field. We additionally bring our several years experience in the training of movie film authors in the design of interactive multimedia products. Some of our examples are extracting from vocational training projects where we were involved in all development phases from the analysis of needs to the evaluation of the acquisition within the trainee's / employee job's. Obviously, we cannot bring and exhaustive approach in this domain where a lot of parameters are involved as frame for the CBT interactive multimedia modules authors' and designers' training.

  13. Echoes in Plato's cave : ontology of sound objects in computer music and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The sonic aspects of Plato's analogy of the cave is taken as a starting point for thought experiments to investigate the objective nature of sound, and the idea of quasi-Platonic forms in music. Sounds are found to be objects in a way that sights or appearances are not, and it is only in the presence of technology that they become artificial. When recognition, control and communication about sound come into play, abstract concepts emerge, but there is no reason to give these the priority stat...

  14. Ontological Questions in Schelling’s Late Philosophy: Plato and Aristotle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Courtine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to understand the reasons and procedures employed by F. W. Schelling in his Plato and Aristotle re-appropriation, and to extract the authentically ontological thematic of it. It makes a path through the Schelling’s late writings and letters, to construct a complete view about the relation between this appropriation and the possibility of the constitution of a positive philosophy, as a particular science, in opposition to a negative philosophy, understood as metaphysics.

  15. Numbers Rule The Vexing Mathematics of Democracy, from Plato to the Present

    CERN Document Server

    Szpiro, George G

    2010-01-01

    Since the very birth of democracy in ancient Greece, the simple act of voting has given rise to mathematical paradoxes that have puzzled some of the greatest philosophers, statesmen, and mathematicians. Numbers Rule traces the epic quest by these thinkers to create a more perfect democracy and adapt to the ever-changing demands that each new generation places on our democratic institutions. In a sweeping narrative that combines history, biography, and mathematics, George Szpiro details the fascinating lives and big ideas of great minds such as Plato, Pliny the Younger, Ramon Llull, Pierre Simo

  16. An Overview of Innovative Computer-Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, Sebastiaan; Eggen, Theodorus Johannes Hendrikus Maria; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the technological revolution, computer-based testing (CBT) has witnessed an explosive rise the last decades, in both psychological and educational assessment. Many paper-and-pencil tests now have a computer-based equivalent. Innovations in CBT are almost innumerable, and innovative and new

  17. Demystifying the GMAT: Computer-Based Testing Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based testing can be a powerful means to make all aspects of test administration not only faster and more efficient, but also more accurate and more secure. While the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) exam is a computer adaptive test, there are other approaches. This installment presents a primer of computer-based testing terms.

  18. Computer-Based Integrated Learning Systems: Research and Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hativa, Nira, Ed.; Becker, Henry Jay, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The eight chapters of this theme issue discuss recent research and theory concerning computer-based integrated learning systems. Following an introduction about their theoretical background and current use in schools, the effects of using computer-based integrated learning systems in the elementary school classroom are considered. (SLD)

  19. Computer-Based Cognitive Tools: Description and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David; McNaught, Carmel

    With computers, tangible tools are represented by the hardware (e.g., the central processing unit, scanners, and video display unit), while intangible tools are represented by the software. There is a special category of computer-based software tools (CBSTs) that have the potential to mediate cognitive processes--computer-based cognitive tools…

  20. Evaluation of computer-based ultrasonic inservice inspection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.V. Jr.; Angel, L.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Park, W.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Taylor, T.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report presents the principles, practices, terminology, and technology of computer-based ultrasonic testing for inservice inspection (UT/ISI) of nuclear power plants, with extensive use of drawings, diagrams, and LTT images. The presentation is technical but assumes limited specific knowledge of ultrasonics or computers. The report is divided into 9 sections covering conventional LTT, computer-based LTT, and evaluation methodology. Conventional LTT topics include coordinate axes, scanning, instrument operation, RF and video signals, and A-, B-, and C-scans. Computer-based topics include sampling, digitization, signal analysis, image presentation, SAFI, ultrasonic holography, transducer arrays, and data interpretation. An evaluation methodology for computer-based LTT/ISI systems is presented, including questions, detailed procedures, and test block designs. Brief evaluations of several computer-based LTT/ISI systems are given; supplementary volumes will provide detailed evaluations of selected systems.

  1. Philosophy and Mathematics in the Teaching of Plato: the Development of Idea and Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhailova N. V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the largest philosophers differently explain the origin of mathematics. This question was investigated in antiquity, a substantial and decisive role in this respect was played by the Platonic doctrine. Therefore, discussing this issue the problem of interaction of philosophy and mathematics in the teachings of Plato should be taken into consideration. Many mathematicians believe that abstract mathematical objects belong in a certain sense to the world of ideas and that consistency of objects and theories really describes mathematical reality, as Plato quite clearly expressed his views on math, according to which mathematical concepts objectively exist as distinct entities between the world of ideas and the world of material things. In the context of foundations of mathematics, so called “Gödel’s Platonism” is of particular interest. It is shown in the article how Platonic objectification of mathematical concepts contributes to the development of modern mathematics by revealing philosophical understanding of the nature of abstraction. To substantiate his point of view, the author draws the works of contemporary experts in the field of philosophy of mathematics.

  2. The PLATO Simulator: Modelling of High-Precision High-Cadence Space-Based Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos-Arenal, P; De Ridder, J; Aerts, C; Huygen, R; Samadi, R; Green, J; Piotto, G; Salmon, S; Catala, C; Rauer, H

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of the design trade-off of a space-based instrument and its performance can best be tackled through simulations of the expected observations. The complex interplay of various noise sources in the course of the observations make such simulations an indispensable part of the assessment and design study of any space-based mission. We present a formalism to model and simulate photometric time series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all important natural noise sources. This formalism has been implemented in a versatile end-to-end simulation software tool, called PLATO Simulator, specifically designed for the PLATO space mission to be operated from L2, but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. We provide a detailed description of several noise sources and discuss their properties, in connection with the optical design, the allowable level of jitter, the quantum efficiency of th...

  3. Computer-based speech therapy for childhood speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Lisa; Erickson, Shane; Morris, Meg E

    2017-07-01

    With the current worldwide workforce shortage of Speech-Language Pathologists, new and innovative ways of delivering therapy to children with speech sound disorders are needed. Computer-based speech therapy may be an effective and viable means of addressing service access issues for children with speech sound disorders. To evaluate the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs for children with speech sound disorders. Studies reporting the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs were identified via a systematic, computerised database search. Key study characteristics, results, main findings and details of computer-based speech therapy programs were extracted. The methodological quality was evaluated using a structured critical appraisal tool. 14 studies were identified and a total of 11 computer-based speech therapy programs were evaluated. The results showed that computer-based speech therapy is associated with positive clinical changes for some children with speech sound disorders. There is a need for collaborative research between computer engineers and clinicians, particularly during the design and development of computer-based speech therapy programs. Evaluation using rigorous experimental designs is required to understand the benefits of computer-based speech therapy. The reader will be able to 1) discuss how computerbased speech therapy has the potential to improve service access for children with speech sound disorders, 2) explain the ways in which computer-based speech therapy programs may enhance traditional tabletop therapy and 3) compare the features of computer-based speech therapy programs designed for different client populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dialectic and Dialogue in Plato: Refuting the Model of Socrates-as-Teacher in the Pursuit of Authentic "Paideia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, James Michael

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating Gadamer and other thinkers from the continental tradition, this essay is a close and detailed hermeneutic, phenomenological, and ontological study of the dialectic practice of Plato's Socrates--it radicalizes and refutes the Socrates-as-teacher model that educators from scholar academic ideology embrace.

  5. The Education of the Third Class in "The Republic": Plato and the "Locus Classicus" of Formative Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Avi I.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: In one of the classics of educational philosophy, a key issue is remains unsettled. In Plato's "Republic," Socrates makes a case for the importance of a comprehensive education. Socrates is unclear, however, about whether the producer class is eligible for this comprehensive education. Purpose/Objective: Previous…

  6. Dialectic and Dialogue in Plato: Refuting the Model of Socrates-as-Teacher in the Pursuit of Authentic "Paideia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, James Michael

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating Gadamer and other thinkers from the continental tradition, this essay is a close and detailed hermeneutic, phenomenological, and ontological study of the dialectic practice of Plato's Socrates--it radicalizes and refutes the Socrates-as-teacher model that educators from scholar academic ideology embrace.

  7. Design Guidance for Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with nuclear power plant systems are guided by procedures, instructions, or checklists. Paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by most utilities have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield significant savings in increased efficiency, as well as improved safety through human performance gains. The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease human error rates, especially human error rates associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving field workers’ procedure use and adherence and hence improve human performance and overall system reliability, the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the possibility and feasibility of replacing current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing, depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to use of PBPs are management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for a task, and relying

  8. Instructional Applications of Hypermedia: Functional Features, Limitations, and Research Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ok-choon

    1992-01-01

    Defines hypermedia and describes the structure and functional requirements of a hypermedia program. Potentials of hypermedia for instructional delivery, idea generation and organization, file storage and organization, and development of computer-based instruction materials are discussed. Several research issues related to instructional…

  9. A Comprehensive Evaluation Rubric for Assessing Instructional Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Yuan; Cherner, Todd Sloan

    2015-01-01

    There is a pressing need for an evaluation rubric that examines all aspects of educational apps designed for instructional purposes. In past decades, many rubrics have been developed for evaluating educational computer-based programs; however, rubrics designed for evaluating the instructional implications of educational apps are scarce. When an…

  10. Computer-Aided Instruction: College Algebra Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichele, Douglas B.; Tree, D. Rae; Utley, Juliana; Wescoatt, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Technology permeates our daily lives; education has not been untouched. Liaw (2002) points out that "teachers, trainers, and instructional designers of computer-based or Web-based instruction would benefit by being more attentive to learners' perceptions toward Web-based environments." Reviewing the earlier research into student perceptions toward…

  11. A Comprehensive Evaluation Rubric for Assessing Instructional Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Yuan; Cherner, Todd Sloan

    2015-01-01

    There is a pressing need for an evaluation rubric that examines all aspects of educational apps designed for instructional purposes. In past decades, many rubrics have been developed for evaluating educational computer-based programs; however, rubrics designed for evaluating the instructional implications of educational apps are scarce. When an…

  12. Implementing Computer-Based Procedures: Thinking Outside the Paper Margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron

    2017-06-01

    In the past year there has been increased interest from the nuclear industry in adopting the use of electronic work packages and computer-based procedures (CBPs) in the field. The goal is to incorporate the use of technology in order to meet the Nuclear Promise requirements of reducing costs and improve efficiency and decrease human error rates of plant operations. Researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the benefits an electronic work package system and specifically CBPs would have over current paper-based procedure practices. There are several classifications of CBPs ranging from a straight copy of the paper-based procedure in PDF format to a more intelligent dynamic CBP. A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools (e.g., placekeeping and correct component verification), and dynamic step presentation. The latter means that the CBP system could only display relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. The improvements can lead to reduction of the worker’s workload and human error by allowing the work to focus on the task at hand more. A team of human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory studied and developed design concepts for CBPs for field workers between 2012 and 2016. The focus of the research was to present information in a procedure in a manner that leveraged the dynamic and computational capabilities of a handheld device allowing the worker to focus more on the task at hand than on the administrative processes currently applied when conducting work in the plant. As a part of the research the team identified type of work, instructions, and scenarios where the transition to a dynamic CBP system might not be as beneficial as it would for other types of work in the plant. In most cases the decision to use a dynamic CBP system and utilize the dynamic capabilities gained will be beneficial to the worker

  13. Computer-based learning for the enhancement of breastfeeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computer-based learning for the enhancement of breastfeeding training. ... Methods and materials: The Indian module was adapted to suit the South African ... Results: All reviewers rated their information technology (IT) skills as suffi cient and ...

  14. Natural Languages Processing for Building Computer-based Learning Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 李娜

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines a framework to use computer and natural language techniques for various levels of learners to learn foreign languages in Computer-based Learning environment. We propose some ideas for using the computer as a practical tool for learning foreign language where the most of courseware is generated automatically. We then describe how to build Computer-based Learning tools, discuss its effectiveness, and conclude with some possibilities using on-line resources.

  15. The Theory of Argumentation within Language and its relation to Plato, Saussure and Benveniste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Dall'Cortivo-Lebler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Theory of Argumentation within Language, developed by Oswald Ducrot, Jean-Claude Anscombre and Marion Carel, has experienced along its development different phases and forms, constantly seeking to align to what its main developer, Oswald Ducrot, called external hypotheses and internal hypotheses. This paper discusses the presence of Linguistic Theories and Philosophy in Ducrot’s work regarding concepts of Plato, Ferdinand de Saussure and Émile Benveniste, which constitute its external assumptions. The presence of these concepts culminated in the creation of different concepts that comprise the Linguistic Semantics, and gave it a specific point of view about language that emphasizes the internal relationships among language components and understands that speech is the result of a linguistic activity where an “I” speaks to a “you”.

  16. Efficient methods for solving discrete topology design problems in the PLATO-N project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canh, Nam Nguyen; Stolpe, Mathias

    This paper considers the general multiple load structural topology design problems in the framework of the PLATO-N project. The problems involve a large number of discrete design variables and were modeled as a non-convex mixed 0–1 program. For the class of problems considered, a global...... optimization method based on the branch-and-cut concept was developed and implemented. In the method a large number of continuous relaxations were solved. We also present an algorithm for generating cuts to strengthen the quality of the relaxations. Several heuristics were also investigated to obtain efficient...... algorithms. The branch and cut method is used to solve benchmark examples which can be used to validate other methods and heuristics....

  17. Banishing the Poet: The Pedagogical Function of Mythology in the Dialogues of Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martínez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This text attempts to develop a sound justification for Plato’s pedagogical use of myth in the dialogues. In particular, I seek to resolve a seeming contradiction: why Plato personally made use of myths in spite of his many statements that seem to contradict such a pedagogical approach, especially his edict that poets and myth-makers be banished from his republic for the danger their works pose to the attainment of true philosophical wisdom. An analysis of the centrality of myths to the dialogues is carried out, followed by a discussion of the place of muthos in its Ionian historical context. This establishes the basis for resolving the contradiction through the division of muthos into two distinct modes: the fantastic and the eikastic.

  18. Arete and Gender-Differentiation in Socrates/Plato and Aristotle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Robinson

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The article grapples with the question whether Plato believed that, in the matter of arete, the female psyche had a built-in inclination to immorality in a way that the male psyche did not, and was therefore assuch signiticantly different from the male psyche. It is argued that the evidence of the Timaeus ( and, to some lesser degree, of the Laws suggests very strongly that he did, though fortunately the political consequence she drew from this (in the Laws tum out to be positive rather than negative. Aristotle, by contrast,it is argued, while still holding to the lamentable theory of the inferiority of woman, talks of ditl'eringquanta of (one and the same arete in male and female souls, rather than a difference in their very arete.

  19. Instructional Quality Assurance at Lansing Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Dale M.; And Others

    Drawing from the experiences of Lansing Community College (LCC), this paper offers a rationale and model for measuring instructional quality. Section I offers background on LCC's efforts to assess the quality of its courses and curricula, and to introduce such quality assurance procedures as computer-based course syllabi, department and program…

  20. The Value of Video in Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Denis P., II.; Rudd, Denis P.

    2014-01-01

    Online educational instruction has become more prevalent in American and international educational institutions and is increasingly the chosen format for many academic programs. The use of web conferencing, virtual classrooms, and computer-based training are becoming the common platform in which schools provide education in online teaching. This…

  1. Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Technology, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Reviews theories of anchored instruction and addresses issues related to learning, transfer, and assessment. Highlights include video-based macrocontexts; videodisc anchors versus computer-based simulations; cooperative learning; transfer outside the classroom; authenticity; visual anchors versus verbal anchors; situated cognition; and using…

  2. Platón y el silogismo Plato and the syllogism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Correia Machuca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La cuestión de si Platón pudo ser el autor de una primera noción de deducción silogística (un método que Aristóteles hizo conocido a través de una definición y un progreso teórico en los Analíticos Primeros fue discutida en la antigüedad y, desde entonces, debatida por varios comentaristas. En este artículo, comento dos pasajes de la literatura post-aristotélica, uno atestiguado por Boecio (que se remonta a Alejandro de Afrodisia y el otro presente en Juan Filópono, en su comentario a los Analíticos Primeros. El artículo intenta mostrar que estos pasajes contienen información suficiente para favorecer a Platón como conocedor de la técnica deductiva silogística, aunque no para conferirle el desarrollo de la metodología silogística.The question of whether Plato could be the author of a first concept of syllogistic deduction (a method that Aristotle made known by means of a definition and a theoretical improvement in his Prior Analytics was known in the antiquity and from that time, the question has usually examined by several commentators. In this article, I comment on two passages of post-Aristotelian tradition; one is given by Boethius (which stems from Alexander of Aphrodisias and the other was given by Johannes Philoponus in his commentary on Prior Analytics. The article intends to show that these passages contain information that is sufficient to come to an opinion favoring Plato, although it does not imply that they are sufficient to confer him the syllogistic method.

  3. Towards Individualized Instruction with Technology-Enabled Tools and Methods: An Exploratory Study. CRESST Report 854

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gregory K. W. K.; Delacruz, Girlie C.; Dionne, Gary B.; Baker, Eva L.; Lee, John J.; Osmundson, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This report addresses a renewed interest in individualized instruction, driven in part by advances in technology and assessment as well as a persistent desire to increase the access, efficiency, and cost effectiveness of training and education. Using computer-based instruction we delivered extremely efficient instruction targeted to low knowledge…

  4. The effect of computer-based resuscitation simulation on nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Sang Suk

    2014-01-01

    Computer-based simulation has intuitive appeal to both educators and learners with the flexibility of time, place, immediate feedback, and self-paced and consistent curriculum. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of computer-based simulation on nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction between computer-based simulation plus instructor-led cardiopulmonary resuscitation training group and instructor-led resuscitation training-only group. This study was a nonequivalent control group posttest-only design. There were 213 second year nursing students randomly assigned to one of two groups: 109 nursing students with computer-based simulation or 104 with control group. Overall nursing students' performance score was higher in the computer-based simulation group than in the control group but reached no statistical significance (t = 1.086, p = .283). There were no significant differences in resuscitation-specific self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction between the two groups. Computer-based simulation combined with hands-on practice did not affect in nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction in nursing students. Further study must be conducted to inform instructional design and help integrate computer-based simulation and rigorous scoring rubrics.

  5. Simulation results for PLATO: a prototype hybrid X-ray photon counting detector with a low energy threshold for fusion plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, A.; Menouni, M.; Pangaud, P.; Fenzi, C.; Colledani, G.; Moureau, G.; Escarguel, A.; Morel, C.

    2017-01-01

    PLATO is a prototype hybrid X-ray photon counting detector that has been designed to meet the specifications for plasma diagnostics for the WEST tokamak platform (Tungsten (W) Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) in southern France, with potential perspectives for ITER. PLATO represents a customized solution that fulfills high sensitivity, low dispersion and high photon counting rate. The PLATO prototype matrix is composed of 16 × 18 pixels with a 70 μm pixel pitch. New techniques have been used in analog sensitive blocks to minimize noise coupling through supply rails and substrate, and to suppress threshold dispersion across the matrix. The PLATO ASIC is designed in CMOS 0.13 μm technology and was submitted for a fabrication run in June 2016. The chip is designed to be bump-bonded to a silicon sensor. This paper presents pixel architecture as well as simulation results while highlighting novel solutions.

  6. Identifying barriers for implementation of computer based nursing documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Anna-Maria; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Bürkle, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken in the planning phase for the introduction of a comprehensive computer based nursing documentation system at Erlangen University Hospital. There, we expect a wide range of difficult organizational changes, because the nurses currently neither used computer based nursing documentation nor did they follow strongly the nursing process model within paper based documentation. Thus we were eager to recognize potential pitfalls early and to identify potential barriers for digital nursing documentation. In a questionnaire study we surveyed all German university hospitals for their experience with the implementation of computer based nursing documentation implementation. We received answers from 11 of the 23 hospitals. Furthermore we performed a questionnaire study about expectations and fears among the nurses of four pilot wards of our hospital. Most respondents stated a positive attitude towards the nursing process documentation, but many respondents note technical (e.g. bad performance of the software) and organizational barriers (e.g. lack of time).

  7. The Effects of Persistence and Small Group Interaction during Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Compared the effects of grouping sixth grade students with different levels of persistence on their ability to learn in cooperative learning groups while working at the computer. Reports results that indicated that average persisters interacted more than either high or low persisters and discusses implications for forming effective cooperative…

  8. Computer-Based Instruction for Improving Student Nurses' General Numeracy: Is It Effective? Two Randomised Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Hannah; Gilchrist, Mollie; Grant, Celia; Hewitt, Catherine; Ford, Sue; Petrie, Moira; Torgerson, Carole J.; Torgerson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In response to concern over the numeracy skills deficit displayed by student nurses, an online computer programme, "Authentic World[R]", which aims to simulate a real-life clinical environment and improve the medication dosage calculation skills of users, was developed (Founded in 2004 Authentic World Ltd is a spin out company of…

  9. A Comparison of Computer-Based Training and Conventional Classroom Training for Technical Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    to be preferable to • negative reinforcement . Skinner’s work in operant conditioning directly led to his development of the precursor of CBT...permanent.10 Since the inception of this theory, studies * have shown that while positive reinforcement may have a stronger effect on learning, negative ... reinforcement cannot be discounted.Ŕ Despite their findings, Thorndike’s work * is important as it laid the groundwork for some of the work

  10. The Impact of Computer-Based Instruction on the Development of EFL Learners' Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, A.; Mazdayasna, G.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the application and effectiveness of computer assisted language learning (CALL) in teaching academic writing to Iranian EFL (English as a Foreign Language) learners by means of Microsoft Word Office. To this end, 44 sophomore intermediate university students majoring in English Language and Literature at an Iranian…

  11. The Impact of Computer-Based Instruction on the Development of EFL Learners' Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, A.; Mazdayasna, G.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the application and effectiveness of computer assisted language learning (CALL) in teaching academic writing to Iranian EFL (English as a Foreign Language) learners by means of Microsoft Word Office. To this end, 44 sophomore intermediate university students majoring in English Language and Literature at an Iranian…

  12. The Effect of Computer-Based Multimedia Instruction with Chinese Character Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hui-Ya; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine second language learners' learning achievement and attitudes toward two different types of dual coding designs (text group: image plus on-screen text versus narration group: image plus narration) in Chinese character acquisition. A total of 66 college students who did not have prior knowledge of the Chinese…

  13. Effectiveness Evaluation of Force Protection Training Using Computer-Based Instruction and X3d Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Caffeine Thomas Wu Otani, Professor John Falby, Col. Larry Shattuck and Dr. Nita Miller for their excellence in teaching and for providing me with...2. Ship’s security force personnel responses against swimmer attack. 3. Security boat responses against swimmer attack. 4. Hostile swimmer attack...PPR) Duration: 00:00:31 Advance mode: Auto Pre-Planned Reponses (PPR) • Likely threats: - Small boats/Deep draft vessels - Swimmers /Mines

  14. Computer-Based Instruction in Military Environments: Defense Research Series. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    the four best 2) in the class are Mark, Alicia, Wands, and Julio . (1) (2) coach [dl athlete [b) coaches (el athletes coach’s athlete’s Ccl 133...Dorner, D. et al. (1983). "Lohhausen: Vom Umgang mit Unbestimmtheit und Komplexitat." Bern : Verlag Hans Huber. Ford, E. & Tisak, M. (1983). A further

  15. Instructional Design and Curricular Impact of Computer-Based Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    1978-01-01

    A competency-based, self-paced core music curriculum utilizing the concept of digital music synthesis is described. The system is designed to aid in experimental research into the perception of intervals, melodies, chords, rhythms, and harmonies. (RAO)

  16. Comparing Alternative Computer-Based Methods for Preventing Job Task Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    and accurate performance. The final study in this subcategory ( Coff , Schlesinger, & Parlog, 1969) compared the effects of presenting job task...electricity or electronics? No Yes . (If yes, specify the nature and type of schooling/training received; e.g., high school shop class...electricity or electronics? No Yes . (If yes, specify the nature and type of work experience received; e.g., part-time job in TV repair shop

  17. Complexities of learning with computer-based tools: A case of inquiry about sound and music in elementary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Shirley J.

    1996-12-01

    Computer-based technology is increasingly becoming available for students at all grade levels in schools, and its promise and power as a learning tool is being extolled by many. From a constructive perspective, if individuals actively construct meaning from their experiences, then simply having particular tools to work with via a computer doesn't ensure that desired learning will result. Thus, it is important to examine how students construct meaning while using such tools. This study examined what fourth grade students learned from the use of two computer-based tools intended to help them understand sound and music: software that emulated an oscilloscope and allowed students to view sound waves from audio input; and software that turned the computer into an electronic keyboard, which provided students with standard pitches for comparison purposes. Principles of selective attention and pior knowledge and experiences—foundational ideas of a constructivist epistemology—were useful in understanding learning outcomes from inquiry with these tools. Our findings provide critical information for future instruction with the goal of supporting learning about sound and music from such tools. They also indicate the need for more studies examining learning from computer-based tools in specific contexts, to advance our understanding of how teachers can mediate student activity with computer-based tools to support the development of conceptual understanding.

  18. An Introduction to the Computer-based TOEFL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing

    2001-01-01

    TOEFL,which aims to measure the English proficiency of test-takers whose first language is not English, is a familiar test to students around the world. The number of people who take the TEOFL is growing rapidly as the influence of the TOEFL is expanding. In 2002-2003, the computer-based TOEFL test will be introduced into China to replace the old paper-based test. So it is quite necessary for people who are preparing to take the computer-based TOEFL test to learn something about it.

  19. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  20. Framework and implementation for improving physics essential skills via computer-based practice: Vector math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikula, Brendon D.; Heckler, Andrew F.

    2017-06-01

    We propose a framework for improving accuracy, fluency, and retention of basic skills essential for solving problems relevant to STEM introductory courses, and implement the framework for the case of basic vector math skills over several semesters in an introductory physics course. Using an iterative development process, the framework begins with a careful identification of target skills and the study of specific student difficulties with these skills. It then employs computer-based instruction, immediate feedback, mastery grading, and well-researched principles from cognitive psychology such as interleaved training sequences and distributed practice. We implemented this with more than 1500 students over 2 semesters. Students completed the mastery practice for an average of about 13 min /week , for a total of about 2-3 h for the whole semester. Results reveal large (>1 SD ) pretest to post-test gains in accuracy in vector skills, even compared to a control group, and these gains were retained at least 2 months after practice. We also find evidence of improved fluency, student satisfaction, and that awarding regular course credit results in higher participation and higher learning gains than awarding extra credit. In all, we find that simple computer-based mastery practice is an effective and efficient way to improve a set of basic and essential skills for introductory physics.

  1. Framework and implementation for improving physics essential skills via computer-based practice: Vector math

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendon D. Mikula

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a framework for improving accuracy, fluency, and retention of basic skills essential for solving problems relevant to STEM introductory courses, and implement the framework for the case of basic vector math skills over several semesters in an introductory physics course. Using an iterative development process, the framework begins with a careful identification of target skills and the study of specific student difficulties with these skills. It then employs computer-based instruction, immediate feedback, mastery grading, and well-researched principles from cognitive psychology such as interleaved training sequences and distributed practice. We implemented this with more than 1500 students over 2 semesters. Students completed the mastery practice for an average of about 13  min/week, for a total of about 2–3 h for the whole semester. Results reveal large (>1  SD pretest to post-test gains in accuracy in vector skills, even compared to a control group, and these gains were retained at least 2 months after practice. We also find evidence of improved fluency, student satisfaction, and that awarding regular course credit results in higher participation and higher learning gains than awarding extra credit. In all, we find that simple computer-based mastery practice is an effective and efficient way to improve a set of basic and essential skills for introductory physics.

  2. Improving learning with science and social studies text using computer-based concept maps for students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciullo, Stephen; Falcomata, Terry S; Pfannenstiel, Kathleen; Billingsley, Glenna

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been used to help students with learning disabilities (LD) improve literacy skills and content learning, predominantly in secondary school. However, despite increased access to classroom technology, no previous studies have examined the efficacy of computer-based concept maps to improve learning from informational text for students with LD in elementary school. In this study, we used a concurrent delayed multiple probe design to evaluate the interactive use of computer-based concept maps on content acquisition with science and social studies texts for Hispanic students with LD in Grades 4 and 5. Findings from this study suggest that students improved content knowledge during intervention relative to a traditional instruction baseline condition. Learning outcomes and social validity information are considered to inform recommendations for future research and the feasibility of classroom implementation.

  3. Computer-Based Aural Training: The GUIDO System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    1981-01-01

    Describes how the University of Delaware's Grade Units for Interactive Dictation (GUIDO) system is used to improve instructional delivery and educational research in aural skills development. Instruction consists of musical dictation exercises and there are five programs available in two modes--drill-and-practice and heuristic (discovery).…

  4. Instructor-led or Learner-led for Elementary Learners to Learn Computer-based Music Composition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Shih Tseng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of instructional strategy (instructor-led vs. learner-led and grade level (third grade vs. fifth grade on elementary learners’ music composition performance and attitude with the use of a computer-based music composition software. An experimental learning activity was implemented using 5E learning cycle as a pedagogical framework to facilitate learning. A quasi-experimental design was employed with elementary learners participated in the experiment. The results revealed that (a fifth grader outperformed third graders in creativity, whereas third graders were extrinsically motivated and perceived that the computer-based music composition software was useful in learning music composition more than fifth graders were and did; and (b learners with instructor-led instructional strategy outperformed learners with learned-led instructional strategy in creativity and craftsmanship and held high extrinsic motivation than learners with learner-led. The implementations and suggestions for future study were discussed in the present study.

  5. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  6. Evaluating Computer-Based Test Accommodations for English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohr, Katrina Crotts; Sireci, Stephen G.

    2017-01-01

    Test accommodations for English learners (ELs) are intended to reduce the language barrier and level the playing field, allowing ELs to better demonstrate their true proficiencies. Computer-based accommodations for ELs show promising results for leveling that field while also providing us with additional data to more closely investigate the…

  7. The Health of the Computer-Based Patient Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    The newly incorporated Computer-Based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) is discussed in the context of the history of medical records, the need for change (mainly because of health care reimbursement and regulation), and the need for involvement by all medical professionals in the development of standards of data collection which reflect public…

  8. A computer-based registration system for geological collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germeraad, J.H.; Freudenthal, M.; Boogaard, van den M.; Arps, C.E.S.

    1972-01-01

    The new computer-based registration system, a project of the National Museum of Geology and Mineralogy in the Netherlands, will considerably increase the accessibility of the Museum collection. This greater access is realized by computerisation of the data in great detail, so that an almost unlimite

  9. Interface Design in Computer-Based Language Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    Describes a three-phase process model for interface design, drawing on practices developed in the software industry and adapting them for computer-based languages tests. Describes good practice in initial design, emphasizes the importance of usability testing, and argues that only through following a principled approach to interface design can the…

  10. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  11. Assessment of Clinical Competence: Written and Computer-Based Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, David B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Literature concerning the validity and reliability of both written and computer-based simulations in assessing clinical competence in the health professions is reviewed, and suggestions are given for the improvement of the psychometric qualities of simulation-based tests. (MSE)

  12. Severe Neglect and Computer-based Home Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, Inge Linda

    2014-01-01

    . For this reason, this case study tests the possibility of using computer-based training in the rehabilitation efforts for a patient with severe neglect who had no previous skills in computer usage. The article describes the results of the training both in terms of neuro-psychological tests and the reading ability...

  13. Status Report on the NBME's Computer-Based Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyman, Stephen G.; Orr, Nancy A.

    1990-01-01

    The process proposed for the development and use of computer-based testing, including simulation and multiple-choice questions, as part of the National Board of Medical Examiners' certification sequence is outlined. Summary reports of first-phase pilot testing in six medical schools are appended. (MSE)

  14. The Mediated Museum: Computer-Based Technology and Museum Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterman, Nanette T.; Allen, Brockenbrough S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of computer-based tools and techniques in museums. The integration of realia with media-based advice and interpretation is described, electronic replicas of ancient Greek vases in the J. Paul Getty Museum are explained, examples of mediated exhibits are presented, and the use of hypermedia is discussed. (five references) (LRW)

  15. Marking Strategies in Metacognition-Evaluated Computer-Based Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ju; Ho, Rong-Guey; Yen, Yung-Chin

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of marking and metacognition-evaluated feedback (MEF) in computer-based testing (CBT) on student performance and review behavior. Marking is a strategy, in which students place a question mark next to a test item to indicate an uncertain answer. The MEF provided students with feedback on test results…

  16. Computer-Based Information Services in Medicine: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, P. H.; And Others

    The objectives of this study were to examine the need and potential demand for computer-based information services in the University of Otago medical libraries, to evaluate the various databases of interest, and to recommend the best means of access to such services. Data were collected through user and library surveys, an extensive literature…

  17. Establishing performance requirements of computer based systems subject to uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D.

    1997-02-01

    An organized systems design approach is dictated by the increasing complexity of computer based systems. Computer based systems are unique in many respects but share many of the same problems that have plagued design engineers for decades. The design of complex systems is difficult at best, but as a design becomes intensively dependent on the computer processing of external and internal information, the design process quickly borders chaos. This situation is exacerbated with the requirement that these systems operate with a minimal quantity of information, generally corrupted by noise, regarding the current state of the system. Establishing performance requirements for such systems is particularly difficult. This paper briefly sketches a general systems design approach with emphasis on the design of computer based decision processing systems subject to parameter and environmental variation. The approach will be demonstrated with application to an on-board diagnostic (OBD) system for automotive emissions systems now mandated by the state of California and the Federal Clean Air Act. The emphasis is on an approach for establishing probabilistically based performance requirements for computer based systems.

  18. Improving Computer Based Speech Therapy Using a Fuzzy Expert System

    OpenAIRE

    Ovidiu Andrei Schipor; Stefan Gheorghe Pentiuc; Maria Doina Schipor

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our work about Computer Based Speech Therapy systems optimization. We focus especially on using a fuzzy expert system in order to determine specific parameters of personalized therapy, i.e. the number, length and content of training sessions. The efficiency of this new approach was tested during an experiment performed with our CBST, named LOGOMON.

  19. An Intelligent Computer-Based System for Sign Language Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchings, Tim; Khadragi, Ahmed; Saeb, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    A computer-based system for sign language tutoring has been developed using a low-cost data glove and a software application that processes the movement signals for signs in real-time and uses Pattern Matching techniques to decide if a trainee has closely replicated a teacher's recorded movements. The data glove provides 17 movement signals from…

  20. Content Analysis of a Computer-Based Faculty Activity Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Eveleth, Lori; Stone, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The research presents an analysis of faculty opinions regarding the introduction of a new computer-based faculty activity repository (FAR) in a university setting. The qualitative study employs content analysis to better understand the phenomenon underlying these faculty opinions and to augment the findings from a quantitative study. A web-based…

  1. From Pericles to Plato – from democratic political praxis to totalitarian political philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øjvind Larsen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Plato is normally taken as one of the founders of Western political philosophy, not at least with his Republic. Here, he constructs a hierarchy of forms of governments, beginning with aristocracy at the top as a critical standard for the other forms of governments, and proceeding through timocracy and oligarchy to democracy and tyranny at the bottom. Following Karl Popper, the paper argues that Plato’s is a totalitarian philosophy that emphasizes the similarities between democracy and tyranny, which it considers to be the two worst forms of government. Plato’s denigration of democracy has dominated the tradition of political philosophy until recent times. This paper, however, shows that political philosophy in fact originates in democracy, especially as developed by the sophists and that philosophy is only a form of sophism with a similar origin in ancient Greek democracy. A discussion of Pericles’ funeral oration is used to show that Pericles presented a democratic political philosophy that can serve as a counterpoint to Plato’s political philosophy in the Republic.

  2. Plato's Concept of Justice%论柏拉图的正义观

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘欣如

    2015-01-01

    本文以柏拉图的作品《申辩》、《斐多》、《理想国》为切入点,论述了正义是在应在的位置上做应做之事、正义的本质是灵魂的一种属性以及正义的产生,并通过作品提供的背景和对话讨论了正义之人和不义之人的区别、正义的种类、正义行为的动机、正义的各种不同状态等问题.%In this paper, the works of Plato,"defense","Phaedo","Utopia"as the starting point, discusses the justice should be done is to do things in a position to be in, the nature of justice is an attribute of the soul, and justice generation, background and dialogue and through providing discussed works of justice and the unrighteous man of distinction, just the kind of moti-vation act of justice, justice of various states and other issues.

  3. Functional Requirements of an Advanced Instructional Design Advisor: Epitomizing Functions. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    practical lesson. 54 REFERENCES Breuer, K., & Kummer, R. (1990). cognitive effects from process learning with computer-based simulations. Computers in Human Behavior , 6...Higginbotham-Wheat, N. (1989). Implications for the design of computer-based instruction screens. Computers in Human Behavior , 5 , 167-174. Ross

  4. Description of the computer-based patient record and computer-based patient record system. CPRI Work Group on CPR Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Computer-based patient records and computer-based patient record systems support health care effectiveness and efficiency with appropriate safeguards for confidentiality. Achieving a health information infrastructure with computer-based patient records supported by fully integrated computer-based patient record systems is obviously a process of incremental steps. However, CPRI believes significant benefits in health care delivery are certain to be realized over the full course of this process.

  5. SUPPORTING THE INDUSTRY BY DEVELOPING A DESIGN GUIDANCE FOR COMPUTER-BASED PROCEDURES FOR FIELD WORKERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; LeBlanc, Katya

    2017-06-01

    The paper-based procedures currently used for nearly all activities in the commercial nuclear power industry have a long history of ensuring safe operation of the plants. However, there is potential to greatly increase efficiency and safety by improving how the human interacts with the procedures, which can be achieved through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools and dynamic step presentation. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the possibility and feasibility of replacing current paper-based procedures with CBPs. The main purpose of the CBP research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory was to provide design guidance to the nuclear industry to be used by both utilities and vendors. After studying existing design guidance for CBP systems, the researchers concluded that the majority of the existing guidance is intended for control room CBP systems, and does not necessarily address the challenges of designing CBP systems for instructions carried out in the field. Further, the guidance is often presented on a high level, which leaves the designer to interpret what is meant by the guidance and how to specifically implement it. The authors developed a design guidance to provide guidance specifically tailored to instructions that are carried out in the field based.

  6. The Relative Effectiveness of Computer-Based and Traditional Resources for Education in Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Zaid; Quinlan, Kaitlyn; Norman, Geoffrey R.; Wainman, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing use of computer-based resources to teach anatomy, although no study has compared computer-based learning to traditional. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of three formats of anatomy learning: (1) a virtual reality (VR) computer-based module, (2) a static computer-based module providing Key Views (KV), (3) a plastic…

  7. Lost in follow-up rates in TRACER, ATLAS ACS 2, TRITON and TRA 2P trials: challenging PLATO mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Can, Mehmet Mustafa; Serebruany, Victor L

    2013-04-15

    Extreme rates of vascular and all-cause mortality especially in the clopidogrel arm of the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) non-USA cohort raise concerns of data integrity, and call for independent verification of vital records in the national death registries. Four recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS) trials: Thrombin Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction in Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRACER), Anti-Xa therapy to lower cardiovascular events in addition to standard therapy in subjects with acute coronary syndrome (ATLAS-ACS 2), Trial to Assess Improvement in Therapeutic Outcomes by Optimizing Platelet Inhibition with Prasugrel (TRITON), and the Thrombin Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events (TRA 2P), provide a valuable opportunity to match lost in follow-up (LIFU) with mortality rates among similar ACS studies. To compare the LIFU from PLATO, TRACER, ATLAS-ACS 2, TRITON-TIMI 38 and TRA 2P trials. The disturbingly high (8.9%-14.7%) LIFU in PLATO was no match to LIFU in TRACER (0.1%), ATLAS ACS 2 (0.3%), TRITON (0.1%) and TRA 2P (0.1%). In fact, such an astronomical (49-147 fold higher) PLATO LIFU rate should result in less mortality compared to the other ACS trials since no event can be reported or adjudicated if the patient has been lost. Adjusting LIFU rate revealed that vascular (5.55%) and all cause (6.05%) mortality in PLATO was even more disparate than in TRACER (3.2% and 4.9%), ATLAS-ACS 2 (4.1% and 4.5%), TRITON-TIMI 38 (2.4% and 3.2%) and TRA 2P (3.0% and 5.3%) control arms, respectfully. Moreover, the incomplete CV follow-up in the ATLAS ACS 2 trial was later revealed to be around 12%, which lead to the rejection of rivaroxaban for the treatment of ACS. PLATO's LIFU rate was just as high, if not higher, than seen in ATLAS ACS 2. The chance to die in PLATO far exceeds the mortality risks observed in the clopidogrel arms of four recent ACS trials, which becomes especially evident after

  8. An overview of computer-based natural language processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computer based Natural Language Processing (NLP) is the key to enabling humans and their computer based creations to interact with machines in natural language (like English, Japanese, German, etc., in contrast to formal computer languages). The doors that such an achievement can open have made this a major research area in Artificial Intelligence and Computational Linguistics. Commercial natural language interfaces to computers have recently entered the market and future looks bright for other applications as well. This report reviews the basic approaches to such systems, the techniques utilized, applications, the state of the art of the technology, issues and research requirements, the major participants and finally, future trends and expectations. It is anticipated that this report will prove useful to engineering and research managers, potential users, and others who will be affected by this field as it unfolds.

  9. Redesigning Computer-based Learning Environments: Evaluation as Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Brust, Matthias R; Ricarte, Ivan M L

    2007-01-01

    In the field of evaluation research, computer scientists live constantly upon dilemmas and conflicting theories. As evaluation is differently perceived and modeled among educational areas, it is not difficult to become trapped in dilemmas, which reflects an epistemological weakness. Additionally, designing and developing a computer-based learning scenario is not an easy task. Advancing further, with end-users probing the system in realistic settings, is even harder. Computer science research in evaluation faces an immense challenge, having to cope with contributions from several conflicting and controversial research fields. We believe that deep changes must be made in our field if we are to advance beyond the CBT (computer-based training) learning model and to build an adequate epistemology for this challenge. The first task is to relocate our field by building upon recent results from philosophy, psychology, social sciences, and engineering. In this article we locate evaluation in respect to communication s...

  10. The effects of format in computer-based procedure displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaulniers, David R.; Gillan, Douglas J.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate display variables likely to influence the effectiveness of computer-based procedure displays. In experiment 1, procedures were presented in three formats, text, extended-text, and flowchart. Text and extended-text are structured prose formats which differ in the spatial density of presentation. The flowchart format differs from the text format in both syntax and spatial representation. Subjects were required to use the procedures to diagnose a hypothetical system anomaly. The results indicate that performance was most accurate with the flowchart format. In experiment 2, procedure window size was varied (6-line, 12-line, and 24-line) in addition to procedure format. In the six line window condition, experiment 2 replicated the findings of experiment 1. As predicted, completion times for flowchart procedures decreased with increasing window size; however, accuracy of performance decreased substantially. Implications for the design of computer-based procedure displays are discussed.

  11. Computer-based Training in Medicine and Learning Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Martin; Bauch, Matthias; Garde, Sebastian; Heid, Jörn; Weires, Thorsten; Leven, Franz-Josef

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based training (CBT) systems can efficiently support modern teaching and learning environments. In this paper, we demonstrate on the basis of the case-based CBT system CAMPUS that current learning theories and design principles (Bloom's Taxonomy and practice fields) are (i) relevant to CBT and (ii) are feasible to implement using computer-based training and adequate learning environments. Not all design principles can be fulfilled by the system alone, the integration of the system in adequate teaching and learning environments therefore is essential. Adequately integrated, CBT programs become valuable means to build or support practice fields for learners that build domain knowledge and problem-solving skills. Learning theories and their design principles can support in designing these systems as well as in assessing their value.

  12. A quantum computer based on recombination processes in microelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulos, K.; Ntalaperas, D.; Petras, I.; Konofaos, N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a quantum computer based on the recombination processes happening in semiconductor devices is presented. A "data element" and a "computational element" are derived based on Schokley-Read-Hall statistics and they can later be used to manifest a simple and known quantum computing process. Such a paradigm is shown by the application of the proposed computer onto a well known physical system involving traps in semiconductor devices.

  13. A quantum computer based on recombination processes in microelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, K [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Ntalaperas, D [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Research Academic Computer Technology Institute, Riga Feraiou 61, 26110, Patras (Greece); Petras, I [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Konofaos, N [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a quantum computer based on the recombination processes happening in semiconductor devices is presented. A 'data element' and a 'computational element' are derived based on Schokley-Read-Hall statistics and they can later be used to manifest a simple and known quantum computing process. Such a paradigm is shown by the application of the proposed computer onto a well known physical system involving traps in semiconductor devices.

  14. Evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Dean G.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations are presented. The human-computer computer software environment modules are described. The following topics are addressed: command and control workstation concept; cupola workstation concept; Japanese experiment module RMS workstation concept; remote devices controlled from workstations; orbital maneuvering vehicle free flyer; remote manipulator system; Japanese experiment module exposed facility; Japanese experiment module small fine arm; flight telerobotic servicer; human-computer interaction; and workstation/robotics related activities.

  15. A Research Roadmap for Computation-Based Human Reliability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Groth, Katrina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research through the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to extend the life of the currently operating fleet of commercial nuclear power plants. The Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) research pathway within LWRS looks at ways to maintain and improve the safety margins of these plants. The RISMC pathway includes significant developments in the area of thermalhydraulics code modeling and the development of tools to facilitate dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). PRA is primarily concerned with the risk of hardware systems at the plant; yet, hardware reliability is often secondary in overall risk significance to human errors that can trigger or compound undesirable events at the plant. This report highlights ongoing efforts to develop a computation-based approach to human reliability analysis (HRA). This computation-based approach differs from existing static and dynamic HRA approaches in that it: (i) interfaces with a dynamic computation engine that includes a full scope plant model, and (ii) interfaces with a PRA software toolset. The computation-based HRA approach presented in this report is called the Human Unimodels for Nuclear Technology to Enhance Reliability (HUNTER) and incorporates in a hybrid fashion elements of existing HRA methods to interface with new computational tools developed under the RISMC pathway. The goal of this research effort is to model human performance more accurately than existing approaches, thereby minimizing modeling uncertainty found in current plant risk models.

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardev; Herman, Tania De La Fuente; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-01

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem & ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  18. Ancient philosophical ideas of the soul (Plato-Aristotelian tradition and Stoicism as a source of Patristic Thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitsev Cornelius

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the ancient idea of the soul that in the patristic era has been enriched by the perception of the methodology of ancient philosophy. Greek and Roman thinkers considered some properties of the soul, its immortality, revealed its “levels and strata” (Plato, Aristotle, expressed first guesses about the nature of sinful passions (the Stoics. But some aspects still remained unresolved so far. This is the issue of materiality or immateriality, of the soul, which "raised" in the Russian Empire in the 19th century (the dispute saints Theophan the Recluse and Ignatius Brianchaninov and remains relevant today.

  19. Toward a Poeticognosis: Re-reading Plato's The Republic via Wallace Stevens' "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Disney

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a language-based re-reading of Plato's exile of the poets via Wallace Stevens' poem-manifesto, "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven." I examine how philosophy and poetry use language differently in order to deconstruct an origin of the speech-acts -- wonder -- that I then identify as a phenomenological difference between philosophers and poets. I contend that the thinking-into-language of philosophers is based in theoria, comprehension, and a resulting closure of wonder. I contrast this with the processes of poets, who I show to be moving thought into language via gnosis, apprehension, and a phenomenology opening onto inexhaustible wonder.

  20. Love and/in psychoanalysis: a commentary on Lacan's reading of Plato's Symposium in Seminar VIII: Transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    What is love and what part does it play in psychoanalysis? Where are the analyst and the analysand situated in relation to the roles defined as those of the "lover" and the "beloved"? Jacques Lacan explores these and other questions in his soon-to-be-published Seminar VIII: Transference by providing an extensive commentary on Plato's most famous dialogue on love, the Symposium. This paper outlines some of the major points about love that grow out of Lacan's reading of the dialogue and examines their relevance to the analytic setting. Can the analyst be characterized as a sort of modern-day Socrates?

  1. Computer assisted instruction: two decades in perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, Thomas J. Jr.; Orrell, Janet D.

    1987-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the changes that have occurred in Computer Assisted Instruction (CAD over the past 20 years. Numerous literature sources were reviewed and the information extracted was utilized to describe the history of CAI; provide a brief description of other types of computer-based education that are often grouped under the heading of CAI; examine the changes in hardware and software costs; describe the in...

  2. ¿Solamente platos? Cerámicas de barniz rojo en el depósito ibérico del Zacatín (Granada)

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Moreno, Amparo; Niveau de Villedary y Mariñas, Ana María; Adroher Auroux, Andrés María

    2015-01-01

    Se presenta un conjunto homogéneo de platos de barniz rojo indígena con un perfil muy particular y sin paralelos conocidos por el momento. Dicho conjunto formaba parte del depósito ritual hallado en la granadina calle del Zacatín, una fosa junto al río Darro que se rellenó con los resultantes de un festín sagrado posiblemente en relación con el propio río. En este trabajo planteamos que estos platos fueron fabricados ex profeso para el ritual que tuvo lugar fuera de las murallas de Iliberri e...

  3. Development of Computer-Based Training to Supplement Lessons in Fundamentals of Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian P. Benitez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Fundamentals of Electronics allow students to familiarize with basic electronics concepts, acquire skills in the use of multi-meter test instrument, and develop mastery in testing basic electronic components. Actual teaching and doing observations during practical activities on components pin identification and testing showed that the lack of skills of new students in testing components can lead to incorrect fault diagnosis and wrong pin connection during in-circuit replacement of the defective parts. With the aim of reinforcing students with concrete understanding of the concepts of components applied in the actual test and measurement, a Computer-Based Training was developed. The proponent developed the learning modules (courseware utilizing concept mapping and storyboarding instructional design. Developing a courseware as simulated, activity-based and interactive as possible was the primary goal to resemble the real-world process. A Local area network (LAN-based learning management system was also developed to use in administering the learning modules. The Paired Sample T-Test based on the pretest and post-test result was used to determine whether the students achieved learning after taking the courseware. The result revealed that there is a significant achievement of the students after studying the learning module. The E-learning content was validated by the instructors in terms of contents, activities, assessment and format with a grand weighted mean of 4.35 interpreted as Sufficient. Based from the evaluation result, supplementing with the proposed computer-based training can enhance the teachinglearning process in electronic fundamentals.

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of computer-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Loewenberger

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for more cost-effective and pedagogically acceptable combinations of teaching and learning methods to sustain increasing student numbers means that the use of innovative methods, using technology, is accelerating. There is an expectation that economies of scale might provide greater cost-effectiveness whilst also enhancing student learning. The difficulties and complexities of these expectations are considered in this paper, which explores the challenges faced by those wishing to evaluate the costeffectiveness of computer-based assessment (CBA. The paper outlines the outcomes of a survey which attempted to gather information about the costs and benefits of CBA.

  5. The neural and computational bases of semantic cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Matthew A Lambon; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Patterson, Karalyn; Rogers, Timothy T

    2017-01-01

    Semantic cognition refers to our ability to use, manipulate and generalize knowledge that is acquired over the lifespan to support innumerable verbal and non-verbal behaviours. This Review summarizes key findings and issues arising from a decade of research into the neurocognitive and neurocomputational underpinnings of this ability, leading to a new framework that we term controlled semantic cognition (CSC). CSC offers solutions to long-standing queries in philosophy and cognitive science, and yields a convergent framework for understanding the neural and computational bases of healthy semantic cognition and its dysfunction in brain disorders.

  6. Using computer-based tests for information science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Callear

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of objective testing using computer software does not necessarily represent innovative assessment. Where tests occur as an add-on to a course, are timeconstrained, closed-book, invigilated, and where there is little (or no feedback of results to the students, such testing is best regarded as an innovative technique for traditional summative assessment. A computer-based examination of this nature using the commercial software Question Mark has been operating for a number of years in the Department of Information Science at Portsmouth, in the second-year unit for Logic Programming, with student numbers up to 160.

  7. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, S N [Institute of Advanced Research, Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan, Kazan (Russian Federation); Moiseev, S A [Kazan E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  8. Computer-based procedure for field activities: Results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); LeBlanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    , researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with partners from the nuclear industry have been investigating the design requirements for computer-based work instructions (including operations procedures, work orders, maintenance procedures, etc.) to increase efficiency, safety, and cost competitiveness of existing light water reactors.

  9. Effects of people knowledge on science learning in a computer-based learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huang-Yao

    A weakness inherent in science education has been, and continues to be, its emphasis principally on the teaching of scientific knowledge, i.e. knowledge of the object (or the observed). Little attention has been directed to the teaching of people knowledge about scientists, i.e. knowledge of the subject (or the observer), who generates scientific knowledge. This study explored the possible effects of people knowledge on science learning. Participants in the study were 323 tenth graders from nine classes in a public school in Taipei, Taiwan. They were randomly assigned to three groups to self-study science in a computer-based learning environment. The control group was instructed to study various scientific laws discovered by three scientists in three science lessons. The other two groups were instructed to study the same science lessons after studying one of two kinds of people knowledge about the three scientists: achievement-oriented people knowledge (APK) and process-oriented people knowledge (PPK). APK profiles scientists' scientific achievements, and PPK describes scientists' struggles before making the scientific discoveries. The main findings were: Firstly, it was found from problem-solving tests that all three groups performed equally well in applying what they learned from the lessons to solve textbook problems. However, in applying what they learned to interpret the relationships between scientific laws, only the PPK group performed better. Secondly, regarding learning interest, among the students who showed high personal interest in science, the APK group tended to consider the lessons as less interesting than the control group. Among the students who demonstrated low personal interest in science, the PPK group tended to consider the science lessons as more interesting than the control group. Thirdly, in describing their image of the three scientists, the APK group tended to emphasize the abilities and successes of the scientists, whereas the PPK group

  10. The micro-fascism of Plato's good citizen: producing (dis)order through the construction of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Holmes, Dave

    2007-04-01

    The human body has come to be seen as forever susceptible to both external and internal hazards, which in many circumstances require immediate, heroic, and expensive intervention. In response to this, there has been a shift from a treatment-based healthcare model to one of prevention wherein nurses play an integral role by identifying and assessing risks for individuals, communities, and populations. This paper uses Deborah Lupton's outline of the spectrum of risk and applies the theoretical works of Foucault and Plato to demonstrate the means by which nurses maintain social order by identifying and counselling risk takers. It also utilizes the work of Deleuze and Guattari to illustrate how Plato's framework for creating social order through the creation of the good citizen can be viewed as a micro-fascist system, which has been adopted wholeheartedly by preventative health professionals. The goal of this paper is to present an alternate understanding of risk to provide nurses and other healthcare professionals with a non-traditional appreciation of certain aspects of their practice as researchers and clinicians.

  11. Negação e diferença em Platão Negation and diference in Plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Christina de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Platão, ao tratar da negação no diálogo Sofista, afirma que sempre que enunciamos o que não é, não enunciamos algo contrário ao que é, mas algo diferente. A negação significa cada parte da natureza da diferença em antítese ao que é. Tal tratamento da negação resulta da necessidade de resolver alguns problemas colocados pelo eleatismo. Propõe-se indicar esses problemas e examinar o tratamento que Platão dá ao não-ser como diferença.Plato, in dealing with negation in the dialogue Sophist, says that when we say what is not, we speak not of something that is the opposite of being, but of something different. Negation means each part of the nature of the difference in antithesis to what is. This treatment of negation results from the need to solve some problems posed by eleatism. It is proposed to indicate these problems and examine the treatment that Plato gives to non-being as difference.

  12. Comparative Study of Meanings and Status of Imagination in Mathnavi and Plato’s Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sh alyari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Describing and explaining the nature of imagination and its function with regard to human being and ontology has always been one of the preoccupations of philosophers and thinkers. Plato is the first philosopher who considered an epistemological status for imagination and, by dividing the world into the world of reason and world of senses, he ascribed the knowledge of imagination to the world of senses. In different parts of Mathnavi, Molavi, the great Muslim-Iranian mystic, has paid much attention to imagination, its types, its status in the Knowledge of Man (both physical and metaphysical affairs and its various influences on the body, soul and mental states of any individual. Thus, the present article aims to compare the concept of imagination in the view of the two thinkers. For reaching such aim, while using a descriptive-comparative method, first, the definitions of imagination in Mathnavi and Plato’s ideas are investigated and, then, the similarities and differences of the two views are shown. The conclusion is that their ideas are similar with regard to unreality and shadowiness of the world and phenomena, the relation between imitation and imagination, deficiency and restrictions of imagination for understanding the reality, whereas their ideas are different regarding the power of imagination, its epistemological status and the meaning and influence of it.

  13. Anchoring Problem-Solving and Computation Instruction in Context-Rich Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottge, Brian A.; Rueda, Enrique; Grant, Timothy S.; Stephens, Ana C.; Laroque, Perry T.

    2010-01-01

    Middle school students with learning disabilities in math (MLD) used two versions of Enhanced Anchored Instruction (EAI). In one condition, students learned how to compute with fractions on an as-needed basis while they worked to solve the EAI problems. In the other condition, teachers used a computer-based instructional module in place of one of…

  14. A Framework for Intelligent Instructional Systems: An Artificial Intelligence Machine Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee A.

    1987-01-01

    Presents and develops a general model of the nature of a learning system and a classification for learning systems. Highlights include the relationship between artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology; computer-based instructional systems; intelligent instructional systems; and the role of the learner's knowledge base in an intelligent…

  15. Computerbasiert prüfen [Computer-based Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Computer-based testing in medical education offers new perspectives. Advantages are sequential or adaptive testing, integration of movies or sound, rapid feedback to candidates and management of web-based question banks. Computer-based testing can also be implemented in an OSCE examination. In e-learning environments formative self-assessment are often implemented and gives helpful feedbacks to learners. Disadvantages in high-stake exams are the high requirements as well for the quality of testing (e.g. standard setting as additionally for the information technology and especially for security. [german] Computerbasierte Prüfungen im Medizinstudium eröffnen neue Möglichkeiten. Vorteile solcher Prüfungen liegen im sequentiellen oder adaptiven Prüfen, in der Integration von Bewegtbildern oder Ton, der raschen Auswertung und zentraler Verwaltung der Prüfungsfragen via Internet. Ein Einsatzgebiet mit vertretbarem Aufwand sind Prüfungen mit mehreren Stationen wie beispielsweise die OSCE-Prüfung. Computerbasierte formative Selbsttests werden im Bereiche e-learning häufig angeboten. Das hilft den Lernenden ihren Wissensstand besser einzuschätzen oder sich mit den Leistungen anderer zu vergleichen. Grenzen zeigen sich bei den summativen Prüfungen beim Prüfungsort, da zuhause Betrug möglich ist. Höhere ärztliche Kompetenzen wie Untersuchungstechnik oder Kommunikation eigenen sich kaum für rechnergestützte Prüfungen.

  16. Computer-based controlon mathematical education of the future engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Катерина Володимирівна Власенко

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There was offered the computer-based management of the scientific-cognitive activity of the future engineers and organization of control on mathematical education using the attainments of the modern information technologies. There were analyzed the e-school-books elaborated by the higher mathematics teachers of the Donbass state academy of mechanical engineering and Donetsk national technical university. There was grounded an expediency of the use of aforesaid school-books during the lectures or independent students’ work and at the control on education of the future specialists of engineer branch that is considered as the category of management as the relatively independent final element of managerial cycle of educational process. There were offered methodological recommendations of the use of e-educational technologies at mathematical studies. There was elucidated how the introduction of educational materials from internet-resource with the access mode http://vmdbi.net.ua/ favors the computer-based control on education: oral questioning of students, written control works, tests and so on. There was proved that the use of offered means at the control on mathematical education gives the possibility to establish the reverse connection at studying mathematics and comprehensively examine the level of knowledge and skills of the studied discipline in students

  17. A cloud computing based 12-lead ECG telemedicine service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the great variability of 12-lead ECG instruments and medical specialists’ interpretation skills, it remains a challenge to deliver rapid and accurate 12-lead ECG reports with senior cardiologists’ decision making support in emergency telecardiology. Methods We create a new cloud and pervasive computing based 12-lead Electrocardiography (ECG) service to realize ubiquitous 12-lead ECG tele-diagnosis. Results This developed service enables ECG to be transmitted and interpreted via mobile phones. That is, tele-consultation can take place while the patient is on the ambulance, between the onsite clinicians and the off-site senior cardiologists, or among hospitals. Most importantly, this developed service is convenient, efficient, and inexpensive. Conclusions This cloud computing based ECG tele-consultation service expands the traditional 12-lead ECG applications onto the collaboration of clinicians at different locations or among hospitals. In short, this service can greatly improve medical service quality and efficiency, especially for patients in rural areas. This service has been evaluated and proved to be useful by cardiologists in Taiwan. PMID:22838382

  18. Safety Instructions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instructions N0 37 rev. 3 (IS 37 rev. 3) entitled ""LEVEL-3" SAFETY ALARMS AND ALARM SYSTEMS" Is available on the web at the following URL: http://edms.cern.ch/document/335802 Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch TIS Secretariat

  19. Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  20. Method and Tools for Development of Advanced Instructional Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arend, J. van der; Riemersma, J.B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The application of advanced instructional systems (AISs), like computer-based training systems, intelligent tutoring systems and training simulators, is widely spread within the Royal Netherlands Army. As a consequence there is a growing interest in methods and tools to develop effective and

  1. Instructional Delivery in Developmental Mathematics: Impact on Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarella, Carol A.; Ignash, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of students enrolled in computer-based instruction have yielded mixed results, with some reporting a high dropout rate. Tis article describes a quantitative study examining the probability of students' withdrawal from a computer- versus lecture-based developmental math course based on learning style, reasons for selecting the instructional…

  2. IURead: a new computer-based reading test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renfeng; Bradley, Arthur

    2015-09-01

    To develop a computer-based single sentence reading test especially designed for clinical research enabling multiple repeat trials without reusing the same sentences. We initially developed 422 sentences, with an average of 60 characters and 12 words. Presentation controls were improved by employing computer-based testing and the oral reading was recorded by visual inspection of digital audio recordings. Variability in reading speed of normally sighted adults between sentences, between charts, between subjects, between formats, and between display devices was quantified. The impact of display size and pixel resolution on test geometry was assessed, and the impact of reduced retinal image quality and retinal illuminance were compared for reading and standard letter acuities. Eleven visually normal subjects (age: 18-60 years) participated in this study. Stopwatch timing of sentences reliably underestimated reading times by about 0.3 s, and exhibited coefficients of repeatability 17 times larger than those estimated from visual inspection of digital recordings. A slight relaxing of the lexical content constraints had no effect on reading speed; neither did sentence format (single vs three lines) or display size or distance. Within subject standard deviations of reading speed for different sentences were small (between 6% and 9% of the mean speed) requiring only small samples sizes to achieve typical statistical reliability and power when comparing conditions within individual subjects. The greater variability associated with stopwatch timing necessitates larger sample sizes. As defocus and light level were varied, reading acuity and standard letter acuity were highly correlated (r(2)  = 0.99), and reading acuity was slightly better. A computer-based IURead reading test provides a useful reading speed and reading acuity tool for clinical research involving multiple conditions and repeat testing of individual subjects. Ready to use IURead files for use with a

  3. The Case against the Arts from Plato to Tolstoy and Its Implications for Why and How the Arts Should Be Taught in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    From Plato onwards many of the great Western thinkers have explored the nature of the arts, their contribution to society and their role in education. This has often involved a discussion of the potentially negative impact of the arts. The recurring message has been that the arts can warp judgment, elevate emotion at the expense of reason,…

  4. Why Did Socrates Deny That He Was a Teacher? Locating Socrates among the New Educators and the Traditional Education in Plato's "Apology of Socrates"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Avi I.

    2014-01-01

    Plato's "Apology of Socrates" contains a spirited account of Socrates' relationship with the city of Athens and its citizens. As Socrates stands on trial for corrupting the youth, surprisingly, he does not defend the substance and the methods of his teaching. Instead, he simply denies that he is a teacher. Many scholars have…

  5. Cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome patients with peripheral arterial disease treated with ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel: Data from the PLATO trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.;

    Abstract 14299: Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease Treated With Ticagrelor Compared to Clopidogrel: Data From the PLATO Trial Manesh R Patel1; Richard C Becker1; Daniel M Wojdyla2; Håkan Emanuelsson3; William Hiatt4; Jay Horrow5; Steen Husted6...

  6. 18 CFR 3b.204 - Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... information in manual and computer-based record systems. 3b.204 Section 3b.204 Conservation of Power and Water... Collection of Records § 3b.204 Safeguarding information in manual and computer-based record systems. (a) The administrative and physical controls to protect the information in the manual and computer-based record...

  7. ACSES, An Automated Computer Science Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievergelt, Jurg; And Others

    A project to accommodate the large and increasing enrollment in introductory computer science courses by automating them with a subsystem for computer science instruction on the PLATO IV Computer-Based Education system at the University of Illinois was started. The subsystem was intended to be used for supplementary instruction at the University…

  8. Investing in Computer Technology: Criteria and Procedures for System Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The criteria used by the University of Delaware in selecting the PLATO computer-based educational system are discussed in this document. Consideration was given to support for instructional strategies, requirements of the student learning station, features for instructors and authors of instructional materials, general operational characteristics,…

  9. Security considerations and recommendations in computer-based testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleem, Saleh M; Ullah, Hanif

    2014-01-01

    Many organizations and institutions around the globe are moving or planning to move their paper-and-pencil based testing to computer-based testing (CBT). However, this conversion will not be the best option for all kinds of exams and it will require significant resources. These resources may include the preparation of item banks, methods for test delivery, procedures for test administration, and last but not least test security. Security aspects may include but are not limited to the identification and authentication of examinee, the risks that are associated with cheating on the exam, and the procedures related to test delivery to the examinee. This paper will mainly investigate the security considerations associated with CBT and will provide some recommendations for the security of these kinds of tests. We will also propose a palm-based biometric authentication system incorporated with basic authentication system (username/password) in order to check the identity and authenticity of the examinee.

  10. A Computationally Based Approach to Homogenizing Advanced Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, P D; Cowen, C J

    2011-02-27

    We have developed a computationally based approach to optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of complex alloys. The Scheil module within the Thermo-Calc software is used to predict the as-cast segregation present within alloys, and DICTRA (Diffusion Controlled TRAnsformations) is used to model the homogenization kinetics as a function of time, temperature and microstructural scale. We will discuss this approach as it is applied to both Ni based superalloys as well as the more complex (computationally) case of alloys that solidify with more than one matrix phase as a result of segregation. Such is the case typically observed in martensitic steels. With these alloys it is doubly important to homogenize them correctly, especially at the laboratory scale, since they are austenitic at high temperature and thus constituent elements will diffuse slowly. The computationally designed heat treatment and the subsequent verification real castings are presented.

  11. Intricacies of Feedback in Computer-based Prism Adaptation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, Inge Linda; Rytter, Hana Malá

    whether the PAT method can be executed with similar effect using a computer with a touch screen.   62 healthy subjects were subjected to two experimental conditions: 1) pointing out at targets using the original box, 2) pointing out at targets on a computer attached touch screen. In both conditions...... on the touch screen (indirect feedback), 2) the feedback was provided by seeing one's own pointing finger, with no graphical feedback on the computer screen (direct feedback).   The results show that it is possible to obtain similar aftereffects from PAT by using a computer method but only when providing...... a direct feedback (physical finger) on pointing precision. Attempts to provide feedback indirectly via icons on the computer screen fail to create the aftereffects observed in the original PAT. The findings have direct implications for future implementations of computer-based methods in treatment...

  12. A Computer-based Tutorial on Double-Focusing Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbar, Richard R.; Browman, Andrew A.; Mead, William C.; Williams, Robert A.

    1998-10-01

    WhistleSoft is developing a set of computer-based, self-paced tutorials on particle accelerators that targets a broad audience, including undergraduate science majors and industrial technicians. (See http://www.whistlesoft.com/s~ilbar/.) We use multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and retention of the material. The tutorials feature interactive On-Screen Laboratories and use hypertext, colored graphics, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. Parts of our Dipoles module deal with the double-focusing spectrometer and occur throughout the piece. Radial focusing occurs in the section on uniform magnets, while vertical focusing is in the non-uniform magnets section. The student can even understand the √2π bend angle on working through the (intermediate-level) discussion on the Kerst-Serber equations. This talk will present our discussion of this spectrometer, direct to you from the computer screen.

  13. Implementing security in computer based patient records clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, K R; Heimly, V; Lundgren, T I

    1995-01-01

    In Norway, organizational changes in hospitals and a stronger focus on patient safety have changed the way of organizing and managing paper based patient records. Hospital-wide patient records tend to replace department based records. Since not only clinicians, but also other non-medical staff have access to the paper records, they also have easy access to all the information which is available on a specific patient; such a system has obvious 'side effects' on privacy and security. Computer based patient records (CPRs) can provide the solution to this apparent paradox if the complex aspects of security, privacy, effectiveness, and user friendliness are focused on jointly from the outset in designing such systems. Clinical experiences in Norway show that it is possible to design patient record systems that provide a very useful tool for clinicians and other health care personnel (HCP) while fully complying with comprehensive security and privacy requirements.

  14. All-optical reservoir computer based on saturation of absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonckheere, Antoine; Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Fang, Li; Oudar, Jean-Louis; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2014-05-05

    Reservoir computing is a new bio-inspired computation paradigm. It exploits a dynamical system driven by a time-dependent input to carry out computation. For efficient information processing, only a few parameters of the reservoir needs to be tuned, which makes it a promising framework for hardware implementation. Recently, electronic, opto-electronic and all-optical experimental reservoir computers were reported. In those implementations, the nonlinear response of the reservoir is provided by active devices such as optoelectronic modulators or optical amplifiers. By contrast, we propose here the first reservoir computer based on a fully passive nonlinearity, namely the saturable absorption of a semiconductor mirror. Our experimental setup constitutes an important step towards the development of ultrafast low-consumption analog computers.

  15. Computer-Managed Instruction in the Navy: V. The Effects of Charted Feedback on Rate of Progress through a CMI Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    managed Instruction Individualized Instruction Computer-based Instruction Time Management Training Time Student Motivation Computr - geerate progess...could be made to eliminate 11 /---.., - - -. .- -* ... 1.,. , -t z •,.•. . the need for the extra terminets and to simplify the method for requesting

  16. Computer Based Procedures for Field Workers - FY16 Research Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. A CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context-driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. The presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps. This report provides a summary of the main research activities conducted in the Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers effort since 2012. The main focus of the report is on the research activities conducted in fiscal year 2016. The activities discussed are the Nuclear Electronic Work Packages – Enterprise Requirements initiative, the development of a design guidance for CBPs (which compiles all insights gained through the years of CBP research), the facilitation of vendor studies at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a pilot study for how to enhance the plant design modification work process, the collection of feedback from a field evaluation study at Plant Vogtle, and path forward to

  17. Computer-based and web-based applications for night vision goggle training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffner, John W.; Woodward, Kim G.

    2001-08-01

    Night vision goggles (NVGs) can enhance military and civilian operations at night. With this increased capability comes the requirement to provide suitable training. Results from field experience and accident analyses suggest that problems experienced by NVG users can be attributed to a limited understanding of NVG limitations and to perceptual problems. In addition, there is evidence that NVG skills are perishable and require frequent practice. Format training is available to help users obtain the required knowledge and skills. However, there often is insufficient opportunity to obtain and practice perceptual skills prior to using NVGs in the operational environment. NVG users need early and continued exposure to the night environment across a broad range of visual and operational conditions to develop and maintain the necessary knowledge and perceptual skills. NVG training has consisted of classroom instruction, hands-on training, and simulator training. Advances in computer-based training (CBT) and web-based training (WBT) have made these technologies very appealing as additions to the NVG training mix. This paper discusses our efforts to develop NVG training using multimedia, interactive CBT and WBT for NVG training. We discuss how NVG CBT and WBT can be extended to military and civilian ground, maritime, and aviation NVG training.

  18. Video instruction is more effective than written instruction in improving inhaler technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Romil F; Gupta, Rakesh M

    2017-08-07

    Many patients with asthma use inhalers incorrectly. Better inhaler technique is associated with better asthma control. We tested the effectiveness of a computer-based video training solution versus traditional written instructions, both which may be used in a resource-limited setting, for teaching inhaler technique. We hypothesized that computer based training will provide a higher quality of instruction which will improve technique more effectively than written training. 50 asthma patients were recruited from pulmonary clinic at the Junta De Beneficencia Hospital, Ecuador (average age 48.2 years, 58% female). Inhaler technique was taught using written instructions in 20 and video in 30 patients. Inhaler technique was analyzed by video recording pre and post training inhaler use. Inhaler technique score was calculated for each video recording. Baseline performance was equivalent in each group, achieving an average of around 5 of 11 of the inhaler steps. Video training was significantly more effective than written instructions (change of 3.6 points vs. change of 0.4 points, p instruction appears to be inadequate to achieve safe and effective administration of inhaled medicine. In contrast, video-based education can effectively create adequate inhaler technique without additional provider time. REGISTRATION NUMBER (CLINICALTRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER): NCT02660879. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Diagnostic reliability of MMPI-2 computer-based test interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Hina; McCabe, Brian J; Deskovitz, Mark A; Weed, Nathan C; Williams, John E

    2014-09-01

    Reflecting the common use of the MMPI-2 to provide diagnostic considerations, computer-based test interpretations (CBTIs) also typically offer diagnostic suggestions. However, these diagnostic suggestions can sometimes be shown to vary widely across different CBTI programs even for identical MMPI-2 profiles. The present study evaluated the diagnostic reliability of 6 commercially available CBTIs using a 20-item Q-sort task developed for this study. Four raters each sorted diagnostic classifications based on these 6 CBTI reports for 20 MMPI-2 profiles. Two questions were addressed. First, do users of CBTIs understand the diagnostic information contained within the reports similarly? Overall, diagnostic sorts of the CBTIs showed moderate inter-interpreter diagnostic reliability (mean r = .56), with sorts for the 1/2/3 profile showing the highest inter-interpreter diagnostic reliability (mean r = .67). Second, do different CBTIs programs vary with respect to diagnostic suggestions? It was found that diagnostic sorts of the CBTIs had a mean inter-CBTI diagnostic reliability of r = .56, indicating moderate but not strong agreement across CBTIs in terms of diagnostic suggestions. The strongest inter-CBTI diagnostic agreement was found for sorts of the 1/2/3 profile CBTIs (mean r = .71). Limitations and future directions are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Social psychology: new directions in computer-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley J. Allinson

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Perhaps surprisingly, psychology has been a discipline eager to capitalize on the application of computers for teaching. Traditionally, this has been for statistical calculations, and the presentation of experimental stimuli and the automatic collection of timed events (e.g., reaction times, choice-decision times. Here, the traditional capabilities of computers are being exploited - namely, their accurate temporal sequencing, graphical performance, and, above all, their number crunching. As such, they have been powerful and essential tools for those involved in the more psychophysical or cognitive areas of psychology. Computer-based learning (CBL remains very much a preserve of these more formal domains. The arrival of hypermedia has opened the way for CBL to be exploited within the less formal domains of psychology; but the level of interactivity is usually very restricted, and the constrained presentational styles means that even this technological progression fails to meet the contextual richness needed in the teaching of much of the behavioural sciences. The advent of multimedia has for the first time provided the potential to explore, within the normal undergraduate learning environment, real behaviour using the observational techniques that form the basic methodology of the practising social psychologist.

  1. Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers - Identified Benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) computer-based procedure (CBP) research team is exploring how best to design a CBP system that will deliver the intended benefits of increased efficiency and improved human performance. It is important to note that no “off-the-shelf” technology exists for the type of CBP system that is investigated and developed by the INL researchers. As more technology is integrated into the procedure process the importance of an appropriate and methodological approach to the design of the procedure system increases. Technological advancements offer great opportunities for efficiency and safety gains, however if the system is not designed correctly there is a large risk of unintentionally introducing new opportunities for human errors. The INL research team is breaking new ground in the area of CBPs with the prototype they have developed. Current electronic procedure systems are most commonly electronic versions of the paper-based procedures with hyperlinks to other procedures, limited user input functionality, and the ability to mark steps completed. These systems do not fully exploit the advantages digital technology. It is a part of the INL researchers’ role to develop and validate new CBP technologies that greatly increase the benefits of a CBP system to the nuclear industry.

  2. Computer-based mechanical design of overhead lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinaru, D.; Bratu, C.; Dinu, R. C.; Manescu, L. G.

    2016-02-01

    Beside the performance, the safety level according to the actual standards is a compulsory condition for distribution grids’ operation. Some of the measures leading to improvement of the overhead lines reliability ask for installations’ modernization. The constraints imposed to the new lines components refer to the technical aspects as thermal stress or voltage drop, and look for economic efficiency, too. The mechanical sizing of the overhead lines is after all an optimization problem. More precisely, the task in designing of the overhead line profile is to size poles, cross-arms and stays and locate poles along a line route so that the total costs of the line's structure to be minimized and the technical and safety constraints to be fulfilled.The authors present in this paper an application for the Computer-Based Mechanical Design of the Overhead Lines and the features of the corresponding Visual Basic program, adjusted to the distribution lines. The constraints of the optimization problem are adjusted to the existing weather and loading conditions of Romania. The outputs of the software application for mechanical design of overhead lines are: the list of components chosen for the line: poles, cross-arms, stays; the list of conductor tension and forces for each pole, cross-arm and stay for different weather conditions; the line profile drawings.The main features of the mechanical overhead lines design software are interactivity, local optimization function and high-level user-interface

  3. Learning styles: individualizing computer-based learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Musson

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available While the need to adapt teaching to the needs of a student is generally acknowledged (see Corno and Snow, 1986, for a wide review of the literature, little is known about the impact of individual learner-differences on the quality of learning attained within computer-based learning environments (CBLEs. What evidence there is appears to support the notion that individual differences have implications for the degree of success or failure experienced by students (Ford and Ford, 1992 and by trainee end-users of software packages (Bostrom et al, 1990. The problem is to identify the way in which specific individual characteristics of a student interact with particular features of a CBLE, and how the interaction affects the quality of the resultant learning. Teaching in a CBLE is likely to require a subset of teaching strategies different from that subset appropriate to more traditional environments, and the use of a machine may elicit different behaviours from those normally arising in a classroom context.

  4. A Spread Willingness Computing-Based Information Dissemination Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper constructs a kind of spread willingness computing based on information dissemination model for social network. The model takes into account the impact of node degree and dissemination mechanism, combined with the complex network theory and dynamics of infectious diseases, and further establishes the dynamical evolution equations. Equations characterize the evolutionary relationship between different types of nodes with time. The spread willingness computing contains three factors which have impact on user’s spread behavior: strength of the relationship between the nodes, views identity, and frequency of contact. Simulation results show that different degrees of nodes show the same trend in the network, and even if the degree of node is very small, there is likelihood of a large area of information dissemination. The weaker the relationship between nodes, the higher probability of views selection and the higher the frequency of contact with information so that information spreads rapidly and leads to a wide range of dissemination. As the dissemination probability and immune probability change, the speed of information dissemination is also changing accordingly. The studies meet social networking features and can help to master the behavior of users and understand and analyze characteristics of information dissemination in social network.

  5. Computer Based Porosity Design by Multi Phase Topology Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burblies, Andreas; Busse, Matthias

    2008-02-01

    A numerical simulation technique called Multi Phase Topology Optimization (MPTO) based on finite element method has been developed and refined by Fraunhofer IFAM during the last five years. MPTO is able to determine the optimum distribution of two or more different materials in components under thermal and mechanical loads. The objective of optimization is to minimize the component's elastic energy. Conventional topology optimization methods which simulate adaptive bone mineralization have got the disadvantage that there is a continuous change of mass by growth processes. MPTO keeps all initial material concentrations and uses methods adapted from molecular dynamics to find energy minimum. Applying MPTO to mechanically loaded components with a high number of different material densities, the optimization results show graded and sometimes anisotropic porosity distributions which are very similar to natural bone structures. Now it is possible to design the macro- and microstructure of a mechanical component in one step. Computer based porosity design structures can be manufactured by new Rapid Prototyping technologies. Fraunhofer IFAM has applied successfully 3D-Printing and Selective Laser Sintering methods in order to produce very stiff light weight components with graded porosities calculated by MPTO.

  6. Standardized Procedure Content And Data Structure Based On Human Factors Requirements For Computer-Based Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bly, Aaron; Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya L

    2015-02-01

    Most activities that involve human interaction with systems in a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. Traditionally, the use of procedures has been a paper-based process that supports safe operation of the nuclear power industry. However, the nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. Advances in digital technology make computer-based procedures (CBPs) a valid option that provides further enhancement of safety by improving human performance related to procedure use. The transition from paper-based procedures (PBPs) to CBPs creates a need for a computer-based procedure system (CBPS). A CBPS needs to have the ability to perform logical operations in order to adjust to the inputs received from either users or real time data from plant status databases. Without the ability for logical operations the procedure is just an electronic copy of the paper-based procedure. In order to provide the CBPS with the information it needs to display the procedure steps to the user, special care is needed in the format used to deliver all data and instructions to create the steps. The procedure should be broken down into basic elements and formatted in a standard method for the CBPS. One way to build the underlying data architecture is to use an Extensible Markup Language (XML) schema, which utilizes basic elements to build each step in the smart procedure. The attributes of each step will determine the type of functionality that the system will generate for that step. The CBPS will provide the context for the step to deliver referential information, request a decision, or accept input from the user. The XML schema needs to provide all data necessary for the system to accurately perform each step without the need for the procedure writer to reprogram the CBPS. The research team at the Idaho National Laboratory has developed a prototype CBPS for field workers as well as the

  7. When Simple Harmonic Motion is not That Simple: Managing Epistemological Complexity by Using Computer-based Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnafes, Orit

    2010-12-01

    Many real-world phenomena, even "simple" physical phenomena such as natural harmonic motion, are complex in the sense that they require coordinating multiple subtle foci of attention to get the required information when experiencing them. Moreover, for students to develop sound understanding of a concept or a phenomenon, they need to learn to get the same type of information across different contexts and situations (diSessa and Sherin 1998; diSessa and Wagner 2005). Rather than simplifying complex situations, or creating a linear instructional sequence in which students move from one context to another, this paper demonstrates the use of computer-based representations to facilitate developing understanding of complex physical phenomena. The data is collected from 8 studies in which pairs of students are engaged in an exploratory activity, trying to understand the dynamic behavior of a simulation and, at the same time, to attribute meaning to it in terms of the physical phenomenon it represents. The analysis focuses on three episodes. The first two episodes demonstrate the epistemological complexity involved in attempting to make sense of natural harmonic oscillation. A third episode demonstrates the process by which students develop understanding in this complex perceptual and conceptual territory, through the mediation (Vygotsky 1978) of computer-based representations designed to facilitate understanding in this topic.

  8. 面向CBT的计算性的VRML建模%Computing- based Modelling in VRML Targeting Computer Based Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 李艳; 周晓军

    2006-01-01

    VR(Virtual Reality)技术已经成为影响CBT(Computer Based Teaching)的关键技术之一.基于VRML(Virtual Reality Modeling Language)的VR技术已经作为教育部现代教育技术的重要内容[1].但在现实CBT课件中应用偏少.一个重要问题就在于有关教师包括部分开发人员对于复杂VRML建模感觉难度太大.本文首先分析了VRML的情景模拟教学特色,进而对基于几何、函数等计算的VRML建模技术进行了综合介绍和分析对比.对模型在基于VRML的情景教学中的运用做了简要说明.希望本文分析介绍的多策略VRML建模方法能促进VRML技术在CBT中的运用.

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Animated Drawings and Selected Instructional Strategies on Students' Performance in Creative Arts in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugbenga, Aiyedun Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Creative Arts is a core and compulsory subject in Nigerian upper basic classes, but the students' performance over the years indicated high failure. Instructional strategies play a pivotal role in improving students' performance. Computer-based instructions such as animated drawings could be a possible solution. This research adopted the design…

  10. Effects of Instructional Strategies Using Cross Sections on the Recognition of Anatomical Structures in Correlated CT and MR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Paas, Fred; Johnson, Tristan E.; Su, Yung K.; Payer, Andrew F.

    2008-01-01

    This research is an effort to best utilize the interactive anatomical images for instructional purposes based on cognitive load theory. Three studies explored the differential effects of three computer-based instructional strategies that use anatomical cross-sections to enhance the interpretation of radiological images. These strategies include:…

  11. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and

  12. Validation of computer-based training in ureterorenoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Thomas; Trojan, Lutz; Haecker, Axel; Alken, Peter; Michel, Maurice Stephan

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the outcome of training both urological novices and experts, using the recently developed UroMentor (Simbionix Ltd, Israel) trainer, that provides a realistic simulation of rigid and flexible ureterorenoscopy (URS). Twenty experienced urologists (total number of previous flexible URSs 21-153) were monitored during simulated flexible URS for treating a lower calyceal stone, and the outcome was correlated with individual experience. A score was compiled based on the variables recorded, including total operation time, stone contact time, complications such as bleeding or perforation, and treatment success. A further five urological residents with no endourological experience were trained on the UroMentor in rigid URS for ureteric stone treatment. Their acquired clinical skills were subsequently compared to those of five urological residents who received no simulator training. All 20 experienced urologists disintegrated the stone on the simulator, and the score achieved was related to their personal experience; there was a significant difference in performance in those with 80 previous flexible URSs. For the five urological residents with no endourological experience, simulator training improved their skills, and comparison with urological residents who had received no simulator training showed advantages for the trained residents. After being trained on the simulator, the group performed better in the first four URSs on patients. Individual experience correlates with individual performance on the simulator. Simulator training was helpful in improving clinical skills. Although the distribution of computer-based simulators is limited by high prices, virtual reality-based training has the potential to become an important tool for clinical education.

  13. Design and Development Computer-Based E-Learning Teaching Material for Improving Mathematical Understanding Ability and Spatial Sense of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjanah; Dahlan, J. A.; Wibisono, Y.

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to make a design and development computer-based e-learning teaching material for improving mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students. Furthermore, the particular aims are (1) getting teaching material design, evaluation model, and intrument to measure mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (2) conducting trials computer-based e-learning teaching material model, asessment, and instrument to develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (3) completing teaching material models of computer-based e-learning, assessment, and develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (4) resulting research product is teaching materials of computer-based e-learning. Furthermore, the product is an interactive learning disc. The research method is used of this study is developmental research which is conducted by thought experiment and instruction experiment. The result showed that teaching materials could be used very well. This is based on the validation of computer-based e-learning teaching materials, which is validated by 5 multimedia experts. The judgement result of face and content validity of 5 validator shows that the same judgement result to the face and content validity of each item test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense. The reliability test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense are 0,929 and 0,939. This reliability test is very high. While the validity of both tests have a high and very high criteria.

  14. A multimedia adult literacy program: Combining NASA technology, instructional design theory, and authentic literacy concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    For a number of years, the Software Technology Branch of the Information Systems Directorate has been involved in the application of cutting edge hardware and software technologies to instructional tasks related to NASA projects. The branch has developed intelligent computer aided training shells, instructional applications of virtual reality and multimedia, and computer-based instructional packages that use fuzzy logic for both instructional and diagnostic decision making. One outcome of the work on space-related technology-supported instruction has been the creation of a significant pool of human talent in the branch with current expertise on the cutting edges of instructional technologies. When the human talent is combined with advanced technologies for graphics, sound, video, CD-ROM, and high speed computing, the result is a powerful research and development group that both contributes to the applied foundations of instructional technology and creates effective instructional packages that take advantage of a range of advanced technologies. Several branch projects are currently underway that combine NASA-developed expertise to significant instructional problems in public education. The branch, for example, has developed intelligent computer aided software to help high school students learn physics and staff are currently working on a project to produce educational software for young children with language deficits. This report deals with another project, the adult literacy tutor. Unfortunately, while there are a number of computer-based instructional packages available for adult literacy instruction, most of them are based on the same instructional models that failed these students when they were in school. The teacher-centered, discrete skill and drill-oriented, instructional strategies, even when they are supported by color computer graphics and animation, that form the foundation for most of the computer-based literacy packages currently on the market may not

  15. The Effectiveness of Web-Based Instruction: An Initial Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatana M. Olson

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available As the use of Web-based instruction increases in the educational and training domains, many people have recognized the importance of evaluating its effects on student outcomes such as learning, performance, and satisfaction. Often, these results are compared to those of conventional classroom instruction in order to determine which method is “better.” However, major differences in technology and presentation rather than instructional content can obscure the true relationship between Web-based instruction and these outcomes. Computer-based instruction (CBI, with more features similar to Web-based instruction, may be a more appropriate benchmark than conventional classroom instruction. Furthermore, there is little consensus as to what variables should be examined or what measures of learning are the most appropriate, making comparisons between studies difficult and inconclusive. In this article, we review the historical findings of CBI as an appropriate benchmark to Web-based instruction. In addition, we review 47 reports of evaluations of Web-based courses in higher education published between 1996 and 2002. A tabulation of the documented findings into eight characteristics is offered, along with our assessments of the experimental designs, effect sizes, and the degree to which the evaluations incorporated features unique to Web-based instruction.

  16. Industry and Academic Consortium for Computer Based Subsurface Geology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. L.; Nunn, J. A.; Sears, S. O.

    2008-12-01

    Twenty two licenses for Petrel Software acquired through a grant from Schlumberger are being used to redesign the laboratory portion of Subsurface Geology at Louisiana State University. The course redesign is a cooperative effort between LSU's Geology and Geophysics and Petroleum Engineering Departments and Schlumberger's Technical Training Division. In spring 2008, two laboratory sections were taught with 22 students in each section. The class contained geology majors, petroleum engineering majors, and geology graduate students. Limited enrollments and 3 hour labs make it possible to incorporate hands-on visualization, animation, manipulation of data and images, and access to geological data available online. 24/7 access to the laboratory and step by step instructions for Petrel exercises strongly promoted peer instruction and individual learning. Goals of the course redesign include: enhancing visualization of earth materials; strengthening student's ability to acquire, manage, and interpret multifaceted geological information; fostering critical thinking, the scientific method; improving student communication skills; providing cross training between geologists and engineers and increasing the quantity, quality, and diversity of students pursuing Earth Science and Petroleum Engineering careers. IT resources available in the laboratory provide students with sophisticated visualization tools, allowing them to switch between 2-D and 3-D reconstructions more seamlessly, and enabling them to manipulate larger integrated data-sets, thus permitting more time for critical thinking and hypothesis testing. IT resources also enable faculty and students to simultaneously work with the software to visually interrogate a 3D data set and immediately test hypothesis formulated in class. Preliminary evaluation of class results indicate that students found MS-Windows based Petrel easy to learn. By the end of the semester, students were able to not only map horizons and faults

  17. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The introduction of advanced technology in existing nuclear power plants may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. In addition, the incorporation of advanced technology in the existing LWR fleet may entice the future workforce, who will be familiar with advanced technology, to work for these utilities rather than more newly built nuclear power plants. Advantages are being sought by developing and deploying technologies that will increase safety and efficiency. One significant opportunity for existing plants to increase efficiency is to phase out the paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used at most nuclear power plants and replace them, where feasible, with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information

  18. Republican Utopia:from Plato to Moore%共和主义乌托邦:从柏拉图到莫尔

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐百军

    2012-01-01

    通过对柏拉图的《理想国》和莫尔的《乌托邦》的文本分析,我们发现他们的乌托邦思想中潜藏着共和主义叙事,实质上柏拉图和莫尔都希图建构一种共和主义乌托邦,由此也可以说乌托邦思想与共和主义之间原本就存在着一种共生的却被遗忘的历史关系,因而我们试图恢复以柏拉图和莫尔为代表的乌托邦思想家在共和主义政治光谱中的理论地位也并非一种主观冲动。%Through making a text analysis of Plato's Republic and Moore's Utopia,we find that a republican narrative has been hidden in their Utopian thought.Essencially,Plato and Moore both hoped to construct a republican utopia.It also can be said that there is a symbiotic and forgotten historical relation between the utopian thought and republicanism.So it is not a subjective impulse that we try to give the theoretical status in the republican political spectrum back to the utopian thinkers whose representatives are Plato and Moore.

  19. The great Lisbon earthquake and tsunami of 1755: lessons from the recent Sumatra earthquakes and possible link to Plato's Atlantis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutscher, M.-A.

    2006-05-01

    Great earthquakes and tsunami can have a tremendous societal impact. The Lisbon earthquake and tsunami of 1755 caused tens of thousands of deaths in Portugal, Spain and NW Morocco. Felt as far as Hamburg and the Azores islands, its magnitude is estimated to be 8.5 9. However, because of the complex tectonics in Southern Iberia, the fault that produced the earthquake has not yet been clearly identified. Recently acquired data from the Gulf of Cadiz area (tomography, seismic profiles, high-resolution bathymetry, sampled active mud volcanoes) provide strong evidence for an active east dipping subduction zone beneath Gibraltar. Eleven out of 12 of the strongest earthquakes (M>8.5) of the past 100 years occurred along subduction zone megathrusts (including the December 2004 and March 2005 Sumatra earthquakes). Thus, it appears likely that the 1755 earthquake and tsunami were generated in a similar fashion, along the shallow east-dipping subduction fault plane. This implies that the Cadiz subduction zone is locked (like the Cascadia and Nankai/Japan subduction zones), with great earthquakes occurring over long return periods. Indeed, the regional paleoseismic record (contained in deep-water turbidites and shallow lagoon deposits) suggests great earthquakes off South West Iberia every 1500 2000 years. Tsunami deposits indicate an earlier great earthquake struck SW Iberia around 200 BC, as noted by Roman records from Cadiz. A written record of even older events may also exist. According to Plato's dialogues The Critias and The Timaeus, Atlantis was destroyed by ‘strong earthquakes and floods … in a single day and night’ at a date given as 11,600 BP. A 1 m thick turbidite deposit, containing coarse grained sediments from underwater avalanches, has been dated at 12,000 BP and may correspond to the destructive earthquake and tsunami described by Plato. The effects on a paleo-island (Spartel) in the straits of Gibraltar would have been devastating, if inhabited, and may

  20. Computer-Based GED Testing: Implications for Students, Programs, and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley-Etzkorn, Karen E.; Ishitani, Terry T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the process of transitioning from the 2002 version of the GED test to the new 2014 computer-based version. Specifically, this research sought to identify: (1) stakeholder attitudes regarding the new computer-based test; (2) the relationship between students' computer access/comfort and their perceptions…

  1. Computer-Based Algorithmic Determination of Muscle Movement Onset Using M-Mode Ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    from baseline. Computerized algorithms Computed MO was determined by three separate classes of algorithms using RStudio: (i) a novel standard...ARL-RP-0596 ● APR 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Computer -Based Algorithmic Determination of Muscle Movement Onset Using M...the originator. ARL-RP-0596 ● APR 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Computer -Based Algorithmic Determination of Muscle Movement

  2. Improving Student Performance through Computer-Based Assessment: Insights from Recent Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, C.; Wilks, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Compared student performance on computer-based assessment to machine-graded multiple choice tests. Found that performance improved dramatically on the computer-based assessment when students were not required to scroll through the question paper. Concluded that students may be disadvantaged by the introduction of online assessment unless care is…

  3. English Language Learners' Strategies for Reading Computer-Based Texts at Home and in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Deoksoon

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated four elementary-level English language learners' (ELLs') use of strategies for reading computer-based texts at home and in school. The ELLs in this study were in the fourth and fifth grades in a public elementary school. We identify the ELLs' strategies for reading computer-based texts in home and school environments. We…

  4. Effects of an Interactive Computer-Based Reading Strategy on Student Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    The computer-based testing mode has received limited research as a task condition for elementary students as it relates to comprehension for both narrative and expository text. The majority of schools now use computer-based testing to measure students' progress for end of the year exams. Additionally, schools are also delivering state-wide…

  5. Effects of Computer-Based Programs on Mathematical Achievement Scores for Fourth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenel, Jessica; Lambeth, Dawn T.; Spires, Bob

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research study was to identify the effects of computer-based programs on mathematical achievement, perceptions, and engagement of fourth-grade students. The 31 student participants were divided into two intervention groups, as a hands-on group and a computer-based group. Student achievement was measured by comparing the pretest…

  6. Analyzing Log Files to Predict Students' Problem Solving Performance in a Computer-Based Physics Tutor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether information saved in the log files of a computer-based tutor can be used to predict the problem solving performance of students. The log files of a computer-based physics tutoring environment called Andes Physics Tutor was analyzed to build a logistic regression model that predicted success and failure of students'…

  7. A Pilot Meta-Analysis of Computer-Based Scaffolding in STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belland, Brian R.; Walker, Andrew E.; Olsen, Megan Whitney; Leary, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This paper employs meta-analysis to determine the influence of computer-based scaffolding characteristics and study and test score quality on cognitive outcomes in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education at the secondary, college, graduate, and adult levels. Results indicate that (a) computer-based scaffolding positively…

  8. Overview of Design, Lifecycle, and Safety for Computer-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the need and justification for the development of a design guide for safety-relevant computer-based systems. This document also makes a contribution toward the design guide by presenting an overview of computer-based systems design, lifecycle, and safety.

  9. Providing Feedback on Computer-Based Algebra Homework in Middle-School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Homework is transforming at a rapid rate with continuous advances in educational technology. Computer-based homework, in particular, is gaining popularity across a range of schools, with little empirical evidence on how to optimize student learning. The current aim was to test the effects of different types of feedback on computer-based homework.…

  10. Discovery Learning, Representation, and Explanation within a Computer-Based Simulation: Finding the Right Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieber, Lloyd P.; Tzeng, Shyh-Chii; Tribble, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how adult users interact and learn during an interactive computer-based simulation supplemented with brief multimedia explanations of the content. A total of 52 college students interacted with a computer-based simulation of Newton's laws of motion in which they had control over the motion of a simple…

  11. Development and validation of a computer-based learning module for wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Alewijnse, J V; Mathoulin, C; Liverneaux, P; Tuijthof, G J M; Schijven, M P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a computer-based module for wrist arthroscopy to which a group of experts could consent. The need for such a module was assessed with members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS). The computer-based module was developed through several rounds of consulting experts on the content. The module's learning enhancement was tested in a randomized controlled trial with 28 medical students who were assigned to the computer-based module group or lecture group. The design process led to a useful tool, which is supported by a panel of experts. Although the computer based module did not enhance learning, the participants did find the module more pleasant to use. Developing learning tools such as this computer-based module can improve the teaching of wrist arthroscopy skills.

  12. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  13. A dialogical exploration of the grey zone of health and illness: medical science, anthropology, and Plato on alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Kieran

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes a phenomenological hermeneutic orientation to explicate and explore the notion of the grey zone of health and illness and seeks to develop the concept through an examination of the case of alcohol consumption. The grey zone is an interpretive area referring to the irremediable zone of ambiguity that haunts even the most apparently resolute discourse. This idea points to an ontological indeterminacy, in the face of which decisions have to be made with regard to the health of a person (e.g., an alcoholic), a system (e.g., the health system), or a society. The fundamental character of this notion will be developed in relation to the discourse on health and the limitations of different disciplinary practices. The case of alcohol consumption will be used to tease out the grey zone embedded in the different kinds of knowledge made available through the disciplinary traditions of medical science, with its emphasis on somatic well-being, and anthropology, with its focus on communal well-being. This tension or grey zone embedded in different knowledge outcomes will be shown to have a discursive parallel with the dialogue between the Athenian, the Spartan, and the Cretan in Plato's Laws. Making use of the dialogical approach as described by Gadamer, the Athenian's particular resolution of the tension will be explored as a case study to demonstrate the necessarily particular analysis involved in a grey zone resolution.

  14. USING COMPUTER-BASED TESTING AS ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT METHOD OF STUDENT LEARNING IN DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia SAPRIATI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the use of computer-based testing in distance education, based on the experience of Universitas Terbuka (UT, Indonesia. Computer-based testing has been developed at UT for reasons of meeting the specific needs of distance students as the following: Ø students’ inability to sit for the scheduled test, Ø conflicting test schedules, and Ø students’ flexibility to take examination to improve their grades. In 2004, UT initiated a pilot project in the development of system and program for computer-based testing method. Then in 2005 and 2006 tryouts in the use of computer-based testing methods were conducted in 7 Regional Offices that were considered as having sufficient supporting recourses. The results of the tryouts revealed that students were enthusiastic in taking computer-based tests and they expected that the test method would be provided by UT as alternative to the traditional paper and pencil test method. UT then implemented computer-based testing method in 6 and 12 Regional Offices in 2007 and 2008 respectively. The computer-based testing was administered in the city of the designated Regional Office and was supervised by the Regional Office staff. The development of the computer-based testing was initiated with conducting tests using computers in networked configuration. The system has been continually improved, and it currently uses devices linked to the internet or the World Wide Web. The construction of the test involves the generation and selection of the test items from the item bank collection of the UT Examination Center. Thus the combination of the selected items compromises the test specification. Currently UT has offered 250 courses involving the use of computer-based testing. Students expect that more courses are offered with computer-based testing in Regional Offices within easy access by students.

  15. What is good sport: Plato's view Co je to dobrý sport: Platónův pohled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Pisk

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available One of Plato's most common questions found in his dialogues is "What is something?" By asking this question Plato usually brought his co-speakers to the recognition that in fact they do not have a full comprehension of what something is, although they have a partial comprehension of it. The awareness of one's incomplete cognition is the first step to be made on the philosophic way to truth. As in ancient times also today Plato asks us – the modern philosophers of sport – "What is sport?" or more precisely "What is good sport?" Probably the best of Plato's answers to this question can be found in the basic concepts of his philosophy regarding his hierarchical division of the state and human soul into three parts. Since sport is derived from human being also the goodness of sport can be divided into three stages. The lowest stage of sport corresponds to the first part of the soul – the appetite soul. On this stage sport is based on the gaining of material goods through prizes won at competitions. In the philosophic view, this is the lowest possible stage of goodness of sport. The second stage of sport corresponds to the second part of the soul – the emotional soul. Sport at this stage is based on the elementary ancient agon, which seeks fulfilment in the winning of honour and glory. The greatest and the most superior is the third part of the soul – the reasonable soul. According to this, also the sport corresponding to the third part of the soul is the best. For this kind of sport it is no longer necessary to compete with other contestants, since it can achieve it's fulfilment in perfect execution of movement or exercise, in which the perfect cooperation between reason (soul and body is attained. At this stage of sport it is the most important to compete and win over one's self, and this can be achieved by everyone, without regard to his/her physical abilities in comparison with others. In Plato's view, good sport is the sport directed

  16. A Comprehensive Evaluation Rubric for Assessing Instructional Apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for an evaluation rubric that examines all aspects of educational apps designed for instructional purposes. In past decades, many rubrics have been developed for evaluating educational computer-based programs; however, rubrics designed for evaluating the instructional implications of educational apps are scarce. When an Internet search for existing rubrics was conducted, only two such rubrics were found, and the evaluation criteria used in those rubrics was not clearly linked to previously conducted research nor were their evaluative dimensions clearly defined. These shortcomings result in reviewers being unable to use those rubrics to provide teachers with a precise analysis of an educational app’s instructional potential. In response, this paper presents a comprehensive rubric with 24-evaluative dimensions tailored specifically to analyze the educational potential of instructional apps.

  17. Improving the Acquisition of Basic Technical Surgical Skills with VR-Based Simulation Coupled with Computer-Based Video Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, David; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Next to practice, feedback is the most important variable in skill acquisition. Feedback can vary in content and the way that it is used for delivery. Health professions education research has extensively examined the different effects provided by the different feedback methodologies. In this paper we compared two different types of knowledge of performance (KP) feedback. The first type was video-based KP feedback while the second type consisted of computer generated KP feedback. Results of this study showed that computer generated performance feedback is more effective than video based performance feedback. The combination of the two feedback methodologies provides trainees with a better understanding.

  18. PENGARUH MEDIA COMPUTER BASED INSTRUCTION (CBI BERORIENTASI POE DALAM MENINGKATKAN MOTIVASI DAN KETERAMPILAN MEMPREDIKSI IPA SISWA KELAS IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ririn. A. K. Dewi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sumber belajar yang ada di sekolah belum memuat kegiatan yang dapat melatih kemampuan memprediksi siswa. Media pembelajaran belum digunakan secara maksimal. Pengembangan media pembelajaran berorientasi POE (predict, observe, explain yang dapat meningkatkan motivasi dan keterampilan memprediksi siswa serta mengetahui hambatan yang dialami siswa dalam memprediksi. Metode penelitian menggunakan mix method. Hasil validasi media diperoleh skor rata-rata 3,35 dengan kriteria valid. Karakteristik media dikembangkan dengan strategi belajar POE, diawali dengan jenis soal memprediksi untuk melatih keterampilan memprediksi siswa, observasi untuk melihat kebenaran prediksi siswa kemudian menjelaskan materi pelajaran yang memperlihatkan keterkaitan antara tema dengan aplikasinya dalam kehidupan sehari-hari. Semuanya terangkum dalam tampilan yang menarik. Hasil uji peningkatan keterampilan memprediksi secara keseluruhan sebesar 0,60 dengan kategori sedang. Hasil uji peningkatan  motivasi belajar siswa sebesar 0,54 dengan kategori sedang. Hambatan siswa dalam memprediksi yaitu: 1 siswa tidak bisa menjelaskan fenomena yang belum pernah dilihat atau dialami sebelumnya; 2 siswa tidak bisa menjelaskan hubungan sebab akibat; 3 siswa kesulitan dalam menginterpretasikan data; dan 3 siswa tidak bisa menganalisis data. Learning Resources that are in school does not contain the activity that can train predict ability students. Learning Media is be exploited yet. Development-oriented learning media POE (predict, observe, explain that can promote motivation and skills predicts that students and knows constraints students in predicting. Research method using mixed method. Result of the validation media, the score price 3,35 with the criteria were valid. The characteristics media developed with learning strategy POE, started with the kinds of questions predicted to train skills predicted students, observation to see the truth prediction students then explains the subjects which shows link between a theme with its application in daily life. All was summed up in attractive views. Test result improving the skills predicted as a whole was 0,60 with the category. Test result as students learning motivation of 0,54 with the category. Obstacles students in predicting: 1 students could not explain the phenomenon that has never been seen or experienced before; 2 the students could not explain cause-and-effect relationship; 3 students difficulties in interpret data; and 3 students could not be analyzed the data.

  19. The Computer Integration into the EFL Instruction in Indonesia: An Analysis of Two University Instructors in Integrating Computer Technology into EFL Instruction to Encourage Students' Language Learning Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihatin, Pius N.

    2012-01-01

    Computer technology has been popular for teaching English as a foreign language in non-English speaking countries. This case study explored the way language instructors designed and implemented computer-based instruction so that students are engaged in English language learning. This study explored the beliefs, practices and perceptions of…

  20. The Role of Explicit Information in Instructed SLA: An On-Line Study with Processing Instruction and German Accusative Case Inflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culman, Hillah; Henry, Nicholas; VanPatten, Bill

    2009-01-01

    The present study reports the findings of an experiment on the effects of explicit information on the learning of German case markings. Fifty-nine learners of first- and second-year German received computer-based processing instruction on German accusative case marking and word order. These learners were divided into two groups: one received…

  1. Design and evaluation of an onboard computer-based information system for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, S. H.; Rouse, W. B.; Hammer, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Information seeking by human operators of technical systems is considered. Types of information and forms of presentation are discussed and important issues reviewed. This broad discussion provides a framework within which flight management is considered. The design of an onboard computer-based information system for aircraft is discussed. The aiding possibilities of a computer-based system are emphasized. Results of an experimental evaluation of a prototype system are presented. It is concluded that a computer-based information system can substantially lessen the frequency of human errors.

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Laboratory; Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Laboratory; LeBlanc, Katya [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01

    , researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with partners from the nuclear industry have been investigating the design requirements for computer-based work instructions (including operations procedures, work orders, maintenance procedures, etc.) to increase efficiency, safety, and cost competitiveness of existing light water reactors.

  3. What Are We Looking for in Computer-Based Learning Interventions in Medical Education? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Patrícia; Taveira-Gomes, Isabel; Severo, Milton; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-based learning (CBL) has been widely used in medical education, and reports regarding its usage and effectiveness have ranged broadly. Most work has been done on the effectiveness of CBL approaches versus traditional methods, and little has been done on the comparative effects of CBL versus CBL methodologies. These findings urged other authors to recommend such studies in hopes of improving knowledge about which CBL methods work best in which settings. Objective In this systematic review, we aimed to characterize recent studies of the development of software platforms and interventions in medical education, search for common points among studies, and assess whether recommendations for CBL research are being taken into consideration. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature published from 2003 through 2013. We included studies written in English, specifically in medical education, regarding either the development of instructional software or interventions using instructional software, during training or practice, that reported learner attitudes, satisfaction, knowledge, skills, or software usage. We conducted 2 latent class analyses to group articles according to platform features and intervention characteristics. In addition, we analyzed references and citations for abstracted articles. Results We analyzed 251 articles. The number of publications rose over time, and they encompassed most medical disciplines, learning settings, and training levels, totaling 25 different platforms specifically for medical education. We uncovered 4 latent classes for educational software, characteristically making use of multimedia (115/251, 45.8%), text (64/251, 25.5%), Web conferencing (54/251, 21.5%), and instructional design principles (18/251, 7.2%). We found 3 classes for intervention outcomes: knowledge and attitudes (175/212, 82.6%), knowledge, attitudes, and skills (11.8%), and online activity (12/212, 5.7%). About a quarter of the

  4. Computer-Based Testing System. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume III. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the third of four project objectives, the development and implementation of a computer-based testing…

  5. The influence of Plato, Aristotle, and the ancient Polis on a programme for congenital cardiac surgery: the virtuous partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl L

    2007-09-01

    The problems that exist in maintaining a partnership in paediatric cardiac surgery are considerable. They relate to fairness in allocation of time for leisure, the apportioning of cases between the partners, internal competition between them, financial considerations, and promotion of the ego. In this review, we discuss our own experiences in maintaining a partnership over a period of more than 18 years, relating such a "virtuous partnership" to the writings of Plato and Aristotle, and setting it against the tenets of the ancient Greek polis. The polis, or city state, came to prominence in ancient Greece during the golden age of Pericles, this period seeing the initial evolution of Western philosophy, as well as numerous other scientific, artistic and architectural advances. The concept of the polis was to create a natural association with its citizens that nurtured all that is best in people, at the same time defining their character. In this respect, according to Plato, the person and the polis are mirror images. Aristotle then expanded this notion to incorporate the various forms of friendship, which he pointed out last only as long as the interrelated pleasure survives. Using these principles as the point of departure, we argue that cardiac surgeons should respect moral virtue in each other. Extending this process means that we should also respect, and celebrate, our relationships with affiliated physicians, nurses, perfusionists, administrators, and all concerned in the care of children with congenitally malformed hearts. In this way, we create a virtuous partnership for congenital cardiac surgery that promotes all that was good, as engendered in the ancient Greek polis. As we extend these observations to the modern world, we discuss some of the features that have permitted us to work so well together. One of the most important is a summoning and unwritten tenet that greets us as we enter the operating room, namely "check your ego at the door". The operative

  6. Test Anxiety Analysis of Chinese College Students in Computer-based Spoken English Test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    .... With the employment of designed questionnaires and computer-based spoken English test, this paper explored test anxiety manifestation of Chinese college students from both macro and micro aspects...

  7. THE DISCIPLINE «COMPUTER-BASED PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT» AND ITS ROLE IN TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena V. Fedotova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the creation of complex discipline «Computer-based Product Lifecycle Management» in accordance to competency approach and specification of its role in education process for technical university. 

  8. Learning to Summarize and Summarizing for Learning: Some Computer-Based Supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessus, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Dessus, P. (2008). Learning to Summarize and Summarizing for Learning: Some Computer-Based Supports. Workshop presentation at the symposium Learning networks for professional. November, 14, 2008, Heerlen, Nederland: Open Universiteit Nederland.

  9. Computer-Based Concept Mapping: Enhancing Literacy with Tools for Visual Thinking (Technology Tidbits).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Inman, Lynne; Horney, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Shares details about two prewriting strategies (brainstorming and synthesizing information), and discusses some practical issues related to the use of computer-based concept mapping in the classroom. (SR)

  10. Traditional classroom education versus computer-based learning: how nurses learn about pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esche, Carol Ann; Warren, Joan I; Woods, Anne B; Jesada, Elizabeth C; Iliuta, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Nurse Professional Development specialist is to utilize the most effective educational strategies when educating staff nurses about pressure ulcer prevention. More information is needed about the effect of computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on pressure ulcer education for the staff nurse. This study compares computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on immediate and long-term knowledge while evaluating the impact of education on pressure ulcer risk assessment, staging, and documentation.

  11. Problems and Issues in Using Computer- Based Support Tools to Enhance 'Soft' Systems Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Stansfield

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the issue of whether computer-based support tools can enhance the use of 'soft' systems methodologies as applied to real-world problem situations. Although work has been carried out by a number of researchers in applying computer-based technology to concepts and methodologies relating to 'soft' systems thinking such as Soft Systems Methodology (SSM, such attempts appear to be still in their infancy and have not been applied widely to real-world problem situations. This paper will highlight some of the problems that may be encountered in attempting to develop computer-based support tools for 'soft' systems methodologies. Particular attention will be paid to an attempt by the author to develop a computer-based support tool for a particular 'soft' systems method of inquiry known as the Appreciative Inquiry Method that is based upon Vickers' notion of 'appreciation' (Vickers, 196S and Checkland's SSM (Checkland, 1981. The final part of the paper will explore some of the lessons learnt from developing and applying the computer-based support tool to a real world problem situation, as well as considering the feasibility of developing computer-based support tools for 'soft' systems methodologies. This paper will put forward the point that a mixture of manual and computer-based tools should be employed to allow a methodology to be used in an unconstrained manner, but the benefits provided by computer-based technology should be utilised in supporting and enhancing the more mundane and structured tasks.

  12. Learning with New Information Technologies in Schools: Perspectives from the Psychology of Learning and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Corte, Erik

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of new information technology in schools and reviews research on the psychology of learning and instruction. Highlights include a theory of expertise; individual differences in learning; the role of prior knowledge; social interaction and learning; transfer of cognitive skills; and designing computer-based learning environments.…

  13. The Use of Instructional Simulations to Support Classroom Teaching: A Crisis Communication Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifflet, Mark; Brown, Jane

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how exposure to classroom instruction affected the use of a computer simulation that was designed to provide students an opportunity to apply material presented in class. The study involved an analysis of a computer-based crisis communication case study designed for a college-level public relations…

  14. Inservice Mathematics Education for Elementary School Teachers Via Computer-Assisted Instruction (Gladeville). Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Keith A.; And Others

    A second field test of a computer-based, mobile, in-service teacher education program in modern mathematics for elementary school teachers is reported here. Evaluations of the students' achievement and of their attitudes towards mathematics and computer-assisted instruction, as well as an analysis of the relationships among achievement, attitudes,…

  15. Computer- and Video-Based Instruction of Food-Preparation Skills: Acquisition, Generalization, and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kevin; Cihak, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based video instruction (CBVI) program to teach life skills. Three middle school-aged students with intellectual disabilities were taught how to make a sandwich, use a microwave, and set the table with a CBVI software package. A multiple probe across behaviors design was used to…

  16. Computers in Music and Music Instruction: The Joys of Hardware and the Woes of Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jack A.

    1988-01-01

    Traces the history of computer usage in the arts, examines how computers are being used in music today, and addresses the state of computer-based music instruction. Assesses available hardware and software, calling for more innovative and interactive products and a discontinuance of the drillmaster-learning machine approach to computer-based…

  17. Instructional Technologies in the Workforce: Case Studies from the Nuclear Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widen, William C.; Roth, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    Describes six types of instructional technology used in the nuclear industry: Study Pacs, computerized test banks, computer-based training, interactive videodisc, artificial intelligence, and full-scope simulation. Each description presents the need, training device, outcomes, and limitations or constraints on use. (SK)

  18. Speechreading Instruction for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1988-01-01

    This holistic approach to speechreading instruction proposes: enhancement of the child's self-motivation, strategy-based instruction, an interactive processing approach that focuses on meaning and psycholinguistic guessing, bisensory instruction, and a hierarchical continuum beginning with easy, successful activities that gradually increase in…

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based Learning Environment for Teachers: Assessment of Learning Strategies in Learning Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Glogger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Training teachers to assess important components of self-regulated learning such as learning strategies is an important, yet somewhat neglected, aspect of the integration of self-regulated learning at school. Learning journals can be used to assess learning strategies in line with cyclical process models of self-regulated learning, allowing for rich formative feedback. Against this background, we developed a computer-based learning environment (CBLE that trains teachers to assess learning strategies with learning journals. The contents of the CBLE and its instructional design were derived from theory. The CBLE was further shaped by research in a design-based manner. Finally, in two evaluation studies, student teachers (N1=44; N2=89 worked with the CBLE. We analyzed satisfaction, interest, usability, and assessment skills. Additionally, in evaluation study 2, effects of an experimental variation on motivation and assessment skills were tested. We found high satisfaction, interest, and good usability, as well as satisfying assessment skills, after working with the CBLE. Results show that teachers can be trained to assess learning strategies in learning journals. The developed CBLE offers new perspectives on how to support teachers in fostering learning strategies as central component of effective self-regulated learning at school.

  20. Pregnancy and the Acceptability of Computer-Based Versus Traditional Mental Health Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantsoo, Liisa; Podcasy, Jessica; Sammel, Mary; Epperson, Cynthia Neill; Kim, Deborah R

    2017-04-20

    Recent recommendations urge increased depression screening in pregnant and postpartum women, potentially increasing demand for treatment. Computer-based psychotherapy treatments may address some of perinatal women's unique mental health treatment needs and barriers. We conducted a quantitative survey of pregnant women (≥12 weeks of gestation) on preferences regarding computer-based therapies compared with traditional therapies (psychotherapy and medication). Nonpregnant women and men served as comparison groups. Participants were provided descriptions of three computer-based therapies: video telehealth therapy (VTT), computer-assisted therapy (CAT), and self-guided online therapy (SGO). Participants were asked to select all options that they would consider for treatment as well as first choice preference. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) assessed current depressive symptomatology, and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) assessed psychiatric history. Participants included pregnant females (n = 111), nonpregnant females (n = 147), and males (n = 54). Among pregnant women, 77.5% (n = 86) indicated that they would consider some form of computer-based therapy for mental health treatment during pregnancy; VTT was the most commonly considered, followed by CAT and SGO. When asked to select their preferred intervention, traditional talk therapy was the first choice among all three groups, controlling for treatment history and PHQ-9 score. About one-third of pregnant women chose some form of computer-based therapy as their top choice. While computer-based therapies were acceptable to most pregnant women in this sample, traditional talk therapy was the preferred option. Future research should consider how to tailor computer-based therapies to the unique needs of perinatal women.

  1. Misrepresentation of vital status follow-up: challenging the integrity of the PLATO trial and the claimed mortality benefit of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Tomek, Ales

    2013-10-30

    Ticagrelor, a novel, reversible, and oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist, was claimed to reduce all-cause mortality compared to clopidogrel in the PLATO trial. We sought to ascertain vital status follow-up for clopidogrel and ticagrelor to determine if any discrepancy existed by reviewing data from the FDA Complete Response Review. The FDA Complete Response Review indicated misrepresentation of vital status follow-up by the sponsor's presenter at the Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee. Instead of five patients with missing vital status follow-up, the FDA primary efficacy reviewer indicated that there was a minimum of 106 patients. Additionally and more concerning was the fact that significantly more patients on ticagrelor (3.1%, n = 289 patients) had incomplete vital status follow-up versus clopidogrel (2.6%, n = 242 patients, p = 0.04 for the difference). The Advisory Committee that voted in favor to approve ticagrelor was given misrepresented data, which may have affected the approval of ticagrelor. The fact that significantly more patients on ticagrelor had incomplete vital status follow-up versus clopidogrel challenges the claimed mortality benefit of ticagrelor and the approval of the PLATO trial. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Proporción y autoría. Arte mueble paleolítico. Figuras de los Omóplatos de

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Fernández Lombera

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo se compone de las siguientes partes : a.- Realización de calcos con una gran objetividad gráfica de las figuras grabadas en los omóplatos de El Castillo, exhumados por OBERMAIER en sus campañas de 1911/12. b.- Diseño, validación y aplicación de un método para el cálculo de la proporción de una figura, independoentemente de cuál sea, enfrentándola a un arquetipo. c.- Aplicación de tal método, una vez validado, a las figuras de los omóplatos de El Castillo. d.- Análisis de la manera de hacer de cada uno de los autores de las figuras de El Castillo ; es a lo que llamamos autoría. e.- Obtención de un conjunto de conclusiones de tipo formal, artístico y paleoetnológico

  3. The assessment of virtual reality for human anatomy instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Karen P.

    1994-01-01

    This research project seeks to meet the objective of science training by developing, assessing, and validating virtual reality as a human anatomy training medium. In ideal situations, anatomic models, computer-based instruction, and cadaver dissection are utilized to augment the traditional methods of instruction. At many institutions, lack of financial resources limits anatomy instruction to textbooks and lectures. However, human anatomy is three dimensional, unlike the one dimensional depiction found in textbooks and the two dimensional depiction found on the computer. Virtual reality is a breakthrough technology that allows one to step through the computer screen into a three dimensional world. This technology offers many opportunities to enhance science education. Therefore, a virtual testing environment of the abdominopelvic region of a human cadaver was created to study the placement of body parts within the nine anatomical divisions of the abdominopelvic region and the four abdominal quadrants.

  4. Validation of a computer based objective structured clinical examination in the assessment of undergraduate dermatology courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feroze Kaliyadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many teaching centers have now adopted objective structured clinical examination (OSCE as an assessment method for undergraduate dermatology courses. A modification of the standard OSCE in dermatology is computer based or electronic OSCE (eOSCE. We attempted to validate the use of a computer-based OSCE in dermatology in a group of fifth year medical students. The scores of the students in the computer-based OSCE showed a strong positive correlation with the scores on the clinical presentation (Pearson′s co-efficient - 0.923, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level and a good correlation with overall scores of the student (Pearson′s co-efficient - 0.728, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level, indicating that this is a reliable method for assessment in dermatology. Generally, the students′ feedback regarding the methods was positive.

  5. Replacement of traditional lectures with computer-based tutorials: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Lavelle

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a pilot project with a group of 60 second-year undergraduates studying the use of standard forms of contract in the construction industry. The project entailed the replacement of two of a series of nine scheduled lectures with a computer-based tutorial. The two main aims of the project were to test the viability of converting existing lecture material into computer-based material on an in-house production basis, and to obtain feedback from the student cohort on their behavioural response to the change in media. The effect on student performance was not measured at this stage of development.

  6. Designing Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Lorraine T.

    1974-01-01

    The author presents an instructional design model for teachers that evolves around a teacher-manager concept which recognizes management functions of: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. (EA)

  7. Designing Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Lorraine T.

    1974-01-01

    The author presents an instructional design model for teachers that evolves around a teacher-manager concept which recognizes management functions of: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. (EA)

  8. Comparative Effectiveness of Animated Drawings and Selected Instructional Strategies on Students’ Performance in Creative Arts in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyedun Emmanuel Olugbenga

    2016-01-01

    Creative Arts is a core and compulsory subject in Nigerian upper basic classes, but the students’ performance over the years indicated high failure. Instructional strategies play a pivotal role in improving students’ performance. Computer-based instructions such as animated drawings could be a possible solution. This research adopted the design and development type. The between groups repeated measure design compared pretest and post-test scores of participants to identify differences after t...

  9. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja J Boevé

    Full Text Available The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration.

  10. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boevé, Anja J; Meijer, Rob R; Albers, Casper J; Beetsma, Yta; Bosker, Roel J

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security) and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration.

  11. La cuadratura del plato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángeles Mora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Una de las cosas que el Jurado del X Premio de Poesía Vicente Núñez destacó de este libro fue “su exquisito tratamiento del lenguaje”. Y desde luego lo es, es exquisito su tratamiento del lenguaje pero no porque utilice un lenguaje exquisito o excelso sino porque sabe arrancarle al lenguaje de todos los días, a las palabras sencillas, toda la carga poética de emoción e iluminación que llevan dentro. Mónica Doña nos dice que en su libro ha querido huir de un lirismo que muchas veces resulta falso, hueco, y nos habla de que lo que ha querido hacer es “épica cotidiana”, sin héroes, porque por su libro, como por la vida nuestra de todos los días, lo que circulan son seres que sobreviven como pueden en un mundo adverso.

  12. La cuadratura del plato

    OpenAIRE

    Ángeles Mora

    2012-01-01

    Una de las cosas que el Jurado del X Premio de Poesía Vicente Núñez destacó de este libro fue “su exquisito tratamiento del lenguaje”. Y desde luego lo es, es exquisito su tratamiento del lenguaje pero no porque utilice un lenguaje exquisito o excelso sino porque sabe arrancarle al lenguaje de todos los días, a las palabras sencillas, toda la carga poética de emoción e iluminación que llevan dentro. Mónica Doña nos dice que en su libro ha querido huir de un lirismo que muchas veces resulta fa...

  13. A Computer-Based Simulation for Teaching Heat Transfer across a Woody Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maixner, Michael R.; Noyd, Robert K.; Krueger, Jerome A.

    2010-01-01

    To assist student understanding of heat transfer through woody stems, we developed an instructional package that included an Excel-based, one-dimensional simulation model and a companion instructional worksheet. Guiding undergraduate botany students to applying principles of thermodynamics to plants in nature is fraught with two main obstacles:…

  14. Computer-Based versus High-Fidelity Mannequin Simulation in Developing Clinical Judgment in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Beverly J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students learn clinical judgment as effectively using computer-based simulations as when using high-fidelity mannequin simulations. There was a single research questions for this study: What is the difference in clinical judgment between participants completing high-fidelity human simulator mannequin…

  15. Some Useful Cost-Benefit Criteria for Evaluating Computer-Based Test Delivery Models and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecht, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based testing (CBT) is typically implemented using one of three general test delivery models: (1) multiple fixed testing (MFT); (2) computer-adaptive testing (CAT); or (3) multistage testing (MSTs). This article reviews some of the real cost drivers associated with CBT implementation--focusing on item production costs, the costs…

  16. The Effectiveness of Computer-Based Hypermedia Teaching Modules for Radiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Roger; And Others

    This paper explains the rationale for utilizing computer-based, hypermedia tutorials for radiology education and presents the results of a field test of this educational technique. It discusses the development of the hypermedia tutorials at Montreal General Hospital (Quebec, Canada) in 1991-92 and their use in the radiology residency program. The…

  17. Children's Experiences of Completing a Computer-Based Violence Survey: Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellonen, Noora; Poso, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the ethics of research on children when studying sensitive issues such as violence. The empirical analysis is based on the accounts given by children (11 377) who completed a computer-based questionnaire about their experiences of violence ("The Finnish Child Victim Survey 2008")…

  18. Computer Literacy and the Construct Validity of a High-Stakes Computer-Based Writing Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Yan, Ming

    2017-01-01

    One major threat to validity in high-stakes testing is construct-irrelevant variance. In this study we explored whether the transition from a paper-and-pencil to a computer-based test mode in a high-stakes test in China, the College English Test, has brought about variance irrelevant to the construct being assessed in this test. Analyses of the…

  19. Computer-Based English Language Testing in China: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoxing; Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    In this special issue on high-stakes English language testing in China, the two articles on computer-based testing (Jin & Yan; He & Min) highlight a number of consistent, ongoing challenges and concerns in the development and implementation of the nationwide IB-CET (Internet Based College English Test) and institutional computer-adaptive…

  20. Relative User Ratings of MMPI-2 Computer-Based Test Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John E.; Weed, Nathan C.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight commercially available computer-based test interpretations (CBTIs) for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), of which few have been empirically evaluated. Prospective users of these programs have little scientific data to guide choice of a program. This study compared ratings of these eight CBTIs. Test users…

  1. Computer-Based Materials: A Study of Learner Autonomy and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figura, Klaudia; Jarvis, Huw

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which examines the extent to which specified cognitive, social, and metacognitive strategies, are used by language students when working with computer-based materials (CBMs), in self-study contexts outside of the language classroom; particularly in a self-access centre (SAC). Data were collected using questionnaires,…

  2. Central Issues in the Use of Computer-Based Materials for High Volume Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Billy

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses issues relating to the use of computer-based learning (CBL) materials for entrepreneurship education at university level. It considers CBL as a means of addressing the increased volume and range of provision required in the current context. The issues raised in this article have importance for all forms of computer-based…

  3. Enhancing Conceptual Learning Through Computer-Based Applets: The Effectiveness and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, George G.; Brouwer, Wytze; Nocente, Norma; Martin, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Several Canadian universities and colleges have been working together for years to build Web-accessible computer-based applets to help students learn physics concepts. This paper reports the findings from a study that evaluated the effectiveness of these applets in enhancing conceptual learning. We integrated quantitative and qualitative methods…

  4. The Comparative Effect of Individually-Constructed vs. Collaboratively-Constructed Computer-Based Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Young; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    The researchers investigated the comparative effects of individually-constructed and collaboratively-constructed computer-based concept mapping on middle school science concept learning. One hundred and sixty one students completed the entire study. Using prior science performance scores to assure equivalence of student achievement across groups,…

  5. A Computer-Based Program to Teach Braille Reading to Sighted Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, Mindy C.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Instructors of the visually impaired need efficient braille-training methods. This study conducted a preliminary evaluation of a computer-based program intended to teach the relation between braille characters and English letters using a matching-to-sample format with 4 sighted college students. Each participant mastered matching visual depictions…

  6. Fledgling CPRI (Computer-Based Patient Record Institute) faces difficult challenges as legislative clock ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M L

    1992-09-01

    A diverse group of users, vendors, employers, insurers and government officials met in Washington in July for the Computer-Based Patient Record Institute's First Annual Meeting. Deemed "the focal point" of legislation demanding automated patient records, their task was to overcome a myriad of differences and form a true coalition that can meet an ambitious, and some say unrealistic, deadline.

  7. Intention and Usage of Computer Based Information Systems in Primary Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosizah; Kuntoro; Basuki N., Hari

    2016-01-01

    The computer-based information system (CBIS) is adopted by almost all of in health care setting, including the primary health center in East Java Province Indonesia. Some of softwares available were SIMPUS, SIMPUSTRONIK, SIKDA Generik, e-puskesmas. Unfortunately they were most of the primary health center did not successfully implemented. This…

  8. Measurement and Evidence of Computer-Based Task Switching and Multitasking by "Net Generation" Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Terry; Kennedy, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Logs of on-campus computer and Internet usage were used to conduct a study of computer-based task switching and multitasking by undergraduate medical students. A detailed analysis of over 6000 individual sessions revealed that while a majority of students engaged in both task switching and multitasking behaviours, they did so less frequently than…

  9. Reliability and Validity of a Computer-Based Knowledge Mapping System To Measure Content Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herl, H. E.; O'Neil, H. F., Jr.; Chung, G. K. W. K.; Schacter, J.

    1999-01-01

    Presents results from two computer-based knowledge-mapping studies developed by the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST): in one, middle and high school students constructed group maps while collaborating over a network, and in the second, students constructed individual maps while searching the Web.…

  10. The Use of Small Groups in Computer-Based Training: A Review of Recent Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Stanley D.

    1994-01-01

    Recent work in small-group computer-based training (CBT) reveals that the approach does not necessarily lead to higher achievement. Many of the studies, however, have methodological weaknesses. If proper guidance and structure can be provided to group members, using small group CBT should lead to higher achievement than individual CBT. (Contains…

  11. Using Multimedia in Large-Scale Computer-Based Testing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R. E.; Goodman, M.; Hessinger, J.; Kahn, H.; Ligget, J.; Marshall, G.; Zack, J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of multimedia in large-scale computer-based testing programs to measure problem solving and related cognitive constructs more effectively. Considers the incorporation of dynamic stimuli such as audio, video, and animation, and gives examples in history, physical education, and the sciences. (Author/LRW)

  12. Paper- and computer-based workarounds to electronic health record use at three benchmark institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Mindy E; Saleem, Jason J; Millitello, Laura G; Russ, Alissa L; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals develop workarounds rather than using electronic health record (EHR) systems. Understanding the reasons for workarounds is important to facilitate user-centered design and alignment between work context and available health information technology tools. Objective To examine both paper- and computer-based workarounds to the use of EHR systems in three benchmark institutions. Methods Qualitative data were collected in 11 primary care outpatient clinics across three healthcare institutions. Data collection methods included direct observation and opportunistic questions. In total, 120 clinic staff and providers and 118 patients were observed. All data were analyzed using previously developed workaround categories and examined for potential new categories. Additionally, workarounds were coded as either paper- or computer-based. Results Findings corresponded to 10 of 11 workaround categories identified in previous research. All 10 of these categories applied to paper-based workarounds; five categories also applied to computer-based workarounds. One new category, no correct path (eg, a desired option did not exist in the computer interface, precipitating a workaround), was identified for computer-based workarounds. The most consistent reasons for workarounds across the three institutions were efficiency, memory, and awareness. Conclusions Consistent workarounds across institutions suggest common challenges in outpatient clinical settings and failures to accommodate these challenges in EHR design. An examination of workarounds provides insight into how providers adapt to limiting EHR systems. Part of the design process for computer interfaces should include user-centered methods particular to providers and healthcare settings to ensure uptake and usability. PMID:23492593

  13. Attention Paid to Feedback Provided by a Computer-Based Assessment for Learning on Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Caroline; Veldkamp, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Three studies are presented on attention paid to feedback provided by a computer-based assessment for learning on information literacy. Results show that the attention paid to feedback varies greatly. In general the attention focuses on feedback of incorrectly answered questions. In each study approximately fifty percent of the respondents paid…

  14. Educational Game Design. Bridging the gab between computer based learning and experimental learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    Considering the rapidly growing amount of digital educational materials only few of them bridge the gab between experimental learning environments and computer based learning environments (Gardner, 1991). Observations from two cases in primary school and lower secondary school in the subject...

  15. The Effect of Emotional Feedback on Behavioral Intention to Use Computer Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Vasileios; Moridis, Christos N.; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2012-01-01

    This study introduces emotional feedback as a construct in an acceptance model. It explores the effect of emotional feedback on behavioral intention to use Computer Based Assessment (CBA). A female Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) with empathetic encouragement behavior was displayed as emotional feedback. More specifically, this research aims…

  16. Evaluation of Computer Based Foreign Language Learning Software by Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baz, Fatih Çagatay; Tekdal, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate Computer Based Foreign Language Learning software called Dynamic Education (DYNED) by teachers and students. The study is conducted with randomly chosen ten primary schools with the participants of 522 7th grade students and 7 English teachers. Three points Likert scale for teachers and five points Likert scale…

  17. Evaluating Computer-Based Assessment in a Risk-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Stan; Steven, Christine; Ricketts, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are three purposes for evaluation: evaluation for action to aid the decision making process, evaluation for understanding to further enhance enlightenment and evaluation for control to ensure compliance to standards. This article argues that the primary function of evaluation in the "Catherine Wheel" computer-based assessment (CBA) cyclic…

  18. Development and evaluation of a computer-based educational program for adults with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönning, Helén; Nielsen, Niels Erik; Strömberg, Anna; Thilen, Ulf; Swahn, Eva

    2013-02-01

    There is a lack of educational material for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. Computer-based education has shown to have significant effects on knowledge and management of chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a computer-based educational program for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. The program was developed by a multidisciplinary team. Data were collected by questionnaires, observations, and structured interviews. The final product was a computer-based educational program consisting of ten separate modules, one for each particular malformation. The program was experienced as stimulating and easy to use. The appearance and quantity of the text was graded as good and the content as relevant and very useful. This is the first computer-based program developed for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. The evaluation found the program to have great potential as an important tool for improving care. Further studies are needed to test the outcomes of the program on knowledge, perceived control over the heart condition, anxiety/depression. and health-related quality of life. The program may be used as a complement to verbal information and every adult with a congenitally malformed hearts can receive individualized information from a personal CD.

  19. Assessing Medical Students' Self-Regulation as Aptitude in Computer-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyuksoon S.; Kalet, Adina L.; Plass, Jan L.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a Self-Regulation Measure for Computer-based learning (SRMC) tailored toward medical students, by modifying Zimmerman's Self-Regulated Learning Interview Schedule (SRLIS) for K-12 learners. The SRMC's reliability and validity were examined in 2 studies. In Study 1, 109 first-year medical students were asked to complete the SRMC.…

  20. Interaction Between Conceptual Level and Training Method in Computer Based Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustik, Joan M.; Brown, Bobby R.

    A study of 130 undergraduate students enrolled in a course on auiovisual techniques sought to determine whether heuristic or algorithmic computer-based problem solving training would be differentially effective for students varying in cognitive complexity as measured by the Educational Set Scale (ESS). The interaction was investigated between one…

  1. Effects of a Computer-Based Intervention Program on the Communicative Functions of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E.; Tannous, Juman

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the use of computer-based intervention for enhancing communication functions of children with autism. The software program was developed based on daily life activities in the areas of play, food, and hygiene. The following variables were investigated: delayed echolalia, immediate echolalia, irrelevant speech, relevant…

  2. Test Anxiety Analysis of Chinese College Students in Computer-Based Spoken English Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanxia, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Test anxiety was a commonly known or assumed factor that could greatly influence performance of test takers. With the employment of designed questionnaires and computer-based spoken English test, this paper explored test anxiety manifestation of Chinese college students from both macro and micro aspects, and found out that the major anxiety in…

  3. Primary School Students' Anxiety and Attitudes toward Computer-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, SeokHoon; Choo, Mooi Lee

    The introduction and implementation of computer-based learning (CBL) in primary schools in Singapore has created both benefits and problems. This study examined the attitudes and level of anxiety of 77 students toward CBL through two scales, the Computer Programming Anxiety Scale and the Liking for Computer-Related Activities Scale. Results showed…

  4. Learning Mathematics by Designing, Programming, and Investigating with Interactive, Dynamic Computer-Based Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Neil; Buteau, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    As part of their undergraduate mathematics curriculum, students at Brock University learn to create and use computer-based tools with dynamic, visual interfaces, called Exploratory Objects, developed for the purpose of conducting pure or applied mathematical investigations. A student's Development Process Model of creating and using an Exploratory…

  5. Designing and Introducing Ethical Dilemmas into Computer-Based Business Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Paul L.; Scott, Timothy W.; Anderson, Philip H.

    2006-01-01

    This article makes two contributions to the teaching of business ethics literature. First, it describes the steps involved in developing effective ethical dilemmas to incorporate into a computer-based business simulation. Second, it illustrates these steps by presenting two ethical dilemmas that an instructor can incorporate into any business…

  6. Attention Paid to Feedback Provided by a Computer-Based Assessment for Learning on Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Caroline; Veldkamp, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Three studies are presented on attention paid to feedback provided by a computer-based assessment for learning on information literacy. Results show that the attention paid to feedback varies greatly. In general the attention focuses on feedback of incorrectly answered questions. In each study approximately fifty percent of the respondents paid…

  7. Effect of Computer-Based Multimedia Presentation on Senior Secondary Students' Achievement in Agricultural Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olori, Abiola Lateef; Igbosanu, Adekunle Olusegun

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the use of computer-based multimedia presentation on Senior Secondary School Students' Achievement in Agricultural Science. The study was a quasi-experimental, pre-test, post-test control group research design type, using intact classes. A sample of eighty (80) Senior Secondary School One (SS II) students was…

  8. Children's Experiences of Completing a Computer-Based Violence Survey: Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellonen, Noora; Poso, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the ethics of research on children when studying sensitive issues such as violence. The empirical analysis is based on the accounts given by children (11 377) who completed a computer-based questionnaire about their experiences of violence ("The Finnish Child Victim Survey 2008")…

  9. Computer-Based Acquisitions Procedures at Tarrant County Junior College District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, John, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    The computer-based procedures described in this report form the basis of book acquisitions performed by the Automation and Technical Services Division in serving the Learning Resources Centers of the multi-campus Tarrant County Junior College District. The procedures, which are off-line in a batch mode, have been operational since 1968. Since 1970…

  10. A Review of Research on Intercultural Learning through Computer-Based Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftçi, Emrullah Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Intercultural communication is now a crucial part of our globalizing lives; however, not everyone has an opportunity to engage in an intercultural interaction with people from different cultures. Computer-based technologies are promising in creating environments for people to communicate with people from diverse cultures. This qualitative…

  11. Effects of a Computer-Based Intervention Program on the Communicative Functions of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E.; Tannous, Juman

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the use of computer-based intervention for enhancing communication functions of children with autism. The software program was developed based on daily life activities in the areas of play, food, and hygiene. The following variables were investigated: delayed echolalia, immediate echolalia, irrelevant speech, relevant…

  12. Creating a Supportive Environment to Enhance Computer Based Learning for Underrepresented Minorities in College Algebra Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendricks, Kimberly D.

    2011-01-01

    Significant research in K-12 education has shown that computer based learning in mathematics positively impacts students' attitudes toward mathematics and greatly increases academic performance. Little research has shown, however, how this success can be replicated in a postsecondary classroom for minority students. This paper is a case study that…

  13. Development of an Integrated Computer-Based Assessment System for Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Deborah E.; Arvidson, Helen H.; Giorgetti, Karen

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the development of a computer-based assessment system for children in early childhood programs, The Indiana Assessment System of Educational Proficiencies: Early Childhood (IASEP: EC). Skills in five developmental domains (i.e., cognitive, communication, social, sensory motor, and self-help) were selected and content…

  14. Automated Detection of Heuristics and Biases among Pathologists in a Computer-Based System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Rebecca S.; Legowski, Elizabeth; Medvedeva, Olga; Reitmeyer, Kayse; Tseytlin, Eugene; Castine, Melissa; Jukic, Drazen; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: (1) to develop an automated, computer-based method to detect heuristics and biases as pathologists examine virtual slide cases, (2) to measure the frequency and distribution of heuristics and errors across three levels of training, and (3) to examine relationships of heuristics to biases, and biases to…

  15. Effects of Computer Based Learning on Students' Attitudes and Achievements towards Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Husamettin; Durmaz, Asli; Tuysuz, Cengiz; Feyzioglu, Burak

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of computer-based learning and traditional method on students' attitudes and achievement towards analytical chemistry. Students from Chemistry Education Department at Dokuz Eylul University (D.E.U) were selected randomly and divided into three groups; two experimental (Eg-1 and Eg-2) and a control…

  16. Factors Affecting Learning of Vector Math from Computer-Based Practice: Feedback Complexity and Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Mikula, Brendon D.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we…

  17. Design and Development of the ITC Guidelines on Computer-Based and Internet-Delivered Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Iain; Bartram, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the design and development of the International Test Commission's (ITC, this issue) Guidelines for Computer-Based and Internet-Delivered Testing. It examines some of the reasons why the ITC Council decided to invest in a program of research, consultation, and conferences designed to develop internationally agreed-on…

  18. Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, Anuraag

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional…

  19. Investigating Uniform and Non-Uniform Gender DIF in Computer-Based ESL Writing Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Hunter; Lee, Yong-Won

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to examine the comparability of writing prompts for different gender groups in the context of the computer-based Test of English as a Foreign Language[TM] (TOEFL[R]-CBT). A total of 87 prompts administered from July 1998 through March 2000 were analyzed. An extended version of logistic regression for…

  20. Formative Evaluation of Computer-Based Training for a University Financial System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kathryn M.; Savenye, Wilhelmina C.; Sullivan, Howard J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a formative evaluation of a one-day introductory computer-based training course for university employees using a new online financial and purchasing system. Evaluated the effectiveness of the training, identified appropriate revisions that were incorporated into the training program, and examined learner attitudes toward the course.…

  1. Learning with Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Literature Review of Computer Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Daniel C.; Azevedo, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Although computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) are becoming more prevalent in the classroom, empirical research has demonstrated that some students have difficulty learning with these environments. The motivation construct of computer-self efficacy plays an integral role in learning with CBLEs. This literature review synthesizes research…

  2. A Computer-Based Microarray Experiment Design-System for Gene-Regulation Pathway Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the methods and evaluation of a computer-based system that recommends microarray experimental design for biologists — causal discovery in Gene Expression data using Expected Value of Experimentation (GEEVE). The GEEVE system uses causal Bayesian networks and generates a decision tree for recommendations.

  3. Emphasizing Planning for Essay Writing with a Computer-Based Graphic Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evmenova, Anya S.; Regan, Kelley; Boykin, Andrea; Good, Kevin; Hughes, Melissa; MacVittie, Nichole; Sacco, Donna; Ahn, Soo Y.; Chirinos, David

    2016-01-01

    The authors conducted a multiple-baseline study to investigate the effects of a computer-based graphic organizer (CBGO) with embedded self-regulated learning strategies on the quantity and quality of persuasive essay writing by students with high-incidence disabilities. Ten seventh- and eighth-grade students with learning disabilities, emotional…

  4. Graduate Studies in Computer-Based Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, Irvin

    This overview of the programs, activities, and facilities relating to computer-based education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) includes, (1) a brief account of the history and mission of OISE; (2) a description of the OISE Computer Applications Department and its merger with the Department of Measurement and Evaluation in…

  5. Examining the Effects of Computer-Based Scaffolds on Novice Teachers' Reflective Journal Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guolin; Calandra, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    This study employed an explanatory mixed methods design to examine the effects of two computer-based scaffolds on novice teachers' reflective journal writing. The context for the study was an attempt to refine the reflective writing component of a large scale electronic portfolio system. Quantitative results indicated that the computer-based…

  6. Development of Decision-Making Skills and Environmental Concern through Computer-Based, Scaffolded Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Christiana Th.; Korfiatis, Konstantinos; Evagorou, Maria; Constantinou, Constantinos

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the development of decision-making skills and environmental concern by 11- and 12-year-old students through computer-based, scaffolded learning activities. The enacted activities provided necessary scientific information and allowed for the consideration of multiple aspects of the problem, the study of the effects of every…

  7. Computer-Based Script Training for Aphasia: Emerging Themes from Post-Treatment Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Kaye, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of post-treatment interviews following computer-based script training for persons with chronic aphasia. Each of the 23 participants received 9 weeks of AphasiaScripts training. Post-treatment interviews were conducted with the person with aphasia and/or a significant other person. The 23 interviews yielded 584 coded…

  8. Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, Anuraag

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional…

  9. Effect of Varied Computer Based Presentation Sequences on Facilitating Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonen, Ann; Dwyer, Francis M.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of visual illustrations in computer-based education, the effect of order of visual presentation, and whether screen design affects students' use of graphics and text. Results indicate that order of presentation and choice of review did not influence student achievement; however, when given a choice, students selected the…

  10. Application of the Decomposition Method to the Design Complexity of Computer-based Display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Ju; Lee, Seung Woo; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Kyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The importance of the design of human machine interfaces (HMIs) for human performance and safety has long been recognized in process industries. In case of nuclear power plants (NPPs), HMIs have significant implications for the safety of the NPPs since poor implementation of HMIs can impair the operators' information searching ability which is considered as one of the important aspects of human behavior. To support and increase the efficiency of the operators' information searching behavior, advanced HMIs based on computer technology are provided. Operators in advanced main control room (MCR) acquire information through video display units (VDUs), and large display panel (LDP) required for the operation of NPPs. These computer-based displays contain a very large quantity of information and present them in a variety of formats than conventional MCR. For example, these displays contain more elements such as abbreviations, labels, icons, symbols, coding, and highlighting than conventional ones. As computer-based displays contain more information, complexity of the elements becomes greater due to less distinctiveness of each element. A greater understanding is emerging about the effectiveness of designs of computer-based displays, including how distinctively display elements should be designed. And according to Gestalt theory, people tend to group similar elements based on attributes such as shape, color or pattern based on the principle of similarity. Therefore, it is necessary to consider not only human operator's perception but the number of element consisting of computer-based display

  11. Designing and Introducing Ethical Dilemmas into Computer-Based Business Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Paul L.; Scott, Timothy W.; Anderson, Philip H.

    2006-01-01

    This article makes two contributions to the teaching of business ethics literature. First, it describes the steps involved in developing effective ethical dilemmas to incorporate into a computer-based business simulation. Second, it illustrates these steps by presenting two ethical dilemmas that an instructor can incorporate into any business…

  12. The Impact of a Computer Based Information System (CBIS) on Foreign Investments Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Chester

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact that computer based information systems (CBIS) could have on U.S. multinational corporations operating in Canada, particularly in the province of Quebec, and the implications for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that went into effect on January 1, 1994. The study focused on how the…

  13. A Methodology for Integrating Computer-Based Learning Tools in Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadouris, Nicos; Constantinou, Constantinos P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a methodology for effectively integrating computer-based learning tools in science teaching and learning. This methodology provides a means of systematic analysis to identify the capabilities of particular software tools and to formulate a series of competencies relevant to physical science that could be developed by means…

  14. A display model for the TOU of PLATO: just a cool toy or a benchmark of opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Greggio, D.; Bergomi, M.; Biondi, F.; Farinato, J.; Farisato, G.; Magrin, D.; Lessio, L.; Marafatto, L.; Munari, M.; Pagano, I.; Ragazzoni, R.; Viotto, V.; Piazza, D.

    2016-07-01

    We produced a "toy-model" of one Telescope Optical Unit of PLATO, the Medium sized mission selected by ESA to fly in 2024. This is a six lenses dioptric very wide field camera with a window in front to take care of radiation impact on the first lens whose optical glass cannot be replaced with a radiation hardened one. The main aim of this project is just to produce a "cool" model for display purposes, in which one can "explore" the details of the inside through some openings in the tube, in order to visually inspect some of the fine details of the opto-mechanics. While its didactic and advertising role is out of doubt, during its construction we realized that some interesting outcome can be of some relevance for the project itself and that some findings could be useful, in order to assess the ability of producing with the same technology some (of course of much more modest quality) optical systems. In this context, we immediately dropped the option of producing the lenses with opaque material painted with a color resembling a refractive material (like blue for instance) and decided to actually produce them with transparent plastic. Furthermore the surfaces are then finely polished in order to give them basic optical properties. Such an optical system has only very coarsely the converging properties of the original nominal design for a number of reasons: the refractive indexes are not the nominal ones, the quality of the surfaces and their nominal values are only roughly, within a few percent, the targeted one, and the way the surfaces are built up makes them prone to some diffraction effects. However, the bulk of the lens and the surface roughness will give a large magnification of the scattering effects that will be experienced, at a much lower level, on the actual flight model. We investigated through propagation of a laser beam and by digital camera the main stray light modes that this toymodel offers. In other words, the model amplifies, to a large extent, the

  15. Investigating the Effectiveness of the Tutorials in Introductory Physics in Multiple Instructional Settings

    CERN Document Server

    Slezak, C; Endorf, R J; Braun, G A

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the educational impact of the implementation of "Changes in Energy and Momentum" from the Tutorials in Introductory Physics in five different instructional settings. These settings include (1) a completely computer-based learning environment and (2) use of cooperative learning groups with varying levels of instructor support. Pre- and post-tests provide evidence that a computer-based implementation falls significantly short of classroom implementations which involve both collaborative learning groups and interactions with a teaching assistance. Other findings provide insight into the importance of certain elements of instructor training and the appropriate use of the tutorial as an initial introduction to a new concept.

  16. Foreign Language Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmaier, Emma; Lange, Dale

    1967-01-01

    This review of research in foreign language instruction summarizes and interprets selected studies produced during the period 1963-66. Topics covered include the psychology of learning, comparisons o f methods, language skills, visual-auditory relationships, vocabulary, grammar, and FLES, as well as programed instruction, technological media,…

  17. Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  18. Presentation on Instructional Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Bibi Asia

    2009-01-01

    "Learning can be defined as change in a student's capacity for performance as a result of experience" (Kenneth D. Moore). The intended changes should be specified in instructional objectives. Viewed in this context, an objective can be defined as a clear and unambiguous description of your instructional intent. An objective is not a…

  19. Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  20. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…